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Collective behaviour of a large number of (usually) self-propelled entities of similar size

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  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
swarm

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Latest podcast episodes about swarm

DWBRcast
DWBRcast 246 - The Vanquishers!

DWBRcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 90:10


A saga de Doctor Who Flux chega ao fim! Chegamos ao tão aguardado finale da última temporada de Jodie Whittaker... mas foi um final satisfatório? Dentre as tramas de Azure e Swarm, a invasão Sontaran à Terra e o envolvimento do Grand Serpent o que tiramos para fazer um bom finale? Toda a trupe de companions da temporada teve sua importância nesse último episódio? E o misterioso passado da Doutora conseguiu ser revelado? Tudo isso e muito mais no DWBRcast de hoje! Solta esse play aí!

PVD Horror
Screenwriter Matthew Chernov Interview (Shark Swarm, Hard Ride to Hell)

PVD Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 68:57


On this episode we had the pleasure of chatting with screenwriter and journalist Matthew Chernov. Matthew is yet another Rhode Island native who is an absolute horror fanatic. We were able to talk to him about his some of his local horror roots as well as his experience as a screenwriter and what it's been like to see his works adapted to film. As a journalist, Matthew has written a number of horror-based top-10 lists which was fun to delve into, even though PVD Horror was not part of his top horror podcasts list...We hope you can sit back and enjoy this laid back conversation with a fellow horror hound!Be sure to follow us on social media at...YouTubehttps://m.youtube.com/channel/UCOyloOb0puVCXDjJ_ZiPYqgInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/pvdhorrorFacebookhttps://www.facebook.com/pvdhorror/Twitterhttps://twitter.com/PvdHorrorTik Tokhttps://vm.tiktok.com/ZMJBeoamE/Tumblrhttps://pvdhorror.tumblr.com/

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast

This week, a quick trip to Colchester with Joe Ford and Jack Shanahan, to try on a new frock at Sanderson & Grainger before being horribly murdered. In the meantime, of course, James Corden is learning a valuable lesson about fatherhood, while the Doctor comes to terms with his impending certain death, probably. It's Closing Time. Notes and links We start the episode by making a list of similarities between this story and Series 5's The Lodger. By the most amazing coincidence, Joe and Jack joined us for the first time on our episode about The Lodger earlier this year. No, Nathan, it's nail polish remover, not nail polish that finishes off the Cybermen in The Moonbase. (Thanks, Brendan.) Brendan cracks the joke that the Cybermen came from Marinus, which is actually a thing that happens (spoilers) in the Doctor Who Magazine comic The World Shapers. Joe is right — the scene where those Cylons start singing All Along the Watchtower in Battlestar Galactica (2004) is one of the great moments in television history. No spoilers. Team Knight Rider only ran for a single season in 1997–1998, which suggests that the cliffhanger Brendan mentions didn't have the effect on audience figures that the creators might have been hoping for. And finally — it's not Brendan who cracked the code in the tag: the theory that the M in Swarm stands for Meglos comes from @joshryancarr on Twitter. At the time of publication, Flux Chapter 6 is mere hours away, and so there's still time for this theory to be proved true. Fingers crossed. Follow us Nathan is on Twitter as @nathanbottomley, Brendan is @brandybongos, Joe is @docoho and Jack is @shackjanahan. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. Jack and Joe podcast about Doctor Who together on The Nimon Be Praised. Jack also has his own Doctor Who commentary podcast A Hamster with a Blunt Penknife: Jack, Brendan and Nathan have all guested on it. We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on Apple Podcasts, or we'll spend all the money we had saved for your Christmas present on lamps and vegetables. And more You can find Jodie into Terror, our flashcast on the Whittaker Era of Doctor Who, at jodieintoterror.com, at @JodieIntoTerror on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and wherever podcasts can be found. We'll be releasing our final episode for the current series this Tuesday. Our James Bond commentary podcast is called Bondfinger, and you can find that at bondfinger.com, at @bondfingercast on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and everywhere else as well. We're also involved in the Blakes 7 podcast Maximum Power, which is just weeks away fom the end of Series A. Episode 12 will be released today. And finally, there's our new Star Trek commentary podcast, Untitled Star Trek Project, featuring Nathan and friend-of-the-podcast Joe Ford. In our most recent episode, we watched the third Star Trek episode ever recorded — The Corbomite Maneuver.

Project Zion Podcast
435 | Coffee in The Swarm | Jullie Wheaton

Project Zion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 19:36


Today we're back in the Swarm at Graceland University talking to Jullie Wheaton. Jullie is a music education major, plays volleyball, is in InSpire; Community of Christ's missional ministry practicum, and on the Academic Student Council representing her house, Shalom. Host: Mike HoffmanGuest: Jullie Wheaton

Doctor Who: Radio Free Skaro
Radio Free Skaro #826 - Across The Multiverse

Doctor Who: Radio Free Skaro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 103:32


It's time for the Three Who Rule to analyze Doctor Who: Flux – Chapter Five: “Survivors of the Flux”, a veritable casserole of content featuring a multitude of planets, times, Time, Swarm, Azure, more cranky tunnel building, and globe-spanning pottery quests. Did it measure up to last week's Weeping Angel nail-biter? And what treats yet lay in store for us when Flux concludes next week? More to the point, we have statistical ploddings and historical wanderings to amuse you with along with news, views and other things you can peruse! Links: Support Radio Free Skaro on Patreon The Timelash Flux Chapter Five: Survivors of the Flux review Survivors of the Flux RFS twitter poll Village of the Angels BBC One overnight viewing figures 3.45M Village of the Angels AI 79 Village of the Angels BBC America overnights 318K Once, Upon Time BBC One final viewing figures 4.67M Bernard Holley died The Abominable Snowmen to be animated in 2022 Big Finish Eighth Doctor Adventures: Charlotte Pollard – The Further Adventures Big Finish Day April 23, 2022 Doctor Who and Jodie Whittaker on The Dengineers

