Podcasts about Adderall

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Drug mixture used mainly to treat ADHD and narcolepsy

  • 746PODCASTS
  • 1,002EPISODES
  • 57mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 3, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Adderall

Latest podcast episodes about Adderall

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 7:12


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, it's time for Ally to give you the A.D.D. news! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 7:24


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to tell you what's happening in A.D.D. News  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:53


CLIP: Grab your Adderall and find out what's going on in the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 5:53


CLIP: Grab your Adderall and find out what's going on in the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 7:37


CLIP: Grab your Adderall and find out what's going on in the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Live From The Green Box
Season 2 Episode 5: Adderall War Ready

Live From The Green Box

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 79:49


Once again we are back from a hiatus but we are blessed for the opportunity to do what we love. On this episode of Live from The Green Box we're sharing about our hiatus, and catching you all up with what has been going on in our lives and in the entertainment industry! We're calling this season 2.5 :) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/livefromthegreenbox/support

Slip The Jab
Episode 104: Thanksgiving Special - Viera vs Tate Recap - How Racist Is Cody Durden Game - Kevin Lee Suspended for Adderall

Slip The Jab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 154:11


On this episode of Slip The Jab, UFC Vegas 43 delivered 10 decisions out of 11 fights, fans are voting on whether or not it was the worst card in UFC history, but in the end we saved the card with our Thanksgiving special. We debate whether or not the fans are wrong, where it lands in terms of worst cards of all time and play the "How Racist Is Cody Durden Game".  We also recap Khamzat Chimaev's wrestling match against Jack the Joker Hermanson. Kevin Lee getting suspended for taking Adderall, which then takes us down a rabbit hole on whether or not it should be a banned substance and Raging Al Iaquinta retiring, We also answer this weeks fan question, let Mike Perry spit a little knowledge on losing weight this holiday season, and end with a gobble gobble gee Post Fight Song of the Week. VISIT OUR WEBSITE: https://slipthejabpodcast.comSLIP THE JAB MERCH: https://slipthejabpodcast.com/shopThanksgiving 20% OFF Code: GOBBLE20ALSO AVAILABLE ON:Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/STJSpotifyApple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/STJApplePodcastsFOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA:Twitter: https://twitter.com/slipthejabpodFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/slipthejabpodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/slipthejabpodcastABOUT US: Unfiltered and unscripted, hosts Lino P and Ian Ebbitt pull no punches as they offer up entertaining insight into the world of combat sports and current events. Two guys from a huge fight town called Pittsburgh, bringing you a weekly podcast smothered in realness, sprinkled with humor and served with a side of whiskey neat. Light your cigars and bring your opinions… we certainly brought ours.Amazon Smile Link: https://smile.amazon.com- Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma FoundationHow to use AmazonSmile on a web browser:Visit smile.amazon.comSign in with the same account you use for Amazon.comSelect Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Foundation as your charityStart shopping! Remember to checkout at smile.amazon.com to generate donations for your chosen charity.Tip: Add a bookmark to make it easier to shop at smile.amazon.com.How to use AmazonSmile using the Amazon app on your mobile phone:Open the Amazon Shopping appNavigate to the main menu (=)Tap on Settings and then select “AmazonSmile”Select Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Foundation as your charity and then follow the on-screen instructions to turn ON AmazonSmile in the mobile appOnce AmazonSmile has been activated in your app, future eligible app purchases will generate a donation for the charity you have selected.MANSCAPED.COM - 20% Off Code: SLIPSTER20https://www.manscaped.comExtendedFamilyApparel.com - 10% Off Code: SLIPSTER10https://www.extendedfamilyapparel.com/

Grieving Out Loud: A Mother Coping with Loss in the Opioid Epidemic
Emily's teammate finds recovery through Emily's Hope Treatment Scholarship

Grieving Out Loud: A Mother Coping with Loss in the Opioid Epidemic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 19:49


22-year-old Morgan was a couple of years younger than Emily, but went to the same high school and was part of the gymnastics team. She says Emily was always encouraging her.  Morgan began drinking and smoking college and then moved on to harder drugs. Morgan says, " I would use a lot. It wasn't just a small amount, it was a large amount and I could never have enough. I always needed more. Where my friends would be stopping, I would keep going."Morgan says a miracle led her to treatment and when she received an Emily's Hope Treatment Scholarship, she knew that Emily was looking out for her. She calls Emily her guardian angel. Morgan shares how drinking and drugging took over her life and how she is returning to herself through sobriety. Support the show (https://www.emilyshope.foundation/donate-2)

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 6:27


CLIP: Grab your Adderall and find out what's going on in the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rough Cut
The Rough Cut: Sponsored by Big Adderall - 11/19/21

The Rough Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 90:27


Spider-Man and Tommy & Pam trailer reactions -  A Return To Hogwarts! The gang gets back together after 20 years -  Jonah Hill set to play Jerry Garcia in Scorsese film -  3 Thanksgiving guests from MCU, HBO, and Happy Madison 

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 6:01


CLIP: Grab your Adderall and find out what's going on in the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 6:38


CLIP: Grab your Adderall and find out what's going on in the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Don't Tell Mom
Why Am I Wearing This F***ing Hat?

Don't Tell Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 50:33


Hanna and Skylar discuss single people's rights to register for gifts, wearing bold clothing and feeling like an asshole about it, donating to St. Judes (or in the gal's case, not donating), and gaining weight on Adderall. The girlies also talk psychics, Gen Z, Harry Styles, and a tiktoker who lets her mom fuck her husband. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 6:57


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to get you up to date on what's going on in the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 7:26


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to get you up to date on what's going on with the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 9:29


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to get you up to date on what's going on with the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 9:40


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to get you up to date on what's going on with the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 7:53


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to get you up to date on what's going on with the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Contra Radio Network
The Dave Kershner Lightning Round Ep. 28

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:44


In Episode 28, Dave's midweek preparedness show revolves several topics this week. Honestly, it's obvious he needs Adderall or something as he bounces all over the place (in a good way) while discussing topics like websites, books, the procurement of canned goods and consumable commodities, stock rotation, and quite a few things relating to each. Not a bad listen if you can keep up! Throughout the show though, Dave stresses the need to build out your knowledge base. The wider your knowledge base, the more prepared you are, the more self-sufficient you are. Which means, you can survive more and endure more than the ones that are neither prepared nor self-sufficient.

Plant Medicine Podcast with Dr. Lynn Marie Morski
Encore episode: Microdosing Q&A with James Fadiman

Plant Medicine Podcast with Dr. Lynn Marie Morski

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 91:57


James Fadiman, PhD, was a part of the first wave of pioneering psychedelic researchers in the 1960s in the US. He's the co-founder of the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology, now known as Sofia University, and he's the author of several well-known psychedelics books, including The Psychedelic Explorer's Guide. From his initial rediscovery of microdosing and developing a protocol based on early reports, Dr. Fadiman teamed up with Dr. Sophia Korb to record and pattern-map the microdosing experiences of several thousand individuals from 51 countries. In this episode, Dr. Fadiman answers listener-submitted questions regarding microdosing psilocybin and LSD. He discussed dosing recommendations, tolerance, microdosing's general effects on healthy normals, and its specific effects on a number of conditions, ranging from depression to PMS. He also covered a variety of additional areas where people benefit from microdosing, including academic performance and athletics.  In the last part of the episode, Dr. Fadiman discusses his new book, Your Symphony of Selves. He points out that we have not one, but a multitude of selves, and that we can learn to shift between them consciously. Further following this idea, he illustrates how we can save a lot of mental distress by not over-identifying with any particular one of our selves, and how we can extend that concept to those around us. This helps us not only forgive others when one of their selves may have acted in a displeasing way but also helps us forgive and go easy on ourselves when we act in a way that we later find distressing or shameful.   In this episode: The reported benefits and risks of microdosing psilocybin mushrooms and LSD. Whether someone's height and weight makes a difference on their dosage. The overwhelming number of those suffering from depression who reported significant improvements in their survey. Why microdosing may not be advisable for those with anxiety. Dr. Fadminan reports on study findings regarding conditions including depression, PMS, migraine headaches, and bipolar    Quotes: “A lot of people have found that when they're tapering off of an SSRI, which means taking it down very, very slowly over a period of maybe a couple of months from full dose to zero, that microdosing helps. That makes it easier. Makes it maybe even a little faster.” [14:13] “I'm an enthusiast for the effect of microdosing, but I never recommend that anyone microdose. That's a personal decision based on information, but the nice thing is the risk/reward ratio, which is how dangerous versus how beneficial. It's very good for microdosing. Meaning, if you take it, it's very low risk, and yeah, from the reports, we have a lot of possibility of benefits.” [35:00] “What we've found is that about 80% of the people who come in with heavy depression, and again, most of them having failed medications or other therapies, we've about an 80% turnaround rate where they're not depressed. That's really striking.” [42:00] “They (students) say: “Microdosing is very much like Adderall, except with none of the very disturbing side effects.” Adderall includes crashing, by the way. And addiction.” [49:18] “Individual neurons in the laboratory, exposed to microdoses, grow into more healthy, more complex neurons with more dendrites, meaning more communication capacity.” [52:17] In discussing his new book, Your Symphony of Selves: “The inconsistencies you see in yourself and particularly in the people you love are not inconsistencies. It is that they have several selves, and you do too. And if you begin to think in that way, curiously, the world becomes easier. You understand things differently and you are kinder to yourself and more compassionate to others.” [1:10:43]   Links: Psychedelic Medicine AssociationMicrodosing Psychedelics  James Fadiman's website and email: jfadiman@gmail.com Cluster Busters - treatment for cluster headaches Get 20% off everything at Octagon Biolabs with coupon code 'plantmedicine' Porangui Studies mentioned:Psychedelics Promote Structural and Functional Neural Plasticity Books Mentioned: A Really Good Day by Ayelet Waldman The Psychedelic Explorer's Guide by James Fadiman PhD Your Symphony of Selves by James Fadiman PhD, Jordan Gruber JD

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 9:41


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to get you up to date on what's going on with the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
A.D.D News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 8:35


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to get you up to date on what's going on with the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RAD Radio
Rob's Soapbox - Privilege? Ignorance? Racism? All of the above?

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 9:20


It's amazing how just one word can take a seemingly innocent question and turn it into, at best, an ignorant position of privilege, and at worst, complete and total racism.In the aftermath of NFL Wide Receiver Henry Ruggs killing a woman and her dog while driving drunk in the early morning hours along the streets of Las Vegas at speeds as high as 156 MPH, a listener sent an email asking the following:“After reading about Ruggs a couple days ago, and listening to what you reported to us all…it saddens me that the NFL doesn't have professionals trained to work with these young…men coming into the NFL…could the lives of this girl and her dog have been saved if there was some sort of guidance given to Henry?”In and of itself, it's an innocuous question and a good one. The truth of the matter is, that the NFL does, and has for decades, held days-long orientations for rookies entering the league and recently, expanded their program to start mentoring college football players. The potential superstars are taught money management, the trappings of fame, how to stay out of trouble, and given the roadmap to prosperity, all of which is commendable considering so many of the young men who wind up in the NFL find themselves, suddenly, at the age 20-ish, millionaires. https://nflcommunications.com/Pages/NFL-Announces-Expanded-Rookie-Transition-Program.aspxhttps://frontofficesports.com/nfl-college-rookie-transition/ Sadly, no amount of “education,” will prevent the inevitability of life, as we see with our own eyes daily. Had that been the end of the email, there'd be no story here, and no soapbox. Sadly, that wasn't what the email said. Rather it read as follows in its entirety:“After reading about Ruggs a couple days ago, and listening to what you reported to us all today, It saddens me that the NFL doesn't have professionals trained to work with these young black men coming into the NFL. Maybe I'm wrong and there is, but if not could the lives of this girl and her dog have been saved if there was some sort of guidance given to Henry? Her family and all that were involved in the accident are grieving. I don't know much about Henry or how his upbringing was, I just wonder if all this could have been avoided if there were things put in place to help men like Ruggs who recently signed million dollar plus contracts.” To put it kindly: What the F%*K you say?Full disclosure; I'm married to a black woman and freely admit that issues of race are a hot button for me. In fact, the RAD Radio show got this email on Thursday, and I intentionally ignored it to give myself time to ruminate on it and make sure I wasn't overreacting to it. By Sunday morning, I woke up more pissed than when I first read it.Clearly, based on the insertion of the word “black,” white and Hispanic young men coming into the NFL don't need any training or guidance because they already have all of the skills needed to “life” in a legal, responsible manner. Just ask Ben Roethlisberger, Ryan Leaf, Aaron Hernandez, Jared Allen, Sebastian Janikowski, Richie Incognito, Matt Prater, Mark Chmura, Barrett Robbins, Todd Sauerbrun, Eric Naposki, and dozens of other non-black NFL players who have beaten their significant others, driven drunk, had sex with underage babysitters, assaulted, sexually assaulted, and even murdered people.https://bleacherreport.com/articles/719049-the-nfl-all-arrest-all-pro-teamhttps://www.business2community.com/sports/27-active-nfl-players-who-have-been-arrested-multiple-times-01325152 Yet clearly, we need to train and guide only the ignorant and already inherently dangerous black boys. Lovely.Approximately 70% of NFL players are African American, yet, despite all of the attention that comes with it, the arrest rate for NFL players is lower than the standard arrest rate for the entire American population. That's odd; you'd think a league dominated by hoodlums with brown skin would be setting the curve. http://www.nflarrest.com/It's easy and lazy to say that the letter writer is just naïve and/or that he didn't mean anything by it. If he didn't mean anything by it, he wouldn't have inserted the word “black” into his email. While it's true that he may be so misinformed that he can only think of black NFL players that he's heard of that have gotten in trouble, the fact that he then deduces and implies that only black players get in trouble or, put another way all young black men are trouble is nothing short of racist.Not to mention the very end of his email; having already established that he's only concerned about young black men coming into the league, his solution is to “put something in place to help men like Ruggs who recently signed million dollar plus contracts.” Like, for example; this year the first two draft picks in the NFL were Trevor Lawrence and Zach Wilson, who received $24 and $22 million each, respectively in signing bonuses. They're both 22 and white so they're of no concern. But, uh-oh…That dastardly third pick in the draft was Trey Lance, who at the age of just 21 was given $22 million dollars for signing his contract and…guess what? He's black! And, by definition, young! Oh my God I can hear the shrieks of horror all around me. Certainly something has been put in place to help him! How in the world can we just hand a grown man that much money when he's black? That's just irresponsible. We should probably tell him that we'll hold onto that $22 million and give him just what he needs for living expenses until he's say, 30. Oh wait, his mom is white, so he's only part black. He probably doesn't need as much guidance as the other fully black young men.As we sit in awe at the embarrassing spectacle that is Aaron Rodgers this week and his total loss of credibility and any sort of respect he had left, it's ironic that people want to focus on those darn ghetto ass black men. And don't even try moral equivalency arguments like “Aaron Rodgers didn't kill anyone.” For starters, three of those white NFL players in the earlier list are murderers. Secondly, the truth of the matter is that Aaron Rodgers MAY have been responsible for someone's death by lying to his teammates and the media about being “immunized” and not following the protocols the NFL has in place for non-vaccinated players. As stupid as so much of our reaction as a nation to Covid has been, it's still killed more than 700,000 people and is a deadly virus to plenty of players' parents or immunocompromised relatives. And the most relevant analogy to this story is the fact that short of Tom Brady, there is no player as prolific in the NFL as Aaron Rodgers. He was on the short list to host Jeopardy permanently for God's sake! The Ruggs story is despicable, but it's essentially already a memory. His career is over, he's going to go to jail for a long time and in a couple years, no one will remember his name. Rodgers is a Hall-of-Fame shoo-in who, for 5 days and counting, has been the epicenter of all NFL coverage as we watch him lie, squirm, whine, and make things worse by the day, clearly distracting from the image the league works so hard to maintain. Most importantly, I haven't gotten any emails asking why the NFL doesn't train and guide young WHITE men to tell the truth.Clearly, I'm being hyperbolic and am not suggesting Rodgers and Ruggs are on morally equivalent ground, but I couldn't resist.Perhaps the better comparison would be Britt Reid. While not a player, he was a coach in the NFL, and had been since he was 21 years old. Fortunately, though, the trappings of fame and money weren't a jarring experience for him since his father was already a highly successful multi-millionaire. Plus, talk about a “system put in place,” to help guide a young man in the NFL, Britt Reid spent his entire career in the NFL working for and beside his father, Andy. And of course, they're both white, so there was no need to worry about anything in the first place. Other than the fact that Reid was involved in a multi-vehicle crash on February 4, 2021, just a few days before Super Bowl LV. Reid was on Adderall and had a blood alcohol concentration of .113. The five-year-old passenger in the car Reid struck was in critical condition and spent ten days in a coma and on April 2, 2021, roughly two months after the crime, the five-year-old girl was released from the hospital, still unable to walk or talk and being fed through a feeding tube.But hey, let's make sure we keep an eye on those young black men coming into the NFL.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Stryker & Klein
A.D.D. NEWS

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 7:35


CLIP: Grab your Adderall and find out what's going on in the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Page Avenue Crew
Dan Hates Books

Page Avenue Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 65:58


At some point in this episode, we actually talk about music, but also... Who wants to snort a microcose of Adderall off my butt? Leave me in The Matrix; give me a cheeseburger. Dragons are a key part of Josh's mental health. Thankfully, rumor has it Peter Jackson's new Beatles documentary heavily features dragons. Dan's kid has no idea what a priest is. Which One are You, Bartles or Jaymes? The true lesson of Harry Potter is that you don't need a huge dick to defeat evil. Support Story of the Year on Patreon: patreon.com/storyoftheyear Get Story of the Year merch: ghostsignal.co Follow Story of the Year on social media: Instagram twitter Dan: Instagram twitter Adam: Instagram twitter Josh: Instagram twitter Ryan: Instagram --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pageavenuecrew/support

Stryker & Klein
A.D.D. NEWS

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 8:55


CLIP: Grab your Adderall, Ally is here to get you up to date on what's going on with the world with A.D.D. News! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Thank You Heartbreak
218: Lazy Loving with Lil Sebby

Thank You Heartbreak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 82:46


“That's literally what it is,” today's guest recording artist Lil Sebby tells Chelsea 57:25 minutes in. "Lazing loving. You're not fully committed. You're not ready to ride throughout the ups and downs. And there are going to be down times. It's inevitable. It's never just going to be perfect. But once it's not as fun anymore, they dip. They just dip. Ghost culture.”HIGHLIGHTS.2:35 — I don't even know if I should be comfortable being close to you. I'm just looking at you from a distance. You could have COVID. The trust for a common human being was gone.5:11 — You know how people say, start before you're ready? The next big shift I need to make is, start before I know. Start before knowing whether it is going to resonate or go in your favor.10:15 — You should never stop because you're not making money. Money is just the cherry on top of the cake. The passion is the cake.15:40 — Late in my twenties, I started to see that there was always something beautiful about everyone I looked at. I realized that most everyone we pass on the street has been loved before and I started to get curious about that. Someone has loved them, I wonder why.21:30 — Depending on Adderall to give us a false sense of interest in our lives.29:15 — Sometimes you don't really connect or click with someone when you want to. You may see they have their own thing going on outside of you that comes into play. And it shows, it radiates off them. They aren't ready for love and you don't want to force that.33:10 — I would never change who you are for nobody. Because when you're changing who you are for somebody else, are you truly happy or are you trying to impress and having to hold back? Because, then, you're in your head and that's the worst place to be.43:20  — Girls won't even give dudes a shot these days.59 — We don't need fans. We need believers. We need partners who believe in us.1:08:40 — I feel like if you want something, you can get there and get rejected but at least you tried and took the time to get there rather than not going to figure it out. You fail by not trying. You succeeded by trying. So, either way, you win. 1:16:00 — I'm more litty than ever. We're having a lit experience right now because we're expressing ourselves. ——Lil SebbyInstagram: www.instagram.com/lils3bbySpotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/3Ez3l65SieOJV8bxp2qlWzTwitter: https://twitter.com/lilsebby_Chelsea Leigh TrescottWebsite: www.breakupward.comInstagram: www.instagram.com/thankyouheartbreakEmail: Chelsea@breakupward.comHuffPo Advice Column: Advice Column

Stryker & Klein
A.D.D. News

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 7:54


Make sure to take your Adderall! Ally catches you up on the world's news with A.D.D. News.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Old Dirty Boston
Sober Dan

Old Dirty Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:16


In this episode, I'm talking to Dan Hall host of the Weed Game Show who decided to stop smoking weed for 30 days, the longest he's gone since he was 12. Dan also gave up drinking about a year ago and talks very honestly about how alcohol, Adderall and weed have affected him.    All this talk about Boston comedy and comedians wouldn't be complete without a live show. We'll be taping a live episode of The Weed Game Show on December 1st at Laugh Boston.  Tickets are $20. I hope you can make it to the show, I'll be there, Dan will be hosting, its gonna be a great night, I hope you can make it. 

