Podcasts about Linus Pauling

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US scientist, Nobel laureate, and husband of Ava Helen Pauling

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  • Jan 3, 2022LATEST
Linus Pauling

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Best podcasts about Linus Pauling

Latest podcast episodes about Linus Pauling

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 610 (1-3-22): Wading into the New Year, the New River, and Water Thermodynamics

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:20).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-31-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of January 3, 2022.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. For this first week of 2022, we listen in on one Virginian's annual New Year's challenge to the laws of physics and chemistry—water-temperature physics and chemistry, that is.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds. SOUNDS AND VOICE - ~35 sec – “It's the New Year, on the shore of the New River. It's 22 degrees and perfect time for a swim. Happy New Year, everyone! Happy New Year! [Series of exclamations about the cold.] Ah, welcome to Antarctica.” You've been listening to Blacksburg resident Alan Moore during the 2014 version of his annual New Year's Day wade into the New River.  The watery welcome to that January 1st—unaided by a wet-suit—lasted only a few seconds, not as much because of the 22-degree air temperature as because of the 39-degree water temperature.  Water that cold can cause exhaustion or unconsciousness within 15 to 30 minutes, and even water at 60 or 70 degrees can be dangerously chilling over one to two hours, depending on a person's body size and other factors. Water's capacity to chill a human body is much greater than that of air at the same temperature, for two reasons.  First, liquids generally conduct heat more rapidly than gases, because liquids are denser (that is, the molecules are closer together).  And second, liquid water has chemical attractions between molecules that can absorb high amounts of energy, such as heat energy coming from a person's body.  These and other interactions among water, heat, and temperature are part of water's thermodynamics, and they exert a big influence on weather, aquatic environments, biology, and taking a plunge on New Year's or any other day. Thanks to Alan Moore for lending his voice and wade-in sounds to this episode.  We close this first episode of the New Year with about 45 seconds of music to give a hydrological hello to 2022. Here's “New Year's Water,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~46 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 195, 1-6-14. Thanks to Alan Moore for allowing Virginia Water Radio to record sounds during his annual New River wade-in on January 1, 2014.“New Year's Water” is copyright 2016 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 349, 1-2-17.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two photos of the New River near the county line between Giles and Montgomery counties in Virginia, looking upstream: At dawn on January 1, 2014 (upper photo) and at 8:40 a.m. on January 1, 2022 (lower photo). EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT COLD WATER SAFETY The following is quoted from the National Weather Service, “Cold Water Hazards and Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/coldwater. “Warm air doesn't always mean warm water in lakes, streams or oceans.  Fifty-five degree water may not sound very cold, but it can be deadly.  Plunging into cold water of any temperature becomes dangerous if you aren't prepared for what the sudden exposure can do to your body and brain.  Warm air temperatures can create a false sense of security for boaters and beach goers, so if you are planning to be on or near the water, arrive knowing the conditions and how to protect yourself.  Cold water drains body heat up to 4 times faster than cold air.  When your body hits cold water, “cold shock” can cause dramatic changes in breathing, heart rate and blood pressure.  The sudden gasp and rapid breathing alone creates a greater risk of drowning even for confident swimmers in calm waters. In rougher open water this danger increases.  Unplanned immersion in cold water can be life-threatening for anyone without protection from the temperatures or a lifejacket to help you stay afloat.  When Cold Shock and Hypothermia begin to impact your ability to think and act, life jackets and flotation can create extra time for help to arrive or for you to get out of danger.   Even the most experienced cold water surfers, swimmers or boaters know to prepare for the conditions.” SOURCES Used for Audio Encyclopedia Britannica, “Thermodynamics,” online at https://www.britannica.com/science/thermodynamics. J. J. Hidore and J. E. Oliver, Climatology—An Atmospheric Science, MacMillian, New York, 1993, pages 55-58. Linus Pauling, General Chemistry, Dover, New York, 1970, pages 343-350. On survival in cold water: National Weather Service, “Cold Water Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/coldwater. University of Minnesota Sea Grant, “Hypothermia Prevention: Survival in Cold Water,” at http://www.seagrant.umn.edu/coastal_communities/hypothermia; see the site's “How Long Have I Got?” section for information on how long one can survive being immersed in cold water. For More Information about Cold Weather Safety, Hypothermia, and Frostbite National Weather Service, “Cold Weather Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/cold. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Prevent Hypothermia & Frostbite,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/staysafe/hypothermia.html. Virginia Department of Health, “Newsroom/Winter Weather Preparedness,” at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/news/public-relations-contacts/winter-weather-preparedness/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to other episodes that focus on an incoming New Year. Episode 296, 12-28-15 – Setting a Course for 2016 with ‘On a Ship' by Kat Mills.Episode 349, 1-2-17 – Water for a World of New Years, Featuring “New Year's Water” by Torrin Hallett.Episode 401, 1-1-18 – Diving into 2018 with “Driving Rain” by Chamomile and Whiskey.Episode 453, 12-31-18 – Water and the New Year of 2019.Episode 505, 12-30-19 – Eyes on the Water as the 2020s Arise. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge® for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades). Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Bird-related Episodes for Winter Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – Episode 607, 12-13-21.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19. Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Fall migration – Episode 603, 11-15-21.Northern Harrier – Episode 561, 1-25-21.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20. Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20. Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy 5.2 – Energy can take many forms. Grades K-3 plus 5: Matter 5.7 – Matter has properties and interactions. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 6 6.4 – There are basic sources of energy and energy can be transformed. 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Physical Science PS.5 – Energy is conserved and transformed. Chemistry CH.7 – Thermodynamics explains the relationship between matter and energy. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels (* indicates episode listed above in the “Related Water Radio Episodes” section). Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.*Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.*Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.*Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.*Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition
Top 6 Ways to Reverse Aging Naturally (Without Surgery)

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 24:19


There is no way to avoid aging. We are all destined to grow old, get sick, and die… Or are we? Although we can't completely avoid the aging process, we sure can slow it down quite a bit. And disease? Even though it may be the “norm” for an increasing number of older Americans to succumb to chronic diseases as they age, this doesn't have to be the case for you. There is a new normal when it comes to how we age — and following these six simple steps to reverse aging naturally can help you get there.   6 Ways You Can Help Reverse the Aging Process #1: Take key supplements. Nobel Prize-winning chemist, author, and health advocate Linus Pauling said, “By the proper intakes of vitamins and other nutrients and by following a few other healthful practices from youth or middle age on, you can, I believe, extend your life and years of well-being by twenty-five or even thirty-five years.” He might have added: “And you can live those extra years with excellent and vibrant health!” Supplements (and foods, which we will talk about next) that are best for keeping your body and mind sharp must contain antioxidants. Some essential vitamins to add to your anti-aging arsenal include vitamin C and E as well as Glucosamine and Coenzyme Q10. Polyphenol-rich matcha tea, resveratrol, and collagen are three other supplements that can be age-busters as well. #2:  Use the immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory support power of medicinal mushrooms. In addition, if you are serious about your anti-aging regime, you must also consider adding a medicinal mushroom supplement to your daily routine. Have you ever heard of the Japanese island of Okinawa? For generations, the population there was teeming with centenarians (people in their 100s) who were bright eyed and in great physical health. What was their secret? Eating fresh foods, spending lots of time out in nature and in their gardens, and surrounding themselves with family and friends. And, according to research conducted by the Okinawa Centenarian Study, the population also ate a large amount of various kinds of mushrooms, including shiitake and reishi mushrooms. These mushrooms have been proven to have a profound effect on the immune system and help to curb inflammatory responses. The study researchers, as well as many other studies, have linked consuming medicinal mushrooms with relief from inflammatory disease, osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disorders and digestive problems, just to name a few. #3: Eat Antioxidant Rich, Anti-Aging Foods. Besides mushrooms (which can be consumed in tea, in food form, or as a supplement), fill your plate with foods that are rich in omega-3 fats such as wild caught salmon, green leafy organic vegetables that contain high numbers of phytonutrients, berries such as raspberries and blueberries that have antioxidants called anthocyanins (which have been shown to slow tumor growth as well), and healing herbs like turmeric, basil, and ginger. Want to improve your odds of living longer and living pain-free? Make it a point to also avoid all processed and GMO foods (including GMO produce), refined sugar, wheat products (especially commercially-produced breads, pastas, and baked goods), trans fats and artificial ingredients, and keep alcohol consumption to a minimum. The best diet for staying vibrant into your 70s, 80s, and beyond is the simplest kind of diet. Eat real, recognizable food and plenty of (preferably raw or lightly steamed) vegetables in a relaxed setting and drink plenty of clean, filtered water. Even when we are older, our bodies are still primarily made of water so the key is to hydrate, hydrate, hydrate! #4: Get Plenty of Sleep. Older people often have trouble sleeping, especially women in their post-menopausal years. The reasons for this are plentiful: stress and anxiety as well as hormonal imbalances can play a part. Making rest a priority can do wonders for your daily energy levels and clarity of mind. Studies have shown that individuals with sleep disorders such as “sleep apnea” and insomnia have an increased risk of cancer. Insufficient sleep has been associated with cell damage, neurological impairment, a compromised immune system, inflammation, and accelerated aging. When you get consistent, quality sleep, however, these conditions can sometimes reverse as the body is allowed to repair and restore during sleep. #5: Exercise Your Mind. You may think of activities such as doing crosswords or sudoku, learning a language or musical instrument or reading a book as ways that you can keep your mind active in later years. But these activities are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how you can boost your brain power. Stress-relieving and focusing activities such as meditation (and movement meditations like qi gong and forest bathing) have been proven to improve the strength and length of telomeres, stretches of DNA at the end of chromosomes which protect our genes. Telomeres keep chromosomes from fraying and clumping. Shortened telomeres are associated with aging as well as cancer and higher risk of death. A 2015 Canadian study linked evidence of longer telomere strands to meditation (when compared to those who did not meditate). In addition, activities like creative visualization, repeating affirmations, and doing something like Emotional Freedom Technique (which also clears energy channels for physical healing, according to the principles of Chinese medicine) can keep you in a positive state of mind which can aid in the slowing down of the aging process. Famed actress Sophia Lauren had it right when she said, “There is a fountain of youth: it is your mind, your talents, the creativity you bring to your life and the lives of people you love. When you learn to tap this source, you will truly have defeated age.” #6: Keep Moving! Hundreds of studies have correlated even moderate amounts of exercise with lower blood pressure, lower incidents of diabetes, lower cancer rates (sometimes up to 80 percent reduction), lower rates of heart disease, increased longevity and happiness overall. Take a walk (especially in nature), swim, do some yoga or tai chi, or dance to your favorite tune. The most important thing is that you move your body at least 3 to 4 times a week for at least 30 minutes, according to experts. In addition, if your lifestyle or profession dictates that you sit for long periods of time, make sure that you get up to stretch and move every hour at least. Your Reverse Aging “Recipe” Taking key supplements (including mushrooms for supporting your immune system), eating healthy, organic foods and drinking fresh, filtered water, getting plenty of sleep, exercising the mind, and moving the body regularly. These six actions really are the “recipe” for not only a long life, but a vibrant one as well. Slowing down the aging process and staying sharp into your hundreds like the centenarians of Okinawa is possible. It simply takes discipline and a vision of a strong and healthy you, no matter what your physical age! Resources: Organixx Clean Sourced Collagens Collagen for Your Skin: Hype or Healthy? The Healing Power of Medicinal Mushrooms – Episode 158 Organixx 7M+ Organixx Ageless Brain Sleep… The experts were wrong and what you need to know! – Episode 37 Want to Slow Down Aging? Meet Your Telomeres – Episode 145 The Tapping Solution Longevity & Anti-Aging Secrets – Episode 140 Amazon John Easterling Shares His Secrets for Optimal Brain Health – Episode 152 Can Alzheimer's and Dementia Be Prevented Naturally? Inspired Health Journey: TeriAnn Trevenen – Episode 24

Empowering You Organically - Video Edition
Top 6 Ways to Reverse Aging Naturally (Without Surgery)

Empowering You Organically - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 24:19


There is no way to avoid aging. We are all destined to grow old, get sick, and die… Or are we? Although we can't completely avoid the aging process, we sure can slow it down quite a bit. And disease? Even though it may be the “norm” for an increasing number of older Americans to succumb to chronic diseases as they age, this doesn't have to be the case for you. There is a new normal when it comes to how we age — and following these six simple steps to reverse aging naturally can help you get there.   6 Ways You Can Help Reverse the Aging Process #1: Take key supplements. Nobel Prize-winning chemist, author, and health advocate Linus Pauling said, “By the proper intakes of vitamins and other nutrients and by following a few other healthful practices from youth or middle age on, you can, I believe, extend your life and years of well-being by twenty-five or even thirty-five years.” He might have added: “And you can live those extra years with excellent and vibrant health!” Supplements (and foods, which we will talk about next) that are best for keeping your body and mind sharp must contain antioxidants. Some essential vitamins to add to your anti-aging arsenal include vitamin C and E as well as Glucosamine and Coenzyme Q10. Polyphenol-rich matcha tea, resveratrol, and collagen are three other supplements that can be age-busters as well. #2:  Use the immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory support power of medicinal mushrooms. In addition, if you are serious about your anti-aging regime, you must also consider adding a medicinal mushroom supplement to your daily routine. Have you ever heard of the Japanese island of Okinawa? For generations, the population there was teeming with centenarians (people in their 100s) who were bright eyed and in great physical health. What was their secret? Eating fresh foods, spending lots of time out in nature and in their gardens, and surrounding themselves with family and friends. And, according to research conducted by the Okinawa Centenarian Study, the population also ate a large amount of various kinds of mushrooms, including shiitake and reishi mushrooms. These mushrooms have been proven to have a profound effect on the immune system and help to curb inflammatory responses. The study researchers, as well as many other studies, have linked consuming medicinal mushrooms with relief from inflammatory disease, osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disorders and digestive problems, just to name a few. #3: Eat Antioxidant Rich, Anti-Aging Foods. Besides mushrooms (which can be consumed in tea, in food form, or as a supplement), fill your plate with foods that are rich in omega-3 fats such as wild caught salmon, green leafy organic vegetables that contain high numbers of phytonutrients, berries such as raspberries and blueberries that have antioxidants called anthocyanins (which have been shown to slow tumor growth as well), and healing herbs like turmeric, basil, and ginger. Want to improve your odds of living longer and living pain-free? Make it a point to also avoid all processed and GMO foods (including GMO produce), refined sugar, wheat products (especially commercially-produced breads, pastas, and baked goods), trans fats and artificial ingredients, and keep alcohol consumption to a minimum. The best diet for staying vibrant into your 70s, 80s, and beyond is the simplest kind of diet. Eat real, recognizable food and plenty of (preferably raw or lightly steamed) vegetables in a relaxed setting and drink plenty of clean, filtered water. Even when we are older, our bodies are still primarily made of water so the key is to hydrate, hydrate, hydrate! #4: Get Plenty of Sleep. Older people often have trouble sleeping, especially women in their post-menopausal years. The reasons for this are plentiful: stress and anxiety as well as hormonal imbalances can play a part. Making rest a priority can do wonders for your daily energy levels and clarity of mind. Studies have shown that individuals with sleep disorders such as “sleep apnea” and insomnia have an increased risk of cancer. Insufficient sleep has been associated with cell damage, neurological impairment, a compromised immune system, inflammation, and accelerated aging. When you get consistent, quality sleep, however, these conditions can sometimes reverse as the body is allowed to repair and restore during sleep. #5: Exercise Your Mind. You may think of activities such as doing crosswords or sudoku, learning a language or musical instrument or reading a book as ways that you can keep your mind active in later years. But these activities are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how you can boost your brain power. Stress-relieving and focusing activities such as meditation (and movement meditations like qi gong and forest bathing) have been proven to improve the strength and length of telomeres, stretches of DNA at the end of chromosomes which protect our genes. Telomeres keep chromosomes from fraying and clumping. Shortened telomeres are associated with aging as well as cancer and higher risk of death. A 2015 Canadian study linked evidence of longer telomere strands to meditation (when compared to those who did not meditate). In addition, activities like creative visualization, repeating affirmations, and doing something like Emotional Freedom Technique (which also clears energy channels for physical healing, according to the principles of Chinese medicine) can keep you in a positive state of mind which can aid in the slowing down of the aging process. Famed actress Sophia Lauren had it right when she said, “There is a fountain of youth: it is your mind, your talents, the creativity you bring to your life and the lives of people you love. When you learn to tap this source, you will truly have defeated age.” #6: Keep Moving! Hundreds of studies have correlated even moderate amounts of exercise with lower blood pressure, lower incidents of diabetes, lower cancer rates (sometimes up to 80 percent reduction), lower rates of heart disease, increased longevity and happiness overall. Take a walk (especially in nature), swim, do some yoga or tai chi, or dance to your favorite tune. The most important thing is that you move your body at least 3 to 4 times a week for at least 30 minutes, according to experts. In addition, if your lifestyle or profession dictates that you sit for long periods of time, make sure that you get up to stretch and move every hour at least. Your Reverse Aging “Recipe” Taking key supplements (including mushrooms for supporting your immune system), eating healthy, organic foods and drinking fresh, filtered water, getting plenty of sleep, exercising the mind, and moving the body regularly. These six actions really are the “recipe” for not only a long life, but a vibrant one as well. Slowing down the aging process and staying sharp into your hundreds like the centenarians of Okinawa is possible. It simply takes discipline and a vision of a strong and healthy you, no matter what your physical age! Resources: Organixx Clean Sourced Collagens Collagen for Your Skin: Hype or Healthy? The Healing Power of Medicinal Mushrooms – Episode 158 Organixx 7M+ Organixx Ageless Brain Sleep… The experts were wrong and what you need to know! – Episode 37 Want to Slow Down Aging? Meet Your Telomeres – Episode 145 The Tapping Solution Longevity & Anti-Aging Secrets – Episode 140 Amazon John Easterling Shares His Secrets for Optimal Brain Health – Episode 152 Can Alzheimer's and Dementia Be Prevented Naturally? Inspired Health Journey: TeriAnn Trevenen – Episode 24

Choses à Savoir SANTE
La vitamine C est-elle réellement efficace contre le rhume ?

Choses à Savoir SANTE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 2:07


La vitamine C a souvent la réputation de guérir le rhume et d'en prévenir l'apparition. Or plusieurs études invitent à un certain scepticisme à cet égard, d'autant que, pour obtenir quelques effets, il faudrait consommer des doses massives de vitamine.La vitamine C n'empêche pas les rhumes...La vitamine C empêcherait donc de contracter un rhume. C'est du moins ce que prétend la rumeur. Elle s'appuie sur les affirmations de certains scientifiques, comme le chimiste Linus Pauling, qui, à la fin des années 1960, affirme que la prise de vitamine C est la meilleure manière d'éviter les rhumes hivernaux.Mais il faudrait pour cela en absorber des doses massives. Pauling en prendrait lui-même 200 fois plus que la limite conseillée.Or une vaste étude, menée en 2013 sur plus de 11.000 volontaires, a montré qu'une cure de vitamines C n'empêcherait pas l'apparition des rhumes. Les participants qui prenaient de la vitamine C souffraient d'autant de refroidissements que ceux qui s'en abstenaient....Et n'est guère efficace pour les guérirD'autres spécialistes vantent les bienfaits de la vitamine C pour guérir le rhume. À condition, là encore, d'en prendre beaucoup plus que ce qui est requis.Rappelant que certains animaux en consomment beaucoup plus que les humains, certains vont jusqu'à recommander une dose quotidienne de 2.000 mg, à comparer avec les 75 à 90 mg conseillés habituellement.La vitamine C réduirait de façon notable le taux d'histamine dans le sang, responsable notamment de certaines réactions allergiques. Elle aurait également un pouvoir antioxydant, neutralisant ainsi les effets nocifs des radicaux libres.Or, là encore, des études montrent qu'une cure de vitamine C, à raison de 1000 mg par jour, n'aurait pour effet principal qu'une réduction de 8 % de la durée d'un rhume. Ainsi, un adulte serait enrhumé, en moyenne, 11 jours par an au lieu de 12.Il semble également démontré que cette prise massive de vitamine C ne diminuerait en rien la gravité des symptômes. Aussi le jeu ne paraît-il pas en valoir la chandelle, d'autant qu'une consommation excessive de vitamine C peut se traduire par des effets secondaires gênants. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 594 (9-13-21): Neurons, Ions, and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:18).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-10-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 13, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2018 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. MUSIC – ~ 15 sec – Lyrics:  “Well you're nothing but a pack of neurons, in a shapely bag of goo.  All your thoughts and dreams, your hopes and schemes, are electrochemical, too.”This week, that music sets the stage for describing some biochemical and electro-chemical aspects of the water-based environment inside of us.  Have a listen for about 45 more seconds. MUSIC – ~47 sec – Lyrics: “Well the first time I ever saw your face, dear, my ions began to diffuse.  Your eyes aglow made the sodium flow through those membrane avenues.  When our fingers unite, more than synapses excite, and those lips I can't refuse.  I know we're more than just a chemical reaction, ‘cause I'm in love with you-oo-oo, I'm in love with you.  Well you're nothing but a pack of neurons, controlling a bag of goo.  All your thoughts and dreams, your hopes and schemes, are electrochemical, too.  You are what you eat, ‘cept for what you excrete, so watch out what you chew.  You're nothing but a pack of neurons, and I'm in love with you-oo-oo, I'm in love with you.  This is the part where the sodium and potassium ions do a little soft-shoe.”You've been listening to part of “Pack of Neurons,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va., on his 2008 album, “Mostly Live.”  According to Mr. Gramann, the title “Pack of Neurons” was inspired by the use of that phrase in The Astonishing Hypothesis, a 1994 book by Francis Crick on human consciousness.   Dr. Crick shared the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with James Watson and Maurice Wilkins for their discoveries of the structure of the DNA molecule. Mr. Gramann's song is a light-hearted look at the fundamental role of neurons, of nerve cells, in transmitting the electrical impulses that control humans' mental and physical processes.  Those nerve impulses are transmitted along neurons by changes in the concentration of electrically-charged atoms of sodium and potassium. [Note, not in audio: Neurons are the type of nerve cell that transmits impulses.  The nervous system also has other supporting cells.]  Water is vital as the solvent for those charged atoms, known as ions.  And not just in neurons, but in all biological cells, a water-based solution is the medium in which biochemical substances exist and react.  Regarding water-based solutions, chemist Linus Pauling in 1970 wrote, “One of the most striking properties of water is its ability to dissolve many substances”—including, we might add, ions transmitting the nerve impulses that right now are allowing you to hear or read these words.Thanks to Bob Gramann for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Pack of Neurons.” MUSIC – ~21 sec - Instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 450, 12-10-18, and Episode 93, 12-19-11. “Pack of Neurons,” from the 2008 album “Mostly Live,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  Bob Gramann's Web site is http://www.bobgramann.com/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Diagram of a neuron.  Image from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, “SEER Training Modules: Introduction to the Nervous System—Nerve Tissue,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/; the specific URL for the diagram was https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/tissue.html, as of 9-8-21. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN NERVOUS SYSTEM The following information is quoted from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, “SEER Training Modules: Review: Introduction to the Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/review.html, accessed 9/10/21. *The nervous system is the major controlling, regulatory, and communicating system in the body. It is the center of all mental activity including thought, learning, and memory. *The various activities of the nervous system can be grouped together as three general, overlapping functions: sensory, integrative, and motor. *Neurons are the nerve cells that transmit impulses.  Supporting cells are neuroglia. *The three components of a neuron are a cell body or soma, one or more afferent processes called dendrites, and a single efferent process called an axon. *The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord.  Cranial nerves, spinal nerves, and ganglia make up the peripheral nervous system. *The afferent division of the peripheral nervous system carries impulses to the CNS; the efferent division carries impulses away from the CNS. *There are three layers of meninges around the brain and spinal cord.  The outer layer is dura mater, the middle layer is arachnoid, and the innermost layer is pia mater. *The spinal cord functions as a conduction pathway and as a reflex center.  Sensory impulses travel to the brain on ascending tracts in the cord. Motor impulses travel on descending tracts. SOURCES Used for Audio Stewart W. Holmes, “You are Nothing but a Pack of Neurons,” ETC: A Review of General Semantics, Vol. 51, No. 4 (Winter 1994-95), pages 406-412, accessed online at https://www.jstor.org/stable/42577594?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents(subscription may be needed for access).Nobel Media AB, “The discovery of the molecular structure of DNA—the double helix,” Sept. 30, 2003, online at http://educationalgames.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/dna_double_helix/readmore.html. Linus Pauling, General Chemistry, Dover Publications, New York, N.Y, 1970).  The quotation used in this episode's audio is found on page 447. Scott K. Powers and Edward T. Howley, Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y., 2012.  See particularly pages 142-148, “Organization of the Nervous System.”Publishers Weekly, “Review of The Astonishing Hypothesis: The Scientific Search for the Soul, by Francis Crick,” Jan. 3, 1994, online at https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-684-19431-8. University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. For More Information about the Human Nervous System Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, “SEER Training Modules: Introduction to the Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 287, 10-26-15 – Skeleton system connections to water.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 450, 12-10-18 – Neurological system connections to water.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Matter3.3 – Materials interact with water.5.7 – Matter has properties and interactions. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function. ChemistryCH.5 – Solutions behave in predictable and quantifiable ways.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

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The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 07.16.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 59:27


A fermented-food diet increases microbiome diversity and lowers inflammation, study finds Stanford University, July 13, 2021 A diet rich in fermented foods enhances the diversity of gut microbes and decreases molecular signs of inflammation, according to researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine.  In a clinical trial, 36 healthy adults were randomly assigned to a 10-week diet that included either fermented or high-fiber foods. The two diets resulted in different effects on the gut microbiome and the immune system. Eating foods such as yogurt, kefir, fermented cottage cheese, kimchi and other fermented vegetables, vegetable brine drinks, and kombucha tea led to an increase in overall microbial diversity, with stronger effects from larger servings. "This is a stunning finding," said Justin Sonnenburg, PhD, an associate professor of microbiology and immunology. "It provides one of the first examples of how a simple change in diet can reproducibly remodel the microbiota across a cohort of healthy adults." In addition, four types of immune cells showed less activation in the fermented-food group. The levels of 19 inflammatory proteins measured in blood samples also decreased. One of these proteins, interleukin 6, has been linked to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, Type 2 diabetes and chronic stress.  "Microbiota-targeted diets can change immune status, providing a promising avenue for decreasing inflammation in healthy adults," said Christopher Gardner, PhD, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and director of nutrition studies at the Stanford Prevention Research Center. "This finding was consistent across all participants in the study who were assigned to the higher fermented food group." Microbe diversity stable in fiber-rich diet By contrast, none of these 19 inflammatory proteins decreased in participants assigned to a high-fiber diet rich in legumes, seeds, whole grains, nuts, vegetables and fruits. On average, the diversity of their gut microbes also remained stable. "We expected high fiber to have a more universally beneficial effect and increase microbiota diversity," said Erica Sonnenburg, PhD, a senior research scientist in basic life sciences, microbiology and immunology. "The data suggest that increased fiber intake alone over a short time period is insufficient to increase microbiota diversity."  The study will be published online July 12 in Cell. Justin and Erica Sonnenburg and Christopher Gardner are co-senior authors. The lead authors are Hannah Wastyk, a PhD student in bioengineering, and former postdoctoral scholar Gabriela Fragiadakis, PhD, who is now an assistant professor of medicine at UC-San Francisco. A wide body of evidence has demonstrated that diet shapes the gut microbiome, which can affect the immune system and overall health. According to Gardner, low microbiome diversity has been linked to obesity and diabetes.  "We wanted to conduct a proof-of-concept study that could test whether microbiota-targeted food could be an avenue for combatting the overwhelming rise in chronic inflammatory diseases," Gardner said.  The researchers focused on fiber and fermented foods due to previous reports of their potential health benefits. While high-fiber diets have been associated with lower rates of mortality, the consumption of fermented foods can help with weight maintenance and may decrease the risk of diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. The researchers analyzed blood and stool samples collected during a three-week pre-trial period, the 10 weeks of the diet, and a four-week period after the diet when the participants ate as they chose.  The findings paint a nuanced picture of the influence of diet on gut microbes and immune status. On one hand, those who increased their consumption of fermented foods showed similar effects on their microbiome diversity and inflammatory markers, consistent with prior research showing that short-term changes in diet can rapidly alter the gut microbiome. On the other hand, the limited change in the microbiome within the high-fiber group dovetails with the researchers' previous reports of a general resilience of the human microbiome over short time periods.  Designing a suite of dietary and microbial strategies The results also showed that greater fiber intake led to more carbohydrates in stool samples, pointing to incomplete fiber degradation by gut microbes. These findings are consistent with other research suggesting that the microbiome of people living in the industrialized world is depleted of fiber-degrading microbes.  "It is possible that a longer intervention would have allowed for the microbiota to adequately adapt to the increase in fiber consumption," Erica Sonnenburg said. "Alternatively, the deliberate introduction of fiber-consuming microbes may be required to increase the microbiota's capacity to break down the carbohydrates." In addition to exploring these possibilities, the researchers plan to conduct studies in mice to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which diets alter the microbiome and reduce inflammatory proteins. They also aim to test whether high-fiber and fermented foods synergize to influence the microbiome and immune system of humans. Another goal is to examine whether the consumption of fermented food decreases inflammation or improves other health markers in patients with immunological and metabolic diseases, and in pregnant women and older individuals.  "There are many more ways to target the microbiome with food and supplements, and we hope to continue to investigate how different diets, probiotics and prebiotics impact the microbiome and health in different groups," Justin Sonnenburg said.   Effect of resveratrol intervention on renal pathological injury in type 2 diabetes Capital Medical University (China), July 11, 2021 According to news reporting from Beijing, People's Republic of China, research stated, “Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a clinically common cardiovascular disease that can lead to kidney damage and adversely affect male fertility and sperm quality. Resveratrol (Res) is a natural product that has a wide range of effects in animals and cell models.” The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Capital Medical University, “This research is designed to observe the effect of resveratrol (Res) intervention on renal pathologic injury and spermatogenesis in mice with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Sixty healthy male SD mice without specific pathogens (SPF grade) were selected, and numbered by statistical software to randomize into control group (CG; n=20), model group (MG; n=20) and research group (RG; n=20). Mice in CG were given regular diet, while those in MG and RG were fed with high fat diet. Subsequently, RG was given Res intervention while MG received no treatment. Biochemical indexes [triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting blood glucose (FBG), 24-hour urinary albumin excretion rate (24h-UAER)] of mice in the three groups before and after intervention were observed and recorded. The effect of Res on oxidative stress, kidney histopathological structure, spermatogenic function, sperm density and viability of mice, as well as spermatogenic cell cycle of testis were determined. Res reduced hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia in T2D mice. By reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), Res relieved oxidative stress and alleviated kidney tissue damage. In addition, Res improved the spermatogenic function of T2D mice by increasing the sperm density and survival rate and restoring the percentage of spermatogenic cells at all levels.” According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “Res intervention in T2D mice can reduce kidney tissue damage, lower blood glucose (BG), and improve spermatogenic function by increasing sperm density and restoring the percentage of spermatogenic cells at all levels.” This research has been peer-reviewed.     Eating whole grains linked to smaller increases in waist size, blood pressure, blood sugar Study in middle- to older-aged adults suggests whole grains may protect against heart disease Tufts University, July 13, 2021 Middle- to older-aged adults who ate at least three servings of whole grains daily had smaller increases in waist size, blood pressure, and blood sugar levels over time compared to those who ate less than one-half serving per day, according to new research. Published July 13, 2021, in the Journal of Nutrition, the study by researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University examined how whole- and refined-grain intake over time impacted five risk factors of heart disease: Waist size, blood pressure, blood sugar, triglyceride, and HDL ("good") cholesterol. Using data from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort, which began in the 1970s to assess long-term risk factors of heart disease, the new research examined health outcomes associated with whole- and refined-grain consumption over a median of 18 years. The 3,100 participants from the cohort were mostly white and, on average, in their mid-50s at the start of data collection. The research team compared changes in the five risk factors, over four-year intervals, across four categories of reported whole grain intake, ranging from less than a half serving per day to three or more servings per day. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025, the recommended amount of whole grains is three or more servings daily. An example of a serving is one slice of whole-grain bread, a half cup of rolled oats cereal, or a half cup of brown rice. The results showed that for each four-year interval:   Waist size increased by an average of over 1 inch in the low intake participants, versus about ½ inch in the high intake participants. Even after accounting for changes in waist size, average increases in blood sugar levels and systolic blood pressure were greater in low intake participants compared to high intake participants. The researchers also studied the five risk factors across four categories of refined-grain intake, ranging from less than two servings per day to more than four servings per day. Lower refined-grain intake led to a lower average increase in waist size and a greater mean decline in triglyceride levels for each four-year period. "Our findings suggest that eating whole-grain foods as part of a healthy diet delivers health benefits beyond just helping us lose or maintain weight as we age. In fact, these data suggest that people who eat more whole grains are better able to maintain their blood sugar and blood pressure over time. Managing these risk factors as we age may help to protect against heart disease," said Nicola McKeown, senior and corresponding author and a scientist on the Nutritional Epidemiology Team at the USDA HNRCA. "There are several reasons that whole grains may work to help people maintain waist size and reduce increases in the other risk factors. The presence of dietary fiber in whole grains can have a satiating effect, and the magnesium, potassium, and antioxidants may contribute to lowering blood pressure. Soluble fiber in particular may have a beneficial effect on post-meal blood sugar spikes," said Caleigh Sawicki. Sawicki did this work as part of her doctoral dissertation while a student at the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and while working with the Nutritional Epidemiology Team at the USDA HNRCA. The greatest contributor to whole-grain intake among participants was whole-wheat breads and ready-to-eat whole-grain breakfast cereals. The refined grains came mostly from pasta and white bread. The difference in health benefits between whole and refined grains may stem from the fact that whole grains are less processed than refined grains. Whole grains have a fiber-rich outer layer and an inner germ layer packed with B vitamins, antioxidants, and small amounts of healthy fats. Milling whole grains removes these nutrient-dense components, leaving only the starch-packed refined grain behind. "The average American consumes about five servings of refined grains daily, much more than is recommended, so it's important to think about ways to replace refined grains with whole grains throughout your day. For example, you might consider a bowl of whole-grain cereal instead of a white flour bagel for breakfast and replacing refined-grain snacks, entrees, and side dishes with whole-grain options. Small incremental changes in your diet to increase whole-grain intake will make a difference over time," McKeown said. Methodology To measure daily grain intake, the researchers used diet questionnaires that participants completed every four years from 1991 to 2014, resulting in a median of 18 years of data. Dietary assessment data came from five study examinations, and observations were only included if participants attended at least two consecutive examinations with accurate dietary data. Participants with diabetes at baseline were excluded. The statistical analysis was adjusted for factors that might influence the results, including other aspects of a healthy diet. Limitations of the study include the fact that food consumption is self-reported, and participants may over- or under-estimate intake of certain foods based on perceived social desirability. Due to its observational design, the study does not reflect a causal relationship.   Antibiotics in early life could affect brain development Exposure to antibiotics in utero or after birth could lead to brain disorders in later childhood Rutgers University, July 14, 2021 Antibiotic exposure early in life could alter human brain development in areas responsible for cognitive and emotional functions, according to a Rutgers researcher. The laboratory study, published in the journal iScience, suggests that penicillin changes the microbiome - the trillions of beneficial microorganisms that live in and on our bodies - as well as gene expression, which allows cells to respond to its changing environment, in key areas of the developing brain. The findings suggest reducing widespread antibiotic use or using alternatives when possible to prevent neurodevelopment problems.  Penicillin and related medicines (like ampicillin and amoxicillin) are the most widely used antibiotics in children worldwide. In the United States, the average child receives nearly three courses of antibiotics before the age of 2. Similar or greater exposure rates occur in many other countries.  "Our previous work has shown that exposing young animals to antibiotics changes their metabolism and immunity. The third important development in early life involves the brain. This study is preliminary but shows a correlation between altering the microbiome and changes in the brain that should be further explored," said lead author Martin Blaser, director of the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine at Rutgers. The study compared mice that were exposed to low-dose penicillin in utero or immediately after birth to those that were not exposed. They found that mice given penicillin experienced substantial changes in their intestinal microbiota and had altered gene expression in the frontal cortex and amygdala, two key areas in the brain responsible for the development of memory as well as fear and stress responses.  A growing body of evidence links phenomena in the intestinal tract with signaling to the brain, a field of study known as the "gut-brain-axis." If this pathway is disturbed, it can lead to permanent altering of the brain's structure and function and possibly lead to neuropsychiatric or neurodegenerative disorders in later childhood or adulthood. "Early life is a critical period for neurodevelopment," Blaser said. "In recent decades, there has been a rise in the incidence of childhood neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and learning disabilities. Although increased awareness and diagnosis are likely contributing factors, disruptions in cerebral gene expression early in development also could be responsible." Future studies are needed to determine whether antibiotics directly effect brain development or if molecules from the microbiome that travel to the brain disturb gene activity and cause cognitive deficits.  The study was conducted along with Zhan Gao at Rutgers and Blaser's former graduate student Anjelique Schulfer, as well as Angelina Volkova, Kelly Ruggles, and Stephen Ginsberg at New York University, who all played important roles in this joint Rutgers-New York University project.   Taking the brain out for a walk A recent study shows that spending time outdoors has a positive effect on our brains Max Planck Institute for Human Development, July 15, 2021 If you're regularly out in the fresh air, you're doing something good for both your brain and your well-being. This is the conclusion reached by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE). The longitudinal study recently appeared in The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry. During the Corona pandemic, walks became a popular and regular pastime. A neuroscientific study suggests that this habit has a good effect not only on our general well-being but also on our brain structure. It shows that the human brain benefits from even short stays outdoors. Until now, it was assumed that environments affect us only over longer periods of time. The researchers regularly examined six healthy, middle-aged city dwellers for six months. In total, more than 280 scans were taken of their brains using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The focus of the study was on self-reported behavior during the last 24 hours and in particular on the hours that participants spent outdoors prior to imaging. In addition, they were asked about their fluid intake, consumption of caffeinated beverages, the amount of time spent outside, and physical activity, in order to see if these factors altered the association between time spent outside and the brain. In order to be able to include seasonal differences, the duration of sunshine in the study period was also taken into account. Brain scans show that the time spent outdoors by the participants was positively related to gray matter in the right dorsolateral-prefrontal cortex, which is the superior (dorsal) and lateral part of the frontal lobe in the cerebral cortex. This part of the cortex is involved in the planning and regulation of actions as well as what is referred to as cognitive control. In addition, many psychiatric disorders are known to be associated with a reduction in gray matter in the prefrontal area of the brain. The results persisted even when the other factors that could also explain the relationship between time spent outdoors and brain structure were kept constant. The researchers performed statistical calculations in order to examine the influence of sunshine duration, number of hours of free time, physical activity, and fluid intake on the results. The calculations revealed that time spent outdoors had a positive effect on the brain regardless of the other influencing factors. "Our results show that our brain structure and mood improve when we spend time outdoors. This most likely also affects concentration, working memory, and the psyche as a whole. We are investigating this in an ongoing study. The subjects are asked to also solve cognitively challenging tasks and wear numerous sensors that measure the amount of light they are exposed to during the day, among other environmental indicators," says Simone Kühn, head of the Lise Meitner Group for Environmental Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and lead author of the study. The results therefore, support the previously assumed positive effects of walking on health and extend them by the concrete positive effects on the brain. Because most psychiatric disorders are associated with deficits in the prefrontal cortex, this is of particular importance to the field of psychiatry. "These findings provide neuroscientific support for the treatment of mental disorders. Doctors could prescribe a walk in the fresh air as part of the therapy - similar to what is customary for health cures," says Anna Mascherek, post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) and co-author of the study. In the ongoing studies, the researchers also want to directly compare the effects of green environments vs urban spaces on the brain. In order to understand where exactly the study participants spend their time outdoors, the researchers plan to use GPS (Global Positioning System) data and include other factors that may play a role such as traffic noise and air pollution.     Vitamin C found to block growth of cancer stem cells, says peer reviewed study University of Salford (UK),  July 8, 2021   Increasingly, researchers are discovering the role played by cancer stem cells in the growth and spread of the disease. In groundbreaking new research, vitamin C showed its ability to target cancer stem cells and stop their growth – preventing the recurrence of tumors. Although mainstream medicine has been slow to accept the cancer-fighting properties of vitamin C, the exciting results of this study could help to change that. It's official: Vitamin C interferes with cancer stem cell metabolism In a newly-published study conducted at the University of Salford in Manchester, vitamin C demonstrated its power to stop tumors in their tracks by interfering with cancer stem cell metabolism – suppressing their ability to process energy for survival and growth. Cancer stem cells are responsible for triggering tumor recurrence, and promoting their growth and metastasis. Researchers believe that cancer stem cells give cancer its ability to resist chemotherapy and radiation – the reason for treatment failure in advanced cancer patients. The study, helmed by researchers Michael P. Lisanti and Gloria Bonucelli, was published last month in Oncotarget, a peer-reviewed journal. Peer-reviewed studies are considered the gold standard of scientific research. The study was the first to explore the effects of vitamin C on cancer stem cells – and provided the first evidence that vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid, can target and kill them. In a side-by-side comparison of seven different substances, vitamin C even outperformed an experimental cancer drug. Vitamin C works ten times better than the experimental cancer drug 2-DG The team investigated the impact on cancer stem cells of seven different substances. Three were natural substances, three were experimental drugs, and one was an FDA-approved clinical drug that is widely used. The natural products studied, along with vitamin C, were silibinin – derived from milk thistle seeds – and caffeic acid phenyl ester – or CAPE – derived from honeybee propolis. The experimental drugs were actinonin, FK866 and 2-DG, and the clinical drug was stiripentol. Researchers noted that vitamin C destroyed cancer stem cells by inducing oxidative stress. And, the vitamin performed this process ten times more effectively than 2-DG. Vitamin C used two different mechanisms of action to attack cancer stem cells. It worked as a pro-oxidant in cancer cells, depleting them of the antioxidant glutathione and causing oxidative stress and apoptosis – or cell death. It also inhibited glycolysis, which is the process that creates energy production in cell mitochondria. By inhibiting glycolysis, vitamin C inhibited mitrochondrial protein synthesis in cancer stem cells – while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Non-toxic vitamin C lacks the serious side effects of many pharmaceutical drugs Both experimental and approved cancer drugs can feature serious adverse effects, including thrombocytopenia – a deficiency of platelets in the blood that can cause bruising and slow blood clotting. They can also induce lymphopenia – a decrease in the body's infection-fighting white blood cells – and anemia, or low red blood cells. And the clinically-approved drug used in the study, stiripentol, can cause severe nausea, vomiting and fatigue. On the other hand, the National Cancer Center reports that high-dose vitamin C has caused very few side effects when used in clinical studies. Scientifically speaking, the future looks bright for vitamin C All seven of the substances tested inhibited the growth of cancer cells to varying degrees – including the non-toxic natural substances. But researchers said the most “exciting” results were with vitamin C. The research team concluded that vitamin C was a “promising new agent,” and called for more study to explore its use as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapies to prevent tumor recurrence and growth. “Vitamin C is cheap, natural, non-toxic and readily available, so to have it as a potential weapon in the fight against cancer would be a significant step,” observed Dr. Lisanti. As in most of the successful studies showing vitamin C's cancer-fighting properties, researchers used high doses of vitamin C, administered intravenously. IV vitamin C therapy is available in some alternative and holistic cancer treatment clinics worldwide. The real reason why vitamin C is ignored by conventional medicine and the mainstream media Again, vitamin C was 1,000 percent more effective than 2-DG, an experimental pharmaceutical drug – in targeting cancer stem cells. If vitamin C were developed by big pharma, these results would be shouted from the rooftops and featured in newspaper headlines. Yet, as always, “the powers that be” in mainstream medicine respond with…crickets. The reason; say natural health experts, is all too obvious. As a natural nutrient and vitamin, vitamin C can't be patented, and is inexpensive and easy to obtain. Therefore, there is no incentive for cancer clinics to promote it – when they can instead rake in the profits from chemotherapy. The indifference of conventional medicine to vitamin C is all the more frustrating because the nutrient has been shown to be an effective and non-toxic anti-cancer agent in previous studies, including many conducted by Nobel prize-winning scientist Linus Pauling. Vitamin C has been shown in a Japanese study to cut mortality in cancer patients by 25 percent. In addition, it has inhibited tumors in animal studies, and been shown to kill cancer cells in a wide variety of cancer cell lines. How much longer will the potential of this safe and powerful cancer-fighting nutrient be overlooked?     Mothers' high-fat diet affects clotting response in sons, mice study finds University of Reading (UK), July 13, 2021 Mothers who follow a high fat diet may be affecting the cardiovascular health of their sons, according to a new study in mice. In a paper published in Scientific Reports, a team of scientists found that the male children of mice mothers who were fed on a high fat diet during pregnancy had unhealthy platelets, which are responsible for clotting, when fed on a high fat diet themselves. Although both male and female children of the mothers fed on a high fat diet showed a variety of risks associated with cardiovascular disease, it was only the platelets of male mice which were considered hyperactive. These platelets were larger, more volatile and showed signs of stress compared to offspring fed on a normal diet. Dr. Dyan Sellayah, lecturer in cellular and organismal metabolism at the University of Reading said: "Heart disease is one of the UK's biggest killers and mounting evidence suggests that the risk of developing it may be increased during early development, particularly during the gestation period where mothers have a high-fat diet/are obese. The underlying mechanisms by which an unhealthy maternal diet may impact heart disease risk remains largely unknown. "This study used a mouse model of maternal obesity to understand how specialist blood cells known as platelets may be programmed during pregnancy. Platelets are important for blood clotting but are also the cause of heart attacks and strokes if they are activated at the wrong time and place." Children of the mothers fed on a high fat diet who followed a control diet however did not show the same concerning heart disease risks. The offspring from the group given a control diet had very similar levels of fat mass, cholesterol and other markets of cardiovascular health as the children of mothers fed a standard diet. In addition, where mothers had been fed a standard diet and their offspring fed a high fat diet, those children had higher levels of fat mass and other cardiovascular markers, but their platelets were statistically similar to the other groups apart from where both mum and child were fed high fat diet.  Dr. Craig Hughes, lecturer in cardiovascular biology at the University of Reading said: "This study revealed that maternal obesity during pregnancy causes offspring platelets to become hyperactive in response to a high-fat diet in adulthood. These results raise the possibility that the risk of unwanted blood clotting (aka thrombosis) in adulthood could be altered during pregnancy by diet of the mother. "The specific mechanisms for why high fat diets affect male offspring are still being investigated but we can see that there's likely to be a double-hit where both mums and sons diets together were required to see these bigger, more hyperactive platelets."

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 07.15.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 58:42


Short chain fatty acids: An 'ace in the hole' against SARS-CoV-2 infection Scientists find that short chain fatty acids can be used to reduce susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality from COVID-19 University of Fukui (Japan), July 14, 2021 Humans are no stranger to coronavirus (CoV) pandemics. Just like SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19), another member of the coronavirus family--SARS-CoV--caused the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic across parts of Asia in 2003. But, its spread was contained way faster than COVID-19. So, what makes SARS-CoV-2 so contagious? Both SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 viruses bear "spike proteins" which get inside our cells by binding to a protein called angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) that is found in our cells. However, the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein has been found to have a higher binding affinity (10 to 20 times that of SARS-CoV) to ACE2, thus establishing a link between the pathogen and the protein. Interestingly, recent studies have shown that patients with COVID-19 who have rhinosinusitis (i.e., inflammation of the nose) have a low risk of hospitalization. Moreover, the expression of ACE2 was reduced in patients with rhinosinusitis. Coincidentally, another study has shown that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), produced by bacteria in the gut have beneficial effects in allergy and viral infections. These separate findings prompted an investigation of the effect that SCFAs in the nasal cavity against SARS-CoV-2 infection by scientists from the University of Fukui, Japan, led by Dr. Tetsuji Takabayashi. In a new study published in the American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy, the scientists attempted to understand the effect of SCFAs on ACE2 expression in the nasal passage, and the potential impact on COVID-19 infection. "This is the first report that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) effectively reduce the ACE2 levels in human airway epithelial cells," remarks Dr. Takabayashi. To understand the status of ACE2 expression in patients with allergies, the researchers studied the levels of ACE2 in the inner lining of the nose in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis induced by Japanese cedar pollen (SAR-JCP) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Using techniques like real time-PCR to quantify the expression of ACE2, the researchers found that there was no increase in ACE2 expression in in patients with SAR-JCP, whereas it was decreased in patients with CRS. To better understand the effect of SCFAs on ACE2 expression, the researchers cultured nasal epithelial cells and exposed them to either SFCA and double-stranded RNA (similar to the nuclear material found in some viruses and known to enhance ACE2 expression). Upon examining the expression of ACE2, the researchers saw that the SFCAs had suppressed ACE2 expression in the presence of the RNA as well. These results suggest that SFCAs has potential therapeutic applications against COVID-19. Dr. Takabayashi explains, "The nasal mucosa exhibits the highest ACE2 expression among human organs and hence is a prominent target of original infection. Therefore, the development of strategies to downregulate ACE2 expression in nasal epithelial cells could reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission and be useful as a novel therapeutic approach." The team's timely findings will certainly aid in our fight against COVID-19.   Flavonoids may slow Alzheimer onset Tufts University Human Nutrition Center, July 13, 2021 The following information was released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture: According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 5.8 million Americans aged 65 or older live with Alzheimer's disease, and that number is projected to nearly triple by 2160. Fortunately, USDA-funded research may have found a tasty way to slow disease onset. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that diets high in flavonoids may protect cognitive health. Flavonoids are plant nutrients known for their antioxidant, antiviral, and anticancer properties and are found in berries, tea, dark chocolate, and other foods. "Alzheimer's disease is a significant public health challenge," said Paul Jacques, nutritional epidemiologist at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. "Given the absence of drug treatments, preventing Alzheimer's disease through a healthy diet is an important consideration." Jacques's study, which followed 2,809 people for nearly 20 years, revealed that diets high in fruits and vegetables showed significant promise to quell the onset of Alzheimer's. "Our study showed that individuals with the highest intakes of flavonoids were more than 50% less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, relative to those with the lowest intakes," he said. "Plant foods, such as vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds are good sources of flavonoids." According to Jacques, flavonoid-rich diets help more than just Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. "The bottom line is that there are many reasons to consume a healthy diet, including lower risks of cardiovascular disease and some cancers. We can now add protection of cognitive health and prevention of Alzheimer's disease to that list."     Mitochondria malfunction shown to be the major cause of Parkinson's University of Copenhagen (Denmark), July 9, 2021 12,000 people in Denmark and 7 to 10 million people worldwide suffer from Parkinson's Disease (PD). It is the second most common neurogenerative disorder of aging and the most common movement disorder, but the cause of the disease is largely unknown. In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show that the most common form of the disease, encompassing 90 to 95 percent of all Parkinson's Disease cases known as sporadic PD, is caused by a blockage of a pathway that regulates the nerve cell's powerhouse, the mitochondria. "Just like when people eat, cells take what they need and get rid of the rest waste products. But if our brain cells have this specific kind of signaling blockage, it means that the powerhouse of the cell—mitochondria—cannot get cleaned up after being damaged," explains corresponding author and group leader Professor Shohreh Issazadeh-Navikas at the Biotech Research & Innovation Centre. The blockage leads to an accumulation of high amounts of damaged mitochondria, while not being able to produce enough energy for the cells. It causes neurons to gradually die, which is the reason for the development of Parkinson's Disease symptoms, and why it leads to dementia. The blockage is caused by a dysregulation of the immune genes, more specifically a pathway called type 1 interferon, which is normally important for fight against viruses, but now we show that it is also responsible for regulating the energy supply of the nerve cells. "Every part of our body needs to be regulated. We get a signal to stop eating, when we are full, and the same thing happens everywhere else in our body. If we get an infection, parts of our body need to fight it and stop it from replicating. But when the infection is cleaned up, the signal should subside. This is the job of a protein called PIAS2. That causes the blockage of the type 1 interferon-pathway, and when the infection is over, the blockage should stop and go back to normal. But that does not seem to be the case in patients with Parkinson's Disease. We further demonstrate that this dysregulation leads to a defect in the mitochondrial energy supply, as mentioned before," says Issazadeh-Navikas. These pathways are very important for brain functions, but they are also associated with microbial and virus recognition. For example, they are very important for fighting COVID-19, and a mutation in the related gene has been shown to be linked to a deadly outcome after contracting COVID-19. The researchers combined and analyzed four data sets, which studied neurons from brains with Parkinson's Disease and looked at what type of genes they express. They then looked at which gene patterns were disturbed in patients with Parkinson's Disease and especially those who had also developed PD with dementia. In order to test the results, the major findings of the combined data was tried in three different mouse models using a negative regulator of the type I interferon pathway, PIAS2, which had been identified from the patients study as one of the key proteins linked to the progression of Parkinson's Disease and dementia. "We show that a high accumulation of the PIAS2-protein is what is causing the blockage in the pathway, which should have activated the processes responsible for removing damaged protein and mitochondrial garbage," says Issazadeh-Navikas. "The accumulation of damaged mitochondrial mass further leads to increase of other toxic proteins. So when we compare patients to same-aged healthy patients without Parkinson's Disease, we see that this PIAS2-protein is highly expressed in the neurons, which is why this pathway should be evaluated for potential roles in the other forms of familial Parkinson's Disease that we have not studied here." The researchers hope the study will encourage research to counteract the pathway blockage, which could have a beneficial impact on the disease and towards preventing dementia. In the next stages, the Issazadeh-Navikas group will study how the pathwaycontributes to neuronal homeostasis and survival, as well as how its dysregulation causes neuronal cell death.   Combining plant-based diet and a healthy microbiome may protect against multiple sclerosis Metabolism of isoflavone by gut bacteria protects mice from MS-like inflammation University of Iowa, July 13, 2021 A new University of Iowa study suggests that metabolism of plant-based dietary substances by specific gut bacteria, which are lacking in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), may provide protection against the disease.  The study led by Ashutosh Mangalam, PhD, UI associate professor of pathology, shows that a diet rich in isoflavone, a phytoestrogen or plant-based compound that resembles estrogen, protects against multiple sclerosis-like symptoms in a mouse model of the disease. Importantly, the isoflavone diet was only protective when the mice had gut microbes capable of breaking down the isoflavones. The findings were published July 9 in Science Advances. "Interestingly, previous human studies have demonstrated that patients with multiple sclerosis lack these bacteria compared to individuals without MS," Mangalam says. "Our new study provides evidence that the combination of dietary isoflavones and these isoflavone metabolizing gut bacteria may serve as a potential treatment for MS." Isoflavones are found in soybeans, peanuts, chickpeas and other legumes. The study also found that mice fed the isoflavone diet have a microbiome that is similar to the microbiome found in healthy people and includes the bacteria which can metabolize isoflavones. Conversely, a diet lacking isoflavones promotes a microbiome in mice which is similar to one observed in patients with MS and lacks beneficial bacteria that can metabolize isoflavone. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the brain and spinal cord where the immune system attacks the protective coating surrounding nerve fibers. The symptoms of this disease include muscles weakness, balance issues, and problems with vision and thinking. While there are treatments that slow down the disease, there is currently no cure for MS.  Although the exact cause of MS is unknown, a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors are thought to initiate the disease. Recently, the gut microbiome--the trillions of gut bacteria the live inside human intestines--has emerged as a potential environmental factor that contributes to MS. In prior work, Mangalam and colleagues demonstrated that there are significant differences between the gut microbes of patients with MS and people without MS. Specifically, patients with MS lacked bacteria that are able to metabolize isoflavones. Although role of gut microbiome in human diseases such as MS is being appreciated, the mechanism through which these gut bacteria might influence the disease is poorly understood. In the current study, Mangalam's team, including first author Samantha Jensen, a UI graduate student in immunology, found that the bacteria that are lacking in patients with MS are able to suppress inflammation in a mouse model of MS. The team compared the effects of an isoflavone diet and an isoflavone-free diet on disease in the mouse model of MS. They found that the isoflavone diet led to disease protection. However, when the team placed the mice on the isoflavone diet but removed the isoflavone-metabolizing gut bacteria, the isoflavone diet was no longer able to protect against MS-like symptoms. When the bacteria were reintroduced, the protective effect of the isoflavone diet was restored. Furthermore, the team was able to show that a specific isoflavone metabolite called equol, which is produced by the gut bacteria from isoflavone, is also able to provide protection against disease.  "This study suggests that an isoflavone diet may be protective so long as the isoflavone metabolizing gut bacteria are present in the intestines," say Mangalam, who also is a member of the Iowa Neuroscience institute and Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center.   How a Mediterranean diet could reduce osteoporosis University of East Anglia (UK), July 12, 2021 Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. New findings published today show that sticking to a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts, unrefined cereals, olive oil, and fish can reduce hip bone loss within just 12 months. The study is the first long-term, pan-European clinical trial looking at the impact of a Mediterranean diet on bone health in older adults. More than 1,000 people aged between 65 and 79 took part in the trial, and volunteers were randomised into two groups - one which followed a Mediterranean diet and a control group which did not. Bone density was measured at the start and after 12 months. The diet had no discernible impact on participants with normal bone density, but it did have an effect on those with osteoporosis. People in the control group continued to see the usual age-related decrease in bone density, but those following the diet saw an equivalent increase in bone density in one part of the body - the femoral neck. This is the area which connects the shaft of the thigh bone to its rounded head, which fits in the hip joint. UK study lead Prof Susan Fairweather-Tait, from UEA's Norwich Medical School, said: "This is a particularly sensitive area for osteoporosis as loss of bone in the femoral neck is often the cause of hip fracture, which is common in elderly people with osteoporosis. "Bone takes a long time to form, so the 12-month trial, although one of the longest to date, was still a relatively short time frame to show an impact. So the fact we were able to see a marked difference between the groups even in just this one area is significant." The EU-funded trial, led by the University of Bologna, was completed by 1142 participants recruited across five centres in Italy, the UK, the Netherlands, Poland and France. Those following the Mediterranean diet increased their intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts, unrefined cereals, olive oil, and fish, consumed small quantities of dairy products and meat and had a moderate alcohol intake. People in the intervention group were provided with foods such as olive oil and wholemeal pasta, to encourage them to stick to the diet, and were also given a small vitamin D supplement, to even out the effects of different levels of sunlight on vitamin D status between the participating countries. At the start and end of the trial, blood samples were taken to check for circulating biomarkers. Bone density was measured in over 600 participants across both groups at the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Of these participants, just under 10% were found to have osteoporosis at the start of the study. Co-researcher from UEA, Dr Amy Jennings said: "Although this is a small number it is sufficient for the changes in femoral neck bone density between the two groups to be statistically significant. "Those with osteoporosis are losing bone at a much faster rate than others, so you are more likely to pick up changes in these volunteers than those losing bone more slowly, as everyone does with age. "With a longer trial, it's possible we could have picked up changes in the volunteers with normal bone density. However, we already found it quite challenging to encourage our volunteers to change their diet for a year, and a longer trial would have made recruitment more difficult and resulted in a higher drop-out." The researchers would now like to see a similar, or ideally longer, trial in patients with osteoporosis, to confirm the findings across a larger group and see if the impact can be seen in other areas of the body. If the condition could be mitigated through diet, this would be a welcome addition to current drug treatments for osteoporosis, which can have severe side effects. But in the meantime, say the researchers, there is no reason for those concerned about the condition not to consider adapting their diet. "A Mediterranean diet is already proven to have other health benefits, reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and cancer," said Prof Fairweather-Tait. "So there's no downside to adopting such a diet, whether you have osteoporosis or not." 'A Mediterranean-like dietary pattern with vitamin D3 (10 μg/day) supplements reduced rate of bone loss in older Europeans with osteoporosis at baseline: results of a one year randomised controlled trial' is published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition .   Rishi mushroom promotes sleep through a gut microbiota-dependent and serotonin-involved pathway  Hang-zhou Medical College (China), July 10, 2021 According to news reporting out of Zhejiang, People's Republic of China, research stated, “Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom used in traditional Chinese medicine with putative tranquilizing effects. However, the component of G. lucidum that promotes sleep has not been clearly identified.” Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Hangzhou Medical College, “Here, the effect and mechanism of the acidic part of the alcohol extract of G. lucidum mycelia (GLAA) on sleep were studied in mice. Administration of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg GLAA for 28 days promoted sleep in pentobarbital-treated mice by shortening sleep latency and prolonging sleeping time. GLAA administration increased the levels of the sleep-promoting neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine and the Tph2, Iptr3 and Gng13 transcripts in the sleep-regulating serotonergic synapse pathway in the hypothalamus during this process. Moreover, GLAA administration reduced lipopolysaccharide and raised peptidoglycan levels in serum. GLAA-enriched gut bacteria and metabolites, including Bifidobacterium, Bifidobacterium animalis, indole-3-carboxylic acid and acetylphosphate were negatively correlated with sleep latency and positively correlated with sleeping time and the hypothalamus 5-hydroxytryptamine concentration. Both the GLAA sleep promotion effect and the altered faecal metabolites correlated with sleep behaviours disappeared after gut microbiota depletion with antibiotics.” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “Our results showed that GLAA promotes sleep through a gut microbiota-dependent and serotonin-associated pathway in mice.”     Vitamin C found to block growth of cancer stem cells, says peer reviewed study University of Salford (UK),  July 8, 2021   Increasingly, researchers are discovering the role played by cancer stem cells in the growth and spread of the disease. In groundbreaking new research, vitamin C showed its ability to target cancer stem cells and stop their growth – preventing the recurrence of tumors. Although mainstream medicine has been slow to accept the cancer-fighting properties of vitamin C, the exciting results of this study could help to change that. In a newly-published study conducted at the University of Salford in Manchester, vitamin C demonstrated its power to stop tumors in their tracks by interfering with cancer stem cell metabolism – suppressing their ability to process energy for survival and growth. Cancer stem cells are responsible for triggering tumor recurrence, and promoting their growth and metastasis. Researchers believe that cancer stem cells give cancer its ability to resist chemotherapy and radiation – the reason for treatment failure in advanced cancer patients. The study, helmed by researchers Michael P. Lisanti and Gloria Bonucelli, was published last month in Oncotarget, a peer-reviewed journal. Peer-reviewed studies are considered the gold standard of scientific research. The study was the first to explore the effects of vitamin C on cancer stem cells – and provided the first evidence that vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid, can target and kill them. In a side-by-side comparison of seven different substances, vitamin C even outperformed an experimental cancer drug. The team investigated the impact on cancer stem cells of seven different substances. Three were natural substances, three were experimental drugs, and one was an FDA-approved clinical drug that is widely used. The natural products studied, along with vitamin C, were silibinin – derived from milk thistle seeds – and caffeic acid phenyl ester – or CAPE – derived from honeybee propolis. The experimental drugs were actinonin, FK866 and 2-DG, and the clinical drug was stiripentol. Researchers noted that vitamin C destroyed cancer stem cells by inducing oxidative stress. And, the vitamin performed this process ten times more effectively than 2-DG. Vitamin C used two different mechanisms of action to attack cancer stem cells. It worked as a pro-oxidant in cancer cells, depleting them of the antioxidant glutathione and causing oxidative stress and apoptosis – or cell death. It also inhibited glycolysis, which is the process that creates energy production in cell mitochondria. By inhibiting glycolysis, vitamin C inhibited mitrochondrial protein synthesis in cancer stem cells – while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Both experimental and approved cancer drugs can feature serious adverse effects, including thrombocytopenia – a deficiency of platelets in the blood that can cause bruising and slow blood clotting. They can also induce lymphopenia – a decrease in the body's infection-fighting white blood cells – and anemia, or low red blood cells. And the clinically-approved drug used in the study, stiripentol, can cause severe nausea, vomiting and fatigue. On the other hand, the National Cancer Center reports that high-dose vitamin C has caused very few side effects when used in clinical studies. All seven of the substances tested inhibited the growth of cancer cells to varying degrees – including the non-toxic natural substances. But researchers said the most “exciting” results were with vitamin C. The research team concluded that vitamin C was a “promising new agent,” and called for more study to explore its use as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapies to prevent tumor recurrence and growth. “Vitamin C is cheap, natural, non-toxic and readily available, so to have it as a potential weapon in the fight against cancer would be a significant step,” observed Dr. Lisanti. As in most of the successful studies showing vitamin C's cancer-fighting properties, researchers used high doses of vitamin C, administered intravenously. IV vitamin C therapy is available in some alternative and holistic cancer treatment clinics worldwide. Again, vitamin C was 1,000 percent more effective than 2-DG, an experimental pharmaceutical drug – in targeting cancer stem cells. If vitamin C were developed by big pharma, these results would be shouted from the rooftops and featured in newspaper headlines. Yet, as always, “the powers that be” in mainstream medicine respond with…crickets. The reason; say natural health experts, is all too obvious. As a natural nutrient and vitamin, vitamin C can't be patented, and is inexpensive and easy to obtain. Therefore, there is no incentive for cancer clinics to promote it – when they can instead rake in the profits from chemotherapy. The indifference of conventional medicine to vitamin C is all the more frustrating because the nutrient has been shown to be an effective and non-toxic anti-cancer agent in previous studies, including many conducted by Nobel prize-winning scientist Linus Pauling. Vitamin C has been shown in a Japanese study to cut mortality in cancer patients by 25 percent. In addition, it has inhibited tumors in animal studies, and been shown to kill cancer cells in a wide variety of cancer cell lines. How much longer will the potential of this safe and powerful cancer-fighting nutrient be overlooked?