Dirty Pillows Podcast
Ep. 20: When Animals Attack! (But NO Sharks!) Pt. 1

Dirty Pillows Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 118:13


In honor of Thanksgiving we have a feast of a conversation for you! Let's take a deep dive into the WHEN ANIMALS ATTACK films! In this extra full-bellied-two-parter, we break down the best creature features for you to gorge on with your family. Since we are a little too obsessed with all things shark, we've decided this list can include any living creature, but for fairness and biodiversity sake... NO SHARK FILMS. So join us as we dish on our favorite killer animal flicks from Orcas to Sea Cows (yes really), Birds to Bees (had to..), Crocs and Tigers (oh my!) ... these episodes will give you new insights to your furry feathered favorites and introduce you to many new zoological killers to chew on. In Part One, Krys and Matty talk BURNING BRIGHT, THE SWARM, THE KILLER BEES, ORCA, ANACONDA, ARACHNOPHOBIA, LONG WEEKEND and the WILLARD films. In addition, your ghost hosts discuss new releases like LAST NIGHT IN SOHO, ANTLERS, THE ETERNALS and the long awaited GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE! Take a break from the family talk, and join us at the bad kids table as we gorge on our favorite killers of the Wild Kingdom! Love you.. to Death. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dirtypillows/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dirtypillows/support

rSlash
r/Maliciouscompliance Yell at Me? Enjoy an Angry Swarm of Wasps!

rSlash

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 14:20


r/Maliciouscompliance In today's episode, OP is stuck in the middle of a vicious parking dispute between two tenants at an apartment complex where he works. One of the tenants makes the terrible mistake of screaming at OP, so he happily maliciously complies by moving their parking space next to a dumpster surrounded by an angry cloud of wasps. Enjoy getting stung every time you go to your car, jerkface! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Doctor Who: Tin Dog Podcast
TDP 1028: #DoctorWhoFlux - Once Upon Time

Doctor Who: Tin Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 10:29


  297c 3 "" Azhur Saleem Chris Chibnall 14 November 2021 TBD 75 The Doctor jumps into the temple's time storm and stalls Swarm by hiding Dan, Yaz and Vinder in their pasts, albeit with many details changed. Vinder reluctantly relives his time assisting the dictatorial Grand Serpent, and his demotion upon revealing the Serpent's misdeeds. Bel, a survivor of the Flux, travels through its ruins in a Lupari ship, evading , Sontarans and . The Doctor jumps into her own timestream and recovers memories of her past incarnation, the , and Karvanista raiding the temple to defeat Swarm and rescue the priests, from her time in the Division. She finds the priests and encourages them to return to the temple, but the priests separate her from her past to protect her. A mysterious old entity reprimands the Doctor. Bel is revealed to be searching for Vinder as his true love, and is carrying his child and messages. The Doctor returns Yaz, Dan and Vinder to the present and fixes the timestreams. The Doctor returns Vinder to his Flux-ravaged home planet, after which a Weeping Angel intercepts the TARDIS.

Doctor Who: Discussing Who
Episode 260: Review of Doctor Who Flux, Part III: Once, Upon Time

Doctor Who: Discussing Who

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 54:51


The Doctor returns when The Doctor, Yaz, Dan and Vinder are sent into their own timestreams. What secrets will be uncovered?  Who was the mysterious woman? And, still, who are Azure and Swarm? What did we think of the third episode of Jodie Whittaker's final series of Doctor Who? Find out as we review Doctor Who Flux Part III: Once, Upon Time.  Let us know by connecting with us on social media. Just look for @DiscussingWho. The Discussing Network proudly presents Discussing Who Episode 260.  Hosted by Kyle Jones, Clarence Brown and Lee Shackleford.

The Alphabetical Fugazi
"Suggestion" with Amy Pickering

The Alphabetical Fugazi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 36:12


"Suggestion" by Fugazi https://fugazi.bandcamp.com/track/suggestion End on End: Fire Party interview https://www.buzzsprout.com/893587/9164277-fire-party-new-orleans-opera-full-band-interview "Wendigo" by Swarm of Flies https://swarmofflies.bandcamp.com/track/wendigo Fugazi [1991.02.15] Sacred Heart Church, Washington, D.C. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWMEKcwBpUo Kathleen Hanna: Why I'm Glad Default Genders Wrote A Song About Sexism And Rape Culture https://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/kathleen-hanna-why-im-glad-default-genders-wrote-a-song-about-sexism-and-rape-culture-22420 Conan Neutron's Protonic Reversal-Ep209: Ian Mackaye https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZFwr0jypJ8 Christopher Pepper quoted here about his experience https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/how_to_find_your_purpose_in_life Email the podcast: fugaziAtoZ@gmail.com Donate to the podcast: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/the-alphabetical-fugazi

OTCBPodcast
OTCB 11 - 18 - 21; Shayne Jackson, Reid Reinholdt

OTCBPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 101:58


This week on the return of the OTCBPodcast we chat with the reigning NLL MVP Shayne Jackson from the Swarm, as well as Reid Reinholdt from the Toronto Rock and of the NLLPA. But first we need to welcome the newest member of the show- Pat Gregoire has been a longtime guest of OTCB and we finally convinced him to join the dark-side and hop on as co-host. Jackson was off to an incredible start before the shutdown and while he doesn't like to set too many personal goals, he definitely would like to have the same sort of consistency that saw him record 9 hat-tricks in the Swarms 12 games. Reinholdt has been extremely busy over the last 18 months as he's taken on the role of Vice President of the Players Association. With the Union opting out of the current CBA, there is even more to accomplish over the next few months than ever before. Plus, he's gotta get back in game shape as the Rock open up versus the FireWolves on TSN, December 4th. We bring you the first edition of BoxBets, break down the transaction wire and look deep into the NLL on TSN schedule. All that and more on this week's OTCBPodcast.

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
11/16 5-1 Scorpion Swarm

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 19:25


Well, that's terrifying.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

In the Pit
11.16.21 - Carlos Correa, Deadly Swarm Of Scorpions, Birthdays Are The Deadliest Day Of The Year

In the Pit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 60:22


Today we talked about Carlos Correa's comments about Derek Jeter, a deadly swarm of scorpions leaving 500 hospitalized, birthdays being the deadliest day of the year, and more!

Doctor Who: Discussing Who
Episode 259: Review of Doctor Who Flux, Part II: The War of the Sontarans

Doctor Who: Discussing Who

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 63:06


The Doctor meets Mary Seacole in the past while Dan returns to a changed present day and Yaz meets Vinder somewhere in space. What's going on with Time? Who are Azure and Swarm? What did we think of the second episode of Jodie Whittaker's final series of Doctor Who? Find out as we review Doctor Who Flux Part II: The War of the Sontarans. What did you think of this episode? Let us know by connecting with us on social media. Just look for @DiscussingWho. The Discussing Network proudly presents Discussing Who Episode 259.  Hosted by Kyle Jones, Clarence Brown and Lee Shackleford.