Below the Belt
Episode 257: UFC 267 Blachowicz vs Teixeira | Vettori vs Costa RECAP

Below the Belt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 67:02


Brendan breaks down and makes pick for this weekend's UFC 267 Jan Blachowicz vs Glover Teixeira, recaps Marvin Vettori vs Paulo Costa and talks an all new Fight Companion guest for this weekend's UFC 267, Costa's unprofessional weight cut, Daniel Cormier's comments about Fedor Emelianenko and why Brendan thinks Fedor should retire, Khamzat Chimaev's long awaited return vs a very game Li Jingliang, Jason Herzog's eye poke point deduction controversy, Jake Paul vs Tommy Fury's fight date announcement, Kevin Lee getting popped for Adderall use and much more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Below Average Joe's MMA Podcast
Ep. 150 - UFC Vegas 41 & Bellator 269 Preview | Paulo Costa Fight Week Drama | Fedor Wants the Title

Below Average Joe's MMA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 65:29


We hope you all enjoy this MMA Weekend Preview show! Join us as we break down the biggest fights for UFC Vegas 41 and Bellator 269 this coming weekend, Paulo Costa's fight week drama, Fedor Emelianenko wants one last title shot, and much more! Time Stamps: (0:00) - Intro (3:17) - Fight Announcements (8) Jessica Eye OUT of her fight against (12) Andrea Lee at UFC Fight Night on November 13, (5) Cynthia Calvillo will REPLACE her (C) Sergio Pettis vs Kyoji Horiguchi SCHEDULED for Bellator 272 on December 3 (2) Katlyn Chookagian vs (4) Jennifer Maia SCHEDULED for UFC 270 on January 22 (7) Viviane Araujo vs (10) Alexa Grasso SCHEDULED for UFC 270 on January 22 (16:02) - What We Missed (Other notable news stories) Chuck Liddell will not face domestic violence charges stemming from his 10/11 arrest Kevin Lee gets flagged by Nevada Athletic Commission for Adderall (19:33) - DWCS Season 5, Week 8 Recap Jonny Parsons defeats Soloman Renfro via Split Decision Piera Rodriguez defeats Valesca Machado via Unanimous Decision Caio Borralho defeats Jesse Murray via First-round TKO Armen Petrosyan defeats Kaloyan Kolev via First-round KO Pedro Falcao defeats James Barnes via Third-round KO (26:52) - Bellator 269 Main Event Preview: Fedor Emelianenko vs (2) Timothy Johnson (34:12) - UFC Vegas 41 Main Event Preview: (2) Paulo Costa vs (5) Marvin Vettori (54:33) - THE REST (Other notable fights to look out for at UFC Vegas 41) Grant Dawson vs Ricky Glenn Alex Caceres vs Seungwoo Choi Jun Yong Park vs Gregory Rodrigues Mason Jones vs David Onama (1:02:25) - Follow our social media + Interact and engage with the show! Be sure to follow us on all platforms to stay updated on future episodes and announcements: Our Linktree can take you straight to our Donation and Voice Message options, video episodes on YouTube, social media platforms, and more! Simply click the following link and explore where you can support, engage and interact with our podcast: https://linktr.ee/belowaveragejoes_podcast Thanks for listening! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/belowaveragejoes-podcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/belowaveragejoes-podcast/support

Spinning Unrest Music
S01 E19 - Gas Station Adderall

Spinning Unrest Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 78:55


Today we'll come full circle on our old "Stranded on a Desert Island Albums" discussion and find out what violation Stump committed at work that caused a companywide staff e-mail. We'll also discuss what our essential gas station food purchases are and find out which one of us sleeps COMPLETELY naked. The Final battle of the Beefcake Brackets and a super politically incorrect installment of "Hot or Not" to wrap the whole mess up. Watch On YouTube: bit.ly/3rCf1Jh Follow/Vote On Instagram: instagram.com/riotatthedogpark Web Site: riotatthedogpark.com Desert Island Album Updates - (13:33) Sleepwear - (20:46) Work Rules - (26:56) Beefcake Brackets - (33:07) Gas Station Snacks - (40:50) Land of the Band - (47:54) Fun Fact - (60:35) Hot Or Not - (62:12)

Space: What The F**k, Dude?!
Comedian Lindsay Theisen

Space: What The F**k, Dude?!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 57:07


South Carolina native and NYC comedian Lindsay Theisen stops by the pod john to discuss drinking, Adderall, comparing yourself to your high school friends, and Dollywood.Follow her on Insta: @lindsaytheisMy stuff:@dannypalmernyc@thedannypalmershowSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thedannypalmershow)

I am Cannabis Sativa
Spensary's THC-V Jack Herer Cart

I am Cannabis Sativa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 8:39


THC-V over Adderall. THC-V is excellent for me. Check in with your doctor or medical professional. Taking medical advice from me is a profoundly stupid idea! Source: https://www.earthgrownwellness.com/products/spensary-x-lulacbd-thcv-delta-8-thc-cbd-full-spectrum-vape-cartridge-1-gram Our Video: https://youtu.be/VU6cFGGIh-E ICYMI - Dan Reviews Purple Punch Delta 8 THC Cartridge from 3Chi https://open.spotify.com/episode/7vevLKW5oS3aTPkqSYASNy?si=Z2yhSsNCSaqNHwiyj2_7Cw ICYMI - Dan Reviews StrawNana Delta 8 Cartridge from 10 Cartridge https://open.spotify.com/episode/6T0HJnIOoAqB2VpFZQZymq?si=UttztviPShKRx1kzoc23Aw ICYMI – Update: Delta 8 THC CANNOT be Shipped to All 50 states https://open.spotify.com/episode/5vvHXg59yTe0ppmqwxWTb1?si=PSYwnnFcRmC1izgjRPFSpg ICYMI - Cannabis for Average Janes and Joes - Getting Delta 8 THC to Your Door Nationwide https://open.spotify.com/episode/0ZRsuQV6FWgaUzF26vQzLl?si=tuo-r7LdRZqtVvRO1-7H3w ---------------------------------------- To Follow Mr. Sativa on Social Media: Twitter - https://twitter.com/icsativapod Periscope: https://www.pscp.tv/icsativapodcast Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/_iamcannabissativa/ Please become a Patreon at just $1 a month - http://bit.ly/2NJmshn Please support us via PayPal - paypal.me/icsativapodcast If you want to support us via Anchor: https://anchor.fm/iamcannabissativapodcast/support My Twitch Channel - https://www.twitch.tv/iamcannabissativa My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMtiTbOFE3D39rpLfLglaw? Get Great Quality CBD products from Sequoia Organics: https://www.sequoiaorganics.co/?a_aid=iamcannabissativa My Email: iamcannabissativa@gmail.com Like Our Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/iamcsativapodcast/ Now Syndicated on Radical Russ Radio: https://streamingv2.shoutcast.com/radicalruss-radio --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/iamcannabissativapodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/iamcannabissativapodcast/support

Green Light Weekend
GLW Episode #155 - DeadRoom Comedy

Green Light Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:05


This week we have 3 owners of DeadRoom Comedy (-Josh Emerson) and our old co-host David Oakley. We talked masturbation, Only Fans, Adderall, comedy, Jacob's trip to Atlanta, guns, Jeff's uncle's bison incident, Dave's bad driving, dead animals and so much more. Thanks for listening, we love you all. Intro/outro music by Ethen Esparza and the Chava People https://soundcloud.com/chavapeople https://soundcloud.com/hiphoptrip Follow Dead Room Comedy at deadroomcomedy.com on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/deadroomcomedy/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DeadRoomComedy/ Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCv-EvQQ1OCXy-MPmNDYSKBw Follow Dave on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/daveolaughs/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/david.oakley.1023 Follow Jeff on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/jeffandtonic/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/jstanich3 Follow Elliot on Instagram www.instagram.com/elliotaweber/, Twitter twitter.com/elliotaweber Facebook www.facebook.com/elliot.weber.1232 and YouTube www.youtube.com/channel/UChnusQMcrwBomBx2pK9Cv3A https://www.deadroomcomedy.com/ Follow Jacob on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/jenkem_jones/ TikTok https://www.tiktok.com/@jenkemjones?lang=en Facebook https://www.facebook.com/YourFaceIsCup Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/glw_podcast/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/greenlightweekend/ and YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvWtSBMa_E7fXnlDO-Ipdjg or you can get a hold of us at greenlighweekend@gmail.com