Gut Check Project
Talking SH!T with Sabine Hazan, MD - #58

Gut Check Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 87:34


Eric Rieger  0:00  Hello gut check project fans and KB MD health family. I hope you're having a great day. It is now time for episode number 58. And of course we got an awesome guest. It's Dr. Sabine Hasan, who is she a world renowned research gastroenterologist, she is based in California, and she is an expert in faecal microbial transplants, FMT trusted it fast. I couldn't do it. Anyhow FMT. So essentially you're taking healthy poop from a healthy person, and using that microbiome that's inside of there to be transplanted into somebody else who may not be doing so well and could have all kinds of disease etc. Regardless, she's at the forefront of finding real solutions that can be accepted by our bodies to make us better make us well even help you lose weight. That's right. Could poop because somebody else's poop Have you lose weight, and earmuffs in case you have any young kids in the car, but she wrote a book and it's called let's talk shit, although the AI is upside down like a exclamation point. So regardless, let's get to her interview. And well first got to pay the bills though of course brought to you by artron to artron to get your daily polyphenols that are Tron teal.com or just go to love my tummy calm get your daily polyphenols. That's right. Developed by my partner, Dr. Kenneth Brown, gastroenterologist, these polyphenols are terrific for you. Whether you having digestive issues, maybe you have symptoms that are similar to those of IBS. Or you're just an athlete and you want to be your best artron to love my tummy.com use code. gut check and save I believe 20% Next, of course, unrefined bakery they've been a longtime supporter, unrefined bakery.com excellent, incredible food, regardless of your specialty diet that's unrefined bakery.com if you are keto, paleo or vegan, they've got it in that is desserts breads, etc. pie crust yeah pie crust, do you think that you are gluten free or celiac disease and you can't have pie crust, unrefined bakery.com use code gut check and save 20% off of your entire first order delivered to all of the lower 48 states and last but not least go to KB Md health.com to get your very own KB MD health CBD and Brock elite which has severe veins or ultra until you can get the signature package from Dr. cans Brown. kb Md health.com. Now it is time for oh I'm sorry, KB Md health.com. Use code GCP to save 20% off of any order. Now it's time for episode number 58. Dr. Sabine HasanKen Brown  3:03  Hey, what's up everybody? Welcome to Episode 58 of the gut check project. Ooh, today's a really, really cool one. We have Dr. Sabine Hasan, who will be our very first gastroenterologist as a guest. So I'm a gastroenterologist, but she's way smarter than I am and does all kinds of really cool stuff on read. What's that? Cool stuff? Yes. Cool stuff. Indeed. It's awesome. So I put together a quick little bio for you. I apologise that I don't have your probably standard bio. So I hope I get some of this stuff, right. This is Oh, and you'll notice there's an empty seat here where my co host, Dr. Eric riegert crna, who's usually here on time. Don't do that. It'll make it blurry. It'll make it blurry. It'll get us out of focus. He almost photo bombed us. Dr. Hayes in this is Eric reser. We've already been talking and we practically had a whole podcast before this podcast. You missed it. Sorry. Oh, that'sEric Rieger  4:05  okay. Another topic that I'd like to talk about is promptness, and being on time, that's another thing that really well, apparently I wasn't very good at today.Ken Brown  4:14  So I'm really surprised. You know, what is what's interesting, and I hope it's something that we can comment later is that Eric got a round of antibiotics. And ever since then, it's so weird. He's just always late for everything, and I'm blaming it on the microbiomeUnknown Speaker  4:26  100% I think we should test this microbiome. I'll send you a kit. That's the first thing I do.Ken Brown  4:34  Alright, so Dr. Sabine Hasan is a Board Certified gastroenterologist and avid researcher. She has a thriving practice in Ventura, California, and she started her own clinical trial company 16 years ago called Ventura clinical trials, and has been principal investigator and sub investigator in over 150 clinical trials. Now you say that number but I'm in like, For, and it was exhausting. So 150 Holy cow. Alright, so during this period, she became an expert in the microbiome with an interest in cdiff. Clostridium difficile. So through this process, she became one of the world's leaders in faecal microbial transplant. And through her research and expert, and through research and experience, she realised the unmet need to dive deeper into the microbiome. And she founded progenitor biome. So she is the founder of her own company, progenitor biome. And most recently, she published a fun, easy to read book for the lay person called let's talk shit. And I got it, and I read it and I laughed a lot. And it's really good. Written in a great lay, lay person point of view. And I loved it. So Dr. Hayes, you want to talk some shit? Talk?Unknown Speaker  5:57  Let's talk shit, for sure. Oh, at least finally a podcast that's like willing to go there? Like, oh, I don't think we should talk about it. Or we should say another word. And I'm like, Are you kidding me? I've seen half the books that are out there. The Art of not giving a f EU Oh, that's number one bestseller. But let's talk shit. We can't even say the word shit. Since when is the F word more acceptable than the shit? Come on?Ken Brown  6:28  This is true. Unfortunately, I think I use the words quite frequently, both of them often. So I really do not discriminate.Unknown Speaker  6:36  I named it that way. Because too often, you know, we sugarcoat microbiome, right? We made it pretty. But I think we're entering in a world of microbiome, we got to tell the public and the consumer what it's all about. And that's why I wanted it. First of all, I thought it was funny. I mean, this is like a tough topic, right? People come to us as gi doctors, bloated, gassy symptoms of you know, bowel changes, etc. And so we hope to, we have to explain to them and how do you explain a topic like the microbiome, without, you know, a little bit of humour to digest it a little bit better? My opinion, that's what I that's why I named it. So to give it full transparency. And then the other thing was to, essentially, you know, make people smile, because there's so many jokes you could say about it.Ken Brown  7:30  I heard you on another podcast where you're exactly right. As gastroenterologist, we have no problem talking about it. But I have the same issue with patients. They're like it was so embarrassing. I don't want to discuss this. I'm like, we have to discuss this. And then that goes from that to Okay, well, as long as you're comfortable with it. Here's some pictures.Eric Rieger  7:49  Not all the time, like no pictures, please. Okay, sometimes randomly the nurses they showed up with the bag.Unknown Speaker  7:58  Field great. I mean, you know, you probably know Neil Stallman, right? Yeah. So Neil, when I was a fellow at University of Florida, and I was presenting my research on visceral hyperalgesia, which was super clean, would come to me and say, You better start getting your hands dirty, because we're going into the ship business. I said, No, please, they call me Gucci girl in the GI lab, because if it's dirty, if the colonoscopy was not clean, I was out of there. I'm like, sorry, we do the prep, come back next week. I'm not cleaning the patient, right. And then the mere mention of having to actually play with tools and putting it in there was just something I never ever thought that would even happen to me. And, um, you know, when a patient is about to die from C diff, and you tried everything from, you know, antibodies after antibiotics to, you know, clinical trials, and that was my, my path, right? I was doing clinical trials, and Neil was doing people transplants. And we met when I was doing a clinical trial on faecal material in a capsule because every time I would do a clinical trial for pharma, if the pharmaceutical product didn't work, I would do faecal transplant, because I would say, Well, you know, the patient trusted me to heal them. And whether they got placebo or the drug didn't work, it's my obligation to make sure they're fine. So I would do people transform them. And then I discovered all these things. And of course, I you know, I blame Neil in a way for stepping into this because I've stepped in fully and every day I play with it, I can tell you the first time I I was, you know, looking at collecting stools, I think I almost passed out. But then you develop you know, that survivor or that, you know, warrior mentality that you're like, I can do this, I can do this. I went into gi I'm tough and blameless goes I can do this. And that's what happened.Ken Brown  9:59  So I'm really curious about your history. Can you just give us a little background about like your family and where you came from who you're married because I find it all really interesting. Your, your past is fantastic to where you are right nowUnknown Speaker  10:13  increasing the volume. So I'm I was born in Morocco. My parents, you know, my background is pretty much a mud like Spanish background German, you name it. It's all mixed in Italian, I was happy to see on 23andme I have some Italian blood and Greek. So I'm a mutt. And essentially, my parents immigrated to Montreal, I was raised in Montreal, went to medical school in Nova Scotia. My siblings all went to McGill and wanted the McGill route. And I went down housing because I didn't want to, you know, in my family, you had to live at home if you're going to college in Montreal, but if you go to college elsewhere, then that's the only exception to moving out of the house. So I said, Okay, I'm going to Dalhousie and Dalhousie was, was fun because it was you got into the rotations of, of medicine right off. You know, from day one, you were seeing patients. So that was kind of fun for me. And then I was gonna go back to Montreal, and I had a cold and I was interviewing for positions for internal medicine and gi for internal medicine, I don't even think I was going to be a GI at the time. And I got an interview a University of Miami Jackson Memorial Hospital, and they paid for my plane tickets, because they love Canadians back then. And they paid for my hotel. So I said, Oh, free trip to Miami. And then I show up in Miami, and I'm interviewing, I'm doing the interview. And they're telling, they're showing me like a room of 10 CAT scans, and you know, just like beautiful hot. I mean, you've been I don't know, if you've been to Miami Jackson Memorial, it's it's a city in itself. And back then, I mean, we had one CAT scan and the whole country of Canada, I mean, show up in my app, and you've got like 10 CAT scans in the room, and it's like, and then they sell you on Miami, and they're like, Oh, you could live in, you know, on the beach. And then you could go to the hospital, like, I'm there. I'm coming. So I showed up. And that was during the, the world of HIV. You know, that's when HIV was really, you know, really starting and all right, I remember here I am this, you know, kid that my parents kept like in a, you know, protected and clean environment. And then I'm the move, I'm moving to Miami, and I'm dealing with, you know, HIV, like 12 HIV patients a night and patients are like throwing blood all over the walls. And you remember the, I don't know, you're probably much younger than I am. But, you know, this was this was war, right? And so, me and Neil and my colleagues from Miami, we we trained under those circumstances of patients coming and crashing from HIV, kind of what we're seeing with COVID. Right?Ken Brown  13:04  It does have some and yes, I did have that we had our aids Ward where you would have to rotate, and then you have to make sure because their CD forecasts are so low that you you know, so you didn't want to give them any microbes that could hurt them. We just didn't know back thatUnknown Speaker  13:20  you didn't know. And we were so scared, right? We were if we got pricked by a needle, we, you know, you'd hear the residents like chopping their fingers. You know, going into a room of a patient that was altered mental status and being dressed like an astronaut going into space. And I met my husband, by the way, in Jackson Memorial first day of internship. And we became best friends because we were on call together. And it wasn't like scrubs or er, although kind of, but it was kind of fun. We were together we like work hard and do call and then we'd go party after on South Beach. So we met under this circumstances, and I think some of my best friends and you know, I've been married to my husband almost 30 years. So I think that really that environment really, you know, bonded us forever The memories, my colleagues because it was really survival. And he used to joke because he used to say, you look like an astronaut going into space. Going to see these spaces are like I'm not coming because we had TB resistant TB and HIV. We had all sorts of infections in that hospital. So it was really Warzone. And at the same time, you're treating these patients that are swallowing bags of cocaine, and in condoms, right and you have to like wash the bag evacuated. So it was really it was intense. I mean, we were I was taking care of your HIV patients criminals. I mean, it was just it was a interesting times but it forms you and makes you you know, a top doctor that you can do survive, you know, helping people no matter who they are. Right. So I think that that was it was great for me. It was a great education. It was great. And then in Miami and residency, some guys said, because we were, my husband wanted to go into cardiology, and I said, Well, maybe I'll go into cardiology. And then some guy said to me, you know, we don't take an eye and I said, how's gi his gi a good feeling looks kind of fun. I mean, it's like surgery but without doing surgeries, and he said, we don't take women in gi so don't bother well. That's all it took.Ken Brown  15:40  In there on challenge taking you ripped off your space suit room is roomful of AIDS people vomiting blood me like I'm gonna do giEric Rieger  15:52  the lion You sound like you're talking shit. Let's talk shit.Unknown Speaker  15:56  So basically, yeah, and back then gi and it was actually a miracle because back then gi was like the the flexible StG where you're like, touching your like, baby, you train with that. You were still you were probably kaleidoscope. IKen Brown  16:12  am actually a few years older than you. And so I went through everything you're saying I'm 100% dead. But I will say this, you've got way more guests than I did. I interviewed at Miami. And I went I looked at the volume and what was wrong because Miami had that they had more than a bigger HIV population, tonnes of age, lots of trauma, all that stuff. And I'm like, I like the warp. So I was training in Nebraska and I just got sick of the cold. And so I just moved south, I just drew a line from California, Arizona, across and it basically Texas is like Midwest but south. So I just but Miami I was I remember thinking, Oh my gosh, if I do residency here, you're just you're just not gonna sleep.Unknown Speaker  16:53  And actually, I was sleeping because I came out. So I was a Canadian train. So we trained with like physical exams, right? you examine the patient, you actually say, oh, gallbladder problem just by doing, you know, Toby's face and percussion, etc. So, you know, it was much faster for me to take care of patients. So me and my husband used to have like, gone, you know, he would, he would come in the column. He's like, you're sleeping, I didn't sleep. And I'm like, Oh, you know, and then we would have this competition of who would discharge the patient and treat the patient the fastest. So there'd be a board. And it'd be like Hasan and Steinberg and HIV patients and I'd be like, I'm giving them this, this, this, that and that. Okay, they're fine out of the hospital one day, and then it'd be like zero. He's in 20, Steinberg and thenKen Brown  17:42  eventually he just made everybody DNR and just flowing out.Unknown Speaker  17:48  He was it was a you know, it was it. We do things for challenges, right. I mean, we do things. Why do you go into medicine? Otherwise, if it's not the treat, that's what bothered me with this whole COVID is like, was the idea of doing nothing. I the patient's having shortness of breath, oxygen, the SATs and you do nothing? I couldn't understand that mentality because you have to try.Ken Brown  18:12  So I have a feeling that this we're just going to go all over the map here. So I'm going to get right off because there's something I was super impressed that you did, you gave a lecture on COVID and ivermectin way back. So now ivermectin, now, all these things were being said, are now coming to light and going, what the heck, why don't we? Yeah. How did you realise ivermectin fairly early.Unknown Speaker  18:36  So it was I started the protocol with the hydroxychloroquine, which went completely political. And my idea was, well, makes sense, right? That's kind of like what we do with H. pylori, multiple drug combo. So I thought, well, hydroxychloroquine azithromycin would be killing the virus and then vitamin C, D and zinc would boost the microbiome, right? So in other words, you kill but you boost right? So you we we bring the balance. And so Dr. Berg when hydroxy glow. At the same time, Dr. Brody said you know what, I think ivermectin is a better solution, because he was investigating himself. And you know, Dr. Brody is the man we all follow for his leadership on faecal transplant, but also he was the one the brain behind H. pylori and triple therapy. So he was the one that said combination therapy, and he's big on combination therapy. I mean, he's used combination therapy for two patients in Parkinson's, he published on that. So, basically, for me, it was following his direction. And he said to me, you know, what we need to do ivermectin, doxycycline zinc. And I said, Yeah, but you got to add the vitamin C and vitamin D. Nothing should be done without vitamin C, and D because you're killing the virus. And in fact, the microbiome is going to tell the story, and it's going to be amazing, because I showed the data to Dr. Ayman quickly, and you know, Dr. COVID,Ken Brown  20:02  right. The Godfather of probiotics,Unknown Speaker  20:05  yes. And and by the way, he was like fantastic data. Fantastic. And he's on my paper that's coming out. So yeah. So I got I got Dr. bozkurt from Turkey. I got Dr. Brody, of course in the paper and even quickly, so and it's basically blank, blank, blank susceptible marker for COVID-19. And we know we're going to show in the microbiome why ivermectin is working. Oh, that's cool.Ken Brown  20:39  So both Eric and I are big fans of the podcast. Brett Weinstein the Dark Horse podcast. Yes. And he had the critical care doctor from New York, pa Corey. Yeah, up here. And I was just floored because, you know, like all of us. We, we there's only so many hours in the day and we do quite a bit of research and I'm and ivermectin caught me off guard. I went, I was like I was, I was behind the curve on that one. I looked back and went. How did I miss that? How did I miss ivermectin? That's why I was so impressed that you were on it right away.Unknown Speaker  21:09  Yeah. And by the way, when you see what is doing to the microbiome, it's going to be as clear as life because what happened is because I have a CR O, and I'm able to put these protocols through pipelines through the FDA. And by the way, I did it because I had enough of pharma. You know, I had enough of putting these products and then you saw with the Alzheimer study, this Alzheimer drug goes into market, and the benefits are like, you know, what's going on there. So I said, we need to have doctors lead the path for pharma. In other words, doctors come up with these solutions, and bring them to the FDA. And so I kind of started this with COVID was more of a lead to show it Look, I'm taking combination therapy, and I'm putting them through a pipeline, I wrote the protocol and I submitted to the FDA and the FDA approved it right off the bat. Then the FDA then had second thought, because they said, Well, you need to have a placebo, and I said a placebo and COVID in the middle of a pandemic. I'm like, that's like. And I said, we're in the middle of a pandemic. Rome is burning. Are you asking me to use a bucket that doesn't have water? On the fire?Ken Brown  22:30  Okay, the house is on fire. I'm going to give you a bucket. Yeah. And you're gonna get a bucket. Now go put it out. Yeah. And then walk one of those bucket was gonna have water and one's gonna have nothing makes gasoline. More than anything, because we're talking about COVID here. I mean, it's like giving a placebo is like giving gasoline.Eric Rieger  22:48  Okay, so some burning Sinan fire truck. And over here sim school bus?Unknown Speaker  22:52  Yeah. So that's basically what happened. And then I started, when I submitted these protocols, I said, Okay, find the, the placebo is going to be a vitamin. So we did vitamin versus the other thing. But what we discovered is when we started looking at the microbiome and looking at we found COVID, in the stools, whole genome sequencing presented at an american college of gastro and then it got published, took six months to get published on gut pathogen, because they couldn't believe it. Right? They were, what is this real, we had to like submit, it was sent to the who I mean, it was just too ridiculous, you know, long term time to get that paper published. And so when we started looking at the microbiome, we discovered something in the microbiome. And we discovered something in the microbiome of those that were super sick, compared to those that were not so sick, compared to those who never got COVID to begin with. But yet we're exposed to patients with COVID. So we said, Wow, if this is a susceptible marker, so it was so basically became like a susceptibility marker, right. And so we determined that if we don't know the baseline of the microbiome in a patient, and we're giving them placebo, and that person has those microbes are super high. In other words, where's your immunity in your gut, right? And your immunity at baseline is super high, and I'm giving you a sugar pill? Well, of course, it doesn't matter because you already have like super strong microbiome to survive. COVID So is it fair to compare a placebo to a person, you know, that doesn't have a good microbiome? You know, you're comparing like an athlete running a marathon to a person on a wheelchair. Unless you know, the microbiome, you're really doing placebo controlled trials useless and COVID in mind,Ken Brown  24:47  you're bringing up something that is, I mean, could be a complete game changer in how pharma would do and type of research in the future. Yes, because what we're saying what you're saying is, if You do not have. And we've discussed this kind of stuff on the on other podcasts. If you do not have a diverse microbiome, are you able to take full advantage of these medications that we believe are helping because the FDA determined that there's a safety profile on it, therefore, it goes to the second trial. And then just like you said, in phase three and four trials, you're 6% better than placebo. So because of that, it's now a $14 billion drug that got bought by a bigger company.Unknown Speaker  25:26  Yes, absolutely. And we are entering into a world of research now, that is no longer research. In my opinion, medicine is no longer an art, it's a business. And that's scary to me, because that's not why I went into medicine. I'm sure that's not why you went into medicine. We're all individuals, we should all have an individual treatment. We have the technology now, especially with what we do with Regina biome, to understand with precision, these microbes of the individual, and the future is beautiful, because it's going to be a readjustment of microbes to attain that precision medicine. We need to get there, we can't be stopped, because roadblocks is what stops innovations and stops answers. And we got to keep asking questions and say, is this is this correct? Is this safe? Why are we doing this? Why are we not? The moment we stop asking questions, we stop science, we stop research, we stop finding answers. And then in my opinion, humanity is lost. I mean, you're talking about diversity. Look at the diversity of microbes. Over the last 100 years, we've gone from diverse microbiome to now an diverse look at 1980 the rate of autism was one in 2000. Now it's one in 20. In New Jersey, something is happening in the microbiome that we have to pay attention to and is it the herbs we're giving? Is it these vitamins that are over the counter and supposedly have the vitamins right? Or is it the probiotics? Is it the right probiotics, the wrong probiotics? So I think all that we need to fine tune a little bit more.Ken Brown  27:06  fine tune is an understatement thatUnknown Speaker  27:09  sure, like people come to you and say, Doc, I want I'm on this probiotic. And you're looking at this bottle and you're shaking your head, right. Probably. Dr. Hasan,Ken Brown  27:21  have you met Kiran Krishnan from microbiome labs? Yes, yeah. Very, very, very smart microbiologist. We had him on the podcast and we discussed this exact thing about the fact do you know if it's alive, do you know that you can get a a railcar, you know, like one of those big giant crates for like $2,000. From who knows where and then anyways, we went into the whole aspect of probiotics and how easy it is to make your own probiotic. Yes, put your label on it, but you have no idea if it's gonna do that, you know, you have no idea if there's data it's gonna survive. So absolutely on the same page. bacteria in the gut that's live is dangerous, in my opinion. Yeah. And that's in your book, your offices. It's funny, because in your book, you you had a brief segment about how people in the desert when they would get I don't know, dysentery, they would eat Kagame. And Kiran brought up that exact same thing. oil based, soil based people figured out early on that somebody got sick, they would eat the camel dung, and they would get better. Yes. And you brought it up there, which was fascinating.Unknown Speaker  28:27  To the soldiers were stuck. I forget where but they they had Calera and that's how, you know, the Bedouins told them. Just eat the apples from the camel, which is really the poop from the camel, and they cure the colour all of a sudden.Ken Brown  28:45  Isn't that crazy?Unknown Speaker  28:46  I know. We're not going to go into that because I don't think people want to eat that. But I think we can understand the microbes that are play. Right. So that was my thing is we're heading up.Ken Brown  28:58  I just saw Eric trying to order a camel off Amazon. No,Eric Rieger  29:02  no, no, I've got a coupon for camel apples. Oh, that's what it is.Unknown Speaker  29:05  I already trademarked sisters of Camelot. I was in Jordan with my sisters. And we were on camels. And of course, you know, they're pooping all over. And it came to me. I said, I need to analyse the stools. So of course, I took my eye because I did bring some kids with me. And I'm taking it. I took it home and looked at it. So I said, Okay, we're starting sisters of Camelot. But we're not going to start that because I'm my plan not to make people eat pizza becauseKen Brown  29:36  of you. You're the reason why when I'm coming back from a from a country and in customs, they're like, Did you bring any animals? Do you have any food? Do you have any camel dung on you? And I'm like, why would I have Canada? No.Unknown Speaker  29:50  It was me. It was me. Actually one time my husband brought in an apple to an island and actually we got fine. I think they got the memo. They were like Dr. Hasan's come in, there's probably some microbes in there, stay away. $200 fine.Ken Brown  30:07  Alright, so we got so many things I would love to talk about. But I do want to really hone in on progen ibiam for several different reasons. Number one, I am also trying to run a different company and you know, have all this stuff, you've got a lot of stuff going on, we got a lot of similarities and how your enthusiasm and your need to keep your curiosity forces you to start other companies to sort of meet the need that you're trying to find. So can you please tell everybody what progetto biome is?Unknown Speaker  30:36  So progenitor biome is a genetic sequencing lab, what does that mean? It basically looks at the microbes, the genetics of the microbes, so the fingerprint of your microbiome, kind of like your DNA, but the DNA of all your microbes that co exist and cohabitate in your gut. It's so when I explain this, we have a choice. When we look at the microbiome to look superficially, it's kind of like scuba diving and being at the ocean, in the top of the ocean and seeing guppies or going super deep into the ocean and seeing the life and so we go super deep with every patients. So we can look superficially and do a lot of patients with that cartridge. So when we do genetic sequencing, you have to take that stool sample, which is the size of a fingernail, and then we have to tag it and do library preps are called and then we put them on these cartridges, and then essentially the cartridge we have a we have a choice, we can use the cartridge and do multiple development and see the surface. Or we can go deep, deep and use that same cartridge into the depth. So we go into the depth of the microbiome, to look at the microbes a species because that's what we want. We want species of microbes because we as doctors understand species, you know, to the rest of the for the forever the world of microbiome has been from acuities bacteroides. Right? But that's very superficial. So if you remember microbiology you go phylum class, order family, genus, species. I don't want to be at the phylum phylum is like looking at Planet Earth, right? I don't want to be at the class. That's like looking at London. I want to be almost at the family to say Mr. And Mrs. Jones, but I really want to see the species to see the kid of Mr. And Mrs. Jones, who has autism, the species tells the story, right? Because when you see mycoplasma for the first time, which is a cellular doesn't have a cell wall, and you see 40,000 sequences or 40,000 mycoplasma shapes into the microbiome. You say this kid has mycoplasma, and that's the cause of his problem. Maybe, right? Because then the next step would be, well, what is mycoplasma succeeding, and is mycoplasma. So creating something and therefore active in that patient, or it's just a dead organism? But even if it's a dead organism, why does that kid have so much relative abundance of that? So really, it's looking at the species and understanding the species yesterday, I was excited because I had a Crohn's patients. So remember, for Crohn's, I'm always looking for mycobacterium tuberculosis, right? Because that was Dr. Brody's idea. That map is the cause of Crohn's. Right? But when, but other scientists have come in and says said, well, you're sending your your sindhya and turistica is the cause of Crohn's. And then others have said, malice sees your firfer. And so you look at all that and you go Well, which one is it is a mouse, he's your first and your semi analytic as a map. So it's important to look at the species. And when you look at the species, you start going, Wow, this patient has a lot of eco lie a lot of Shigella, a lot of demopolis. There's definitely a dysbiosis there, right, because we know that these microbes have been the culprit of problems E. coli, chronic urinary tract infections, you know, Shigella, you know, all these bugs. So when you look at the species, and you see the species, and you can kind of make a correlation, it helps in the diagnosis and helps guide you with the patient. And so, to me, that's what it was basically. So that's why I started 42 clinical trials, we're actually up to 59. Now on every diseases, because it was that look, every time a patient comes in with Crohn's, we would say, Crohn's database going there, but what we discovered from the beginning with progetto biome when we looked at everyone, and that was something that made me think, you know, what's out there like you biome is not legit, because they're comparing individuals to others, but we're all different. How can we be compared? So what we so the first thing we discovered Regina biome is we're all different, which, you know, I know, you know, by common sense, right? We all have different fingerprints. How can we have the same microbiome? and Why would my microbiome that was in Jordan, B compared to someone that lives in Greece, right? Completely different microbiome. But why am I healthy with this microbiome? And this person is not healthy with down microbiome, right? That's the million dollar question. So we started noticing, well, if we are all different, how do we compare? How do we understand the microbiome, so the only thing that you can compare is really within the family. And then the other thing that you can compare is within the individual. So whenever you have a product that you want to give it, you have a patient with Crohn's, and you attain a cure. And that was my thing that I would speak about at conferences, attain a cure, understand the microbiome, right? Because if you attain a cure on the same patient, and you see the microbiome before and after the cure, you know that something changed in the microbiome, and what was it that changed that obtain the cure. And so that's basically my bath is, is looking at families. And then from there, once you have like a group of microbes that you've identified and said, Okay, well, that makes sense. This is the bugs, these are the bugs that are related with Alzheimer's, because I've improved the patient's memory. And now these bugs have disappeared. Now, let me look at other groups and see if those bugs are in those patients with Alzheimer's, and let's come up with an essay. That's a formula. So ideally, what I want is the dictionary of all the bugs with diseases.Ken Brown  36:43  Let me back that up just a little bit. First of all, it's super fascinating. And there's a lot going on here. But as the as gastroenterologist, and I know that my colleagues get this, I get second opinions. And so they'll come in, and they'll just hand me this pile. And in evitable, II, there's some sort of stool analysis. And then somebody will circle things and then say, you need to take this supplement for this, this supplement for this this supplement. And I've always just flipped it over and said, I'm sorry, just because we can analyse it doesn't necessarily mean that we need to make recommendations on this or that we can manipulate it. You're saying, just to clarify is that progen A biome your company is doing a much deeper dive and making the association with diseases, yes, with the person that comes in so that you can at least develop a trend and start to predict how or what I need to do for it.Unknown Speaker  37:43  And the other thing we did is basically we created an assay that we felt were the 25 actually 15 most important microbes for disease. And we validated that. So what does that mean? We took microbes that were cultured, we bought them, and we put them through the pipeline. And lo and behold, see this was seeded because we had the microbe. So that's validation process, right? The second thing we did is we verified the validation process. In other words, let me repeat that to sample Am I getting the same value? And then let's reproduce it right. So let's reproduce it at month one that's reproduce it by someone else, another technician takes on the same standard operating procedure of how we develop this asset. And basically, we produces the asset. So I was very vague at the beginning. And I hired a genetic sequencer, PhD physician, who is actually behind the bracket gene. And his genius, who developed the essay for me with me. And I said to him from the beginning, I said, Listen, I want to be able to give you a stool sample, and I want you to be able to reproduce the same thing. In other words, I give you my stool sample today, tomorrow, next year, it should be the same fingerprint, the same exact colours. Because if you I'm giving you a stool sample today, and in a month, I'm giving you another sample, but it's no longer the same colours, and the same fingerprint while you're comparing apples and oranges. And that was the whole problem with all these sequencing lab because I remember and again, you'll see them and I would call them because like you I was getting patients that would bring me Sue samples, and I would say what does that mean? I mean, like bacteroides in your gut, what does that mean? And I would call I would call Neon is like nothing, it's all bogus. And I know there's a whole holistic path out there that has looked into this, but you know, they have their vision but unfortunately, you know, we need to bring the holistic and we the idea that holistic healers have achieved and bring in into gi to understand it with the microbiome In my opinion, right. Bring everything that's out there and say, Okay, well, we all see this from this guy and this from this guy. Let's put it all together to say, yes, this is accurate information. This is valid, verified and reproducible data, because everything in science, you have to reproduce it right? If I do faecal transplant on a patient that's has alopecia areata, and my patient grows hair like Dr. Colleen Kelly. Then I've just reproduced Dr. Colleen Kelly's data. And I can say, Well, I did this ABCD like Dr. Kelly, and I got ABCD the same thing and my patient blue hair, right. So reproduction of validation, verification, and reproduction of data is very important in research. But, you know, the problem is just too many we live in a world where people want to just fast, fast development of products fast sell, you know, like sell a probiotic, sell this sell that. And we've stopped the research because it takes time to do research, but it doesn't have to take time to do research.Ken Brown  41:06  Where you're gonna say something? Yeah,Eric Rieger  41:07  I had a quick question is, so you've talked about the microbiome. And obviously, you've been able to look at different diseases and then figure out where they match up. And whether the same somebody it's kind of interesting to me, though, is that locally, that makeup of that microbiome, of course, is at the local level in the colon. But they've all looked at the second level and tried to map out that it also matches not just in the makeup of the microbiome, but what those post biotic metabolites would look like. So that the systemic responses are also the same to mimic what what the makeup isUnknown Speaker  41:44  absolutely an excellent point. There's so the microbiome is different at every location in the coalmine, that what we're doing is really a beginning of seeing what it's looking like at a deep level. The next step that we're going to do, and we're going to be working with a company that developed a capsule that is guided that takes a sample of Seoul, from every different locations, where we can show with precision that the stomach microbiome looks like this, the small bowel microbiome looks like this, the seachem looks like this, the transverse colon. So that's going to be coming because that with that technology, hopefully we can deliver precision microbes to those areas to achieve cures in the future. And, you know, capsule endoscopy, I was the first one Well, one of the first doctors to start using it. And that was the first time that we saw that I saw myself a parasite floating in the small bowel. That was a revelation, right? When you look at the, the sequencing of the microbiome, and you see all these microbes, and I said that I found c diff in my gut, um, you start going, Wow, this there's a mystery there that needs to be figured out. Yeah. Because the microbiome is everything. You're you're born with a lot of good microbes, you die with very little good microbes, right? You live, and then the microbes consume your body and put you back into the earth. So from the earth to the earth. I mean, we're proving that with the microbiome. So even on a and I think for me, the biggest lesson about the microbiome is really that diversity is key to life, key to health. And I was just speaking on the microbiome at a farm polyface Farm that's really big on regenerative farming. And so they believe in diversity of farming, they believe in, you know, coconut, you can't just put like avocado trees, you got to put the avocados with the blueberry trees with the tomatoes with everything. And it's the diversity that creates the beauty of the soil and the amazing, you know, matrix of microbes underneath the ground that feeds us really.Eric Rieger  43:55  So yeah, they they try to discourage monocropping now, because it will destroy the soil. They wanted, they want to switch it up. Yeah, right.Unknown Speaker  44:04  Well, you see, Amazon jungle, they tried to do that they tried to utilise things from the Amazon jungle.Ken Brown  44:11  So one more time in your book, you're you're not discussing the examples that you have in the book. But I was just thinking you had that great section on we should be doing green burials because what we're not doing is giving our microbiomes back we have micro biomes are trillions of microbiome we should give them back to the soil so that then other you know, it'll fertilise plants. We shouldn't be embalming ourselves. We shouldn't. We should be green burying and let that happen.Unknown Speaker  44:42  We should, we should. So that's what we should be doing. I have someone at the door but I'm gonna ignore them. You can go get him. You can.Eric Rieger  44:49  I am on bring him on.Ken Brown  44:51  Let's listen, we have some reach. Maybe Dr. Brody saw this and said I'm gonna fly over there and see Right or Yeah, that would be great. Do you have one quick question about progetto biome and then IUnknown Speaker  45:12  talked to Dr. Brody like every day two to three times a day times on love the man will have toKen Brown  45:19  genius I've never personally met him obviously read tonnes of his tonnes of his work even quickly I've met a tonne of times and you know he's just so nice and so approachable and everything. Quick question for you not for Dr. Hasan but to Sabine is it Sunday now you're sitting clean, it's fine. So being the how I built this aspect. So as a as somebody that built presented by him, how did you think about organising like that stuff? That's that was really intimidating to me. How do you how do you build a business?Unknown Speaker  45:51  You know, I built it basically, I just my attitude with everything in life is I just jump in, and I just expect, you know, to find something. So I basically jumped into it. I saw, you know, it was it was during the Woolsey fire, the whole backyard burned. And I was in communications with Dr. Feingold, who was the father of bacteria in anaerobic bacteria in the gut, he actually wrote the book anaerobic infections. And I was in communications with him because earlier on, I had done a faecal transplant on a patient who had Alzheimer's and he remembered his daughter's Date of Birth six months later. So to me, that was one of those, you know, and Dr. Brody likes to call it Martians. It's one of those Martians that comes in your front door and you say, wow, there's life on Mars. And so I called Dr. Feingold. And so what am I seeing? When I change the mind? Which microbe Am I seeing when I changed the microbiome in a patient with Alzheimer, and he remembers his daughter's date of birth. And Dr. Feingold said, You're seeing this bacteria that I cultured for so many years, nobody wanted to take on the study and to support it. So I'm giving you the protocol. Get yourself a next generation sequencer machine gets yourself alive, a scientist, and he showed me the path, right? He was 97 years old. And he showed me the path he gave me the paper. And then he put I put it in my Sage because I said, Well, I'm not going to start a genetic lab that's like, you know, at least a couple million. And so what happened is he passed away during the Woolsey fire, my whole backyard burns. And the family calls me and they go, Dr. Hayes, and we want to give you like all the books of our dad, and he signed all his books. So I had like, I have about 1000 books in my I picked up I took a pickup truck, and I picked up the books. My husband thought I was crazy. It's like, our house is burning. And I said, Don't worry about the house. I don't care. This is more important that this is like a seat. This is his work. I wanted to take it on. And I felt like and I felt like it was like tag you're it right. And about a month later, I started communicating with Dr. Brody because Neil had introduced us at ACG and said, oh, by the way, Sabine also cured Crohn's disease with faecal transplant. And he said, what he took my card, and then called me in December, and I said, By the way, I got the paperwork from, I got everything. And I found a couple of patents with you and Dr. feigl. You guys were communicating together those wonderful man, wonderful scientists, brilliant mind. And I said, Well, we got to continue this. And then he said, by the way, I'm working with Dr. Adams, who's publishing a data on autistic children post faecal transplant. So I said, he said, Be ready. You're gonna have the flood. This is Dr. Brody. I'm autism, I don't even know anything about autism. No way. And then next thing, you know, I start my lab. And I told my husband, I said, we're not rebuilding the backyard. I don't care about the house. I'm building a genetic sequencing lab. So he goes Sure, honey, and my if you know, my husband, my husband's a great guys, cardiologist. You know, hi, doctor. Amazing. And he's like, yeah, sure money, do whatever you want. You want to analyse shit, go for it.Unknown Speaker  49:15  I said, Okay, I'm buying a machine. So, and it was kind of at that point in my life where, you know, my, you know, you your kids are growing up and you've done the raising and they're blooming on their own and you're, you know, at that point where you say, Okay, well, what is my life mean? I'm no longer a mom. Okay, great. I'm a GI doctor, I do research for pharma. But now farmers getting into the shed business, and we don't even understand it. So I saw this light and I just said, I think this is my path. And then lo and behold, everything was just opened up. I mean, my first case of faecal transplant was a patient with metastatic melanoma. That I submitted the protocol to the FDA, the FDA thought I was crazy for wanting to put stools in a woman's body Hold on who was dying, but her haemoglobin was seven. She wasn't eating anything. She was dying. I had to fight with them to let me do it. And I saw her starting to crave chicken nuggets after the faecal transplant, the same cravings that her grandson had. So that was an open an eye opener for me. She ended up living a lot more months than she was supposed to, to to begin where she should have died within the month. But I think the faecal transplant really helped her and I think we're seeing that with, you know, MD Anderson's work with faecal transplants, and chemo, etc. So I think that was the path. I didn't really think of money because people always ask me, Well, how do you support it? How do you venture and I said, Well, let me create a nonprofit. So I created a nonprofit. And then next thing, you know, I wrote the book was shali. And, and everything, like even Shelley came to me in my office, it was just like divine intervention.Ken Brown  50:56  Shelley? Who is Shelly, I don't know her.Unknown Speaker  50:58  So Shelly is an author, she writes, you know, she writes books. And she, her husband, was a friend of mine. And we started talking, he's a pilot. And he said, you know, and I said, I need to write this book. And he goes, one is why don't you have Shelly, I'll pay you. And she puts it in the book. And she wrote, I helped Dr. Hayes and get her shit together. Because this is what happened. I gave her all my stack of papers. I said, this is chapter one. Let's start chapter one. And then she started. So as she was building, and we were building dog book. And then Dr. Brody, of course, every time we had a chapter, we're like, what do you think is that said, it's like, I like the quotes I like, you know, because he's very much into, you know, quotes and old quotes from, you know, people in the past. So we started, you know, writing. And then at the same time, I started building these protocols. And I had a team of writers that I basically, I had my, my, my main writer that I said, you know, let's start writing these protocols. And little by little, it was built, and I and Andrea showed me from day one, a patient with Crohn's disease. And he showed me the microbiome, and I changed the microbiome, I played with it with certain products like you that I believed could change the gut. And I was able to reach a cure in this kid, and I was able to see the cure in the microbiome. So before and after. And so when I saw that, I said, I have something. And then I saw see this in 17, the first 17 patients, I saw c diff, and all of them. So I said, you know, maybe we're wrong about C. diff May, and I and I actually challenged the industry, the infectious disease doctors, because I said, maybe we all have C diff, and maybe it's what we give our gut that kills off all the microbes, the diversity, that causes c diff to start succeeding, it's toxin, right? And so, you know, infectious diseases are very pragmatic. They're like, well, if you didn't call to it, then it's not there. And I can't say, Well, how do you culture a dead bacteria? How do you take a tree that's dead and expect to plant it? It doesn't work. I mean, you almost have to culture it anaerobically, right. And so I said, well, but the next generation sequencing shows the whole genetic sequence of the microbe, right? And then when we did RNA pipeline, which is the you know, so we have a bunch of pipelines when we look at microbes, right? So we actually can do a DNA pipeline that looks at our bacteria, or we can do an RNA pipeline, which looks at the bacteria reproducing. So if you see a microbe is reproducing, and you see it high in the messenger RNA pipeline, then you know that this microbe is active.Ken Brown  53:48  That that's that's a game changer. That's awesome. Yes. Nobody showed it. Nobody. Nobody's ever said that before. Because I remember mark, you know who Mark Pimentel is and cedars? Yes, I know, Mark. So I remember Mark was describing Well, when we're doing these stool studies, where basically it's like going into a neighbourhood and looking at the trash, and then making these assumptions about what's going on inside. That that's just trash is what you're looking at. Oh, the mRNA that's huge. That's big fish.Unknown Speaker  54:18  Yes. And then the metabolomes is the next step, right? Are those microbes to creating something like the sofa Vibrio in the gut, right, then we know that sofab embryo was linked with autism from Dr. Feingold. So he thought that the sofa Vibrio or Clostridium perfringens could play a role with autism. Well, when you see the sofa Vibrio in a family in one kid that has autism, and the rest of the family doesn't have autism, and don't have it, but the kid has 40% relative abundance of the sofa of embryo you don't even need to do metabolomic studies on that because you know, that there's that The problem most likely, and then that good faecal transplant would be a solution. Oh, that's, that's so cool.Ken Brown  55:06  I talk to my patients that, especially people with certain food cravings are battling their weight and stuff. And I'm like, well, it could be that you're not really it's not really you and controlled your microbiome, would you discuss briefly your two daughters? In your experience?Unknown Speaker  55:20  Yeah. So. So I took antibiotics, my young, my old, my oldest also, and, you know, I have a hard time I used to eat like, in Miami, I used to eat the whole tuna subway, and you know, would not gain a pound naito cucumber, and I get a pile. And my little one eats 5000 10,000 calories. Sometimes she'll eat like a one o'clock in the morning, the whole pizza, and then an apple pie doesn't gain weight. She's a toothpick, right. And so we looked at the family microbiome, and actually, there was a group of microbes that is potentially the obesity marker. There's also a group of markers that are potentially the cholesterol. And so this is a new world, right that we're entering. So even with Alzheimer's, we're seeing similarities in the microbiome. So we need to understand, but more important, I think, then understanding the microbes isn't is understanding the environment of the microbes. Because you saw studies when they do so we know that when we do faecal transplants, we are achieving improvement in patients, right. But you saw the studies where they remove the faecal material and they just had the liquid then they implanted it and they still got improvement, right? So something in the substance, something in the environment, the substances, I think, make a big, big difference. It's all gonna make sense to you. When you read the paper with ivermectin.Ken Brown  56:44  I'm so excited. I just I'm literally like thrilled.Unknown Speaker  56:49  Vitamin C and vitamin D, because I'm going to be writing Linus Pauling was right.Ken Brown  56:54  That's coming. I agree. With everything you said. I have a couple quick comments. Number one, your doorbell rang. And he did tell you that emotion would show up on your front doorstep that could have been, and Oh, well. And then I got a I have a I have a quick story for you. Yes, that we were interviewing a fellow. He was from Yale. And this is gonna be about eight to 10 years ago. So before faecal microbial transplant FMT was being discussed. We're out to dinner with them. I've took them to a nice steak restaurant here in here in my city. And I was asking him about his research. And he goes, Well, what we're showing is and he's talking, and the waitress was there, and she was like, This is interesting. And she was listening. And she was a little bit obese. And he goes, Well, we're taking stool from skinny mice and giving it to fat mice. And those fat mice are losing weight. And then vice versa. Right, like, no, that's so cool. Because like the first time I'd ever heard of it, he was doing the original research on this. And then the funniest thing happened. She was once again I said she was a little overweight. She looks over at this busboy who's all about six for 120 pounds. She was Bill, you are the sexiest person in this restaurant, right? Cuz he went on to say that if you live with somebody, you end up sharing the microbiome. Yeah, and she yells to this poor guy was probably like, 17. She's like, you want to move in? You want to move in? A little premature, but I don't know. Maybe she wasn't. SoUnknown Speaker  58:25  hey, you know what I do every day as a routine. I take my little one my 17 and I rub my face to her. I'm like, I want some of that microbiome on my skin. That's the best lotion right there. I mean, I don't need to put lotion on my face.Ken Brown  58:38  Your I'm scared that I'll ruin my kid's Mojo by giving them my kids,Unknown Speaker  58:46  my little one who actually is a hyper metabolizer. That's what I call her. I asked her to donate stools from me. I said, you know, your skills could be worth a lot of money, because that could cure for obesity. And I said $1,000 for one sample Scarlet. She's like, Nope, not giving it I'm not going to grab it. She's like, I'm not going to be a rat lab. Mom, she gave me one sample. That's it. That was all.Ken Brown  59:10  That's it. And this is this is not hyperbole. In your book you discuss about how the marathon runner they took his store he gave it to mice, and the mice immediately with no extra training could run 13% moreEric Rieger  59:21  than they could before. Before we publish this episode we need we need to get shit studying calm. have it ready to go?Ken Brown  59:31  Well, I will give you credit. A lot of the things that come across you do trademark it's like you'll just like call your trademark attorney and they're just trademarking everything.Unknown Speaker  59:41  Yeah. Because so yes, it's it's kind of funny because I, you know, in medicine and you know, you come up with an idea. A businessman takes an AI takes your idea and make something out of it. And then you're like, wait a minute, that was my idea how many doctors have I seen over the course of my career that have come up with cures, and a businessman came, took that cure and made it a business and the doctor now, you know, Dr. Feingold, his book is the beginning of so many pharmaceutical companies, because that was without his book. Without that foundation, none of these pharmaceutical companies, you know, existed. And, you know, the fact that he had to struggle to get money for his research and keep putting all his money into his work. It was just not okay. And so when I started this, and I started the company, I said to myself, first of all, I'm trademarking everything. And I learned from the best Dr. Brody, because he said, patent everything, trademark everything, because they will always say, somebody will take your idea and try to make something out of it. So the man is genius on multiple level. Yeah.Ken Brown  1:00:57  And the fact that you actually are doing what people don't realise is that you're going down this microbial path, a speaker microbial path. And to get these studies done, you have to file these nd eyes, these new drug sounds like that. Yes, I end that's it. Yeah, I end in Yeah. And that's, it's super expensive. And they make it they make it difficult, or maybe they do on purpose or not, I don't know. I mean, obviously, as as an investigator, where we have to deal with that a little bit with our supplement, we kind of skirt the FDA, but we still have to walk such a careful line, you want to talk science, but if you start talking too much science, then you have to file that ind andUnknown Speaker  1:01:40  and I think, you know, it's not hard to file it's not hard to do it. I think this is where doctors need to join forces because really, um, you know, we lose when we don't work together when we were in residency and internship we were collaborating together to fix you know, what happened with COVID was really sad to me because the collaboration disappeared. All of a sudden, the media is telling you how to take care of your patients, and the politicians and the whole time it was like, wait a minute, the moment the politician can tell me what the Latina does in COVID, or Rosa Yuria or fasula, bacterium, press neiti let alone they should probably spell fasula bacterium proxy, never mind what it's doing. The moment a politician can tell me that, then I will respect what they're saying or immediate person. But the reality is we're entering a world of microbes, I think we should let the people that are in the microbiome world, lead that path and lead the treatment. At the end of the day, achieve success listen to the people that achieve success. You know, those doctors on the front line that realise different methods to to meet, forget ivermectin, let's talk about others, right. kosha seen, you know, cheap solutions be that cyanide, you know, eliquis all these I think those were hints right? When when I have a patient that's oxygen saturation 73%. And I'm freaking out because the patient doesn't want to go to the hospital, but I know he's gonna die on my shift. And I don't want him to die. I'm going to do everything in my power. So I'm going to give him everything I know. And then I'm going to call, you know, my buddies. You know, Brian Tyson say, Brian, what did you do with this? And then he would say, you know what, I've this. And then Peter McCollum. What did you do on this? And so I think this is where the collaboration of physician comes into play. Because we are the ones on the front line, taking care of patients. And at the end of the day, who do you trust with your life? The doctors that guided you this way? Right. I trusted with my life. Tom perrotti. Let me Yeah,Ken Brown  1:03:50  I just want to ask a quick question on this, because I saw that you have done presentations you have submitted for different trials. You've done this, have you? A lot of the doctors that have had the guts to do this have had backlash. Did you receive any backlash from social media, from the media from anything?Unknown Speaker  1:04:07  So I'm because I'm working with the FDA oversight. And right now we're doing actually clinical trials with the Department of Defence sponsoring it, which is another product altogether? I've not had the backlash as much, I'm sure I've had backlash when I tried to advertise to get patients. You know, definitely my there were criticisms and you know, and I always try to stay under the radar as much as possible talking about treatment. I'm more the microbiome girl and I don't think anybody really knows about the microbiome and if they want to go one on one with me and start trashing me, bring it on the ship is going to be caught starting. And I call the book and in January because let's talk shit because I said Look, I couldn't be full shade or I could know my shit. But I think I know my shiftKen Brown  1:05:02  to that is awesome.Unknown Speaker  1:05:04  So we'll see. I mean, it's a it's a path. It's a, it's a discovery path. It's, it's, it needs to be done. And I think I say to people, if you stop the innovation, you're going to be the patient coming for an innovation that's not going to be happening. You know, right now we get how many patients do get probably as much as me that wants faecal transplant for Alzheimer's, for Parkinson's, for autism, etc. You can't offer it. We're not there yet.Ken Brown  1:05:31  So let me ask you this. So you've got your lab set up to do a really good job. We were doing it heavily. A guest standing for this podcast, Dr. Stuart Ackerman, him and I did a few of these super intelligent doctor, my colleague who trained in New York, we were lucky enough to steal him and bring him over about five years ago, he jumped all in on the on the faecal transplant, and he signed up, he did everything. And then like overnight, he said, Well, this was like, in between the FDA saying it's a drug and this and then he was able to get the frozen capsules. And then it was like overnight, it became cost prohibitory because something happened with the lab. And we just quit doing it because we couldn't get it approved insurance wouldn't pay it suddenly, it was super expensive. Right?Unknown Speaker  1:06:17  So that's the peer pressure and the lobbying power, right? of lobbyists that basically, and I'm gonna say it out there because I think it needs to be told, you know, there is a lobbying movement that is basically stopping these, these drugs, these, these cheap solutions. And I think we need to stop that we need to fight as physicians for that because the moment we stop, you know, trying to do what was right for the patient, faecal transplant being one of them. I think all of us that were doing faecal transplant join forces in the microbiome meeting, the Malibu microbiome meeting that you probably saw, because of the fact that we saw that our ability to help patients were being cut. We were doing, we were helping patients we were doing using a bank that was good. And that ability was cut. I think, you know, the onus is to go from that product that was sold of open biome to go to Finch, right, which is now a pharmaceutical product, then, you know, that's fine, as long as you know, the data shows that it's working, etc. But I think you know, stopping the right to try and doctors from doing faecal transplant or scaring them, you know, I still do faecal transplant, you know, who's gonna stop me? I mean, the the FDA, you know, has said you can do faecal transplant for C diff, provided you do all these things. And even if you want to do it for autism, you have to submit an ind, well, I just have to write the ind, I have to follow the protocol and follow the guidelines. Nobody's gonna stop you if you're doing things the right way.Ken Brown  1:08:03  So you don't have to wait for them to approve the ind. JustUnknown Speaker  1:08:07  wait for them to approve the ID. But for C diff, you can do faecal transplant. You just have to f

BetterDay - gesunder Lifestyle und mehr!
Praktische Tipps: Vitamin-C

BetterDay - gesunder Lifestyle und mehr!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 7:30


Reichlich Vitamin-C über den Tag verteilt und ohne Pillen...