The Doctor Who Big Blue Box Podcast
Woks at the Ready for War of the Sontarans

The Doctor Who Big Blue Box Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 85:18


The NewsNo news this week. Review story this episode: Chapter Two: War of the SontaransCan this second episode carry the momentum from last week and produce another good ep? Lots of Sontar-ha! and the big question still remains... (no, not "What is the flux?" although that is a good question) "Who is Swarm?". Coming next week: Chapter Three: Once, Upon TimeIt looks like the storyline with Swarm and Azure is heating up and there's definitely a Weeping Angels connection in here somewhere. Join us next week for our thoughts. Thank you all for listening to this week's episode and remember to follow the podcast wherever you listen to your podcasts so you don't miss an episode when they land every Friday. Stay cool and until next week - Allons-y!

Campaign Notes Podcast
Episode 151-Poppet's Swarm Welcome

Campaign Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 86:45


The crew battles new foes and icky bugs and stuff.

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Charles Skaggs & Jesse Jackson are joined by special guest companion Holly Mac to discuss "War of the Sontarans", Chapter Two of "Flux", the second episode from Doctor Who Series 13, featuring Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor, Mandip Gill as Yasmin "Yaz" Khan, John Bishop as Dan Lewis, and Sara Powell as Mary Seacole! Find us here:Twitter: @NextStopWho, @CharlesSkaggs, @JesseJacksonDFW @HollyMac_79 Instagram: @nextstopeverywherepodcast Facebook: Facebook.com/Nextstopeverywherepodcast Email: NextStopEverywhereSMG@gmail.com Listen and subscribe to us in Apple Podcasts and leave us a review!

Breaking the Sound Barrier by Amy Goodman
Like Locusts, Lobbyists Swarm COP26 in Glasgow

Breaking the Sound Barrier by Amy Goodman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


By Amy Goodman & Denis Moynihan Critiques of COP26 from activists both inside and outside its walls range from business as usual to abject failure. Despite the presence of an army of fossil fuel lobbyists, some progress in the official proceedings is evident.

Alphabet Flight: A Marvel Encyclopedic Adventure

Jessie and Faith talk about BEES?  Faith is on Over Innsmouth with Jessie.  Jessie is also on Creepy Critters, Over Innsmouth, and Into the Rewatch podcasts. You can help by donating to Patreon. Find us on Twitter and Instagram as @alphabetflight or at the Hodge Pod Facebook Group.

Doctor Who: Tin Dog Podcast
TDP 1025: Doctor Who Flux 2 War of the Sontarans

Doctor Who: Tin Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 19:26


  The Doctor lands the malfunctioning TARDIS near -era , and is met by British general Logan and nurse . The Flux's effects abruptly send Dan back to 2021 Liverpool, and Yaz to a damaged temple full of dying priests, beside  and Vinder. The Doctor deduces that the Sontarans slipped past the Lupari's defences and overtook human history. Dan infiltrates the Sontarans' shipyard. Swarm arrives at the temple, reveals it to be on the planet Time, kills the priests and takes Yaz and Vinder hostage. The Doctor enlists Seacole to gather intelligence on the Sontaran camp, then summons the Sontarans to negotiate a retreat, only to be arrested by Logan's soldiers, who later fight a disastrous battle with them. The Doctor regroups with Seacole and Logan's men, and they disrupt the Sontarans' supplies, but Logan reneges and bombs the camp. The Sontarans discover Dan's presence, but Karvanista rescues him right before destroying the shipyard, which resets the timeline. The Doctor manages to recover the TARDIS and collect Dan, but it is hijacked and brought to the temple, where they are forced to watch as Swarm is about to kill Yaz and Vinder.

Doctor Who: Radio Free Skaro
Radio Free Skaro #823 - Radio Free Skaro #823 - Rice Pudding and Hard Liquor

Doctor Who: Radio Free Skaro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 87:39


This week on Doctor Who: Flux – it's a War! With Sontarans! Plus some noodling about with Azure and Swarm, pots and pans and probic vents and more in the second of six new episodes of one Doctor Who television programme. Join the Three Who Rule for their rumination on a Rutan-free conflict zone as well as reflections on the legacy of Bob Baker, the usual historical delvings in The Timelash and, to Warren's horror, the return of STATS!  Links: Support Radio Free Skaro on Patreon The Timelash Flux Chapter Two: War of the Sontarans review Flux Chapter Three: Once, Upon Time Nov 14, 6:30pm on BBC One Flux Chapter Four: Village of the Angels Nov 21, 6:20pm on BBC One An intro to Dan Lewis The Halloween Apocalypse BBC One overnight viewing figures 4.43M The Halloween Apocalypse BBC One AI 76 Flux Chapter One RFS poll result Flux Chapter Two RFS poll result Flux DVD/Blu-Ray/Steelbook due Jan 24 in the UK Bob Baker died Bob Baker & Dave Martin RFS Miniscope Part 1 Bob Baker & Dave Martin RFS Miniscope Part 2 Time Fracture reopens Nov 26 Time Fracture trailer Doctor Who Magazine 571 will have three covers Big Finish The Fifth Doctor Adventures: Forty due January 2022 Big Finish The Eighth Doctor Stranded 3 due December 2021 Titan Comics Empire of the Wolf due Nov 17 Doctor Who: The Return of Robin Hood by Paul Magrs due July 2022 Doctor Who: A Short History of Everyone due July 2022 2021 Children in Need limited edition Fourth Doctor Pudsey 2021 Children in Need limited edition Eleventh Doctor Pudsey

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Charles Skaggs & Jesse Jackson are joined by special guest companion DJ Nik to discuss "The Halloween Apocalypse", Chapter One of "Flux", the first episode from Doctor Who Series 13, featuring Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor, Mandip Gill as Yasmin "Yaz" Khan, and the debuts of John Bishop as Dan Lewis and Sam Spruell as Swarm! Find us here:Twitter: @NextStopWho, @CharlesSkaggs, @JesseJacksonDFW @HiDarknesspod Instagram: @nextstopeverywherepodcast Facebook: Facebook.com/Nextstopeverywherepodcast Email: NextStopEverywhereSMG@gmail.com Listen and subscribe to us in Apple Podcasts and leave us a review!