The Solarpreneur
How to Develop a Winning Culture in Solar

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:44


Sign up for www.solciety.co! Speaker 1 (00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:42):What's going on Solarpreneurs. I am super excited for this episode. We have a live episode in the studio. I always love doing it with live guests because I think I get more out of it and more connection with the guests. And I'm super excited because we have our second lady, second girl rep coming on the show. I don't know. I don't know if you guys like get like female girls, lady, whatever. Um, but anyway, it's okay. So we've got Alex Hogan hall on the show here, live in the studio, Alex. Thanks for coming out today and coming on the show. Yeah, of course.Speaker 3 (01:15):Taylor, thanks so much for having me. I'm excited to beSpeaker 2 (01:17):Here. Yeah, it'll be super fun. And she's, uh, hopefully moving our assume, but you're right now you're commuting from Utah working with the team, right? Yes, sir.Speaker 3 (01:25):Yep. Back and forth,Speaker 2 (01:26):California. You're getting sick of that. Uh, that plane ride yet. Are you guys like riding in the plane?Speaker 3 (01:31):Oh my gosh. I feel like everyone at Delta probably has to know me by now. It's the same flight.Speaker 2 (01:38):Uh, is it like you see like the same pilots and like flight attendants and stuff? Or does that change your name?Speaker 3 (01:43):I see the same, like Utah based crew. I feel like every time.Speaker 2 (01:47):Nice. Well, that's cool. And, um, so for those that don't know, Alex, she right now is the, uh, you might have to help me a little bit, but your CMO right at,Speaker 3 (01:57):Yep. I'm a chief marketing officer and chairman of the board for true power.Speaker 2 (02:02):Okay. True power in Alex. She has a ton of experience. We're just talking a little bit before the show and she gave me their own whole, you know, kind of run down of everything. She's done all the experiences she's had and, um, she's done a ton awesome stuff. So, um, Alex, do you want to give us kind of like the rundown for those who don't know you kind of how you got into the industry, how you got into door to door and, um, I guess how you got into the position that you're at now too. Yeah,Speaker 3 (02:25):Sure. Cool. So, um, so I got started in the industry back in 2015. I had just finished up college with a degree in Marine biology and I was just loved the environment of super, you know, pro hippie fixing, fixing climate change. So couldn't find a job in Marine bio. So I applied to this position to knock doors and sell solar. So I was like, look, I can do this for a petition signing or something. It's going to be easy to get paid. Um, so I tried it out. I was one of the first, uh, direct training classes over at Trinity solar out in New Jersey. Um, back in, I think of 2015. And at the time we really didn't have much training in place support systems. It was still very new to the business. Um, so I was one of the first female sales reps. They brought on board.Speaker 3 (03:11):I had to like make my own polos with the logo on it and stuff, um, at the time. So yeah, just start now and I, uh, didn't have any sales background or anything didn't think I'd ever get into sales, but I, you know, did pretty well. I am a super hard worker, so I just went straight into, um, you know, knocking every day, making sure I was working the hours and I did pretty well. I was doing about five or six a month and was able to pay off all of my student loans within the first year I was able to, uh, get my first, uh, apartment with some friends. I was able to get my first car. So pretty much everything I wanted at 22 and I was getting all that stuff covered. Yeah. And so I enjoyed what I was doing. Um, but I was starting to think about getting back into Marine biology.Speaker 3 (03:56):This was about nine months to a year later and the director of sales and I kind of sat down before I was looking to leave and they offered me a role to come in and kind of just use a little bit of experience I had out in the field understanding kind of what the field was going through to start building out their support systems. So that's covering anything with onboarding. What does our recruiting process look like? What do our competitions look like? What's our training, our marketing materials, kind of you name it. And that was kind of the stuff that I got into and the way that I did it was mostly like, you know, figuring out what problems existed in the org that I could come in and solve. And, uh, and just kind of figuring out where my hard work could get put in a place. And when you don't really have a skillset built out for something like that, a lot of what you're going to be able to do, that's unique is provide value through your hard work. So I worked my butt off or to really late hours, um, kind of whatever I needed to do to start getting that off the ground. And within, I'd say two years, I was managing a team and then took a director position at Trinity over, uh, all of sales admin, and then also recruiting.Speaker 2 (04:59):Let's go, was there a lot of like, was there a lot of girls at the time or you really, really like the only one coming into the office?Speaker 3 (05:05):So we, our office staff is a little bit heavier on the female side, lots in our different support departments. Um, but I was our first and only female director, youngest director. So yeah, not, not as, quite as much at the leadership level on the sales side, for sure. Okay. Yeah. And so that's kinda where I grew into my director level self, I guess. And then, um, I transitioned into working with legacy, uh, built out the setter closer model over there. Again, I'm very heavy on like building out the systems, kind of the backend stuff, making everything work. Um, and then, uh, after working at legacy for awhile, transitioned over into vivant solar and took on a role managing the sales marketing department there under Jason Del stra. And, uh, that was probably my most fun part of the career before branched out into consulting. I loved, you know, we had this big $5 million budget.Speaker 3 (05:55):I had a huge team. We were very heavy on the culture and that's kind of where I realized how unique and valuable it was to be excellent at building out culture. So, um, when, you know, kind of doubled down on that as the way that I could provide, you know, unique value in the industry. And so when I left Viven and got into consulting with door to door experts, that was kinda my thing. So I worked really heavily on both new hire experience, repor tension, increasing your per rep average for your team, just kind of that type of stuff that kept people around, um, long-term and could make companies unique. Um, culture is really interesting with that where, you know, I'm going back to school now and something we're learning about is how does a business provide a competitive advantage or sustain their competitive advantage.Speaker 3 (06:38):And if you think about it in door to door, our audience for marketing, isn't so much like, uh, the solar customer, as much as it is this as it is the sales rep. So that's kinda my biggest audience is how can I provide the best possible experience for my sales reps? And so a sustained competitive advantage also, you know, usually comes from something that's really socially complex. And so if you can build a really unique and interesting culture that keeps people around, it's something that's very hard for other companies to imitate. So that's going to be kind of the way that you can, uh, set your company apart from the rest.Speaker 2 (07:09):No doubt. And yeah, I saw Alex first speak actually back at door-to-door con was that last year and last year. Yeah. Yeah. So, uh, got a ton of like nuggets from just her talking to door to door con. Um, and you talked to a lot of things you just mentioned, like the culture of the competitions, um, how to increase the per rep average. I remember, um, need to go back and review my notes, but it was super good, super valuable stuff you talked about. Um, and yeah, in my opinion, I think that's why we need more like girl reps in door to door is because I don't know, you've probably seen this by now, but pretty much every successful, you know, door to door rep, at least the guys we all got add, we're all super disorganized. We're all, you know, take an Adderall, all this stuff.Speaker 2 (07:53):That's like the, you know, door to door, culture and everything though. Um, in every like most, every girl I see come in and they, you know, they're on top of it. They want organize things. They just get people in line and yeah. Then matter of fact, that's how it is. Our company ran out. I told you just off, um, before we started the interview here, we got someone that used to be at Trinity solar to your name's Jeanette. And, uh, yeah, she helped us like just dial in like being so much better than, than what we were doing before though. Yeah. Um, for those that are looking for, you know, more organization, I would consider looking at, you know, bringing in some more girls in your organization because yeah. I think that's kind of the super powers that a lot of, probably not all girls, but I would say in general, um, they're definitely more organized. Is that fair to say Alex?Speaker 3 (08:39):Yeah, I would say so. I mean, that's definitely been like a blessing for me at first I was like kind of done being the only girl in my org. It was tougher for me to find mentorship, you know, connect with the male leaders that I was with. It was just, you know, there's just that barrier there. Um, so it was for us to build that relationship. So for awhile it was kind of sad, but then after I realized, you know, just like you mentioned, Taylor, like so much of my natural skill set or the things that I knew I could double down on to become unique. Like a lot of that was very different than the skill set that my male peers brought to the table. A lot of them were growing up and having success, like getting into director roles through being really great at sales. And so, um, I was fortunate enough to have kind of that mix of doing well enough with sales to really understand what reps are going through. So then when I could come in and build out those systems and provide that structure, it w it was a very specific to them and help that out a lot.Speaker 2 (09:30):Yeah. That's awesome. So how long were you like in the sales before you got into more like the like management's type stuff organization?Speaker 3 (09:37):Yeah, so I, I knocked for about a year, um, and then took a lot of referrals after that, that lasted for awhile. And then once I moved out of New Jersey into Utah referral game, kind of dried up there, um, wasn't working out there quite as much, but yeah, I still, you know, to this day, I'll go out and talk with our sales reps here and there and make sure I'm spending as much time as in the field as I can. I think it's super important to know firsthand what they're going through in order to make sure that, you know, everything we're building is the best it possibly can be to support them and, um, keep them here longterm, as everybody wants to find a home in their career. I think oftentimes we think in door to door, how, like, you know, reps don't stay that long. It's kind of fleeting. It's okay if you lose a lot of people, but I think it's, um, it's a challenge, but to think about it the opposite way where, you know, if I can figure out if I can crack the code on how people can stay longterm, I'm actually gonna have an org that connects at a way deeper level has success at a way deeper level. So that's what I'mSpeaker 2 (10:32):A hundred percent. Yeah. I respect that a ton like leaders that still want to go out and knock with their teams as all these top companies. I see all the leaders. A matter of fact, I just saw a post about a, I think it was Sunrun CEO or something shows up. I don't know if he saw that, but she shows up to a meeting and then they thought they're going to have a meet and greet after. And she's like, no, we're going to the doors who might knock them with like, wow, she's awesome. So like, I think people really expect respect that. And I've talked with reps from other organizations that don't do that, where their leaders are just coming in and doing trainings and then heading out and they're talking about all these things. I go and knock harder, go close more doors and things like that. But I think it's hard to, um, I don't know, maybe take that information sometimes if the reps don't see, oh, they're willing to do it themselves. And, um, they're going to come out and like, show me how it's done even though, I mean, I mean, I'm sure you're not to the level you were before when you're knocking consistently every day. Yeah.Speaker 3 (11:26):This is just here and there, but I mean, you're so right. Like even, you know, in the times where I've been even recruiting at the manager level, a DM will sometimes say, okay, like I am down to come over and I'll do this, that, and the other thing, but I don't really want to knock anymore. And I just think it's so silly to think that you can be as effective and be the best person for your people if you don't really know what they're going through and you're not willing to do that with them. Yeah.Speaker 2 (11:50):That's for sure. Yeah. So when you, um, like kind of transitioned more into the management stuff, more into building out the systems, things like that, was that, were they asking you to do that? Or were you kind of like, I dunno, is that, was that you more wanting to get into that type of role? Or how did that transition go?Speaker 3 (12:07):Yeah, I, I didn't really know what to expect when I first took the role. I was kind of, even in the mentality of, you know, I'll, I'll come on, I'll do this and I'll keep looking for a job that I want in the meantime. Um, but coming in, I, I didn't realize how valuable this question was at the time I was like 23, but I remember going, um, department to department the first couple of weeks of my job, because my boss was traveling to all the offices. So I'm just sitting around corporate. I'm like, okay, what am I going to do? And I went to all the departments and I said, Hey, I'm Alex, I'm working with the direct sales team. I just wanted to know, like, how do you interact with them? What problems do you run into? Like, how can I make things easier for you guys?Speaker 3 (12:42):And kind of like build that, um, kind of system up and everybody had their own opinions and things. And so not only did it build a ton of relationship equity for me, like people kind of talked about playing politics and corporate, I don't think it has to be politics, but you do need to build relationships. So I built up a ton of that equity by, um, going out, doing things for other departments, kind of seeing how I could kind of grease the wheel there between their relationship with sales. And, uh, and because of that, I noticed a ton of holes that needed to be filled, created systems and kind of, um, different problem solving solutions that I could put into place there. And then I managed it because I put it into place. So as I grew and built more systems under me and things that I was managing, I was able to convince my boss to let me bring on additional people. And that's how I got into management was purely just working my butt off and then figuring out, okay, what problems exist that no, one's either thinking about solving or wants to solve and figure out the solution to that, and then kind of build out my influence from there.Speaker 2 (13:39):Uh that's awesome. So it sounds like you're more like super proactive, like, Hey, what problems can I help with? What things can be improved? It wasn't like them doing yoga, doing this, go do this, like went out there and kind of recognize that yourself and like suggest to them, things like that.Speaker 3 (13:54):Totally. And I think that like, it applies, I think, no matter what position you're in, like anyone that's trying to get into leadership, if you can be proactive about figuring out, you know, what needs to get done, that's not getting done. What are the holes that you can fill with different solutions? Um, that is the way to kind of stand out and be unique. Yeah.Speaker 2 (14:10):Well that's, yeah, that's a good point. Good point. And so I'm with team, I know this is what you're doing at a door to door experts for awhile while was helping people kind of help build out these systems and more on the organizational thing, the rep retention. Right. Um, what was like some big mistakes that you would see as you went into a company? I'm sure you've dealt with some pretty disorganized companies and maybe some that were a mess and everything. Do you have any, uh, I don't know, cool stories of companies that were a disaster and you helped them turn things around or anything like that,Speaker 3 (14:40):Dude, that's such a good question. Um, yeah, I, I'm just thinking through all these examples, I would say one of the biggest things I noticed was if you're a smaller business or you're like a manager looking to do this for your team, you know, you're not doing it huge scale of in status yet, or anything like that. A lot of people, you don't even realize you're doing it, but you're like trying to imitate a big culture. You're trying to imitate these big players that you admire. So it's not coming from a place of like genuine, authentic, like you're trying to do what's in your reps, best interest. You're like building out systems or creating competitions or doing all these things because you think you need to, and because you think that's, what's going to work. And so it's like, it's this weird, like disconnect, like emotionally in between like you and the sales rep.Speaker 3 (15:28):So instead a big part of it was getting in touch with that. Company's like identity, like what are the things that they really care about? Who are the people that they're trying to bring on board? Like who really aligns with their core values and then figuring out how do I build out systems, build out training, uh, build it into my recruiting process, whatever a way that I'm providing what is best for the best interests of the sales rep. And that will also align with your best interest as a business or a, you know, manager simply because you're bringing on the right people. So, you know, you're bringing on the right person, if your best interests and theirs align perfectly because you're bringing somebody into your culture that shares your values.Speaker 2 (16:05):Okay. So it sounds like step one is kind of recognizing what are the core values before anything and then going out and finding people that fit into that. And that's more, would you say that's what we, what you were helping companies with as you started working with them?Speaker 3 (16:20):Yeah, I would say so because a mistake I made in the beginning was I would, you know, I just, I, I feel like I've got these systems now that could be successful anywhere. So we'd start on the system front and we'd put the stuff into place. And, um, their retention didn't go up. Like the metrics kind of, we were trying to measure, we're not really changing. And so if I looked at it, it was like this, yeah. It was just this like false imitation of what we really needed to be providing. So we started a step back and said like, okay, who are the people that we're truly trying to bring on board? Right. Like, and one thing I, um, I was telling you about this earlier, but a little Simon Senate training I saw that I think is super valuable is, uh, he, he was interviewing a leader in Navy seals and he was talking about, um, how they choose who they want to bring into their org.Speaker 3 (17:01):And he kind of drew this little graph. So one of the axis was, uh, high performance, so low to high performance. And then the other axis was, uh, culture, or, you know, how good of a human is this person kind of thing. So every company wants someone that falls under that one corner where it's high performance, you know, high, high value to the culture. Nobody wants someone that's in the low and low corner, but then, um, oftentimes people will choose the high performer. That's a bad fit for your culture over the, a low performer. That is a great fit for your culture. And I think that's a huge thing we do here in door to door because we care so much about that production, but this guy kind of defined that person as a toxic team member. So it's someone that comes on board. Um, they might be breaking your rules.Speaker 3 (17:45):They might be kind of going against your core values. And then as a manager or a leader, you're looking at this person and you're like, dang, I really want the production. So you keep them on board. You make concessions with yourself, you kind of give up some of that identity that you care so much about with your, with your team and what you guys stand for. And then you think that, that person's either, you know, providing a neutral or a benefit to the team where oftentimes if you put a top performer, that's a bad fit for the culture in place, and you prioritize them over your good guys on the team that are maybe mediocre, you know, you work with that person versus developing them. Then you're actually going to detract from the overall kind of culture and performance of everyone.Speaker 2 (18:19):That's interesting. So how do you know cause like, um, um, I'm sure you've seen, sometimes it's tough to recognize you do one, two interviews and you don't necessarily know how this person's going to work out with the team. So how do you, like, what do you do? Say you bring on someone they're crushing it, but yeah. They're not fitting into their culture. I don't know. Maybe they're like doing shady stuff or, and I'm sure you've seen all types of things going on that, like, what do you do with these reps? Do you like, Hey, strike one, strike two year out or do you like sit down and talk with them or do you like, I don't know if you see they're not a good fit in your culture, do you try to like mold them first? Or what do you do in these cases?Speaker 3 (18:55):Yeah, I would, I would say always like, step one, you should be a high enough level person too. If you have a high performer, that's not a good fit for your culture, you should be able to control that situation enough to try to mold them into what you need. Okay. So oftentimes, you know, someone's, um, uh, being, you know, really aggressive or territorial or just kind of this personality that doesn't fit with the group. If you first try to level with them and be like, Hey, like I want to provide a space for you to, you know, move into leadership here, make the most money. You can, whatever that person's goals are, I'd kind of aligned with them there and be like, I need you to do me a favor though, because you are such a high level influencer on the team because of your production level and like how well you can go out and perform that if you don't come to meetings and you do all of these things that are like against the basic rules that I'm trying to hold everybody to.Speaker 3 (19:42):And those expectations, it sucks for me as a leader because I have a tough time. Like all these people look up to, you have all this influence over them. So I need to try to hold you to those same standards if it's not, you know, just for you coming to the team, cause you don't care that much about going to the trainings every day. Maybe you don't need them as much, but the rest of the team does. And so you would be doing me a massive, massive favor if you could, you know, follow X, Y, and Z. So whatever those basic expectations are, I try to kind of set it that way. And oftentimes if you level with that person and they're like, yeah, um, I'm just doing something nice for the team like that usually connects and will resonate with people. Um, if they are still not going to be a good fit for the group, I have, you know, um, consulted people and we've said, okay, let's put this person kind of out on an island.Speaker 3 (20:25):So, you know, don't come to the meetings. We're not gonna put you on the leader board, but you're welcome to come here and sell lights out and kind of do your thing and work with me. But I can't just put you in with the rest of the team because you're kind of a bad influence on them. Um, or worst case scenario too. Like I've also, um, personally lost people that I thought were high, high performer, toxic team member. Um, and I've also had, uh, one of my roofing clients actually in Colorado, they lost their top top person that they were petrified to lose because they finally put some expectations in place like this. And he left and they were petrified that the whole team was going to leave. And now they're like five X the size that they were like this little training room where they had these influences that kept them from holding their expectations. Um, when I was there, like that was tough for them. So now that person's gone, they're able to hold everyone to a higher standard, the team actually gels a lot better. And so they've only gotten better since then.Speaker 2 (21:16):Yes. Yeah. Yeah. It's like cutting the fat off, but yeah. And then I think it's that scarcity mindset people get, they don't want to let go of the golden goose, the things it's feeding them. So they're afraid to, I don't know, do sometimes what's necessary. Like a lot of times they, they probably know they need to do it right, but they're just like scared to like, I don't want to cut a guy that's closing 10 deals a month, whatever it, 10 20 dealsSpeaker 3 (21:37):For sure. And if that person leaving allows you to help everybody else in the office get one or two more deals a month and that kind of covers your 10 or 20 that you're losing. So I look at it.Speaker 2 (21:48):Yeah. I like that. I agree for sure. And so another thing I know you've helped a lot of companies with, and you're probably one of your strengths do is just the rep retention. Um, so does that, would you say that's pretty hand-in-hand with what we're talking about? Like retaining reps, just figuring out the culture first, any other ideas you have on that? Because as you know, solar, I mean, at my first company I was with, it's like, you know, trying to pour, uh, uh, like water in a colander, you know, you're trying to fill up a colander and the water is just flowing out of there and you're constantly just filling it up, filling it up every single week. I go, at one point we were recruiting, I don't know, maybe like five or six reps a week. And then we're lucky if one of them like stayed double next week. Cause we're just like bringing in these guys from, you know, restaurant, is it ZipRecruiter, indeed all these things. So yeah. In your opinion, Alex, what's like the biggest, um, I dunno, mistaken retention. I know probably a lot of that stuff we just talked about, but anything else you would say that's helps a lot that you've seen in companies you work with in retention? Yeah.Speaker 3 (22:50):Yeah. So I would say, um, first off is I think a big mistake we make in the industry is, you know, we put a lot of weight on recruiting, but then mentally people start to kind of check out of the recruiting process once that person gets hired. So as soon as that person shows up to bootcamp, you're like, cool, my job is done. This person's here. And that's what we reward people on. We say, oh, he brought in this number of recruits, but what we really care about is that person staying retained. So I'm a metric and solar that I got from a previous company, just with a ton of data, was, um, if a rep can get five sales within their first 60 days, they're 80% more likely to stay with that company six months or longer, which is a huge step for us in our industry.Speaker 3 (23:29):Right. So, um, I, you know, knowing that, I mean there's a million things you can think of to put into place. You know, how I answer the question? How can I get more of my sales reps to hit five sales in 60 days? There's a lot you can build into place there. But I think a big thing too, that should be thought of through the recruiting process and kind of, as it bleeds into that onboarding and the first couple of weeks is just kind of the journey that your, your recruit is going to have to go through in order to actually stay retained and like fully integrate this new job into their life. So for example, let's say you've got, um, someone that's working like a nine to five job. They're a young parent, young mom or dad, and they've got like a two or three-year-old at home that they put to bed at like 7, 7 30 every night.Speaker 3 (24:11):And that's like their little family time. It totally fits into their current routine. And now you're trying to recruit this person from that lifestyle into door to door. Well, if you're asking that person, you know, you, if you're feeling resistance during the recruiting process, you might immediately go to, let me throw more money at this person. And let me give them a manager title, like whatever, some of these perks that we can give versus thinking through that hesitation is more so based on the changes to their lifestyle, that they haven't thought through a solution to yet. So like this person, this example may come into your org and if they plan to like, they've always needed to be home at seven 30 for bedtime, and now you're telling them they need to knock until eight or later, every single night, that's going to be a disconnect for you guys.Speaker 3 (24:52):So you could nip that stuff in the bud, even during the recruiting process, by getting to know that person at a deeper level, know what their life is, like, know what they care about. And then, um, you know, that could be setting up a schedule where a couple of nights a week you want them out late and a couple of nights a week, you're cool with them going home because they get their doors in or they start earlier, like whatever it's gotta be. But if you can kind of figure those things out early on and mold some of the process with them, it breaks that barrier down between where they are and them being, you know, fully self-sustaining in this role, making money and working with the longterm. So I think if you can think through solving that, that is going to change the way you recruit your processes, your onboarding, your incentives, like everything else kind of falls in line. Yeah.Speaker 2 (25:34):Yeah. Okay. I love that. Yeah. That's a good point now. And I'm doing a little bit with that right now. I mean, the company I'm with now, it's like we have all these young guys that just came like young hustlers coming from, uh, Vivian alarms and stuff like that. They're all lined up for the summer. And then, um, yeah, I told you before we started recording here that I was running a team of just like 10, 15 reps. Most of us were like married guys, just, uh, I don't know, kind of doing our thing had kids, stuff like that, but now our teams, like we ha we got 30 guys that they're not married, they're off like, uh, just doing like the single guy stuff. And we're trying to kind of like, um, you know, fit into that culture and everything. And then, uh, you know, you get like girls coming on the teams too. So like there's all these different, like people that can come into the organization and from all types of scenarios, different schedules that they're used to. So, um, I dunno, do you have any like tips on say you got something like that where it's a bunch of young people and you've got some married guys, then you got some girls. I don't know. Is that how your team is right now currently or, yeah,Speaker 3 (26:36):Yeah. We've got a really good mix over at Tru. We've got, um, I'd say probably 30% of our like active reps are women, which is cool. Um, yeah, we, we have a younger Salesforce, but we've got plenty of married people with young kids and everything. Um, I mean, I think a big, a big piece of that is like, we've got all these little subcultures within our teams that I've noticed people that have similar schedules. They're kind of like breaking off and doing some of their own thing. Um, you could even incentivize the groups that start to naturally form like that to like, do little