Secretos para emprendedores
SPE 220: Ideas Para Desarrollar Estrategias Creativas De Marketing

Secretos para emprendedores

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 28:13


“La creatividad es pensar en cosas nuevas” – Linus Pauling. El proceso del desarrollo de estrategias creativas de marketing, es una forma poderosa de dar vida a nuevas ideas. Porque en lugar de fijarse en lo que se ha hecho antes, la creatividad invita a explorar nuevos territorios que no hemos explorado antes. Admitámoslo, es […] La entrada SPE 220: Ideas Para Desarrollar Estrategias Creativas De Marketing se publicó primero en Moises Leon. Su autor es Moisés León.

Bipolar Inquiry
A bipolar energetic shift that feels like I'm processing things differently that could be called distress

Bipolar Inquiry

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 33:16


I've been having a different couple of days I use the word different instead of rough on purpose and I'm wondering if this change is an opportunity for me to talk about what I'm sensing and feeling using some of the language that I unfolded and created some of the different memes and different ways of viewing and interpreting experience so it's probably been about it's probably been about four or five days since I had some kind of energetic shift and it feels like I'm processing things differently that could be called distress or things breaking down I've noticed that I'd like to reframe and say that I'm processing different and since it's sort of a downshift and processing in a way it feels supposedly not as good or and the difference in processing is interesting I feel like I don't want to be alone feel like I want to be relational and I also feel very sensitive to noise so my my senses are quite heightened and so that adds to stress and if I'm already a little bit stressed out then it's quite additive and I think I've talked about the noise where i live in other videos but it's not super bad right now because evening and it's a weekend but I spent Tuesday and Wednesday just trying to avoid the noise i went to a quiet park then i went to a library when i got cold and the next day I had a meeting in a quiet building I just stayed in the quiet building until I had to leave and then I went to the library again and I was feeling really what would be called may be anxious but i guess it felt like energy being stirred up and and it was there for sure when I was at the building and then when I went to the library I saw somebody that I know when acquaintance from the clubhouse and we ended up chatting for probably about an hour and at first I was talking about how I wasn't doing as good as well or something and and then we were just talking about whatever and then after I left after that our I had to go and share my story for my job and that energy had completely dissipated and I was thinking to myself it's like Oh a one-hour dose of that person makes that go away because I haven't yet taken any PR ends or anything like that I would if it gets to the point where i'm feeling really fearful but if it's just uncomfortable then then I just stay with it and wait for it to pass so one hour dose that person made that feeling go away and then I drove and share my story for an hour and i think it was sort of the best i had ever done at sharing my story and it was a small group of like six or seven people but I was like really energetic and enthusiastic and I shared my story very well I can't really remember what I said but I just thought that oh that one that went well and it was sort of surprising in a way because of how I was feeling just an hour before and to me that relates to the relational thing wanting to be relational and and also an hour with that person before was relational so on one hand I need quiet from noise it doesn't have acquired from people talking or being near people it's like almost the wrong type of sound being alone hearing traffic noise all the time versus being with people and hearing people noise it's like the opposite and so and two days earlier on along the Tuesday because the thursday i shared my story i had shared my story on the tuesday and i felt like i wasn't feeling uncomfortable or like i did a bad job or anything but I just felt like oh that was I didn't feel that energy from that exchange between me and the group I guess maybe I didn't make that connection somehow and it just was like not as good in comparison to how I did on the Thursday even though I can't really remember what I shared at each of them and interestingly enough a woman at the Thursday group shared that her loved one is connected with altruism and empathy and very sensitive to other people as well I really do feel it's like a different line of intelligence it's a different sensitivity that people develop and then it makes them not acting the same line as everybody else because one is sensing other information it's perceiving holistically and seeing the whole situation and then reacting to that not just 20 the words somebody said which was a simple instruction there's more information available and so with that I feel like I have that extra perceptiveness and I was actually watching TED talk today on highly sensitive people and I was thinking to myself that sounds derogatory in a way it doesn't but when you think about it it's like oh you're highly sensitive I think I would call it extraordinarily sensitive because that sounds better or extraordinarily perceptive something like that and the lady who did the talk was saying that a woman wrote a book about highly sensitive people I've probably seen it and I've heard of it and stuff but I just never thought to read it and i don't know if i will just cuz i'm not really reading books lately but she said that it's a genetic trait to be highly sensitive and i was thinking to myself how when i was younger i wasn't highly sensitive at least i wasn't aware that I was I was very academic and very in alignment with that I could have still been highly sensitive but not really i don't think i was sensitive to other people's feelings or anything like that and and I feel like it's almost like an acquired extraordinarily sensitive perceptive thing and I wonder if it can be acquired epigenetically or if it could be related to what Linus Pauling said about how some people have different nutritional requirements to to stay rational pretty much to not have some kind of supposed mental illness like some people need different nutrients but I still think that there's a different line of intelligence there it's maybe a different genetic expression of a different line of intelligence we just think that if people are outside a certain norm they must be mentally ill or they must be highly sensitive or something like that I don't really agree I agree that there are highly sensitive people but I think that it's a totally different line of intelligence and to say while these people are highly sensitive maybe regular people are highly insensitive and dulled and numbed and and educated into a stupor and I think I was one of those people and so that's why I think that it's more of a conditioning thing and then some people are less apt to get that kind of conditioning and be conditioned out of their highly sensitive perceptiveness that they were born with as children which is the pattern recognition which is the learning which is so many things and it's traded for words and rationality and then we call that normal and again the ego and the rationality are helpful in that they allow us to be desensitized to all the things that if we were sensitized to we would actually act and change the world so again it's more about conformity and and things like that so i don't know i think that certain people are less able to be programmed out of their sensitivity and then they're kind of like the highly sensitive ones and that are left to their own devices and then those traits and characteristics and that line of intelligence isn't valued in society because that's the one that would change society and then the people that are able to be programmed they go to the top and that's why they want to perpetuate that kind of programming because if they if that was lost then those people would be out of a job and I actually I read today a hopeful article about how universities are implementing some kind of well-being policy I'm not saying it properly but certain universities have adopted it and it's basically about rewriting the rules to be more strength based and also it's one thing to write rules to be punitive and it's another thing for them to be supportive like supportive rules and and they were saying some professors are giving options like you can do this assignment or this assignment or this assignment versus everyone doing the same assignment and I bet they would be geared a little bit to different intelligences or different learning styles who knows though mainly certain types of learning styles are the ones that get to university in the first place but it's definitely a step in a good direction and it was also saying that their training listeners so people in University of someone to talk to and someone to listen to them and they actually wrote it in the context of to keep the medical part of the mental health system to people that really need that medical attention and I was thinking that's really interesting because because a lot of maybe the wait times and things for mental health stuff is because there's people that maybe don't quite fit that or or maybe they need the medical attention because there's nobody to actually listen out there so if they had somebody to listen to they wouldn't necessarily need to go and get some kind of medication or psychiatric help so they're training listeners and I thought that was very similar to what i want to do with the ECP are have people that are able to help people with their distress whereas Mental Health First Aid it's like oh you're you're you're distressed you have a medical problem you better get medical help and that's fine for people that really need it but it's making so many people go for medical help when maybe they just need somebody to listen to them and maybe that's the best medicine and having somebody to talk to and have a chat with meet with me at the library for an hour after that I went and shared my story and did the best I think I've ever done and and also took away that sort of unpleasant energy that was moving around in my abdomen we get so disconnected that we feel so much pain that we need these medications to take away the pain which prevents us from connecting I might have talked about how it seems like I might have just written it down how it seems like this psychological anguish is almost a protective mechanism so we don't isolate ourselves and live in isolation from each other because with that anguish we have to seek out help which is usually from another person oftentimes it's replaced by a pill but when a person listens and is heard and vice versa it actually connects the people makes them relational and makes it sort of reconnects part of the social fabric of the collective social fabric so it's really important for that to happen I feel like I've lost my focus and I've talked about focus before and how it's kind of like focus pocus because for students in school we give them this crap to learn or do some crappy assignment and then we say oh they can't focus there's something wrong with them and we never questioned what we're actually giving the person to do and so I feel like since I have my new job I couldn't focus on Tuesday and Wednesday where I couldn't focus on was Wednesday and Thursday I couldn't focus I was very disturbed and distressed by all the noise and and maybe it's just a matter of that's not what I want to focus on maybe it's almost my brain or my my being or everything saying that's not your path and i think i mentioned how I had a decision i did this coin flip thing and i even and it said don't take the job basically and then i did a walk in a park to look for best two out of three for another coin and i found 25 pennies that also pointed tails which was the original so best two out of three even though the universe flipped 25 pennies for me for best two out of three and i still took the job and now i'm at this point where i'm wondering if my brain is going to allow me to do the job and I've also talked about how before I worked in a medical office where it was just joyful happy and and I never had any trouble and now I'm in this david-versus-goliath situation where I'm a person with lived experience with the system trying to sort of implement something with more people with lived experience in the system of people who don't really buy into that whole scenario and and that part of the system wasn't even the part of the system that really helped me the part was the clubhouse portion of the system which is funded a lot by the system but it's very different and so I'm just I feel almost like a hypocrite in a way like by by being well and working in the system I'm almost being like oh the system helped me when it didn't help me that much it helped me somewhat but since I've been trying to work in the system it's actually hurt me a lot more than when I was not working the system because I see how it's structured and it's just I think I see it and and it really bothers me and it's one of those very sensitive things and they talked about in the highly sensitive person talk that a person is a highly sensitive person has depth of processing over stimulation empathy and awareness of subtleties so if I think about everything that I've talked about in the 70 videos I've put on a playlist that i haven't yet released but i might one day it's all related to that so I almost feel like my supposed mental illness mi which have also called multi-dimensional awareness or multi-dimensional intelligence is what I called it I feel like what that highly sensitive people thing said is sort of like multi-dimensional intelligence it's being aware of so many more dimensions and when there's so many more dimensions it's a totally different way of processing than relying on one's ego compass the Eagle compass is very binary it's very either-or it's very simple and being able to process so much more and all those factors contribute to multidimensional intelligence part of it too is one sees the lack of intelligence in the way that we've designed society and I feel this intelligence wants us to be relational because that's the way we're designed to be I feel like I might have acquired epigenetic changes to make me into a highly sensitive person and it could have been the the trauma as it's called which opens one up to more spectrum it maybe makes a person were aware in this society in order to avoid that in the future and and it could be mistaken as okay avoid everything now that this is happening for a kind of the fourth time where I'm starting to I'm starting to retreat i'm starting to retract from the activities that i was moving towards it's almost like there's too much poison that that poison being aware of that all those factors the depth of processing the over / sensitivity or over stimulation it's like a poison that maybe changes me epigenetically in a way that i lose my focus i'm unable to focus on what it was that i was doing and i'm back in this sort of zoomed out mode of okay well what's really important right now so i spent some time with my family get lots of sleep and so it's really interesting i could think i could think that i am going into crisis or i could think that it's just not the right path and I've caught it really early this time [Music] and i really wonder if a lot of people that get diagnosed with a mental illness actually have this highly sensitive person quality because the person so much more sensitive that it would accumulate more allostatic load more stress and it could also be that one can't handle as much stress because the stress is what attacks the hippocampus and then memories and thoughts can't be sorted properly and then a person gets confused etc etc and then oh this person's mentally ill when it could almost be that certain people aren't designed to take that kind of stress so they'll start to design a reality that is not does not have that much stress in it because they can't really survive in it so there could be highly sensitive people that are able to kind of function but have to change their life to manage and then there's people that get diagnosed with a mental illness that become more or less non functional but it could just be a more extreme occurrence of being highly sensitive and and so there's this spectrum of sensitivity that is not accounted for because everything like science through which we view people in frame people is based on rationality but these people and like myself are not operating based on rationality we're operating based on a different intelligence it could be the intelligence of the heart could be the intelligence of the relational mind of empathy and then a lot of times a person might have so-called bad behavior and then you think well this person is being badly so how could they be connected to this other intelligence it gets to be like fight or flight a person goes into fight or flight for different reasons so she also talked about sensory processing sensitivity and there's being there's kids being born like this and this to me is similar to how I think a person can acquire this kind of sensitivity or it could also be to a lot of people after they go through post-secondary ordering that's when they have a so-called mental health crisis it's basically that the ego structures are false they're not real those aren't our real ways of sensing and processing and then it breaks down and then it's confusing because it's all new that's not how we're used to sensing and processing and so a person is behaving different and behaving odd and all these things and then they're seen as mentally ill when really the ego structure is false so it it could break down at any point and if we were never trained out of our sensitivity are learning are perceiving I don't feel like we would need or have this supposed mental illness reaction in order to try to get us to navigate with a different perception and compass and map we've been walking around drawing maps of our reality based on false conditioning again it's a different compass that's not logical and it's not valued and I actually feel it's suppressed it's not taken into consideration and it's pushed to the margins and the fringes and it goes along with the different lines of intelligent intelligence just like I was talking about with the autism spectrum it's a different line of intelligence and a lot of children acquire language takes longer but they have other intelligences that may or may not be allowed to flourish because logic doesn't see it I was thinking about algorithms a little bit and I was thinking that this high sensitivity or this extraordinary sensitivity is a different algorithm of what is made salient so the ego is a certain algorithm it's actually programmed into us through marketing through education so between TV and between the commercials on the internet and things and school and whatever else those are the things that we pick up that will be our compass by which we measure ourselves and navigate this reality and perhaps a highly sensitive person is is more perceptive to everything holistically so doesn't necessarily pick up the linear bits as easily because they're seeing the whole picture so it's harder for them to be programmed in that way so there seems to be this algorithm of deprogramming which is supposed crisis and then there's an algorithm of deprogramming which is happening through the autism spectrum and and those children are also highly sensitive to noise and different things oftentimes because there is too much information and there is too much noise and it's very difficult to sort what is meaningful and so with autistic children they have a difficult time sorting out what is meaningful what do these sounds mean and if they're so sensitive they could be hearing the sound of the furnace running and so that sound is interfering with their ability to pick up the discerning bits of sound and make sense out of them and if they're highly sensitive there's got to be some value to that high sensitivity and to also people that acquire this high sensitivity later in life through supposed mental illness or or and that's the thing with supposed mental illness that people become so sensitive they can pick up on things from the past possible futures they can extrapolate they can they can see and then create different pictures in their mind based on what they're processing and computing it's not necessarily mental illness it could just be an intelligence that logic and reason doesn't understand and it could be an intelligence beyond logic and reason we're programmed to ignore the intelligence of our body and whatever other intelligences we have i would say that some of my videos to me feel like depth of processing and awareness of subtleties and i talked a lot about empathy and over stimulation I feel like highly sensitive personhood and suppose it mental illness is just different intelligence along the spectrum and it could actually be the deprogramming algorithm because to me the main line of intelligence is dependent on how well we can be programmed and when we're programmed and we're rational we lose our sensitivity to these other intelligences these multi-dimensional intelligences to take a lot of things into consideration I actually feel like normality is how well we can be programmed and all the other aspects of consciousness and the way people are and the other intelligences are are devalued just because people can be programmed acquiring the sensitivity is acquiring a different compass and a different map think my heart is having an allergic reaction to working in mental illness it's like an aversion Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/bipolar_inquiry. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cosmic Sponge
The Zamora UFO

Cosmic Sponge

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 88:25


On April 24, 1964 at 5:50 p.m., Lonnie Zamora encountered a UFO sighting involving unknow entities and trace evidence.   Several explanations have been suggested including a hoax perpetuated by students of New Mexico Tech, ball lightning, and a mirage of the star Canopus.  Regardless, Project Bluebook's casefile listed this incident as unexplained. Additionally, J. Allen Hynek noted this encounter as one of the more interesting ones and it remains an open case of an unidentified object to this day.  Stick around for the details as we dive into this week's casefile: The Lonnie Zamora Incident!

SWR2 Zeitwort
19.4.1968: Linus Pauling empfiehlt Vitamin C als Allheilmittel

SWR2 Zeitwort

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 4:08


Chemie- und Friedens-Nobelpreisträger Pauling nutzte seine Popularität für eine dritte Karriere als Vitamin-Guru: Er empfahl hochdosiertes Vitamin C zur Vorbeugung von Krebs.

The Night Nerd
Throwback Thursdays: Revisit Week

The Night Nerd

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2021 14:54


A few years ago I did one of the most informative episodes ever when I looked at the life of Linus Pauling.

Health & Longevity
Linus Pauling Day 2021

Health & Longevity

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 28:32


The state of Oregon has declared February 28th as Linus Pauling Day in honor of the late scientist, Dr. Linus Pauling. Today on Health & Longevity, Dr. John Westerdahl’s special guest is Dr. Emily Ho, PhD, the Director of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. The institute is named after two time Nobel […]

Sound Health Options - Sharry Edwards & TalkToMeGuy
W. Gifford-Jones, MD - Linus Pauling and Scientific Evidence on Vitamin C

Sound Health Options - Sharry Edwards & TalkToMeGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2021 62:00


W. Gifford-Jones, MD has influenced complementary and alternative medicine like no other. His greatest impact on health care and on progress in considering, safe, effective, and low-cost natural approaches has been through his medical column that reaches millions of readers across North America.  W. Gifford-Jones join the show to discuss: Linus Pauling Scientific evidence on Vitamin C His 45 years of medical newspaper columns Women’s Wellness Lysine Covid 19 Health as a Lifestyle And more! W. Giffords-Jones, MD  W. Giffords-Jones more then 18 years of columns and research W. Giffords-Jones, MD on Facebook W. Giffords-Jones on Twitter  High doses of vitamin C help build immunity, offering protection against viral infections. Vitamin C: A natural alternative to drugs. Peewee Amounts of Vitamin C Won’t Stop Heart Attacks

Integrative Answers to Cancer
Pancreatic & Protelytic Enzymes, Metabolic Typing & Coffee Enemas | Mary Swander, Author: The Maverick M.D.: Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez & Ryan Sternagel

Integrative Answers to Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2021 80:02


Show notes at https://thesternmethod.com/mary-swander Mary Swander is an award-winning American author, dramatist, performer, speaker, and teacher. She is the former Poet Laureate of Iowa and a professor emerita Distinguished Professor of Iowa State University. Mary is the Artistic Director of Swander Woman Productions, a theatre troupe that performs dramas about food, farming, and the wider rural environment. She is also the Executive Director of AgArts, a nonprofit designed to imagine and promote healthy food systems through the arts. Her latest book is The Maverick M.D.: Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez and His Fight for a New Treatment for Cancer (New Spring Press). The Maverick M.D. is the story of how Dr. Nick Gonzalez perfected the scientific theory behind Dr. William Kelley's work and put the protocol into practice in New York City. Gonzalez drew courage from his Christian faith, from Mexican-Italian-American family, and from key loved ones, colleagues and mentors.  He spent years treating patients with the most serious conditions--from cancer to diabetes to lupus. But he wasn't satisfied as an outlier in the medical community. He wanted his work put to the test with a clinical trial. This book portrays a man who fought for the acceptance of a nutritional cancer treatment in the halls of some of the most established U.S. medical institutions. Against intense opposition, Nick Gonzalez's determination held up until the end--a scientist who developed a therapy that saves lives and promotes the healing of the human mind, body and spirit.             ***Resources Mentioned*** Mary Swander   Swander Woman Productions    Agarts: Imagine a healthy food system New Spring Press Nutricology Pancreas Pork Natural Glandular Capsules Nutricology ImmoPlex Natural Glandulars The Nicholas Gonzalez Foundation The Maverick MD ***   In This Episode: Ryan takes a candid look at Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez’s life and “the man behind the suit” in the discussion with his biographer, Mary Swander. You’ll learn about why Ryan thinks so highly of Dr. Gonzalez, his life and personality, the Gonzalez Protocol and the results it produced. Ryan and Mary delve into Dr. Gonzalez’s attempts to take his enzyme therapy protocol to clinical trials in the conventional medical arena. They also discuss Mary’s experience as a patient of Dr. Gonzalez for over 20 years. You’ll gain insight into the brilliant mind of Dr. Gonzalez, his spiritual life, his concept of balance, and his mysterious death. And speaking of brilliant minds...at the end, you’ll be treated to a special creation by Ryan’s son, Ryder!            Timestamps: 2:35  How Ryan learned about Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez Dr. Gonzalez was speaking at The Truth About Cancer conference Smartest guy in the whole field - genius  Didn’t consider himself an integrative medical practitioner Helping people with cancer and other degenerative diseases Ivy-league doctor, traditional medical training 5:15 What was the paradigm shift which caused Dr. Gonzalez to go into the realm of unconventional medicine? His two loves : literature/arts and medicine Accomplished investigative journalist - worked for Time, Inc. Linus Pauling encouraged him to go to medical school after an interview Sloan Kettering Medical School When Dr. Gonzalez’s father got cancer, he stood beside his father’s death-bed and vowed he would find a cure for cancer. Met dentist William Kelley who had cured himself from pancreatic cancer Dr. Gonzalez wanted to know how Dr. Kelley cured himself and his patients - went to Texas to investigate how Came back to Sloan Kettering and tried to prove Dr. Kelley’s method in the conventional setting Wanted clinic trials but conventional medicine wasn’t cooperative Dr. Gonzalez had family in Mexico and could have gone there to practice alternative medicine but wanted to stay in the US. 11:45 Mary Swander’s experience as a patient of Dr. Gonzalez       Dr. Gonzalez passed away in 2015   MaryBeth Gonzalez (widow) has worked hard to keep his legacy alive   Mary Swander was patient of Dr. Gonzalez for 20 years   Group of scientists with breast cancer wanted to work with Dr. Gonzalez to heal metastasis On the advice of a friend, Mary worked with Dr. Gonzalez to clear up her fibrocystic tumors and to build up her depleted immune system   Mary didn’t want people to forget Dr. Gonzalez and his work. She felt a book needed to be written about his life and therapy. Dr. Gonzalez’s widow, Mary Beth, agreed. 17:00 What surprised Mary about Dr. Gonzalez’ life During the time Dr. Gonzalez was a journalist, he used to read a book a day.   He researched and was fascinated with ecology As a child, Dr. Gonzalez used to spend his summers camping at Lake George, NY. The rest of the year, his family lived in NYC. Went to Brown University but transferred for a short time to Cornell to study agriculture Read Sir Albert Howard and other sustainable agricultural teachers Thinking holistically at a very young age 21:25 The experience of trying to explain unconventional healing to conventional medical practitioners Dr. Gonzalez identified 12 different metabolic types Dr. Gonzalez was very “balanced” on his own scale of metabolic types Dr. Gonzalez’s grandparents were immigrants, exceptionally bright and accomplished. Mexican-Italian heritage. Ancestors helped lead the Revolution in Mexico and included accomplished musicians. Story of how Dr. Gonzalez’s grandfather almost didn’t make it through customs at Ellis Island but succeeded by playing the cello in the customs building halls. Anthropologist Margaret Mead said it takes 3 generations to create the super-accomplished person and Dr. Gonzalez was just that. 25:00 Combining the physical with the meta-physical/spiritual world The archetype of the wounded healer - physical wounds and healing can lead to spiritual awareness, healing, transformation Not only was Dr. Gonzalez incredibly bright and balanced, he was also very spiritual Dr. Gonzalez spent a lot of time with his patients and always had a Bible nearby Dr. Gonzalez grew up Catholic and became fascinated with the Bible during his first marriage  He had a photographic memory and became a biblical scholar 29:00 Dr. Gonzalez’s personality and drive to develop his program Small in stature, athlete, fighter, quick and motivated, driven Part of the program is use of pancreatic enzymes   Dr. Gonzalez learned about enzymes from Dr. William Kelley The enzymes are formulated in a precise way - Dr. Gonzalez worked on this for years Pancreatic enzymes go back to the end of the 19th century with a biologist (embryologist) named John Beard, DSc in Scotland Beard studied placental growth and embryonic development and theorized pancreatic enzymes might control tumor growth in the same way they control the growth of the placenta At the turn of the 20th century, pancreatic enzymes were being used with modest success Beard was forgotten about after Marie Curie’s discovery of radiation Dr. Gonzalez’s enzymes are still in production through NutriCology Dr. Gonzalez had to finance his own research Number of enzymes and frequency taken varies with the type of condition Everyone on the program does coffee enemas to help detox Dr. Gonzalez asked the Merk Manual editors why they took coffee enemas out of the manual (lack of space) Protocol uses liver and colon cleanses, some juicing Dr. Gonzalez’s widow Mary Beth is working to formalize the Gonzalez program and train doctors in the protocol Metabolic scale/typing determines which diet is used on the protocol 46:55 Balance is key  Acid v. alkaline - don’t go off the scale in either direction The genius of Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. William Kelley Not possible to use same protocol for everyone because of unique metabolic types 12 different diets with 99 variations   51:24 Metabolic typing Testing and bloodwork pH Personality type Physical characteristics Ancestry Geographical location 57:05 Dr. Gonzalez’s thoughts on meat Didn’t look as much at individual (chemical) components of foods as he did using foods to bring the body back into balance   Eliminate the whole food dislikes- listen to your body   1:02:15 Clinical study of the Gonzalez protocol Dr. Gonzalez worked most of his earlier career trying to find funding for his clinical trials (Nestle, Proctor and Gamble) Nestle funded a study by Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. Linda L. Isaacs on pancreatic cancer and enzymes published in medical literature Encouraged by doctors at the NIH to do a clinical trial Trial took place at Columbia University over course of 10 years Dr. Gonzalez wrote a book called What Went Wrong  because so many procedures weren’t followed In the end, researchers at Columbia published a paper which said the protocol didn’t work Success of the protocol often depends on the compliance of the patient Dr. Gonzalez didn’t cure everyone who walked through his doors   1:09:33 Mystery surrounding Dr. Gonzalez’s death News articles are not definitive Facts of the death (not conspiracies) are in the book Autopsy and second round of tests were performed Heart attack was ruled out Died suddenly at age 67 Not much reliable information on the internet about Dr. Gonzalez 1:13:45 Book: The Maverick MD Engaging book Readers want to know when the movie is coming out Book available on Amazon and New Spring Press Gonzalez Foundation- widow Mary Beth working to bring into print all the books Dr. Gonzalez was writing 5 books published so far 1:17:00 Picking up the torch where Dr. Gonzalez left off 1:19:30 Ryder’s first knitting project :) If you have a question or comment about this episode let us know below!!   Keywords                                               Volume                  CPC          PPC             SCORE   Pancreatic enzymes                              27100                      1.3              .87                45 Enzyme therapy                                      1300                      1.11            .9                  41 Alt:pancreatic enzyme replacement        1000                      1.62          1.0                  42 Alt:enzyme treatment                                720                       1.07         1.0                  26   Proteolytic enzymes                                 9900                        .91           1                    48 Alt: Proteolytic                                         18100                      1.37          .02                 49 Alt: Enzymes proteolytic                           27100                      1.15         .96                 43 Alt: Enzyme supplements                           5400                      1.85         1                    49   Enzymes                                                165000                       .47           .78                 64 Digestive enzymes                                   90500                     1.39           1                    59   Gonzalez protocol                                          90                      1.1             .16                 37 Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez                                  590                    1.13             .11                 37 Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez death                        480                     3.36            .12                 24 Nicholas Gonzalez Foundation                      10                        .78            .04                 33                                    Maverick MD                                                   0 Mary Swander                                                70                         0                .03                39 Mary Swander author                                      0   Metabolic typing                                         9900                          .67            .06                  37   Dr. William Kelley                                          90                           0                .04                 31   Nutritional cancer treatment                        110                        3.49             .45                  50 Nutritional therapy for cancer                       210                       1.45             .5                    44 Alternative cancer treatment                     4400                         7                 .03                  51   Dr. Linda Isaacs                                          290                         0                  .02                  25

TheScienceShed
CupOfCovid 47 - Vitamin D for COVID - the new Pauling megadose

TheScienceShed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 14:06


Linus Pauling, famous Nobel-winning chemist and peace activist, famously went round the bend late in life and thought Vitamin C mega-doses could cure EVERYTHING. Are we doing the same with Vitamin D and COVID now? Steve and Nick investigate....

A Música do Dia
Há 50 anos, no dia 18 de novembro em 1970, Linus Pauling afirmou que vitamina C previne a gripe

A Música do Dia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2020


Stacked with Joe DiStefano
075 | Jay Campbell - How to Maximize Fat Loss & Muscle Gain At The Same Time

Stacked with Joe DiStefano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2020 110:18


For this week’s episode, I’m joined by Jay Campbell, a popular previous guest on the podcast and an expert on optimizing hormonal health and manipulating diet to lose body fat in the fastest possible way whilst preserving muscle. Jay is the author of several books on health and nutrition, including The Metabolic Blowtorch Diet: The Ultimate Guide for Optimizing Intermittent Fasting, and Guaranteed Shredded; How to Maximally Reduce Your Body Fat % in Under 10 Weeks. With over thirty years of experience in the health and fitness industry, Jay has a wealth of knowledge to share about building an impressive physique, biohacking your age, and improving your performance.During our last conversation, Jay and I talked about raising our levels of consciousness through meditation and mindfulness. However, today we change tack and consider the health benefits of intermittent fasting. We discuss how targeted fasting routines can be simpler, more effective and easier to stick to than traditional diets, and we dive into some of the therapeutic interventions that Jay is known for, including his use of the pharmaceutical drug, metformin, to help tweak his metabolism and increase his longevity. Jay emphasizes the importance of hormonal health and we end the podcast with a discussion about the recent dramatic decline in testosterone levels. Proudly Sponsored By: Magnesium BreakthroughMagnesium is THE single most studied mineral in existence. It powers over 600 critical reactions in our bodies. To date, thousands of studies have proven it to be beneficial for the heart, energy, metabolism, immunity, sleep, pain, and more. In fact, the only two-time Nobel Prize winner, Linus Pauling, recommended daily supplementation of magnesium (at least 350mg per day). And so do over 100,000 courageous doctors—including top MDs from Harvard.And right now during the entire month of November the makers of Magnesium Breakthrough are running their Black Friday and Cyber Monday until November 30th. This is the BEST time of the year for incredible deals. On select products you can get free shipping, up to 40% off and they are even giving away free bottles of MassZymes, P3OM and their HCl breakthrough with select orders. You won’t find this deal anywhere else (not even on their official website) - it’s only through this special link: www.bioptimizers.com/stacked and use coupon code stacked10 for 10% off.BluBloxThroughout 2.6 million years of evolution, the only time our eyes were exposed to ultraviolet wavelengths of light was in the day time, with the most intense light being around 12 noon. And for that reason, our brains evolved to recognize the experience of blue light as a signal that it’s time to work and really anything -- except SLEEP!That’s why I love BluBlox, makers of the most scientifically validated blue-blocking sunglasses on the market. These shades help relieve eye strain and headaches from long hours on the computer as they also allow you to control your light exposure in the hours leading towards bed. They also have a sleep mask, which I love for travel, and red light bulbs that have become a big part of optimizing our new baby’s sleep cycles.To check out their extensive line of stylish frames and products please visit: www.blublox.com/stacked And use Code STACKED for 15% off at checkout.Support the show (https://www.coachjoedi.com/joe-recommends )

Pushing The Limits
Episode 171: Vitamin C for the Critically Ill with Dr Anitra Carr

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2020 63:28


Sepsis is a massive health issue worldwide. According to WHO, nearly 50 million people get sepsis every year, killing 11 million. Here in New Zealand, one in five ICU patients dies because of it. Thus, raising awareness about the role of vitamin C in sepsis can help save lives. Dr Anitra Carr joins us in this episode to expand our understanding of the role of vitamin C in our body. She also explains how vitamin C functions not only as an antioxidant but also as a cofactor in many different mechanisms, particularly in fighting cancer and sepsis. Everything we share in this episode will be helpful for you should you find yourself or a loved one admitted to a hospital, so tune in.   Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health program all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/. You can also join their free live webinar on epigenetics.   Online Coaching for Runners Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Consult with Me If you would like to work with me one to one on anything from your mindset, to head injuries,  to biohacking your health, to optimal performance or executive coaching, please book a consultation here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/consultations.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again, but I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within 3 years. Get your copy here: http://relentlessbook.lisatamati.com/ For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   My Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection ‘Fierce’, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Learn more about vitamin C’s antioxidant properties. Discover how vitamin C helps patients with pneumonia and sepsis. Learn about vitamin C’s role as a cofactor and how it ensures the proper functioning of different body processes.   Resources Read more about Dr Carr's study on vitamin C levels in patients with pneumonia. Access Dr Carr's review on recommended doses of vitamin C. Health and Immune Function Benefits of Kiwifruit-derived Vitamin C by Dr Anitra Carr Read more about Dr Carr's ongoing clinical trial on vitamin C and its effect on COVID-19 patients. Learn more about Dr Paul Marik's protocol for sepsis using vitamin C and steroids. Learn more about Dr Fowler's Phase 1 safety trial of IV vitamin C in patients with severe sepsis. Watch Professor Margreet Vissers' lecture on her work on vitamin C.   Episode Highlights [04:40] How Dr Carr’s Research on Vitamin C Started Dr Carr’s research began in 1998, where she studied how reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by white blood cells react with our tissues. White blood cells produce ROS to help kill bacteria. However, they can also react with the tissues and create inflammation. Dr Carr then began investigating how vitamin C’s antioxidant properties help decrease inflammation. She also studied the benefits of vitamin C in preventing atherosclerotic plaques and the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). [09:42] Vitamin C as an Antioxidant Vitamin C has real antioxidant properties. Metal ions produce oxidants in the body; vitamin C donates electrons to these ions, converting them to the reduced state. The recommended daily dose to benefit from the antioxidant potential of vitamin C is 60 to 90 milligrammes in men and 75 milligrammes in women. You need a higher dose (120 milligrammes) of the vitamin to protect yourself from CVD and cancer. [17:57] Vitamin C in Food vs. Vitamin C Tablet Dr Carr conducted a comparative dosing study between kiwi fruit and vitamin C tablets. She found no difference in the vitamin C obtained from food and tablets. The body recognises the same molecule and takes up the same amount. [21:36] Vitamin C in Sepsis and Pneumonia Patients with pneumonia can develop sepsis, resulting in multi-organ failure, septic shock and, eventually, death. In observational studies in patients with pneumonia, Dr Carr found that the lower the vitamin C levels, the higher the oxidative stress. The body's requirement for vitamin C goes up by at least 30-fold when you get pneumonia and sepsis; it is hard to get those amounts orally. ICU patients need a vitamin C dose of 100 milligrammes per day. In these patients, the actual levels of vitamin C measured in the blood is lower compared to the amount they are receiving. [25:25] Why Is Vitamin C Testing Not a Protocol in Hospitals? Doctors are not familiar with the importance, recent research and mode of action of vitamin C because it is not taught in medical schools. The hospital system is not set up to routinely measure vitamin C. In trials, vitamin C is treated as a drug rather than a vitamin. We need to know how vitamin C works to create proper and adequate study designs. [32:27] What Are Some of the Future Vitamin C Studies We Can Conduct? We need studies about the frequency, dosing and timing of its administration.  We need to learn about the finer details of the vitamin rather than doing the same study designs. It is tough to obtain research funding due to the misinformation surrounding vitamin C. We also need to educate doctors and patients alike about the science behind vitamin C. [43:16] Vitamin C as a Cofactor Our cells rely on enzymes to carry out chemical reactions. A cofactor helps enzyme function. Vitamin C functions as a cofactor for the enzyme that synthesises noradrenaline and vasopressin. These hormones help in blood pressure regulation. It’s better to give ICU patients vitamin C than giving them vasopressin drugs. This allows the body to naturally produce the hormone, preventing the side effects of getting vasopressin externally. Vitamin C is also a cofactor of collagen, which plays a role in stopping cancer metastasis and wound healing. [54:30] Vitamin C in Epigenetics The expression of DNA may be regulated by adding or removing methyl groups. Vitamin C is a cofactor for enzymes that modify DNA methylation. It controls the switching on and off of genes, playing a possible role in personalised medicine.   7 Powerful Quotes from This Episode ‘I’m much more interested in the whole person and how they're feeling, not what's happening inside a single cell’. ‘Don't wait until they're at death's door and at septic shock. It's hard for a vitamin to do something at this stage, even a really high-dose vitamin’. ‘A lot of these studies were designed to reproduce the first studies that came out to see if they could reproduce it also. That's why they’re using similar regimes. But now that we know more about it, each study adds another piece to the puzzle’. ‘There’s bigger issues at play with the whole pharmacological model that our whole system is built upon, and that nutrients and nutrition isn't taught in medical school. So, we're up against this big sort of brick wall’. ‘People go into a hospital setting or something, and they expect to have the latest and greatest information available, that the doctors know all that. And unfortunately, that's not always the case’. ‘Every person's life that is saved is a family that's not grieving’. ‘It’s the reason I’m doing this podcast, and it's the reason you're doing your research. And hopefully together and with many others, we can move the story along so that people get helped’.   About Dr Anitra Dr Anitra Carr holds a PhD in Clinical Biochemistry/Pathology. She started researching vitamin C when she undertook a postdoctoral research position at the Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, USA, and was also awarded an American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr Carr produced a number of high-impact publications in the field of vitamin C in human health and disease. Dr Carr is currently a Research Associate Professor at the University of Otago, Christchurch, School of Medicine. She has established her own research group, the Nutrition in Medicine Research Group, and undertakes translational bench-to-bedside research comprising observational studies and clinical trials on the role of oral and intravenous vitamin C in infection, cancer, metabolic health, mood and cognitive health. Dr Carr endeavours to understand the underlying biochemical mechanisms of action as well as improve patient outcomes and quality of life. She also pursues various ways to improve clinician and general public understanding of the roles of vitamin C in human health and disease. You may contact Dr Carr through anitra.carr@otago.ac.nz or call +64 3 364 0649.   Enjoyed This Podcast?  If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can learn more about the benefits of vitamin C in sepsis and pneumonia. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Full Transcript Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com.  Lisa Tamati: Welcome back to the show! This week, I have another fantastic interview with another amazing scientist. But before we get there, I just want to remind you please give a rating and review to the show if you're enjoying the content and share it with your family and friends. I really appreciate that. And if you haven't already grabbed a copy of my book Relentless, make sure you do, you won't regret it. It's an incredible story that is really about taking control of your own health and being responsible for your own health and thinking outside the box. And it's the story of bringing my mum back to health after a mess of aneurysm. And it will really make you think about those—the way our medical system works and about why you need to be proactive when it comes to health and prevention, preventative health. And it's really just a heart-warming story as well. So, you can grab that on my website at lisatamati.com. Or you can go to any bookshop in New Zealand and order that or get that and it's available also on audiobook for those people who love to listen to books rather than reading them, I know, I certainly do a lot of that.  And just to also remind that if you have any questions around some of the topics that we've discussed on the podcast episodes, please reach out to me lisa@lisatamati.com. And if you want help with one of your health journeys or your performance journeys, or you want to work on some goal setting, on some mindset, please reach out there as well. We'd love to work with you. So today I have the Dr Anitra Carr, who is a scientist at Otago University. She's currently a research associate professor at the University of Otago, Christchurch School of Medicine. She's established her own research group, the Nutrition in Medicine Research Group and undertakes translational bench to bedside research comprising observational studies and clinical trials on the role of oral and intravenous vitamin C in infection, cancer, metabolic health, mood, cognitive health. And she endeavours to understand the underlying biochemical mechanisms of action as well as improve our patient outcomes. So, she's a person who loves to actually not just be in the lab and looking at petri dishes, but to actually help people in human intervention study. She currently has a study underway, which I'm really, really excited and waiting with bated breath to see what comes out. It’s a sepsis study, in the Christchurch hospital with 40 patients. And we talk a little bit about that today.  And we talk about the role of vitamin C  today. Continuing the conversations that we've had with some of the world's best vitamin C researchers. We're looking at the antioxidant properties, we're looking at the pro-oxidant properties, we're looking at vitamin C as a cofactor in so many different mechanisms in the body. We talking about its role in the production of adrenaline and vasopressin, in hypoxia inducible factors, in relation to cancer, and especially in relation to sepsis, which is obviously a very important one for me.  One in five ICU patients in New Zealand dies of sepsis. This is a massive problem. Worldwide, between 30 and 50 million people a year get sepsis. This is something that you really need to know about. You need to understand it and Dr Anitra Carr, also shares why you may not get a doctor in a hospital situation, actually understanding all the information that we're going to be sharing with you today. So, educate yourself, learn from this and enjoy the show with Dr Anitra Carr. Lisa: Well, hi, everybody. And welcome back to the show. Today I have Dr Anitra Carr, and today we're continuing the series around vitamin C. We've had some brilliant doctors and scientists on in the last few weeks and it's been really exciting to share some of the latest research and we have one of our own Kiwi scientists with us today, Dr Anitra Carr from Christchurch. Welcome to the show. Dr Anitra Carr: Hi, Lisa! Lisa: It's fantastic to have you. So, Dr Anitra, can you just tell us a little bit of your background and how you got involved with vitamin C research? Dr Anitra: Well, I first started researching back in the late 90s. So, 1998 and I had just finished a PhD with the University of Otago and I had been studying how reactive oxygen species that are produced by white blood cells react with our own tissues, damage their own tissues because these white blood cells produce these really reactive oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide, which is hair bleach, and hypochlorous acid, which is household bleach. So very strong oxidants and they produce these to help kill bacteria in our bodies. But these oxidants can also react with their own tissues and that's what contributes to inflammation and the processes of inflammation. And so, I've just been studying how these oxidants react to certain components in our tissues. And when I finished that, I thought it’d be really interesting to investigate how antioxidants, such as vitamin C, which is one of the most potent antioxidants in our body, and help potentially protect against this damage. So, scavenge those oxidants before they react with our tissues, and help decrease the inflammation associated with them and features and conditions. And so, I applied to various people in the United States, I wanted to go to continue my research in the United States. And so I applied to several people over there who are doing research in the area that I was interested in, and they'll write back and say, ‘Yes, we have postdoctoral positions available.’ And so I selected one, on the advice of my PhD supervisor, and this was Professor Balz Frei. He was at the time in Boston. And after I said, ‘Yes, I'd like to work with him.’ He wrote back and said, ‘Oh, by the way, I'm moving to the west coast to Oregon. And I'm going to be the director, the new director of the Linus Pauling Institute.’  Lisa: Oh, wow.  Dr Anitra: Great opportunity it is. I like the West Coast of the United States. I've done a bit of work in California during my PhD. And so, I was quite happy with it. And so Linus Pauling had died just a few years prior to that. And so, the Linus Pauling Institute, which was in California, at the time, kind of needed a new home, I think they're in Palo Alto. And so they ended up going to Oregon State University because that was—for a couple of reasons—that was Linus Pauling alma mater. So, he had done his undergraduate research when he was in a cultural college. And also, because the library there was going to be able to host his papers. And so he has this collection of his writings and papers, thousands and thousands of documents, because as you've stated before, he's one of the only people to have been awarded two unshared Nobel prizes. So one was in chemistry around his work on the nature of the chemical bond. And the other one was a Peace Prize for his anti-nuclear campaign. And so the Oregon State University Library has his complete collection, it's called the Linus Pauling Special Collection. And so I spent a few years at Oregon State University researching how vitamin C can protect against oxidation of low density lipoprotein particles, which are what the body uses to export fat and cholesterol around the body, because the cells need cholesterol. But most people know low density lipoprotein protein as bad cholesterol. I mean, it's not intrinsically bad. But if it becomes oxidized, it can contribute to the development of atherosclerotic plaques and contribute to cardiovascular disease. And so I was looking at how vitamin C can protect against oxidation of this particle, and thereby potentially peak against development of atherosclerosis. And I was... Lisa: What was the outcome of it? That would be really interesting. Dr Anitra: Yes. So, I was particularly interested in the oxidants produced by white blood cells, because these can react with these low density lipoprotein particles and oxidized them. And vitamin C is a great scavenger in particular, and I was interested in how much do you need and how the particulars—is the real biochemical level? And, but also during this time, so late 1990s. We were interested—Professor Balz Frei was interested in the recommended dietary intakes for vitamin C. Because in a lot of countries they are very low—these recommendations, primarily to prevent deficiency diseases, such as scurvy. Whereas, we believe you know, that the recommendations should be high to help reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer and that sort of thing. That's a bit helpful to the outcome. So, in the late 90s, in 1998, the Food and Nutrition board of the Institutes of Medicine was re-examining the recommended dietary intake for the antioxidant vitamins, the A, C, and E in the United States.  And we write a comprehensive review around all the scientific evidence at the time for what sort of doses of vitamin C appear to protect against cardiovascular disease and cancer. And so, we made a recommendation of 120 milligrams a day, which was, at that time twice what the recommended dietary intake in the States, it was 60 milligrams a day at the time. And so we submitted that document, and it was considered by the Food and Nutrition Board. And also another review, I'd written around vitamin C's antioxidant roles in the body versus its pro-oxidant roles. Vitamin C, referred to as pro-oxidant.  Lisa: Yes, I’ve heard that. To get hit around the antioxidant and as a pro-oxidant.  Dr Anitra: Vitamin C is an antioxidant. It's not a not oxidant, pro-oxidant. But what it does is it can reduce—so antioxidants donate electrons, and they reduce oxidized compounds. So, it reduces transition metal ions such as copper and iron. So, these are metals in our body that can read off cycles so they can produce oxidants. Lisa: Yes, and we've talked about redox before in the podcast. Dr Anitra: Yes, so what vitamin C does is it converts these metal ions into a reduced state and metal ions can go on and generate oxidants. Lisa: So it gives ion and copper a longer life, does it? It sort of gives them—ion and copper away to keep going? Dr Anitra: Regenerates them so that these metal ions can keep producing oxidants. But in our body, these metal ions are all sequestered away and protected by proteins, they're not floating around free. In the body, vitamin C doesn't seem to do that, based on the evidence, it seems to just have it’s true antioxidant roles, not this kind of prooxidant by-product, as you might call it. So, this sort of evidence was considered by the Food and Nutrition Board and they decided, ‘Yes, it does have an antioxidant role in the body.’ And, and so they also referred to Mark Levine's seminal work to kind of work out a dose, a daily dose of vitamin C, they thought would be good to help foster this antioxidant potential on the body—potentially protect against these other chronic long-term diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. And so they did end up increasing the RDA for vitamin C instead from 50 to 90 milligrams a day for men, and 75 milligrams a day for women. So that was good, not quite as high as we would have liked to see, but still a step in the right direction. Lisa: A very conservative, aren’t they? They are slow to respond and conservative? Because you think like being the preventative space would be a good thing, if we're trying to... Dr Anitra: It is. Prevention is a lot cheaper, a lot easier to prevent a disease. Lisa: Exactly. But I think New Zealand's even worse, isn't it? I think we're at 45 milligrams, which is I think it is. Dr Anitra: One of the lowest in the world, yes. Lisa: That’s got to change, sorry.  Dr Anitra: So we're trying to generate the evidence to help support them increase in RDA. Lisa: Gosh, so it's also slow, like you've been doing this for what? 20-like years. And still... Dr Anitra: They do say that translation of science into medical research into clinical practice takes 15 to 20 years. Lisa: Wow, that is a really interesting statement. Because this is why I think, like sharing the sort of information direct from the experts, if you like, and I sit this was Professor Margreet Vissers too, that we have to make sort of educated decisions as people in trouble now. Whether you've got cancer or whether like my case who have a dad who had sepsis, you have to make an educated decision now based on you're running out of time. And we're waiting for the research and the research will be great, but it will be another 10 to 20 years down the line before it actually… And then in the medical world, it seems to be a very slow—Doctor Fowler said that beautifully when I had him on last week. It's like trying to shift a supertanker, Critical Care he was referring to is very, very slowly coming around. And I had Dr Ron Hunninghake on as well from the Riordan Institute, another fantastic doctor, and he talked about Medical Mavericks. Dr Hugh Riordan had written three books on people who were really ahead of their time, got in trouble for it and then actually the research and everything caught up with them later.  So that's interesting. So, if you’re listening to this, New Zealand has got 45 milligrams as the RDA, that's just to keep you out of scurvy. Right?  So, okay, so you've done all this antioxidant research and this with RSS and at the Linus Pauling Institute, when did you start to develop an interest in the infectious diseases, sepsis side of that, because I'd really love to... Dr Anitra: Yes, that's, that's more recent.  So, after a few years—three years at the Institute, I decided to have our first child and move back to New Zealand. And I made the decision to quit science and just focus on bringing up our family, ended up having three children. Stayed home for nine years looking out after our children. And I made the decision that they were more important than my career  Lisa: Wonderful. That's an interesting fact, as well as a mom and a scientist, like, an incredibly dedicated career that you'd have spent years getting there and then trying to juggle mum roles with scientist roles, and taking nine years out of your career. Has that hurt your career massively? Or I would have catch up so to speak? Dr Anitra: It hasn't hurt my career. I mean, I'm 10 years behind my contemporaries, my colleagues because I took that time out. But that's the decision I made. And I stand by it because the first three years of a child's life are very important. So I thought I'll dedicate myself to the children in the early years. And after those nine years, right? I've done my time and really can’t get back to work. Lisa: Mum's going to be a working mum from now on.  Dr Anitra: But I just went back to work part time, so, within school hours, so that I'll still be there for them after school hours. And one of the things that drew me back to work—I was recruited back to run a human intervention study. What really excited me because when I was in the lab doing lead-based research, I always felt too removed from the need to be helping. And so I’m much more interested in the whole person and how they're feeling, not what's happening inside a single cell.  Lisa: Yes. Yes, it makes sense.  Dr Anitra: I was really excited and really grateful to be recruited back, especially after taking nine years out for my... Discoveries have been made during that time that I had no idea until I went back and I've got a bit of catching up to do. And... Lisa: So what was that first intervention study, that human...  Dr Anitra: This was a kiwi fruit study. So kiwi fruit is very high in vitamin C. In summary, we're interested in how many kiwi fruit do you need to eat to get adequate and optimal vitamin C level. So it's just kind of a dosing study?  Lisa: Brilliant. Dr Anitra: Then we went on to compare kiwi fruit with tablets. So, animal research had shown our food sources of Vitamin C seemed to be a bit better than tablet sources. And so we would—we thought we'd translate that into a human study. And what we found is there's no difference  Lisa: There's no difference. Uptake of vitamin C from food versus tablets, the body is really good at it. Because we need vitamin C, our body has adapted ways to...   Lisa: Take it wherever it gets it. Dr Anitra: Take it up, regardless of the source. Lisa: Wow, that's... Dr Anitra: The structure of vitamin C's the same in foods as it is in tablets. So the body recognizes it the same, takes up the same amounts. I mean, the benefit of food is that you're also getting all the other vitamins and minerals and fibre. So, we still recommend food. But it is in our daily diets these days, it's very hard to get 200 milligrams a day of vitamin C. Lisa: Just fruits and veggies. Yes. Dr Anitra: That’s just fruit and vegetables. And as you know, different fruits and vegetables have quite different amounts of vitamin C, which a lot of people aren't aware of. Lisa: No. No. Dr Anitra: I mean, people know that kiwi fruit and citrus are high, but they may not realize that apples and bananas are actually quite low in vitamin C. Lisa: Or capsicums are quite high… You wouldn’t think that broccoli… And if you decide to take a supplement, is there a bit of supplement? Like, I have heard concerns about corn-derived vitamin C because of the glyphosate discussion, and that’s a bit hard to track really, the types of vitamin C. But is there any sort of research around—I mean, I've talked previously with a couple of doctors and scientists around liposomal delivery. Have you seen anything in that department or any supplementation method that's better? Dr Anitra: Not convincingly better. I mean, there might be trials that show that’s slightly better than just your normal chewable vitamin C. But I just go for the standard, cheap vitamin. Lisa: Yes, doesn't have to be super special. Like it's a pretty simple molecule, isn't it? Like, the body is pretty, like you say, it needs it, it knows it. Dr Anitra: Liposomal vitamin C kind of wrapped up in lipids, and the body doesn't need it because like you said it’s designed to recognize vitamin C in its natural form, in foods and such like. Lisa: Yes—who was that? I think Dr Thomas Levy was saying it bypasses some of the digestive issues because with vitamin C, you can get digestive stress when you take a bigger... Dr Anitra: When you take a higher dose. Some people, we're talking about more than four grams a day, and some people can get stress, it does but you can use that. Lisa: Okay. So then you've moved into—and forgive me for jumping here—but very keen to talk about the role of sepsis and pneumonia and patients in ICU reasons   Dr Anitra: So, after about five years of doing that research part time, I managed to get at Health Research Council, such as speakers Health Research Fellowship, which allowed me to move into the more clinical arena of studying infection, which was an area I was interested in. And done some observational studies where we have recruited patients who have pneumonia, measured the vitamin C levels, and levels of oxidative stress. And found that they have very low levels of vitamin C and high levels of oxidative stress. And the more severe the condition, the worse it is, the lower the vitamin C levels, and the higher the oxidative stress. So, if those patients with pneumonia are going to develop sepsis, and sepsis is kind of this uncontrolled inflammatory response to a severe infection. And that can develop into multi organ failure and the patient’s taken to the intensive care unit. And it can go on further to develop into septic shock due to failure of the cardiovascular system. And up to half those patients die, it’s the major cause of death in critically ill patients.  Lisa: Yes. And that's what I unfortunately experienced with my dad. And so, with the organs are starting to break down. So, when you get anything like pneumonia or sepsis, the body's requirement just goes up, a hundred-fold or more. Dr Anitra: Yes, at least 30-fold. Yes. So, it's very hard to get those amounts into a patient orally. And so, when the patients are in the intensive care unit, they're generally sedated because they're being mechanically ventilated. And so, they're given nutrition in two different ways because they can't eat. And so, the main way is to drip feed it directly into the stomach, liquid nutrition in the stomach through nasal gastric tube. The other way is to inject it directly into the bloodstream. And so, the recommended amounts of vitamin C by these means is about 100 milligrams a day. Lisa: That’s nothing.  Dr Anitra: But what we did on one of our studies was we looked at how much vitamin C these patients should theoretically have in their blood based on how much vitamin C they're consuming. Because 100 milligrams a day in a healthy person is more than adequate to—provides adequate plasma, what we would consider adequate plasma levels. And so, we mapped out what it would look like in these patients based on how much they were getting. And then we compared it with what we actually measured in their blood, it’s way lower than what theoretically should have been. And so, this, this was an indication that you still need a lot more vitamin C than they're getting in the standard liquid nutrition. And that the body also has these much higher requirements, which has been shown previously by other researchers. Lisa: And so this leading to almost a scurvy-like situation. I mean, some of these severe sepsis people—I mean, seeing one of your [unintelligible 24:53] that sort of normal community cohort of people, young people, middle aged people, and then down into the more severe pneumonia and then sepsis, and severe sepsis. And they are just over the scurvy level. So basically, their bodies are falling apart because of that, as well as the sepsis if you like. and it's... Dr Anitra: And that’s even on top of being given a day of at least 100 milligrams a day, that's still really low. Lisa: That's just not touching the sides.  Dr Anitra: Yes and...  Lisa: Why is this not like—for people going into the hospital, why is it that even though—okay, we may not know the dosages, why is not every hospital testing at least the really sick patients, what their vitamin C levels are, and then treating it the nutrient deficiency only? Even apart from the high dose intravenous stuff, but just actually—with my dad, I was unable to get a vitamin C test done to prove my case. I couldn't prove my case because I couldn't get it tested.  Dr Anitra: Yes, no, it's so true. It's because doctors don't learn about nutrients in medical school, it’s not part of their training.  Lisa: At all, yes.  Dr Anitra: So they're not familiar with how important they are for the body. They're not familiar with all the recent research around all the different functions and mechanisms of action that vitamin C carries out. Over the last 10 years, all these brand-new mechanisms and functions have been discovered, and they think we know everything there is to know about it.  Lisa: Yes, and we don't. Dr Anitra: [unintelligible 26:34] the time. It’s basically exciting. Lisa: Yes, it is.  Dr Anitra: So basically, they don't understand. The hospital system isn't set up to routinely measure it. It is only ever measured if scurvy—if someone comes in with suspected scurvy. And even then, a lot of doctors aren't used to recognizing the symptoms of scurvy. It's not something they're familiar with because it doesn’t... Lisa: They think it no longer exists because it’s what sailors had in the 1800s. Dr Anitra: ...the parents and the wisdom.  Lisa: It’s basically in the sick population. Dr Anitra: It is. But I think... So when I first applied for funding to carry out these studies, in pneumonia and sepsis, there were only a couple of papers have been published at that time looking at vitamin C sepsis, and that was Berry Fowler's safety dosing study.  Lisa: That is phase one trial.  Dr Anitra: And another one, small one in Iran. So, there was very, very little information out there at the time. And so, I put in an application for us to carry out an intervention study in our ICU at Christchurch. So just a small one, 40 people—20 placebo control of vitamin C and 20 getting intravenous vitamin C.  And not long after that, Paul Marik's study came out and that stimulated real explosion and research in this field because of the media interest. So the media picked up on it. And it hit the world. I've been talking about this for years to doctors. I see doctors and they're trying to get to talk about it. But it wasn't until it hit the media, and they heard about it through the media, they thought, ‘Okay, maybe there's something here.’ So that just goes to show how important media can be. Lisa: Exactly why we're doing the show. I have not seen it. But you know what I mean? We've got to get this from the ground up moving.  Dr Anitra: Yes. And so since then, there's been many studies carried out around the world, all of different quality. And so we're learning more and more information, real-time clinical trials, they take a long time to run. Recruitment being the most difficult part.  The other thing is that, a lot of the clinical trials, the clinical researches are used to running drug trials and so they treat vitamin C like a drug, but it's not a drug. It's a nutrient, it’s a vitamin, that the body is specially designed to take up and use very different from drugs. And so they don't always understand how vitamin C works in the body. And it's important to know how it's working in order to design good studies, good quality studies. So a lot of the data that's come out may be impacted by how well the study was done and thought out. So we still don't know all the important essays about the dose, how often should you give it, when should you give it?  I mean, ideally it should be given you know, as early as possible.  Lisa: Early as possible.  Dr Anitra: Don't wait until they're at death's door and septic shock. It's hard for vitamin C to do something at that stage even really high, even a really high dose vitamin. The earlier that you give it, the longer you can get it for digest.  Most of these trials have given it for four days and they stop.  Lisa: Yes, I've wondered that.  Dr Anitra: The whole time, they're in the ICU because once pharmacokinetic study showed that when you stop that vitamin C, some of those patients just drop straight back down to where they were. Now they need to keep that continued input.  Lisa: So why? Why has it been made that it's only—all of those I've seen, I think have been 4-day, 96 hour studies. And occasionally one of them is or for the latest day in ICU, but most of them have been 96 hours and most of them have been very, very conservative dosing. From what I understand conservative dosing. And I know Dr Berry Fowler said where there's some consideration about oxalate in kidney function. And I'm like, ‘Yes, but this is still a very low risk for somebody who's got sepsis.’ Dr Anitra:  If a patient has kidney dysfunction in ICU they put them on haemodialysis anyway, so which clears that excess vitamin C. So it's not such an issue for those patients. But yes, a lot of these studies were designed to reproduce the first studies that came out to see if they are reproducible. so, that's why they’re using similar regimes. But now that we know more about it, each study adds another piece to the puzzle. And so hopefully, future studies will look more into what dose we actually need and it only varies depending on the... Lisa: The severity  Dr Anitra: Severity, etc. How long? And I believe, once they leave the ICU... So patients who survived sepsis, they can go on to have real problems, physical disabilities, cognitive issues, psychological issues, like depression, anxiety. And so, I really believe they keep taking vitamin C when they leave the hospital just orally, that might help with those conditions that hasn't been researched yet. That's a whole area of research that should be carried out to. Lisa: So, if I was to ask you, in your dream world where your resources are unlimited, and you had lots of money, and you had lots of people to help you do all these and you have enough patience to enrol. What are some other things that you would like as a scientist and you understand some of the mechanisms and the cofactors—which I want to get on to as well—what are some of the studies that you would like to see happen? So, we can move this along faster.  What are some of the key things?  So, quality of life afterwards? Yes, like dosages, what?  Dr Anitra: Really practical things that the doctors need to know, I think, what's important, like, how much to give, how often to give it? Most of the studies are done four times a day because that's what was done in the initial studies. Is it better to give it continuously? So, when they're in the ICU, can you just use drugs continuously, rather than this kind of bolus dosing?  So, do more research around that.  So the frequency and dosing and timing like when do you administer it, how long should you administer it for? I mean, there's so many important aspects around that. And we've got the foundational research done now, we can start teasing out the finer details now, I think. Rather than just doing the same study designs over and over again, Lisa: Yes and reproducing.  Dr Anitra: Modify their study designs to start addressing these other issues. And there's some really big studies underway at the moment. One in Canada with 800 people. I mean, they'll give us really good information, those sorts of studies, rather than the little studies. Unless you live in small countries. Lisa: Small countries that can’t afford those things that cost millions and millions of dollars. And is there a trouble with funding because it's not a drug that we're developing here? Does it make it harder to get funding? Dr Anitra: It's extremely hard to get funding because often on the CSUN committee, it's often medical people on these who don't believe in vitamin C. The bad press or the misinformation don't understand the importance, the relevance and so, that's why this outreach is really important. It's just educating people about the science behind it. It's not hocus pocus.  Lisa: Yes, I mean, if I can share—I mean, I've shared a little bit on the past episodes with my case with my dad. I know and I felt they just put me in that, wackery quackery caught and they paid lip service to listening to me. They didn't really and but I’m quite—well in this case, I had to be quite forceful because my dad was dying. And I didn't go away, most people would go away because—and I just wish I knew then what I know now even because I wasn't that deep into the research. And now I am deep into the research and really an advocate for this.  But I was treated like—there was one really good doctor who listened to me, who advocated, he didn't believe in it, he didn't understand the mechanisms of action or any of that sciency stuff. But he did advocate for me at the ethics committee, whereas everyone else would just roll their eyes basically.  And this is why I think it's so important to share this, to come back again and again to the science for science for science, and for them to just open up their eyes just because they didn't learn it in medical school. And it's not in the current textbook for, like you say, because it takes 20 years probably to get it to the textbook. Because it's a vitamin, they just immediately shut down, it’s how I felt. They just immediately, ‘Well, just eat an orange and you're good to go.’ I mean, the surgeon—I had a friend that was going into surgery, and she was like, ‘Should I have intravenous vitamin C, before I go into surgery to prepare my body?’ Very logical thing to do in my eyes. It’s like, ‘You don’t need that, just eat an orange,’ and it's like, ‘Oh, you don't get the whole why and how, and what happens when the body goes through a trauma and a surgery, or a sepsis or any of these things.’And I don't know, like there's a bigger issue at play with the whole pharmacological model that our whole system is built upon. And that nutrients and nutrition isn't taught in medical school. So we're up against this big sort of brick wall.  And when I tell my story to people just, sharing with friends and things, they’ll be going, ‘But where's the downside? He was dying anyway, why couldn't he have it?’ And I said, ‘Well, you're up against machinery, you're up against ethics committees, legal battles, and a system that is just very staid and conservative in its approach.’  And that's not to criticize individual people within the system. I'm not wanting to do that. I'm just trying to make people aware because people go into a hospital setting or something, and they expect to have the latest and greatest information available that the doctors know all that. And unfortunately, that's not always the case. Do you find that frustrating?  Dr Anitra: I mean, it's not the doctors’ fault as such, because they're very busy people, they don't have time to keep up with all the literature, and they're not likely to be going into the nutrition literature in the first place. Which is why we try and publish as much of that stuff and the clinical literature, they're more likely to see it then. And they have the patient's best interests at heart. They've just heard the bad things about vitamin C and the misinformation. And so they don't want to do harm to the patient, I guess. It’s the view that they’re coming from and they don't have time to read all the latest information. And that's why just piece by piece, chip away at theirs, and educate them and hopefully it'll come into the training of the new doctors. And future hopefully, more nutrition courses will be introduced into training because it's not just vitamin C.  The body needs all the vitamins that are all vital to life. That's where the name comes from. You don't hit them, you die. It's as simple as that. So, yes, I think that it is vital that this information gets into the appropriate arenas. Lisa: Yes. And I think that's why I'm passionate about the show is that my sort of outlook on the whole thing is, ‘Yes, I'm not a doctor, but I can give voice to doctors and researchers. And I can curate and I can investigate and I can share.’ And this is a very emotional topic for me or for obvious reasons, but I'm trying to take the emotion out of it because that doesn't help the discussion.  And it’s really hard but I understand the importance—because I know that if I share things in an emotional manner, then I'll get shut down as having mental health problems in a group being a grieving daughter. When actually I’m an intelligent person who's educated herself in this. I've got the best people, and the best researchers, and the best scientists, and the best doctors sharing the latest research. And I hope that by doing that you can get one mind after the other and just get them to understand rather than the emotional side of things. Because what I do want to also share with the story is that every person's life that is saved is a family that's not grieving. These are not statistics.  When Dr Berry Fowler's research, with Dr Merricks research and you see a drop from, I think Dr Merricks was 40%, mortality to 8% and Dr Berry’s was something like 49, down to 29. Don't quote me on the numbers, but big numbers in drops and mortality. And you go, those are just dozens, if not hundreds of lives that are saved. And those families are saved from that grief.  And worldwide, I've heard a couple of estimates between 30 and 50 million people a year who get sepsis. Of those, one in five—I've heard in your research—one in five in New Zealand ICU dies of sepsis. This is a huge problem. This is as big as cancer and actually is one of the complications often of cancer therapies. So, I don't think people understand the enormity of sepsis itself. And then pneumonia, and then we can go into the discussion of COVID, and cancer, and all those other things. It's like we're talking millions of lives every year around the world. So this research is just absolutely crucial. Sorry, I've gotten on my bandwagon a little bit. But I really want to get this information out there. And that I think it's really, really important.  And let’s change track a little bit and just talk a little bit briefly because I haven't covered this subject with the other vitamin C interviews that I've done. Around the cofactor, so vitamin C is a cofactor for so many different areas. So I remember from one of your lectures, it has epigenetic influences and hairs like with collagen synthesis, and that's not just for your skin and your and your nails, but also has implications for cancer. You've got your health, which Professor Margreet Vissers talked about your hypoxia inducible factor, tumor growth. Can you just go and give me a little bit of information around—the vasopressin one would be very good and anything else that pops to mind there. Dr Anitra: Yes, so the cofactor is a compound that helps enzyme function. So everything in our cells relies on the functions of enzymes to carry out reactions in ourselves or the chemical reactions require enzymes. And so a cofactor supports that function.  And so early on when I was just starting in this area of research in the field of sepsis, I was looking at the different cofactor functions of vitamin C, and one of them is a cofactor for the enzyme which synthesizes noradrenaline. And noradrenaline is one of the main drugs, as you might say, that's given to patients who are going into septic shock. So it's given to the patients to try and increase the blood pressure. And it works by making the muscles around the blood vessels contract. Makes the blood vessels a bit smaller, so it increases your blood pressure.  And so vitamin C is a cofactor for the enzyme that naturally synthesizes noradrenaline in our body. And there's another enzyme which synthesizes hormones, one of which is vasopressin.  And this is another drug that's also sometimes given to these patients to help your blood pressure. And it works by increasing the re-uptake of water by the kidney. So, that increases your blood volume and hence, your blood pressure. So, for a lot of ICU patients, they're given noradrenaline and sometimes they're given vasopressin on top of that. Really try and get the blood pressure up. Lisa: Yes, their collapsing cardiovascular system.  Dr Anitra: And I realized, ‘Oh wait a minute vitamin C is also cofactor for this enzyme that synthesizes vasopressin.’ So here it is, a cofactor for two quite different enzymes that synthesize vasopressors naturally in our body. And so, if these patients are coming into the ICU, very low in vitamin C, and going into shock, is one of those reasons because they don't have enough vitamin C in the body to support natural vasopressor function. The doctors have to give them these drugs but if we're able to get them vitamin C, early enough that it can potentially support their own natural synthesis of these vasopressors in the body, which is a much better way to do it. Because if drugs are given from the outside, they're often given in high doses and not regulated, and so can cause side effects. There is a difference being produced in the body, the body knows what it's doing. It regulates how much and how often, all those sort of 46:07 engineering emails and so you don't get the nasty side effects. Lisa: Can I share a bit of a story there? Because both my mom and her case was—she had an aneurysm four years ago, she was on noradrenaline, and could only be given in an ICU. And originally she was in the neurological ward. And they couldn't do it there. And I only realized like she was going into a coma. So she had massive brain damage going into a coma. That when they took her up to ICU, they could give her the noradrenaline that opened up that the vessels in the heat it a little bit, or keep the pressure up, so that the vessels were open to stop the vasospasm in her case, which was killing parts of the brain. But she'd been in the neurological ward where they couldn't give any of that earlier. And so the damage had already been done partly.  And then with the case with my dad, back then I didn't know anything about vitamin C, of course. With the case with my dad in July, this year, I got vitamin C, but it was on day 13 of his 15-day battle, because I had paid to go through ethics committees and all of that sort of jazz. So he was an absolute death's doorstep, should have been dead days ago, according to the doctors. They couldn't believe he was still going but he was one tough man. I don’t know how he was still alive but he was. And the very first infusion that we got a vitamin C, immediately we were able to take him off norad for a period of about eight hours. We needed the vitamin C again, that took me another 18 hours before I could get permission to get the second one. Unfortunately, I couldn't get it in the six-hour bolus, which was ideal.  We gave him initially 15 grams. So this was again, multiple organ failure, fecal matter, and the creatinine, desperate, desperate, desperate straits. His CRP, c-reactive protein dropped from 246 down to 115. His white blood cell count improved and his kidney function went from 27% to 33%. And I was able to take him on vasopressors and noradrenaline for about eight hours. That is incredible for someone who could die at any moment. And we eventually—we failed because I struggled to get the second and I struggled to get the third infusion and it really was too late.  But even at that point, I thought it might be interesting for your research—I have all the medical records by the way, if you want to have a look at the data exactly. But it really was a strong—he doesn't need the noradrenaline, his blood pressure was going up. And that was a really, really good sign. As the dropping of the CRP, which was still very high at 115 but it was way better than where it had been.  So goodness, what would have happened if I'd had him on day one from the surgery? Yes. And, and none of it is understood. So that's one of the cofactors that… And that brings to mind just as someone who's connecting the dots, if you have an HPA axis problem, like your adrenals aren't doing the job well. And your cortisol, vitamin C would probably be a good thing to take to support.  Dr Anitra: And sometimes it’s referred to as a stress hormone because it is involved in the adrenal response. And people who are under stress, or in animal studies who have stress animals they appear, they use more vitamin C, and they generate more vitamin C, the animals they can synthesize it themselves, they generate more vitamin C to compensate for that. We are not there anymore. So we have to take more if we're under stressful conditions. Lisa: Exactly. And that's a really—it's just a funny thing of evolution that we've lost the ability to synthesize more as we like animals, like the goat, especially it can synthesize like a ton more when it needs that. We will give them big brains so that we can make vitamin C so we can take it. What are some of the other cofactors? Just as we start to wrap it up, but just a couple of the other important cofactors.  And collagen? Why is collagen important apart from you want my skin and hair, and your joints? Well, I did hear in one of the lectures about collagen helping stop metastasis of cancers?  Dr Anitra: Right, yes, that's one mechanism. It's also very important in wound healing. And, interestingly, a lot of—a reasonable number of surgeons are aware of this and that they're a lot more open to people taking vitamin C around surgery before and after surgery just to help affect wound healing. Lisa: Oh, wow. Yes.  Dr Anitra: Which is great. And Lisa: And oncologists, are they sort of open to...  Dr Anitra: Least so  Lisa: Least so. Yes. In fact, I've had friends who have told us, if you take intravenous vitamin C, we won't do any treatments. And this is... Dr Anitra: And that is primarily around all the misunderstanding around those early, early trials around intravenous. What I'm seeing is when Linus Pauling showed a feat of vital intravenous vitamin C. The clinicians at the Mayo Clinic who tried to reproduce those studies, they used oral doses, so just small doses over a day.  But back in those days, they weren't aware of the different pharmacokinetics of vitamin C, they thought oral and intravenous, are just the same, like the drug. But it's quite different. Oral uptake is a lot lower, much smaller amounts are taken up versus intravenous, you can get really high doses. And very quickly,  Lisa: Up to 200 times. I heard Professor Gabi Dachs, saying that intravenous is up to 200 times for short periods, but that short periods makes a difference, because you can get that into the tumor cells and to—so that… And this is the problem. Professor Margreet Vissers was saying the original controversy around Linus Pauling’s work and because they didn't have an understanding of how can possibly this mechanism of action been working. They just pursued it, basically. And it caused this big rift, those on the side, and those on that side, and for the next—what are we? 40 something years later—we'll still actually, it's problematic. Dr Anitra: Yes, it wasn't really till Mark Levine did his really detailed pharmacokinetic studies that people realized the big differences between oral and intravenous. And also there’s more recent discoveries of vitamin C's cofactor functions around regulating genes through herbs and through the epigenetic enzymes. These are all mechanisms, which could be involved and its anticancer mechanisms as such. And so the epigenetic area is a very, very exciting, very interesting area of research. And I think it'll enable us to personalize medicine in the future.  Lisa: Oh! I mean, I have an epigenetics program as one of my health programs. And yes, that's looking at okay, how genes being influenced by your environment, and let's optimize your environment to your genes. And the vitamin C helps serve to give people an understanding, so is vitamin C helping produce the enzymes that read the DNA? And then therefore having the reactions. Is that how it works? Dr Anitra: It works as a code. Lisa: the transcription Dr Anitra: Yes, so it helps the function of the enzymes which modify the DNA. So genetics is about the DNA itself. Epigenetics is above the DNA. So it's a way to regulate the DNA as you know. Usually through adding methyl groups to the dynast DNA, adding and subtracting and that affects how the DNA is read by the enzymes that read DNA and transcribe it. Lisa: Turning them on or off, or simplify.  Dr Anitra: So vitamin C, regulates the enzymes which modify the methyl groups and stimulates them coming off or stimulates different mechanisms happening. So switching certain genes on, switching certain genes off, now it can teach you to regulate thousands of genes in our body through stimulation of these enzymes. Lisa: Wow. So yes, I've heard somewhere, I think it was seven or 8000 genes that are possibly affected by this. So we are really at the beginning of the vitamin C journey, as far as the epigenetics mechanisms is concerned. Yes, that's exciting. Dr Anitra: A lot of its functions, not just in cancer, but in all areas of health and disease, these functions could be playing a role. So yes, huge areas of research possible there. Lisa: Yes. Yes. Yes. Is there a—I remember Professor Margaret, talking about Tt? Is that one of the enzymes? The Tt one? Dr Anitra: It is an enzyme, that's right. Lisa: And that's important for cancer in some way? Dr Anitra: Now, the enzyme search modifies the methylated DNA, some regulation that epigenetics. And it's definitely difficult. Lisa: To replicate it in the cancer process. Wow. Okay, we're getting quite technical here.  Doctor Anitra, I just want to say thank you very much for your dedication because I've listened to a couple of interviews with you. And you've actually sacrificed quite a lot to do the research that you're doing because there isn't a heck of a lot of funding and things are out there. So, thank you for doing all that. It's a labour of love, I can imagine. It's a long, slow process, getting the information, getting it to be watertight—scientifically watertight, so that we can actually get people help, who need help. And that at the end of the day it’s the reason I'm doing this podcast. And it's the reason you're doing your research, and hopefully together and with many others, we can move the story along so that people get helped.  Is there anything that we haven't covered that you think would be an important message for people listening today? Dr Anitra: Well, I think—I mean, of course, infection is very relevant these days with COVID. There’s a lot of information and misinformation floating around out there about vitamin C and COVID. And at this stage, the studies are still at the really early, early stages. Americans have done a study which shows that patients with COVID in the ICU do have low vitamin C levels, like other similar conditions. COVID is a severe respiratory infection like pneumonia and sepsis or complications with COVID. And so, I think that the key is to stay healthy, eat a good healthy... Lisa: Boost your immune system, yes.  Dr Anitra: Yes, to support your immune system, it doesn't mean you won't get COVID. But it may decrease the severity and the duration, so it doesn't go on to become the more severe version, the pneumonia and sepsis.  So I think that's an important message and if you do get infection, your requirements, dear God, so you do need to take more vitamin C, you need to take gram amounts, rather than milligram amounts. Want you to prevent getting even more severe. So, I'm all for prevention as much as possible, not leaving it till it's too late. So, I think, yes, just look after yourself, eat well. Lisa: Yes. And get your vitamin C. Come buy some kiwi fruit, and some oranges today, and some lemons, and capsicum. And some supplements maybe. Just as a final thing, you yourself, have a study that's currently underway, which is really, really exciting. And this is based in the Christchurch hospital, I believe, in 40 patients and with sepsis. Can you just tell us a little bit, the parameters of that study and when you think you'll have some results from it? Dr Anitra: So this was patients with septic shock. So once again, at the end. And they were administered either placebo control, so half the patients and the other half were given intravenous vitamin C at a dose of 100 milligrams per kilogram body tissue per day, which equates to about six to seven grams a day. The reason for that, I have wanted to use the high dose, Berry Fowler. But the ethics committee—because when I put this into the ethics committee, there were only the two studies out, which was Berry Fowler's and the small study headed by Iran. And they said, ‘Well, slightly more people have received a lot lower dose versus the higher dose. So we'd rather use the lower dose.’’ Even though there'd be no adverse events at any dose. And subsequently, no adverse events and any studies.  Lisa: No. Dr Anitra: And so, we've used the lower dose, we've only just finished recruiting the last patients. It took a while and we had issues of lockdown. And so now we're in the process of analysing the samples that we've collected analysing the data. And so hopefully, we're about to pull that together, sometime next year and publish the results next year.   Lisa: Brilliant. I can't wait to see that. And yes, that's a little bit frustrating because I would have liked to have seen a study with the 15 to 18. And even that I thought was still very conservative compared to some of the cancer dosages. But I understand from what Dr Berry Fowler said because of the decreased kidney function often in septic patients and so on, but it's just like yes, but the dying often. And it's because that was one of the arguments that was thrown at me, I could damage my dad's kidneys. The sepsis was doing that quite nicely and he was dying anyway. So why the hell?  So, but I think even at those dosages, we’ll hopefully see some fantastic results come out of it. And hopefully, in future we'll be able to do slightly more high-powered dosages. Dr Anitra: Yes. Well, the key is also the size of the study, our study is very small. And we were interested in being a scientist. I'm interested in how it's working in the body because once you understand how it's working, it makes it easier to design better studies and not our future studies.  And so, our study will be too small to show a yes or no, it decreases mortality or not—that we're leaving it up to the large studies to show there. And hopefully, we can put a bit more science behind how it's working, what's happening in the body.  Lisa: And it's such a complicated thing to design a study. People don't probably realize how the parameters and the limitations and the number of variables that you can look at and the primary outcomes and the secondary outcomes and so on.  Dr Anitra: Sepsis is such a complex variable that comes in as unique in this situation. So there's huge variability in the data. And that's where the biggest studies are good, because it helps decrease... Lisa: The statistical...  Dr Anitra: The statistical analyses of those studies. Yes, I'm looking forward to the results of the big studies coming out. Lisa: Yes, but these, these smaller ones are really, really important. So, and it's great that we've got one going in New Zealand. So, thank you very much for your work, Dr Anitra. It’s been absolutely fascinating. And thank you for your dedication to this. I really, really appreciate you. Dr Anitra: Thank you. Thank you for inviting me. That's it this week for Pushing the Limits. Be sure to rate, review, and share with your friends and head over and visit Lisa and her team at lisatamati.com

The Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore
1684: High-Dose Vitamin C And Vitamin D Are The Foundation Of Boosting Immunity To COVID-19

The Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2020 87:43


  “We are being told to socially distance and wear a mask, but nobody is talking about how to boost your immune system.” Jimmy Moore When you feel a cold coming on, do you start taking higher doses of things like vitamin C and zinc? You’re not alone. Plenty of people swear by this helping it lessen the severity and length of the common cold. Have you ever stopped to ask yourself what made you start doing that to begin with?⁣ ⁣ When the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic made its way to America in March 2020, we really didn’t know a whole lot about it at the time. We knew that those who started experiencing the most severe symptoms had on average three comorbidities and were at the greatest risk for being hospitalized, going on a ventilator, and sadly dying. At the same time, health officials were telling us all to stay at home, wear a mask, socially distance, wash your hands, and all the rest that we’ve all been obediently doing all year long. ⁣ ⁣ But what the health officials have neglected to do is actually give instructions to people on how they can boost their own immunity as a prophylactic to protect themselves against COVID-19 before it even hits them. Now we have lots of research supporting various ways to do just that and I have two incredible studies from September 2020 to share with you about the role Vitamin D levels play on lessening the intensity of the cytokine storm this virus brings on. ⁣ ⁣ In this episode of JIMMY RANTS on The LLVLC Show, I read from a skeptical article about vitamin C where it went into the history of Linus Pauling and his work looking at this micronutrient and the effects it has on your health. Also ⁣In this episode, I go into the full details about a September 17, 2020 study published in PLOS ONE as well as a September 2, 2020 study published in the BMJ journal Open Heart featuring researchers @drjamesdinic and @lifestylemedicinedoctor. The direct correlation between levels of Vitamin D in the blood and the rate and severity of COVID-19 infection is incredibly correlative. Find out all the details in this episode. ⁣ Support this show by becoming a Patron at Patreon!

The Savage Nation Podcast
Was Trump’s Joyride Wise and Should He Back in WH With Contagious Disease

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2020 74:47


Trump leaving the hospital is reckless. Mathematical Association of America says math is create by humans and is therefore racist. Trump joyride is racist. Have to delete all articles on science on twitter. Twitter is garbage. Go chase the COVID bug for herd immunity if you’re reckless. Took a covid test, who was the initial spreader at the ACB event? Why are the girls in the White House wearing such short skirts. What is God saying when he looks down here? Man should not have been chosen to have souls. We kill so much in his name. We’re destroying the environment. There is truth in the world. Linus Pauling. How to improve your immune system. Need zinc, foods high in zinc. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dr. Alain Dutra
Ansiedade e depressão: Tratamentos Naturais. Com Dr. Juarez Callegaro

Dr. Alain Dutra

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2020 141:50


Live Imperdível sobre Nutrologia cerebral para a Ansiedade e Depressão. A pandemia a crise de saúde pública e a crise econômica gerou mais quadros de Ansiedade e depressão em toda a população. Nesta Live vamos abordar maneiras naturais, sem remédios fortes, para gerenciar e tratar. Dr. Alain Dutra conversa com Dr. Juarez Callegaro, médico psiquiatra, um dos pioneiros em nutrologia cerebral e professor de psiquiatria ortomolecular. Dr. Juarez Callegaro foi aluno de Linus Pauling, duas vezes ganhador do Prêmio Nobel, de quem é discípulo.

Pushing The Limits
Episode 164: The power of intravenous vitamin C with Dr Ron Hunninghake

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2020 64:46


Dr Ron Hunninghake is the Chief Medical Officer of the prestigious Riordan Institute in Witchita, Kansas.   In this episode Dr Ron explains the uses and mechanisms of action of Vitamin C both oral and intravenous Vitamin  C and it's uses in cancer, sepsis, pneumonia, shingles, hepatitis to schizophrenia and mental illnesses.   They also discuss the problems facing functional medicine/orthomolecular medicine vs allopathic medicine and the pharmacological model dominant in our system today.   They elucidate the the mechanisms by which intravenous Vitamin C exerts its powerful healing abilities and discuss the latest clinical trials and work by double nobel prize winner Dr Linus Pauling and subsequent research by Dr Hugh Riordan, Dr Barry Fowler, Dr Paul Marik and others.   This is a must listen to episode for those wanting to take control of their health and who want to dive deeper into vitamin c research.   You can find out more about the Riordan Institute at  https://riordanclinic.org/ and follow their youtube channel at  https://www.youtube.com/c/RiordanClinicOnline/playlists   For the Riordan Protocol for cancer patients visit:  https://riordanclinic.org/research-study/vitamin-c-research-ivc-protocol/   Dr Ron's Bio Dr. Ron, as patients fondly refer to Ron Hunninghake, MD, is a native Kansan. He served his medical internship at Wichita's Wesley Medical Center in 1979 and completed his residency at the Smoky Hill Family Practice Program in Salina, Kansas in 1982. Dr. Ron began his career as a small-town doc in Minneapolis, Kansas where he first started teaching clinic-based wellness. Later, he joined nearby Salina Family Physicians and was instrumental in founding WellPlan, a comprehensive lifestyle modification program. Seeking even greater involvement in helping patients learn innovative ways to rebuild and maintain their health, he joined the Riordan Clinic in 1989 as its Medical Doctor. Following in the footsteps of Dr. Hugh Riordan after the Clinic founder's untimely death in 2005, Dr. Ron set about articulating the Riordan approach in seven core precepts: The primacy of the doctor/patient relationship Identify and correct the underlying causes Characterize the biochemical uniqueness of the patient as co-learner Care for the whole person Let food be thy medicine Cultivate healthy reserves The healing power of nature In addition to his full-time practice as a holistic medical doctor at the Riordan Clinic, Dr. Ron has made multiple trips to Japan, Spain, Ecuador, Columbia, New Zealand, Canada and South Korea to lecture on The Riordan IVC Protocol for Cancer. He is a past chairman of the International Schizophrenia Foundation and has been a regular presenter at their Orthomolecular Medicine Today conference that has been held annually in Canada for the past 39 years. Here at the Riordan Clinic, he has presented more than 300 lectures dealing with all facets of nutrition, lifestyle, and optimal health. He has co-authored three books on subjects including inflammation, energy-boosting supplements, and how to stop pre-diabetes.   We would like to thank our sponsors for this show:   For more information on Lisa Tamati's programs, books and documentaries please visit www.lisatamati.com   For Lisa's online run training coaching go to https://www.lisatamati.com/pag... Join hundreds of athletes from all over the world and all levels smashing their running goals while staying healthy in mind and body.   Lisa's Epigenetics Testing Program https://www.lisatamati.com/pag... measurement and lifestyle stress data, that can all be captured from the comfort of your own home   For Lisa's Mental Toughness online course visit: https://www.lisatamati.com/pag...   Lisa's third book has just been released. It's titled "Relentless - How A Mother And Daughter Defied The Odds" Visit: https://relentlessbook.lisatam... for more Information   ABOUT THE BOOK: When extreme endurance athlete, Lisa Tamati, was confronted with the hardest challenge of her life, she fought with everything she had. Her beloved mother, Isobel, had suffered a huge aneurysm and stroke and was left with massive brain damage; she was like a baby in a woman's body. The prognosis was dire. There was very little hope that she would ever have any quality of life again. But Lisa is a fighter and stubborn. She absolutely refused to accept the words of the medical fraternity and instead decided that she was going to get her mother back or die trying. This book tells of the horrors, despair, hope, love, and incredible experiences and insights of that journey. It shares the difficulties of going against a medical system that has major problems and limitations. Amongst the darkest times were moments of great laughter and joy. Relentless will not only take the reader on a journey from despair to hope and joy, but it also provides information on the treatments used, expert advice and key principles to overcoming obstacles and winning in all of life's challenges. It will inspire and guide anyone who wants to achieve their goals in life, overcome massive obstacles or limiting beliefs. It's for those who are facing terrible odds, for those who can't see light at the end of the tunnel. It's about courage, self-belief, and mental toughness. And it's also about vulnerability... it's real, raw, and genuine. This is not just a story about the love and dedication between a mother and a daughter. It is about beating the odds, never giving up hope, doing whatever it takes, and what it means to go 'all in'. Isobel's miraculous recovery is a true tale of what can be accomplished when love is the motivating factor and when being relentless is the only option.   We are happy to announce that Pushing The Limits rated as one of the top 200 podcast shows globally for Health and fitness.  **If you like this week's podcast, we would love you to give us a rating and review if you could. That really, really helps to show get more exposure on iTunes**

Elemental Podcast | Club de aprendizaje
Sé radicalmente abierto de mente, Pricipios de Ray Dalio

Elemental Podcast | Club de aprendizaje

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2020 25:16


¿Cómo tener una mente radicalmente abierta? En este episodio conversamos sobre los pasos y el proceso del pensamiento crítico, además de las barreras que nos impiden expandir nuestros horizontes. Esta habilidad que raramente se enseña en las instituciones educacionales es fundamental para nuestro éxito.   ¿Quieres ayudarnos?, ¿Quieres donar? Ingresa a https://www.patreon.com/elementalpodcast   |Nuestra página|: http://www.elementalpodcast.cl/ |Twitter|: https://twitter.com/elementalpodcas (@elementalpodcas) |Facebook|: https://www.facebook.com/ElementalPodcast/ |Instagram|: https://www.instagram.com/elementalpodcast/ |Youtube|: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzbMsT2QA6TTaYrzLr6t1AQ   |Subscríbete en Spotify|: https://buff.ly/2x0X8KA |Subscríbete en iTunes|: https://buff.ly/2BKkvgf |Subscríbete en Stitcher|: https://buff.ly/2GYSu5H |Subscríbete en Podbean|: https://buff.ly/2H0Uw5p |Subscríbete en GooglePodcast|: https://buff.ly/2GIzUj2     Links y notas del Show:  Principios de Ray Dalio: https://youtu.be/oC6hhCk5hX0   El científico que Pedro hacía referencia era Linus Paulin (https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_Pauling), quien hizo enormes contribuciones a la química. Además, ganó el Premio Nobel dos veces y popularizó la idea que se puede curar el cáncer con vitamina C, sin evidencia real o conocimiento respecto a la enfermedad.   Acá también hay un artículo por si quieren leer más de Einstein vs Mecánica Cuántica: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/einstein-and-the-quantum/ Pedro García-Huidobro (@pedroghg) y Santiago Allamand (@stgoallamand) discuten sobre distintos libros todas las semanas.    Agradecimientos especiales a: |Redes y Comunicaciones|: Rosario del Valle |Música Intro|: Osvaldo Guzmán |Sonidos Adicionales|: Osvaldo Guzmán  |Musica Cierre|: ”Rollin at 5" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/  

Optimal Performance Podcast
272 Mega Dosing Vitamin C - A True Panacea With Theo Lucier

Optimal Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2020 85:07


This episode falls into the category of MIND BLOWER.  Here's where you can take advantage of this free offer just pay for shipping for your free organic vitamin c to try it yourself.  https://www.purevitamincflush.com/pure-vitamin-c-kit?affiliate_id=1978235 If you knew that you could do a comprehensive detox protocol in a few hours, inexpensively you would do it right?  If you knew that your body could utilize vitamin c to immediately energize your body and help you upgrade your health, you'd jump for it wouldn't you?  The Pure Vitamin C Flush is amazing, and so is this episode:  •How it works •When do we first see mega dosing vitamin C in the literature? •Albert St. Georgie in the 1920s •Vitamin C shown to cure polio via Dr. Klenner •Vitamin C is a powerful anti-toxin •Pregnant women getting 8k vit c per day (Klenner babies) •Linus Pauling, popularized therapeutic doses in the U.S. •Over 90% of vitamin C is GMO laced with glyphosate •Almost every chronic disease is found next to low vitamin c levels •Sicker bodies will hold much more vitamin c than a healthy body •”Why don’t more people know more about this?” •”You don’t take the amount of (vitamin) C that you think you need. You take the amount that works.” •”We as humans don’t make our own vitamin C.” •”Vitamin C is your body’s primary circulating anti-oxidant” •Vitamin C is an electron donor •Immune system, chronic fatigue, Epstein-barre, stress, anti-fragile, cortisol reduction, stretch-marks (stimulates collagen), heart disease, cancer (dr riordan, killing it directly through proxidation), anemia, anti-toxin, anti-viral, scurvy,  •Isn’t too much vitamin c bad for you? •My experience on the vitamin c flush

Health & Longevity
Linus Pauling Institute – Dr. Emily Ho

Health & Longevity

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2020 28:33


Today on Health & Longevity, Dr. John Westerdahl’s special guest is Dr. Emily Ho, PhD, Endowed Chair and Director of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. This program features the Linus Pauling Institute, a research institute at Oregon State University. The institute is named after two time Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Linus Pauling, […]

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.19.20

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2020 47:49


The Gary Null Show is here to inform you on the best news in health, healing, the environment. Multivitamin, mineral supplement linked to less-severe, shorter-lasting illness symptoms Oregon State University, August 18, 2020   Older adults who took a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement with zinc and high amounts of vitamin C in a 12-week study experienced sickness for shorter periods and with less severe symptoms than counterparts in a control group receiving a placebo. The findings by Oregon State University researchers were published in the journal Nutrients. The research by scientists at OSU's Linus Pauling Institute involved 42 healthy people ages 55 to 75 and was designed to measure the supplement's effects on certain immune system indicators. It also looked at bloodstream levels of zinc and vitamins C and D while taking the supplement, as these micronutrients are important for proper immune function. The immune indicators, including white blood cells' ability to kill incoming pathogens, were unaltered in the group receiving the supplement.  The multivitamin group showedimproved vitamin C and zinc status in the blood. Most intriguingly, illness symptoms reported by this group were less severe and went away faster than those experienced by the placebo group.  The same percentage of participants in each group reported symptoms, but days of sickness in the supplement group averaged fewer than three compared to more than six for the placebo group.  "The observed illness differences were striking," said corresponding author Adrian Gombart, professor of biochemistry and biophysics in the OSU College of Science and a principal investigator at the Linus Pauling Institute. "While the study was limited to self-reported illness data and we did not design the study to answer this question, the observed differences suggest that additional larger studies designed for these outcomes are warranted - and, frankly, overdue." As people get older, the risk of vitamin and mineral deficiencies that contribute to age-related immune system deficiencies rises. Across the United States, Canada and Europe, research suggests more than one-third of older adults are deficient in at least one micronutrient, often more than one. "That likely contributes to a decline in the immune system, most often characterized by increased levels of inflammation, reduced innate immune function and reduced T-cell function," Gombart said. "Since multiple nutrients support immune function, older adults often benefit from multivitamin and mineral supplements. These are readily available, inexpensive and generally regarded as safe." The multivitamin supplement used in the study focused on vitamins and minerals typically thought to help immunity. It contained 700 micrograms of vitamin A; 400 international units of vitamin D; 45 milligrams of vitamin E; 6.6 milligrams of vitamin B6; 400 micrograms of folate; 9.6 micrograms of vitamin B12; 1,000 milligrams of vitamin C; 5 milligrams of iron; 0.9 milligrams of copper; 10 milligrams of zinc; and 110 micrograms of selenium. "Supplementation was associated with significantly increased circulating levels of zinc and vitamin C, and with illness symptoms that were less severe and shorter lasting," Gombart said. "This supports findings that stretch back decades, even to the days of Linus Pauling's work with vitamin C. Our results suggest more and better designed research studies are needed to explore the positive role multivitamin and mineral supplementation might play in bolstering the immune system of older adults."     Honey found to be a better treatment for upper respiratory tract infections than traditional remedies Oxford University, August 19, 2020 A trio of researchers at Oxford University has found that honey is a better treatment for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) than traditional remedies. In their paper published in BMJ Evidence-based Medicine, Hibatullah Abuelgasim, Charlotte Albury, and Joseph Lee describe their study of the results of multiple clinical trials that involved testing of treatments for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and what they learned from the data. Over the past several years, the medical community has grown alarmed as bacteria have developed resistance to antibacterial agents. Some studies have found that over-prescription of such remedies is hastening the pace. Of particular concern are antibacterial prescriptions written for maladies that they are not likely to help, simply due to demands from patients. One such case is often URTIs, the vast majority of which are caused by viruses, not bacteria. Because of such cases, scientists have been looking for other remedies for these infections, and one therapy in particular has begun to stand out: honey. Anecdotal evidence has suggested that honey can be used to treat colds in general and coughs in particular—people have been using it as a therapy for thousands of years. In this new effort, the researchers looked at the results of multiple clinical trials testing the effectiveness of therapies against URTIs. In all, the team looked at data from 14 clinical trials involving 1,761 patients. In analyzing the data from all of the trials combined, the researchers found that the trials had included studies of virtually all of the traditional remedies such as over-the-counter cold and sinus medicines as well as antibiotics—and honey. They found that honey proved to be the best therapy among all of those tested. In addition to proving more effective in treating coughing (36 percent better at reducing the amount of coughing and 44 percent better at reducing coughing severity), it also led to a reduction in average duration of infection by two days. The researchers note that the reason honey works as a treatment for URTIs is because it contains hydrogen peroxide—a known bacteria killer—which also makes it useful as a topical treatment for cuts and scrapes. Honey is also of the right consistency—its thickness works to coat the mouth and throat, soothing irritation.   High intensity physical activity in early life could lead to stronger bones in adulthood University of Bristol (UK), August 17 2020   The research, which analysed data from 2,569 participants of the Children of the 90s health study, found that more time spent doing moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) from age 12 years was associated with stronger hips at age 25 years, whereas time spent in light intensity activity was less clearly associated with adult hip strength. Peak bone mass occurs in young adulthood and is considered to be a marker of the risk of fracture and osteoporosis in later life. Hip fractures make up a large proportion of the osteoporosis disease burden.  Researchers looked at data from healthy individuals who had physical activity measured up to 4 times using accelerometers worn as part of clinical assessments at age 12, 14, 16 and 25 years. This is a device that measures a person's movement for the whole time they wear it. Researchers also found evidence to suggest that adolescent MVPA was more important than MVPA in adulthood, and that MVPA in early adolescence may be more important than in later adolescence. There was also some evidence that higher impact activity (consistent with jumping; assessed once in a subsample in late adolescence using custom accelerometer) was related to stronger hips at age 25. Dr Ahmed Elhakeem, lead author and Senior Research Associate in Epidemiology, said: "The unique availability of repeated accelerometer assessments over many years beginning at age 12 within the Children of the 90s cohort, allowed us to describe the trajectory of time spent in different physical activity intensities through early life and to examine how this might relate to adult hip strength. The results highlight adolescence as a potentially important period for bone development through high intensity exercise, which could benefit future bone health and prevent osteoporosis in later life. We have also confirmed other studies showing that levels of MVPA decline through adolescence. Our findings show it is really important to support young people to remain active at this age"  Francesca Thompson, Clinical and Operations Director at the Royal Osteoporosis Society (ROS), said: "The ROS is working closely at the moment with Public Health England to review the importance of exercise for bone health in children. The findings from this study are welcome as they provide further evidence that children need to be doing moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity during their early adolescence to maximise bone strength in later life and reduce the risk of painful fractures. Supporting and encouraging young people to be more physically active needs to be a priority for bone as well as general health."   Magnesium supplementation associated with improved vitamin D status in postmenopausal women University of Granada (Spain), August 17, 2020   According to news originating from Granada, Spain,  the research stated, “Menopause is a stage of hormonal imbalance in women which, in addition to other physiopathological consequences, poses a risk of deficiency of key micronutrients such as magnesium and vitamin D.” Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from University of Granada: “A study was made of the influence of a magnesium intervention upon vitamin D status in a postmenopausal population from the province of Granada (Spain). Fifty-two healthy postmenopausal women between 44-76 years of age were included. Two randomized groups-placebo and magnesium (500 mg/day)-were treated during eight weeks. Nutrient intake was assessed using questionnaires based on 72-h recall. Vitamin D was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Baseline vitamin D proved deficient in over 80% of the subjects.” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “The administration of magnesium resulted in significantly increased vitamin D levels in the intervention group versus the controls (* * p* * < 0.05). Magnesium supplementation improved vitamin D status in the studied postmenopausal women.”     High fructose diet in pregnancy impacts metabolism of offspring, study finds University of Otago (New Zealand), August 18, 2020   An increased level of fructose intake during pregnancy can cause significant changes in maternal metabolic function and milk composition and alter the metabolism of their offspring, researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, have found. The research, which was led by Dr Clint Gray, a Research Fellow in the Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, found increasing the fructose in the diets of female guinea pigs led to highly significant and consistent changes in the free fatty acids circulating in the blood of their offspring. This was despite the offspring consuming no fructose themselves.  The research is published in the international journal Frontiers in Endocrinology.  First author, PhD student Erin Smith, says "previous research has shown poor quality nutrition during pregnancy can predispose offspring to long-term consequences, including the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life".  "However, there has been a lack of data examining the impact of increased fructose intake before and during pregnancy and subsequent adverse effects on lactation, foetal development and offspring metabolic function." The two experimental groups were fed either a control diet or a fructose diet prior to and during pregnancy. The fructose group was given supplementary fructose water to replicate increased sugar-sweetened beverage intake 60 days prior to mating and until the delivery of their offspring. Fructose made up 16.5 per cent of their diets, closely resembling the average human consumption of fructose/sugar in Western countries, which is estimated at about 14 per cent of average daily caloric intake.  "We found fructose had a significant impact on a pregnant females' metabolic status and the free fatty acid content of their milk. We also provide the first evidence that offspring born from fructose-fed mothers display a very specific pattern of increased free fatty acids and altered lipid metabolism that persists throughout early life." Ms Smith says it is well known that increased levels of circulating free fatty acids increases the risk of obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease - with increased fatty acid synthesis shown to occur following fructose consumption. She says the evidence suggests suboptimal maternal diets, such as diets high in fructose and refined sugars, may be contributing to the rise in metabolic diseases in humans observed during the past 40 to 50 years. "Our study emphasises the importance of limiting added refined fructose, such as sugar-sweetened beverages, and striving for a more nutritionally balanced diet in women prior to and during pregnancy and lactation."       Sleep makes relearning faster and longer-lasting University of Lyon (France). August 14, 2020   Getting some sleep in between study sessions may make it easier to recall what you studied and relearn what you've forgotten, even 6 months later, according to new findings from Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.   "Our results suggest that interleaving sleep between practice sessions leads to a twofold advantage, reducing the time spent relearning and ensuring a much better long-term retention than practice alone," explains psychological scientist Stephanie Mazza of the University of Lyon. "Previous research suggested that sleeping after learning is definitely a good strategy, but now we show that sleeping between two learning sessions greatly improves such a strategy."   While studies have shown that both repeated practice and sleep can help improve memory, there is little research investigating how repetition and sleep influence memory when they are combined. Mazza and colleagues hypothesized that sleeping in between study sessions might make the relearning process more efficient, reducing the effort needed to commit information to memory.   A total of 40 French adults were randomly assigned to either a "sleep" group or a "wake" group. At the first session, all participants were presented with 16 French-Swahili word pairs in random order. After studying a pair for 7 seconds, the Swahili word appeared and participants were prompted to type the French translation. The correct word pair was then shown for 4 seconds. Any words that were not correctly translated were presented again, until each word pair had been correctly translated.   Twelve hours after the initial session, the participants completed the recall task again, practicing the whole list of words until all 16 words were correctly translated.   Importantly, some participants completed the first session in the morning and the second session in the evening of the same day ("wake" group); others completed the first session in the evening, slept, and completed the second session the following morning ("sleep" group).   In the first session, the two groups showed no difference in how many words they could initially recall or in the number of trials they needed to be able to remember all 16 word pairs.   But after 12 hours, the data told another story: Participants who had slept between sessions recalled about 10 of the 16 words, on average, while those who hadn't slept recalled only about 7.5 words. And when it came to relearning, those who had slept needed only about 3 trials to be able to recall all 16 words, while those who had stayed awake needed about 6 trials.   Ultimately, both groups were able to learn all 16 word pairs, but sleeping in between sessions seemed to allow participants to do so in less time and with less effort.   "Memories that were not explicitly accessible at the beginning of relearning appeared to have been transformed by sleep in some way," says Mazza. "Such transformation allowed subjects to re-encode information faster and to save time during the relearning session."   The memory boost that participants got from sleeping between sessions seemed to last over time. Follow-up data showed that participants in the sleep group outperformed their peers on the recall test 1 week later. The sleep group showed very little forgetting, recalling about 15 word pairs, compared to the wake group, who were able to recall about 11 word pairs. This benefit was still noticeable 6 months later.   The benefits of sleep could not be ascribed to participants' sleep quality or sleepiness, or to their short-term or long-term memory capacity, as the two groups showed no differences on these measures.   The results suggest that alternating study sessions with sleep might be an easy and effective way to remember information over longer periods of time with less study, Mazza and colleagues conclude.       Meta-analysis adds evidence to chromium supplementation's glucose control benefits in diabetics Lorestan University of Medical Sciences (Iran), August 15, 2020   A systematic review and meta-analysis published on July 27, 2020 in Pharmacological Research found reductions in fasting plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, a marker of long term glucose control) and insulin resistance in men and women with type 2 diabetes who supplemented with the mineral chromium.  For their analysis, Omid Asbaghi of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences and colleagues selected 23 randomized, controlled trials that evaluated the effects of supplementing with chromium on various glycemic control indexes. Doses used in the studies ranged between 50 micrograms (mcg) and 1,000 mcg per day consumed from four to 25 weeks. Eleven of the trials evaluated a chromium dosage within a 400 to 600 mcg range.  Analysis of 22 trials that reported fasting plasma glucose levels concluded that chromium supplementation was associated with an average reduction of 19.0 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) in comparison with the placebo. Trials of at least 12 weeks duration were associated with a far greater average decrease of 58.74 mg/dL in association with chromium.  Of the 14 trials that reported insulin levels, levels declined by an average of 1.7784 µIU/mL among subjects who received chromium compared to the placebo, with trials that lasted 12 weeks or longer associated with a decrease of 3.47 µIU/mL.  For the 22 trials that reported HbA1c, supplementation with chromium was associated with an average decrease of 0.71%, which improved to a significant 1.70% reduction when trials of 12 weeks duration or more were examined. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) also decreased significantly among participants who received chromium.  The authors observed that chromium plays a role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and may enhance insulin sensitivity. Other nutrients that have been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes include vitamins A, C, D and E, beta-carotene, calcium, magnesium, potassium and zinc. “Present systematic review and meta-analysis of all available published randomized trials up to 2020 found a significant reduction in all glycemic control indices such as fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1c and HOMA-IR levels after chromium supplementation,” they wrote. “Furthermore, long term intervention contributed to greater reduction of all mentioned indices.” “The results of the current meta‐analysis study might support the use of chromium supplementation for the improvement of glycemic control indices in T2DM patients,” they concluded.       Mangiferin: The Health-Boosting Antioxidant in Mangos GreenMedInfo, August 12th 2020    Mangiferin, a polyphenol found in mango fruit and plant extracts, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Mangiferin has been shown to have beneficial effects on gastrointestinal health, Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular health, and may have anticancer properties Mango, a type of juicy stone fruit native to eastern Asia and India, is rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, fiber, antioxidants, micronutrients and minerals, and a unique polyphenol called mangiferin.[i] While mango itself has long been touted for its health benefits, researchers are becoming increasingly interested in mangiferin, which can be found in the leaves, fruit, stone, kernel and stems of the mango plant.[ii] Studies show that mangiferin extracts may have beneficial effects on lifestyle-related disorders and degenerative diseases, and researchers are eager to understand and utilize this potent polyphenol. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Potential of Mangiferin Mangiferin is a powerful antioxidant that modulates glucose metabolism and shows enhanced antioxidant capabilities in both inflammatory and pro-inflammatory conditions.[iii] Mangiferin antioxidants have also been shown to protect against liver damage and lower peroxidation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, and mangiferin may have radioprotective properties thanks to its ability to suppress free radicals in cells.[iv],[v] Additionally, mangiferin's anti-inflammatory benefits have been demonstrated in both the liver and heart, and researchers have discovered that mangiferin can protect against lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress by up-regulating the expression of Nrf2, a transcription factor responsible for the regulation of protective antioxidants and detoxification responses.[vi],[vii] Mangiferin's anti-inflammatory effects have also been demonstrated in the lungs, where it can improve acute lung injury by reducing systemic and pulmonary inflammationresponses.[viii] Overall, mangiferin's anti-inflammatory properties have been demonstrated to reduce both macro and microscopic damage in various organs and tissues, making it a potential preventative therapy for a variety of disorders.[ix] Many of the benefits of mangiferin come from these strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Researched benefits of mangiferin include: Mangiferin Extract May Protect Against Diabetes More than 80% of all diabetes cases are Type 2, which is associated with a lowered ability to increase glucose utilization in skeletal muscle tissue and adipose tissue.[x] This decrease in glucose metabolism and increased insulin increases the risk for disorders like cardiovascular disease, fatty liver and renal diseases.[xi] In one study, researchers demonstrated that mangiferin extract significantly reduced kidney weight while enhancing enzymatic activity and protein expression after just nine weeks.[xii] Other studies have shown that mangiferin extract can also reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and improve oral-glucose tolerance after just 28 days.[xiii] Mangiferin Boosts Gastrointestinal Health Mangiferin has gastroprotective effects, leading researchers to believe it could be a useful therapeutic measure against gastric complications including diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss and anemia associated with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.[xiv] These effects are likely due to mangiferin's antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which both contribute to the development of gastrointestinal disorders.[xv] In other studies, researchers have found that mangiferin improves postoperative ileus, a short-term disturbance of gastrointestinal motility after surgery.[xvi] Mangiferin improves intestinal transit by reducing the intestinal inflammatory response and decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the plasma, improving gastrointestinal transit in both normal and constipated subjects.[xvii],[xviii] Mangiferin Has Anticancer Properties Researchers believe that one root cause of carcinogenesis is oxidative stress and have long searched for natural, polyphenolic antioxidant compounds that could mediate oxidative damage in the body. One study found that mangiferin's antioxidant capabilities may stall the progression of carcinogenesis and induce apoptosis (cell death) on cancer cells.[xix] Mangiferin is demonstrated to have protective effects against several cancers, including breast, colon, neural, skin and cervical cancers, by lowering oxidative stress and suppressing DNA damage in cells in various studies.[xx] Mangiferin Has Immunomodulatory Properties Mangiferin's strong immunomodulatory characteristics come from its ability to both reduce oxidative stress in lymphocytes, neutrophils and macrophages, and also enhance the number and activity of immune cells in your body.[xxi],[xxii] Additionally, mangiferin inhibits lipid peroxidation, which researchers believe may account for the reduction of radiation-induced DNA damage to immune cells and explain mangiferin's strong immune-stimulating and anticancer effects.[xxiii] Mangiferin Protects Against Cardiovascular Disease Mangiferin may play a significant cardiovascular-protective role by decreasing fatty acids, cholesterol and triglycerides and decreasing the inflammatory process in heart tissue.[xxiv] Mangiferin treatment is also shown to increase enzymatic activity and reduce the formation of lipid peroxides, which researchers use as a marker for cardiovascular disease risk and vascular cognitive impairment disorders.[xxv] Given that mangiferin exhibits little to no toxicity and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits, there is strong evidence that mangiferin can be used as an alternative or preventive therapy against a variety of illnesses.[xxvi] However, it has a low water solubility and oral bioavailability and researchers must find an effective dosage and enhance its absorption rate before it can effectively be used in clinical settings.  

Sound Health Options - Sharry Edwards & TalkToMeGuy
W. Gifford-Jones, MD - Linus Pauling and Scientific Evidence on Vitamin C

Sound Health Options - Sharry Edwards & TalkToMeGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2020 64:00


W. Gifford-Jones, MD has influenced complementary and alternative medicine like no other. His greatest impact on health care and on progress in considering, safe, effective, and low-cost natural approaches has been through his medical column that reaches millions of readers across North America.  W. Gifford-Jones join the show to discuss: Linus PaulingScientific evidence on Vitamin CHis 45 years of medical newspaper columnsWomen’s WellnessLysineCovid 19Health as a LifestyleAnd more! W. Giffords-Jones, MD  W. Giffords-Jones more then 18 years of columns and research W. Giffords-Jones, MD on Facebook W. Giffords-Jones on Twitter  High doses of vitamin C help build immunity, offering protection against viral infections. Vitamin C: A natural alternative to drugs. Peewee Amounts of Vitamin C Won’t Stop Heart Attacks  

Elite Man Podcast
What You Need To Know About COVID-19 (The Coronavirus) To Keep You And Your Loved Ones Safe – Dr. Stephen Cabral (Ep. 270)

Elite Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2020 53:08


Dr. Stephen Cabral, Naturopath, and Ayurvedic and Functional Medicine practioner, joins our show in this special episode of the Elite Man Podcast! In today’s episode Dr. Cabral shares everything you need to know about COVID-19, aka the Coronavirus. Dr. Cabral debunks a lot of the misconceptions, gives us the truth, and shares a multitude of powerful and practical tips for keeping you and your loved ones safe. In fact, he dives into a myriad of interesting and helpful topics surrounding the current global crisis and how to make sure you and your loved ones can survive. If you’re wondering how to ensure the health and safety of those you love during this COVID-19 epidemic, check this episode out now!      *Download this episode now and subscribe to our channel to get more of these amazing interviews! In our episode we go over: Dr. Stephen Cabral’s thoughts on the current state of COVID-19 and the global pandemic sweeping the world Why 5-10 times more people actually have COVID-19 than the actual confirmed cases of COVID-19 Why the death rate is actually much lower than the one being thrown around Dr. Cabral’s prediction of the Coronavirus ultimately being similar to that of the seasonal flu or perhaps 2-3X worse (not 30X or more as often being reported) The fact that the Coronavirus has been way overblown by the media The stress of COVID-19 and how this is actually making us more susceptible to getting the virus and getting sicker once we do Why the media is sensationalizing everything surrounding the virus The downside to social distancing and shutting down the economy for an extended period of time The fact that the suicide rate skyrockets in times of economic recession or depression Keeping the old and those with a compromised immune system (especially compromised respiratory system) safe during the epidemic Are we able to stop this virus altogether or will it come back every season and every year Why saunas can help fight off viruses and boost your immunity Why the Coronavirus will most likely go down during the summer season The theories behind why Italy has been hit the worst by COVID-19 The different symptoms between a cold, allergies, the flu, and COVID-19 The need for conventional medicine during critical times The many drugs being tested for the treatment of COVID-19 The promise of Hydroxychloroquine and other anti-viral drugs Using the blood plasma from people who have already recovered from COVID-19 to help others who get it The power of high dose Vitamin C The incredible work of Linus Pauling and his treatment of many viral conditions and other chronic diseases many decades ago The power of zinc and whether or not this can be effective for viruses like COVID-19 Natural anti-viral foods and supplements that Dr. Stephen Cabral recommends you add into your life The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 and how to recover from it if you get it Check out Dr. Cabral on: Website:  stephencabral.com/virus Facebook:  facebook.com/drstephencabral Instagram: instagram.com/stephencabral Sponsors: * Follow Justin on Instagram now for daily content not found anywhere else! *Check out Justin’s new book ELITE MIND at EliteMindBook.com.