Golden Spiral Media All Inclusive Feed
DB 65 – S13E01 – Flux: The Halloween Apocalypse

Golden Spiral Media All Inclusive Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 45:39


The Flux, the Lupari, Swarm, the Weeping Angels, Division, and a new companion; it seems that the 13th Doctor is going out on a high note. For what might be the very first Doctor Who Halloween special "Flux: Chapter one - The Halloween Apocalypse" Starts with a frantic pace that doesn't end until the episode does. Read More... The post DB 65 – S13E01 – Flux: The Halloween Apocalypse appeared first on Golden Spiral Media- Entertainment Podcasts, Technology Podcasts & More.

DWBRcast
DWBRcast Extra - Afinal, o que sabemos sobre A Divisão?

DWBRcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 60:15


Se tem uma coisa que Doctor Who faz bem é introduzir mistérios que fazem os fãs mergulharem em teorias. No caso da Divisão, não é diferente! De Fugitive of the Judoon, passando por The Timeless Children e finalmente por The Halloween Apocalypse, essa organização vem sendo uma das maiores interrogações em nossas cabeças. Quais as reais motivações da Divisão? Qual o envolvimento da Doutora na organização? Qual a relação de Swarm e Azure com a Criança Atemporal? Venha analisar e questionar todos esses dados com a gente! E o mais importante. Lembre-se: A divisão não existe. A Divisão não tem agentes. Esse podcast nunca sequer foi ao ar.

Obie & Ashley
Oliver meets Santa & Country Stars swarm the World Series!

Obie & Ashley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 29:12


Country represented well during this world series and now we have a new Champion. Plus, Obie's wife is getting Christmas cards set and Oliver met Santa! How'd that go?

Upzoned
The Gathering ”Swarm” of Small-Scale Developers

Upzoned

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 33:50


It's no secret here at Strong Towns that the many places that urbanists consider to be the most enduring and timeless and wonderful—from small towns to big cities—were the result of incremental development. In other words, they weren't the result of careful planning, but rather of a decentralized process with ad hoc adaptation over time. Rooted in the creation of these places were ecosystems of tradespeople, laborers, lenders, and small-scale developers. The latter, in particular, are the focus of Strong Towns Senior Editor Daniel Herriges's recent series, Unleash the Swarm: Reviving Small-Scale Development in America's Cities. In this week's special episode of Upzoned, host Abby Kinney talks with Daniel about incremental development, and what work still needs to be done in order to truly build up a “swarm” of small-scale developers across North America. Additional Show Notes Read part one of Unleash the Swarm here, and sign up here to get a copy of the e-book for the series when it becomes available! Abby Kinney (Twitter) Daniel Herriges (Twitter) Theme Music by Kemet the Phantom (Soundcloud) Cover image via Unsplash.