head-to-head matches. Like you can do some office level incentives with them on that type of stuff. Okay. Um, and then, I mean, just touching on bringing people into solar from summer programs, I've got like a whole thing that I've been, uh, brewing up with a couple with, you know, Brandon and Parker, a couple of old experts, but, um, we've been talking about a lot how, how different it is going from a summer program over into solar.Speaker 3 (27:32):And I think for anyone like recruiting from summer programs right now, this is a hurdle that you guys might not be thinking of people in pest control or alarms or something they're coming from this very regimented schedule. They know what they're doing. Like every hour of the day for the summer, they've got really robust training systems because they're trying to, you know, in a summer program, you need to get people, videos, get that stuff figured out, and then they need to be on the doors producing as soon as the summer starts. So they've got this whole system in place. And oftentimes, you know, a lot of us got into solar maybe because you were doing other sales and you loved the freedom and things that come with the schedule we can create. And solar, well, if you're a manager that values freedom with your time and you're kind of unstructured and you don't care if people are showing up to the meetings twice a week and stuff like that, and you recruit a group of alarm guys, like what are the chances that, that person's going to be successful in this unstructured culture where it's like, no, man, you can do whatever you want.Speaker 3 (28:25):Like kind of thing. You know? So, um, so oftentimes we see that as a perk that we got into this industry for, if you're bringing on summer teams, I would say, match what they are familiar with until they know what they're doing. And then you can let off the gas a little bit, like put something into place that feels remotely similar to what they've been going through with their training and their schedule and their structure. And it may not match what you're asking the rest of the team to do, but it's going to help those people come on board and get past the learning curve.Speaker 2 (28:54):Okay. That's interesting. So almost like having them do, even though we say you're only meeting twice a week or something, so you bring in a group of summer guys. So you're saying maybe like meet with them every day and just have them do their same schedule for a while until they start seeing success. Things like that.Speaker 3 (29:09):Totally. Because for us, we might be like, oh yeah, it's cool. We only do meetings twice a week. Like this like less structured lifestyle is what we enjoy. But for someone coming from a really regimented routine and door to door that could give them anxiety and it could keep them from like their routines on how they've learned and their work ethic and their numbers are all based on them being in a regular regimented schedule. So if you mess that up, they may not have the personal, like wherewithal to just do that themselves because they know that's what they need. Like they might not even know that. So I would say, put those guys in, yeah, like a quick 30 minute meeting every day to kind of touch base for the first couple of weeks. And once you guys, once you see them kind of get into their own like groove with solar, you can always let up and pull them into the, the, um, structure that you're holding with the rest of the group. But I think that would help with retention, like big time for summer people.Speaker 2 (29:56):Yeah. No, for sure. I agree with that. Cause you actually, that's, I'm totally, I'm working with Jason newbie and that's basically what we're doing right now because he comes from alarms, a bunch of the guys that he has on the team are from vivid alarms. So right now, yeah, he has a meeting every day. Like it used to be 10:00 AM you moved it to 12, but it's like every single day we're having a meeting, we're getting out there and yeah. I mean, the guys are producing, so it's, whatever's doing work and working and they were producing a lot more than our team that was working twice. There was a meeting twice a week. I'm like, okay, well something must be working.Speaker 3 (30:26):Oh yeah. We, uh, we just finished up our first competition as a company. And it was like a one V one and our top manager that won the whole thing came from pest control. Yeah. He's got his schedule down. He works harder than everyone else because he knows like the another trap we get into with solar is the commissions are so high right now that like, it's so tough to push people, to actually make them produce what numbers you want to see on the board. If they've got any type of limiting mindset with money or they don't need that much. And they don't think about that type of stuff. So we, um, part of our practice when we're bringing people on board is we'll even frame it during the interview process is like kind of this, this problem. We want this person to help us solve, which is like, look, you can make very, very good money coming in and solar to the point where sometimes it can be tough to make people hit the numbers that we expect out of them every month, because you might sell one or two deals and like cover all your bills for the month.Speaker 3 (31:16):So you want to relax, but how does a person that does two sales a month affect the rest of their team that wants to do way more than that could be stretching their personal limits, way higher than we've seen people in our industry do 30 plus a month, you know, like that happens all the time. So if you hire a bunch of people and you don't kind of frame it that way first, um, you can get people kind of caught in this like, oh yeah, I'm good doing one or two sales and you've got kind of this mediocre performance. So yeah,Speaker 2 (31:42):No, that's true. I mean, that's, the act is do two deals and solar. I mean, especially in California, that's still like decent money.Speaker 3 (31:49):Yeah. You might be doing better than anyone in your family has ever done. And you're only selling two accounts. So like if you're pulling someone in, that's not from our industry and they're doing two accounts a month, they think they're winning. You think that they're, uh, you know, time suck on the rest of your team. So you got to kind of figure out how to like reconcile that early on to make sure that person knows what you expect out of them. And can, you know, if they've got some limiting mindset there, you're working with them on that, that's kind of another step to helping people stay longer term is kind of getting them in the frame of mind. Like, no, I, I may be doing way better than the rest of my family, but doing two deals a month. Like I could, now that I know this skill, I can be doing 6, 10, 15, whatever. So, um, getting people kind of in that number mindset versus the money, one is big too. Yeah,Speaker 2 (32:33):I would agree. And yeah, I think it's good to bring to that point to bring people from the other industries. Because like, for me, I, I saw it on myself. I was like getting lazier and lazier for awhile just because we're guys that were just pretty much in pure soul where we weren't bringing any whales that had been in like Pesan show alarms. And so we're good with our three, four hours knocking a day and, you know, just closing her maybe two or three deals a week tops and yeah, it was good money and everything. But then once I recently, once we have did this, like merger as Tony about with Jason newbie's team, got to these alarm guys, a lot of them were working on alarm schedule, like 6, 7, 8 hours of knocking. And then, and then they're closing 30 plus deals a week. A few of them I'm like, whoa, like this is possible.Speaker 2 (33:18):And solar guys can do this much. So I think it's a, I think it's a good idea to be bringing in people that are fresh that don't know that, that don't kind of like have that lazy solar mindset. Cause in my opinion, like, um, I've seen guys that are coming from different industries or guys there may be new. Um, a lot of times they're having more success than recruiting from like other solar companies, because a lot of these other like no offense to a lot of these companies, but they have a lot of lazy reps that are used to closing, you know, one or one or two deals maybe tops a week. So, uh, yeah, I think I liked that a lot.Speaker 3 (33:54):That was kind of like, you know, I was fortunate enough to work at some of the bigger companies and pull some lessons from there. So whether I'm working with a smaller company and mid whatever, like a big, a big thing has been the pattern with the top performing companies is they expect high performance all the way through their leadership stack. A lot of times you'll, you know, you could recruit someone into a smaller dealer, um, and they've done well in the past. You want to put them at this really high level. You're either bringing them in as like a DM, maybe a regional, maybe a director. And they're like, cool. I want to come in. And this is what I'm going to do. But by the way, I'm not going to knock doors. And if they go that route, like again, I saw some of the craziest performance of my life in solar, just being at Viven and those guys all the way up through the director level, like they could be managing hundreds of reps under them and they're still expecting to hit some of the highest levels of production in the industry and leading from the front.Speaker 3 (34:46):They're like a lot of times we will get into management and you start to get sucked into the reporting and the hiring and firing and territory management and all that other stuff. And you, and you forget how high priority you should be, um, putting, actually knocking and showing up for your team, but by far and away say the biggest pattern is like you see managers, um, able to bring teams on and have them perform at a much higher level of they are leading the charge.Speaker 2 (35:11):Yeah, I agree for sure. And say, I speak in a culture. Um, I know that was, you probably, uh, learned a ton as you were, um, helping them like Vivid Solar things. And I know that's part of, we talked about a door to door con too. Um, but you also mentioned like, I think you were saying smaller companies shouldn't necessarily try to do all the things that the big dogs are doing, like the vivid soldiers of the, of the world and that and all that. So what do you see? I don't know, say you're a small company. How should the culture be different? Like in a big company, how much of what they're seeing Vivint solar and all these companies that are having a ton of success? What th what should they try and take from that? And I don't know, maybe what are some things that didn't work that you saw that companies were trying to take from these big cultures that were super successful?Speaker 3 (35:56):Oh my gosh. That's such a good question. Um, I think a big one was the way that you're spending your money to build your culture. So I think the two metrics that matter in culture are increasing your repor tension. How long are people staying? How well are they doing? And then the per rep average. So if my reps are producing two sales a month on average, can I get that to a three or four or higher? Okay. And, uh, and so I see companies, you know, especially sometimes I do my like competition training and people get all jacked up about getting into doing a competition and, um, the way you could spend $10,000 on a competition and have it be the best thing that's ever happened to your business, or you could do it and it could be a total flop. You might not get any extra sales.Speaker 3 (36:38):Yeah. So I think it's, um, figuring out how to spend your money, not just to like check off all the boxes of like, I've got the fancy things, I've got a competition where someone can like win a razor and all that kind of stuff like this high level stuff. Um, you can spend a lot less money, but gain some of the lessons from that, like, you know, motivating reps through a competition, for example, um, the way Vivian is going to handle a competition with, um, they're, you know, really flashy launch videos, really big flashy prizes, all of that stuff, you know, podcasts and video casts on like all of the people that won last year, bringing them on trash, talking like this whole thing. Um, there's a bootstrap version of that that I think can happen, um, for companies at a lower level, but like a lot of what goes into making an amazing competition can just be you hyping it up ahead of time as a manager, you knowing what the rules are and the prizes, and like letting your reps know that, um, a month in advance, maybe sometimes more letting them kind of prepare, you know, if I've got a four or five week competition coming up, um, I would launch it to my sales reps in enough time where they can move, um, obligations that they might have if someone's got, you know, I'll, I'll roll out my schedule at the beginning of the year.Speaker 3 (37:49):Most companies should do that so that their reps can kind of plan out for sure. Yeah. So if I know, like I know the main competitions I want to do, and then maybe I'll have like one or two months where it's a little bit light and offices can do their competitions. If I do that, that allows, uh, your sales reps to not have to sacrifice family time for work time. They can plan their family time around the times and the seasons where you're going to do like high level competitions. So literally just scheduling your competition's a little bit different, like that could double the production you get from one versus spending a crap ton of money on the prizes.Speaker 2 (38:23):Mm genius. I love that. Yeah. Cause most, yeah, you probably see that a lot, but like guys tomorrow we're doing a competition tournament tomorrow starts tomorrow, getSpeaker 3 (38:35):Ready. Yeah. And then like reps will go like a week without knowing their numbers in it. And they're like, Hey, what's the score? And you're like, crap. I keep forgetting to do that. And like, finally you do it. And you just like text the numbers into the group chat. Like it's not even on a graphic or anything. So, um, so yeah, like just hyping it ahead of time, setting up the rules, allowing everyone to clear their schedule, um, tracking and hyping up the numbers and what's happening during a competition, like in, as life-time, as you can to give them those updates. All of that generates that kind of competitive nature that you're looking to get out of your sales reps, that in and of itself is going to help them kind of break past their previous limits and perform way better during competitions. Um, but that was one thing I noticed at, at Vivian.Speaker 3 (39:17):I think this is a cool principle across the board. We did not make significantly more money because of the competitions we put into place, pretty big budgets for it. We would see a really big volume pop. Um, and then you'd see kind of this dip afterwards as everyone kind of relaxes. And you want to make sure that rise always kind of supersedes the dip that comes after, but even if it does, like the one thing we saw was no matter what happened at the end of the competition, the per rep average is kind of what went up. So we would see sales reps that previously had maybe had their best week of being four or five sales. Now they're doing 10 plus sales in a week and they didn't even realize that was possible for themselves. So reps are all setting this new personal record with themselves or a new personal record that they now have, you know, manager, the office just did 30 that month. Now they know it's possible. So you're kind of raising the limit in competitions to show everyone what they're capable of, which hopefully then you can kind of sustain that afterwards. And that's like, I think that's the target with competition. So how can I, what, what practices, or what way can I structure this competition in a way that's going to allow my sales reps to raise the personal limit they have on the number of sales they think they can do.Speaker 2 (40:26):Yeah. I love that. That's a massive, um, yeah, but no, it's just reminds me of, uh, my first company I was with, um, it seemed like every single competition we had, I had like some trips scheduled with my family or whatever. They would like schedule months in advance and they rolled it out like the next week or whatever. I'm like, all right, well, I'm not going to try that hard because I already know I have this like, scheduledSpeaker 3 (40:49):Exactly. That's so if you could like prevent that stuff and it changes everything.Speaker 2 (40:54):I don't know. So that's not, I think that's a huge takeaway. Um, so sweet. And so Alex, um, I know we don't have all day here, but the last thing I kind of wanted to ask, pick your brain about is just with recruiting. Um, you guys said you're, uh, you have a team of 110 reps or so right now at true power. Yep. Okay. And so you did a merger. How many reps did you have, like when you first started with that merger, has it stayed the same or have you built the team a lot since you like started the company or merged?Speaker 3 (41:23):Yeah, I mean, and I know you're kind of going through this too, uh, merging multiple cultures and systems and everything together, um, has probably been one of the most fun challenges I've had in the industry so far. Um, we're fortunate enough to have a lot of people putting their egos aside to combine leadership. You know, we've got an awesome team. Um, we started out, uh, probably trying to think how many sales reps we had. We probably had a hundred total, but active, I'd say it was probably close to like 60 or 70, um, reps that we had. And we've had some big new hire classes, but, you know, even coming from this is the area of door to drive, decided to become an expert in, um, still retention is tough. So we've kind of gone back and forth. You know, we've had big classes, we've lost some people we've changed our practices a lot. So, um, yeah, we've been able to, we've been able to grow quite a bit, but by far and away, the biggest thing that's made a difference, I think is establishing some better systems to get like our mid-level reps, um, understanding, expectations, getting support to become better and like figure out how they can kind of level up. We rolled out a mentor program, which I think is big. Um, so that is essentially, it's something Brandon I've used in the past with companiesSpeaker 2 (42:39):Legacy does too, right?Speaker 3 (42:41):Yes. Yeah. Similar. So essentially what we wanted to do was along with that statistic of let's get people to five or more sales within 60 days. Um, if you are just alone manager or you're a small company, you might have only one person that can get all of your new hires past that learning curve. Like it's just that one manager. Yeah. So, um, if that's what you're doing, you're kind of limited to only being able to bring on enough people where that person can actually truly give the amount of attention that they need to, to all of their new hires at one time to get them past the curve. So, um, rolling out something like the mentor program, essentially the mentor role as this new, uh, position in leadership where you're not quite a manager yet, but it's kind of the first step towards it.Speaker 3 (43:21):So, um, you can, as long as you're, you know, we've got some performance requirements, but as long as you're a good, uh, kind of conduit of our culture, you understand our processes well enough. Um, this person is now going to be mentor to a new hire coming in as a mentee. And their goal is to get that mentee to five sales in 60 days. Okay. Um, so we, we do like an incentive. If anyone gets to seven sales, we'll do a rookie trip for them. So they want to get their mentees to seven sales. And then we also incentivize our mentors for that. So, um, if we have mentees hitting that, they get to go on this trip as mentors get more and more of their reps through to those higher levels, we've kind of gameified it. So we've got like, you know, scoreboards and calls with just our mentors where we can kind of work a hundred percent on focusing on that new rep experience. So that's been like, you know, we, we knew that was, uh, needed to be a focus coming in. We had some big classes, we lost a bunch of people. So now we've really like doubled down on that for the fall. Yeah.Speaker 2 (44:17):That's awesome. And yeah, you mentioned you guys do like a bootcamp, right? So you're bringing in like a big, like, I guess a new class of people, almost like a university class or something. Right. I'd get them all trained a little bit. And how are you, uh, for you guys, what's your like, system on recruiting? How you guys recruiting now in yourSpeaker 3 (44:35):Good question? So, um, it's kind of twofold. Uh, Brandon Hall, my husband is our CEO and he's made his career around becoming an expert in recruiting. So, um, he's both working on personal recruiting culture within the business, but a big thing too, is how can you, how can you succeed at bringing in web applicants and, um, help them have the same experience you would if they were personal recruits? So we all know if we bring in a personal recruit, that person is way more likely to stay than a web applicant. A lot of that's just because of the ties they have in the business, the community, they feel like they have, like, they feel like they know someone that can support them, whether the person that recruited them as good at selling or not, it's just a person they can talk to if they need it.Speaker 3 (45:14):Right. Um, so just having some of those elements, so that's kind of why that's some of the reason we put the mentor program into place was like, you can bring on a ton of web applicants. Anyone can figure out how to crack the code on indeed and get enough resumes coming through. It's really a numbers game there. Um, but you know, there's plenty of tactics we do in our interviews to make sure people have their mindset shaped into. Um, I, I know what to expect. This is a very legitimate company. I don't want to let them down. A lot of times we'll go into, uh, people in our industry will go into interviews and you sound like you are recruiting for an MLM. It's just like, you're going to do so great, bro. Like, you're going to kill it. Like I know you're going to make over six figures this year.Speaker 3 (45:50):Like I can't wait to be there for it, blah, blah, blah. So you do that. And then someone's coming on board, like dang, like that guy would have hired probably anyone with a pulse. So let's see how this first day goes. So if you have someone with that mentality coming in versus holy crap, I'm so lucky to have this opportunity. I do not want to let this company down, like I'm going to come in here and kill it. Just that mentality going into bootcamp is totally different. So we definitely shape our interviews around people having that mentality, kind of coming out of it and into our bootcamp. And then we just make sure that we are providing the experience that they would get as if they were a personal recruit. So that's where they get their mentor. They meet that person before they come on board.Speaker 3 (46:28):Um, so, you know, first time they walk into a corelation room, they already know, at least that one person is going to come over and chat with them and sit with them and stuff. So it's just all those little things to help someone feel like they're, um, integrating into your team's culture quicker. If you have someone that's kind of out on an island because you don't have the time to help them as a manager, no one else can come in and shadow them. Like I think that, you know, that can be a big, uh, the first week is so important for new hires. If you are giving them like polos that are two sizes too big and having a stain on it, cause you take it from a rep that left and like, you don't have a badge prepared for them. And then you're like, Hey Frank, can you, uh, can you have this new guy shadow you? And he's like, no, dude, sorry. Like I was going to go do this, this and this. Isn't going to do it. And you're like, crap. Uh, well what about you? Can you shadow this guy? And everyone's like, no, man, sorry, I can't do it. Like now you're stuck with this reps that like, dude, like, how am I going to get trained here? So, uh, so it's just having those little things organized ahead of time. Can make such a big difference for your new hires.Speaker 2 (47:24):It's funny. That's what happensSpeaker 3 (47:26):All the time. Like, you know, when you, I mean, I, if you've ever had like a new hire come into your bootcamp, like wearing like a three-piece suit or anything, but I'd totally have that. And you're like, dude, that's my bad that I did not. I should have told you that you don't wear that to your first day, but it's moments like that where someone walks in and they're like, I'm in the wrong place. I don't know what I'm doing here. And it's like that mind, like that little mental story, they start to tell themselves if you can keep that from happening, keep them on the positive. Even with those little, little things, it makes such a big difference.Speaker 2 (47:53):Uh, no. Yeah. There's, it's funny. I've been with previous companies do where they bring in these indeed recruits and they're like, they had an interview and everything and they show up to the meet and they're like, oh wait, this is door knocking. We have to knock doors. That's like a, yeah, they don't take that in the interview. I go, no, I guess I'll come Che.Speaker 3 (48:11):Yeah. And it's such an art to talking about door knocking in interviews. Um, because you know, some companies like the mentality of, they'll just be like, yo, this is door to door. Are you cool with that? And then they'll scare away anyone that isn't okay with it. And then anyone that is like, perfect. I've weeded out the week kind of thing. Yeah. I think that mentality, you're losing a ton of people that could be open to it. Just because door to door kind of carries a negative connotation if you don't understand our industry. Um, but if you are talking through parts of the job where like, you know, we're super picky with who we bring on board and we care a lot about making sure this person's aligned with our culture and our business and what we're trying to accomplish here. And you know, you, and most of the rest of the team, you guys are going to spend a lot of your time outdoors.Speaker 3 (48:54):Uh, you're going to be out in neighborhoods because we need to make sure people are qualified for solar. So that means you need to see what their roof looks like, see what their house looks like, make sure they've got the right meter. There's all of these in-person elements to it. So you're going to be outside dealing with homeowners, kinda like that on a daily basis. So, you know, that being said, um, do you have any problems with like extreme weather or whatever you good being outside in the rain? And then P you basically just said, it's door to door. You're gonna be out in neighborhoods. You're talking to homeowners, you're in person, blah, blah, blah. You're qualifying them. Right. But you didn't say the phrase door to door to start the pitch. So then people are like, no, no, I'm totally cool with that. Like, oh, I love the heat.Speaker 3 (49:30):I love the cold. Like, whatever. They'll say these things to convince you, like, no, no, please hire me. Like, I'm still the, I wanna, I want to work with you. So they're convincing you to hire them in that instance. And then later on, like, as you, you can keep talking, you know, day in the life and get into how it store to door and talk about your culture. Now it's a little bit less of a blow, right? Like if you just come out and be like, Hey, this is a door to door position. Are you cool with that? You're going to weed out. A lot of people that would have said no in that instance, but could have said yes, if you framed it a little bit differently,Speaker 2 (49:58):It's almost like in California, how you can't really start at the door saying, I'm saying I'm selling solar doors that had like sneak your way around at first, get them to buy into that. They want to save money on energy and all that. And then the, how we do that as solar. Exactly. Similar thing. Well, that's awesome, Alex. No, some great ideas you've given us today. And for our, for our listeners kind of last question I wanted to ask you before we wrap up here, um, all, a lot of small companies, they don't have this role of someone like you. It's like super great at organizing. That's helping all put all these systems together and things like that. We didn't get one until pretty recently, actually in our company it's helped a ton. So how do you suggest people that's traditional door to door? Just like, I don't know, like manager, the sales reps a lot of times and then company owner. So what would you suggest to people that are, maybe they're struggling with all this management stuff and setting up the systems and they're hearing all these things right now and I go, dang, how do they bring someone on to implement all this, all these ideas Alex has given us all this, a fire she's spent and how do we implement these things? So what would you say to those companies that's want to like have help with getting someone that's more organized like that?Speaker 3 (51:09):Yeah. Good question. Um, I guess there's a couple ways you could do it depending on your circumstance. I'd say, um, you could bring in someone that either has experience on the doors and is just not doing well in your company. Similar, you know, I had the opportunity to, I was about to leave. I was able to take this opportunity instead. Um, you could pull someone in, you could even hire, I mean, a lot of this could be an hourly type of role, but like I would say the first, first position, which would totally pay for itself is bringing someone in to work on like new hire experience, help the recruiting process, flow into the onboarding, help that person get to their first sale. So, um, you could hire someone for that role and have that really be your focus. And then you will again have that person pay for themselves many times over.Speaker 3 (51:54):So then that new cashflow can kind of help you build out that little department if you want. Um, or I would kind of split it up amongst your management. So even if he didn't have anybody focusing on this system, um, and you just had, you know, a manager that was really focused on the interviewing process and the training, like boot camp type of training, and then you assigned yourself one or two mentors within your org that were going to help out with this new hire experience. I think that is really the most important. So you could, um, you know, I'd say first step, if you don't have any other leaders is identify people in your org that you would want to pull into a mentorship type of position. You don't need to give up any override or anything. This is just, they can be incentivized based on just getting a little portion of those first few sales, um, and kind of gamifying that. So I'd bring in your mentors and then I would start to implement some of the little systems, like a lot of this isn't super time-consuming, you're probably already doing interviews. You might just need to change the way you're interviewing. You are probably already doing a bootcamp and already trying to get them out to shadow. You just could tweak the way that you're running that system a little bit. So you're spending the same amount of time. You're just doing everything a little bit better. Yeah.Speaker 2 (52:58):Yeah. It's huge. So yeah, for all our listeners definitely consider bringing on someone like that. Um, if you're like a lot of company owners, um, if you're like myself, a lot of us are super disorganized and we need someone like Alex, I wish we could just clone Alex like 50 times and send her to every company, but you can't so listen to this podcast and then get someone to help you with that, I think is a huge key to growing and, uh, retention like Alex was talking about. So Alex, before we say goodbye here, where can people connect with you? And, um, I dunno, say what's up and thank you for coming on the