All The People You Should Know
Episode 9: Linus Pauling

All The People You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2020 14:31


In honor of Spring Break, I present one of Oregon State University's most inspiring alumni. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/allthepeople/support

Qwerty / Historias de la ciencia
236_Pauling, la fórmula química de la paz

Qwerty / Historias de la ciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2020 3:37


Ganó dos veces el premio Nobel, y se interesó por investigaciones tan dispares como los efectos beneficiosos de la vitamina C sobre el organismo o el desarrollo del primer motor eléctrico. Así era Linus Pauling, el hombre que presentó ante la ONU una carta firmada por 11.000 miembros de la comunidad científica internacional para que se detuvieran los ensayos con armas nucleares.

Qwerty / Historias de la ciencia
236_Pauling, la fórmula química de la paz

Qwerty / Historias de la ciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2020 3:37


Ganó dos veces el premio Nobel, y se interesó por investigaciones tan dispares como los efectos beneficiosos de la vitamina C sobre el organismo o el desarrollo del primer motor eléctrico. Así era Linus Pauling, el hombre que presentó ante la ONU una carta firmada por 11.000 miembros de la comunidad científica internacional para que se detuvieran los ensayos con armas nucleares.

Serendip - cientistas infalíveis
Linus pauling e a Tripla Hélice de DNA

Serendip - cientistas infalíveis

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020 27:42


E quando aquele cientista genial, vencedor de 2 prêmios Nobel e um dos maiores químicos da história da humanidade comete um erro? Bom, todo mundo erra! E o Serendip está aqui para te contar essas histórias. No primeiro episódio da nossa segunda temporada, contamos como Linus Pauling chegou a conclusão que o nosso DNA tinha o formato de uma tripla hélice. Falamos também sobre a corrida para desvendar a real estrutura tri-dimensional do DNA e a técnica que permitiu desvendá-la, a cristalografia de Raio-X ContatosE-mail: professoradefisica@gmail.comTwitter: @PodcastSerendip e @CienciaExplicaProduçãoLeandro Lobo (@Lobo_Lele), Muriel de Souza Lobo (@Muriel_Souza) e Sidcley Lyra (@LyraSid)Arte: Sidcley Lyra (@LyraSid)SerendipO Serendip é um podcast sobre ciência, só que diferente. Aqui, você vai ouvir as histórias das coincidências, erros e acidentes que fazem a ciência. Você descobrirá que muitas descobertas foram feitas por acaso, e muitos cientistas famosos já cometeram erros inacreditáveis.Você pode ouvir os episódios do Serendip através do iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcast, TuneIn e outros aplicativos de podcast.

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Friday, February 28, 2020

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2020 5:00


It's the birthday of Linus Pauling (1901), who won a Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1954 as well as the Nobel Peace Prize in 1962 for his opposition to WMDs.

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition
Top 6 Ways to Reverse Aging Naturally (Without Surgery)

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2020 24:17


There is no way to avoid aging. We are all destined to grow old, get sick, and die… Or are we? Although we can’t completely avoid the aging process, we sure can slow it down quite a bit. And disease? Even though it may be the “norm” for an increasing number of older Americans to succumb to chronic diseases as they age, this doesn’t have to be the case for you. There is a new normal when it comes to how we age — and following these six simple steps to reverse aging naturally can help you get there. 6 Ways You Can Help Reverse the Aging Process   #1: Take key supplements. Nobel Prize-winning chemist, author, and health advocate Linus Pauling said, “By the proper intakes of vitamins and other nutrients and by following a few other healthful practices from youth or middle age on, you can, I believe, extend your life and years of well-being by twenty-five or even thirty-five years.” He might have added: “And you can live those extra years with excellent and vibrant health!” Supplements (and foods, which we will talk about next) that are best for keeping your body and mind sharp must contain antioxidants. Some essential vitamins to add to your anti-aging arsenal include vitamin C and E as well as Glucosamine and Coenzyme Q10. Polyphenol-rich matcha tea, resveratrol, and collagen are three other supplements that can be age-busters as well. #2:  Use the immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory support power of medicinal mushrooms. In addition, if you are serious about your anti-aging regime, you must also consider adding a medicinal mushroom supplement to your daily routine. Have you ever heard of the Japanese island of Okinawa? For generations, the population there was teeming with centenarians (people in their 100s) who were bright eyed and in great physical health. What was their secret? Eating fresh foods, spending lots of time out in nature and in their gardens, and surrounding themselves with family and friends. And, according to research conducted by the Okinawa Centenarian Study, the population also ate a large amount of various kinds of mushrooms, including shiitake and reishi mushrooms. These mushrooms have been proven to have a profound effect on the immune system and help to curb inflammatory responses. The study researchers, as well as many other studies, have linked consuming medicinal mushrooms with relief from inflammatory disease, osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disorders and digestive problems, just to name a few. #3: Eat Antioxidant Rich, Anti-Aging Foods. Besides mushrooms (which can be consumed in tea, in food form, or as a supplement), fill your plate with foods that are rich in omega-3 fats such as wild caught salmon, green leafy organic vegetables that contain high numbers of phytonutrients, berries such as raspberries and blueberries that have antioxidants called anthocyanins (which have been shown to slow tumor growth as well), and healing herbs like turmeric, basil, and ginger. Want to improve your odds of living longer and living pain-free? Make it a point to also avoid all processed and GMO foods (including GMO produce), refined sugar, wheat products (especially commercially-produced breads, pastas, and baked goods), trans fats and artificial ingredients, and keep alcohol consumption to a minimum. The best diet for staying vibrant into your 70s, 80s, and beyond is the simplest kind of diet. Eat real, recognizable food and plenty of (preferably raw or lightly steamed) vegetables in a relaxed setting and drink plenty of clean, filtered water. Even when we are older, our bodies are still primarily made of water so the key is to hydrate, hydrate, hydrate! #4: Get Plenty of Sleep. Older people often have trouble sleeping, especially women in their post-menopausal years. The reasons for this are plentiful: stress and anxiety as well as hormonal imbalances can play a part. Making rest a priority can do wonders for your daily energy levels and clarity of mind. Studies have shown that individuals with sleep disorders such as “sleep apnea” and insomnia have an increased risk of cancer. Insufficient sleep has been associated with cell damage, neurological impairment, a compromised immune system, inflammation, and accelerated aging. When you get consistent, quality sleep, however, these conditions can sometimes reverse as the body is allowed to repair and restore during sleep. #5: Exercise Your Mind. You may think of activities such as doing crosswords or sudoku, learning a language or musical instrument or reading a book as ways that you can keep your mind active in later years. But these activities are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how you can boost your brain power. Stress-relieving and focusing activities such as meditation (and movement meditations like qi gong and forest bathing) have been proven to improve the strength and length of telomeres, stretches of DNA at the end of chromosomes which protect our genes. Telomeres keep chromosomes from fraying and clumping. Shortened telomeres are associated with aging as well as cancer and higher risk of death. A 2015 Canadian study linked evidence of longer telomere strands to meditation (when compared to those who did not meditate). In addition, activities like creative visualization, repeating affirmations, and doing something like Emotional Freedom Technique (which also clears energy channels for physical healing, according to the principles of Chinese medicine) can keep you in a positive state of mind which can aid in the slowing down of the aging process. Famed actress Sophia Lauren had it right when she said, “There is a fountain of youth: it is your mind, your talents, the creativity you bring to your life and the lives of people you love. When you learn to tap this source, you will truly have defeated age.” #6: Keep Moving! Hundreds of studies have correlated even moderate amounts of exercise with lower blood pressure, lower incidents of diabetes, lower cancer rates (sometimes up to 80 percent reduction), lower rates of heart disease, increased longevity and happiness overall. Take a walk (especially in nature), swim, do some yoga or tai chi, or dance to your favorite tune. The most important thing is that you move your body at least 3 to 4 times a week for at least 30 minutes, according to experts. In addition, if your lifestyle or profession dictates that you sit for long periods of time, make sure that you get up to stretch and move every hour at least. Your Reverse Aging “Recipe” Taking key supplements (including mushrooms for supporting your immune system), eating healthy, organic foods and drinking fresh, filtered water, getting plenty of sleep, exercising the mind, and moving the body regularly. These six actions really are the “recipe” for not only a long life, but a vibrant one as well. Slowing down the aging process and staying sharp into your hundreds like the centenarians of Okinawa is possible. It simply takes discipline and a vision of a strong and healthy you, no matter what your physical age!

Empowering You Organically - Video Edition
Top 6 Ways to Reverse Aging Naturally (Without Surgery)

Empowering You Organically - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2020 24:19


There is no way to avoid aging. We are all destined to grow old, get sick, and die… Or are we? Although we can’t completely avoid the aging process, we sure can slow it down quite a bit. And disease? Even though it may be the “norm” for an increasing number of older Americans to succumb to chronic diseases as they age, this doesn’t have to be the case for you. There is a new normal when it comes to how we age — and following these six simple steps to reverse aging naturally can help you get there. 6 Ways You Can Help Reverse the Aging Process   #1: Take key supplements. Nobel Prize-winning chemist, author, and health advocate Linus Pauling said, “By the proper intakes of vitamins and other nutrients and by following a few other healthful practices from youth or middle age on, you can, I believe, extend your life and years of well-being by twenty-five or even thirty-five years.” He might have added: “And you can live those extra years with excellent and vibrant health!” Supplements (and foods, which we will talk about next) that are best for keeping your body and mind sharp must contain antioxidants. Some essential vitamins to add to your anti-aging arsenal include vitamin C and E as well as Glucosamine and Coenzyme Q10. Polyphenol-rich matcha tea, resveratrol, and collagen are three other supplements that can be age-busters as well. #2:  Use the immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory support power of medicinal mushrooms. In addition, if you are serious about your anti-aging regime, you must also consider adding a medicinal mushroom supplement to your daily routine. Have you ever heard of the Japanese island of Okinawa? For generations, the population there was teeming with centenarians (people in their 100s) who were bright eyed and in great physical health. What was their secret? Eating fresh foods, spending lots of time out in nature and in their gardens, and surrounding themselves with family and friends. And, according to research conducted by the Okinawa Centenarian Study, the population also ate a large amount of various kinds of mushrooms, including shiitake and reishi mushrooms. These mushrooms have been proven to have a profound effect on the immune system and help to curb inflammatory responses. The study researchers, as well as many other studies, have linked consuming medicinal mushrooms with relief from inflammatory disease, osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disorders and digestive problems, just to name a few. #3: Eat Antioxidant Rich, Anti-Aging Foods. Besides mushrooms (which can be consumed in tea, in food form, or as a supplement), fill your plate with foods that are rich in omega-3 fats such as wild caught salmon, green leafy organic vegetables that contain high numbers of phytonutrients, berries such as raspberries and blueberries that have antioxidants called anthocyanins (which have been shown to slow tumor growth as well), and healing herbs like turmeric, basil, and ginger. Want to improve your odds of living longer and living pain-free? Make it a point to also avoid all processed and GMO foods (including GMO produce), refined sugar, wheat products (especially commercially-produced breads, pastas, and baked goods), trans fats and artificial ingredients, and keep alcohol consumption to a minimum. The best diet for staying vibrant into your 70s, 80s, and beyond is the simplest kind of diet. Eat real, recognizable food and plenty of (preferably raw or lightly steamed) vegetables in a relaxed setting and drink plenty of clean, filtered water. Even when we are older, our bodies are still primarily made of water so the key is to hydrate, hydrate, hydrate! #4: Get Plenty of Sleep. Older people often have trouble sleeping, especially women in their post-menopausal years. The reasons for this are plentiful: stress and anxiety as well as hormonal imbalances can play a part. Making rest a priority can do wonders for your daily energy levels and clarity of mind. Studies have shown that individuals with sleep disorders such as “sleep apnea” and insomnia have an increased risk of cancer. Insufficient sleep has been associated with cell damage, neurological impairment, a compromised immune system, inflammation, and accelerated aging. When you get consistent, quality sleep, however, these conditions can sometimes reverse as the body is allowed to repair and restore during sleep. #5: Exercise Your Mind. You may think of activities such as doing crosswords or sudoku, learning a language or musical instrument or reading a book as ways that you can keep your mind active in later years. But these activities are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how you can boost your brain power. Stress-relieving and focusing activities such as meditation (and movement meditations like qi gong and forest bathing) have been proven to improve the strength and length of telomeres, stretches of DNA at the end of chromosomes which protect our genes. Telomeres keep chromosomes from fraying and clumping. Shortened telomeres are associated with aging as well as cancer and higher risk of death. A 2015 Canadian study linked evidence of longer telomere strands to meditation (when compared to those who did not meditate). In addition, activities like creative visualization, repeating affirmations, and doing something like Emotional Freedom Technique (which also clears energy channels for physical healing, according to the principles of Chinese medicine) can keep you in a positive state of mind which can aid in the slowing down of the aging process. Famed actress Sophia Lauren had it right when she said, “There is a fountain of youth: it is your mind, your talents, the creativity you bring to your life and the lives of people you love. When you learn to tap this source, you will truly have defeated age.” #6: Keep Moving! Hundreds of studies have correlated even moderate amounts of exercise with lower blood pressure, lower incidents of diabetes, lower cancer rates (sometimes up to 80 percent reduction), lower rates of heart disease, increased longevity and happiness overall. Take a walk (especially in nature), swim, do some yoga or tai chi, or dance to your favorite tune. The most important thing is that you move your body at least 3 to 4 times a week for at least 30 minutes, according to experts. In addition, if your lifestyle or profession dictates that you sit for long periods of time, make sure that you get up to stretch and move every hour at least. Your Reverse Aging “Recipe” Taking key supplements (including mushrooms for supporting your immune system), eating healthy, organic foods and drinking fresh, filtered water, getting plenty of sleep, exercising the mind, and moving the body regularly. These six actions really are the “recipe” for not only a long life, but a vibrant one as well. Slowing down the aging process and staying sharp into your hundreds like the centenarians of Okinawa is possible. It simply takes discipline and a vision of a strong and healthy you, no matter what your physical age!  

Searching for Unity in Everything
8 | RUSSELL TARG – Physicist/Remote Viewing and ESP

Searching for Unity in Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2020


Shownotes Russell Targ, a physicist who retired as a senior staff scientist from Lockheed Martin, was a pioneer in the development of the laser and laser technology for peaceful application. He then cofounded the Stanford Research Institute’s (SRI) investigation into psychic abilities, primarily via Remote Viewing, which was funded by the CIA during the 1970s and 1980s. A prolific writer, he most recently authored The Reality of ESP: A Physicist’s Proof of Psychic Abilities. Other books: Limitless Mind: A Guide to Remote Viewing and Transformation of Consciousness; Do You See What I See? Memoirs of a Blind Biker; Lasers and Love, ESP and the CIA, and the Meaning of Life. He is co-author of Mind Reach: Scientists Look at Psychic Abilities; The Mind Race: Understanding and Using Psychic Abilities; Miracles of Mind: Remote Viewing and Spiritual Healing; The Heart of the Mind: How to Experience God Without Belief; and, The End of Suffering: Fearless Living in Troubled Times. Ressell also is an editor, publisher, songwriter, producer, and teacher who has had extensive engagement with Buddhism and was a longtime leader of a study group for A Course in Miracles. Russell Targ website Russell’s mission – “I consider that my purpose is to discover my own timeless awareness, and then teach that.” Russell’s one-line message to the world – “Since we are all created from the same stardust, we can greatly diminish our suffering, by moving from our ego-based craving and fear, to timeless awareness, and freedom.” The SUE Speaks Blog Post about Russell Talking points from this episode Russell's was a pioneer in developing the laser There are more than 5 million YouTube views of Russ Targ’s cancelled TEDx talk! Too “controversial” for TED. But people want to see the story Third Eye Spies: Russell's documentary about remote viewing - Russell as a childhood magician: his intro to ESP in surprising flashes while doing stage magic The American Psychological Association Journal Carl Jung and Linus Pauling on meaningful coincidence Melbourne Christopher - consultant to the SRI program Psychics at the end of the 19th century tuned into what later was validated by science: Dora Kuntz - founder of therapeutic touch Helena Blavatsky Charles Webster Leadbeater Annie Besant Lucifer Magazine - articles on philosophical, theosophical, scientific and religious topics Andrija Puharich - a medical and parapsychological researcher, medical inventor, physician and author, who brought Uri Geller and Peter Hurkos to the United States Wernher von Braun - the leading figure in the development of rocket technology in Germany and rocket technology and space science in the United States Harold E. Puthoff – laser pioneer and co-author of Fundamentals of Quantum Electronics Remote viewing is describing what is going on in a distant place The Reality of ESP: A Physicist's Proof of Psychic Abilities by Russell Targ The CIA funds Russell's ESP lab at Stanford Research Institute (SRI) Russell developed an app to teach ESP Edgar Mitchell - NASA astronaut and the sixth person to walk on the moon Ingo Swann – New York psychic, visionary artist, co-creator of the Stargate Project using remote viewing Pat Price – Ex police officer and remote viewer Christopher (Kit) Greene – remote viewer Examples of successes of SRI remote viewing: President Jimmy Carter gets SRI to find a downed Russian airplane Helping find kidnapped Patty Hearst Predicting the future -- a failed Chinese atomic bomb test Nonlocality -- entanglement where particles born together are permanently interrelated Wikipedia shamefully labels scientific work that's outside of scientific materialism as pseudoscience Remote viewing: the practice of seeking impressions about a distant or unseen target via (ESP) or "sensing" with the mind. Quantum physics – nonlocality as described by science Spoon bending Uri Geller - spoon-bending and mind-reading Gary Sinclair – Suzanne’s spoon bending friend

Eat Real To Heal Podcast
Ep. 44 Dr Terry Wahls talks about her MS and how she reversed it with food and created her Wahls Diet for her Patients.

Eat Real To Heal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2020


Find out more about our upcoming ONLINE COURSE https://nicolettericher.com/richer-at-work Learn more about our Holly Hock Retreat this year - https://nicolettericher.com/hollyhock-retreat Want to improve your health… Click here to access our FREE resources so you can live your best life! https://nicolettericher.com/free-stuff This week we are talking to Dr. Terry Wahls about what its like to be a doctor, to defy the odds and to turn to plant based food as medicine to reverse chronic disease for herself and for her patients. Dr Wahls is an Institute for Functional Medicine Certified Practitioner and a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa where she conducts clinical trials.  In 2018 she was awarded the Institute for Functional Medicine’s Linus Pauling Award for her contributions in research, clinical care and patient advocacy. She is also a patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, which confined her to a tilt-recline wheelchair for four years. Dr. Wahls restored her health using a diet and lifestyle program she designed specifically for her brain and now pedals her bike to work each day. She is the author of The Wahl Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles.   Wahls conducts clinical trials that test the effect of nutrition and lifestyle interventions to treat MS and other progressive health problems. She hosts a Wahls Protocol Seminar every summer where anyone can learn how to implement the Protocol with ease and success. FIND Dr Terry Wahls Here Website - www.terrywahls.com/research Instagram @drterrywahls Facebook/Twitter at @TerryWahls.   Book - The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles - https://www.amazon.ca/Wahls-Protocol-Radical-Autoimmune-Conditions/dp/1583335544/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1579027684&sr=8-1 Pick up a one-page handout for the Wahls™ Diet at www.terrywahls.com/diet Book - The Wahls Protocol Cooking for Life: The Revolutionary Modern Paleo Plan to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions - https://www.amazon.ca/Wahls-Protocol-Cooking-Life-Revolutionary/dp/0399184775/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Learn more about her MS clinical trials by reaching out to her team: MSDietStudy@healthcare.uiowa.edu. TED Talk - Minding your mitochondria Copies of our  research papers https://terrywahls.com/researchpapers/ Discussed on the PODCAST International MS DC Research Meeting - https://www.ectrims.eu/annual-ectrims-congresses/ Book - Susanne Meadows – The Other Side of Impossible - https://www.amazon.ca/Other-Side-Impossible-Ordinary-Challenges/dp/0812996488/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1579029992&sr=8-1 The SWANK Diet - http://www.swankmsdiet.org/the-diet Linus Pauling - https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/1954/pauling/biographical/   Find out ways you can work with Nicolette to improve your health here: https://nicolettericher.com/work-with-me Want to know more about Nicolette’s Green Moustache Café’s https://www.greenmoustache.com/ Sign up for the Eat Real to Heal Online Course - https://nicolettericher.com/eat-real-to-heal Buy the Eat Real to Heal Book here: https://www.amazon.ca/Eat-Real-Heal-Medicine-Arthritis/dp/163353782X/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1567629190&sr=8-1

How are you feeling?
Hangry and hanxious

How are you feeling?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2020 8:32


Hangry is that angry feeling that can occur when you missed lunch and dinner is still a long way down the road. Some people may feel more anxious when overly hungry - close to tears unless a snack happens first - hanxious. Low magnesium and/or low blood sugar might be underlying factors. The short term solution for low blood sugar is a small amount of simple carbohydrates followed about 20 minutes later with a more substantial snack that includes protein and fats along with more complex carbohydrates - whole grains, nuts, beans, seeds, or whole fruit instead of fruit juice or concentrated sugar or white flour/refined starch. Topics include: Reactive hypoglycemia, magnesium deficiency symptoms, and snack ideas. Image Quote: "Do unto others 20% better than you would expect them to do unto you, to correct for subjective error." - Linus Pauling, a nutrition scientist. Email - jen@peace-is-happy.org, Twitter - @denutrients Webpage - peace-is-happy.org/how are you feeling Transcript/Reference list Disclaimer: This information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of Fair Use. It is not intended to provide individual guidance. Please seek a health care provider for individualized health care guidance.

Earth Energy Forecast
The Nuclear Threat Combined with Global Warming

Earth Energy Forecast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2019 56:00


Joan Cerio welcomes Dr. Helen Caldicott who shares with us her knowledge of how nuclear weapons, nuclear disasters such as Fukushima, and global warming are threatening the existence of our planet. The single most articulate and passionate advocate of citizen action to remedy the nuclear and environmental crises, Dr. Helen Caldicott, has devoted the last 42 years to an international campaign to educate the public about the medical hazards of the nuclear age and the necessary changes in human behavior to stop environmental destruction. Dr. Caldicott received her medical degree from the University of Adelaide Medical School in South Australia in 1961. She founded the Cystic Fibrosis Clinic at the Adelaide's Children's Hospital and subsequently was an instructor in pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. While living in the US, she was the president of Physicians for Social Responsibility. She also helped start similar medical organizations in many other countries. One of these groups, the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1985. She also founded the Women's Action for Nuclear Disarmament. Dr. Caldicott has received many prizes and awards for her work, including the Lannan Foundation's 2003 Prize for Cultural Freedom and 21 honorary doctoral degrees. She was personally nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by Linus Pauling, himself a Nobel Laureate. The Smithsonian has named Dr. Caldicott as one of the most influential women of the 20th Century. She has written for numerous publications and has authored seven books. She has also been the subject of several films, including the documentary If You Love This Planet, which won the Academy Award for best documentary in 1982. Dr. Caldicott is the President of The Helen CaldicottFoundation/NuclearFreePlanet.org. Her website is https://HelenCaldicott.com.

BiOptimizers - Awesome Health Podcast
038: The Power of Magnesium with Matt Gallant

BiOptimizers - Awesome Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2019 53:17


  Did you know magnesium is needed to perform 300 different bodily functions? That is the power of magnesium. In today's episode with Matt Gallant, we will talk about some of those functions, why we need different types of magnesium for different parts of the body and why we created a special magnesium blend to address these needs. Different types of magnesium are generally used by different parts of your body. For example, magnesium chelate is really important for muscle building recovery and health. Magnesium citrate helps with counteracting some obesity issues and it can help with arterial stiffness in people who are healthy and in those who are overweight. Magnesium biglycinate or glycinate is great for sleep, and it may also help with stomach acid (meaning it can aid in digestion). It may also be helpful in reducing heart disease, Type 2 diabetes as well as osteoporosis. Magnesium taurate is also very beneficial for the heart and for reducing muscle cramping and migraines. Magnesium malate may also help with some of those same issues plus it can alleviate depression and anxiety. Malate is also good at removing aluminum from the body, so it can aid in detoxing as well. Another magnesium we talk about is magnesium L-threonate, it helps with memory, cognitive functioning in the short and long-term as well as overall mental ability. And finally, the last magnesium we recommend is magnesium orotate, which is very helpful for the heart and is especially useful for metabolic improvements. We also share a few studies that show the power of magnesium and how truly beneficial it is for a healthy, functioning mind and body. One particular study followed 4,000 people for 20 years and found that people with the highest magnesium intake were 47% less likely to develop diabetes. Today we also discuss some at-home options for increasing your levels of magnesium like bathing in Epsom salts and more intense, even experimental options that are out there. We share our personal experiences with intravenous magnesium, and how we have brought all 7 types of magnesium together in one special combination for you. Join us to hear these cutting edge insights and more on this episode of Awesome Health! Episode Resources Magnesium Breakthrough web site Fats That Heal, Fats That Kill by Dr. Udo Erasmus Read the Episode Transcript : Wade Lightheart: Good afternoon, good morning and good evening wherever you are. It's Wade T Lightheart back with the Awesome Health Podcast. And I got Matty the mad scientist with me today, my co founder, co-conspirator, co-creator co everything. And uh, we're excited today because we're going to reveal something that happened to me a number of years ago. Basically I made a profound discovery crisis is an awesome, awesome opportunity for those who don't know in Japan they write crisis and opportunity actually together in Kaishu script. And so it says danger, proceed with caution, but there's always opportunities within it. And one of the things when you're on the leading edge, the bleeding edge, um, and pushing your body to the max pushing your lifestyle, the maximum as a high performer in variably, I don't know, a high performer that doesn't run into trouble somewhere at some time. It's just, it's just the nature of revs engines at high level. Wade Lightheart: A couple years ago, I fell into a that doing more than I thought possible writing checks my body couldn't cash and just burning it to the absolute max. And I did this for years. Running a bunch of different companies, working day and night, sleeping crazy hours, traveling around, burnt myself to a crisp. Literally, I was at a restaurant in Panama. I was listening like some that's like my best friend. We were living literally five minute walk from each other in, in, in, in about six months. I saw him five times and on the fifth time he's like, dude, what's, what's going on? And I said, Matt, I'm living in hell. And the crazy thing is is, well, let's see. He's like, okay, yeah, I can see that you're struggling. I see you are not quite yourself. Well, what's going on? I said, it's like I can't function. Wade Lightheart: It's like my brain isn't working. This distress of my decisions, I'm having emotional reaction. He goes, okay, well let's go look you up on a brain machine and tell them. Now, Matt, you're an expert in, I would say a in a, in a really great experiment on brainwave function, neurological activity. We both dove deep into that and I knew I wasn't like there was something seriously wrong with me, not just physically. I was lethargic in the gym. But like mentally I was just struggling. What happened when I, when we, when you hooked you up to your, to your lab, your lab tests. Matt Gallant: I have a medical grade neurofeedback device that measures the electrical activity in someone's brain. And part of what gets revealed is the amount, you know, like basically the voltage in someone's brain. And at that time, uh, Wade had around a quarter of the electricity of, uh, my 78 year old friend, uh, who I've seen his brain waves. So, you know, Wade was like maybe one or two levels away from being brain dead essentially. Wade Lightheart: I had the brain of a 280 year old. So, uh, something you don't want to look into. And so of course, uh, you know, the crisis opportunities, like, okay, what do, what do we got to do about this? How do we go about this? And obviously I went off and hired a naturopathic doctor to do a bunch of tests and uh, looked and I, one of the things that I was suffering from was extreme levels of adrenal fatigue. I had been using a variety of stimulants in order to sustain the output. And those work for a while, you know, it's kinda like you, you burn the candle at both ends. And it turned out I was suffering from a condition. It's actually according to American psychological at one of the six leading causes of death. And I, I felt like how I felt like I was gonna die and it turned out I probably actually was well on my wave to setting myself up for a problem. Wade Lightheart: So one of the key elements that I did, obviously I had to change to make some lifestyle changes, but I had to start addressing some of the deficiencies that my, uh, desire or my excess type of lifestyle would contribute to. And the reality is, is one particular nutrient that was super deficient and was my road to recovery is I had to take massive doses of a, of a nutritional supplement that virtually 80% of Americans are deficient in. They don't have it. Uh, and almost everybody doesn't get enough that's deficient just for basic functions. We're not even talking about optimal functions. We're not talking about super optimal function. Matt Gallant: And let's face it, we're BiOptimizers all about like optimize levels, not normal levels, you know, cause again with bioptimization spectrum, yeah, most people, you know, people want to stay normal. That's cool. We're not into that. We're into becoming super humans as you know, in whatever shape, way or form that means for you. And in order to do that, you need to be at optimal levels. So it's very different than, than normal levels. Wade Lightheart: I want to talk about something really important and when we get into this and how important are key elements to a dietary facts. I'm going to share a story, uh, that might seem unrelated, but it is. And that is at the turn of the century, there is a variety of, uh, conditions in North America related to iodine. Remember, we're not talking about iodine today, but I'm going to tell you this story cause this is mindblowing. So there was an iodine deficiency ramping across North America. They started looking at it and they started adding iodine to salt. Here was the crazy result. The average IQ increase in America because of iodized salt increased by 15 points, 15 points just because people were deficient in iodine. I was deficient in this element that we're going to talk about today. And I've come full circle from the moments of hell to the moments of super optimization. I'm so grateful for it and that's why I'm so excited and that's why we're here to talk about this today because I don't know what the potential results are free people out there, but I think it might be the biggest breakthrough in nutrient. Uh, I would say optimization that I've seen in the industry and it doesn't cost that much. That's the best part. It and, and its effects are not only short lasting, but I think it's certainly something that's gonna have a big impact for people over the long term, maybe as effective as what iodine did a hundred years ago. Matt Gallant: So as Wade was going through that experience, um, simultaneously I went through my own, you know, we'll just call it if Wade was, you know, at 12,000 RPM in the red in the, you know, the engine's about to blow. I was probably in the yellow, you know, and the symptoms of that. For an example, I remember I had to give up coffee because I would drink coffee. I would instantly feel fried, like frazzled, like my nerves, my nerves were raw and my nerves felt, you know, frazzles the most accurate description I can come up with. So, and then three different help experts, including Charles Paul, Dr. Joseph Mercola and a friend of mine, all revealed a protocol that we're gonna share with you today that's inspired me to go hog wild. So this was like three months, I think before Wade kind of hit rock bottom. Matt Gallant: And so I get on this protocol and I go hog wild with it, which we're going to reveal. And it was probably you, you know, like there's a lot of supplements, especially when it comes to minerals and vitamins. You don't feel them right? Like, you know, it makes sense. The, the science makes sense and theoretically makes sense. So you, you take them. But this, in terms of feeling it, I just, I was feeling it heal my nervous system. I was feeling myself a shift from fight or flight. And again, when I did a great podcast on healing the nervous system, the parasympathetic and sympathetic. So I was feeling myself shift over from being trapped in sympathetic and certain moving into the healing mode. My sleep improved, my mood improved and I just became like super chill, you know, like just relaxed, which was, you know, it's a sign that you're in a parasympathetic versus when you're, you know, intense and angry and frustrated and irritated and discontent. Matt Gallant: That's, you know, you're in fight or flight. So all of that happened relatively fast. I think it was around two months and you know, it kept getting even better the third month. And then that's when you kinda hit bottom and I said, Hey man, this, you know, this has worked really wonders. And then Wade, you got on this protocol and then you, you know, healed in, in a relatively short amount of time, especially considering how fried you are at that time. Um, you, you made a very quick comeback. Wade Lightheart: Yeah. And that I was really grateful for it. Now it's hard to believe that this one thing could make such a big difference. I mean I did a bunch of things, but we did the testing and stuff in that, the one factor that that changed everything was this particular, um, element, this ingredient. Matt Gallant: I think we've teased them enough I think. I think right now, you know, there's, there's a lot, I feel like we're strippers, just this keep teasing here. They were ready to, to reveal the goods. Um, but before we do, you know, it's this, this nutrient, I got to say when the deeper I went into the research, the more my mind blow and what we're talking about is magnesium. So you've probably heard of magnesium. I mean, you know, it's been something you heard in school and chemistry class and you know, the importance of it. I remember hearing a long time ago. Okay, those 300 different things in the body. But yeah, it's, it's just incredible what it does. Now going back to Wade's story and my story, there's something that I had learned relatively recently about magnesium that blew my own mind. I didn't know this, which is that when you're stressed, okay, you start leaking magnesium at an accelerated rate, your body starts expelling and losing magnesium. Matt Gallant: Now what then does this, there's a numbness, a second order of a consequence, the less magnesium that you have, the more stressed you feel, and then you lose more magnesium. So it's this vicious cycle that Wade went through and I went through that, you know, leads to some level of burnout, of feeling stressed out, feeling overwhelmed. So you know, the antidote, the answer is, you know, taking enough of the right magnesiums and that's what we're going to be talking about. Uh, today is really about the right blends of magnesium, how much to take, how long to take it, and what you can expect. Wade, thoughts? Wade Lightheart: Well, you know, it's funny cause when I went through that piece in diagnose I was all turned on and I had a recollection of a lecture I went to at uh, Bulletproof the Bulletproof conference with Charles Poliquin and Charles Poliquin was a strength coach and he died not that long ago. Matt Gallant: Probably the greatest strike coach. Wade Lightheart: Yeah. He coached gold medalist and I think in, it's over 28 different sports. Matt Gallant: 400 Olympians, I think 400 metal winners. I don't know these guys. Wade Lightheart: Yeah. Professional athletes of all different fields. He was really far ahead. He used to read all these different research journals and you learn different languages to learn a different biases of cultures. It was a very interesting person. He looked amazing and it's unfortunate he died so soon. However, one of the things that made him unique is he athletes undergrowth a disproportionate amount of stress than the regular population. They are continually red line, especially to think about an Olympic athlete or a professional athlete. And one of the things that he talked about is even at a professional athlete and Olympic athlete is another level beyond a professional athlete on, on, on their ability to perform on demand because of professionals doing it over, over, over at an Olympic athlete. And he, one of the things that he said that he was using it's like specifically and in massive quantities was was magnesium but not just one magnesium. Wade Lightheart: He was using different magnesiums for different components of the brain. There were things for brain, things for your heart, things for uh, energy production inside the body, things for recovery, things for cramping, all of these issues. And he had actually broken down magnesium into a bunch of different types and was using supplementation because it's virtually impossible. It is virtually impossible regardless of any diet that you're following to get all of the magnesiums. And one of the things that's happening today in the world of testing and stuff is we're now able to drill down a little deeper instead of just protein, fats and carbohydrates. Well, it's now we've taken minerals and vitamins and supplements nce and we're able to drill down to the different components of those, which ones are more utilizable by the body, which ones are more available to the body, which ones have performed different functions inside the body. Matt Gallant: It's a great segue into talking about like the different types of magnesiums and what they do. Um, and the essence is this. Different magnesiums tend to go to different parts of the body and affect them. So if you just taking one type or even two types of magnesium, there's a lot of your organs in different parts of your body, including maybe your brain or your heart that are deficient. So what's the answer is to have a wide variety of different types of magnesium. So magnesium chelate is really important for muscle building recovery and health. Magnesium citrate helps with some of, you know, counteracting some of the obesity issues and it can help with arterial stiffness with healthy, even overweight individuals, magnesium biglycinate or glycinate, essentially the same thing. Um, that's a great one for sleep, and sometimes it also helps with, you know, stomach acid. So on the digestive side it can have some positive benefits. Wade Lightheart: It's, it's also used for heart disease type 2 diabetes to assist in breaking down sugars. And it's a key component in osteoporosis as well. Matt Gallant: Yeah, magnesium malate - some people believe it's the most bioavailable and it can help with migraines, chronic pain and depression and just, just the research there that we're going to get into around magnesium and anxiety and depression is just, it's just mind blowing. Wade Lightheart: Last thing, one thing on the, on the, on the malate, it's also good for removing aluminum from the body. So if you're looking for detoxification, it's a, it's a, it's a great one for that as well. Matt Gallant: Magnesium L-threonate. Um, L-threonate, which is the one you use for brain. I've used a lot of it. It's one of my favorites. Uh, it seems to help with working memory, mental ability, functioning capability, long and short term. Wade Lightheart: And in my, in my own situation that was the, that was the one that was really a big game changer for me on the cognitive side, on the sleep side. I was so stressed out, I wasn't sleeping. It was part of the reason why I was getting so, uh, reduced. And my naturopathic doctor, she recommended that I take massive quantities of this in particular because of the brain. And one of the things that I noticed if you're struggling with memory, that's, that was the one I couldn't remember anything. And when you're, and that one literally my, my memory came back cause I generally have an extraordinary memory and uh, it really made a big difference for me when I was taking L-threonate. Matt Gallant: Well what happens when you're stressed out? It blows out your hippocampus, which destroys your short term memory. So you know, that was just another side effect of the vicious cycle that you were trapped in. And you know, I might as well reveal this right now. I'm the best stack that like, cause I'm about four and a half years ago, I was noticing that my short term memory was starting to decline. And you know, at the time I'm 38, I'm like, you know, this, this is not good. So I started taking um, magnesium and fish oil, which we're going to get back into, you know, uh, you on DHA essentially you can get it from plant-based as well from the allergies. We'll get back to that. But that and Lion's Mane, which is a mushroom that helps increase BDNF in the brain, brain drive and trophic factors that stack from memory. Matt Gallant: And again, it's, it's one of those things that it builds up and it gets better and better. Like you'll notice it in about 30 days and then 90 days it gets better in six months. And now, I mean, it feels like my short term, just my memory in general is as good as I was probably as a, as a teenager before I started using drugs. So there you go. You know, definitely works. Um, next is magnesium Taurates, which is probably the best one for the heart. And one study noted this complex magnesium Taurate made us have considerable potential as a vascular protective nutritional supplement. So that's a really good one for your vascular system. Wade Lightheart: It's also, it's also for people who suffer from migraines. Um, that one is a really great one. And for women who are suffering from PMs, cramping. So I have a lot of women that reach out to me and that my naturopathic doctor who happens to be a female, she's like, this is the one that females typically respond best to. Or also athletes who are dealing with a lot of cramping issues. Matt Gallant: Yeah, that's awesome. And uh, the last one we recommend is magnesium Orotate, which is very helpful for the heart, but the, it's really the number one use magnesium for metabolic improvements. So far on the athletic side, if you're working on hard, uh, you want better performance, better recovery energy, and that'll help because magnesium is involved and helps the mitochondria produce more ATP, which is where your energy comes from. So this magnesium seems to hit that pathway significantly. Like you know, and I remember that. I think the first time I heard about magnesium was back in our body building days Wade and you know, we had the big stack magazines, you know, they were talking about magnesium for, for strife and for working out. And I remember when I did my loading phase of magnesium, like I added two, three, four reps on everything. I think in like two weeks. I, you know, it was, it was a huge jump in performance in the gym. So I mean, what have you noticed in terms of the benefits from an athletic side in terms of working out or recovery? Wade Lightheart: Well, you know, particularly with Orotate as well, um, it's really good for blood sugar. It's, I find it's great for handling food, uh, food cravings or sugar cravings if my magnesium levels are high. If I'm taking math, like I actually, cause I eat a lot of carbs, but I notice when I take my magnesium in the mornings, uh, my first milk, cause sometimes I'll, I'll have tea, any caffeine subject can diminish your magnesium supply. Just so you know, and I, and I, and I also, because I eat such a rich of vegetable diet, I tend to get a lot of calcium and calcium and magnesium work in a ratio. So if I take my magnesium, I don't have the sweet sugar cravings. When I, when I don't take my magnesium, if I forget for what he was on or I'm on the road and I forgot my magnesium, okay, uh, I get those sugar cravings. Wade Lightheart: But the other thing is what I find, I don't get cramping either. A, I that the tightness in the muscles, uh, firing as well is if I get, if you're sweating, one of the things for athletes who are sweating, particularly, you know, people who are on quarter the field for hours at a time, the drop in magnesium is one of the reasons why they start losing the pop. They start, they start to, you know, slow down. It's, and if you see those fourth quarters in the NFL, often times it's not just dehydration, it's the key loss of magnesium in those cases. And in a worst case situation and you see this with a long distance runners and endurance people or athletes that get heart rhythms like a, they get the heart rhythm gets disrupted or they have an irregular heartbeat. You're seeing it more and more in athletic performance that's directly related to magnesium and Orotate as the probably the best one to deal with those things. Matt Gallant: Yeah. So you know, and just to kind of add to what you've said, like in terms of athletic performance, um, in terms of moving beyond just magnesium, your magnesium, we just highlight how critical it is. Couple of things you are there, things you want. One is potassium, um, which I, I don't think I've shared in this podcast, but what I do, I have this pitcher of, of water and I put about a quarter teaspoon of cream of tartar inside of it with salt so I can absorb more. And it just got my blood work done and my potassium was like kiddo, really up there where you want it. Um, I mean you don't, you don't want it too high but quarter teaspoon and they'll give you the dose. And then enough calcium, cause you know, if you're cramping or your muscles not firing, you're either missing your calcium, the potassium or the magnesium and calcium. Matt Gallant: You don't need that much. Like, you know, eating cheese, like a little bit of cheese twice a week. Most people just have an overload of calcium in their body. And in what way? To share really cool story in a second. But like I said, right now there's kind of an overdose of calcium and most people's diet you don't need that much. So I don't think people need to be concerned too much with that. I think it's more to the magnesium that people are really deficient in. And then again, the potassium. So you know, using salt, especially like Himalayan salt, sea salt, I mean they just load it in your food unless you have really, really high blood pressure. Um, but you want to be able to, to retain water. Okay. If I don't, especially like I'm on keto, so if I'm not eating enough salt, I just lose water like crazy cause I don't have the carbs to hold it in. So that's one of the things. But Wade, why don't you share your story about when you went to Bali and you did the intravenous magnesium because I've done it too, but I think think it's a really powerful, um, story, Wade and I have a really powerful theory or an exciting theory about magnesium and calcium. So Wade, go ahead. Wade Lightheart: So one, so as being, the radical experiment is there, once I've found out that I had magnesium deficiency, I was like, okay, what else can I do? And I found out there is a way that you can do it intravenously. And so I happened to have, I went to Bali and had a naturopathic physician who would use this actually, he was a special forces person and they used to do a magnesium for, for special forces people who are in extreme cases of stress and distress. They would do this. And so what they did, you kind of dose up and obviously don't do this at home, get a doctor to supervisor. You could really mess yourself up if you took too much. But basically you take this, you put an intravenously and they start dripping it into your system. Now what starts to happen? First off, there's a general sense of regular like relaxation and then it kinda hits pretty much. Wade Lightheart: It gets, you get so relaxed, it kind of gets hard to move around if you have to go to the bathroom or something. You're getting kind of feel a little jelly. Uh, I mean this is super physiological doses of magnesium. But then what happens is where you've got little alleys or calcium buildups in the body, it starts to burn. And I literally started to get burning inside my brain where I had calcium deposits built up in the brain tissue. I had like cold shoulder injuries from way back in the day when I was benching too much weight, too fast, um, that would literally start to burn. Uh, and so what I believe is that the, and this is theory theoretical, is that the magnesium as it went through the body, was finding these places where the calcium was up, bonding with the calcium and dissipating the calcium in those particular pieces. And I've done that a whole bunch of times ever since. And I can tell you every single time I get burning in some area of my body. Matt Gallant: Yeah. And the last in the last hardcore brain optimization brain training we did, we were doing, it was a blend of different vitamins and amino acids, but there was a very high dose of magnesium and the doctor that was injecting that says, uh, that's going to hit you right in the genitals. And yeah. You know, I don't think I did as high a dose as you did. Um, I mean it was kind of a nice warm, uh, pleasant feelings. So that was my experience injecting my knees. Matt Gallant: You know, I am the extreme optimizer, the mad scientist. So it, it, I wouldn't be doing myself a service. I wouldn't be authentic Matt Gallant: unless I've revealed another way to load magnesium, which, you know, only the crazies will be excited about. And I haven't done this yet. I have researched it. Um, there is a doctor that uses a protocol and again, you know, try to set your own risks, make sure you talk to your doctor, if you're doing crazy experiments, but it's rectal magnesium loads. And the, the issue with like doing a crazy amount, uh, orally is that the magnesium pulls water. That's not a big problem. You know, you get just a flushing effect and you go to the bathroom and you know, it ends there. In fact, some of them, there's, there's other magnesium's yeah. That I've used for flushing. Like let's say you're doing a fast and you really want to do kind of an intestinal cleanse. There's, there's special magnesiums that like really pulled the water in. Matt Gallant: And you know, we've, we're a fan of minimizing that. But when you start getting past like two grams at a time, that's typically when you start getting some flushing effects. So let's say you want to load like five grams at a time, then that's when, um, you would basically prepare the magnesium with water and basically do an enema and your body's just going to absorb it. So it was probably the second best way after injections. And again, I haven't done this yet but probably will very soon. So anyways, again, just wanted to share that cause I know some people like crazy experiments. Wade Lightheart: I know another thing that you were a big fan of is floating in magnesium, salt pools and one of the big things, Joe Rogan is a big fan of that as well. And the magnesium is a great way just lying in a pool of mags, which has been known for a long time. Wade Lightheart: Magnesium salts also as a way of get it externally. It doesn't have the internal benefits but it does have a general relaxation effect. Matt Gallant: Yeah, I'm a huge fan. Um, I mean and again for those of us that don't have float tanks at home, you can buy like Epson salts, get in, get into the bathtub or you know, hot tub or whatever you have and throw it in there and, and get, you know, cause you will absorb some, uh, through the skin and it will have some effects. So yeah, I'm a huge fan. It's a great thing to do before bed to relax or yeah, floating to me is still my, like my number one favorite. Biohacks so to speak, uh, to, to, to relax and to heal the nervous system and get me out of fight or flight. So anyways, let's jump into some mindblowing research on magnesium. Matt Gallant: Um, so on the aquatic side, there was athletes supplementing with magnesium for four weeks. They had faster running, cycling, swimming times during a triathlon and they experienced reductions in insulin, which, you know, when your insulin goes down it, there's almost every part of the body. There's this, uh, you know, yin and yang. So the yin and yang would insulin is glucagon. And when you release glucagon, you burn, you're in fat burning mode periods. So anything you can do to reduce insulin is a, also reduction in stress hormone levels. Um, now on the mood side, this is where, and I experienced the effects of this. Like I really did. Um, I went from kind of being kind of stressed out to being a level of chill that, you know, you know, haven't smoked weed in a long time, but when I used to, um, you know, that it was almost like that level of chill, you know, and it was like all the time. Matt Gallant: It wasn't, I wasn't high after taking pills. I was like in a permit chill zone. So in terms of magnesium, um, it's been linked to like magnesium deficiencies have been linked to depression, increased risk of depression, uh, and then supplementing with the mineral, there's been a lot of reduction in the symptoms of depression. Sometimes in some cases it can be dramatic. Um, now in randomized controlled trials in depressed older adults, 450 milligrams improved mood as effectively as an antidepressant drug. I mean, think about that. That's, that's incredible. So, and that's, that's a relatively low dose in our opinion. So four 50 can replace antidepressants. That's pretty exciting. One study follows 4,000 people for 20 years and found that the ones with the highest magnesium intake were 47% less likely to develop diabetes. So we're talking massive beneficial effects on blood sugar and insulin. I mean that, that alone in terms of weight loss in terms of health is again, incredible. Matt Gallant: Then there was one study that found that 450 milligrams per day increased, experienced a significant decrease in blood pressure in both the systolic and diastolic. Um, again, more research on prevailing insulin resistance and many people would, metabolic syndrome are deficient. So metabolic syndrome is a term for people that you know, don't seem to be responding to normal weight loss parameters. Like the, maths not making sense, you know, they're, they're not eating that much or direct resizing. They're, they're not, um, you know, they're insulin resistant. Like there's, there's a whole set of things that makes up metabolic syndrome, but again, people that are deficient in magnesium seem to, to show that another study shoot insulin, uh, improvements in insulin resistance. But another study found that it reduced insulin resistance and blood sugar levels even in people with normal blood levels, which means that it will help you again burn more body fat. And we'd mentioned this earlier, that magnesium has been shown to improve mood, reduce water retention, aka bloating and other symptoms in women with PMs. So, I mean that's just a quick, quick overview of, you know, there's hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of studies, but I just wanted to highlight that, you know, this is the mineral that can drop your stress, improve your blood sugar, improve your brain, improve your athletic performance, improve your sleep, improve your PMs symptoms. I mean, there's almost no part of your body that it doesn't have a positive impact on. Wade Lightheart: And also just increase your capacity to handle things like caffeine because pretty much everybody is pounding caffeine these days. It's a big trend. And you know, I think one of the things that's really important is now you're able to enjoy a coffee or a caffeinated beverage without any of that, that edginess that kind of comes associated with it or the, you know, the frying feeling, if you will. Matt Gallant: Yeah. So let's talk about the protocol. Um, so I want to share, I'm going to share again, it was, you know, in three people that you trust and respect. Tell you more or less the same thing. I always think that is a sign from the universe. So Poliquin's protocol was around five grams of magnesium a day and 20 grams of fish oil. You know, uh, Mercola was very similar. Now Mercola hit his, what he's saying is that the magnesium can help counter counteract a lot of the negative consequences of the EMF cause the electromagnetic frequency pollution from cell phones and wifi. What we know now is that it opens up what's called the calcium gates in the cells. So you're basically like leaking calcium. And if you think about aging, aging, like most of the negative consequences, whether you're talking about heart disease or arthritis, is that calcification of the body, right? Matt Gallant: The body's hardening in all the wrong places. So you don't want to be, you don't want your cells to be leaking calcium. So he's a big proponent of magnesium to help counteract a lot of those side effects. And then the other guy, uh, it was, uh, a mutual friend of Wade's. His, his approach was to heal the nervous system. So that's where he was coming from. So all three guys again had a very similar protocol which was around three to five grams of magnesium a day with a big essential oil loading protocol. Now if Wade is vegetarian, and Wade I want you to share your favorite vegetarian oil sources because I think there's some synergy between the magnesium and again, essential fatty acids. Wade Lightheart: Yeah, I do believe that's true. Um, for those of you who have checked out some of our podcasts, there's two particular ones. I'm going to refer you to dr Udo Erasmus, "Fats that heal, fats that kill", he's kind of the guy that put fats back on the map. He's a friend of mine here in Vancouver, world renowned guy, great guy. He talks about the relationship and how important that is and and providing, you know, your three sixes and nines, you can get them from plant sources. You just, the threes are a little bit tough, so you've got to watch that and make sure that you get an a balances. The other one is Ian Clark's Activation oils. I think some of the best liquid oils I've ever taken. I, I was always someone that struggled with oils, taking oils probably from my bodybuilding days where we had to, I'm a literally cut fats out of my diet for about 10 years and got to super physiological low body fat levels, which depleted my myelin sheath and nervous system. Wade Lightheart: So again, on the extreme side, again, you know, feeling the burn. But yeah, I use those oils. I like to, I like to take my magnesium with my essential oils in the morning. Uh, they're great. And again, with oils, I mean it like everything cheaper is cheaper. Like go with the best stuff, go with the products are out, you can and if you're a vegetarian, uh, definitely you want to supplement your diet with a, you know, either the Udo's oil or the Activation oil inside it. There's a, uh, there's another company out there. It's, I think it's an MLM company called doTERRA. They have an essential, and I, I'm not getting anything from any of these, just so you know, they have an essential, uh, a plant based essential fatty acid, which is a combination of a bunch of different essential oils. That's really good as well. So the vegetarian one from those guys is fantastic and I've, I felt benefits on all of those products and I use them. Uh, I stack, I take a little bit of each one, uh, every day. Matt Gallant: Yeah. And another great source for vegetarians that want the DHA, which is really the key one for the brain is Algae, right? So either, you know, E3Live is a great one and they have BrainON, which is specifically, it's an Algae that these spin to remove the cell walls that crosses the blood brain brain barrier. I'm a, I'm a fan of that product as well, even though I am a, I'm not vegetarian, but um, yeah, so the Algae, another good service. Now, if you're not vegetarian, I'm a fan of krill oils. Probably. Um, my favorite source and you know, I'll, I'll usually stack that with the fish oil, but curls my go-to and uh, again, I'll sack that official. Now let's talk about dosage. Um, in my opinion, you start with 500 milligrams, maybe two or three times a day, which will give you about one and a half grams a day. Matt Gallant: And that's a really, you know, it's a good dose. Uh, and it's a tolerable dose. Yeah. I'd be surprised if you have any digestive distress. Um, you can also start with about five grams of fish oil and then you start ramping it up. So you go from, you know, half a gram to a gram. Um, where I went the highest was six grams a day. That was a little too high. Yes. You know, I was, I was definitely having watery stools at that point. So for me, if I'm really pushing the dose, it's around, you know, four or five grams. And the thing is we recommend you do a loading phase of 60 to 90 days and once you're loaded then you go back to like a gram, a gram and a half, maybe two grams a day, depending how intense your life is. Cause you know, keep in mind like if you're training hard, you need more minerals, you're burning up more things, you know, you're, you're, you're using up, um, you're sweating minerals, you're sweating salt through sweating, magnesium, you're sweating, all of these things, you're burning them up at a higher rate. So what have you found works for you in terms of dosage? Wade Lightheart: Orthomolecular nutrition, um, which was developed by Abram Hoffer and um, Linus Pauling and Hawkins way back in the 70s, they developed a way of doing things. It was kind of what Matt's referring to. This isn't something that we've just cooked up at a, our ideas, what they did is they would always keep titrating up, bringing up the dosage until you break what's called the gastrointestinal barrier. That's where you get the runs. That's where you get the watery stools. So start at that half gram. And what I did is when I first started out get this [inaudible], I went to eight and a half grams per day before I started getting stills. That's how deficient I was. My body just started stacking. And then after about three weeks, I got the runs one morning on my, on my dosage, and I was like, okay. So at that point, what I did is I tapered down to six. Wade Lightheart: I went about another month. And keep in mind though, I did do the intro. I, I, during that time I went and did the, uh, the, um, IV drip of magnesium. And when I did that in combination, I went from six down to four and I've stayed around for ever since. And I take it every single day. And, uh, if I go for a long, like sometimes I do these long walks or I do an intense, like I'll do like a four hour work, four hour walk in the heat or whatever. I'll, up it a little bit and I don't get any, uh, digestive stuff. Now that's me in particular. Um, each person is going to different, you can do what's called a SpectraCell analysis. So we talked about this on another podcast with dr Maximus and everybody should do this test. Wade Lightheart: Um, it's a test where they spin your blood and they can tell how well you absorb a particular, uh, nutrients. So for example, Matt, myself, and let's say you the listener, we could all take the same amount of magnesium, but we will not absorb the same amount of magnesium. And we're also, Matt and I are taking, uh, we're taking one of our, you know, well-known products, which is Masszymes, which in order for you to get your minerals, you need minerals to get your proteins, proteins to get your minerals, minerals to get your vitamin. And most people are deficient in enzymes. So I would recommend also adding in enzymes or Masszymes product. And on top of that, because that's going to also assist an absorbent. And if you can take it with a meal or, Wade Lightheart: or, or with the protein drink or, you know, breakfast and stuff like that, I usually have it with my breakfast every morning. And I like it that way. And then also for my lunch.. Matt Gallant: So Wade and I, we, we were kind of guys that just follow our passion and, and we, you know, we, we, I'm passionate about things that work and from the beginning of BiOptimizers, you know, just to give you some backstory, and I don't think we've ever shared this publicly, so if we share bits of it, but Wade and I were doing this, this incredible protocol with very high dose enzymes, very high dose probiotics. This is before we ever created any products. And we were so blown away by the results that we said, you know what, let's create a better version of those products because they work, they're incredible. Let's build a better version and share it with the world. Matt Gallant: And that's what we've done with magnesium. So again, Wade and I, I've been using magnesium now for about two years. Um, again, using these protocols and you know, like I, I've got to think like five different types of mag, like five different types of magnesium downstairs that I have to pop in and, and take and you know, and one of them as three and you don't want, as you know, that's just what I have to do to get all the magnesiums that I want. Um, the other issue too with a lot of magnesium blends, and I don't know why they don't do this, but they don't put the cofactors. There's a couple of things that you can put into magnesium that will actually help absorption. So what way did I have done? We have a combined all seven magnesiums that we talked about earlier along with the cofactors and we've created a product called Magnesium Breakthrough. So we're really excited to share this with you. I think it's going to become the magnesium of the health industry. We haven't seen anything like it. There's some magnesium of act three, some have four, but I haven't seen any with all seven. So we're super excited to be bringing this to you. I think that's going to be one of the most impactful supplements you've ever felt, specially if you're stressed out. And again, it's one of these things too. If you're training hard, you'll see some incredible results in the gym. Wade Lightheart: Yeah, pretty exciting. The other thing I also want to add to that is like all of our products, we have the 365 day your Money Back guarantee. If you don't, if you don't feel the difference taking this, if you don't say, this is awesome, I feel awesome, I can feel the difference. You just reach out to us and call us and we just give you your money back. We, there's nothing more expensive than a product that doesn't work and then there's nothing that feels better than a product that delivers on what you want. And one of the things that we represented by optimizers is over delivering on the promises that we make and removing all the risk of purchasing with us because we were not in the business of selling products. We're in the business of creating relationships with people who want to optimize their health, live long, live strong for a long period of time. Wade Lightheart: So, you know, I simple sale or something like that. That's not what we're interested in. We're interested in being your GoTo advisors, your health advocates, to bring you the latest research. What we've been doing, what we've blown up on, what we've learned as well as the experts who can, who are influencing us and our decisions. And if we can make a product that will enhance people's lives better than other people, we do it. If we can't make a product that's better than anything on the market, we refer you to the people that, that we do check our podcasts. That's what we're into. We don't make everything, but what we do make is absolutely fantastic. And for those of you who have tried our products and are with us, we want to thank you and enjoy it. And I think this is going to be another element that you're going to add to your repertoire that's going to make a big difference for you and your family over the decades. Matt Gallant: Yeah. So the website is a magnesiumbreakthrough.com. And you know what's really nice about magnesium is even if you're on a tight budget, uh, you know, you can get a really positive effect for around a dollar a day. So, you know, even if, again, if you're cash strapped, I think it's probably one of the biggest bang for the bucks in terms of cost to benefit ratio. And you know, going back to the BiOptimizers triangle, which is the aesthetics, the performance in health, um, everything that we do is moving, you know, one, two or all three of those such triangles sides further out. And you know, for those of you that are into high-performance and whether that's, you know, business pushing your brain or at why I performance, um, you have to make sure, and again listen to our nervous system projects cause we went pretty deep, but you have to make sure that you're, you're balancing or managing the fight or flight response. Matt Gallant: If you're just trapped in that side and you're going to burn out and really your performance then starts dropping and your help starts dropping. So that's why the magnesium blend, Magnesium Breakthrough, you know, you're keeping yourself out of fight or flight, you're, you're, you're pushing your body into parasympathetic, just using this miserable. So that allows you to keep training harder without burning out or working harder without burning out. I think, you know, way you would have had this product back when you were in your, you know, super intense work zone, you probably would have avoided, you know, being almost clinically brain dead on a EEG machine. Wade Lightheart: Yeah. And that's a, that's the thing, you know, um, you always have to be kind of humble enough to say, well, what if maybe I should give it a shot? Um, the reality is is I'm probably not gonna change my hard wiring. I've, you know, I've been an extreme athlete virtually all my life. I was, you know, from hockey and violence, sports like that, and then that transit into kind of extreme levels of bodybuilding at the high levels. And now we're at extreme business building and, and as you age, things happen in your body, changes happen. And sometimes deficiencies can kind of go undetected too. You kind of fall off the cliff or life changes. You go through a divorce, you go through a business stress, um, maybe someone in your family gets sick, maybe you end up traveling a lot, and there's these little points, these spikes that are the pieces that puts you over the top. Matt Gallant: And oftentimes it's for those high performers out there, you kind of think that you can gut it out. Um, so I do recommend, uh, getting a net naturopathic doctor. Do your regularly regular testing, look at your, your blood, look at your results. And what's interesting when you add products like magnesium, like are digestive enzymes. Everything else just seems to work better. So a, we're pumped and we're excited about this. I think it's a, we're for all those guys that are like us who have been, you know, we've got half a dozen bottles of magnesium in our cupboard. Uh, it's nice to just be able to throw all of those in, you know, uh, in the garbage and just have one bottle. And I've got that covered every day. And that's, that's one of the beauties, you know, it's also about efficiency. And effectiveness. And so when you look at the price invested for your magnesium, instead of buying five bottles of all these different ones, you can just buy one bottle or three bottles and you're good to go. Matt Gallant: Yeah. Our philosophy when we create products and Wade alluded to it, we're either the first in class meaning you know, we're creating a new type of product or we're the best in class. And you know, magnesium was a lot of magnesiums out there. But again, you will not find one that has seven magnesiums plus the cofactors in this ratio. Cause you know, one of the things we did, we optimize it to minimize the water flushing. So the ratio of the magnesiums that we put in, we're again designed to minimize that water flushing so that you can push the dose if you want you to get. Again, there is a point where it'll happen, but it's, it's a lot higher than what you would normally experience. So again, the website's magnesium breakthrough. Uh, we want to thank you for spending your valuable time with Wade and I, and we'll be back soon with some more cutting edge bleeding edge information. Wade Lightheart: Thanks so much and have yourself an awesome day.