Screaming in the Cloud
Making Multi-Cloud Waves with Betty Junod

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:13


About Betty Betty Junod is the Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware helping organizations along their journey to cloud. This is her second time at VMware, having previously led product marketing for end user computing products.  Prior to VMware she held marketing leadership roles at Docker and solo.io in following the evolution of technology abstractions from virtualization, containers, to service mesh. She likes to hang out at the intersection of open source, distributed systems, and enterprise infrastructure software. @bettyjunod  Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/BettyJunod Vmware.com/cloud: https://vmware.com/cloud TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You know how git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really Please ask someone else!Corey: Thats all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best way I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's git based workflows mean you don't have to play slap and tickle with integrating arcane non-sense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for pets startup, to global fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them, because you don't have to, they get why self service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y.comCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Periodically, I like to poke fun at a variety of different things, and that can range from technologies or approaches like multi-cloud, and that includes business functions like marketing, and sometimes it extends even to companies like VMware. My guest today is the Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware, so I'm basically spoilt for choice. Betty Junod, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today and tolerate what is no doubt going to be an interesting episode, one way or the other.Betty: Hey, Corey, thanks for having me. I've been a longtime follower, and I'm so happy to be here. And good to know that I'm kind of like the ultimate cross-section of all the things [laugh] that you can get snarky about.Corey: The only thing that's going to make that even better is if you tell me, “Oh, yeah, and I moonlight on a contract gig by naming AWS services.” And then I just won't even know where to go. But I'll assume they have to generate those custom names in-house.Betty: Yes. Yes, I think they do those there. I may comment on it after the fact.Corey: So, periodically I am, let's call it miscategorized, in my position on multi-cloud, which is that it's a worst practice that when you're designing something from scratch, you should almost certainly not be embracing unless you're targeting a very specific corner case. And I stand by that, but what that has been interpreted as by the industry, in many cases because people lack nuance when you express your opinions in tweet-sized format—who knew—as me saying, “Multi-cloud bad.” Maybe, maybe not. I'm not interested in assigning value judgment to it, but the reality is that there are an awful lot of multi-cloud deployments out there. And yes, some of them started off as, “We're going to migrate from one to the other,” and then people gave up and called it multi-cloud, but it is nuanced. VMware is a company that's been around for a long time. It has reinvented itself in a few different ways at different periods of its evolution, and it's still highly relevant. What is the Multi-Cloud Solutions group over at VMware? What do you folks do exactly?Betty: Yeah. And so I will start by multi-cloud; we're really taking it from a position of meeting the customer where they are. So, we know that if anything, the only thing that's a given in our industry is that there will be something new in the next six months, next year, and the whole idea of multi-cloud, from our perspective, is giving customers the optionality, so don't make it so that it's a closed thing for them. But if they decide—it's not that they're going to start, “Hey, I'm going to go to cloud, so day one, I'm going to go all-in on every cloud out there.” That doesn't make sense, right, as—Corey: But they all gave me such generous free credit offers when I founded my startup; I feel obligated to at this point.Betty: I mean, you can definitely create your account, log in, play around, get familiar with the console, but going from zero to being fully operationalized team to run production workloads with the same kind of SLAs you had before, across all three clouds—what—within a week is not feasible for people getting trained up and actually doing that. Our position is that meeting customers where they are and knowing that they may change their mind, or something new will come up—a new service—and they really want to use a new service from let's say GCP or AWS, they want to bring that with an application they already have or build a new app somewhere, we want to help enable that choice. And whether that choice applies to taking an existing app that's been running in their data center—probably on vSphere—to a new place, or building new stuff with containers, Kubernetes, serverless, whatever. So, it's all just about helping them actually take advantage of those technologies.Corey: So, it's interesting to me about your multi-cloud group, for lack of a better term, is there a bunch of things fall under its umbrella? I believe Bitnami does—or as I insist on calling it, ‘bitten-A-M-I'—I believe that SaltStack—which I wrote a little bit of once upon a time, which tells me you folks did no due diligence whatsoever because everything I've ever written is molten garbage—Betty: Not [unintelligible 00:04:33].Corey: And—so to be clear, SaltStack is good; just the parts that I wrote are almost certainly terrible because have you met me?Betty: I'll make a note. [laugh].Corey: You have Wavefront, you have CloudHealth, you have a bunch of other things in the portfolio, and yeah, all those things do work across multiple clouds, but there's nothing that makes using any of those things a particularly bad idea even if you're all-in on one cloud provider, too. So, it's a portfolio that applies to a whole bunch have different places from your perspective, but it can be used regardless of where folks stand ideologically.Betty: Yes. So, this goes back to the whole idea that we meet the customers where they are and help them do what they want to do. So, with that, making sure these technologies that we have work on all the clouds, whether that be in the data center or the different vendors, so that if a customer wants to just use one, or two, or three, it's fine. That part's up to them.Corey: The challenge I've run into is that—and maybe this is a ‘Twitter Bubble' problem, but unfortunately, having talked to a whole bunch of folks in different contexts, I know it isn't—there's almost this idea that you have to be incredibly dogmatic about a particular technology that you're into. I joke periodically about the Rust Evangelism Strikeforce where their entire job is talking about using Rust; their primary IDE is PowerPoint because they're giving talks all the time about it rather than writing code. And great, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but there are the idea of a technology purist who is taking, “Things must be this way,” well past a point of being reasonable, and disregarding the reality that, yeah, the world is messy in a way that architectural diagrams never are.Betty: Yeah. The architectural diagrams are always 2D, right? Back to that PowerPoint slide: how can I make pretty boxes? And then I just redraw a line because something new came out. But you and I have been in this industry for a long time, there's always something new.And I think that's where the dogmatism gets problematic because if you say we're only going to do containers this way—you know, I could see Swarm and Kubernetes, or all-in on AWS and we're going to use all the things from AWS and there's only this way. Things are generational and so the idea that you want to face the reality and say that there is a little bit of everything. And then it's kind of like, how do you help them with a part of that? As a vendor, it could be like, “I'm going to help us with a part of it, or I'm going to help address certain eras of it.” That's where I think it gets really bad to be super dogmatic because it closes you off to possibly something new and amazing, new thinking, different ways to solve the same problem.Corey: That's the problem is left to our own devices, most of us who are building things, especially for random ideas, yeah, there's a whole modern paradigm of how I can build these things, but I'm going to shortcut to the thing I know best, which may very well the architectures that I was using 15 years ago, maybe tools that I was using 15 years ago. There's a reason that Vim is still as popular as it is. Would I recommend it to someone who's a new user? Absolutely not; it's user-hostile, but back in my days of being a grumpy sysadmin, you learned vi because it was on everything you could get into, and you never knew in what environment you were going to be encountering stuff. These days, you aren't logging in to remote systems to manage them, in most cases, and when it happens, it's a rarity and a bug.The world changes; different approaches change, but you have to almost reinvent your entire philosophy on how things work and what your career trajectory looks like. And you have to give up aspects of what you've considered to be part of your identity and embrace something new. It was hard for me to accept that, for example, Docker and the wave of containerization that was rolling out was effectively displacing the world that I was deep in of configuration management with Puppet and with Salt. And the world changes; I said, “Okay, now I'll work on cloud.” And if something else happens, and mainframes are coming back again, instead, well, I'm probably not going to sit here railing against the tide. It would be ridiculous to do that from my perspective. But I definitely understand the temptation to fight against it.Betty: Mm-hm. You know, we spend so much time learning parts of our craft, so it's hard to say, “I'm now not going to be an expert in my thing,” and I have to admit that something else might be better and I have to be a newbie again. That can be scary for someone who's spent a lot of time to be really well-versed in a specific technology. It's funny that you bring up the whole Docker and Puppet config management; I just had a healthy discussion over Slack with some friends. Some people that we know and comment about some of the newer areas of config management, and the whole idea is like, is it a new category or an evolution of? And I went back to the point that I made earlier is like, it's generations. We continually find new ways to solve a problem, and one thing now is it [sigh] it just all goes so much faster, now. There's a new thing every week. [laugh] it seems sometimes.Corey: It is, and this is the joy of having been in this industry for a while—toxic and broken in many ways though it is—is that you go through enough cycles of seeing today's shiny, new, amazing thing become tomorrow's legacy garbage that we're stuck supporting, which means that—at least from my perspective—I tend to be fairly conservative with adopting new technologies with respect to things that matter. That means that I'm unlikely to wind up looking at the front page of Hacker News to pick a framework to build a banking