Mint Arrow Messages
Cameron Treu on ADHD Awareness and Understanding

Mint Arrow Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 52:56


Justin Timberlake. Michael Phelps. Ty Pennington. Adam Levine. Richard Branson. Simone Biles. Channing Tatum. Jim Carrey. Do you know what all of these well known celebrities and Olympic athletes have in common? They all have ADHD. But have you ever sat down and talked to someone who has ADHD about what life is like for them? Have you ever had the chance to understand what being in their head is like day to day? And maybe more importantly, if you do know someone who has ADHD or you suspect might have it, do you know what to do to support them? Today I'm interviewing my friend Cameron Treu, the owner and pit master of Utah's best barbecue Bam Bam's, co-host of the Nitty Gritty Podcast, father, husband, and sports fanatic. I've never known anyone personally who would openly talk about their condition of ADHD and what it's like for them, so I'm very grateful for Cam and his willingness to share his story, perspective, and advice to those struggling with ADHD. Today's episode is brought to you by Better Help counseling services. Join over one million people who have taken charge of their mental health. Go to betterhelp.com/mintarrow and get 10% off your first month of counseling.   Time Stamps: [01:07] - Cameron Treu tells his story of starting a new life in BBQ, later becoming a Pit Master.  [03:30] - Once Cameron made up his mind to pursue BBQ, he set his focus on making the most of his interest. Here's how that led to Bam Bam's BBQ.  [05:32] - Cameron recalls the interaction that allowed him to be the mentee of a top chef. [07:27] - Cameron's story with John Louis proves a few lessons in making genuine connections in the industry. [09:52] - Listen to Cameron express his thoughts on ADHD, childhood, and building self-awareness around how he operates as a person. [12:33] - Cameron describes the first time taking Adderall and talks about the effects for individuals with ADHD. [15:29] - Society's relationship with modern technology increases ADHD symptoms shown in neuro-typical individuals. [17:15] - Dealing with ADHD can expose individuals to these secondary physiological and psychological impacts. [19:55] - Cameron explains the unseen perspective of combating external pressure and opinions towards ADHD. [21:15] - How can someone be supportive of an individual dealing with ADHD? Cameron shares his insight. [23:41] - Corinne and Cameron talk about being mindful of words related to nuanced experiences, especially when being used casually. [25:45] - Having a different focus or attention is not the fault of an individual with ADHD. [28:42] - Cameron talks about learning to love his brain. What is it like to balance the internal experience of ADHD? [30:44] - Is there a positive impact that can come from involving spirituality in the journey of dealing with ADHD? [33:29] - Cameron shares this analogy of what happens when people separate from spirituality. How can someone get back on track? [36:24] - Cameron encourages addressing ADHD early, like in childhood, to reduce possible health threats. [38:18] - What are some approaches Cameron uses to live his active life? He talks about the trials and errors of figuring things out. [40:41] - Cameron discusses mind hacks related to hand-eye coordination and dopamine for ADHD. [42:41] - If you deal with ADHD, here are the things that Cameron feels that are really important in the journey. [45:18] - Dealing with ADHD is possible, and it can also still have its ups and down. [47:45] - “Love one another.” [50:18] - Corinne and Cameron talk about being BYU fans, Utah fans, and connecting with people.   Supporting Resources: The Nitty Gritty Podcast @bambamsbbq  @nittygrittyshow

Good Dudes Grow
EP 43: Jorge Moral — How CBD Improved My Sleep Hygiene As a First Responder

Good Dudes Grow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 24:48


Jorge Moral, a veteran firefighter for the past 30 years, used to think he had a drinking problem. It's something many firefighters struggle with — turning to the bottle in response to on-the-job stress and, in more extreme cases, trauma and PTSD. Only for Jorge, he realized it wasn't actually a drinking problem he had. It was a sleeping problem.   “I was using alcohol to try to go to bed, because I went two or three years of just taking naps,” he says. “I would take a nap at night, maybe a couple of hours, and that's it.”    Ultimately, Jorge decided to try CBD to treat his insomnia — and he's never looked back. On this episode of Good Dudes Grow, Gary and Jorge talk about the ways CBD has helped him with his recovery as a first responder, the coping mechanisms it's allowed him to let go of (including Adderall), and why he sees CBD as a piece of the puzzle (but not the entire answer).   What You'll Learn: The role CBD played in his recovery when Jorge (drunkenly, at a wedding) decided to donate his kidney What else he's turned to, besides CBD, to improve his sleep hygiene Why it's important that more first responders have stigma-free access to CBD and THC And much more!   Favorite Quote:   “CBD is not the answer to everything, but it's a tool to get you to the answer.” — Jorge Moral   Connect with Jorge:    Facebook   Instagram   How to Get Involved:   Gary Roberts is the founder and CEO of Pure Body Zen, a company based around creating and selling high-quality CBD products that work to heal mind and body alike. Gary considers hemp-based medicine a calling, and his organization, along with the world-class team that runs it, reflects his passion.   You can learn more about Pure Body Zen on their site, on LinkedIn and on Instagram.   If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to visit the show on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating and review! We love hearing from you!