OnTrack with Judy Warner
Practical Applications of Designing With High-Density Interconnect-HDI

OnTrack with Judy Warner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2019 49:46


Happy Holden, known as the father of High-Density Interconnect and the author of The HDI Handbook, is this episode’s fascinating guest. We’ll discuss how Happy went from a small-town boy to a first-name basis with legends Bill Hewlett and David Packard, the founders of HP. Happy will be a keynote speaker at our AltiumLive Annual PCB Design Summit in Frankfurt, where he’ll discuss smart factories and how we’re going to get to the point of having digitized data. He’ll also talk about AI and his full-day talk will include HDI and the considerations you need to keep in mind.  Trade In Your Outdated PCB Design Tool & Unlock 45% OFF Altium Designer today! Watch the video, click here. Show Highlights: Happy feels lucky to have been at the right place at the right time throughout his career. He grew up in the mountains of Oregon in a small, highly-involved logging community. His math and science teacher in high school had a physics Ph.D.—not a traditional education curriculum. At university, they also had professors who were Nobel prize winners, such as Linus Pauling. After graduation, he was invited to interview with the integrated circuit department at Hewlett-Packard, on the recommendation of one of his professors. HP was more advanced than IBM when it came to integrated circuits. At the time, HP was making high-frequency and RF integrated circuits out of germanium and silicon placed on sapphire wafers, called “Silicon on Sapphire” or SOS. Intel was still a start-up at this time. As the first chemical engineer at HP in integrated circuit (IC) production; he was on a frontier at HP, the only chemical engineer at a company of fewer than 2,000 people—it was exciting for 21-year-old Happy Holden. During his 28 years there, HP climbed to 167,000 employees and from 200 million in sales per year to 54 billion! HP’s first 64-bit desktop machine was called a “Desktop Calculator”, because at the time a 64-bit computer was the size of a room. By 1972, Happy assisted Bill Hewlett in making an HP35 ‘calculator’ which was battery-powered and fit in his pocket. During his keynote, Happy will show pictures of the unique solution they used for the keyboard. At the time, they had no idea how to make a reliable gold-plated rigid-flex printed circuit board and the result was an eight-layer logic board, double-sided keyboard, and displays soldered in at an angle. Apart from the keynote, Happy will present a full-day class on October 21, which he calls ‘Product realization using HDI technology”; a course on the electrical performance and the advantages and drivers of using High-Density Interconnect and blowing up the myth that you have to pay more for it. He will be giving some insights into unlearning several aspects of multi-layers and how miniaturization should indeed save you money by demonstrating four different case studies where complex 18- and 24-layer boards were made into an 8- or 10-layers with High-Density Interconnect and less expensive. An interesting aspect of this full-day course is where do we go from here, what’s the next step after HDI? Also, don’t miss the keynote on October 23, titled “PCB Trends That Will Impact YOUR Future” and how he started working with AI 25 years ago! Links and Resources: HDI Handbook Articles by Happy Holden Learn, connect, and get inspired at AltiumLive 2019: Annual PCB Design Summit.

Scienze Motorie
ADOLFO PANFILI - Medico Chirurgo Padre Fondatore della Medicina Ortomolecolare

Scienze Motorie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2019 64:08


174° Talk Show Scienze Motorie – ADOLFO PANFILINella 174° Puntata del Talk Show Scienze Motorie, Giacomo Catalani è in conversazione con Adolfo Panfili, Medico Chirurgo specializzato in Ortopedia, Medicina Ortomolecolare, Chiropratica, Agopuntura, Omeopatia, Fitoterapia. Padre Fondatore della Medicina Ortomolecolare Italiana, il primo a diffonderla e praticarla seguendo gli studi di Linus Pauling doppio Premio Nobel e suo maestro negli anni di perfezionamento trascorsi all'estero. È specializzato nelle complesse tecniche americane: NET (Neuro Emotional Technique) e BEST (Bio-Energetic Synchronization Technique), ed è il primo ad aver effettuato in Italia interventi di chirurgia robotica mini invasiva in ortopedia con il sistema Mazor. Il Dottor Panfili tratta vertebre, postura e nutrizione in sinergia sin dall'inizio della sua trentennale attività professionale, sia dal punto vista chirurgico che manipolativo. Da sempre impegnato in diversi progetti di ricerca e Autore di numerosi libri tra cui: In forma in tre settimane; Nutrigenetica, Gruppi Sanguigni e Dieta; La Dieta pH, ha all'attivo oltre 100 Pubblicazioni Scientifiche attinenti la Chirurgia, l'Ortopedia, il Metabolismo, la Nutrizione Ortomolecolare, la Medicina Sportiva, gli Aminoacidi, il Sistema Redox e la Chemioluminescenza. Segui questa puntata ricca di informazioni per comprendere come si arrivi al successo nel campo della salute. PUNTATA IMPERDIBILEBuona Visione!

Giacomo Catalani Editore
ADOLFO PANFILI - Medico Chirurgo Padre Fondatore della Medicina Ortomolecolare

Giacomo Catalani Editore

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2019 64:08


174° Talk Show Scienze Motorie – ADOLFO PANFILI Nella 174° Puntata del Talk Show Scienze Motorie, Giacomo Catalani è in conversazione con Adolfo Panfili, Medico Chirurgo specializzato in Ortopedia, Medicina Ortomolecolare, Chiropratica, Agopuntura, Omeopatia, Fitoterapia. Padre Fondatore della Medicina Ortomolecolare Italiana, il primo a diffonderla e praticarla seguendo gli studi di Linus Pauling doppio Premio Nobel e suo maestro negli anni di perfezionamento trascorsi all'estero. È specializzato nelle complesse tecniche americane: NET (Neuro Emotional Technique) e BEST (Bio-Energetic Synchronization Technique), ed è il primo ad aver effettuato in Italia interventi di chirurgia robotica mini invasiva in ortopedia con il sistema Mazor. Il Dottor Panfili tratta vertebre, postura e nutrizione in sinergia sin dall'inizio della sua trentennale attività professionale, sia dal punto vista chirurgico che manipolativo. Da sempre impegnato in diversi progetti di ricerca e Autore di numerosi libri tra cui: In forma in tre settimane; Nutrigenetica, Gruppi Sanguigni e Dieta; La Dieta pH, ha all'attivo oltre 100 Pubblicazioni Scientifiche attinenti la Chirurgia, l'Ortopedia, il Metabolismo, la Nutrizione Ortomolecolare, la Medicina Sportiva, gli Aminoacidi, il Sistema Redox e la Chemioluminescenza. Segui questa puntata ricca di informazioni per comprendere come si arrivi al successo nel campo della salute. PUNTATA IMPERDIBILE Buona Visione!

Nourish Balance Thrive
A Statin Nation: Damaging Millions in a Brave New Post-health World

Nourish Balance Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2019 142:55


Scottish doctor, writer, speaker, and outspoken cholesterol sceptic Malcolm Kendrick is back on the podcast this week. He continues to challenge the widespread use of statin medications, despite being targeted personally and professionally by those opposing his message. Since we last talked he has authored a new book, A Statin Nation: Damaging Millions in a Brave New Post-health World, elucidating his position against mainstream medicine’s rampant cholesterol-lowering tactics.  On this podcast, Dr. Kendrick describes in detail exactly what he believes drives the process of cardiovascular disease, informed from 35 years of research on the subject.  He explains specifically why cholesterol has been misunderstood, and how medicine got it wrong. We discuss corruption in medical research and the money supporting the status quo, and Dr. Kendrick shares some of the best ways to avoid heart disease (which have little to do with diet!). Here’s the outline of this interview with Malcolm Kendrick: [00:00:07] Our first podcast with Malcolm Kendrick: Why Cholesterol Levels Have No Effect on Cardiovascular Disease (And Things to Think about Instead). [00:00:30] Book: A Statin Nation: Damaging Millions in a Brave New Post-health World, by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick. His previous two books: Doctoring Data and The Cholesterol Con. [00:02:00] Causes vs processes. [00:03:40] History behind his journey and questioning authority. [00:07:30] Articles written by Elspeth Smith. [00:09:00] Karl Rokitansky’s paper discussing an alternative way of looking at CVD: A manual of pathological anatomy, Vol. 4. Day GE, trans. London: Sydenham Society, 1852:261; in print here. [00:09:06] Rudolf Virchow, researcher who pointed to cholesterol in artery walls. [00:10:55] Researcher Nikolai N. Anichkov: fed rabbits a high-cholesterol diet and cholesterol appeared in their arteries (sort of). [00:12:07] Ancel Keys; blaming saturated fat. [00:14:11] France - highest saturated fat consumption, lowest rate of CVD. Georgia - lowest sat fat consumption, highest rate of CVD.  See graph, here. [00:15:16] International Network of Cholesterol Skeptics (THINCS). Study: Ravnskov, Uffe, et al. "Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review." BMJ open 6.6 (2016): e010401. [00:16:50] Pleiotropic effects of statins. [00:17:29] Movie: 12 Angry Men (1957). [00:20:30] Robert Ross - response to injury hypothesis; Study: Ross, Russell, John Glomset, and Laurence Harker. "Response to injury and atherogenesis." The American journal of pathology 86.3 (1977): 675. [00:20:40] TV show: Stranger Things. [00:22:31] Infectious disease hypothesis. [00:22:52] Analogy of rust in the paint of a car; Sickle Cell Disease as an example. [00:27:12] 14-year old boy with Sickle Cell and atherosclerosis; Study: Elsharawy, M. A., and K. M. Moghazy. "Peripheral arterial lesions in patient with sickle cell disease." EJVES Extra 14.2 (2007): 15-18. [00:28:57] Endothelial progenitor cells, produced in the bone marrow, discovered in 1997. [00:29:31] Pig study of endothelial turnover: Caplan, Bernard A., and Colin J. Schwartz. "Increased endothelial cell turnover in areas of in vivo Evans Blue uptake in the pig aorta." Atherosclerosis 17.3 (1973): 401-417. [00:31:48] Vitamin C's role in maintaining collagen and blood vessels. [00:33:08] Lp(a) molecules - patching cracks in the artery walls. [00:33:42] Depriving guinea pigs of vitamin C caused atherosclerosis; Study: Willis, G. C. "The reversibility of atherosclerosis." Canadian Medical Association Journal 77.2 (1957): 106. [00:34:24] Linus Pauling - said CVD was caused by chronic low-level vitamin C deficiency. [00:35:53] What else damages endothelial cells? Many things, including smoking, air pollution, high blood sugar, Kawasaki disease, sepsis/infection. [00:41:19] Glycocalyx; Nitric oxide. [00:43:30] Health benefits of sun exposure. [00:44:26] Biomechanical stress (blood pressure) - atherosclerosis in arteries but not in veins. [00:47:57] Things that interfere with repair: steroids, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. [00:55:00] The effects of stress on the cardiovascular system. [00:57:55] Red blood cells are what brings cholesterol into blood clots. [00:58:59] Cholesterol crystals in atherosclerotic plaques come from red blood cells. Study: Kolodgie, Frank D., et al. "Intraplaque hemorrhage and progression of coronary atheroma." New England Journal of Medicine 349.24 (2003): 2316-2325. [01:00:55] Very low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) are procoagulant; High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is anticoagulant. [01:03:46] Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH); Factor VIII. [01:08:15] Cholesterol-lowering pharmaceuticals; Repatha. In the clinical trial, the total number of cardiovascular deaths was greater in the Repatha group than the placebo group. Study: Sabatine, Marc S., et al. "Evolocumab and clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease." New England Journal of Medicine 376.18 (2017): 1713-1722. [01:09:34] David Deamer, biologist and Research Professor of Biomolecular Engineering. [01:10:05] Karl Popper, philosopher. [01:10:28] Bradford Hill’s Criteria for Causation. [01:13:52] Michael Mosley, BBC journalist. [01:16:40] Statin denialism - an internet cult with deadly consequences? [01:19:18] The money behind the statin and low-fat industries. [01:20:06] Margarine; Trans-fatty acids, banned in several countries. [01:24:37] The impact of food; The focus on food to the exclusion of other pillars of health. [01:26:38] Dr. Phil Hammond; CLANGERS [01:28:21] Avoiding internet attacks. [01:32:00] ApoA-1 Milano. Original study: Nissen, Steven E., et al. "Effect of recombinant ApoA-I Milano on coronary atherosclerosis in patients with acute coronary syndromes: a randomized controlled trial." Jama 290.17 (2003): 2292-2300. [01:33:05] The Heart Protection (HPS) Study in the UK: Heart Protection Study Collaborative Group. "MRC/BHF Heart Protection Study of cholesterol lowering with simvastatin in 20 536 high-risk individuals: a randomised placebo controlled trial." The Lancet 360.9326 (2002): 7-22. [01:33:36]  Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S) Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study Group. "Randomised trial of cholesterol lowering in 4444 patients with coronary heart disease: the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S)." The Lancet 344.8934 (1994): 1383-1389. [01:33:49] West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS): Shepherd, James, et al. "Prevention of coronary heart disease with pravastatin in men with hypercholesterolemia." New England Journal of Medicine 333.20 (1995): 1301-1308. [01:34:21] National Institute of Health’s ALLHAT-LLT trial: Officers, A. L. L. H. A. T. "Coordinators for the ALLHAT Collaborative Research Group: Major outcomes in moderately hypercholesterolemic, hypertensive patients randomized to pravastatin vs. usual care: the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT-LLT)." JAMA 288.23 (2002): 2998-3007. [01:34:50] 2005 - Regulations guiding clinical trials changed. [01:35:14] Negative antidepressant studies not published; Study: Turner, Erick H., et al. "Selective publication of antidepressant trials and its influence on apparent efficacy." New England Journal of Medicine 358.3 (2008): 252-260. [01:37:11] Minnesota Coronary Experiment (MCE): Analysis of recovered data: Ramsden, Christopher E., et al. "Re-evaluation of the traditional diet-heart hypothesis: analysis of recovered data from Minnesota Coronary Experiment (1968-73)." bmj 353 (2016): i1246. [01:39:44] Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: Ioannidis, John PA. "Why most published research findings are false." PLoS medicine 2.8 (2005): e124. [01:39:55] Richard Horton, editor of the Lancet: half of what is published is not true: Horton, Richard. "Offline: What is medicine’s 5 sigma." Lancet 385.9976 (2015): 1380. [01:41:11] The problem with reproducibility; a database of clinical trials that cannot be challenged or reproduced. [01:42:37] Editors of prominent journals losing faith in published research: Marci Angell, Richard Smith [01:44:55] Parachute study: Yeh, Robert W., et al. "Parachute use to prevent death and major trauma when jumping from aircraft: randomized controlled trial." bmj 363 (2018): k5094. [01:46:01] Benefits that are major are obvious; no randomized clinical trial necessary. [01:48:33] Preventing vs. screening. [01:51:42] Podcast: Movement Analysis and Breathing Strategies for Pain Relief and Improved Performance with physical therapist Zac Cupples. [01:51:59] Analysis of women who died in various ways, examining breast tissue; found that a high % of women had what you could diagnose as breast cancer. Study: Bhathal, P. S., et al. "Frequency of benign and malignant breast lesions in 207 consecutive autopsies in Australian women." British journal of cancer 51.2 (1985): 271. [01:53:34] Screening programs not associated with reduced CVD or death; Study: Krogsbøll, Lasse T., et al. "General health checks in adults for reducing morbidity and mortality from disease: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis." Bmj 345 (2012): e7191. [01:54:26] Coronary Artery Calcium (CAC) scan. Podcast: Coronary Artery Calcium (CAC): A Direct Measure of Cardiovascular Disease Risk, with Ivor Cummins. [01:54:46] Cardiologist Bernard Lown.  [01:58:38] People who had measles/mumps less likely to get CVD; Study: Kubota, Yasuhiko, et al. "Association of measles and mumps with cardiovascular disease: The Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study." Atherosclerosis 241.2 (2015): 682-686. [02:00:55] Life expectancy in US and UK is now falling. [02:06:46] Physical health doesn't exist without social health and psychological health. [02:07:40] Negative Twitter messages correlate with rates of heart disease; Study: Eichstaedt, Johannes C., et al. "Psychological language on Twitter predicts county-level heart disease mortality." Psychological science 26.2 (2015): 159-169. [02:09:58] People who take statins believe they’re protected so they stop exercising. Study: Lee, David SH, et al. "Statins and physical activity in older men: the osteoporotic fractures in men study." JAMA internal medicine 174.8 (2014): 1263-1270. [02:11:45] Simple changes: make friends, have good relationships, speak to your kids, exercise, eat natural food, sunshine. [02:16:53] Blood sugar measurements following funny lecture vs. boring lecture; Study: Hayashi, Keiko, et al. "Laughter lowered the increase in postprandial blood glucose." Diabetes care 26.5 (2003): 1651-1652. [02:18:08] Dr. Malcolm Kendrick’s blog.

Nerds Amalgamated
Comets, He-Man & DayZ

Nerds Amalgamated

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2019 73:33


Welcome back for another amazing episode from the Nerds, it is full of fun stuff, amazing science, and some crazy stuff. We hope as always that you enjoy it and perhaps by accident or intentionally learn something cool. I remember when I found out about chemistry, It was a long, long way from here, I was old enough to want it but younger than I wanted to be, Suddenly my mission was clear… All about chemistry. OK, I know that is the song Chemistry by Semisonic, but it relates to our first topic from Buck, which is all about chemistry and producing oxygen on Mars, Comets, and interplanetary space travel. That’s right we are one step closer to science fiction becoming reality once more. Honestly, where would the world be without science, science fiction, or Nerds to think up the impossible dreams? Although we must apologise for the zombie apocalypse resulting from the advancements in technology; otherwise known as reality television, social media, or just uncontrollable gaming. But, all that aside scientist have found a way to change carbon-dioxide (CO2) into beautiful oxygen (O2). That’s right, you heard us correctly, and it doesn’t involve a chemical scrubber like those currently used on submarines. No, this alters the very nature of the chemical bonds on a molecular level in a whole new way. By the power of Greyskull, someone has the power. That’s right folks, He-Man is coming back to our screens in the near future it seems. DJ has brought us news that a new extension to the story of He-Man is in the works, he says it is an anime, but we aren’t sold. But it is exciting that it appears to not be a rebirth or re-imagining. But then again that is those weirdos over at Disney doing all the remakes, except for the unfortunate incident with She-Ra. Whoever is responsible for that fiasco is a greater villain than Skeletor and Hordak combined. Seriously, it was traumatic to see what had happened there. With the contentiousness of is it going to be able to claim the title of an anime aside, He-Man is looking promising. Next we have the Professor bringing us news about the censorship of a few games in Australia and the impact that is having on the world. Now we normally don’t agree with a lot of the issues in censorship, or Material Ratings as they are referred to, but this time there is some merit. This topic is one in which the Nerds have a heated debate, and Buck really gets fired up, DJ gets angry and the Professor needs a whip and chair to keep them apart. So if you feel strongly about the topic of censorship this might be a poignant topic for you. We apologise if we offend anyone during this section (I know we don’t normally, but hey). Let us know what you think on the matter, is Buck an old fart that needs to be exhibited in a museum, is the DJ taking the matter too light, is it somewhere in between (like the Professor). As always we have the games played this week, which is looking interesting. Also the weekly shout outs, remembrances, birthdays, and events of interest. As always stay safe, look out for each other and stay hydrated.EPISODE NOTES:Comet chemistry - https://www.caltech.edu/about/news/comet-inspires-chemistry-making-breathable-oxygen-marsHe-Man Anime - https://comicbook.com/anime/2019/08/19/he-man-anime-synopsis-kevin-smith-netflix/DayZ Banned in Australia - https://www.kotaku.com.au/2019/08/dayz-pc-ps4-xbox-one-banned-completely-australia/Games currently playingBuck– Dungeons and Dragons - https://dnd.wizards.com/Professor- https://store.steampowered.com/app/861540/Dicey_Dungeons/DJ – Mortal Kombat 11- https://www.mortalkombat.com/Other topics discussedChemistry – SemisonicPublished on Oct 7, 2009Music video by Semisonic performing Chemistry. (C) 2001 Geffen RecordsCategory Music Song CHEMISTRYWritersDan WilsonLicensed to YouTube byLatinAutor - Warner Chappell, PEDL, LatinAutor, ASCAP, UNIAO BRASILEIRA DE EDITORAS DE MUSICA - UBEM, Warner Chappell, LatinAutor - PeerMusic, and 5 Music Rights Societieshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgCVR2pjXc0Rihanna feat. Drake – Work (2016 song)- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL1UzIK-flAComet- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CometTotal Recall (1990 film)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_Recall_(1990_film)Climate Change in China- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_change_in_ChinaCarbon Dioxide scrubber- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_dioxide_scrubberSolar Impulse (Swiss long-range experimental solar-powered aircraft project)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_ImpulseCanadian company sells bottled air to China- https://edition.cnn.com/2015/12/15/asia/china-canadian-company-selling-clean-air/index.htmlMost expensive bottle of water- https://alvinology.com/2008/04/15/worlds-most-expensive-bottled-water/Oxygen bars- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen_barHe-Man – What’s Up- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjVugzSR7HAMore details about He-Man- https://www.empireonline.com/movies/news/kevin-smith-creating-new-he-man-animated-series/- https://www.bleedingcool.com/2019/08/18/masters-of-the-universe-revelation-kevin-smith-netflix-to-continue-original-animated-series/Western Anime TV shows- Avatar: The Last Airbender (2005 series) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avatar:_The_Last_Airbender- Teen Titans (2003 series) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teen_Titans_(TV_series)She-Ra and the Princesses of Power (2018 series)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/She-Ra_and_the_Princesses_of_PowerComparison of She-Ra in the 1985 series and her 2018 redesign- https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1c/She-Ra_comparison.png- https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-5qOlZ2u2Duk/W_IqVYCvmpI/AAAAAAADlPQ/eYUrEFWP1vcr0ljMgVFsJZ-sLeASo2GDwCLcBGAs/s1600/shera-shera.jpgNetflix fires Kids & Family Executives- https://deadline.com/2019/08/netflix-layoffs-executives-kids-family-1202687407/Netflix market value drops- https://www.forbes.com/sites/noahkirsch/2019/07/24/as-growth-slows-netflix-market-value-drops-26-billion-in-a-week/Acorn TV (American subscription streaming service)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acorn_TV- https://acorn.tv/Reasons why Netflix are cancelling its original programs- https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/08/20/4-reasons-netflix-cancels-its-original-programs.aspxGame of Thrones creator: End of Game of Thrones on TV was a liberation- https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2019/aug/17/george-rr-martin-game-thrones-writer-end-of-show-was-liberationGame of thrones book ending will be different to the show ending – Geroge R Martin- https://people.com/tv/george-rr-martin-game-of-thrones-books-end-differently-show/Anime reboots to TV series- Ghost in the Shell : Stand Along Complex (2002 series) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_in_the_Shell:_Stand_Alone_Complex- Appleseed - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appleseed_(manga)#AnimeSamurai Jack (2001 TV Series)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samurai_JackFallout 3 (2008 game)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallout_3Joy Pill (We Happy Few game item)- https://we-happy-few.fandom.com/wiki/JoyLisa Simpson taking happy pills- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxkDytaDI0wBanned video games in Australia- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_banned_video_games_in_AustraliaBanned movies- Tender Loving Care (1998 Interactive movie) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tender_Loving_Care_(video_game)- Nymphomaniac (2013 movie) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nymphomaniac_(film)Other banned movies- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_banned_filmsNoddy the TV series banned- https://www.independent.co.uk/news/the-truth-about-how-noddy-was-framed-1256823.htmlBill Henson (controversial art photographer)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_HensonMichael Atkinson (former Australian politician opposed to R18+ for games)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_AtkinsonMortal Kombat 11 new content- New character: Nightwolf - https://mortalkombat.fandom.com/wiki/Nightwolf- Kombat Pack Roster Reveal Trailer - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRjbIuJWtlgDisney vs Sony standoff- https://deadline.com/2019/08/kevin-feige-spider-man-franchise-exit-disney-sony-dispute-avengers-endgame-captain-america-winter-soldier-tom-rothman-bob-iger-1202672545/Future Disney princesses- Sarah Connor (Terminator character) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Connor_(Terminator)- Ellen Ripley (Alien character) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_RipleyThe Humour Experiment (TNC Podcast)- https://thatsnotcanon.com/thehumourexperimentShoutouts19 Aug 1692 – Salem witch trials: In Salem, Province of Massachusetts Bay, five people, one woman and four men, including a clergyman, are executed after being convicted of witchcraft. More than 200 people were accused, 19 of whom were found guilty and executed byhanging (14 women and 5 men). One other man, Giles Corey, was crushed to death for refusing to plead, and at least five people died in jail. It was the deadliest witch hunt in the history of colonial North America. Despite being generally known as the Salem witch trials, the preliminary hearings in 1692 were conducted in several towns: Salem Village (now Danvers), Salem Town, Ipswich, and Andover. The most infamous trials were conducted by the Court of Oyer and Terminer in 1692 in Salem Town. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salem_witch_trials19 Aug 1953 – Cold War: The CIA and MI6 help to overthrow the government of Mohammad Mosaddegh in Iran and reinstate the Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi the last Shah of Iran. While the coup is at times referred to in the West as Operation Ajax after its CIA cryptonym, in Iran it is referred to as the 28 Mordad 1332 Coup d'état, after its date on the Iranian calendar. Mosaddegh was imprisoned for three years, then put under house arrest until his death and was buried in his own home so as to prevent a political furore. In 2013, the U.S. government formally acknowledged the U.S. role in the coup, as a part of its foreign policy initiatives. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_Iranian_coup_d%27%C3%A9tat19 Aug 1967 - Beatles' "All You Need is Love" single goes #1. In a statement to Melody Maker magazine, Brian Epstein, the band's manager, said of "All You Need Is Love": "It was an inspired song and they really wanted to give the world a message. The nice thing about it is that it cannot be misinterpreted. It is a clear message saying that love is everything." Lennon later attributed the song's simple lyrical statements to his liking of slogans and television advertising. He likened the song to a propaganda piece, adding: "I'm a revolutionary artist. My art is dedicated to change." - https://www.stereogum.com/2018942/the-number-ones-the-beatles-all-you-need-is-love/franchises/the-number-ones/19 Aug 2013 – The Dhamara Ghat train accident kills at least 37 people in the Indian state of Bihar. At least 37 people were killed and 24 were injured. The accident triggered a protest by passengers who beat the driver unconscious, attacked staff and torched two coaches of the train. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dhamara_Ghat_train_accidentRemembrances12 Aug 2019 - Danny Cohen, a distinguished computer scientist who helped develop the first digital visual flight simulator for pilot training, early digital voice conferencing and cloud computing. Cohen was a graduate student at Harvard University in the late 1960s when he helped develop the first computerized flight simulation system on a general-use computer. The design re-created aircraft flight and the landscape it travelled above. He was involved in the ARPAnet project and helped develop various fundamental applications for the Internet. Cohen is probably best known for his 1980 paper "On Holy Wars and a Plea for Peace" which adopted the terminology of endianness for computing (a term borrowed from Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels). He died from Parkinson's disease at the age of 81 in Palo Alto, California. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danny_Cohen_(computer_scientist)19 Aug 1662 - Blaise Pascal, French mathematician,physicist, inventor, writer and Catholic theologian. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascal's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum by generalising the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Pascal also wrote in defence of the scientific method. Pascal was an important mathematician, helping create two major new areas of research: he wrote a significant treatise on the subject of projective geometry at the age of 16, and later corresponded with Pierre de Fermat on probability theory, strongly influencing the development of modern economics and social science. Following Galileo Galilei and Torricelli, in 1647, he rebutted Aristotle's followers who insisted that nature abhors a vacuum. Pascal's results caused many disputes before being accepted. He died from stomach cancer at the age of 39 in Paris. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaise_Pascal19 Aug 1822 - Jean Baptiste Joseph Delambre, French mathematician and astronomer. He was also director of the Paris Observatory, and author of well-known books on the history of astronomy like the Histoire de l'astronomie from ancient times to the 18th century. Delambre was one of the first astronomers to derive astronomical equations from analytical formulas, was the author of Delambre's Analogies. He was a knight (chevalier) of the Order of Saint Michael and of the Légion d'honneur. His name is also one of the 72 names inscribed on the Eiffel tower. The crater Delambre on the Moon is named after him. He died at the age of 72 in Paris. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Baptiste_Joseph_Delambre19 Aug 1977 - Groucho Marx, American comedian, writer, stage, film, radio, and television star. A master of quick wit, he is widely considered one of America's greatest comedians. He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life. His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, spectacles, cigar, and a thick greasepaint moustache and eyebrows. These exaggerated features resulted in the creation of one of the most recognizable and ubiquitous novelty disguises, known as Groucho glasses: a one-piece mask consisting of horn-rimmed glasses, a large plastic nose, bushy eyebrows and moustache. He died from pneumonia at the age of 86 at the age of 86 in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles,California. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groucho_Marx19 Aug 1994 - Linus Pauling, American chemist,biochemist,peace activist, author, educator, and husband of American human rights activist Ava Helen Pauling. He published more than 1,200 papers and books, of which about 850 dealt with scientific topics. New Scientist called him one of the 20 greatest scientists of all time, and as of 2000, he was rated the 16th most important scientist in history. Pauling was one of the founders of the fields of quantum chemistry and molecular biology. Pauling also worked on the structures of biological molecules, and showed the importance of the alpha helix and beta sheet in protein secondary structure. His discoveries inspired the work of James Watson,Francis Crick, and Rosalind Franklin on the structure of DNA, which in turn made it possible for geneticists to crack the DNA code of all organisms. In his later years he promoted nuclear disarmament, as well as orthomolecular medicine, megavitamin therapy, and dietary supplements. For his scientific work, Pauling was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1954. For his peace activism, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1962. He is one of four individuals to have won more than one Nobel Prize (the others being Marie Curie,John Bardeen and Frederick Sanger). He died from prostate cancer at the age of 93 in Big Sur, California - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_PaulingFamous birthdays19 Aug 1871 – Orville Wright, one half of the Wright Brothers who were two American aviation pioneers generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft with the Wright Flyer on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05, the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft, the Wright Flyer III. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible. The brothers' breakthrough was their creation of a three-axis control system, which enabled the pilot to steer the aircraft effectively and to maintain its equilibrium. This method remains standard on fixed-wing aircraft of all kinds. He was born in Dayton, Ohio - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright_brothers19 Aug 1921 – Gene Roddenberry, American television screenwriter,producer and creator of the original Star Trek television series, and its first spin-off The Next Generation. Roddenberry flew 89 combat missions in the Army Air Forces during World War II, and worked as a commercial pilot after the war. Later, he followed in his father's footsteps and joined the Los Angeles Police Department, where he also began to write scripts for television. As a freelance writer, Roddenberry wrote scripts for Highway Patrol, Have Gun–Will Travel, and other series, before creating and producing his own television series The Lieutenant. In 1964, Roddenberry created Star Trek, which premiered in 1966 and ran for three seasons before being cancelled. He then worked on other projects, including a string of failed television pilots. The syndication of Star Trek led to its growing popularity; this, in turn, resulted in the Star Trek feature films, on which Roddenberry continued to produce and consult. In 1985, he became the first TV writer with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and he was later inducted by both the Science Fiction Hall of Fame and the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame. Years after his death, Roddenberry was one of the first humans to have his ashes carried into earth orbit. The popularity of the Star Trek universe and films has inspired films, books, comic books, video games, and fan films set in the Star Trek universe. He was born in El Paso, Texas. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_Roddenberry19 Aug 1944 – Charles Wang, American businessman and philanthropist who was a co-founder and CEO of Computer Associates International, Inc. (later renamed to CA Technologies). Wang grew Computer Associates into one of the country's largest software vendors. Wang authored two books to help executives master technology: Techno Vision and Techno Vision II. He was a minority owner (and past majority owner) of the NHL's New York Islanders ice hockey team and their AHL affiliate, an investor in numerous businesses, and benefactor to charities including Smile Train, the World Childhood Foundation, the Islanders Children's Foundation and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, among others. He was born in Shanghai. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Wang19 Aug 1967 - Satya Nadella, engineer and Indian American business executive. He currently serves as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Microsoft, succeeding Steve Ballmer in 2014. He led a giant round of layoffs and flattened the organization (getting rid of middle managers). Before becoming chief executive, he was the Executive Vice President of Microsoft's Cloud and Enterprise Group, responsible for building and running the company's computing platforms. His tenure has emphasized openness to working with companies and technologies with which Microsoft also competes, including Apple Inc.,IBM and Dropbox. Under Nadella Microsoft revised its mission statement to "empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more". In comparison to founder Bill Gates's "a PC on every desk and in every home, running Microsoft software", Nadella says that it is an enduring mission, rather than a temporal goal. His key goal has been transforming Microsoft’s corporate culture into one that values continual learning and growth. Nadella's leadership of Microsoft included a series of high-profile acquisitions of other companies, to redirect Microsoft's focus. His first major acquisition was of Mojang, a Swedish game company best known for the popular freeform computer building game Minecraft, in late 2014, for $2.5 billion. He followed that by purchasing Xamarin and LinkedIn in 2016, then GitHub in 2018. He was born Hyderabad, Telangana. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satya_NadellaEvents of interest19 Aug 1887 - Dmitri Mendeleev makes a solo ascent by balloon to an altitude of 11,500 feet (3.5 km) above Klin, Russia to observe an eclipse. - https://www.wired.com/2009/08/dayintech-0819/19 Aug 1940 – First flight of the B-25 Mitchell medium bomber. Named in honor of Major General William "Billy" Mitchell, a pioneer of U.S. military aviation. Used by many Allied air forces, the B-25 served in every theatre of World War II, and after the war ended, many remained in service, operating across four decades. Produced in numerous variants, nearly 10,000 B-25s were built. These included a few limited models such as the F-10 reconnaissance aircraft, the AT-24 crew trainers, and the United States Marine Corps' PBJ-1 patrol bomber. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_B-25_Mitchell19 Aug 1964 – Syncom 3, the first geostationary communication satellite, was launched. The satellite, in orbit near the International Date Line, had the addition of a wideband channel for television and was used to telecast the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo to the United States. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SyncomIntroArtist – Goblins from MarsSong Title – Super Mario - Overworld Theme (GFM Trap Remix)Song Link - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GNMe6kF0j0&index=4&list=PLHmTsVREU3Ar1AJWkimkl6Pux3R5PB-QJFollow us onFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/NerdsAmalgamated/Twitter - https://twitter.com/NAmalgamatedSpotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6Nux69rftdBeeEXwD8GXrSiTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/top-shelf-nerds/id1347661094RSS - http://www.thatsnotcanonproductions.com/topshelfnerdspodcast?format=rssGeneral EnquiriesEmail - Nerds.Amalgamated@gmail.com

tv kids los angeles power australia australian china california ceo american america interactive indian dj world war ii game thrones netflix french love north america mars star trek fame west climate change moon academy texas professor disney iran games pascal dungeons and dragons peace ghosts anime tokyo internet shanghai united states russia climate cia sony wright north carolina wright brothers eiffel salem princesses ohio national center appleseed palo alto swedish microsoft dragons dna pierre shah andover nerds chemistry court buck game of thrones harvard university semisonic catholic missing groucho mi6 executive vice president dropbox she ra hordak tv series minecraft carbon honestly aristotle ghost in the shell he man nobel prize roddenberry pc oxygen comets o2 allied total recall marie curie named histoire bill gates province coup co2 plea nymphomaniac el paso summer olympics nobel peace prize hall of fame skeletor ahl parkinson github rouen wang ibm danvers television arts lieutenant avatar the last airbender groucho marx you bet your life have gun will travel next generation ascap gene roddenberry ipswich big sur iranians acorn tv hollywood walk los angeles police department new scientist marx brothers smile train mojang dayz apple inc torricelli kitty hawk melody maker hyderabad delambre telangana brian epstein fermat bihar science fiction hall international date line drake work saint michael teen titans tv klin chief executive officer ceo highway patrol james watson arpanet pauling steve ballmer wright flyer xamarin ca technologies blaise pascal computer associates orville wright satya nadella cedars sinai medical center terminer nadella danny cohen enterprise group amalgamated exploited children r18 indian americans salem village rosalind franklin charles wang warner chappell giles corey nightwolf salem town army air force linus pauling francis crick massachusetts bay microsoft's cloud greyskull dmitri mendeleev oyer ava helen pauling latinautor
Pathways to Well-Being
Terry Wahls, MD, On Being a Physician, Provocateur, and Patient

Pathways to Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2019 25:24


In this interview, IFM's co-founder Jeffrey Bland, PhD, interviews the 2018 Linus Pauling award winner, Terry Wahls, MD. Dr. Wahls received this award for her work as a physician, researcher, teacher, and patient advocate. Her health journey led to the publication of her pioneering research in neurological disorders, and it serves as a beacon of inspiration to the Functional Medicine movement and community as a whole. “I am profoundly grateful to Functional Medicine, which has transformed me as a person, as a physician, and as a researcher,” says Dr. Wahls. For more info on Terry Wahls: https://www.ifm.org/about/profile/terry-wahls/ For more info on Jeffrey Bland: https://www.ifm.org/about/profile/jeffrey-bland/

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#3.10: Gal eller genial? Nobelprisens forbandelse (DA)

Spækbrættet

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2019 65:21


Det er ingen let sag at være verdens klogeste mennesker. Faktisk er det så svært, at det er alment kendt at Nobelprismodtagere bliver så ramte af deres belønning at de bliver vanvittige af dem! I dag snakker vi om Nobel-sygdommen! Flemming forklarer, hvad sygdommen er og Mark har Linus Pauling med som eksempel. Den eneste person i verden til at vinde to udelte nobelpriser. Og så var han tosset som den gamle kone på gården nede for enden af vejen.Køb vores merch! bit.ly/spækshopGiv os fem stjerner på iTunes! bit.ly/spækitunesSend os water hilarious science eller stil et spørgsmål på facebook, twitter eller spaekbraettet@gmail.comKilder: https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Nobel_diseasehttps://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/pauling.html - Stephen Barrett, M.D.A.K. Geim & H.A.M.S ter Tisha (2001) Detection of earth rotation with a diamagnetically levitating gyroscopeSupport the show (https://spaekbraettet.10er.app/)

Gut Check Project
Bryan Bradford, CN, Sunflower Shoppe, Host of "The Healthy Approach" Podcast