system in, and I'm unlikely to be the first kid on my block to update to a new file system or database, just because, yeah, if I break a web server, we all laugh, we make fun of the fact that it throws an error for ten minutes, and then things are back up and running. If I break the database, there's a terrific chance that we don't have a company anymore. So, it's the ‘mistakes will show' area and understanding when to be aggressive and when to hold back as far as jumping into new technologies is always a nuanced decision. And let's be clear as well, an awful lot of VMware's customers are large companies that were founded, somehow—this is possible—before 2010. Imagine that. Did people—Betty: [laugh]. I know, right?Corey: —even have businesses or lives back then? I thought we all used horse-driven carriages and whatnot. And they did not build on cloud—not because of any perception of distrust; because it functionally did not exist at the time that they were building these things. And, “Oh, come out into the cloud. It's fine now.” It… yeah, that application is generating hundreds of millions in revenue every quarter. Maybe we treat that with a little bit of respect, rather than YOLO-ing it into some Lambda-driven monster that's constructed—Betty: One hundred—Corey: —out of popsicle sticks and glue.Betty: —percent. Yes. I think people forget that. And it's not that these companies don't want to go to cloud. It's like, “I can't break this thing. That could be, like, millions of dollars lost, a second.”Corey: I write my weekly newsletters in a custom monstrosity of a system that has something like 30-some-odd Lambda functions, a bunch of API gateways that are tied together with things, and periodically there are challenges with it that break as the system continues to evolve. And that's fine. And I'm okay with using something like that as a part of my workflow because absolute worst case, I can go back to the way that my newsletter was originally written: in Google Docs, and it doesn't look anywhere near the same way, and it goes back to just a text email that starts off with, “I have messed up.” And that would be a better story than most of the stuff I put out as a common basis. Similarly, yeah, durability is important.If this were a serious life-critical app, it would not just be hanging out in a single region of a single provider; it would probably be on one provider, as I've talked about, but going multi-region and having backups to a different cloud provider. But if AWS takes a significant enough outage to us-west-2 in Oregon, to the point where my ridiculous system cannot function to write the newsletter, that too, is a different handwritten email that goes out that week because there's no announcement they've made that anyone's going to give the slightest toss about, given the fact that it's basically Cloud Armageddon. So, we'll see. It's about understanding the blast radius and understanding your use case.Betty: Yep. A hundred percent.Corey: So, you've spent a fair bit of time doing interesting things in your career. This is your second outing at VMware, and in the interim, you were at solo.io for a bit, and before that you were in a marketing leadership role at Docker. Let's dive in, if you will. Given that you are no longer working at Docker, they recently made an announcement about a pricing model change, whereas it is free to use Docker Desktop for anyone's personal projects, and for small companies.But if you're a large company, which they define is ten million in revenue a year or 250 employees—those two things don't go alike, but okay—then you have to wind up having a paid plan. And I will say it's a novel approach, but I'm curious to hear what you have to say about it.Betty: Well, I'd say that I saw that there was a lot of flutter about that news, and it's kind of a, it doesn't matter where you draw the line in the sand for the tier, there's always going to be some pushback on it. So, you have to draw a line somewhere. I haven't kept up with the details around the pricing models that they've implemented since I left Docker a few years ago, but monetization is a really important part for a startup. You do have to make money because there are people that you have to pay, and eventually, you want to get off of raising money from VCs all the time. Docker Desktop has been something that has been a real gem from a local developer experience, right, giving the—so that has been well-received by the community.I think there was an enterprise application for it, but when I saw that, I was like, yeah, okay, cool. They need to do something with that. And then it's always hard to see the blowback. I think sometimes with the years that we've had with Docker, it's kind of like no matter what they do, the Twitterverse and Hacker News is going to just give them a hard time. I mean, that is my honest opinion on that. If they didn't do it, and then, say, they didn't make the kind of revenue they needed, people would—that would become another Twitter thread and Hacker News blow up, and if they do it, you'll still have that same reaction.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: It seems to be that Docker has been trying to figure out how to monetize for a very long time because let's be clear here; I think it is difficult to overstate just how impactful and transformative Docker was to the industry. I gave a talk “Heresy in the Church of Docker” that listed a bunch of things that didn't get solved with Docker, and I expected to be torn to pieces for it, and instead I was invited to give it at ContainerCon one year. And in time, a lot of those things stopped being issues because the industry found answers to it. Now, unfortunately, some of those answers look like Kubernetes, but that's neither here nor there. But now it's, okay, so giving everything that you do that is core and central away for free is absolutely part of what drove the adoption that it saw, but goodwill from developers is not the sort of thing that generally tends to lead to interesting revenue streams.So, they had to do something. And they've tried a few different things that haven't seemed to really pan out. Then they spun off that pesky part of their business that made money selling support contracts, over to Mirantis, which was apparently looking for something now that OpenStack was no longer going to be a thing, and Kubernetes is okay, “Well, we'll take Docker enterprise stuff.” Great. What do they do, as far as turning this into a revenue model?There's a lot of the, I guess, noise that I tend to ignore when it comes to things like this because angry people on Twitter, or on Hacker News, or other terrible cesspools on the internet, are not where this is going to be decided. What I'm interested in is what the actual large companies are going to say about it. My problem with looking at it from the outside is that it feels as if there's significant ambiguity across the board. And if there's one thing that I know about large company procurement departments, it's that they do not like ambiguity. This change takes effect in three or four months, which is underwear-outside-the-pants-superhero-style speed for a lot of those companies, and suddenly, for a lot of developers, they're so far removed from the procurement side of the house that they are never going to have a hope of getting that approved on a career-wide timespan.And suddenly, for a lot of those companies, installing and running Docker Desktop just became a fireable offense because from the company's perspective, the sheer liability side of it, if they were getting subject to audit, is going to be a problem. I don't believe that Docker is going to start pulling Oracle-like audit tactics, but no procurement or risk management group in the world is going to take that on faith. So, the problem is not that it's expensive because that can be worked around; it's not that there's anything inherently wrong with their costing model. The problem is the ambiguity of people who just don't know, “Does this apply to me or doesn't this apply to me?” And that is the thing that is the difficult, painful part.And now, as a result, the [unintelligible 00:17:28] groups and their champions of Docker Desktop are having to spend a lot more time, energy, and thought on this than it would simply be for cutting a check because now it's a risk org-wide, and how do we audit to figure out who's installed this previously free open-source thing? Now what?Betty: Yeah, I'll agree with you on that because once you start making it into corporate-issued software that you have to install on the desktop, that gets a lot harder. And how do you know who's downloaded it? Like my own experience, right? I have a locked-down laptop; I can't just install whatever I want. We have a software portal, which lets me download the approved things.So, it's that same kind of model. I'd be curious because once you start looking at from a large enterprise perspective, your developers are working on IP, so you don't want that on something that they've downloaded using their personal account because now it sits—that code is sitting with their personal account that's using this tool that's super productive for them, and that transition to then go to an enterprise, large enterprise and going through a procurement cycle, getting a master services agreement, that's no small feat. That's a whole motion that is different than someone swiping a credit card or just downloading something and logging in. It's similar to what you see sometimes with the—how many people have signed up for and paid 99 bucks for Dropbox, and then now all of a sudden, it's like, “Wow, we have all of megacorp [laugh] signed up, and then now someone has to sell them a plan to actually manage it and make sure it's not just sitting on all these personal drives.”Corey: Well, that's what AWS's original sales motion looked a lot like they would come in and talk to the CTO or whatnot at giant companies. And the CTO would say, “Great, why should we pick AWS for our cloud needs?” And the answer is, “Oh, I'm sorry. You have 87 distinct accounts within your organization that we've [unintelligible 00:19:12] up for you. We're just trying to offer you some management answers and unify the billing and this, and probably give you a discount as well because there is price breaks available at certain sizing.” It was a different conversation. It's like, “I'm not here to sell you anything. We're already there. We're just trying to formalize the relationship.” And that is a challenge.Again, I'm not trying to cast aspersions on procurement groups. I mean, I do sell enterprise consulting here at The Duckbill Group; we deal with an awful lot of procurement groups who have processes and procedures that don't often align to the way that we do things as a ten-person, fully remote company. We do not have commercial vehicle insurance, for example, because we do not have a commercial vehicle and that is a prerequisite to getting the insurance, for one. We're unlikely to buy one to wind up satisfying some contractual requirements, so we have to go back and forth and get things like that removed. And that is the nature of the beast.And we can say yes, we can say no on a lot of those questionnaires, but, “It depends,” or, “I don't know,” is the sort of thing that's going to cause giant red flags and derail everything. But that is exactly what Docker is doing. Now, it's the well, we have a sort of sloppy, weird set of habits with some of our engineers around the bring your own device to work thing. So, that's the enterprise