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC180 Robb Kelly - His Recovery Story and How to Heal Root Causes of Addiction

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 54:00


Arlina Allen 0:13 Dr. Rob Kelly, thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you, Andy for asking. Awesome. Looking forward to this. Hey, before we get started, I saw a picture of you with an English bulldog. Was that yours? Unknown Speaker 0:25 Yes, I have three English Bulldogs we strive for, but we had to rehome one because of fights. Oh, but I have Mackenzie, Who's the girl and two boys. Arlina Allen 0:34 And so sweet. So I've had four total but right now I have just one. Yeah, an English bulldog. His name is Teddy. He's the podcast mascot. You will occasionally hear him snoring in the background. Unknown Speaker 0:47 Always. I've got three in the office today cuz doing other things downstairs. But yeah, I hope they don't balk or anything. Otherwise, we're in trouble. It's Arlina Allen 0:56 fine. It's fine. This is not CNN. Be good. But my audience is all about sobriety and finding solutions. And you are the solution guy. I saw you on the doctors and did my research and saw on your on your website that you talk about permanent recovery. And that's what everybody wants. Everybody wants these people who've just been through the wringer of people who want to stop and cannot. Those are our people. Right and so I can't wait to hear what you have to say about all that. But like I said, before we jump in we do this something called the lightning round. So I'm just gonna pepper you with it's never usually very fast. But I'm I'm so curious. What were some of your favorite books when you got sober? Unknown Speaker 1:51 When I got sober? Well, obviously the big book I read often, but I kind of well I wrote about myself. So that's obviously the best ever. But just real life, I love biographies. I love to see how other people live. And now other people have overcome not not a big believer in you know, these get get well or get fit box that are out there. I just think that it's all about the mind. on trade with the mind. Yeah, I Arlina Allen 2:21 couldn't agree more. Yeah, I'll be talking to Dr. Anne Lemke. She wrote that book that just was released dopamine nation, so I'm super excited about that. And also, never enough. Another neuroscientist. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So I'm all about it. Awesome. What about do you have like a favorite go to mantra, he kind of said it this morning. When I asked I Unknown Speaker 2:44 did I did. I always use that it's dreaming. I'm living the dream instead of dreaming a living is and it came to me. When I was homeless, passing a nice house with the children mum and dad. Having Christmas lunch. I used to dream of that. I used to dream of living that little dream. And I went I did. It just came to me one day, and it's been my mantra ever since. Arlina Allen 3:08 Yeah, we do have a tendency to spend a lot of time in fantasy land. One more. Yeah. And that throws Unknown Speaker 3:14 even afterwards, if I'm honest. Um, do you have a regular self care routine that you practice for yourself? I do every single day when I get up. First thing I want to do is I want to train my subconscious brain. So I go to the mirror. I love myself in the eyes. And I say I love you 10 times. I don't say any other affirmation just I love you. Because I used to have a big problem with that. So I'm kind of stored in the subconscious brain. So when it comes to like decision making, that's going to pop over to the prefrontal cortex, and I'm gonna go you know, something, I love myself today. I deserve this. So yeah, that's what I do. And then I write out five things, I'm going to accomplish that day. And, and the idea behind that is if I if I, if I complete all five, I've taken a step forward in life. If I only complete three or four, I've taken a step back in life. Arlina Allen 4:07 Oh, interesting account. You know, what I heard recently is accountability. Empathy without accountability reinforces the victim mentality. Yes. I like that. I like the I like that accountability piece that you have for yourself. I have a feeling you're kind of a hard ass and I can't wait to talk to you about that. But I have one more question. I like I like to work question. What's the one thing you wish you knew when you first got sober? It's gonna be okay. That's gonna be my life's gonna be amazing. You're like this amazing? He says, um, and what do you do for fun? Unknown Speaker 4:44 I have a music where am I used to be a musician when I was young. So I was a onstage musician and then I was a played at Abbey Road for about three or four years. I played with elton john Queen David Bowie. So I have a music room at home or with a full fall everything Got everything and you can imagine so I go in there about once every couple of days and I may play drums or guitar I might play keyboard I might write songs I might do a live YouTube. So that's what I do and of course walking my three English Bulldogs is also great Arlina Allen 5:16 use I noticed that you have some big guns Do you consider exercise fun? Unknown Speaker 5:21 Yes of course. Yeah, I I have what's called a mirror in the house. We also have a bike. A well known bike power. Arlina Allen 5:28 The mirror the exercise mirror thing? Yeah. Oh, you like that? I'm, I'm I know. Phenomenal. You can do everything on that. Yeah. And you can make yourself look beautiful. Yes. If you really squint for me, I'm like, Oh, yeah. Can I just I don't want to gloss over the fact that you mentioned that you play with elton john and Queen. fucking amazing. Unknown Speaker 5:49 Right on, right. That is Arlina Allen 5:52 amazing. He just kind of like threw that out there very casually. That's pretty incredible. Unknown Speaker 5:57 Yeah, why? It's what paid for courage college, I was a session musician. I grew up on a unmade projects. So I wasn't ever going anywhere, really. But I was wanting to better so I auditioned after playing another recording studio sessions and then added seven auditions and got the job. And I was only 16 at the time against perfect. I know. But I had this confident. Well, I said my mom used to tell me I used to walk around with a guitar around my neck and wouldn't even check it out of both. I was just because I'm musical family. I was on stage at nine. Family. So yeah, so awesome. Everyone asked the same thing. Who's the worst person you've played with? Regarding hanging around? Who's the best, worst person to elton john. Once he gets into that mood, his heart was Arlina Allen 6:40 out before he got sober after? Unknown Speaker 6:43 Yes, I think before it would be 79 around the area. And the best would be Freddie Mercury. We spent hours and hours late into the night chatting about philosophy and how it can change the world. So yeah, I got this Arlina Allen 6:58 sense from Freddie Mercury that he'd be really funny. Unknown Speaker 7:01 Oh, yeah, he is. He's always kind of switched on. You never find him in a bad mood. He's always smiling. He used to call me Robbie, darling. Unknown Speaker 7:10 What else would he call you? Right? Unknown Speaker 7:14 Awesome, guys. Arlina Allen 7:15 It's amazing that he is truly truly unique. That's very cool. Okay, well, that's it for my silly lightning round questions. I always like to provide like Book Resources and things like that and sort of set the stage for mindset. But really, what I, what you and I think both care about is helping other people and to help other people I do I actually practice hypnotherapy. So when you talk about subconscious mind, neuroscience and all that stuff, what we're talking about is root cause, right? Because we're You and I are dealing with people that have chronic, persistent, pervasive conditioning from childhood. I read somewhere in your stuff that root causes are abandonment, fear and shame. Can you tell me a little bit about why those things lead us to want to medicate with drugs and alcohol? And really, mostly, what is your process to help treat that pervasive consist consistent conditioning? Unknown Speaker 8:16 Well, we have to look, there's a couple of things you need to look out before again, that conversation and that is the alcoholic brain, which is a predisposition. We're born this way. So rather drink, not like drug taking. alcoholism is different. So we look at that brain, for instance, is what I study. And many people often ask me, what's the gateway drug? Rob? It's obviously marijuana. And my answer is always the same. It's trauma. That's the gateway drug. So I'm born this way. I have a remapped neural pathways at birth because you have the alcoholic brain, which wants to self sabotage any opportunity it can. So remapped and then trauma. Now when I'd say trauma, people think, Oh, well, I've never been in a car crash or, you know, it's no witness to murder or right. But drama could be in the house. So for instance, by my mom watching, hypothetically, one day and me and my brothers stood on the table, my brother's a normie. And my mom says to my brother, because this is what she said, and this is what she he hears, Paul, down on that table. You stupid idiot. Get down, and he jumps off and he laughs What I hear same sentence said to me in the same voice, get out of that chair, you stupid idiot. So my brain and subconscious brain and central nervous system is jacked up for a start. And all that wording, everything we hear, and we see is always stored in the subconscious brain every thing we do, and that's why the latest science that I do regarding the brain is helpful into the subconscious brain. So I'm automatically abandoned because of the way I hear and see things. So my dad used to work a lot of hours were a working class family. So I have hardly seen my dad there. abandonment issues straight away, which we don't think or abandonment issues. My dad's doing the best he can, you know? Oh, don't be silly, Robert, you can't go to college like your brother. Oh my goodness that does more harm than you could ever imagine. But my subconscious brain loves that stuff. Arlina Allen 10:17 Why did she say Why did she say you can't Don't be silly, you can't go to college, it was Unknown Speaker 10:22 just something my mom said, you know, it's not like my brother, when it's like, we can't go to college, we just don't do that. See, I was supposed to grow up, just like my parents. By the time I was 18, married by the time I was 19, have a baby or to have a normal nine to five working manual job and go to the pub every night and the way home. That was it from generations to generations. Because you can see that pattern of alcoholism and mindset going back through my family, that that's what they settled for. Now, I was different, I didn't want to settle for that. So going back to the abandonment, the alcoholic brain and central nervous system. And the whole aura is always felt as if we don't fit in. So I never fit in anywhere. So there's the abandonment, again, the shame of where I grew up. I grew up on the project counselor stage, all my friends I went to school with even though it was just a normal school, they lived on a private estates, which parents had a mortgage, we pay rent, I was so embarrassed about I was so shameful. And of course, when my drinking took over at the age of nine, I started but it took over about 2526 there was the shame of that. So what we do is we have to go back or we call is a scene of the crime. And we have to start clearing that stuff up. And the worst thing somebody can say to me is Oh, yeah, I've kind of worked on that myself. If you worked on that yourself, you won't be relaxing, first of all, and you won't be going through girlfriend's chain every week, you know, you're having, we have to really go back and look exactly what you do and repair that damage done in the past and usually by Kagan's Arlina Allen 11:57 so when you say go back to the past and repair the damage, that is the crux of the treatment, right? Unknown Speaker 12:04 Yes. Yes. Because you have to go back and look, you know, I mean, many people come in, they go, Okay, well, I drink him out. I don't do this. They do that. Well, anything, any trauma. Now. Everything's good. And when we go back and really pinpoint, they forget to tell me about the molestation from the father or the uncle or the priest. They forgot to tell me a bit homosexual actually did when he was nine or 10. They forgot to tell me about how the mum used to smack them across the face because their house wasn't tidy when they come home. So they kind of think well, mum and dad did the best now. I'm not having that. hating on people say that. Well, they did the best they could now, you know, I used to walk to school with holes in my socks, and cardboard in my shoes. Because I hold in my shoes. Walking on the snow to Mars. I had to watch work every day because my mom couldn't afford my socks and shoes. Now my mom could afford and my dad to go to the bar every Friday and Saturday night. So I had one person sat down once and he said this. He said wrong. You really upset about them shoes. And I said yeah, but my mom dad couldn't afford it. And he said this to me that changed my life. He says when your mom went to the bars every Friday, Saturday and Sunday night, did she have holes in her socks? And I was like, when he hit me I had more trauma and I could ever imagine growing up, you know, they will drop me with a friend. But when I got to the friend, the man and the woman they would say okay, we ever we have a naked night tonight. So everyone gets naked. I didn't tell my mom that because I thought it was natural. Arlina Allen 13:36 Yeah, yeah. That everybody in the house got naked. Unknown Speaker 13:40 Yeah, but you know, all the kids and the mom and dad. And that's just a Wait, why. So I went along. I never even mentioned it because I thought it was the norm. You see my I have a big thing. And it's this, anything less than nurturing as a child, his child abuse, especially what find out more about the brain and the central nervous system. I can never get a girlfriend, Why do I always leave? Why is it Why did I marry my dad? Well, it's like, you have to understand why we do these things. There's a pattern to our behavior. And if and if you're happy doing that pattern and living the way you're living great, but if you want to change your life, then you need to go back and clear this stuff up and change neural pathways from self sabotage to self care. Because at the moment, or when I was born up until about 28 when I got sober. I had more self sabotage. And then I did self care. So I start really good. Oh, I would look so good. I mean, when I was when I went to work, I do anything girlfriend, but after a month or two, it's self sabotage. If you feel like this. Oh my god, it's it's nine o'clock. Rob. You're not supposed to start till 10 and then six rather you're going home. I'll stay till seven A month later, Where the hell is Rob It's one o'clock. That's all my life has been like that. Because I self sabotage over any considerable period with a mindset like that. Arlina Allen 14:59 Right? It's an internal In a mindset of I don't really truly deserve this Unknown Speaker 15:04 100 and million percent and the other one is self dialog I can I can sell stuff so you don't have to say anything to me. I dropped a pat on the floor and I go What a stupid idiot when I'm picking it up loves that stuff so when I go for that car that job that girl that house whatever the subconscious brain goes, You stupid idiot. What are you doing here? You can't do this Did you think you are and I still get that today when I go on when I do speaking of setting the wing some town I'm thinking oh my god, they don't want what I've got nothing to offer. Oh my god, oh my god, and a panic. And then God taking a walk over and I'm a big spiritual guy now used to hate that word garden. Oh, we're all happy going to church. I used to hate that. Arlina Allen 15:47 Did you go to church growing up? Unknown Speaker 15:48 I did. I was a quiet I was a quiet boy I was I was a chorister, as they call it in the Protestant church had a great voice and my but my headmaster sexually abused me. One of the guys that you know, and I blame my mom. My mom knew about this. Arlina Allen 16:06 That he was like that and sent you anyway. Unknown Speaker 16:09 It was nothing directly talked about. But I remember being picked up. There's a there's a group out there of saying there's a cola, Vienna Boys Choir, and we should delete it. Well, my headmaster said well, who was also the the teacher of the music and the church, said to my mom, we have Robert an audition for the Vienna Boys Choir in Chester, which is 70 miles away for LA. He took me there and the rest was blurred. We never went to any audition. I come home feeling sick. Mom said I was silent for about three months. Yeah, I was concerned if and I was shocked. I don't remember the incident. But put two and two together. You know, I don't know of any audition. So it's a ruse. And then there was the neighbor across the road. That was about 1415. And he was he was married. But he was he was gay. And we go to the sauna together because I was into fitness and bodybuilding at the time. And he would try to MLS me and do things. And it was awkward. And no one made it into fun, but many years later, and I said oh you everyone needs to go to sauna. I said, Oh yeah, with the gay guy. And I looked at them. And I said, How'd you know? Now everyone knows about him? And I didn't say Arlina but I wanted to say why the fuck? Did you just let me go through five years of my life with this guy knowing quite well, what he's capable of doing. And he really kind of set me and not against my parents. But I'm thinking you know, the best he could is not good enough for me. Arlina Allen 17:38 I don't know I heard that at a meeting one time this guy because you do hear that a lot and I think it's a way it's a sort of like spiritual bypassing like you have to go through the pain first and do the processing metabolize the pain Ababa. And sometimes that bought they did the best they could offers a little bit of peace. But if you don't do the work first, it's just spiritual bypassing and you're just putting a bandaid over a pile of shit. Right? Exactly. This guy stood up at a meeting one day and he like, pounded the podium. He goes it wasn't good enough. Yes, it wasn't. And I was like, Thank you finally somebody said Unknown Speaker 18:18 you say the truth exists. And that's and that's what's missing. One of the things that I came to America because I wasn't known or famous or anything back then is I wanted to to have a platform where I could speak my mind. I don't report to anybody you know if I say the things that other people are thinking or wish they could say because it isn't good enough. You drop the fucking bar mom and dad own it you know get get oh well that's just the way that my dad never spoke to me. You know, he couldn't give him a gift he was one of them gave very embarrassed what it was just the way he was brought bullshit. Change it I changed it you know I lost my kids and all that but now I've got in touch with one of our I've changed it you know? Just to what No, it's not I'm not having that. You know, Arlina Allen 19:00 what's important about owning it in your mind like when when you're when you tell somebody you know hey, it wasn't good enough and we want them to own it. Is it the validation is it a standing up for ourselves? What is it about owning it that is so important Unknown Speaker 19:18 well first of all when I when I do that it's it's telling the truth it's out in the truth is that there are some there are some guys going up now around the world that don't even think the Holocaust happened. It's that crazy. Don't want people to get into that. It's like less reminders who dropped the ball and who didn't you know, and I like I like given information that you know people go oh shouldn't be talking about that. You know, first of all the alcoholism. Yes, we should. And I'm blatant when farmers comment on little Johnny's you know his his drinking every day like what he's gonna die. Whoa, you can't say that. Yours. Why? Why can I not speak the truth? Truth tell him for me is powerful. Yes, really is power. And I like to I like to. First of all, I have this order that attracts people when I speak. And that was a gift. I used to be on it, huh? Yeah, yeah. Now I say louder, say stronger, say proud. And people listen. And I love the fact that let's not keep it hidden away. Bring it out because alcoholics used to be until two, three years ago, where the gay community was 30 years ago, is that we don't talk about that. We don't really we know it goes on. But hey, you know, I always think I know right? But Arlina Allen 20:33 okay, here's, here's this Sorry to interrupt you. But here's the thing. It's okay for you to get drunk and show your ass in public. Yeah, but God forbid you tell people I don't drink anymore. I just don't like black now. I don't like waking up. And the worst thing in Unknown Speaker 20:47 the world is like, I heard this guy tell the joke when she was like, I went to the bar. And the guy said to me, do you want to drink and he says no one alcoholic? And he said what? He said, I'm sorry. I'm a I'm a serial killer. Thank God for that. scenario, when I'm out there just doing it. You know, it's Arlina Allen 21:06 so crazy to me that people are so like, and people still like that are in recovery. And listen, I don't I don't come out with like, I'm an alcoholic. I'm just like, yeah, don't do that. It just depends on the audience. It really depends on you have to you have to know your audience. Like at work I used to when I was in corporate, I would just be like, yeah, just not drinking want to get up early. Want to be fresh. Unknown Speaker 21:28 Yes. But I'm the last 10 years have been with people who are getting back in shape. And I've worked with a lot of a list footballers and stuff like that. And the fitness now is about getting back in shape, which covers for those people, I tell them the truth. You know, when they come in with a table, or you want a drink, and I was drinking, by the way to go do and drink, I'll just have cold coke. You're a big guy, you know, what you want to drink. Especially if it's a woman something it's like, I just have a little whiskey and like if I had a whiskey, first of all, I'm going to try to rape you. Or take you on in front of my wife. And then we're going to start fighting anybody who disagrees with me. And then I'm not going to actually get you on because I'll be arrested. What? That's what happens when I drink so I'll just have a coke. Yes, sir. And then walk away Arlina Allen 22:14 from coke coming out. One time I made the mistake and tell this guy at work. Because I go oh, I don't drink and he goes How come and I tend to break out naked. And he was off to drinks place. Oh, wrong, wrong thing to say. Break out in handcuffs. How about that? I'm allergic. Yeah, nobody scared of me fighting. I'm like five, three. That's awesome. But okay, so you know what I wanted to ask you? I did. I saw a lot of your videos and things like that. And you have this very strong personality kind of in your face thing. And there. There are some people that that that that really respond like they respond to that people who are in denial, people who just need that. I think people crave that level of accountability. People want to know where the boundaries are, so they can feel safe. But I don't think it works for everyone. How do you know who that works for I you know, since you are able to adapt to every different kind of alcoholic? I think that's part of the gift the chameleon thing, right? I'm sure you have that too. You have learned to turn that into an asset. How do you read someone to know whether the in your face kind of style works or the gentle nurturing works? Unknown Speaker 23:37 So usually the firt the first indication is where they contacted us. It's like, well, I heard this podcast and oh, my God, I love Dr. Rob cannon, that's the first one he needs in his face. And then you got a parent's recall about this 18 year old girl is second too much heroin. And you know, you need a different approach to that. So and then they need to take an assessment, one of the reasons why we have a 97% success rate, over 20 odd years, 30 years and 7000 patients is because of the assessment. So I find out real quick whether you whether you really want to do this deal. So when when we will not take anybody's money if we can't guarantee that they can recover. So the assessment kind of puts everything into place for me. And you know, most people want what I give, but there are so I have a psychotherapist that works with four girls of sorry, three girls and one guy that needs a soft approach. And that's great. We'll do that. Okay. No, but that Arlina Allen 24:35 be assessment that so you You must turn away a lot of people who don't really want it. Unknown Speaker 24:41 Yes. And that's what people can't understand, especially our so called treatment friends out there who keep checking the same person back time and time again for 30,000 a month is like I won't do that. Well, how do you survive? Well, we took almost a million dollars this year. How much did you take by being honest and straight with people because now we get to get be known like that is if you can't pass, I don't care how much money you've got. We've been offered blank checks, literally blank checks by billionaires and say fill it on yours. Unknown Speaker 25:11 Yes, they're saying, Unknown Speaker 25:12 My child is my child. I'll give you a blank check. You can do anything. You can buy your house, you can take a million you do. I'm the guy that turned down Britney Spears for a million dollars back in Dallas in the day because she came in she was drunk. She was three hours late. And she was a mess. So I said, No, I'm not doing it. Jamie at that girl bunnies are please Rob, please robbed. And the bodyguard often said, You're not leaving until you see her. So I'll put him in his place. And then two days later, she shaved all my hair off. So I won't do that. I can't lock in a parent's face and say, Hey, I'm really sorry. But she didn't want to know, I don't believe in that. If you get somebody with you, one on one, we do one hour a day for 90 days, you can change the way they think, per an Arlina Allen 25:55 hour a day for 90 days. What do you do in that hour? Unknown Speaker 25:58 Well, five days with me, and I go back and change neural pathways. And I change belief and I change behavior. And we build a future for them. So if they need a job, we'll get them on. If they need to start their own business, we'll build them a website, all this great stuff, my psychotherapist will go back to the scenes of the crime. He's specialize in childhood trauma, my number one coach, which is also my daughter, which we'll get into later, and Manchester office in England about a year ago. And she is the family, people because we believe if somebody calls, who wants help in a house, and this him, his wife and two children over the age of 16, all of them need to be in the program. We will take you on say, well, let's just be that sick. Now the house is sick, first of all, and the wife probably enabling, and she's going through some stuff, and she's probably mad or nervous breakdown. So either you all come on, or we don't see you as all Arlina Allen 26:54 that brilliant. Unknown Speaker 26:56 What do you think, you know, if you can imagine a house, let's be let's say speak Japanese. And we to take them out of the house and stick them in our houses, let's speak English, because we have a different language for recovery. So he speaks English, Japanese how still speaking Japanese. So we take the guy we're putting back into the Japanese speaking house, what's going to happen is going to start speaking Japanese. And that's one of the problems with recovery, you don't understand the family dynamic dynamics around the alcoholic, the whole family's sick and we need to heal the whole family. So we find that very unnecessarily intense work with the family dimension, the family unit. And of course, the alcoholic and the desperate wife, you know, terrible when we leave the wives alone or the husband's whoever the drinker is or the user. And we forget all about it. Because they've got the abandonment, they've got the shame, they've got the remorse they've got I always say, you know, sort of wives and husbands or partners or alcoholics or addicts, the PTSD that you have, because you have it, if you will, every one is no different from the PTSD from someone coming home from war. Now, I I love our soldiers, I'm an American citizen, I love them to bits, but just talk about the brain guys, because both of them never know it's going to be the last day, both of them never, no one's going to kick off. Both of them never know that you're not going to walk on eggshells today. It's the same thing. So the brain doesn't know the difference between war and war in the household. That's another thing that people don't understand. So the wife is going to be okay. Now she won't, you know, she will, you know, either commit suicide or do a runner or assist the alcoholic start drinking again, because she can't stand this new person that's come out. So it's really complex when when we talk about fixing, you know, it really is. And that's what we've done. We've spent 20 odd years, I do the latest brain science, I do brain spotting. What's brain spotting brain spot is a new development, that was only three people in the country or the world right now it can do it. Because it's not even, they haven't even bought a training course for it. But brain spotting is a technique that goes into the pupil and to the subconscious brain. It's a bit like a DMR. But it's it's a little different. So we're talking to the subconscious brain. And it's all about eye movement and the flicker in one eye. And then we stay with that flicker in that one eye and we find out what's caused that. And so Arlina Allen 29:17 where are they? I can see I can I see where you're going with this. So when you say that you see the eye flicker that's in the indicate and can't speak this morning. That's an indication that there is a traumatic memory there. Yes. And so you have them you see like what's happening now? Yes, that kind of thing. And the Unknown Speaker 29:36 first response, I know it's nothing, but we hold it there. We hold it. And they've got a look at the pan. And that may take five hours. It might take five minutes, but I'm staying there and all of a sudden they go Yeah, yeah. When you start talking about the traumatic event, it's the most powerful thing I've ever seen. Arlina Allen 29:56 So that's so this is what's been coming up for me lately. is there's the traumatic events like EMDR, like you mentioned, the eye movement desensitization reprocessing or reprogramming. And then there's but what do you do with the people who have the consistent pervasive trauma day in and day out? Like I was talking to a gal who had a mother who was a heroin addict, and she would hear her mother on the phone saying, we don't have enough, I need money, I need to feed my kids. Like she was using her kids as a scapegoat. And she was using her kids to get money. And but and there were times when she didn't have food. So today, she hoards food, and she has a weight issue. Right? It's and so you know, we were going to do some EMDR, or some, you know, hypnosis on that. So she goes, but it's not one situation, it's pervasive. How do you treat that pervasive, repetitive conditioning like that mental conditioning? Unknown Speaker 30:54 So we use the brain spotting, obviously, we also use a technique, which is called somatic experience, which is se people call it se. So we go back and we look at the central nervous system, and why is this being beat? Why is this happening? What's causing it, then we go into the brain, and we look at what's been happening in the past. So now we're using NLP neuro linguistic programming. So we're watching the behavior or watching the brain change and watching the trauma in the past, any patient or constantly, first of all needs to feel safe, we're getting in a safe place. And we go through that through the NLP or the SE. And we find out so then three techniques together, as as well as building confidence in the patient, that you're your own person, you know, and, unfortunately, we're going to go back, and we're going to pick them to pieces, the scene of the crime, as we call it, and then bring you forward through for the trauma through the behavior through the reaction that you have through the fear, but you haven't we walk them through bit by bit until they have clear conscience. And this takes time to deal with that in mind, Arlina Allen 32:02 yeah. Okay. So you create the safe space, you build confidence, and then bring them through those traumatic experiences with the button. So that feeling of safety and confidence overrides? Yes. Fear. Oh, 100%. That's what is the rewiring of the brain? Unknown Speaker 32:23 Yes, it's really it's resetting your pathways is what it is. Yeah. And then, and then once we've reset your pathways, and get them excited about life, the neurons start firing and get as excited. Every time we say certain things like thank you to somebody, dopamine is released into the brain, we use that a lot, you have to compliment three people every day. So it's a new technique that we have been doing for so many years, that used to call it out the box, they still call it out the box. But with the percentage rates that was on a success we had, we just really need to start looking at alternative ways to go back and fix this permanently. We don't need to go to for medication straight away. Because when we do, or, Arlina Allen 33:03 I'm sorry, go ahead and finish. Unknown Speaker 33:06 Thoughts about drugs, especially heroin addicts. 99.9% of heroin addicts started in the doctor's office, just because the doctor says it so it doesn't make it right. Or doesn't make it true. Yeah, and one of my big deals at the moment is fight against your doctor questioning why how when, what's going on? Why do I need to take this what damage is gonna do to what's the long term effect, but we don't we just go to doctors who are getting backhanders from somewhere, because the latest medication like vyvanse is out. And all of a sudden, it's the number one pill, you couldn't get it over here in Texas, you have to wait a week for vyvanse so popular he was someone who's getting something for doing that. What is five ounce vyvanse is a bit like it's it's amphetamine salts, it's it's a bit like Adderall. It's a different name on it. So when we're feeding our kids, amphetamine salts, speed is what we're giving our kids for attention deficit, when I was a kid, attention deficit was a slap across the head and say, concentrate. But there's a whole new story on that, where we go with that I can't get into it now. Because there's a lot more to explain about that. But that's that's what we do with people, you know, and we build them up and we create a life worth living. And we'll go to any lengths to do it and the length now, so doing as we have to, Arlina Allen 34:23 yeah, let me ask you, there's a lot of talk about I really don't have any judgment about about how people get sober and I understand that there's, you know, harm reduction is a thing. Yes, right. Like I get that and but I'm always I don't have enough information to make an informed decision about like the brain and the neural pathways and because while I think it's important for you know, people are smoking weed to get off heroin and that keeps them alive. God bless you. Do what you got to do. My concern is that like If the emotional and mental evolution or progress ends there, Do you have feelings about I'm sure you have feelings or opinions about like, why is harm reduction? not meant to be a permanent thing? Like how, like when I talk to people like that, how can we move them? Yes, I'm glad you're alive. If that's what's keeping you alive, I don't even have an opinion. But what about, what about one day stopping that? What about healing your brain and your dopamine reward system so that you no longer have to do that you can have the benefits of living a full life. Yeah, because I've heard of people on Suboxone for years, that's not the idea, you know, is much harder to come off Suboxone is heroin as a fact. So what we have to do is, is down step and grade and down and then taper off gradually and have an end date for that. So let's say the end date is two months or three months, we need to we need to keep heading towards that. And eventually as the brain starts to weaken up, and the central nervous system starts to activate supposed to do, and the feelings start coming back. And you realize that life is worth living and so much you've missed out on, eventually the end date will happen, and then be able to come off successfully. So depending on how far down how bad the psychosis is, how bad the day has been damaged, you cannot just stop and say, Okay, my fault drugs now, that's the worst thing in the world you can do, right best thing in the world you can do is seek doctor's help, come down and get your doctor to bring you down. Same with alcohol. I'm wherever they call me all the time, while he's drunk. Uh, you know, he's in a bad state of head. Now the bottles, don't hide the bottles, make him drink until he gets to detox. And many people are just ignorant about these because lack of now, therefore, his lack of information, though, we've been stuck in a closet for so long that you know, and that's one of the things that you want to do. Listen, when I was homeless people used to spit on me on the floor. I used to wake up and kids used to throw diapers on me that will fall. You know, having a lie. I woke up one morning, I was covered in this stuff. And I just I'm angry at that. And I'm really happy that I'm in a great place to do that today. So you know, I'm really strong on let's get a solution, a permanent solution for this minutes lotion, medication. Unfortunately, I don't think for addiction or alcoholism in general, permanent medication is not the way to go. That's in my opinion. because nothing's good enough for me. You know, we go to the sandwich shop, my friend has a sandwich and a call, I get to seminary a bag of chips, two cups, you know, I want 50,000 in the bank. Great. So when we get it Oh, it's just 100. It's crazy. So giving people drugs over lunch impaired regarding alcohol in our government, their addiction, not talking about medical, I take, I take a small drug for my depression, my antidepressant. And I'm proud of that, and I'm not coming off it. And that's the way it goes, you know, we should have that fine line between good medical advice. And don't listen to what other people say. So when it comes down to hardcore, abstinence completely 100% for that, the way we get there, wow, I don't care how you get there. When you come to me, there's an A, B, and C and you'll follow that up. People often say the difference between a therapist and what Dr. Rob's crew does, is the therapist will ask you How are you feeling? Then bastards will tell you how to feel. It's like, well, that's what it is. Because if I sat here long enough for me, and I said, I love you. I think you're the most amazing, gorgeous person I've ever seen. I want to leave my late wife tomorrow. And I want to come and find you out and marry you. You're going to laugh. But if I said it often enough, you're going to start to believe it. And if I said it real often enough, I'm going to start to believe it. So what we hear when we get these patients in sets them up for an amazing life. When's the last time somebody said you're an amazing person? When's the last time we thank somebody? I'll tell them I love you. When you start saying you stopped at a hospital walked in and thanked all the nurses. It never happens. Because especially when you get to a position like me and other people like me. I'm in the office some months ago and have two nurses there once a year once in their ages. And I heard them once said, oh my god. Did you see what Dr. Kerry just did with that guy? came in measureable suicidal, he walked out laughing and Western said bye to everybody is an absolute miracle worker 90 days. Yeah. And the older nurses said, Hey, have you told him that? And said, No, not me. They already knows. But I knows. We don't know. No, no. That's okay. So. So this is the interesting thing about, you know, the default mode network, right? That that operating system that we have in our brain and we tend to this what I've had this, you know, this observation that we need that if we've had constant conditioning of negativity, right like you were talking about repetition, you said if I tell you All these beautiful things, you're gonna start to believe that I'm gonna start to believing it's the repetition because the subconscious mind doesn't filter false from the truth. Right? It just takes, it's like the balance scale, which is kind of the good news, right? There's that idea of 51% that we're actually all you need is 51% to tip the scale, right? So it's this ongoing conditioning that that we need. So over those 90 days, they get the, you know, they get reconditioned, their mind is reset, the family is re adjusted. But the kicker is the the default mode network and going back to the old way, it's like if we don't maintain the conditioning, is it true that they go back to the old ways? What do you do for the ongoing conditioning course? Unknown Speaker 40:46 So this is my guys who are less than I'm sorry, what guys are watching? This is my self sabotage. neuropathways there's a blue plan. lymphocytes out sabotage, okay, these down here. Your small bits of self care. This runs my brain. Yes, I will self sabotage. So what this program does is it takes you from there to there, Arlina Allen 41:09 flips it over. Unknown Speaker 41:10 Yeah, so so they said never going to go away. So we need to daily maintain this by the smallest things obviously Peter, spiritual guy, you pray, covenant people at the Good Samaritan, you know, whenever I go into a room, like the room up, because if I walk into a room with a frown on my face, those people are gonna frown back. If I walk in the room and a smile on my face, most people gonna smile back. That's the hardest thing for people to do is practice smiling. You know, because the world needs leaders, you could be a leader for a day in the office or that waiting room or, you know, the elevator, you know, it's all about carrying carrying a message of Hey, you can be anything you want. And people people used to go Dr. Robert cambia president as I beg to differ today. You know, our business has just been run our country Don't tell me you can't do anything. There's no difference in somebody who comes to me almost homeless or homeless like me, and they and the CEO sat in that office above the only difference is he believed he could do it you don't want to believe that they can do it. The world is that oyster? Absolutely. Arlina Allen 42:13 People really understand how powerful beliefs are no are all in your subconscious mind. Unknown Speaker 42:20 Yeah, all powerful they are I always tell people your power but you just don't know it we need to start realizing how powerful you really are. Arlina Allen 42:28 Yes, I think you know and traditional, like 12 step record like the old school recovery is beating the drum of you're powerless you're powerless over you know, that hear it all the time. powerless over people places and things and I think I have to call bullshit on that. Unknown Speaker 42:43 Because you know, it's the face the biggest myth in a Yeah, is what because what is that once the Heartless were all put? No, it doesn't. Arlina Allen 42:51 alcohol. Unknown Speaker 42:53 What are the step one says we admitted we were powerless. How can I be power is not aware, no apostrophe in there. But people put in all powers over I'm not powerless over alcohol. I pass the liquor store. Hey, man, it's a past tense, they meant it to be a past tense. The term a permanent recovery. We had mentioned we were and our lives had now. It's all past tense once you start the steps if you've read the book, I mean, I love 12 step meetings with that big book because it's the truth. Yeah, talk about a psychic change and people go is that crystal ball? Listen, in 1938 when they were talking about a psychic change, it was changed neural pathways. 10 years ago, only 10 years ago in the medical fraternity, we found the brain was like plastic neuroplasticity they call it so same thing to change the neural pathways a mold in them in 1938 these guys were talking about that. Ai rooms right now are a joke. 90% of people in any meeting around the world is a heavy drinker. And we allow them to get away with this bullshit that come in. Oh, today I want to talk about I went to bed last night and my cat was looking bear up from my husband. Is he an alcoholic? Fuck Really? You know, we allow these guys to do that. So the real message is gone. But I've got to tell you 20 Arlina Allen 44:08 depends where you go. It did. Not only not all meetings are created. Oh, Unknown Speaker 44:13 no, they're not. They're amazing meetings. But there's the best piece of literature I've ever read. Is the 164 about about Blue Book. Oh, yeah. All the studies I've done in the world regarding that pertaining to the recovery of an alcoholic was the best book I've ever read. Arlina Allen 44:25 Yeah, I love the community that Yeah, there's so many good things but but you know, you just blew my mind with the whole we're powerless. Not we're powerless. Little apostrophe makes all the difference. And I guess the one thing that really bothers me about the 12 step community is the way some people treat the book like a new Bible. It's the religious dogmatic, like they're close minded to other things. And I wanted to ask you if you had any thoughts or opinions on, like treatment resistant depression with the use of psychedelics, I know Johns Hopkins is doing lots of studies. And there's this new like alternative recovery for people with like, intense heroin addiction or tend to alcoholism. They're doing these Iosco retreats in Costa Rica do what what are your thoughts on those? Unknown Speaker 45:16 Well, I have to be really kind of medical hair and say, hey, there's not enough data to make a decision right now. But we only know a little about the brain, we're discovering more and more every month. So why wouldn't you try that? Why wouldn't you try a different route to get to the same end result? Which is sanity? and living your best life? You know, and it may work for you? It may not? AIA may work for you. It may not. I mean, you don't have to go one place. 111 place is not the answer to everyone's problems here. The answer is to seek out the treatment that your doctor or therapist tells you to try. And I tried aect about five years ago with electronics I can't remember now trauma or something. But I was depressed, very, very depressed. And this is what my hater my career, but I did it for about four weeks best thing I ever did. Oh, my thing I ever did. Yeah, in literally four or five weeks. So I am always looking at different alternative new treatment, you know, and I don't put it down on anybody or anything from the medical fraternity that wants to be tried. Because why wouldn't we? Arlina Allen 46:23 Yeah, I've seen some just really interest. I've been hearing lots of experiences from people who talk about doing these Iosco retreats, I practice abstinence, my life is great. And I don't feel the need to I don't suffer from depression. It sounds very interesting, because it is a it sounds like a process of dissolving the ego. And really, it's like, it's like it drops the veil of denial. And you can see things clearly what you were talking about before about recognizing and acknowledging the truth, right, the truth of maybe some of the fear and the abandonment in the past. And I just found that really interesting. It'll be interesting to see what the Johns Hopkins clinical trials do. But I know of people personally who do things like the micro dosing to treat clinical depression, and things like Unknown Speaker 47:12 somebody like john hopkins university, and hospital to try this because everyone else would put a dampener on it. So I'm glad a good name in the industry. And the medical fraternity has actually taken steps to do this. I think it's absolutely amazing. But at the end of the day, it all goes back to your childhood. And you always go back to the predisposition and the heredis do facts of any illness around especially alcoholism and addiction. So it would be interesting to find out because the problem is with this world right now, is everybody knows somebody with an alcohol or drug problem. And I always say to him, if you don't, it's probably you. Because everybody knows somebody. You know, and a few times I've said that people got very quiet, and ended the conversation real quick. Yeah. So you know, let's bring it out into the open. Let's try all these things for different people and see if we can get a response. Arlina Allen 48:06 Yeah, yeah, life is short. Let's just Cut the bullshit and get to the truth. Unknown Speaker 48:11 sugarcoating. This shit kills people. And when somebody goes into a room, and a room and goes, Well, we're all powerless over alcohol. My answer is always the same. How many fucking people have you killed with that line? How many people have you killed by just saying that you self sank just son of a bitch. Read the park? If you if you stuck in is that was that mean? Read the information that tells us read it. It's awesome. Arlina Allen 48:35 Yeah, and it's not it's not only read it but apply it right we have to take action and apply the information. So it's not enough to know how we are know what we need to know the how we need to know how to apply this information. And, and listen, I just love what you're doing. It's I'm so pumped. I'm gonna leave all your links in the show notes. What's the best way to get ahold of you? If somebody is needing your help or wanting your help Unknown Speaker 49:00 jump on a Google or anything like that search engine. Just put my name in there. Dr. Rob Kelly, you'll see me websites Rob Kelly, calm I spell my name with two B's. So it's our BB k e Ll y.com. And if you want Listen, guys, I want to say something. If you're sat at home and listen to this and don't think you're worth anything and don't think you can allow anything because of your past. I want to apologize to you guys. Because somebody put that there. We are born with million dollar minds stop hanging around 10 cent minds, it's not for you. So that being said, I know people are set on going it's okay for him to do a turn to I don't know what to do. I'm going to give you my phone number here and my personal phone number. And if you're sat at home in a bad state, I'd rather come and help you right now and come to your funeral. So if you're sat at home in a bad state and want a 10 minute pep talk that will change your life. Here's my personal phone number people don't believe me. This is my cell phone number. It's not my assistance. It's not the front desk. It's 214600 zero to one, zero. Now, as you can imagine, I'm a busy guy where you call me or text me, leave a message, I will get back to you and it will be okay. Don't believe the hype. It's gonna be alright. Arlina Allen 50:12 Wow, that's impressive. I was like, Oh shit, he's really going to do it. Unknown Speaker 50:17 No, people are surprised that that you know, it just I know, I'm in the trenches with you guys. It's on to a homeless guy that got his kids taken off in, you know, that fell asleep. Last drive his kids Three days later not being changed or fed and I'm drunk on the floor, and the police drag them out of there. This is the guy that his eldest daughter said, baby, Daddy, please stop drinking and I couldn't do it. Six months later, I was homeless, the million dollar house had gone. The cars the wife, the kids, the parents, the brother and sister, I was abandoned on the street, I can do this. I'd love to sit here and tell you, I'm really clever. But I'm not. If I can do this, you can do that. You just need that 10 Mini pep talk to set you on the real track. And of course it had been helped you professionally, of course. But you do have to pass an assessment. And 75% of people that come to us fail the assessment, unfortunately, because we're the real deal. We're talking to true. Arlina Allen 51:09 accountability. I love it. Dr. Rob Kelly, thank you so much for your time today. I am so inspired and excited about the work that you're doing. I can't wait to leave all the links to all the resources and thank you so much for being the real deal and giving your phone number. That's incredible. Unknown Speaker 51:29 I know it's awesome. Thank you guys for listening and thank you Arlina you're an amazing and I love you by the way. Arlina Allen 51:34 I love you. I believe you. You have a wonderful day. Thank you so much. Thank you. Bye bye Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Ali Do Is Win
ADD or ADHD? And How Best to Navigate It with Dave Lee