Gut Check Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2019 117:31


Bryan Bradford is a certified health coach and nutritionist. He is also an owner of the Sunflower Shoppe. Sunflower Shoppe is a long tested pioneer of healthy grocery and supplement stores located in Tarrant County (Fort Worth) Texas. A US Army and Gulf War veteran, Bryan found inspiration to serve his fellow citizens by helping his family business become a stronger resource for health. Bryan joins the GCP to discuss the process of vetting quality products, the importance of certifications and COAs, the dangers of misinformation, bad labels and chemicals.The Sunflower Shoppe serves Tarrant and surrounding counties by having well trained staff, fully screened high quality products, and frequent open forum lectures to educate all of heir customers.https://sunflowershoppe.comhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-healthy-approach/id1444435104https://lovemytummy.com/spoonyhttps://gutcheckproject.comhttps://kbmdhealth.comAnd now an ad from dad save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive what is this where did you get this I'm talking to you with the hair yeah where did you get this good stuff so that's another nearly solid stuff progressive can't save you from becoming your parents but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto progress casually intrinsically affiliates and other insurers discuss not available in all stricter situations all right it is August 1, 2019 this is episode 19 the gap check project with your host Dr. Ken Brown I'm Eric Greer what's up can August 1 August 1 does it give a final become summer here in Texas because it's been really mild it's amazing we haven't I don't think it officially which I think official temp records in our area By DFW airport I don't think they've officially recorded 100° day in all July which is amazing if you're not from Texas that does not happen often I was listening to a Jim Gaffigan set on the way over here we talked about living in the Midwest spring just it sometimes it did vanish like louts it's April it's 30° the next days like 90 music well there was spring on every thrill hot pocket juggling hey so it is it is August 1 and for all of the several hundred of you that wrote in to let us know that you have liked and shared get your project back to the month of July for the contest for the signature package from Dr. Brown being a month supply about trying to heal and keeping the CBD thank you thank you thank you so much for the help the growth the the spreading of the word all of the winners will receive an email by the end of this week we were advised not to read off your names here because we need to have your permission which kinda stinks but I really didn't think that that's being new to to podcast and that's why we have a producer to make sure that we don't step on her on her feet that way Ron is like now you gotta get that kind of in writing so you will be notified the good thing is is after all of the success of the present especially in the art inside we don't have five winners of six winners six winter so it's awesome that's over $600 worth of giveaways right there that you make available to everybody so thank you again to everyone we will have more contests and more chance to share more opportunities and incentives on the good stuff coming forward but what a great way to to roll into the summer so absolutely so you have is our guest today guest today is the great Brian Bradford from sunflower shop and some flower shop if you don't know you live here nor Texas you are missing out basically they are they are the pioneers especially here in Tarrant County so it started to bleed by his grandmother run by his father down in Fort Worth they've expanded now they get a gigantic store appear in Colleyville right off of the 121 and you've given to records – on a super impressed is super smart guys certified health Coach got his own podcast called the healthy approach former military veteran really knowledgeable and I've given two lectures at his store with great turnout like standing remotely like people really enjoy going to stores and hanging out little lecture I does the first time that I've had a differing age population right and you know we always hand out cards to see how people react to its first time I got like didn't understand a word like oh I need to remember not talking to healthcare professionals all the bad I want to like redo it for her to drag her house and be like when he does redo this or catch maybe a little science as well but was also pretty funny and some of those responses were great lecture and they circled one so they just backwards on the net on the numeric scale which I thought was funny that all the time whatever doing those online, root reviews through Keith world somebody will sit there and say you amazing that it save my life and the one you calm up joke hey kid you change that formula, ruining the curve yeah it's not first place any five stars is that's funny stuff well out Brian in his store there was so much more than store which is why were having him here they their pioneer in the community what does it mean to choose healthy foods to have supplements that mean something to have someone guide you to something that it's going to actually benefit you that's why they have such a good turnout whenever you went there to get those lectures these people the customers and the clients that they have their date they don't shop there just because it's convenient place to go to they go there because he getting information on how to live better yeah I can't wait to bring about article with him also trying to was NSF certified I do and the polyphenols have been shown to augment athletic performance correct by increasing nitric oxide an article just came out that's Asada warned athletes about rise in ligand role use so the Australian sports anti-doping Authority warned athletes less than a year ago the ligand role was appearing regularly in random supplements so people are putting this in ligand role is a storm a storm is a selective androgen receptor modulator it's a class of compounds that have very similar products or similar properties to anabolic agents have less androgenic properties and so athletes were using this started in the bodybuilding world and now it's ending up in all these supplements and people to realize it so you have these pro athletes that are being stripped of their titles and stuff like for instance Joaquin Noah tested positive for was suspended for 20 games the best ballplayer emits mixed martial arts athletes that have been find money and had to sit out for six months or so and they swear that they were taking it on purpose and it just shows I can't wait to talk to him about how he vets the different products ago in his in his store and how many NSF certified products he has and so on so because that is exactly why we go to the trouble doing NSF I think really be going to what's the nutrition oh were going to fencing and that that is at the house but on my dates incredibly that is the last week of October or the lastregardless it's a gigantic nutrition conference for our registered dietitians coming there they're basically the front line of how we are reaching so many people 100% not sure that Brian will talk little bit about that because I pretty sure they have registered dietitians startled yeah I know that he is a clinical health coach and not Kunkel nutritionist himself so so this is why it's so important that when you have a product that you can not only to help with bloating not only do we help with the note G.I. distress different things like that bacterial overgrowth SEBO but you know we can show that it's NSF certified you knew the polyphenols as a benefit for your athletic performance yet that is so important to somebody who's a nutritionist dealing with clients could be athletes college athletes Olympic athletes professional athletes even right now Lucas is up in Kalamazoo and he's playing at high level you start applying IETF's and they have banned substances that are actually listed there so just that it happens even a really early age so NSF certified optional until go to love my Tommy.com/spoony SP 00 NY and you get a really big discount on this in a minute challenge everybody to commit to do this because we want to get a little bit of a pusher and make sure that we start promoting the NSF certification the polyphenols and the overall digestive relief on your safety and your confidence is critically important you start whenever we started the company you made no bones about you want to make certain that you had a product that worked to make sure that she had a product was healthy it featured polyphenols but at the same time he didn't want cost to be an issue you wanted to be in excess or I'm sorry a barrier to accessing you also didn't want anybody to not be confident what they were choosing was it safe that's funny because eventually have to write a book about the whole process because like when I look back there are some really funny moments like for instance when we were trying to figure out how to get the we knew that Cabral chose you to be our main ingredient type so we contacted a company that we now work with regularly in the fantastic company but I got some terrazzo in the because I'm worried about everything so I better make sure that this is exactly exactly what it is so I called around if you want to hear something funny stay tuned so I called around and asking labs and the like now as it turns out there's only really one major deconstruction lab it's in Kansas I got hold of the owner and I was like hey I need you to freeze I was like no problem send me some of the bar can all do it I would send you some of the bark is a gas chromatograph on if we get one major spike reducing that's that but I can only do that to a comparison just you watch way too much CSI several white bags that tell us what that is but he comes back it is just like out goes actually we have to compare to get something no gas chromatograph it's it's a fingerprint of the molecule right and we did that episode on food pairing to remember that all yeah that was a gas chromatograph you look at different foods with similar gas chromatograph's and the aromas augment each other and as a way to do food pairing we do that we shut Patrick early on but this is this is an example so I send it to them and I'm like I got a flat on Argentina get some tree bark just go to chop it off and send it so that we went through a lot of trouble to make sure that it was everything was pure but I was the funniest thing you watch too much CSI well and and then beyond that whenever you and Brandy or step in interest to try it out because every single thing you've ever turned out the all of always put yourself through the test first and we learned that through without even knowing that but we learned that through Dr. Dryden right out of Kentucky he's a fantastic guesser neurologist full bird colonel I believe he's an obscure himself and we got to talking that there is a Helsinki rule that if the researcher is willing to do it to himself and it's not questionable or anything then essentially you're saying no I believe this is safe and here's my data with that so yeah everything that we've done it's always been on me and Brandy first so so did you have a brainy phone call one time we were at the time this two different types Toronto Roger Blanco and abrazo Colorado which one is in 20 oh Colorado so the blanket was much easier want to get that act as a molecule in the cold your Hindi which can be a stimulant and it's been reported to have different effects including improved sexual function and things like that but that's one that nobody can find in fact that was well when I did Melanie Avalon's intermittent fasting podcast is check that out right the first one I did it twice with over the first one I found her in website that she tried to make out trying to at home and it did work and work and we actually had a long discussion as well it's because it's a totally different type of molecules because it says Toronto doesn't mean that it's it's this dongle easy to get Colorado not not and so we got the Blanco we will try to dose it out what what we thought it would be to state that Brady had to go to a meeting and I dumped the rest on the sink night and then one of the employees came back say the sink stopped up like what I realize that did say it'll just congeal in water and I went so I called up I'm suggest our children water coke out of the once you have a bowel obstruction to have explained that but virtually nothing happened but I member when we first launched also so we called up with some abdominal pain and I worried I mean I took a bunch so I just ate a whole bottle just make sure wouldn't cause like an obstruction or anything patient call back on fine and hassle – it's going well I got time 60 capsules sit in my stomach let's see what happens you like a Kobayashi of the eating contest but that being said we did understand this is it that reckless we do understand the science of this the cool thing about these polyphenols is that they are poorly absorbed so they stay primarily in the small intestine and there have been studies that have shown that the blood levels are essentially negligible but then when they try and find it imprudent find less than 1% of the original molecule which means it's doing exactly what we needed to do goes through goes to the colon where your bacteria break it down into all these beneficial molecules like euro with and things like that which help with overall my coffee G cell turnover carrying a very antiaging then your Litton is if you done any research and you really try to figure out molecularly what you should be interested in your lesson should be of a good trigger word I think over time it's can be more ubiquitous or more prevalent as people begin to talk about what you can do to be as someone is actively antiaging I totally agree the only thing we were talking about this people become O'Brien the only thing that I don't like is that when this research happens everybody's trying to find their angle and so when Morgana was in town talking about this she's a PhD that we work with he we got to talk about the different metabolites in how people try to figure out how to make these metabolites and turn them into drugs or turn them into a new supplement and it just doesn't work that way mother nature knows how to do it just can't completely manipulated like that now you mother nature works in its whole form I made it we've seen that time and time again we we reference that with that even even marketed drugs that are trying to compete with over-the-counter supplements specifically melatonin we go back to the days of Rozerem when they tried to isolate and make this basically Roseann was post to be a super melatonin that was going to be 14 times the binding affinity of of endogenous or regular melatonin turns out it didn't do much anything you just separated a lot of bills that your wallet didn't sleep anymore it's me that's a bit that's frustrating to see this when we have a lot most pharmaceutical start from a plant-based something she made a Mormon weldment form and the agent Jacoby reductase inhibitors the cholesterol medications aspirin and most of them start or what GW is trying to do now with spinning down that CBD specifically doesn't work nearly as well they can charge you how much do we hear that someone is being charged I don't know exactly but it is tens of thousands is what I was told because it's such a rare orphan goes in orphan drug status duvet syndrome and Lenox Gestalt which is unfortunately a severe form of epilepsy in children small gripe and happened to notice that I didn't read this before did you know okay so upfront for those you who may not know whenever you have something it is prescriptive that may have addictive traits then the FDA technically awarded what they call a scheduled class and schedule class I they basically say highly addictive but has no medicinal purpose there's a handful of things that fall in their people usually a default say heroin etc. and you got to which is most of your potent opioid stent nail cocaine etc. have some medicinal use but could be highly abused or had abuse potential as always down to schedule control five I saw on the label for GW's new release that they have a C5 on there which it really hates schedule it's not addicted it's the most ridiculous FDA's allowed to call schedule five which is like drinking water right and then they had all that coming due or just talking six months ago were people being arrested and saying you can't do this it's addictive in all kinds are so much misinformation out there about CBD is think about that they're trying to trying to pair this this connotation it that there's a little bit of fear and if you understand scheduled medications are trying to say that there is an element of addiction associated with and I spun down CBD isolate its insane it is so now now they are there quite worried about anybody even coming close to pairing up a disease claim with the with CVD and this is from the same institution which has allowed the food products that you eat to be sprayed with with Roundup doesn't it does not there's just so there's so many things were heading and a lot of wrong directions which is why we like having just like Brian on we can talk about how shop like some Photoshop can really help out guide you in your food choices guide your supplement choices I mean just look at CB dealing one of the reasons why we teamed up KPMG health CBD we got that certificate of analysis we really want to make sure that you get what you're doing so CBD my wife she owns a wellness studio called body body balance wellness and its indicator and she has all kinds of different people to come to ask questions and she gets asked about CBD also just yesterday she came across an article where yet another celebrities endorsing the use of it so this is it coming for mazes and coming from my Dr. Brown but Michael J Fox is apparently become part of one of the CBD companies and specifically because of the effect that CBD is having the positive effect it's having on his Parkinson's which I found interesting but not surprising knowing how we think that the Indo cannabinoid system strikes a balance between our nervous and immune systems it does make sense knowing the Parkinson's has some elements of inflammation and a course you have the uncontrolled twitches and whatnot would ask which of course would be the your neurologic complex of our bodies, running out of control he's found some elements of improvement in his life by making CBD a daily part of it so basically treating CBD for him and in his words is a micronutrient oh really isn't what I was really really yeah me last week show we did brief we covered three articles but one of the articles we did cover was on the micro biome affects people with Lou Gehrig's disease and how the micro biome has anti-inflammatory markers which which does this order talk a little bit later about how complex these and a cannabinoid system really is and how a lot of things can be affected but that makes total sense and I want to see at some point that were having CBD catered to in you right have ready so scared to say diseases but CBD catered to something with a different terpene compound turbines are the essential oils in it or different flava noise component because we considered okay what are you looking for this for what I have I have a neurologic process I got MS I've got Parkinson's like the circuit we need something to cross the blood brain barrier more so let's try this particular one with a higher content that's right think the sciences had yeah and it's it's put the cart for the horse because you can't make your disease claims or if you like that but at least we can sit there and go okay this makes sense why that's actually happening you know if I was in Norway we can pull that off you what I'm say was that debt Texas oh yeah so today I learned on Reddit sounds good yeah that Norway people use the term Texas as slaying for crazy it doesn't hurt a person but a chaotic atmosphere or state of mind so saying a party was totally crazy in Norwegian would be debts of our help Texas which literally means it was Texas and I'm looking at the comments of those people from Norway going up we do say that is awesome I I think it is also the green to that point it would be that would be pretty pretty amazing what you know what Holly what what movie was that I think it was Independence Day when the aliens were coming down and they showed how different people were panicked but they paint over to Los Angeles and they were all going crazy and welcoming the aliens I could wait to be abducted it's almost like if you want to join us have like a weird connotation Los Angeles is kind of said yeah that's that you could say it's it's only Los Angeles or Texas is now apparently just wild crazy and wild about Israel so I'm not sure helping the families we have in no way right now but the now that forgot his name but my dancing partner when we are rude to the bathwater 000 she's Norwegian yes yes it is pretty nasty yeah he took control of the as a live band and had them play what he wanted them to play those Norwegians there so Texan yeah and I he was he was great he's hilarious so we now with Brian coming on here in our next half-hour old and have a good 90 minutes this guy this guy's got incredible experience long before he decided to get into running the DSM flower shop which he has your which we referenced in locations in Fort Worth often can't buoy your location appear in Colleyville and got another one it's a smaller version over on heritage trace the cool thing that I liked about it is as they've grown they just simply found that people looking for a local answer that has real guidance to get people into the store so what what you think it takes for a community that may be somewhat isolated to began to find out that they may have better access to this type of nutrition and where they don't to turn to just the Internet over the Internet away because if you look at like the span of where a lot of the healthy shots are its economy migrates from the west and Canada tapers down almost a a diagonal line into Texas and as you go to the southeast until you hit some some populate your supply. Parts of Florida you really don't see you don't see a lot of sunflower shops and stuff like that why is I've never really thought about him for when I imagine the West yes because that becomes her but Texas is really embracing it right now sure and a lot of people they want to go to their doctor and they want to talk nutrition and the doctor is busy doesn't have time doesn't maybe doesn't know a lot I freely admit that I'm continually learning more and more about nutrition little account locale even just think in your life how you changed your thought about what the importance of food is any outside of of medical school the growing up in Nebraska me going up in Texas at first I read anything much about us came home and ate and I have a lecture change my pocket I go to the convenience store and buy something but it's not like that it all for me anymore and then nowadays when we think of you'll you'll hear okay this year so-and-so is released the most obese states of the most obese cities are the least healthy whatever unfortunately this statement immediately comes to mind is first Mississippi or something like that and then it is quickly followed by Alabama Louisiana is a great topic to go over with Brian is a social economic is an education thing is it possible to eat healthy on a budget is it possible to to do all these things the highly processed foods that mean we talked about this all the time I think Netflix just has a new thing called fat something I'm seeing it and I'm assuming that either I was scrolling around with Carla try forgot something to watch and it does get into the fact that 30 years Gordon 1970 I think there's a 1.5 million Americans with diabetes I would like 30 million only some crazy jump that just happened under our noses and we didn't even notice it so that is really a lot to talk about the Bronx on policy bills I don't see the business side to see him as a healthcare provider how do we merge the two where would you go with it it's really really cool that's an unacceptable level and rate of growth is just not enough time for many people to have her since we said Carlsbad I'm sorry fat bad maple starter really double down on the carbs and you know the ass oil started taking place watch watch less which episode I really appreciate all the emails about Amsoil where you can guided some of those comments are pretty pretty funny white liquid and be back in just a moment with Brian Bradford of sunflower shop and that of course the healthy approach podcast we will see you here in just a expenses blue yellow pills to charge your sex life are you thinking about what we can promise you the same results for three paying $20 a pair for the other path you're getting taken to the cleaners same results for less than three dollars and $16 account for the same results right now for blue or yellow pills 23 and keeping more than hundred dollars our pharmacy prices right now your 40 4 PM and qualify for free setting over pain, right 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of course you are now the host of your I guess somewhat recently launched the healthy approach podcast have a healthy approach but because we distorted that your recently to sober try to get kick started to get into this environment this much you guys are that is awesome I know that when can I were talking last half-hour about whenever he came to do the two lectures up at some flower shop now a course your shop is necessary close to him because he's on the other side of the Metroplex right off shop there for years I was not surprised to turn out the first think and said it was that was amazing the engagement was real direct the room yeah well I think that is what's really cool so you actually have on the second floor a full lecture room old 80% 80 people comfortable 80 people I was just shocked both times I went completely packed and I what I like is the sense of community how a lot of people make this the regular outing they want to learn and you you help them learn and you were asking last half-hour how do we go about getting people to become healthier will it all everything comes on education but it does and that's what we pride yourself and as stump our shop is really trying to give people all the education and let people know who's in their backyard having a lot of people don't notice people like yourself who are open-minded to both medical and alternative nutrition and that's huge because people are seeking this information and people like you got Brown coming in and doing your speaking engagement such a blessing for a lot of people both certainly an honor in your you get out the community and you get to hear little bit what people are saying and after the Q&A is so long because people are questioning oh boy yeah and do that and then you start realizing oh my gosh there's some there's a little mismanagement going on out there know my doctor wanted you X, Y, and Z them like why we try to quit doing that in the 70s that's weird yeah it's about keeping up with the research and I know you're someone is a pioneer in that well the one thing that I'm like very open to I watched a Kimber what podcast it was a Freakonomics Freakonomics podcast had a whole episode on medical reversals and you realize I fully expect that what I'm doing today should be somewhat tweaked and could be a little wrong and may be misinformed just like retirement when white low-fat hi card we became sicker that's right and that was that will spread like crazy you know where people do this I was there is a podcast a listen to this morning holds all bones and it's the doctor that that kinda talks about medical misinformation possibly in her husband it's kind of funny and they were talking about alkaline water about how people want to drink alkaline water and she would just go back over the science of it they do a whole episode on medical reversals also and it's not necessarily that your doctor doesn't know what's going on because most of the time the doctors figured it out for instance when Eric was a drug rep for Xenical when they said that you could block fat and lose weight it didn't take long for the medical community to learn something yes they were introduced to add soil so as it turns out he created a lot of in a leakage of oil could you can digest your fats and yeah the warning was to wear white pants with that right warning on the bus that was at that was the corporate response type hands you're not sick it's completely natural that we can all just realize were losing weight is it's only then he is really only 20 years ago I mean that Danielle Ally still would like still out there as far as I know has everyone Walt Walmart had pallets about stuff like crazy has a fat blocker and that's not that's not the source of your problem it's it's it's it's it's unfortunate I did that start out with potato chips or something this night it did when Xenical was like will board this is not going to around let's just sell the which is still being treated so that both Frito-Lay and all the big giant companies they got it they called olestra olestra and everything in San Antonio was in medical school and a DJ on the edge I was driving and he was like Joe not eat these Doritos is horrified euro detailed graphic incidents about how it just he had no control the student realize was happening and is through upward summary stories about that yet people just started with potato chips on their people come in and say hey these things really upset me big time you know I need something else my bowels back in order again crazy what's crazy how fast they pass the buck to because it did start start off is the generic name orlistat and then they just barely tweak the name and called it olestra and move it into large consumables we just want warm at all now that is going down a surprise attack what you know with some flower shop I find it to be an incredibly awesome store and it was refreshing to me when I first did I discovered I was doing we had Dr. J. Anna was doing anesthesia with him that get here Bedford and then I drove along I saw some flower shop looks like a place I like to go to so did you think it was a floral shop though the very first time I didn't honestly I didn't really know I think this is right when the iPhone pretty much had made its way to me and I was googling a place to find a healthy snack and I was it down in Bedford and it came up with some flour shot you can with some flower shop and when I just sawed off in the distance a light I guess at that I'm headed now it's right but a course I yell or not that far from ignorant traditional big chain grocery storages setback behind you so I walked in and immediately I could say okay this place is different and and there's a reason why it exists and it's a lot because of what you talked about with the change in fat content and how people moved over eating different foods it forced people to have to find a different answer and so your grandmother and your dad started this several years ago in 1970 there was a reason they that long ago get into something like this and that is the aspect that it was considered broody right hours herbs and supplements go but no my grandmother started because her sister was dying of leukemia and just all the horror of course you know what treatments were like back in the 60s for the top of this you know Jesus was looking for better ways and she came across some of the pioneers like Adele Davis and Linus Pauling and so forth and said hey baby or something to this we need investigative mordant so that's really what she sold her moving company with that a moving company at the time sold but gamble everything on a subpar shop now why the name I can't tell you why the name all we know is that you love some flowers so is probably where it started out there but that's really work began in 1970 in Wedgewood Texas you know in Fort Worth area and then it grew to now where were at three locations three generations later my brother and two sisters now run the all three locations man it's in its awesome is something one of the things he jumped at me right away when I very first went in there so it was it was probably not inoculation into a store the sky like that and where you go to a big chain they have to identify if they identify the foods that are there okay and or and or non-GMO and rare we don't have to worry about that because everything and there's been vetted they're not going to put a crappy product in the store so first like the wonders of Abel that's okay this fits what I'm after so what what you think led her to decide you know what I don't like what's offered everywhere else and not only my going to open up my own I'm probably gonna carry a lot of things it really is not comfortable with or doesn't know how a lot about how did she decide and then you fallen your dad fall into the idea I like educating people want to know about the selection comes out that's where it really started was really based all centered around education okay no course we didn't know was much we do down today but it started with the education of just saying hey let's learn more about the body and how you know certain plants and herbs can interact with body the best we do back in the 70s is where she started but she wanted everything is clean as possible she didn't want anything to do with chemicals and in anything that's foreign to the body and spirit that way she was really want to keep things clean as possible now today health is relative to the person she notes that we got something with it for everybody what's good for one doesn't mean it's good for the next person and that's where what we pride herself and in consumer like yourself walks into the store we ask a bunch of questions we want to know little bit who you are where you're coming from what your mission goals are and so were gonna do our best to try to isolate you know even though we may have 20 different vitamin C's on the shelf which one is best for you everybody's a little different for each reason summary very first launched trying to heal and we were talking about where all that we wanted to take it just ideas how do we how do we let people here know I gained a whole new respect or what it takes to get into a repeatable store because we talked about trying to let some flower shop on the first longitude and yellow light well we need to see why you think it works what's the story behind it we had to submit all of our ingredients yell called back ask questions the exchanged information that way it was an easy and it was worth it so basically it filtered it keeps out the noise and it put innocently woke on this we think so but puts in the solid product that's available to your well beyond customers or clients well it's a reputation you know we we want make sure that when you're pick up a product simpler shot but it's a good quality product to the best that we can bet it yeah that's that keyword that because that's what ends up happening with that these big box when we we always reference the Wall Street Journal article that described how when they did DNA analysis then we show that 70 over 70% of the products that I have what was on the label a new study just came out on melatonin were the range from nothing to 500% of what was on the label and so it's still happening all the time all the thing it is it's all the time and here we get hit which all these companies are always want to come into the store and it's like you said it becomes low noise and you gotta be old have some kind of system to filter that down and figure out what what in the product is a good for you no good for you it's got her chip is attested for heavy metals in bold pollutants and all the toxins we get to know those things it's important to try to get the best quality product to the consumer and that's I mean what were talking about that I did want to hit on something so when somebody maybe doesn't have the will to say really air water like a really expensive so were an arrow on in LA ditto like celebrities like to go there and it's note similar to what you have but I think it's probably little pricier jurisdiction only mild horse so how do you that like this put this much work into it and still make it affordable so the people become in our system we got some great people the store really do know exactly what to look for what to ask for the questions that we need to know from manufacturers now on my side of things all even fly out to the manufacturing plants I want to see what whether sources are coming from how the processing is much as we can make sure that the bathtub is clean going to make sure the colloquy was possible Eric always there always places drugs and put one of my patients asleep that he just made that propofol this morning's bathtub the flash works real good you don't know you boys your insurance is bad little humor takes away the head to bad food helps everybody but it is it is it really boils down to the best quality get good there's a lot of junk out there there isn't special I know you're big on the CBD side I mean look how many CBD companies are just popping up left and right we get stores popping up all around us you know how are they now they really betting what their carrion and make sure it's good quality product is an unfortunate since this is just the just another thing that just cannot come in around in it we just have to do a lot of educated speaking of educating Brian whatever we do the show I was trying pull an article and now that you brought up CBD limits I about this article that is really interesting because it it hits home with me so dear have anybody comes and complains of the belly issues got issues that is not complaining about soil probably about 3040 times a day so in the this just got published in the Journal of pharmacologic sciences this looks at the role notes can be a really fancy title all eventually get to the point where it's like this is really what this means but it's exciting for me because it's in my world the role of cannabinoid signaling in the brain over Rex and grown induced visceral anti-nociception in rats fancy title basically what what's going on here is that if anybody's ever had abdominal discomfort you been labeled with irritable bowel syndrome then you know that you have what's called visceral hypersensitivity meaning what they have shown is that when people have got issues like bacterial overgrowth see Bo IBS irritable bowel syndrome that they can inflate a balloon in a normal person and this is been proven in humans and animals that one person at the same when one person like yeah there's a balloon in my rectum I can feel it at the other persons come off the table in pain because the direct correlation of the brought date of the gut brain access actually get that person to feel the pain more we call that visceral hypersensitivity so what they're looking at here is that these guys were looking at two hormones correction which is a fasting hormone and sodas hypo cretin to neuropeptide regulates arousal wakefulness and appetite Eric and I were doing a five day fast one time and basically I made my whole company do it in almost all of us like middle the night on day four day three I don't remember what it was but we were all up just run around wired wired yeah and that the old Rex and is this neuronal peptide which is kicking in man and it's because if you go a certain period of time an evolutionary standpoint it's time to go until something in feed go feed the village that's right and so this all wrecks and does that and what it also does which I was unaware of in this is it actually decreases your abdominal perception of pain very fascinating to me and then growling is the hunger hormone we always badmouth it but it actually also decreases the perception of abdominal pain as well so they were citing prior studies with this where this was new to me but we've got these two direction and grown which do this so now it's well known that CBD cannabidiol has been shown to also help with bowel hypersensitivity and it was I don't my practice as he does benefit all the time I put everybody on trying to in CBD and we just get overall benefit for whatever is going on does your belly feel that yes it does what we've always kind of thought will maybe it was an interaction with the receptor CD1 receptor is in anticholinergic the end of cannabinoid system is so complex would really, learning that attract what this article did is it really it was really cool it theorized that CBD had a direct effect on erection and growl and so they set up an animal an animal model to try and prove what they did is they took various rats and they had these pain perception techniques which were too cruel but not very nice either but everything I remember our animal study it's like doesn't sound Nido sound good to know they used a CD one and CD two agonist meaning they were able to give a molecule to turn on CD wanted CD to which are our Endo cannabinoid receptors then they used synthetic correction and growling to actually kick those out finally they had CB one CB two erection and relevant antagonists or blockers so what they did is they could turn your enter cannabinoid system on that you turn it off they could turn on your grill and anorexia and they can turn it off so first what they did is they blocked the CB one receptors and then they gave the hormones of erection and drilling next they gave a CB agonist with no hormones and then third they just gave the CB blocker less ICBM in the undercabinet system blocker and checked central rocks and Negron levels so what I thought is pretty interesting when the end of cannabinoid system of the CB receptors were stimulated this actually induced improved pain perception from colonic stretch so we have a mechanism of action we can't make disease claims but now we've got a study that proves that when you stimulate BCB receptors then they can tolerate more colonic stretch then the hormone effects were severely blunted when the CB receptors were blocked okay so when they gave Grell and Anil Rex and it didn't work unless you have proper CBD levels so basically we can say that that ECC has health is paramount to all Rex and a growl and performing their job absolutely this is the first time it's ever been associated that this would suggest that that the CB receptor CB wanted to be to they can actually mediate the correction induced effects on paint okay we have a mechanism of action that now says oh it's modulating this hormone that helps out a first time somebody's going to this depth what was interesting is growing was also blocked by CB to but not by CB one so it's just really complex okay they go down some rabbit holes I'm trying to really supply this but it is geeky geeky geeky science so what to suggest is that CBD is involved in the hormone benefits of pain relief in the bowel super interesting because many people believe that CB to is in the periphery but there were showing is it's also the brain affecting drilling that is amazing I know it's amazing because we we don't do complex but you don't want to simplify it too much ego this is all that we know so they're saying no there's a lot of CBT receptors in the brain and its regulating other peptides and hormones so this shows a very intricate interplay of the under cannabinoid system and how it can mediate central hormone effects so in layperson terms if you have hypersensitivity got it if you expect if you want these people that when you bloat it hurts really bad because we don't have pain receptors with stretch receptors so if you have bloating due to bacterial overgrowth or irritable bowel syndrome then you may notice an improvement through couple ways you can check the erection up by fasting so that was something else think about Mike that we should do more long fast right or prolonged style fast if you're low on your own endogenous Endo cannabinoids then taking CBD may increase these hormones get you back to balance and finally if you're not in balance than these other complex processes are knocking work as well so just really complex but I thought this was really interesting that I can say oh I have a reason why you feel better and you don't hurt as much when you're taking a good quality city Sony really I think the take away here is nothing in the body is is in a vacuum they long ago you use all connected everything's connect that's right and it's like whenever you take an ad and anti-inflammatory doesn't just go to where you heard it circulates everywhere you just notice that it's helping you or taking away the pain that Harry with the same thing is for the E CSR Indo cannabinoids system it all needs to be healthy and so balanced yeah it's all this really says is you have to have a healthy ECS if you don't want to have too much pain that's not what you're benefiting from you benefit from extra pain so Brian when I deal with doctors and I'm talking them especially traditionally trained doctors guess what neurologists intro medicine will be like how there's no science on Mike there is so much science I will ship every day there's so much but you gotta like knuckle down and read articles like that okay there's no science that says this cures this disease right but there is science it says on a cellular level this is happening which is probably why it might help or may help or could help or whatever term you want to use because unfortunately I think in traditional medicine which is why they go to sunflower shop to get some advice to get some education most of the doctors or just the busy the referring to either what was the last conference I went to which if you're been on its drug rep sponsored to the hilt and they're just kinda being detailed on what the last person can explain to them or their doing things out of habit so a lot of this there's not a lot of time to get really passionate about this one thing I will learn deep into it and then you start realizing I've got I've said this before but anytime you want any articles I've teamed up with a graduate student and we share this Mengele account we can love it me and I got we got over 10,000 downloaded articles I had to laugh because it's like you know I will never get through that now without talking like 1930 that's right I'm up to date stuff. He published all the time and people say unless it makes it to its sensationalized on good morning America or something most people don't ever hear about a lot of this cool stuff I'll call up some of the scientists and elders before that I read their article on like fascinated everywhere you go with it now oh they lost their NIH funding and they had to close the lab or whatever that but yet the research is just amazing and you know some far sharper lease we personally for sure we try to network with a lot of doctors because we know they don't get time to do those things and that's why were always trying say hey send them over here will educate him or not there to try to sell them something is not were not commissioned were not trying to push supplements on you were to try to educate you when the doctors don't have time to do that is like you said it's your busy the busy so it's important to really get as much education can that's what we pride yourself on our whole steps that way yeah it's the you know it's the frustrating thing to see somebody come in with a whole bag of supplements and it's all from Sam you know I worst enemy Dr. Alden Oprah every time they speak about a supplement we get a flood of people that come in the store and 90% of the time we got a tell of this is it for you this is they think it's a one-size-fits-all just because they said it and so it's a love-hate relationship is for sure but we have to really we turn people away more on supplements that are being touted or marketed from certain celebrities especially sure you know because it's not is not for everybody and that's what we want to make sure that was really one of the problems that we run into when we lots are trying to lose it is so different than the mechanism so unique very similar to the amount of knowledge people have a CBD that when we go to like we go to the IFN conference you know there's a lot of really good functional medicine manufacturers but they're just kind of moving around similar ingredients into whatever fancy name you have if you want a white label that's right so one of the big hurdles is to first educate will know this is the problem you have we can fix it because of this this is doing in a completely unique way and then know the answers I Marta I Marty on a probiotic I just spent 20 minutes explaining about it but I have a searcher to think about the early days of auction deal whenever we number the sum of the first marketing material was explaining what type of bloating because people didn't even understand say people several people didn't understand what we meant by this you true bloating and in and being mediated by methane production or whenever people thought that John Teal would cure all constipation we found that when none and it's actually permitting induced constipation it has actually nothing to do with opioid induced constipation so I think even so Dr. Oz had to go in front of Senate committee yeah yeah, taken to taking the task of blood very well they sure did mean it's sometimes they just talk I don't I really don't know how show operates you know how the elbows products get on the shows but well it's I think all of us in this room realize that like if you're a mean just talk about something so anybody is regular and I'm pretty sure I'm not wake up over the night before I sit with my kids on the bottom are then this morning going over articles which was about on the Reddit looking at the euro Denmark: brings Texas you know Dr. Rogers shows up and he's got people just himself in a dry Teleprompter so there poor guy I mean I know it's not like he has the time either to be reviewing all this literature and stuff that's true but you know it that's what sorta gives our industry a bad rap sometimes because now you got 50 people who were never taken are now taken something that they may really not need and that's technical subissues I get it so well so it's an educational issue I know exactly when Oprah or Dr. Oz says something because that'll be the first to be the 10th question I get that degree and I'm like okay Mike you have to watch the summer have to watch these episodes just so I know what that's what we have to do to get by customers in a day in the Nelson were on the watch Dr. Oz at night to figure out what he was saying and why you saying that word that information is coming from that's exactly right yet I am this celebrity status that will bring something that did to the taillight to the forefront and it happens in all industries all details before Michael Jackson had his issue with propofol I didn't have any patients who ever knew what in the world I was talking about but probably what would you say 25% 50% of the people that we have before I put them to sleep for the four procedure they say oh the Michael Jackson sauce every every day and it's not their fault but that's that's the impression that they got inserted that celebrity influence is real well they and it's not just that I mean there they sell advertising all the stuff so they don't just stop at the show me that he's got his magazine's gesture so this is a big massive machine I was talking to Eric before the sergeants I was in the middle of watching this Netflix special boot the big hacker something like that were chasing well it's it's all about how Cambridge America manipulative Facebook does is why Zuckerberg had to go in front of the Senate committee and all that right you just like oh my gosh we are just little ponds me to manipulate us in that so many different ways so many ways that's so true and that's why it really boils down we start our level is that our main goal is gotta be to educate the client you know as much as possible and you in the end of 5 to 30 minutes that we got spent time with them on the floors try to give as much that's really that's really what I want to get into is how the sunflower shop and stores like it because you we are just here in Tarrant County drink with the sunflower shop but we were talking in the last half-hour why is it that tell you he almost see from the West Coast and almost in a diagonal line down to Texas the proliferation of stores similar to yours and then we move over to the East a few states and just don't see them quite as much and it kinda correlates with where we say some of the worst health is found whenever we do no an analysis of which states unfortunates have the highest rates of obesity etc. there's there's a service that you're providing and a couple other industries are providing that are born out of the lack of good information in there trying to find good places to get good products on talk about whenever we get back your Brian I got to where he got what sunflower shop is doing to fill those holes in the community and foreclose out don't forget like and share a gut check project go to get check project.com you will go and connect us there let us know that you have liked and shared in course you can be entered into the next contest don't forget if you want this last month will be emailing you by the end of the week seen on this is the only 24 hour take anywhere platforms dedicated to food and fun clear spoony this hour from Townhall.com, the best way forward on healthcare Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden says it's not the plan being offered by rival Pamela Harris there will your paycheck during last night's debate Harris criticized Biden healthcare blueprint for everyone in America you are in your own people people's access to healthcare in America running for president cover send candidates on the CNN stage last night 10 others debated Tuesday night Heritage foundation's Genevieve Boyd says there's one big issue working against any Democrat hoping to unseat Pres. from Mary Ron when people are feeling good about where they are what variables one. Building background want to be able to deepen their family the son of Osama bin Laden said to have followed in his late father's terrorist footsteps is reportedly dead I'm so bin Laden apparently killed sometime in the past two years one person was killed five others hospitalized following a massive explosion and fire in Lincoln County Kentucky overnight natural gas pipeline blew up a Navy pilot still missing after jet crashed during a training mission yesterday over death Valley search for the pilot continues on Wall Street to shower the Dow is off about 72 points the S&P ahead 11 NASDAQ up 66 more on the stories@townhall.com I never forgotten apparel is more than just a premium women's and men's clothing line it's a movement to remind us to where American-made and serve those who serve us our heroes never forgotten apparel gives 20% of their total sales to nonprofits that support homeless veterans and off-duty firefighters and 50% to individual veterans and firefighters in need nationwide checkout never forgotten apparel.com use promo code Matt and ATT and get 15% off your purchase why have thousands of aspiring authors teamed up with Christian faith publishing to publish their blog because Christian faith publishing is an author friendly publisher who understands that your labor is more than just a book we provide authors freedom and flexibility throughout the publishing process professional book editing award-winning design and some of the highest royalty structures in the publishing industry and is always you will retain 100% of the rights to your book I was looking to find a company that I could trust one that assisted in the editing process completely Christian faith publishing will publish market and sell your books in all major bookstores and online booksellers as well especially Christian bookstores call for your free author submission kit 800-978-4812 800-978-4812 800-978-4812 that's 800-978-4812 Dr. Kim Brown here a host of project with my cohost Eric Rieger I've seen in my practice that I'm trying to is a whole lot more than just a floating product yes it is a whole lot more than just exploding because of the polyphenols that you find in Alicante what are some of these polyphenols do these polyphenols help you have more energy and polyphenols are great sounds like it's helping a lot more people than just loading go to let my family.com/I start the second hour at episode 19 get a project with host Dr. Ken Brown Amir Krieger and we are doing today with Brian Bradford of sunflower shop real quick before you get too far don't forget love my Tammy.com/spooning pickup your own the 20 or you go to branch shop similar shop I challenge everyone to this challenging storm to shop and commit to go into some flower shop to go about trying to forgo to let my tummy.com/spoony is exactly right discount we got a little low show special get you can also like and share the program the podcast got check project.com and you can also find us at YouTube search get to project and you can go to the page and liking look it does look at Dr. Brown in the video you can even see that Brian showed up and much nicer clothes and waited for a coat restart episode wanted tuxedos and we've just gone downhill that's where your body right now – we got a costume shop three warrants and they came in just as a hot dog one time to find the episode that is now it is elegiac well I'm quite sure I hate to break this to we did a whole show and silicide and that he thought he was dressed as a hotdog the whole time flow show I was like you. It's it's about suicide yeah oh yeah I didn't know know know know like I could hear sound like and I could that could you not get I wait to hear Seneca to sound even when I'm still there which is which before we get into a lot of questions I have for you about how your journey with this and some Photoshop and how you help your community you know there's there's a lot of stuff there's a really good chance that psilocybin will be either a therapeutic drug or even over-the-counter product and not too long really things early oh there's some really cool research coming out mainly on depression opioids that comes thing for his part for your project we should hook him up with the Dennis even he would mean the applicable science from Hector Institute would be interesting I think in the chemical what was cool about you is that you're also a grocery store teacher so you do a whole show on sulci than the go does this habit you like jet Philip taken the lens billet portobello have a behind-the-scenes GMO products yet what we had we had a mushroom expert on cold Cooper read and he was describing how you can grab the and he was using the different terms of the mushroom and you can tell the silicide and content based on how it turns purple fastening really that is fascinating that I'm so into mushrooms right now not just the trippy mushrooms but how complex have been massive of a kingdom this is it so interesting he forages for mushrooms and he can say which ones are edible which ones are also all the so they don't become an oncologist or at least one professional trading the mycology acumen of exec with a yellow you're barely what he's referring to Dennis McKenna's a few years ago where pale you effectively showed up with microphones and just put them up in the air B&B that we are at just happen to be that the Godfather of psilocybin mushrooms who is a PhD in mycology really the him and his brother wrote a book on how to grow magic mushrooms when they were in college and it's like the Bible still so he hung out with us for like two hours we just did just geek out on mushrooms and fastening the therapeutic side of it that O'Brien was what is what really got my attention and before he came on to tell us even some of the cool stuff was just the data they had some hindrance to the blaze and is in Idaho and they had people smoking cessation for instance one but six months and 91% success rate what was even more astounding was it five years it's well over 60% smoking cessation 60% got really sick 64 – 16 change massive like that is massive like when we talk about the what's the drug that people take to get off that 00 Chantix Chantix that's like 35% at six months really that's what their standard is right now and this is studies are coming well that's the study of the half-truth Institute new studies are coming out of Johns Hopkins looking in the getting very similar results while it's just it just shows that there's a lot of things that we have left uncovered that's for sure and mother nature that probably could help with disease states and their doing the research on the witches are super exciting that it's very exciting survive for you to get where we are at some flower shop today you let us know you were born in Oklahoma they did what town and not a true okay those are unders six months I think you go to because by six so I can still consider myself to be a Texan guy yeah Dr. Tinker Air Force Base my guy was in the Air Force at the time house I was born there in Oklahoma think is $4.36 is what I cost him so to achieve better cost them a lot more later on their dad to remove the text structure that and gosh my background you want to know RB I got the military back in the know 89 to 93 is when I served as holes in the purse go for French Army nice Army yard mighty preservice appreciated the what got me interested I guess really in health of my first duty station was actually military intelligence duty station knew that from 89 to 93 9380 993 so a friend of Rich Hagedorn patriot leaders liquor with eight anyway they started a veterans organizations that are doing pure whiskey vodka held as we have heard okay I were just about hundred first airborne at that exact same time that really is I was and I was in college he was the was doing that one yeah well yeah you do the exact same thing that you did he was paratrooper that's awesome and I was a paratrooper I dumped more radio operator but I got to be stationed in the military told units not love the detective work oh I was there me all the information coming in trying to sorted and disseminate that to the higher command so forth that's what got me interested in going a I wouldn't mind being in the FBI one day guess what I really wanted to educate I think I've always want to be in law enforcement we are not but my second duty station was a medical and so actually when we went to the Gulf War I was in a medical unit we sort of picked up no bodies and things as we went through the way and love the medical side and soft like me don't want to do this so I set soon as I get the military I went through EMT school I went to the police academy and that's I was just driving that way to really be BBB FBI agent one day is my ultimate goal and then that God had other plans for me I guess in the your 9093 my dad was building the store in Colleyville and need some help putting up shelves and so what wells waiting to get on the four Police Department I went over there to help them out and I met my now wife at that point time to and so I had to make a decision on do I want to pursue the law enforcement career or stay with the store in that I actually stayed with the store and the way I look at though is that what drove me in the military of the military intelligence in the medical side it really shake need to become what I now call myself the body detective in the sense of saying instead of trying to catch criminals and investigate the criminal side investigating the body and that's where I turned that attention focused to so I'm in nerdy but hard to as well too I met you I guess you're the bigger nerd I get out I thought I was a pretty big nerd but other data

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Fundamental Health with Paul Saladino, MD
Are the RDAs relevant on a keto/carnivore diet? A conversation with Amber O’hearn

Fundamental Health with Paul Saladino, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2019 79:03


Amber O’Hearn is a data scientist by profession with a background in math, computer science, linguistics, and psychology. She has been studying and experimenting with low-carb, ketogenic diets since 1997, and more recently writing and speaking about her findings. Her review on the evolutionary appropriateness and benefit of weaning babies onto a meat-based, high fat, low carb diet, was included as testimony defending Professor Tim Noakes in his recent trial.  Amber has been eating a plant-free diet since 2009.   Time stamps:    4:03 Amber O'Hearn's love of singing. 6:03 Amber's journey towards carnivore. 11:50 Pitfalls of bipolar medications. 13:50 Finding the carnivore community (zeroing in on health). 16:03 Amber's amazing mood improvements. 17:19 Had Amber tried re-introducing plants back into her diet? 18:10 The fear of losing variety in your diet. 20:13 How to cook brain. 20:47 Salmonella. 21:43 Eating raw animal foods and food safety. 23:06 Why eating egg whites may not be a good idea. 25:00 How Amber's mood became substantially more stable. 27:49 Micronutrients in meat. 29:00 Unique nutrients in animal foods. 31:34 Eliminating plants from the diet. 33:18 Carnivory and diet dogmatism. 34:25 Humans as facultative carnivores. 37:21 Bioavailability of nutrients in animal vs. plant foods. 40:33 Fiber. 41:33 Other nutrients that low carb dieters do not need as much of. (Vitamin c and scurvy.) 43:13 Linus Pauling's theory. 50:06 Iodine. 50:57 Is the carnivore diet safe for children? 54:00 Newborns/infants and ketosis. 56:27 Ketones and cholesterol. 58:41 Ketones and improved working memory/other benefits. 59:53 Fat to protein ratio on a carnivore diet. 1:06:20 The effect of protein on insulin. 1:09:22 Does protein really have calories? 113:12 Information on where to find Amber online and her upcoming work. Amber’s contact information:    Empiri.ca  Ketotic.org Facultativecarnivore.com  Twitter: @ketocarnivore Instagram: @ambimorph   Ancestral Supplements https://ancestralsupplements.com/ use the promo code “SaladinoMD” on the shopify site for 10% off.    JOOVV: www.joovv.com/paul   My contact information: PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/paulsaladinomd   SOCIAL MEDIA  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulsaladinomd Website: paulsaladinomd.com Twitter:@mdsaladino Facebook: Paul Saladino MD email: paulsaladinomd@gmail.com   Be sure to subscribe for more medicine and lifestyle content. Stay radical!  

Connected with Mika Bradford Podcast
#10 - Interview with Michael Bailey, A forty Year Journey of a Health Enthusiast

Connected with Mika Bradford Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2019 27:16


Today we take a look back over the forty year journey of a health enthusiast.  Hear Michael share key experiences that shaped and changed his life while embracing the principles of looking at the whole person, all aspects of their lives, including nutrition and exercise.    In this episode of CONNECTED with Mika Bradford we’re discussing: Today’s podcast features Michael Bailey, RN, a distinguished veteran who served in the Army as a Combat Medic in Vietnam, with over forty years experience working in various hospitals, Intensive Care Unit, medical clinics and insurance companies. Early on in his career he was introduced to a simplistic, wholesome way of life where clean eating, exercise and taking basic nutritional supplements was the foundation for life. His journey and desire to provide his clients with exceptional care, going beyond the status quo, began after reading “Vitamin C and the Common Cold” a popular book by Linus Pauling. The book was first published in 1970, highlighting vitamin C, its interactions with common cold and the role of vitamin C megadosage in human health. The book promoted the idea that taking large amounts of vitamin C could reduce the duration and severity of the common cold. From that moment on Michael look at health and wellness from a different perspective and began to expand his understanding of nutrition, physiology and how marrying both health, wellness and medicine could help produce optimal outcomes for his clients.  Be sure to follow our Podcast By signing up at connectedmikabradford.com and receive our monthly newsletter to learn what hot topics we will be discussing and the featured guest we have scheduled. Join in the Conversation Our favorite part of recording our podcast each week is participating in the great conversations with you that happen on our live chat, on social media, and in our comments section. Regardless of what information your seeking as long as the world keeps spinning science and technology will continue to expand. A closed door today may be the gateway to a new beginning tomorrow.  If you are a new listener to Connected with Mika Bradford, we would love to hear from you.  Please visit our Contact Page and let us know how we can help you today! Also, listen on our website here.

Science History Podcast
Episode 18. Herbicidal Warfare: Matthew Meselson

Science History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2019 150:30


Matthew Meselson organized the Herbicide Assessment Commission in 1970, which investigated the use of Agent Orange and other defoliants in Vietnam. The work of the commission helped to end Operation Ranch Hand, in which the United States sprayed nearly 20 million gallons – about 73 million liters - of herbicides and defoliants over the rainforest and mangrove forest canopies of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. I called Meselson to ask about his role in the Herbicide Assessment Commission, along with a host of other fascinating investigations to do with chemical and biological weapons, such as the anthrax accident in the Soviet Union and the yellow rain incident in Laos.  I also asked him about the U.S. Army’s insane plan in 1969 to ship 800 railroad cars filled with 27,000 tons of poison-gas weapons from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal to New Jersey for disposal at sea. Meselson completed his Ph.D. in 1957 under Linus Pauling at CalTech.  In 1958, in a classic experiment, he and Frank Stahl showed that DNA is replicated semi-conservatively, and in 1961 he along with Francois Jacob and Sydney Brenner discovered messenger RNA.  Meselson also made fundamental discoveries in DNA repair, the recognition and destruction of foreign DNA in cells, and, along with Werner Arber, he discovered restriction enzymes.  Meselson received his appointment as an Associate Professor of biology at Harvard in 1960 and his full professorship in 1964.  He has been at Harvard ever since.  Meselson has received many prominent awards throughout his career, including from the National Academy of Sciences, the Federation of American Scientists, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Genetics Society of America, as well as the Guggenheim Fellowship and MacArthur Fellows Program Genius Award.

Simply Not Easy
SNE - 86 - Tasty Tuesday: Vitamin C

Simply Not Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2019 10:07


Tune in to learn about vitamin C and why it's so important. From preventing disease like scurvy to decreasing your risk of cancer. Famous chemist Linus Pauling was huge on the role of this nutrient. Find out why I consider vitamin C to be the Pac-Man of the body.

Intellectual Medicine with Dr. Petteruti
Innovation is needed in Cancer Care, Active Surveillance in Cancer, College Final Four, NCAA Tournament

Intellectual Medicine with Dr. Petteruti

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2019 40:30


Active surveillance is also known as watchful waiting. In the 1970s, Dr. Linus Pauling – the only person to ever be awarded two unshared Nobel Prizes – began to examine the potential use of Vitamin C in the treatment of cancer. Starting in 1974, researchers inspired by the theories of Dr. Pauling published clinical trials of high-dose intravenous vitamin C in advanced human cancer. The observed patients had longer than expected longevity when compared to case controls, and when compared to expected norms for their disease. Interest in the use of Vitamin C in cancer treatment waned following a study that was performed at the Mayo Clinic and published in the New England Journal of Medicine in the late 1970s. However, this study used only ORAL Vitamin C, whereas the previous studies had used oral and intravenous Vitamin C. Noting this discrepancy, researchers began to publish studies showing not merely that intravenous Vitamin C was extremely safe, but that it was effective in mitigating the often-significant side effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Increasingly, however, published studies have begun to demonstrate that high dose Vitamin C is actually toxic to a wide variety of cancer cells. Intravenous Vitamin C has been shown to have the capacity to create a buildup of hydrogen peroxide within cancer cells that causes the cell walls to burst and the cells to die. Normal cells, with their ability to easily neutralize hydrogen peroxide, are unaffected by intravenous Vitamin C. We at I.M.120 advocate our High Dose IV Vitamin C therapies in addition to traditional cancer treatment and prevention protocols. We are excited by this growing body of research, and look forward to further developments.

Learn True Health with Ashley James
341 Achieve Low Maintenance Health, Addressing Cortisol, Stress, Thyroid, Autoimmune, PCOS, Osteoporosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Parasites, with Minerals, Boron, Magnesium, and Acerola Chery Powder with Living The Good Life Naturally's Kristen Bowen

Learn True Health with Ashley James

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2019 140:26


www.livingthegoodlifenaturally.com use coupon code LTH to get 10% off! Living The Good Life Naturally https://www.learntruehealth.com/living-the-good-life-naturally I am very excited to welcome back to the show, Kristen Bowen, the founder of Living The Good Life Naturally and my favorite Magnesium Soak! I am a huge fan of this magnesium soak. I’ve been experimenting with different forms of magnesium supplementation for eight years, and this one has been the most effective by far for helping me achieve full cell saturation levels of magnesium. In this interview, I go into more detail and share my experience with using Kristen Bowen’s Living The Good Life Naturally Magnesium Soak. We first had Kristen on Learn True Health in Episode 294: Magnesium Foot Soak. Sleep Through The Night I’ve been using Living The Good Life Naturally Magnesium Soak since last summer with my husband and our 3-year-old son. Before this soak, it would take us up to 2 hours each night to get our son to sleep! Even with taking liquid magnesium as a supplement approved by his Naturopathic Pediatrician he was still always wound up! The very first night he did his regular bath with a 1/8 cup of Kristen’s Living The Good Life Naturally Magnesium Soak in his bath he ASKED us to put him to bed without reading his regular five books because he was ready to sleep!!! Ever since then we have regularly added this concentrated magnesium to his nighttime baths, and he has stopped fighting us at bedtime. He falls asleep quickly and stays asleep through the night. Plus he is calmer during the day! And that is just his results! My husband and I have also noticed fantastic results of our own. There is a Facebook post in our podcast’s Facebook group with 175 comments of people in the community sharing how great this has been for their health and the health of their family. One community member made a video sharing how this magnesium soak has stopped her life-long migraines! Several others have shared that it has helped them finally get better sleep, stop restless legs, aid them in more energy and fewer or no feelings of stress in their day. Our body needs magnesium for over 1,800 cellular processes, Dr. Carolyn Dean shared in Episode 227: Curing Diseases with Magnesium. Magnesium is the most important mineral for health and the one we are chronically low in all of the time! Lab Test For Magnesium Levels If you are not sure that you have a magnesium deficiency, you can get a $50 blood test called the RBC Mag test. You can get it from walkinlab.com if you are in the US. You want your number to be between 6 and 7.2. Most people are below 5, which means they are chronically deficient. When you are deficient in magnesium, it affects hormones, immune health, soft tissue health, stress, sleep, the brain! The list goes on and on. Every system of the body requires magnesium, and every system begins to breakdown without it. That is why this magnesium soak is so effective. As you can tell, I have become a big cheerleader of Kristen Bowen’s Living The Good Life Naturally Magnesium Soak. I was very skeptical at the beginning. I am open-minded enough to give something new a try, and I will let the results speak for themselves. And they did! Near the beginning of our interview Kristen shares that for the next two weeks Learn True Health listeners will get a free jar of her 100% natural Magnesium Muscle Cream plus the regular 10% off that LTH listeners normally get by using the coupon code LTH. What Saved Kristen’s Life This interview was quite a rollercoaster ride of life-changing health information! In our first interview, Kristen shared her story. At her lowest point, Kristen was 70lbs, in a wheelchair and having 30 seizures a day with her hair falling out in handfuls and brain fog so bad she could barely talk. She tried everything to regain her health. It wasn’t until she discovered this pure, concentrated magnesium from the Zechstein Sea that she began to gain her health back! Kristen came to discover that with this specific type of naturally occurring magnesium we absorb 20 GRAMS of bio-available magnesium in a one hour bath with this magnesium soak! This is the most effective way to get magnesium into your body for relaxation, pain relief, sleep, and anxiety! For her, within weeks of using the soak, it helped end her seizures, combat her autoimmune disease and restore her health to the point where she could walk, talk and think again! She said it was like a light bulb went on inside her. She had been so minerally deficient for so many years that the magnesium she was soaking in filled her like a car engine on empty gulping in gallons of fuel at the gas station. How To Achieve Low Maintenance Health In our interview, Kristen brings up an interesting point. Looking at her life, some might think she has to do a lot of things each day to keep on top of her health. These small, daily rituals have built a strong foundation of wellness that allows her to thrive. Her investment into supplements, clean foods, online workshops, holistic medical devices like saunas, herbs, lotions, treatments like massage and acupuncture all have been part of building this foundation. And now, over 12 years after Kristen was able to liberate herself from the frailty of illness the MDs said she would never recover from, she has built a foundation of health so strong that she refers to her health as “low maintenance.” She shares that the years of hard work do pay off. It takes the right mindset, lifestyle, and food choices to have low maintenance health. Importance Of Boron For Our Health Many of our listeners reached out to Kristen after our first interview with a barrage of wonderful questions. The most common one was, “After I reach cell saturation, how can I maintain and hold onto my magnesium better? “Kristen shares that many other deficiencies and conditions can “burn through” our magnesium stores quickly, like a boat with a leak, leading to perpetual mineral deficiency. “If you use the magnesium soak daily and are unable to reach full cell saturation after 30 days, we have a crack in the foundation. I did not rebuild my health by chasing symptoms. But rather I built a strong foundation. Adding boron helps you hold on to that magnesium. It’s like a booster pack for the magnesium,” said Kristen Bowen. Kristen Bowen says boron helps you hold magnesium in your cells. If you’re experiencing the benefits of magnesium, but you have to soak all the time, you may have a boron deficiency. “Boron gives the cell wall flexibility. And the cell wall is like your brain. It’s what communicates the information in your body. If you don’t have enough boron, you are stopping the communication at the cellular level,” Kristen Bowen explains. She adds, “Boron can also help bring the inflammation markers down and help regulate the inflammation in your body which is attached to your pain level. It also helps your pancreas balance blood sugars.” In different areas of the world where there is naturally occurring boron, Kristen Bowen reveals that cancer cases are lower proving the importance of this trace mineral in preventing disease. “Boron works through the parathyroid and helps re-mineralize the bones. But a lot of women will have hormone problems when they add boron,” said Kristen Bowen. “The missing component is cortisol. It is stress. I call it the magnesium mindset.” Recognizing Our Power Kristen Bowen believes we have to recognize how powerful we are. Many of us are “addicted” to our stress and use cortisol to get us through the day. When we produce excess cortisol, it is giving us a short-term fix. It gives us a little bit of energy and clears our head in the short term. “But one of the long-term consequences of living off of our stress hormones is that it robs us of the building blocks that our body uses to make progesterone and estrogen,” said Kristen Bowen. She adds, “If we have some cortisol issues, we need to be a little slower adding boron until we have soaked in magnesium long enough. Because that will help you get on top of the cortisol issues so when you do add that boron, you’re not having issues with your hormones as well.” Maximizing Boron Kristen gets her boron from the all-natural, 100% boron, cleaning agent “20 Mule Team Borax”, Kristen Bowen recommends taking about one liter of water and mixing it with a rounded teaspoon, shake and let it dissolve before taking it. “One teaspoon equals three milligrams of boron approximately. So, I take anywhere from 18 to 24 milligrams a day. But if you chose to take your boron this way, make sure you buy the one that is without the fragrance and 100% all natural. That is why I use 20 MuleTeam Borax, which is 100% boron, the same quality they put in supplements for a fraction of the cost,” said Kristen Bowen. She adds, “Because there are some places in the world where the 20 Mule Team Borax has fragrance added. That’s not appropriate to ingest. Best thing to do is take the 30-day challenge where you get to full cell-saturation of magnesium before you add the boron.” Kristen says you can also get boron from foods like raisins, almonds, dried apricots, and chia seeds, as long as those foods were grown in boron-rich soil. If you take time to gel chia seeds, it creates a polysaccharide and helps mops up excess cortisol in the body. It is also a food source of B vitamins which is crucial to holding magnesium in the cell. PCOS If you have PCOS, Kristen Bowen suggests not to take boron first because it’s just going to aggravate the problem. Instead, you have to do more to support decreasing cortisol and improving magnesium levels. And that’s where chia seeds come in to play. When chia seeds are properly soaked, it will help mop up some of that excess cortisol, and the polysaccharides help as well. So, when your body is ready to handle boron, it’s not going to throw you into converting testosterone at a faster pace. Candida According to Kristen Bowen, every time we have that cortisol spike, it strengthens the biofilm that coats the lining of the gut and harbors harmful candida. The stronger the biofilm is, the harder it is to break the candida down and rid ourselves of unwanted parasites. “Magnesium is good at helping the body to clean out the candida-rich toxic biofilm. If you have had extra cortisol and a candida issue, the magnesium breaks down the biofilm,” Kristen Bowen said. Vitamin C It’s also essential to understand vitamin C dosing. No one can tell you how much you need. It’s different for everybody because the strength of your adrenals determines it. Kristen shares that you can only hold as much vitamin C as your adrenals are strong. The stronger your adrenals, the better your body can utilize vitamin C. When we are under toxic-stress our body burns through our vitamins and minerals faster, leading to deficiency and furthermore, illness. Most people believe that the RDA on the vitamin bottle is the maximum dose we should ever take of vitamins C. However, it is the MINIMUM required amount of vitamin C to barely stave off disease. If you want to be barely diseased than only take the daily RDA amount, we want TRUE HEALTH; so we are going to take more vitamin C than the minimin RDA of 50mg! Dr. Mathius Rath studied under the famous Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling, and after his death continued his research on the importance of vitamin C and amino acid proteins. Dr. Rath has several free ebooks available including one called Why Animals Don’t Get Heart Attacks, and People Do where he outlines fascinating discoveries on how vitamin C works at preventing and reversing cardiovascular disease. An interesting fact that he points out about animals is most of them produce their own vitamin C, much like we produce our own vitamin D internally. A goat will have about 16 grams of vitamin C coursing through its bloodstream at any given time while a wolf will have 32 grams. If a human adult is twice or three times the size and weight of a wolf, how many grams of vitamin C do you think we require for optimal health and healing? The US Government says only 50 mg, while researches like Dr. Mathius Rath and Linus Pauling say we need many grams of vitamin C each day. If we are not getting it from eating a variety of fresh fruit and vegetables, then we need to consider supplementing our vitamin C from a whole foods source. Acerola Cherry Powder for Vitamin C Kristen Bowen experienced a miraculous recovery in her gut health when she added Acerola Cherry Powder to her protocol. Acerola Cherries are naturally high in vitamin C, and when made into a powder it becomes a potent vitamin C supplement that is bioavailable and easily absorbed and utilized by the body. You can buy her Acerola Cherry Powder from her site  LivingTheGoodLifeNaturally.com and be sure to use the coupon code LTH for 10% off. Kristen Bowen’s favorite way to take Acerola Cherry Powder is mixing a drink that has some coconut water, grapefruit juice, and good green algae. My favorite algae is from EnergyBits.com. Be sure to use coupon code LTH for 20% off! Toxic Stress The abuse Kristen Bowen went through as a young girl set the stage for high cortisol levels later in life. A groundbreaking study conducted in 1995 by the Centers for Disease Control and the Kaiser Permanente health care organization in California looked at the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences and overall outcomes in life. They found that the more ACEs we experience will set the stage for what has been now coined as “toxic stress” later in life. Toxic stress is when the body is overreacting to everyday occurrences as if they are threats. A door slams, a car alarm goes off, someone yells, these sounds are enough to set off the fight or flight response in the body. For someone who went through Adverse Childhood Experiences, those sounds feel like dangerous threats and spiral their body into extreme stress. All day long they are overstimulated by little sounds or sights their body perceives as threats. If you know you had ACEs as a child, it is imperative that you take action now to lower and manage your stress; otherwise, this study concluded that you have a greater the chance of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, depression, substance abuse, smoking, poor academic achievement, and early death. The good news is there are many things you can do to be proactive to mitigate the effects that ACEs have on your stress levels, including soaking in magnesium! It was fun to hear Kristen share that as women, as the matriarch, as the mom and wife, we set the tone for digestion at the table. It is set by the female who sits at the table. Our mood affects digestion for everyone dining with us! If we are in a state of relaxation and joy, everyone can relax and digest and absorb the nutrients in their food. If we bring our stress to the table, or worse, all eat in front of the TV, we are setting up our body and the health of our family to fail. We cannot properly digest and absorb the nutrients in our food when under a state of stress. “To create low maintenance health, we have to take into account and claim how powerful we are. For me it was a real mindset shift in helping to re-wire my brain,” said Kristen Bowen. Parasites Remember how I said this interview was a roller coaster of health information? Well, the biggest plot twist was when Kristen shared about her experience with expelling parasites from her body. At some point in her recovery, Kristen realized she had hit a wall. All of her symptoms pointed towards parasites. For over a year Kristen Bowen performed expensive parasites cleanses with little results. Eventually, she stopped taking the abrasive herbs designed to kill the worms, amoebas, and flukes she felt was causing her symptoms and instead turned to study further about the gut’s biofilm and what she could do to support her body in making her gut an inhospitable hotel for those unwanted pests. That is when she discovered the before mentioned Acerola Cherry Powder, and it’s benefits to help aid her in making the parasites leave her body. After adding the Acerola Cherry Powder to her daily protocol, along with soaking in her magnesium and taking boron, she began to expell parasites from her body! However, each month they would return only to be expelled again. She did her research and found out that when we have low stomach acid the parasites can reproduce each month and continue to thrive. Kristen tried taking HCl supplements, but they did not agree with her. Instead, she looked to natural ways to stimulate and support her stomach to make healthy acid. She found that drinking fresh celery juice did the trick! “I use 16 ounces of celery juice on an empty stomach every morning,” said Kristen Bowen. Parasite Release Kristen Bowen believes that on the subject of a parasite release, it’s not just about checking off a list and making sure you got all the supplements. You must put that mindset and be willing to take your power back. “Because your energy goes up, your ability to communicate goes up; your ability to follow through with ideas fills up. We have to be willing to increase our accountability,” said Kristen Bowen. When Kristen Bowen experienced that parasite release and was able to figure out the need to build hydrochloric acid, walking away from the constant reproduction cycle happening, that’s when Kristen Bowen achieved low maintenance health. “We are the CEO of our health and body! We don’t just lift ourselves. It is our gift. Our feminine gift is to lift others around us. Tapping back into that power is crucial,” said Kristen Bowen. Living The Good Life Naturally As a treat to Learn True Health listeners, Kristen Bowen is giving 10% off whenever you buy her products on her website. Just type the coupon code LTH at checkout. And for every jug of magnesium soak, Kristen Bowen includes a free jar of magnesium muscle cream for a limited time. To those who have suggested that the magnesium soak be available in a powder or flake form, Kristen Bowen says the effectivity will be compromised. “The purity, quality of the product and ability to get cell saturation is crucial. And flakes do not meet my standard. I would never sell anything that I’m not willing to use myself,” said Kristen Bowen. However, Kristen Bowen says you can’t get the full cell saturation with the cream, but people do see more localized results. It cannot replace soaking, but it’s a beautiful spot treatment to relax muscles and decrease pain and inflammation. Get Connected with Kristen Bowen: Official Website Facebook Facebook – Living the Good Life Naturally Instagram – Kristen Bowen Instagram – Living the Good Life Naturally Recommended Reading by Kristen Bowen Healing Is Voltage by Jerry L. Tennant   

Nerds Amalgamated
Millicent Patrick, Mad Max & PS5

Nerds Amalgamated

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2019 64:28


This episode we have an amazing guest re-joining us, the fantastic Shaun from Comics2Movies and XCT. So you know straight up it is going to be a great show! Also the DJ is on fire this week and makes us laugh till we cry. We begin with a look at an upcoming book release that is the biography of Milicent Patrick, the lady who designed the creature from the Black Lagoon. She has an amazing story that is sure to inspire many of us. It also looks at the harassment she faced and the ongoing issues in Hollywood today. Also discussed is the reaction of various law enforcement agencies in response to undesirable behaviours such as cyber-bullying. The topic is the 40th anniversary of Mad Max! That’s right the original movie that created a legend is 40 years old. There was a party in Victoria to celebrate with fans even coming from America. Of course this means we have to discuss the amazing films in the Mad Max franchise (even the recent Fury Road – which is suggested is not Mad Max, but you decide and let us know). Also this is when the DJ makes us laugh till we cry, listen out for it, believe me, it is amazingly funny. Next up is the Professor with some information about the PS5 and VR. Things are getting better with improved technology on the VR/AR front with arcades opening up around the place, but what is happening in the home? We then have the regular shoutouts, birthdays, and remembrances. Concluding with a chat about what Shaun is up to in terms of new projects to look forward to, so if you are planning on going to any of the comic conventions you will have to stop by and say G’Day, and check out what he has on offer. Particularly with his new graphic novels, so go along and check out his website and be amazed by the wondrous collection of artwork in the various comic books and graphic novels available for purchase alongside the extensive offering of various memorabilia there. So grab yourself a cup of tea and strap in for our latest instalment of Nerds Amalgamated.EPISODE NOTES:The Lady from the Black Lagoon: Hollywood Monsters and the Lost Legacy of Milicent Patrick- https://www.publishersweekly.com/9781335937803- https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34993030-the-lady-from-the-black-lagoon- https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1335937803/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ll1&tag=bustle-13212013-20&linkId=4eb67e222b74ad35b9b57f4e9dda23c0&language=en_USMad Max turns 40- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-03/mad-max-40th-anniversary/10775336- https://www.thecourier.com.au/story/5450660/mad-max-anniversary-event-ditches-clunes-location/PS5 VR/AR - https://gamingbolt.com/sony-knows-vr-ar-is-the-future-ps5-will-support-it-says-devGames Currently playingBuck, Professor & DJ – Apex Legends - https://www.ea.com/games/apex-legendsShaun – Star Wars Jedi Knight: Jedi Academy - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Wars_Jedi_Knight:_Jedi_AcademyOther topics DiscussedMillicent Patrick’s biography- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milicent_PatrickBlack Fury aka Miss Fury character bio- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Fury_(comics)- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-05/miss-fury-the-most-famous-superhero-youve-never-heard-of/10777988Cyberbullying in American and Australia- America - https://edition.cnn.com/2018/01/23/us/florida-cyberstalking-charges-girl-suicide/index.html- Australia - https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-10/dolly-everett-nt-suicide-cyber-bullying-campaign-launched/9317056MAD MAX Fan Magazine – Silver City on Kickstarter- https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/467328161/mad-max-fan-magazine-silver-cityMad Max Franchise- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mad_Max_(franchise)George Miller wants to make more Mad Max movies- http://collider.com/george-miller-new-mad-max-movies/Amount of dialogue in Mad Max Fury Road- https://www.reddit.com/r/MadMax/comments/4eveny/full_dialogue_for_fury_road/Quentin Tarantino praises Mad Max Fury Road- https://www.indiewire.com/2015/12/quentin-tarantino-says-mad-max-fury-road-was-the-best-movie-he-saw-in-2015-95821/Playstation 5 will be backwards compatible- https://gamerant.com/ps5-backward-compatible/Playstation Eyetoy- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EyeToyWonder Boy (video game)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wonder_Boy_(video_game)Ghouls and Ghosts (video game)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghouls_%27n_GhostsHungry Hungry Hippos the movie poster- http://i.imgur.com/dU5gS.jpgFortnite & PubG are banned in China- https://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/article/650828/fortnite-pubg-could-banned-china/Kate Miller-Hidke (Australian singer-songwriter and actress)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Miller-HeidkeShoutouts24 Feb 2019 - Congrats to all the Oscars 2019 winners- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/91st_Academy_Awards- https://cometoverhollywood.com/2016/02/05/hollywood-capers-stolen-academy-awards/26 Feb 1935 - RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging) first demonstrated by Robert Watson-Watt - https://www.wired.com/2008/02/dayintech-0226/29 Feb 1504 - Crafty Columbus plays a Leap Year Trick, many people born on February 29th curse their luck, but it can also bring luck and benefits as explorer Christopher Columbus demonstrated over 400 years ago. - https://www.onthisday.com/articles/crafty-columbus-plays-a-leap-year-trickRememberances21 Feb 2019 – Stanley Donen, American film director and choreographer whose most celebrated works are On the Town (1949) and Singin' in the Rain (1952), both of which starred Gene Kelly who co-directed. His other films include Royal Wedding (1951), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), Funny Face (1957), Indiscreet (1958), and Charade (1963). He died of heart failure at 94 in New York City - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Donen21 Feb 2019 – Peter Halsten Thorkelson or Peter Tork, was an American musician, composer and actor, best known as the keyboardist and bass guitarist of the Monkees. He died from complications of a rare cancer known as adenoid cystic carcinoma, a rare, slow-growing form of head and neck cancer at 77 in Mansfield, Connecticut - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Tork25 Feb 2019 - Maeghan Albach, American voice actress known for her extensive work with English dubbing. The actress worked with Funimation Entertainment for 13 years and brought her voice to dozens of titles. Most notably series such as Evangelion: 1.0 You Are Not Alone, One Piece, Fairy Tail, Attack on Titan, Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, A Certain Magical Index, Princess Jellyfish, and many more. Died on 22 Jan 2019 with no known causes of death - https://comicbook.com/anime/2019/02/25/fullmetal-alchemist-attack-on-titan-actress-maeghan-albach-death/2 Mar 2019 – Katherine Helmond, American film, theater, and television actress and director. Over her five decades of television acting, she was known for her starring role as feisty mother Mona Robinson on Who's the Boss? (1984–1992). She also voiced Lizzie in the three Cars films by Disney/Pixar. She died of February 23, 2019, from complications of Alzheimer's disease at 89 in Los Angeles, California- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Helmond- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-03-02/whos-the-boss-actress-katherine-helmond-dies-in-los-angeles/10864718Birthdays26 Feb 1802 – Victor Hugo, French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. Hugo is one of the greatest and best-known French writers. Outside France, his most famous works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (French: Notre-Dame de Paris), 1831. Born in Besançon,Doubs - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_hugo26 Feb 1908 – Tex Avery, American animator,director, cartoonist and voice actor, known for producing and directing animated cartoons during the golden age of American animation. His most significant work was for the Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, where he was crucial in the creation and evolution of famous animated characters such as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck,Porky Pig,Elmer Fudd,Droopy,Screwy Squirrel, George and Junior, and Chilly Willy. Born in Taylor, Texas - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tex_Avery28 Feb 1901 – Linus Pauling, American chemist, biochemist, peace activist, author, educator, and husband of American human rights activist Ava Helen Pauling. He published more than 1,200 papers and books, of which about 850 dealt with scientific topics. Pauling was one of the founders of the fields of quantum chemistry and molecular biology. In his later years he promoted nuclear disarmament, as well as orthomolecular medicine, megavitamin therapy, and dietary supplements. For his scientific work, Pauling was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1954. For his peace activism, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1962. He is one of four individuals to have won more than one Nobel Prize (the others being Marie Curie,John Bardeen and Frederick Sanger). Of these, he is the only person to have been awarded two unshared Nobel Prizes, and one of two people to be awarded Nobel Prizes in different fields, the other being Marie Curie. Born in Portland, Oregon - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_PaulingEvents of Interest26 Feb 1616 – Galileo Galilei is formally banned by the Roman Catholic Church from teaching or defending the view that the earth orbits the sun. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_affair#Inquisition_and_first_judgement,_161626 Feb 1952 - Prime Minister Winston Churchill announces Great Britain has developed its own atomic bomb - https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2019/02/26/us/ap-history.html26 Feb 1949 – Lucky Lady II, a B-50 Superfortress begins the non-stop flight around the world from Carswell Air Force base in Fort Worth, Texas - https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/lucky-lady-ii-begins-nonstop-global-flight29 Feb 1940 - Hattie McDaniel becomes 1st African American woman to win an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in "Gone with the Wind". The first Academy Award won by an African American entertainer - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hattie_McDaniel#1940_Academy_AwardsSpecial message from Shaun about his upcoming works such as XCT: Breakout & Terralympus- https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2067957354/xct-breakout-graphic-novel- http://www.comics2movies.com.au/shop/terralympus-vol-1-graphic-novel/IntroArtist – Goblins from MarsSong Title – Super Mario - Overworld Theme (GFM Trap Remix)Song Link - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GNMe6kF0j0&index=4&list=PLHmTsVREU3Ar1AJWkimkl6Pux3R5PB-QJFollow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/NerdsAmalgamated/Email - Nerds.Amalgamated@gmail.comTwitter - https://twitter.com/NAmalgamatedSpotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6Nux69rftdBeeEXwD8GXrSiTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/top-shelf-nerds/id1347661094RSS - http://www.thatsnotcanonproductions.com/topshelfnerdspodcast?format=rssSpecial thanks to Shaun from Comics2Movies, they have some cool stuff such as prints, comics such as XCT and T-Shirts - https://www.comic2movies.com.au

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Rule Thinkers In, Not Out

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2019 9:09


Imagine a black box which, when you pressed a button, would generate a scientific hypothesis. 50% of its hypotheses are false; 50% are true hypotheses as game-changing and elegant as relativity. Even despite the error rate, it’s easy to see this box would quickly surpass space capsules, da Vinci paintings, and printer ink cartridges to become the most valuable object in the world. Scientific progress on demand, and all you have to do is test some stuff to see if it’s true? I don’t want to devalue experimentalists. They do great work. But it’s appropriate that Einstein is more famous than Eddington. If you took away Eddington, someone else would have tested relativity; the bottleneck is in Einsteins. Einstein-in-a-box at the cost of requiring two Eddingtons per insight is a heck of a deal. What if the box had only a 10% success rate? A 1% success rate? My guess is: still most valuable object in the world. Even an 0.1% success rate seems pretty good, considering (what if we ask the box for cancer cures, then test them all on lab rats and volunteers?) You have to go pretty low before the box stops being great. I thought about this after reading this list of geniuses with terrible ideas. Linus Pauling thought Vitamin C cured everything. Isaac Newton spent half his time working on weird Bible codes. Nikola Tesla pursued mad energy beams that couldn’t work. Lynn Margulis revolutionized cell biology by discovering mitochondrial endosymbiosis, but was also a 9-11 truther and doubted HIV caused AIDS. Et cetera. Obviously this should happen. Genius often involves coming up with an outrageous idea contrary to conventional wisdom and pursuing it obsessively despite naysayers. But nobody can have a 100% success rate. People who do this successfully sometimes should also fail at it sometimes, just because they’re the kind of person who attempts it at all. Not everyone fails. Einstein seems to have batted a perfect 1000 (unless you count his support for socialism). But failure shouldn’t surprise us.