thing. Let me be very clear, here at The Duckbill Group, we have a policy of issuing people company machines, we manage them very lightly just to make sure the drives are encrypted, so they—and that the screensaver comes out with a password, so if someone loses a laptop, it's just, “Replace the hardware,” not, “We have a data breach.”Let's be clear here; we are responsible about these things. But beyond that, it's oh, you want to have some personal thing installed on your machine or do some work on that stuff? Fine. By all means. It's a situation of we have no policy against it; we understand this is how work happens, and we trust people to effectively be grownups.There are some things I would strongly suggest that any employee—ours or anyone else—not cross the streams on for obvious IP ownership rights and the rest, we have those conversations with our team for a reason. It's, understand the nuances of what you're doing, and we're always willing to throw hardware at people to solve these problems. Not every company is like that. And ten million in revenue is not necessarily a very large company. I was doing the math out for ten million in revenue or 250 employees; assuming that there's no outside investment—which with VC is always a weird thing—it's possible—barely—to have a $10 million in revenue company that has 250 employees, but if they're full time they are damn close to a $15 an hour minimum wage. So, who does it apply to? More people than you might believe.Betty: Yeah, I'm really curious to how they're going to like—like you say, if it takes place in three or four months, roll that out, and how would you actually track it and true that up for people? So.Corey: Yeah. And there are tools and processes to do this, but it's also not in anyone's roadmap because people are not sitting here on their annual planning periods—which is always aspirational—but no one's planning for, “Oh, yeah, Q3, one of our software suppliers is going to throw a real procurement wrench at us that we have to devote time, energy, resources, and budget to figure out.” And then you have a problem. And by resources, I do mean resources of basically assigning work and tooling and whatnot and energy, not people. People are humans, they are not resources; I will die on that hill.Betty: Well, you know, actually resource-wise, the thing that's interesting is when you say supplier, if it's something that people have been able to download for free so far, it's not considered a supplier. So, it's—now they're going to go from just a thing I can use and maybe you've let your developers use to now it has to be something that goes through the official internal vetting as being a supplier. So, that's just—it's a whole different ball game entirely.Corey: My last job before I started this place, was a highly regulated financial institution, and even grabbing things were available for free, “Well, hang on a minute because what license is it using and how is it going to potentially be incorporated?” And this stuff makes sense, and it's important. Now, admittedly, I have the advantage of a number of my engineering peers in that I've been married to a corporate attorney for 11 years and have insight into that side of the world, which to be clear, is all about risk mitigation which is helpful. It is a nuanced and difficult field to—as are most things once you get into them—and it's just the uncertainty that befuddles me a bit. I wish them well with it, truly I do. I think the world is better with an independent Docker in it, but I question whether this is going to find success. That said, it doesn't matter what I think; what matters is what customers say and do, and I'm really looking forward to seeing how it plays out.Betty: A hundred percent; same here. As someone who spent a good chunk of my life there, their mark on the industry is not to be ignored, like you said, with what happened with containers. But I do wish them well. There's lot of good people over there, it's some really cool tech, and I want to see a future for them.Corey: One last topic I want to get into before we wind up wrapping this episode is that you are someone who was nominated to come on the show by a couple of folks, which is always great. I'm always looking for recommendations on this. But what's odd is that you are—if we look at it and dig a little bit beneath the titles and whatnot, you even self-describe as your history is marketing leadership positions. It is uncommon for engineering-types to recommend that I talk to marketing folks.s personally I think that is a mistake; I consider myself more of a marketer than not in some respects, but it is uncommon, which means I have to ask you, what is your philosophy of marketing because it very clearly is differentiated in the public eye.Betty: I'm flattered. I will say that—and this goes to how I hire people and how I coach teams—it's you have to be super curious because there's a ton of bad marketing out there, where it's just kind of like, “Hey, we do these five things and we always do these five things: blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.” But I think it's really being curious about what is the thing that you're marketing? There are people who are just focused on the function of marketing and not the thing. Because you're doing your marketing job in the service of a thing, this new widget, this new whatever, and you got to be super curious about it.And I'll tell you that, for me, it's really hard for me to market something if I'm not excited about it. I have to personally be super excited about the tech or something happening in the industry, and it's, kind of like, an all-in thing for me. And so in that sense, I do spend a ton of time with engineers and end-users, and I really try to understand what's going on. I want to understand how the thing works, and I always ask them, “Well”—so I'll ask the engineers, like, “So… okay, this sounds really cool. You just described this new feature and you're super excited about it because you wrote it, but how is your end-user, the person you're building this for, how did they do this before? Help me understand. How did they do this before and why is this better?”Just really dig into it because for me, I want to understand it deeply before I talk about it. I think the thing is, it shows a tremendous amount of respect for the builder, and then to try to really be empathetic, to understand what they're doing and then partner with them—I mean, this sounds so business-y the way I'm talking about this—but really be a partner with them and just help them make their thing really successful. I'm like the other end; you're going to build this great thing and now I'm going to make it sound like it's the best thing that's ever happened. But to do that, I really need to deeply understand what it is, and I have to care about it, too. I have to care about it in the way that you care about it.Corey: I cannot effectively market or sell something that I don't believe in, personally. I also, to be clear because you are a marketing professional—or at least far more of one than I ever was—I do not view what I do is marketing; I view it as spectacle. And it's about telling stories to people, it's about learning what the market thinks about it, and that informs product design in many respects. It's about understanding the product itself. It's about being able to use the product.And if people are listening to this and think, “Wait a minute, that sounds more like DevRel.” I have news for you. DevRel is marketing, they're just scared to tell you that. And I know people are going to disagree with me on that. You're wrong. But that's okay; reasonable people can disagree.And that's how I see it is that, okay, I'll talk to people building the service, I'll talk to people using the service, but then I'm going to build something with the service myself because until then, it's all a game of who sounds the most convincing in the stories that they tell. But okay, you can tell an amazing story about something, but if it falls over when I tried to use it, well, I'm sorry, you're not being accurate in your descriptions of it.Betty: A hundred percent. I hate to say, like, you're storytellers, but that's a big part of it, but it's kind of like you want to tell the story, so you do something to that people believe a certain thing. But that's part of a curated experience because you want them to try this thing in a certain way. Because you've designed it for something. “I built a spoon. I want you to use that to eat your soup because you can't eat soup with a fork.”So, then you'll have this amazing soup-eating experience, but if I build you a spoon and then not give you any directions and you start throwing it at cars, you're going to be like, “This thing sucks.” So, I kind of think of it in that way. To your point of it has to actually work, it's like, but they also need to know, “What am I supposed to use it for?”Corey: The problem I've always had on some visceral level with formal marketing departments for companies is that they can say that a product that they sell is good, they can say that the product is great, or they can choose to say nothing at all about that product, but when there's a product in the market that is clearly a turd, a marketing department is never going to be able to say that, which I think erodes its authenticity in many respects. I understand the constraints behind, that truly I do, but it's the one superpower I think that I bring to the table where even when I do sponsorship stuff it's, you can buy my attention but not my opinion. Because the authenticity of me being trusted to call them like I see them, for lack of a better term, to my mind at least outweighs any short-term benefit from saying good things about a product that doesn't deserve them. Now, I've been wrong about things, sure. I have also been misinformed in both directions, thinking something is great when it's not, or terrible when it isn't or not understanding the use case, and I am thrilled to engage in those debates. “But this is really expensive when you run for this use case,” and the answer can be, “Well, it's not designed for that use case.” But the answer should not be, “No it's not.” I promise you, expensive is in the eye of the customer not the person building the thing.Betty: Yes. This goes back to I have to believe in the thing. And I do agree it's, like not [sigh]—it's not a panacea. You're not going to make Product A and it's going to solve everything. But being super clear and focused on what it is good for, and then please just try it in this way because that's what we built it for.Corey: I want to thank you for taking the time to have a what for some people is no doubt going to be perceived as a surprisingly civil conversation about things that I have loud, heated opinions about. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Betty: Well, they can follow me on Twitter. But um, I'd say go to vmware.com/cloud for our work thing.Corey: Exactly. VM where? That's right. VM there. And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:30:07].Betty: [laugh].Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Betty: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Betty Junod, Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a loud, ranting comment at the end. Then, if you work for a company that is larger than 250 people or $10 million in revenue, please also Venmo me $5.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Aussie English
AE 1042 - The Goss: Swarm of Bees Massacres 63 Endangered Penguins