Ali Do Is Win

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 48:55


Guest: Dave Lee Dave is a holistic health coach specialising in male health and well-being, with a particular interest in hormone optimisation therapy, masculine psychology and performance. Dave also has a background and strong interest in plant medicine, neuropsychiatry and genetics, working with clients to become the best men they can be from a holistic approach.Learn more about Dave by visiting his website or following him on Instagram.Host: Ali Weingroff Learn more about Ali and her services by visiting her website or following her on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
The Un-Squeaky Wheel: How Inattentive ADHD Goes Under the Radar w/ Aron Croft

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 22:12


Aron Croft appeared to have it all when he got into Harvard. But that was the beginning of his demise. He struggled nonstop for 15 years until he was broke, divorced, and earning minimum wage, failing out of his first 7 jobs and businesses. But after getting a Master's degree in Coaching Psychology and a diagnosis of Inattentive ADHD, his life changed. He built a successful Fortune 500 career consulting to companies such as Marriott, Deloitte, Johnson & Johnson, McDonald's, KPMG, and United Healthcare. He also got remarried, and most importantly, discovered how to get sh*t done with a neurodivergent brain. Now he's on a mission to raise awareness about Inattentive ADHD, how it goes under the radar, and how to rebuild your life post-diagnosis.  Today we learn how his ADHD diagnosis at 34 led him to recover from being broke, divorced, and earning minimum wage to a successful Fortune 500 career, and turned this Influencer's side hustle into his full-time job… Enjoy! In this episode Peter and Aron Croft discuss:   2:00 - Intro and welcome Aron!  3:14 - So you got into Harvard and things were going great- what happened? 4:28 - Ref: FTN “The One with the ADHD PhD, Featuring Rachel Cotton”  5:15 - How did you feel when things started going off the rails and you didn't know why? 6:24 - What was it like when you finally got diagnosed; and the year prior when you rented half of a bed? 8:32 - And just when things were turning around with Aron's new job…  9:42 - So how did you pull out of that situation?  Ref:  At the time of publishing Seinfeld is now on Netflix   11:25 - Aron on Adderall akin to the scene in Limitless with Bradley Cooper on NZT  13:58 - On those ‘waking up' moments and for the first time realizing you're not a total loser! 15:40 - So you get diagnosed and things begin changing- then what happened? 16:52 - When did you give up the Sweet Tarts and come to the epiphany that you were unfulfilled? 17:49 - On finding Dopamine via other sources 18:48 - See, podcasts ARE fun!  19:22 - How can people find you? https://hiddenadhd.com  @aroncroft on Twitter  @HiddenADHD on Facebook  INSTA  YouTube and hidden_adhd on TikTok 20:33 - What is it with TikTok anyway?! 21:03 - Thank you Aron!  Guys, as always, we are here for you and we love what the responses and the notes that we get from you. So please continue to do that, tell us who you want to hear on the podcast, anything at all, we'd love to know.  Leave us a review on any of the places you get your podcasts, and if you can ever, if you ever need our help, I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  21:28 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits — TRANSCRIPT:  — I want to thank you for listening and for subscribing to Faster Than Normal! I also want to tell you that if you're listening to this one, you probably listened to other episodes as well. Because of you all, we are the number one ADHD podcast on the internet!! And if you like us, you can sponsor an episode! Head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ It is a lot cheaper than you think. You'll reach... about 25k to 30,000 people in an episode and get your name out there, get your brand out there, your company out there, or just say thanks for all the interviews! We've brought you over 230 interviews of CEOs, celebrities, musicians, all kinds of rock stars all around the world from Tony Robbins, Seth Godin, Keith Krach from DocuSign, Danny Meyer, we've had Rachel Cotton, we've had  the band Shinedown, right? Tons and tons of interviews, and we keep bringing in new ones every week so head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ make it yours, we'd love to have you, thanks so much for listening!  Now to this week's episode, we hope you enjoy it! — My name is Peter Shankman. You are listening to Faster Than Normal. I am thrilled that you're here. It is a great day outside, probably one of the last warm days we're going to have this year until like, I don't know, sometime in 2022, but it is a good day, there is good news on the horizon. Life is good. Everyone is happy. I'm happy. I hope you're happy.  So who do we have today? We have someone who was pretty happy. He got into Harvard and he's like, holy crap. I got into Harvard. I'm pretty sure he was happy then. But as he told me, when I talked to him about coming on the podcast, he said that was the beginning of his demise. After getting into Harvard, he proceeded the struggle nonstop for 15 years until he was broke, divorced, earning minimum wage bailing out of his first seven jobs and businesses. I'm talking about Aaron Croft. It is great to have him on the podcast because- after he got a master's degree in coaching psychology and a diagnosis of inattentive ADHD, his life changed. He a built successful fortune 500 career consulting to companies such as Marriott, Deloitte Johnson, Johnson, McDonald's KPMG and healthcare. He got remarried. Most importantly, he discovered how to get shit done with a neurodivergent brain and now he's on a mission to raise awareness about Inattentive ADHD, how it goes under the radar and how to rebuild your life if you get a diagnosis of the same.  Peter. Thank you. It's so awesome to be here. And I do have to say that it's actually a really shitty day in Chicago. It's just been raining and everything.  So, uh, probably that means it'll hit us probably in about 24 hours, 20, 36 hours. That's usually how it happens so we will enjoy it while we have it. But I have no doubt that later in the week, we'll be crap on a stick, anyway. Good to have you here, man. It is great to finally talk to you. I know your story. Um, so you grew up, you weren't diagnosed and you're just like, Hey, going through life and you wind up getting into Harvard and you're like, man, I'm the shit. And then you, in fact, as the announcer would say, in fact he was not the shit. Tell us what happened.  Yeah. I mean, I had, I was a really just naturally good test taker. I had this great support structure growing up. Like, I mean, I had parents that were pushing me. I had older sisters who paved the way for me in school and built a good reputation with teachers and I just had really smart, ambitious friends that would invite me to study with them and that sort of thing. And you know, all those factors converged and I pulled off, you know, an amazing heist of sorts and somehow managed to graduate number one in my high school class, get into Harvard like woo hoo! My life is set like que que the trumpets and, uh, yeah, it turned, it turns out it wasn't. When I got to Harvard, the wheels just fell off. Lack of structure. And honestly Peter, you know, what I used to get through high school was just massive amounts of procrastination followed by minor heart attacks, followed by getting my work done. And by the time I got to Harvard, you know, I had freedom for the first time in my life. I was like, I don't, I'm done with that. I don't want to do that.  What I find interesting is that you're not the first person. Uh, on this podcast, who's gotten into Harvard and realized holy crap, nothing is working. Um, we actually had someone, uh, several years ago named Rachel Cotton. Uh, she was doing her PhD at Harvard and, uh, she had been, she got through undergrad and her graduate degree by uh, mainlining Adderall and no.. no not Adderall, NoDoze and mainlining, uh, uh, caffeine pills. And, you know, she finally had good healthcare at Harvard and she went to it for physical induction and the doctor asked if there's anything else there's anything else they should know and she goes, yeah. I drink about, you know, 14 cups of coffee a day, and take about nine, nine NoDoze. Um, and she just said it nonchalantly and the doctor goes to that's that's, that's, that's probably not normal. And that was the beginning of her diagnosis. So there's something about Harvard, but, um, you know, so you get into it and, and shit starts going off the rails and talk to us about how you must've felt, because I'm assuming much like I did when things would go off the rails for me, you know, it's obviously 100% entirely my fault. I'm the fuck up. It's obviously there's nothing else that could be wrong with it. It's totally me. Um, how could I be such a horrible.  100%. Yeah. I mean, I feel like you just put my brain on loud speaker there, Peter, so thank you for that. Yeah, no, I completely, I mean, so I didn't get diagnosed until my mid thirties. And so this is all like under the radar, undiagnosed and you know, the only explanation that I had was the one that my mom had, which was Aron thinks you better than everyone, that he doesn't have to play by the rules. And he's just lazy and, you know, it's sorta like, well, I'm cutting all these corners and I'm getting away with these last minute saves, like, I guess she's right. And I mean, you know, to this day, I'm still piecing back together my self image and self confidence from all those years of misinformation.  What was it like when, tell us about the, the, sort of the great reveal moment when you finally got diagnosed and, you know, you'd been gone for 15 years how, and if I get diagnosed, like, holy shit, there's a name for this and it starts to make sense. Yeah, totally. Um, let me, let me tell you that. And let me just tell you, uh, what happened about a few months before that, just to get an idea of kinda where, how we got here, because when we go from Harvard we sort of have to paint the real picture. So, uh, A year before I'm diagnosed. Uh, I, I've got all of my possessions, all my belongings in a few suitcases and my wife's just basically kicked me out of the house. So we're getting divorced and I'm broke and I'm earning minimum wage. So anyway, so I'm carrying my two suitcases up the stairs of this shared house, uh, that I'm now going to share with four other acquaintances and I'm in, I'm in the room and I'm unpacking my stuff in the closet. And then Billy this 26 year old tech support agent from Vietnam comes and flops down on my king size bed. Kind of starteling me and I'm like, Hey, Billy, what's up, you know, but he looks really comfortable and that's when it hits me. He hasn't flopped down on his, on my king size bed.  Oh no.  He's flopped down on his half of OUR king size bed because renting half of a bed was all that I could afford at that point in my life.  Wow.  That's that's, that's only a bump. It was, it was such a wake-up call, right.  Did he at least smell good?  I mean, you know, I mean, I think it was, uh, I think it was, uh, Obsession, you know by CK, it was pretty, pretty delightful, you know, it's kinda musky. Uh, and yeah, so anyway, so of course the, the heart attack of that experience got me into action. I got a better job. And then. And then from that better job, which I only was at for seven months, I was able to move into a new company and get a raise. And I'm like, oh, this is great. Like I've, you know, I've rebuilt my life, blah, blah, blah. And anyway, so I'm three months into that job and it's all like high fives and backslaps everyone loves Aron and, uh, then history repeats itself. All of a sudden I got a call from my manager saying the client doesn't like your work. They think that it's subpar and you need to stay late for every night this week and maybe every night next week, if you don't get it done and redo all the work you've done the last few months. And you know, it doesn't mean you can't get done everything else you have to get done this week and you can't charge, you know, bill the time to the client more or anything. And like, Peter, I literally just freak out. Like, I mean, I'm thinking like I'm already, I mean, I'm already taking NoDoz and you know, I'm already at the edge of, at the edge of my bandwidth. Like I don't have another gear to stay late, you know, and redo work that I've already done in addition to a full day job. Like no way.  And, uh, yeah, go ahead. No, this is what happens. So, so you're sitting there in the, you know, probably like deer in the headlights type thing. W what was the next step?  Total, total deer in the headlights. And like, you know, like people say, like, when you die, like your whole life flashes in front of your eyes, there's something in slow motion. Like for me, It was kind of flashing in front of my eyes at that point, because what I was seeing was this whole image of rebuilding my life was going to be gone. At that point I was effectively a 34 year old divorce, a living with my mom. It wasn't technically living with my mom because it was living with my mom's sister, but it's basically the same thing.  And I'm reminded of the Seinfeld episode where, uh, you know, George, is that when we look to you should go talk to her. Yeah. Because balding middle-aged men with no job who live with their parents have a really good success rate there,  Love it, love it. Right. And those, and you can't see this at home, but Peter and I are chatting and I've got the nice bald round dome. And, but what he said is totally true. I'll, uh, George Costanza. And so anyway, like I see my life, I see my life just falling apart for my eyes. I freak out and a friend had mentioned his ADHD and Adderall. He mentioned that socially, like going out drinking, but all I knew because I'd never tried Adderall even really paid any attention to it. But. He said it helped him stay up late to go out drinking. So I'm like, dude, I need to stay up late for this like thing! Or I'm going to get fired and live in my mom's sister's house.  That's how Pfizer originally marketed Adderall is. “Hey, here's the stay up late going out, drinking a drug, right?” Yeah. I totally can imagine. I can totally imagine him saying that. And that's what, what you glom on. So I totally get.  Yeah. And like, exactly. And, uh, and then, yeah, so, so anyway, so I get to work that Monday and like, I go through the day and then kind of midday, cause that was sort of the, the advice that I got like that I could take it and it would get me through the night or through like, you know, staying until 9:00 PM or 8:00 PM. So about mid day I take it anyway, I walk around like I walk around and just kill some time and I come back and I sit down at my laptop. And, you know, it's like in a conference room because I'm a consultant. There's like other people and distractions. And I'm like, of course, working on some super boring shit, like PowerPoint slides and Excel spreadsheets. And, uh, I sit down, I do some work like for a few minutes and then I look off and I look back at my boring stuff and I keep working on it. And then I look away for a little bit. Like, a minute. And then I look back and I keep working. I was like, holy crap. I'm working on this thing without stopping, even though it's not exciting and interesting, like.. is this book people have been talking about this whole time when they've said, Aron, just sit down and work on it!?! You had the Bradley Cooper NZT moment in Limitless, where he sits, where he takes the pill. He sits down, everything becomes clear and in color.  Like, it was literally as if like you'd given a blind person site and it was like, it was like, oh, this is what purple looks like. Like I didn't realize whatever I was everyone was talking about.  That is spectacular, but it's entirely true. Everyone who's been there has had that. I call it that Limitless moment. If you haven't seen this film, dude, go out this afternoon, stop what you're doing and go see this film. He literally, he takes his pill of NZT, which gives him quote, unquote access to the other 90% of his brain. And, and he there's the scene. It's a stairway scene. He walks in the stairway and it goes from black and white drab to super high Def color where every single sound like the ticking of a bicycle, he hears the ticking of the wheel of greatness every day. And he's like, I get it. Right. And, and, and the, the landlord lady who is like, who's like on his ass to pay the rent, you know, five minutes later, he's sleeping with her. Right. It's just. That thing where he's just like, everything makes sense now. Yeah. We've all had that!  Right. Exactly. And if you, if you take Peter's suggestion and you go and see the movie, uh, I also look like Bradley Cooper- so that's like a bonus as well.  Hey, I'll, I'll, I'll sure, why not?  Don't don't look at the show notes! [And you're totally reading the show notes now aren't you- Aron's picture is on the main page ;)] But you know, it's, it's funny because those moments, everyone talks about this one, right. And he talks about the sort of those, those Zen moments, those wake up moments. I think the thing that people don't mention the most about those moments is that it's the wake up call is not only, wow- look at all this shit I can DO, but also holy crap, I'm not the complete loser that I thought I was.  Wow. So, you know, what's amazing about that, Peter, um, is.. I only came to that realization like a week or two ago, because I was putting together this like nine minute TED talk that ADDA is putting out, uh, next month as part of ADHD awareness month. And that literally is the theme of my talk, but I didn't make that connection until I wrote it. And you just like, I should have been just talking to you because you just said it so perfectly clearly. We've all been there man. That's, you know, that literally comes from years of, I remember, you know, back in high school, I remember back in college, like my fourth day of my freshman year, I said something stupid. And I, you know, my, my social acuity didn't kick in and I said something stupid. And I know that's it, I just fucked up 4 years. I remember, I remember screwing up four years ago. I think I was just stood up for his college and it, it, it, why am I just so different? Why am I such a loser? Why am I, and, and. It's amazing how you, how you see that. Um, in people who haven't been diagnosed and they get diagnosed, they under, it's not even so much the diagnosis, you break your leg, you have a, you have a bone sticking on your leg. You pretty much know you've broken your leg. This isn't, this is a secret, this is a secret disease. Right? And so you, you get diagnosed for the first time. You understand it, right. You didn't have a bone sticking out of your brain. You couldn't tell that there was something wrong with you. That could be fixed. So that's it's yeah, it's a massive wake up call. So, all right. So you're diagnosed things, start changing. Now what.  Uh, yeah, so then, then I live happily ever after, and shit just works perfectly. Um, no. So then, then I get medication and it's like a game changer, right? Right, so I go and get diagnosed. The week, like as soon as after, as I could, and then I get medications, it's a game-changer and I go from being an under performer where to like an average and then an above average performer a nd I was like, this is great. Um, and it was really the first time in my adult life that I performed in any meaningful capacity, because as you said, I failed out of my first seven jobs in businesses and it was just like shit show after shit show. And, uh, so I then did what any responsible 34 year old does that's living on his own? I got home from work every day, broke out the weed, played video games and ate freaking sour patch, kids and sweet tarts like every effing day.  I love it. How'd you come out of that?  Uh, well, it was about a few years later and I was like, crap. This, this like hedonic pleasure of doing all that isn't fulfilling. Like, yes, I enjoy it in the moment, but it's also, it's also not making me happy, deep down and you know, my social relationships weren't thriving because of it. Um, and. You know, I also wasn't achieving my fullest potential, you know, like Abraham Maslow, ‘what one can be one must be'. And that was creating like an internal lack of fulfillment and dissonance. So I finally just said that, Hey, maybe holding down a job, isn't my biggest achievement that I can have in life. Maybe I could have something bigger and do something more and make a bigger impact. And so that for me, I finally said, okay, I stopped finding dopamine in those artificial pleasures, if you will. And I started discovering, I could find dopamine through achieving personally meaningful goals and striving to be better, and to constantly improve myself.  What happens when, uh, how many times have you had that moment where you're like, I can't believe I'm getting paid to get this high, essentially the high, the high being, what you love to do. Cause I come off the stage every day and I'd have to shake whenever I speak, as it was to shake my head and be like still, they still don't know. They still think that I'm, you know, I'm still getting paid for this crap. Unbelievable. I still get that.  I think, I think about that. I mean, I think of that in my coaching sessions with clients, like, I love to talk about this shit. Like, you want to talk about how to like improve your life and be productive or like strategy!? Like that is candy, even podcasts, right? Like, like, I mean, obviously I'm not getting paid directly on this, but, this is like the most fun thing in the world. I get to hang out with someone awesome, we get to talk about the shared interests, which, you know, we're both so passionate about and we had to make a difference, like, yeah, same. Yeah. Like you hit it. I love, I love how clearly, uh, and I don't mean this as a knock against anyone else I've talked to, but I feel like there's a clarity of not purpose, but a clarity of thinking, and how you've processed so much of this stuff. That is just a level above.  Thank you. I think a lot of it comes to comes to the point where you're just like, you know what? I know what works. I know what doesn't. I know how I got here. Fuck it. I'm just gonna, I'm gonna say how I feel. Um, tell us, I want to keep it to 20 minutes, I wanna be respectful of your time and the audience's time; cause it's been 20 minutes, you know, ADHD and all that. Um, how can people find more of you? Because there's a lot more that we will discuss next time I have you on but where can they find you? Where can they, where can they learn more about you? Because you have some interesting backstory and some interesting future story. And I think that our audience will want more of that. Tell us.  Yeah, absolutely. So, um, the future story stuff that Peter's referring to, just so we don't leave people with a complete view of me as a fuck up.  No, obviously I told you in the very beginning, you know, you're doing, you're doing fortune 500 coaching now you're doing tons of stuff, you know? So obviously you, you figured it out.  [19:22 - How can people find you? https://hiddenadhd.com  @aroncroft on Twitter  @HiddenADHD on Facebook  INSTA  YouTube and also at hidden_adhd on TikTok] Okay. So then we don't, we don't need to go into it. So I would say then just, uh, just Google hidden ADHD. Uh, so the “hidden” is kind of like a nod to a bit of the inattentive going under the radar and you'll be able to find my TikTok with over a hundred thousand people and you'll be able to find my free downloads and stuff. I've got some cool ADHD one-on-one and productivity guides and stuff. Uh, so you can get all that. And, uh, I would love to connect with you.  Awesome Aron Croft yeah, his TikTok's pretty off the charts you should definitely follow that. I'll give you that. I, you know, it's funny. I've been trying desperately. I tried to get into it, I just, I couldn't, I couldn't fall in love with it. I, I, I fell in love with Twitter. I fell in love with Facebook. I fell in love with Instagram. I couldn't, I still can't fall in love with TikTok, maybe because I know the company in China and I've been to their headquarters in China and it just scares me, but I just, I still can't fall in love with TikTok. I'm trying. I just can't make them a, B,  Maybe you can't. Maybe you can't have more than three loves, like maybe. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, like, you know, your heart's full.  My girlfriend would argue. I can have more than one, but no, I see where you're going with that. Um, all right, cool guys, you've been listening to Aron Croft! I love this guy who's shit is awesome. Definitely check him out. You've also been listening to Faster Than Normal. That's me. You know how to find me. I'm not going to waste your time. I'll be back next week with a new episode. My name is Peter Shankman.  I appreciate you listening. I appreciate you taking 20 minutes of your day. I know that's a lot. And for those who actually listened to this on anything less than 1.25 times speed; you're my people. I thank you for that! See ya soon! — Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week. 