ROYAL MEDICAL RADIO
ROYAL MEDICAL TREATMENT(1-08-19)

ROYAL MEDICAL RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2019 52:40


January 08, 2019--Daniel Royal, DO, CTP, JD interviews True Ott, PhD, an expert in minerals and owner of Mother Earth's Minerals, who worked with Linus Pauling, PhD....Tired of disease management? Seeking health optimization? Want to know more about Stem Cells, Natural Cancer Treatments, etc.? Listen to "THE ROYAL TREATMENT."

Trocando Ideia
S02E39 - "A melhor maneira de ter uma boa ideia é..."

Trocando Ideia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2018 10:40


"A melhor maneira de ter uma boa ideia é ter muitas." Linus Pauling

DrauzioCast
DrauzioCast #020 | Óleo de rícino

DrauzioCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2018 2:34


Já ouviu falar que essa substância é boa para dores articulares? Dr. Drauzio comenta neste podcast sobre óleo de rícino. Alguns anos atrás uma senhora que sofria de reumatismo me contou ter sido tratada com óleo de rícino. Isso mesmo. Duas vezes por semana ela ia ao consultório e o médico perguntava “hoje a senhora prefere o vermelho ou o alaranjado?”. Vermelha era a cor do pote que continha óleo de rícino com groselha; no outro, o óleo vinha misturado com essência de laranja, para disfarçar o gosto insuportável. Tenho uma novidade: o mais desconcertante é que a senhora estava convencida que, graças à ação do famigerado óleo, as dores estavam em período de acalmia. Óleo de rícino é dotado de atividade anti-reumática? É pouco provável, mas a medicina naquele tempo oferecia recursos pequenos e não era baseada em evidências experimentais como a de hoje. Os médicos adotavam condutas e receitavam remédios com base em teorias jamais comprovadas cientificamente, ou de acordo com ideias pré-concebidas em experiências pessoais.  Veja também: Homeopatia previne doenças? | Checagem Parte expressiva desse entulho do empirismo ainda se acotovela nas prateleiras das farmácias, sob rótulos de protetores do fígado, fortificantes, revitalizadores, complexos vitamínicos e de mirabolantes associações de panacéias que apregoam no rádio e na TV curar males tão diversos, como falta de memória, fraqueza, irregularidades menstruais, gripes e doenças do fígado. O caso da vitamina C é um bom exemplo. Nos anos 1970, o cientista Linus Pauling lançou a ideia de que vitamina C em doses altas melhoraria a imunidade, preveniria gripes, resfriados e até câncer. Embora Pauling tenha sido agraciado duas vezes com o prêmio Nobel — o de Química e o da Paz —, ele entendia de medicina quanto eu de pontes e de barragens. O resultado foi o uso indiscriminado de vitamina C, porque usuários contumazes que passam dois anos sem gripe atribuem à vitamina o poder protetor. Quem teve um resfriado que foi embora em dois ou três dias, enquanto o do vizinho levou cinco, faz o mesmo. O uso de vitamina C alardeado por Pauling ainda rende centenas de milhões de dólares em vendas anuais, mas não foi suficiente para livrá-lo do câncer de próstata no fim da vida, nem demonstrou qualquer eficácia na prevenção ou tratamento de gripes e resfriados em nenhum estudo científico realizado.

不可理论
11: 打开潘多拉的黑箱

不可理论

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2018 37:46


如何内建一个科学思维的人格?如何追随科学家和工程师?带着这个目的读了《科学在行动》,我得到了意外的收获…… 邮箱:bukelilun@outlook.com 网站:bukelilun.com Bruno Latour, Science in Action (1987) 中文版:布鲁诺·拉图尔《科学在行动》 Bruno Latour and Steve Woolgar, Laboratory Life (1986) 中文版:布鲁诺·拉图尔、史蒂夫·伍尔加《实验室生活》 「两幅面孔」:罗马神话中的双面神雅努斯(Janus) 形成中的科学 Science in the making,已形成的科学 Ready made science 黑箱(black box)(请注意,black box也可以是一个动词,黑箱化) Bruno Latour, Science in Action - Introduction “Opening Pandora’s Black Box” (Google "Science in Action pdf" 即可读到英文原文) 参与DNA双螺旋结构确立的相关科学家:Linus Pauling, James Watson, Francis Crick, Jerry Donohue, Maurice Wilkins, Rosalind Franklin Bruno Latour的规则与定理总结 推翻「故事不合理」结论的方法:1、在讲故事的人的背景里讲一个结构一样的故事;2、不断重新讲故事,在发现逻辑漏洞时重新审视语境;3、延长故事的时间线。 「罗辑思维」第478期 「荣誉归于最后的人」对贝尔和格雷的电话发明争议的解读 不可理论网站:bukelilun.com 宝婷的「利器」访谈 BGM:Two Steps From Hell - Science Re:plus - Everlasting Truth

Ostensiblings
Vitamin A, B, C

Ostensiblings

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2018


Some links from the show: Vitamin A and night visions British Journal of Opthalmology: Night vision in a case of vitamin A deficiency due to malabsorption Types of vitamin A National Institutes of Health: Vitamin A Overdosing on vitamin A Wikipedia: Hypervitaminosis A How vegans get B12 PETA: Vegan B12 sources that will make you healthy in body and mind Linus Pauling's vitamin C quest Vox: How Linus Pauling duped America into believing vitamin C cures colds Does vitamin C treat colds? Cochrane Library: Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold WebMD: Vitamin C for the common cold

Oregon Real Estate Podcast
Should You Buy A Celebrity Home?

Oregon Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2018 9:43


President Herbert Hoover. Grammy Award nominee Gino Vannelli. Double Nobel laureate Linus Pauling. Renowned chef James Beard. Composer Ernest Bloch.  Authors Beverly Cleary and Walt Morey. Actors Sally Struthers, Frank Cady and Ginger Rogers. What do the people on this diverse list have in common? Celebrities all, they have each called Oregon 'home.' 

Scaling UP! H2O
032 The One with Dick Hourigan

Scaling UP! H2O

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2018 59:33


032 The One with Dick Hourigan,  What I’ve Learned From 45 Years In The Water Treatment Industry. Episode 32: Show Notes. Today on the show we welcome Dick Hourigan. Dick is a Retired US Army Special Forces Lieutenant Colonel and an Analytical Chemist who has been in the water treatment industry since 1973. After being retrenched from his job in 1992, Dick founded Richard Hourigan Inc., as an Illinois water treatment company serving Illinois and southern Wisconsin customers. In 2007, Dick also launched his own website, www.RichardHouriganInc.com and in 2009 opened www.TheWaterTreatmentStore.com to sell his water treatment products on the global market. In 2010 Dick also opened www.MissedPerceptions.com, which is a blog that serves to facilitate communication with global customers. 2018 will mark the 45th year of Dick being in the water treatment industry. He has had a lot of unique experiences and today shares the trials and the triumphs of being a water treater for the most part of his life. There is so much value in hearing the experience of others in this industry and in this episode, Dick walks us through his first jobs, the process of starting his own company and encourages us to never give up and to do whatever you do, well. Take a listen! [0:02:00.0] Key Points From This Episode: Find out the three cornerstones in Dick’s life and career. [0:02:28.0] How Dick found himself in the water treatment industry. [0:03:08.0] Dick’s process and advice for approaching customers. [0:07:27.0] Learn more about Dick’s first beginnings as a sales manager. [0:11:00.0] How Dick picked himself up after getting fired and discovered a new path. [0:17:30.0] Why Dick decided to start his own company and how he did it. [0:20:30.0] When Dick knew that he had made it as a business owner. [0:24:50.0] Find out why Dick has never hired a single employee. [0:26:05.0] Why Dick’s biggest accomplishment was achieved in his first job. [0:26:50.0] The most prolific changes Dick has seen in the water treatment industry. [0:31:48.0] Why Dick applauds the stupid things that happen in the field. [0:34:30.0] Hear Dick’s advice for anyone starting out in the industry. [0:36:15.0] Where do you go to learn more about water treatment? [0:37:45.0] The first steps Dick takes in any troubleshooting process. [0:42:40.0] Questions from the mail bag! [0:52:00.0] And much more!  Tweetables:  “Almost none of us got into this business intentionally.” — @dhourigan [0:03:12.0]  “I thought hiring an employee is either going to be the best or the worst thing I ever do.” —  @dhourigan [0:26:05.0] “Anything that is worth doing, is worth doing well.” — @dhourigan [0:36:15.0]  “It’s not what happens in our life that defines us, it’s how we respond to those things.” — @dhourigan [0:49:40.0] Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode: Dick Hourigan on LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/dickhourigan/ Dick Hourigan Inc – https://www.richardhouriganinc.com The Water Treatment Store – https://richardhouriganinc.com/sunshop/ Dick Hourigan on Twitter – https://twitter.com/dhourigan General Chemistry by Linus Pauling – http://amzn.to/2GW3Epr The Narrative of Life by Frederick Douglass – http://amzn.to/2BO3lNZ Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly – http://amzn.to/2BNnnIE Killing Patton by Bill O’Reilly – http://amzn.to/2BhaDJ3 Uhlig’s Corrosion Handbook - http://amzn.to/2siDLN1  

Functional Neurology Minute Podcast
Episode #22: Food sensitivities: Causes, prevention, and solutions

Functional Neurology Minute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2018 69:51


Download this podcast Dr. Aristo Vojdani is back to explain some fascinating basics about food sensitivities and oral tolerance. For instance, did you know dental cavities and gum disease can increase your risk of food sensitivities and autoimmunity? Or that eating the same food too often can weaken your immunity? You’ll learn about "nature’s vaccine" — secretory IgA (SIgA) — that will make you want to become an SIgA warrior so you can stay healthier, enjoy a more diverse diet, and maintain healthy immunity. Dr. Vojdani explains Cyrex Labs’ Array 14 screen of mucosal immunity (SIgA) and how to make sure your SIgA levels are healthy prior to testing. Dr. Vojdani's bio: Aristo Vojdani, PhD, MSc, CLS, obtained his MSc and PhD in the fields of microbiology and clincal immunology from Bar-Ilan University in Israel with postdoctoral studies in comparative immunology at UCLA and tumor immunology at Charles Drew/UCLA School of Medicine and Science. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Dept. of Preventive Medicine at Loma Linda University in California, and an Adjunct Professor at the Lincoln College of Professional, Graduate and Continuing Education at the National University of Health Sciences. His ongoing research focuses on the role of environmental triggers in complex diseases. Dr. Vojdani's research has resulted in the development of more than 300 antibody assays for the detection of autoimmune disorders and other diseases. He holds fifteen US patents for laboratory assessments of immune disorders associated with the brain and gut, has published more than 170 articles in magazines and scientific journals, and has just published the book "Neuroimmunity and the Brain-Gut Connection" with Nova Science Publishers. He is the CEO and Technical Director of Immunosciences Lab in Los Angeles, California, and is also the Chief Scientific Advisor for Cyrex Labs in Phoenix, Arizona. Dr. Vojdani sits on the editorial board of five scientific journals. Over the years he has received the Herbert J. Rinkel Award, the Linus Pauling, PhD Award, and the F. R. Carrick Research Institute’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Pioniere der Naturheilkunde

Audiovortrag mit dem Inhalt Linus Pauling. Banales und Besonderes rund um Linus Pauling in dieser kurzen Arbeit. Eine Ausgabe des Naturheilkunde Podcasts von und mit Sukadev Bretz, Yogalehrer bei Yoga Vidya. Anmerkung: Gesundheitliche Informationen in diesem Podcast sind nicht gedacht für Selbstdiagnose und Selbstbehandlung, sondern Gedankenanstöße aus dem Gebiet der Naturheilkunde. Bei eigener Erkrankung brauchst … „Linus Pauling“ weiterlesen

Côté jardin
Jean Audouze / «Fabuleuses erreurs De Darwin à Einstein » paru aux Editions CNRS

Côté jardin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2017


À propos du livre : « Fabuleuses erreurs De Darwin à Einstein » aux éditions  / CNRS Charles Darwin, Lord William Kelvin, Linus Pauling, Fred Hoyle, Albert Einstein : cinq scientifiques hors du commun qui ont accompli des découvertes scientifiques considérables. Mais également cinq hommes qui se sont aussi, souvent en même temps, parfois lourdement, fourvoyés sur certains sujets. Charles Darwin n’a pas bien évalué les effets de « dilution » dans la transmission des caractères génétiques ; Lord Kelvin a largement sous-évalué l’âge de la Terre ; Linus Pauling s’est fait « coiffer au poteau » dans la découverte de la structure de l’ADN par Jim Watson et Francis Crick ; Fred Hoyle fut un partisan irréductible de la théorie de l’Univers stationnaire ; enfin, Einstein créa une constante cosmologique pour une mauvaise raison. Il ne s’agit pas d’énumérer les erreurs de ces grands hommes, mais bien plutôt de constater et d’analyser les conséquences bénéfiques de ces errements : la théorie de l’évolution de Darwin fonde la génétique moderne ; Kelvin enseigne à ses successeurs comment utiliser la thermodynamique en astronomie et en géologie ; Linus Pauling introduit superbement les considérations chimiques en biologie ; Fred Hoyle démontre les bienfaits et les limites des approches scientifiques qui se démarquent des théories « à la mode » et, curieusement, au lieu d’être une erreur, l’introduction de la constante cosmologique par Einstein s’avère extraordinairement bénéfique. C’est à une véritable enquête policière, qui dévoile de nombreux aspects jusque-là ignorés de l’histoire des sciences, que s’est consacré l’astrophysicien Mario Livio, qui expose ici de façon originale et vivante les chemins parfois tortueux empruntés par la recherche scientifique À propos du livre : « L’école de la curiosité » aux éditions Vuibert Au fil d’une carrière commencée il y a près d’un demi-siècle, Jean Audouze a tout connu de la science, depuis la recherche en laboratoire jusqu’aux négociations internationales, en passant par la direction de grandes institutions. D’Hubert Reeves à François Mitterrand, il a travaillé avec les plus grands. Alors que sévit une « guerre contre la science », il nous raconte à l’aide de nombreuses anecdotes la science au quotidien et surtout nous explique pourquoi il faut la défendre. C’est la mission qu’il confie aux jeunes scientifiques d’aujourd’hui et à tous ceux pour qui la curiosité et la passion d’apprendre constituent les plus beaux des défauts. Jean Audouze est astrophysicien. Il est l’auteur des Secrets du Cosmos à La Librairie Vuibert (2016).

Côté jardin
Jean Audouze / «L’école de la curiosité » paru aux Editions La librairie Vuibert

Côté jardin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2017


À propos du livre : «L’école de la curiosité » aux éditions La librairie Vuibert Au fil d’une carrière commencée il y a près d’un demi-siècle, Jean Audouze a tout connu de la science, depuis la recherche en laboratoire jusqu’aux négociations internationales, en passant par la direction de grandes institutions. D’Hubert Reeves à François Mitterrand, il a travaillé avec les plus grands. Alors que sévit une « guerre contre la science », il nous raconte à l’aide de nombreuses anecdotes la science au quotidien et surtout nous explique pourquoi il faut la défendre. C’est la mission qu’il confie aux jeunes scientifiques d’aujourd’hui et à tous ceux pour qui la curiosité et la passion d’apprendre constituent les plus beaux des défauts. Jean Audouze est astrophysicien. Il est l’auteur des Secrets du Cosmos à La Librairie Vuibert (2016). À propos du livre : «Fabuleuses erreursDe Darwin à Einstein » aux éditions  / CNRS éditions Charles Darwin, Lord William Kelvin, Linus Pauling, Fred Hoyle, Albert Einstein : cinq scientifiques hors du commun qui ont accompli des découvertes scientifiques considérables. Mais également cinq hommes qui se sont aussi, souvent en même temps, parfois lourdement, fourvoyés sur certains sujets. Charles Darwin n’a pas bien évalué les effets de « dilution » dans la transmission des caractères génétiques ; Lord Kelvin a largement sous-évalué l’âge de la Terre ; Linus Pauling s’est fait « coiffer au poteau » dans la découverte de la structure de l’ADN par Jim Watson et Francis Crick ; Fred Hoyle fut un partisan irréductible de la théorie de l’Univers stationnaire ; enfin, Einstein créa une constante cosmologique pour une mauvaise raison. Il ne s’agit pas d’énumérer les erreurs de ces grands hommes, mais bien plutôt de constater et d’analyser les conséquences bénéfiques de ces errements : la théorie de l’évolution de Darwin fonde la génétique moderne ; Kelvin enseigne à ses successeurs comment utiliser la thermodynamique en astronomie et en géologie ; Linus Pauling introduit superbement les considérations chimiques en biologie ; Fred Hoyle démontre les bienfaits et les limites des approches scientifiques qui se démarquent des théories « à la mode » et, curieusement, au lieu d’être une erreur, l’introduction de la constante cosmologique par Einstein s’avère extraordinairement bénéfique. C’est à une véritable enquête policière, qui dévoile de nombreux aspects jusque-là ignorés de l’histoire des sciences, que s’est consacré l’astrophysicien Mario Livio, qui expose ici de façon originale et vivante les chemins parfois tortueux empruntés par la recherche scientifique.            Traduit par Jean Audouze

Heart Doc VIP with Dr. Joel Kahn
Vitamin C Is What the Doctor Ordered With Dr. Daniel Chong

Heart Doc VIP with Dr. Joel Kahn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2017 27:01


Dr. Daniel Chong is a naturopathic doctor in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Kahn and Dr. Chong trained together over the years and he specializes in heart issues. He just delivered a keynote address on vitamin C and the heart. In this episode he talks about the C Cleanse, Dr. Russell Jaffe, Perque vitamins, Dr. Matthias Rath and Dr. Linus Pauling. Their work combined points to the need for much higher doses of vitamin C to prevent heart disease than most of us eat or take. This is a very important discussion, particularly if you have a high Lipoprotein a (lp a) level, the sticky cholesterol.

Your Nutrition Prescription Podcast
Episode #3: Vitamin C can do what? Immune Enhancing and Potential Cancer Protective Effects of this Diverse Micronutrient

Your Nutrition Prescription Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2017 13:57


In this episode of Your Nutrition Prescription we are going talk all about Vitamin C. I am going to review the health enhancing properties of this diverse vitamin, we are going to highlight some controversy surrounding Vitamin C and nobel prize winner Linus Pauling and even cover some new research that implicates Vitamin C as a potential treatment modality for cancer. I will give a list of the top vitamin C containing foods and some tips for how to use it as a supplement if you choose to go that route.  To connect with me follow me on social media: Instagram: @DrAdrianChavez Facebook: Facebook.com/AdrianCPhd Website: www.DrAdrianChavez.com

Elite Man Podcast
How To Doctor Yourself With Vitamin C, Niacin, And Orthomolecular Medicine – Dr. Andrew Saul (Ep. 129)

Elite Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2017 71:21


Dr. Andew Saul, world-renowned therapeutic nutrition specialist, creator of That Vitamin Movie, founder of DoctorYourself.com, and known by many as “The Megavitamin Man”, joins our show in this special episode of the Elite Man Podcast! In today’s episode Dr. Saul talks about the power of taking high-dose vitamin c, why niacin can change your life, and how to doctor yourself to keep yourself healthy. Dr. Saul shares with us his vitamin c protocol, what to do if you get really, really sick, why Linus Pauling was right all along with his vitamin c research, and why the pharmaceutical industry doesn’t want you to take vitamins. If you’re wondering what you can do right now to become a healthier man, prevent yourself from getting sick, and how to use vitamins to heal yourself if you do become ill, check this episode out now! *Download this episode now and subscribe to our channel to get more of these amazing interviews! In our episode we go over: How Dr. Andrew Saul got into the industry of natural health and orthomolecular medicine Why his children never had to use antibiotics and were never really sick What Dr. Saul’s vitamin c protocol looks like and what he recommends others use Why human beings and guinea pigs don’t produce their own vitamin c and what this means in terms of how much we should be consuming Why Linus Pauling was right about vitamin c and why his tests were intentionally replicated the wrong way to “disprove” they worked The fact that cancer patients who took Pauling’s vitamin c therapy lived 5x longer than patients who did not How vitamin c was able to reduce the symptoms and even reverse polio back in the 1930’s What type of vitamin c you should be taking How much water you should be consuming when you take vitamin c What bowel tolerance really means and why it’s important to get to this level when taking vitamin c for therapeutic benefits Why people with a sensitive stomach may want to take vitamin c with food, consume more water, or take a buffered vitamin c What form to take of vitamin c when you’re really sick My experience with taking high-dose vitamin c for my viral pneumonia Why I regularly take about 5,000mg of vitamin c every day The many uses that niacin has and why you should be taking this often overlooked but very important vitamin How to take niacin the right way and how to deal with the “flushing” sensation How much niacin you should take each day Using niacin as a treatment for schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and more What Dr. Andrew Saul takes for supplements and vitamins every day Check out Andrew on: Website: doctoryourself.com Book: amazon.com/doctoryourself *Also go to EliteLifeNutrition.com to get ready for the launch of our very own natural and organic supplement line. We’re coming out with our own vitamins, minerals, herbs, and supplements to help you become as healthy as possible! We’re just about ready to FINALLY unroll our first products in a couple of weeks and if you want to know exactly how to get them, sign up for our email newsletter now. These will be the highest quality and purest supplements on the market!

Strange Attractor
Episode 18: I've got evidence for a pea which is 2 centimetres wide

Strange Attractor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2016 57:17


What is science? Where are you from? Send us a postcard! Strange Attractor, c/ PO Box 9, Fitzroy, VIC 3065, Australia Understanding science: A great site Lucy found that kinda explains it all (University of California, Berkeley) Tyler Durden (Wikipedia) What is science? (University of California, Berkeley) What is the scientific method? (University of California, Berkeley) Some opinions on what is theoretical vs practical science (The Straight Dope) What is pure mathematics? (Wikipedia) What is applied mathematics? (Wikipedia) Game of Thrones (Wikipedia) Science is focussed on the natural vs supernatural world - the 'natural' world means anything in the universe, including anything that humans make (University of California, Berkeley) ESP: What can science say? (University of California, Berkeley) UriGeller.com What is reproducibility? A key principle of the scientific method (Wikipedia) The role of replication in science (University of California, Berkeley) Dutch agency launches first grants programme dedicated to replication (Nature) Lithium, sodium & potassium react with water (YouTube) Magnesium ribbon burns bright white (YouTube) Newton's three laws of motion (NASA) Kepler's three laws for the motion of planets (HyperPhysics, Georgia State University) Newton's laws are amazing but don't work at very small scales, very high speeds or very strong gravitational fields (Wikipedia) How did NASA conclude that the general theory of relativity was not needed for Earth-moon flight path computation? (Stack Exchange, Space Exploration) What is general relativity? (Wikipedia) What is special relativity? (Wikipedia) Relativity has everyday applications, like GPS (Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University) The Martian (Wikipedia) The discovery of genetics from Mendel to the human genome project is an example of a long-term group effort in science (CogWeb, UCLA) Gregor Mendel & the principles of inheritance (Nature) Interactive timeline on the history of genetics from Darwin to the 21st century (Wellcome Library) Aristotle & ancient Greek genetic theory (About Education) Gregor Mendel died in 1884 & his work wasn't taken seriously until after his death (Wikipedia) Charles Darwin saw an important platypus in Wallerawang, NSW, near where Lucy grew up (Lithgow.com) Einstein used to be a patent clerk in Switzerland (Swiss Federal Institute of Intellectual Property) Fermat's Last Theorem: "The first successful proof was released in 1994 by Andrew Wiles, & formally published in 1995, after 358 years of effort by mathematicians" (Wikipedia) The Higgs boson discovery in the Large Hadron Collider (CERN) Australia's CSIRO coated many of the ultra-high-performance mirrors used in the LIGO to detect the first gravitational waves (CSIRO) The polar bear natural gas ad...sooo cosy (YouTube) Scientists are more creative than you might imagine (The Atlantic) Infographic: What is the cosmic microwave background? (Space.com) Stanley Kubrick (bio.) Crick, Watson, Wilkins, Franklin & DNA (Chemical Heritage Foundation) Sexism in science: Did Watson & Crick really steal Rosalind Franklin's data? (The Guardian) Mendeleev apparently dreamt the periodic table! (Wikipedia) A decade of deep thinking: Princeton Center for Theoretical Science celebrates 10 years (Princeton) Australia's CSIRO overcame the problem of 'reverberation' to invent WiFi (CSIRO) Alas the patent for WiFi has now expired, but not before earning the CSIRO millions of dollars, which was reinvested into more sciencey stuff (The Australian Business Review) Fact or fiction?: NASA spent millions to develop a pen that would write in space, whereas the Soviet cosmonauts used a pencil (Scientific American) Science relies on evidence (University of California, Berkeley) The dark side of Linus Pauling's legacy: Debating the benefits of vitamin C (Quackwatch) DNA was discovered in 1869 & its structure presented in 1953 (History) James Watson is still alive (Wikipedia) Francis Crick died in 2004 (Wikipedia) Stanford Professor Andrei Linde celebrates physics breakthrough (YouTube) Why Einstein was wrong about being wrong (Phys.org) Corrections Lucy meant Apollo 13 not Apollo 11 when talking about movies where stuff went wrong in space (Wikipedia) Gregor Mendel published his main pea results in the 1860s, not 1870s (Wikipedia) Charles Darwin's Beagle voyage lasted 5 years, not 8 (Wikipedia) Sir Isaac Newton said the quote about "standing on the shoulders of giants", not Galileo (BBC) Peter Higgs thought up the boson concept after a failed camping trip in the 1960s, not 1950s (Wikipedia) Sorry Lucy, NASA didn't invent Velcro, some Swiss guy did in the 1940s...in fairness, Lucy heard this from a real astronaut - who wouldn't believe an astronaut? (NASA) "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence" is attributed to Carl Sagan, not Richard Feynman (Rational Wiki) Cheeky review? (If we may be so bold) It'd be amazing if you gave us a short review...it'll make us easier to find in iTunes: Click here for instructions. You're the best! We owe you a free hug and/or a glass of wine from our cellar

Distillations | Science History Institute
Babes of Science, a Guest Episode

Distillations | Science History Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2016 26:17


We’re guessing you know who Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton are, and maybe you’re even familiar with Linus Pauling or Roald Hoffmann. But it turns out that a lot of people can’t name a single female scientist besides Marie Curie. Exasperated by this fact, radio producer Poncie Rutsch made a podcast she titled Babes of Science. The show profiles accomplished scientists from history who also happened to be women. We became such fans of the show that we decided to create a special Babes of Science and Distillations collaborative episode. In it Rutsch profiles Barbara McClintock, a cytogeneticist who discovered transposons, or “jumping genes,” and whose radical ideas made it hard for her to gain acceptance in the field. Show Clock: 00:04 Intro 01:46 Babes of Science: Barbara McClintock 14:37 Interview with Poncie Rutsch Credits: Hosts: Michal Meyer and Bob Kenworthy Guest: Poncie Rutsch  Reporter: Poncie RutschProducer: Mariel Carr Associate Producer: Rigoberto Hernandez These songs courtesy of Free Music Archive: A Way to Get By, Scott Grattonpiano lesson, The RebelGolden, Little Glass MenLittle Strings, The LosersDivider, Chris ZabriskieModulation of the Spirit, Little Glass MenSpontaneous Existence, Little Glass MenPieces of the Present, Scott Gratton Additional music courtesy of the Audio Network.

Cierta Ciencia - Cienciaes.com
La vitamina C y el cáncer

Cierta Ciencia - Cienciaes.com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2016


Linus Pauling, uno de los científicos más destacados y carismáticos del siglo XX dedicó los últimos años de su vida a estudiar los efectos de la vitamina C en diversas enfermedades, cáncer incluido. Dijeron que estaba loco, viejo, senil, a pesar de que en esos mismo años finales seguía produciendo resultados en los diversos campos a los que había dedicado su larga vida en la ciencia. El entusiasmo y la credibilidad de los postulados de Pauling se fueron al traste en 1980, tras dos ensayos clínicos fallidos y se les dio sepultura. Recientemente, en diciembre de 2015, se publicaron on line los resultados de un nuevo estudio que apunta a que Pauling tenía razón después de todo y que la vitamina C es una buena candidata para el tratamiento de algunos tipos de cáncer.

WIKIRADIO 2016
WIKIRADIO del 29/03/2016 - LINUS PAULING raccontato da Telmo Pievani

WIKIRADIO 2016

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2016 29:24


LINUS PAULING raccontato da Telmo Pievani

History Bites Podcast
Episode 3, Part 2 - Full of Pep

History Bites Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2016 33:28


In part two of "Full of Pep" we examine the history of orange juice, vitamins, WWII nutrition, and Adelle Davis and Linus Pauling in the United States.

Nourish Balance Thrive
Mitochondrial Health and Peak Performance, with Dr. Robert Rountree

Nourish Balance Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2015 55:42


So small, so abstract, it’s very hard to get your head around the idea that mitochondria are important. For me, knowing that these tiny organelles make up 10% of our total body weight (25% of the heart) helps put things into perspective. Mitochondria allow us respire with oxygen and produce vast amounts of an energy molecule called ATP. In fact, each one of us produces our body weight in ATP every day! The greater the number of healthy mitochondria, the better you feel and the faster you go. Even more incredible, recent research suggests that mitochondria come from a bacterial lineage and at some point made friends with our cells to form modern eukaryotes. My guest today is functional medicine practitioner and medical doctor, Robert Rountree. Dr. Rountree was named recipient of the Linus Pauling Functional Medicine Award at IFM's 2015 Annual International Conference, held in Austin, Texas. Dr. Rountree received the award for his pioneering work in the development of Functional Medicine and his role as a highly inspirational and informational member of IFM’s faculty. Dr. Rountree is the Chief Medical Officer at Thorne Research. I learned everything I know about the mitochondria through Bryan Walsh’s Metabolic Fitness Pro and the Khan Academy. As promised, here’s the picture of the mitochondrial membrane: One of the most interesting supplements Dr. Rountree talks about during our interview is NiaCell® (nicotinamide riboside). I’ve since done a lot of reading and Dr. Tommy Wood agrees the research is promising. NAD+ levels control almost everything from mitochondrial biogenesis to ability to deal with inflammation and DNA damage. NAD+ drops with inflammation damaged mitochondria. If you’ve done a urinary organic acids test and you have an accumulation of malate, isocitrate, and alpha-ketoglutarate (all need NAD+) as well as lactate (produced in order to regenerate NAD+ from NADH), and possibly quinolinate and kynurenate (both feed into NAD+ production), then you either have high NAD+ requirements or poor NAD+ turnover. In these cases nicotinamide riboside is especially worth worth considering. Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Rountree: [0:05] Christopher’s welcome of Robert. [0:27] Dr. Rountree’s receipt of the 2015 Linus Pauling award and background as Chief Medical officer at Thorne. [2:00] Bob’s interest in nutraceuticals and nutritional treatments and the relationship to functional medicine. [4:28] Christopher’s interest in chatting with Bob about mitochondrial issues and true health. [6:25] Why athletes and people in general should care about their mitochondrial health. [7:32] The mitochondria as the core of healthy metabolic functioning. [9:09] How the mitochondria work: a very basic overview. [12:30] What does a mitochondria look like and what are they? [16:16] Things that make the interplay between cell and mitochondria work better. [17:54] How mitochondria and free radicals impact athletes. [19:18] The importance of using true “antioxidants.” [21:52] Problems that happen with damaged mitochondria: Parkinson’s and diabetes. [25:57] Are the gains needed possible from dietary changes alone? [29:06] How large amounts of carbohydrates damage the cellular pathways in the body. [31:07] What Dr. Rountree recommends for his patients in this area. [34:30] The testing that can be used to measure mitochondrial functioning. [40:00] The use of an unfamiliar nutrient supplement: nicotinamide riboside. [46:08] Why you want more mitochondria to achieve peak performance. [48:00] The supplements Dr. Rountree uses personally and why he believes everyone needs more than food to bolster resistance to chemicals in the environment. [51:44] Dr. Bob’s research and current practice and what he’s doing that is most exciting to him. RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE The Electron Transport Chain at the Khan Academy NiaCell® (nicotinamide riboside) PolyResveratrol-SR® N-acetylcysteine (NAC) Milk Thistle Curcumin Phytosome is in the EXOS multivitamin CoQ10 Genova Diagnostics Organix organic acids test PEOPLE MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Dr. Tommy Wood Linus Pauling Pathway Genomics Dr. Stephen Sinatra

Biochemistry (BIO/CHEM 4361) - Fall 2015
22b. The DNA Structure that Emerges from Nucleotide Structure, and Linus Pauling’s Big Mistake

Biochemistry (BIO/CHEM 4361) - Fall 2015

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2015 34:58


Biochemistry (BIO/CHEM 4361) - Fall 2015
22b. The DNA Structure that Emerges from Nucleotide Structure, and Linus Pauling’s Big Mistake

Biochemistry (BIO/CHEM 4361) - Fall 2015

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2015 34:59


Earth Ancients
Marshall Klarfeld: Archaeological Evidence for the Anunnaki Civilization

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2015 112:54


Marshal Klarfeld is an author and retired engineer. Since his retirement he has researched the work done by Zecharia Sitchin on the mythology of the Sumerian civilization. Like Sitchin, Klarfeld believes Sumerian records chronicle the visitation of an extraterrestrial civilization called the Anunnaki. Klarfeld believes that there is also archaeological evidence of their existence. We talk to Klarfeld about how he first got interested in this topic, and what he believes is the best evidence to indicate that the Sumerian mythologies are real. From Adam: The Missing LinkAs an undergraduate student at CALTECH in the late 1940’s, Marshall was fascinated by the advanced scientific knowledge found in the Bible’s story of creation. Genesis describes the creation of our solar system as occurring in a 6 “day” time frame. His question was, how did this 5,000 year old Bible description of the birth of our solar system disclose the advanced scientific information (the ignition of our Sun occurs at the 4th “day”, in a 6 “day” creation process), thousands of years before we discovered it?Uncertain how to unravel this puzzle, he questioned his Nobel laureate professors, Linus Pauling and Richard Feynman. Their powerful answers stayed with him for decades and inspired him to pursue the knowledge that he is now able to share with the readers of "Adam, The Missing Link." For more information contact Marshall Klarfeld (marshallklarfeld@yahoo.com).or more information on Klarfeld and his books, visit http://www.adamthemissinglink.com/ 

STORY SHARE : Inspiring Stories From The Interview Girl Foundation | Inspiration, Motivation, Charity, Social Good and Storie
Continual, Unrelenting Effort Often Produces Dramatic Results - [Life Lesson Series]

STORY SHARE : Inspiring Stories From The Interview Girl Foundation | Inspiration, Motivation, Charity, Social Good and Storie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2015 6:19


LIFE LESSON SERIES: Continual, Unrelenting Effort Often Produces Dramatic Results To put it very simply: being able to stick with it is often times the trick between those who succeed and those who do not. This is a trait that many people who “we remember in history” have in common. A business friend once asked Edison about the secret to his success. Edison replied, “Genius is hard work, stick-to-itiveness, and common sense.” Along with Thomas Edison - Johannes Kepler, Albert Einstein, Sir Isaac Newton, and Linus Pauling are some other famous historical figures who are all known for their tenacity. CHECK OUT: 1.) Interview Girl On YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/MsToriStory 2.) The Interview Girl FOUNDATION: http://interviewgirl.org/ 3.) Victoria's New BOOK: http://www.amazon.com/Because-Medicine-Ran-Out-InterviewGirl-com/dp/0692297138/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1438041469&sr=1-1&keywords=because+the+medicine+ran+out 4.) DOCUMENTARY FILM Coming Soon: http://chasingtime.us/ The Interview Girl Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to serving others and making a difference in this world by eliminating miseries that others experience. Stories, advice, interviews, and content are shared for the purpose of helping others (eliminating misery). Every project completed helps a different cause. People throughout the world experience various miseries and each product produced at the Interview Girl Foundation aids someone who is experiencing misery. The Interview Girl Foundation is a DO-GOOD organization that uses STORIES to achieve SOCIAL GOOD. http://InterviewGirl.org/ JOIN THE 7-DAY STORY CHALLENGE TODAY!: http://interviewgirl.org/stories/

Healthy Tips Podcast – Better Living Institute
Can Vitamin C Cure Heart Disease? The Linus Pauling Therapy for Reducing Heart Disease

Healthy Tips Podcast – Better Living Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2014 25:45


•Dr. Linus Pauling was a chemist and researcher, especially in the new field of Biochemistry, before it even became a science. He is the only person to win two unshared Nobel prizes, the first for his work in chemistry, and … Continue reading →

Naturheilkunde Podcast
Linus_Pauling

Naturheilkunde Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2014 2:55


Audiovortrag zum Thema Linus_Pauling Simple und komplexe Fakten und Meinungen rund um dieses Thema aus dem Yoga Blickwinkel von Sukadev, dem Gründer des gemeinnützigen Vereines Yoga Vidya e.V. Dieser Audiovortrag ist eine Ausgabe des Audiovortrag zum Thema Fastenaufbau Simple und komplexe Fakten und Meinungen rund um dieses Thema aus dem Yoga Blickwinkel von Sukadev, dem Gründer des gemeinnützigen Vereines Yoga Vidya e.V. Dieser Audiovortrag ist eine Ausgabe des Naturheilkunde Podcast. Er ist ursprünglich aufgenommen als Diktat für einen Lexikonbeitrag im Yoga Wiki Bewusst Leben Lexikon. Zum ganzheitlichen Yoga kann man auch die Theorie von Karma und Reinkarnation dazu zählen. In Ayurveda Ausbildungen erfährst du mehr zum Thema Gesundheit und Prävention. Vielleicht magst du ja deine Gedanken dazu in die Kommentare schreiben. Anmerkung: Gesundheitliche Informationen in diesem Podcast sind nicht gedacht für Selbstdiagnose und Selbstbehandlung, sondern Gedankenanstöße. Bei eigener Erkrankung brauchst du einen Arzt oder Heilpraktiker. Hier findest du: Seminare mit Sukadev Seminarübersicht Themenbezogene Seminare Yoga Vidya YouTube Live Kanal Online Seminare Video Seminare Yoga Vidya kostenlose App Yoga Vidya Newsletter Unseren Online Shop Schon ein kleiner Beitrag kann viel bewegen... Spende an Yoga Vidya e.V.! kunde-podcast.podspot.de">Naturheilkunde Podcast. Er ist ursprünglich aufgenommen als Diktat für einen Lexikonbeitrag im Yoga Wiki Bewusst Leben Lexikon. Zum ganzheitlichen Yoga kann man auch die Theorie von Karma und Reinkarnation dazu zählen. In Ayurveda Ausbildungen erfährst du mehr zum Thema Gesundheit und Prävention. Vielleicht magst du ja deine Gedanken dazu in die Kommentare schreiben. Anmerkung: Gesundheitliche Informationen in diesem Podcast sind nicht gedacht für Selbstdiagnose und Selbstbehandlung, sondern Gedankenanstöße. Bei eigener Erkrankung brauchst du einen Arzt oder Heilpraktiker. Hier findest du: » » » » » »

Açık Bilim Cepyayını
Nobel hastalığı: Baltayı taşa vuran otoriteler

Açık Bilim Cepyayını

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2014 13:41


Bu bir sağlık sorunu değil. Yalnızca, büyük başarılara imza atmış birinin, bilmeden başka alanlarda da ahkâm kesme yetkisini kendinde bulmasına deniyor. Ama çok masum da sayılmaz: Başkalarının canını (veya cebini) yakabiliyor. Linus Pauling (Şekil 1) adını duymadıysanız, ayıp ediyorsunuz: Bu kimya dehası, kimyasal bağların yapısı konusunda yaptığı çalışmayla Nobel Ödülü aldı. Yetmedi, ilk defa bir hastalığın sebebini molekül düzeyinde tespit etti: Orak hücre kansızlığının hemoglobin molekülünün değişiminden kaynaklandığını buldu. Yetmedi, proteinlerin kendilerini soktuğu şekillerden biri olan alfa sarmalını keşfetti. Yetmedi, değişik canlıların kaç yıl önce yollarının birbirlerinden ayrılmış olduğunu hemoglobinlerinin mukayesesiyle hesaplayan bir evrim saati icat etti. Şekil 1. Linus Pauling (solda) ve David Shoemaker, 1983’te Oregon Eyalet Üniversitesi’nde.(Fotoğraf: Oregon Eyalet Üniversitesi arşivleri) Bunlar da yetmedi, Vietnam Savaşı’na, nükleer silahlanmaya ısrarla karşı çıktı, başkalarını da bunlara karşı örgütledi. Döneminin en tanınmış barışseverlerinden biri olarak 1962 yılının Nobel Barış Ödülü’nü aldı. Nobel ödüllü bilim adamı, ama amatör hekim Artık 65 yaşına geldiğinde, keşke 25 yıl daha yaşayıp çağımın bilimsel keşiflerini izleyebilsem diye hayıflanıyorken, kendini doktor diye tanıtan bir şarlatanın lafını dinledi. Adam diyordu ki her gün 3 gram C vitamini alırsa 25 yıldan fazla bile yaşardı. Denedi, daha zinde ve sağlıklı hissetti kendini. Kefeni yırtmıştı. Bir kitap yazdı ve önce günde 3 gram C vitamininin nezleyi ABD’den sileceğini iddia etti. C vitamini ABD’de yok satmaya başladı. Halbuki daha 30 yıl önce yayınlanmış, 980 hasta üzerindeki bir araştırmada C vitamini nezleyi önlememişti. Onun yerine kendi araştırmasını yaptı. Kendi klinik tıp uzmanı olmadığı, bu araştırmanın kalitesinden belli oluyordu. Araştırma, önemli bilimsel dergiler yerine, ancak üyelerinden gelen makaleleri nazlanmadan yayınlayan Bilimler Akademisi dergisi PNAS’de yer bulabildi, Pauling’in üyeliği hatırına. Bu arada Pauling vitamini adım adım günde 3’ten 18 grama çıkardı. Hatta bundan böyle sadece vitaminin değil, iddialarının dozunu da kafasına göre artıracaktı: Bir süre sonra C vitamininin kansere de iyi geleceğini iddia etti. Daha sonra sıra C vitaminini bolca A, E vitaminleriyle, A vitamininin öncüsü olan beta-karotenle, ve bir de bol selenyumla birleştirip aklına gelen her hastalığı aradan çıkardı. AIDS ortaya çıkınca onu da es geçmedi, vitaminler onu da tedavi edebilirdi! Uzatmayalım, bu iddiaların aslında biyolojik veya tıbbi bir temeli yoktu. Ama Pauling’in propogandasının oluşturduğu kamuoyu baskısı muazzamdı: C vitamini önermeyen hekimlere hastaları soruyordu: “Doktor bey, sizin Nobel ödülünüz var mı?” Öyle ya, iki Nobelli Pauling’den iyi mi bileceklerdi? Sırf bu yüzden Pauling’in iddialarına yönelik klinik araştırmalar yapıldı. Geniş çalışmalarda C vitamini ne nezleyi azalttı, ne kanseri yendi, ne de başka bir hastalığı. Bu olumsuz neticeler Pauling’i durdurmadı. Bazılarına kulp taktı, bazılarını umursamadı, ama onca veriye rağmen kendi bildiğinden şaşmadı. Bugün yıllık 28 milyar dolarlık vitamin takviyesi pazarı için ABD’nin vitamin endüstrisi Pauling’e çok şey borçlu. Vitaminin fazlası zarar Zaman geçtikçe vitamin takviyesinin sağlığa zarar bile verebileceği anlaşıldı. Kansere meyilli olan yaşlı ve sigara tiryakisi Fin erkeklerin, E vitamini ve beta-karotenden fayda göreceğini umarak deneye başlayan araştırmacılar, beklentilerinin tam tersiyle karşılaştı: Almayanlara nazaran vitamin alanların daha çoğu akciğer kanseri ve kalp hastalığı geçirip ölmüştü. Başka bir araştırmada ise daha ortasında durduruldu: Asbeste maruz kalanlara koruma amaçlı olarak A vitamini ve beta-karoten verildiğinde kanserde %28, kalp hastalığında %17 artış görülmüştü. E vitamini araştırmalarını derleyen bilim insanları, E vitamini takviyesinin kalp yetmezliği ve ölüm riskini artırdığını buldu.

Because It Matters
Because It Matters – Ron Interviews Mina Carson

Because It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2013 52:51


Mina Carson joins Ron to discuss her biography of Ava Helen Pauling, American human rights activist and wife of Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling.

Learn Chemistry, from the Royal Society of Chemistry

From the Nobel Prize to Making Aircraft from Seaweed, listen to these useful podcasts all about the world of Chemistry.

The Peace Revolution Podcast
Peace Revolution episode 070: How the Mind is Harnessed to Create Human Resources

The Peace Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2013 412:13


  Click here to download this episode, or use the download link at the bottom of the notes for this episode.Notes, References, and Links for further study:Tragedy and Hope dot comInvitation to the Tragedy and Hope online community (link expires monthly)Log in page for the Tragedy and Hope online communityPeace Revolution primary site (2009-2012)*Peace Revolution backup stream (2006-2012)*Includes the 9/11 Synchronicity Podcast (predecessor to Peace Revolution)*These 2 podcasts and lectures amount to 400+ hours of commercial-free educational content, which formulate a comprehensive and conscious curriculum.The Ultimate History Lesson dot com (the film, notes, references, transcript, etc.)IMDB Page for The Ultimate History LessonFacebook Page for The Ultimate History LessonTwitter feed for Tragedy and HopeThe Ultimate History Lesson Official Playlist (on YouTube)UHL Research Bonus Pack and Gatto Fundraiser Pack(fundraiser for media partners and JTG)Partner Coupon Codes (MUST BE IN ALL CAPS):GNOSTICMEDIACORBETTREPORTMEDIAMONARCHYREDICERADIOSCHOOLSUCKSMERIAHELLERFREEDOMSPHOENIXReference Map to Episode 070:(1m-4m) Despotism vs. Aaron Dykes (Infowars Nightly News clip) by R.G.(4m-6m) U.S. Army Kills Kids by Abby Martin (RT)(6m-9m) Robert F. Kennedy did not agree Oswald lone assassin (ABC News)(9m-13m) U.S. Government Found Guilty of Murdering Martin Luther King by Lee Camp(13m-19m) U.S. Court: Martin Luther King Killed by the Authorities by Barrie Zwicker(19m-28m) Richard's introductory monologue(28m-2h50m) Debate: Larken Rose (Anarchy) vs. Tom Willcutts (Authority) History… So It Doesn't Repeat(2h50-5h25m) Briefing: Kevin Cole (Classical Trivium vs. Trivium Method) History… So It Doesn't Repeat(5h25m-6h50m) “Behaviorism in Disguise” School Sucks Podcast #150Hist ory... So It Doesn't Repeat (Official YouTube Series Playlist) Timecodes, notes, links, and references are posted just below the HD video: Notes, Links, & References for "The Trivium Method vs. The Classical Trivium" (recorded February 17, 2013) 1m “The Great Chain of Being and the Organic Unity of the Polis” by Kevin Cole (Winter 2013) 2m “The Trivium Method” by Jan Irvin and Gene Odening @ Gnostic Media dot com 3m “The Trivium Method of Critical Thinking and Creative Problem Solving” vs. the innate method of learning, and comparing it to how the Classical Trivium (as a method of institutionalizing individuals) has historically been used prior to the 21st century. 4m History of the Classical Trivium is the history of the Great Chain of Being, useful in shaping cultures. The Great Chain of Being is defined in classical terms. 5m The concept of “balanced” government and civil society itself, The Ominous Continuity of the “education” system we know as schooling 6m The changing of terms as a means of gaining power over unwitting minds 7m The Occulting of Knowledge to create Power 8m Legacy of 2,500 years of the Noble Lie being used to create Power 9m Romantic Nationalism & Germany vs. Limited Government System, continued definition of the Great Chain of Being (3 estates) 10m Caste System, Divine Right of Kings, and the Classical Trivium; specifically the artificial scarcity of the “7” liberal arts 11m Enkyklios Paideia and the Caste System, Arnold Toynbee “it allows each empire to be immortal” 12m Great Chain of Being and the Classical Trivium in context of Organic Unity 13m United Nations Charter provisions, Positive and Negative Rights, staying knowledgeable about the first principles and jury nullification, Thomas Jefferson and First Principles Article 29: 1. Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible. 2. In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society. Article 30: Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein. 14m Logical foundation of Negative Rights, Irrational foundation of Positive Rights 15m Definition of Organic Unity 16m Scott Buchannan quote on the Classical Trivium to create Organic Unity, Cardinal and Ordinal structures of the story (Buchannan was a Rhodes Scholar) 17m Definitions: The Auctors, The Polis, The Polity, Episcopal, hierarchical structures of authorities, Anglicanism (Church of England) 18m Comparison and Contrast the Trivium Method vs. the Classical Trivium, 7 Liberal Arts, Plato, Aristotle, educational philosophy and Isocrates, 19m The “general education” of the inscribed circle of the Enkyklios Paideia, foreshadowing Fichte and Hegel of the Prussian Education System encyclopedia (n.) 1530s, "course of instruction," from Modern Latin encyclopaedia (c.1500), literally "training in a circle," i.e. the "circle" of arts and sciences, the essentials of a liberal education; from enkyklios "circular," and paideia “education”. According to some accounts such as the American Heritage Dictionary copyists of Latin manuscripts took this phrase to be a single Greek word, enkuklopaedia. 20m plunder v. production and human livestock, classical Trivium as a system of creating production to be plundered… farming plunder 21m Latin education and the Divine Right of Kings, organic unity and feudalism, legitimizing the great chain of being (methods of authority), using the battlefield and education to subjugate individuals for lack of Knowledge. 22m Legitimizing the storyteller as the authority of the day, group-think, authority to control human resources. Any citizen can become an individual through learning habits of self-reliance 23m “Authorities” (educators, sophists) define the “Grammar” of the Classical Trivium, thus making the “Logic” a belief, not an understanding. No knowledge is necessary for belief, in fact belief is often what fills the void created when Knowledge is absent. 24m Unified systems of knowledge, cybernetics and the ship of state (Plato), first principles and common ground (Logic) necessary for linguistic communication. The use of these ideologies to create state systems. 25m Richard Haklyut and Queen Elizabeth, propagating organic unity as “natural”, even though it depends on people ruling over others. Scott Buchannan papers from Harvard University, “Poetry and Mathematics” (foreshadowing role of Rhodes Scholars) Richard Hakluyt (c. 1552 or 1553 – 23 November 1616) was an English writer. He is known for promoting the settlement of North America by the English through his works, notably Divers Voyages Touching the Discoverie of America (1582) and The Principal Navigations, Voiages, Traffiques and Discoueries of the English Nation (1589–1600). 26m Dorothy Sayers and removing the myths to get to the facts of her claims, Reinhold Niebuhr, Royal Institute of International Affairs, Milner Rhodes Roundtable Group, secularizing values to continue organic unity 27m Dorothy Sayers quotes in favor of British Empire building and Cecil Rhodes / Milner Roundtable Group and Organic Unity 28m Origins of the systems which create and facilitate organic unity, cybernetics, using the knowledge of self-learning to dissect the history and identify the contradictions of our public educations 29m Gnostic Media interview with Gene Odening, how the human being learns, removing the dogma from the process of learning for one's self 30m Asking substantial questions and using a method to find valid answers consistently vs. the Classical Trivium (prescribed “Grammar”, mandated “Logic”, rhetoric which reinforces servitude) 31m Isocrates and literacy as a form of slavery (i.e. sophism) until the reader learns how to identify reality and remove unreality (i.e. logic). 32m closed systems of learning to maintain the city-states, aristocracy, and ruling class to manage the polity (public); educating the kings, adopting education system