The Raven Effect
George of the Jungle vs. Curious George

The Raven Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 86:18


Regular listener tried to work in last week's catchphrase into every conversation they had the past week, if you missed the phrase, go back and listen to last week's show; Shots fired early when Rich calls Raven old; Raven wows the crowd with the George of the Jungle theme and the great debate of George of the Jungle vs. Curious George; The tremendous Hollywood career of Brendan Fraser; The debate over Qatar's pronunciation continues; What are people from Qatar called? Why wasn't Raven asked to be part of the Dark Side of the Ring episode talking about Kanyon; Raven shares some details of his relationship with Kanyon; Raven has a TV fit for an NFL stadium; Apple Podcasts reviews of the show; Feeney starts sniffing, leading to Rich thinking he's snorting cocaine; Adderall vs. Cocaine; Why Philadelphia is the only place ECW could have been created and thrived; Fanmail, and of course, all the usual perversions.    Follow the guys on Twitter! Raven - @theRavenEffect Rich - @RichBocchini Feeney - @jffeeney3rd   Get yourself the best Wooden Jigsaw puzzles at unidragon.com - Shop now and Save 10% using the promo code RAVEN   Have Raven say things that you want him to say, either for yourself or for someone you want to talk big-game shit to by going to www.cameo.com/ravenprime1     If you want all the uncensored goodness AND watch The Raven Effect, sign up for Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/TheRavenEffect

Middle Children
Between Chris Being Sick and Improv Parties

Middle Children

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 49:33


Chris has a cold, awwww, but he's going to Scotland soon for a week so that should be very cool. Jessie has been reorganizing, and not much happening in her love life (but she is talking to a conventionally hot man.) Her Adderall vacation is going splendid, she has so many redecorating plans and she's not drinking too much coffee. We end a short improv and of course a praise! Love ya babes.

Huberman Lab
Controlling Your Dopamine For Motivation, Focus & Satisfaction | Episode 39

Huberman Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 136:32


This episode serves as a sort of “Dopamine Masterclass”. I discuss the immensely powerful chemical that we all make in our brain and body: dopamine. I describe what it does and the neural circuits involved. I explain dopamine peaks and baselines, and the cell biology of dopamine depletion. I include 14 tools for how to control your dopamine release for sake of motivation, focus, avoiding and combating addiction and depression, and I explain why dopamine stacking with chemicals and behaviors inevitably leads to states of underwhelm and poor performance. I explain how to achieve sustained increases in baseline dopamine, compounds that injure and protect dopamine neurons including caffeine from specific sources. I describe non-prescription supplements for increasing dopamine—both their benefits and risks—and synergy of pro-dopamine supplements with those that increase acetylcholine.    Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code "huberman" InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman  Headspace - https://www.headspace.com/specialoffer    Logitech Event - Rethink Education: The Biology of Learning Thursday, Sept. 30 at 12pm PT / 3pm ET Sign up here: https://info.logitech.com/ReThink-Education.html    Support Research in Huberman Lab at Stanford: https://hubermanlab.stanford.edu/giving   Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman    Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman    Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab  Website - https://hubermanlab.com  Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Links: Review on Dopamine - https://doi.org/10.1038/  s41583-021-00455-7  Cold Exposure & Dopamine - https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs004210050065    Timestamps: 00:00:00 Introduction & Tool 1 to Induce Lasting Dopamine 00:04:48 Sponsors: Roka, InsideTracker, Headspace 00:09:10 Upcoming (Zero-Cost) Neuroplasticity Seminar for Educators 00:09:58 What Dopamine (Really) Does 00:15:30 Two Main Neural Circuits for Dopamine  00:18:14 How Dopamine Is Released: Locally and Broadly 00:22:03 Fast and Slow Effects of Dopamine 00:25:03 Dopamine Neurons Co-Release Glutamate 00:28:00 Your Dopamine History Really Matters  00:30:30 Parkinson's & Drugs That Kill Dopamine Neurons. My Dopamine Experience  00:36:58 Tool 3 Controlling Dopamine Peaks & Baselines 00:40:06 Chocolate, Sex (Pursuit & Behavior), Nicotine, Cocaine, Amphetamine, Exercise 00:46:46 Tool 4 Caffeine Increases Dopamine Receptors 00:49:54 Pursuit, Excitement & Your “Dopamine Setpoint” 00:56:46 Your Pleasure-Pain Balance & Defining “Pain” 01:00:00 Addiction, Dopamine Depletion, & Replenishing Dopamine 01:07:50 Tool 5 Ensure Your Best (Healthy) Dopamine Release 01:15:28 Smart Phones: How They Alter Our Dopamine Circuits 01:19:45 Stimulants & Spiking Dopamine: Counterproductive for Work, Exercise & Attention 01:22:20 Caffeine Sources Matter: Yerba Mate & Dopamine Neuron Protection 01:24:20 Caffeine & Neurotoxicity of MDMA 01:26:15 Amphetamine, Cocaine & Detrimental Rewiring of Dopamine Circuits 01:27:57 Ritalin, Adderall, (Ar)Modafinil: ADHD versus non-Prescription Uses 01:28:45 Tool 6 Stimulating Long-Lasting Increases in Baseline Dopamine  01:37:55 Tool 7 Tuning Your Dopamine for Ongoing Motivation 01:47:40 Tool 8 Intermittent Fasting: Effects on Dopamine  01:53:09 Validation of Your Pre-Existing Beliefs Increases Dopamine 01:53:50 Tool 9 Quitting Sugar & Highly Palatable Foods: 48 Hours 01:55:36 Pornography 01:56:50 Wellbutrin & Depression & Anxiety 01:58:30 Tool 10 Mucuna Pruriens, Prolactin, Sperm, Crash Warning 02:01:45 Tool 11 L-Tyrosine: Dosages, Duration of Effects & Specificity 02:05:20 Tool 12 Avoiding Melatonin Supplementation, & Avoiding Light 10pm-4am 02:07:00 Tool 13 Phenylethylamine (with Alpha-GPC) For Dopamine Focus/Energy 02:08:20 Tool 14 Huperzine A 02:10:02 Social Connections, Oxytocin & Dopamine Release 02:12:20 Direct & Indirect Effects: e.g., Maca; Synthesis & Application 02:14:22 Zero-Cost & Other Ways To Support Podcast & Research   Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

Middle Children
Between A Ring of Fire and A Ring of Love

Middle Children

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 65:37


Our joints are sooo loud. Chris has another wedding to go to, jeez thats like 5 this year. Jessie's on vacation from her Adderall, and got a 5 star massage. We're both doing pretty regular, so we jump into the Hallmark pitch that's not so regular: Ring Of Love, a wedding planning fiasco. Do you love us? Have you even checked out the Patreon? Please do that!

Huberman Lab
ADHD & How Anyone Can Improve Their Focus | Episode 37

Huberman Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 138:01


In this episode, I discuss ADHD (Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder): what it is, the common myths, and the biology and psychology of ADHD. I discuss both behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for ADHD, and brain-machine interface tools. I also discuss behavioral training protocols that can improve focus in people with ADHD and those without ADHD, and for people of different ages. I discuss the role of dopamine in coordinating 'default-mode' and 'task-related' neural networks, attentional "blinks" (lapses of attention) and how to overcome them, and the role of actual blinks in time perception and attention. Finally, I review some of the prescription and over-the-counter compounds for increasing focus such as Adderall, Ritalin, Modafinil and Armodafinil, the racetams, Alpha-GPC and phosphatidylserine and the role of diet for managing ADHD (and the controversies of diet for ADHD). The role of cell phones/technology in ADHD and ADHD-like challenges with focus are also discussed. Throughout, both basic science and clinical scenarios, as well as applicable tools and resources are covered. Thank you to our sponsors: Roka - https://www.roka.com -- code "huberman" Belcampo - https://www.belcampo.com/huberman Helix Sleep - https://www.helixsleep.com/huberman   Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman   Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman   Support Research in the Huberman Lab at Stanford: https://hubermanlab.stanford.edu/giving   Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab Website - https://hubermanlab.com Email Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network   Links: Review of Compounds for ADHD, Smart Drugs & Focus - https://www.fbscience.com/Landmark/articles/10.52586/4948 Review of Atypical Compounds for ADHD - https://www.hindawi.com/journals/np/2016/1320423/ Study of Focus Protocol In ADHD & Non-ADHD Children - https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/13/4780   Timestamps: 00:00:00 Introduction & Note About Diagnosis 00:03:27 Sponsors  00:07:56 ADHD vs. ADD: Genetics, IQ, Rates in Kids & Adults 00:13:00 Attention & Focus, Impulse Control 00:14:57 Hyper-focus  00:16:45 Time Perception 00:18:25 The Pile System 00:20:00 Working Memory 00:24:10 Hyper-Focus & Dopamine  00:26:40 Neural Circuits In ADHD: Default Mode Network & Task-Related Networks  00:32:57 Low Dopamine in ADHD & Stimulant Use & Abuse 00:37:10 Sugar, Ritalin, Adderall, Modafinil & Armodafinil  00:47:00 Non-Prescribed Adderall, Caffeine, Nicotine 00:49:18 How Stimulants “Teach” the Brains of ADHD Children to Focus 00:52:00 When To Medicate: A Highly Informed (Anecdotal) Case Study 00:56:35 Elimination Diets & Allergies In ADHD 01:04:46 Omega-3 Fatty Acids: EPAs & DHAs  01:07:00 Modulation vs Mediation of Biological Processes 01:10:50 Attentional Blinks  01:16:56 Open Monitoring & 17minute Focus Enhancement  01:22:50 Blinking, Dopamine & Time Perception; & Focus Training  01:30:10 Reverberatory Neural & Physical Activity 01:33:40 Adderall, Ritalin & Blink Frequency 01:35:00 Cannabis  01:37:30 Interoceptive Awareness  01:41:15 Ritalin, Adderall, Modafinil, Armodafinil; Smart Drugs & Caffeine: Dangers 01:48:05 DHA Fatty Acids, Phosphatidylserine 0:1:50:54 Ginko Biloba  01:51:45 Modafinil & Armodafanil: Dopamine Action & Orexin 01:56:19 Acetylcholine: Circuits Underlying Focus; Alpha-GPC 01:59:04 L-Tyrosine, (PEA) Phenylethylamine  02:01:23 Racetams, Noopept  02:05:15 Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation; Combining Technology & Pharmacology  02:09:14 Smart Phones & ADHD & Sub-Clinical Focus Issues In Adults & Kids 02:14:30 Synthesis/Summary 02:16:10 Support for Podcast & Research, Supplement Resources   Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

Jim and Them
Spooky Cookies - #694 Part 2

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 118:51


Horror Nights: Mike is making claims that somehow, some way Jeff and Jim agreed to limitations on the amount of haunted houses he will have to experience!Theme Parks: A couple of drunks and ramblings about theme parks, it's quite a journey and the boys are excited.Karaoke: It's post DIRTY THIRTY, we've been going for over 4 hours, might as well break out some karaoke, fire up DROPS OF JUPITER!KILL LESS PEOPLE!, ARNOLD!, LAST ACTION HERO!, THE JACKSONS!, CAN YOU FEEL IT!?, SHINY GLOVE!, LEGENDS!, 2 WEEKS!, MASK!, THE HYPE!, JEFF'S NOTES!, GAL PACINO!, REALTIME!, WINZIP!, I'M A MAN!, LAUGHING!, MEMPHIS JIM!, RELIGION!, JESUS!, OFFICERS!, POLICE!, BIBLE BELT!, CHURCH!, UBER!, COASTAL ELITES!, CITY BOY!, THE SOUTH!, DALLAS!, NOSE MANUAL!, THRILLER!, LETTERMAN JACKET!, WEREWOLF!, THEME PARKS!, TRIPS!, RIP TOUR!, UNIVERSAL!, SPLESH!, CABANA!, NEW SWIM TRUNKS!, MURDER SLIDE!, BLEACHED!, HALLOWEEN BOY!, HAUNTED HOUSES!, LIMITS!, 2 HOUSES!, TAP OUT!, SOUTHERN LAWYER!, PUSS OUT!, BEETLEJUICE!, HILL HOUSE!, TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE!, TERROR RESPITE!, THE DESCENT!, STELLA!, PUTTING IN WORK!, RESERVATIONS!, LIVESTREAM!, JAMZ!, FORGOT!, COMPLETE PUSSY!, MATTERHORN!, SKI GOGGLES!, HARRY POTTER!, MAKING IT WEIRD!, GODPARENT!, DUDLEY DO RIGHT!, POPEYE!, WHATABURGER!, IN N OUT!, HOUSTON!, CITRUSY CAKE!, HAUNTED MANSION!, RIPTIDE ROCKET!, ADDERALL!, GOOFY MOVIE!, GOOD RIDDANCE!, GREEN DAY!, RUN OVER BY A TRAIN!, THE PEST!, ALEX JONES!, JOEY BUTTZ!, GUY COVERED IN ACID!, CHAN FRANK!, JOEY PORK!, THE LIVING MULE!, 8 BEERS JIM!, KARAOKE!, DROPS OF JUPITER!, TRAIN!, PANIC AT THE DISCO!, THE TOADIES!, POSSUM KINGDOM!, I WRITE SINS NOT TRAGEDIES!, WHEATUS!, TEENAGE DIRTBAG!, I'M NOT OK!, MY CHEMICAL ROMANCE!, LOST TIME!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
09-03-21 - Guad Squares - The Unintentional Musical Edition - Obama And Springsteen - Drunk Adderall Brady - Fat/Skinny Elvis - Clitoris O'Riordan - Singing Trip

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 24:01


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Guadalupe Squares - Friday September 3, 2021

Kickin' it with Koz
EP 6- The Vaccine might be FDA approved, but the amount of Adderall I take definitely isn't

Kickin' it with Koz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 60:52


I know right, what a title... talk about an attention grabber. I like to think my High School English teacher would be proud of that title. Anyways, Only fans bans the only content people use Only fans for... great idea. Why "Back to the Future" was one scene away from making a VERY different movie. Plus, Elon Musk decides to speed up the end of the world with his new Humanoid Robot.... and much more.  Podcast's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kickinitwithkoz My Socials Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anthonykoz_ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/anthonykoz Twitter: https://twitter.com/anthonykoz_ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com