Aussie English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 14:54


The title sounds a tad morbid, doesn't it? Because it is. There were 63 South African penguins found dead from bee stings around their eyes and flippers - the only parts of their bodies without fur. There were also honeybees found dead on the scene. Do you remember that honeybees die too once they sting something? Apparently, a swarm of bees attacked a waddle of penguins in Simon's Town, Cape Town. In this episode, we discuss the gruesome bee story, a YouTube channel called Mouse Trap Monday, and what jumping jack ants are.

Locked On Hornets - Daily Podcast On The Charlotte Hornets
Dylan Jackson, Cavs Recap, and more Plumdog - 11/2/2021

Locked On Hornets - Daily Podcast On The Charlotte Hornets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:13


Dylan Jackson of Swarm and Sting joins Walker to recap Charlotte's loss to Cleveland 113-110. They discuss Cleveland's size, how offseason moves have looked so far, the single biggest development of the season, and Dylan revealing Mason Plumlee's rap career. *** WANT MORE? Patreon.com/loh FOLLOW US ON TWITTER - @LockedOnHornets - @WalkerMehl - @DougBransonLOH MUSIC - Music from https://filmmusic.io - Lobby Time - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), Backed Vibes - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), Casets - Drake Stafford, Buzz - Steve Combs - "Run Amok" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) - License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Kasterborous: Doctor Who PodKast (with a K)
376: Doctor Who Flux: The Halloween Apocalypse Reviewed

Kasterborous: Doctor Who PodKast (with a K)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 43:33


Jodie Whittaker is back with the first part of Doctor Who Flux. The Halloween Apocalypse is part one of the six part series, which introduces not only a new villain (Swarm) but also a universal threat (the Flux) that may or may not be related to him. Throw in some Sontarans, Weeping Angels, seven billion dog like aliens, a future friend from the past and a man on a space observatory, and you've got the beginnings of a movie-like experience. And we haven't even mentioned new companion Dan, his non-girlfriend girlfriend Helen, or Swarm's sister. Christian Cawley and James McLean offer their thoughts about an episode that brings a whole new format to Doctor Who. We need your reviews! Head to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review, and we'll read it out. Deal? Not on Apple Podcasts? Leave us a review somewhere else, send the link over on Twitter or Facebook or podkasterborous@gmail.com, and we'll read it out.

Raven On Podcast
Who's Raven On | The Flux Ep1

Raven On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 63:07


Weeping Angels! Sontarans! Dog creatures! Some weird creepy possibly incesty disco makeup twins! The Flux! It's all happening in the first episode of The Flux, Jodie Whittaker's last full season of Doctor Who. The Doctor and Yaz save a new likely companion in the shape of Liverpuddlian Dan, who turns out is VERY important to one special pooch. The Flux seems to be a ravenous planet-eating cloud machine heading towards Earth, while some ancient enemy of the Doctor's called "The Swarm" has freed himself from prison and rescued his very blue sister for some possible incest? So much to digest, and Nat and Stu are keen to get cracking! Also there's a Sontaran Tongue Thing, so enjoy that. Thanks for listening!

DevOps and Docker Talk
Teleport for Remote Kubernetes with Ben Arent

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 38:33


Unedited Live recording on YouTube (Ep 139) Teleport website Teleport GitHub Teleport Wormhole announcement Ben's Twitter Teleport Twitter ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Globe Hell Warning
Episode 69: Swarm Army

Globe Hell Warning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 60:04


We've heard all about drones (and I'm not talking Bees hahaha) in the army but even if they save pilots lives they are made of metal and plastic so global warming. But what if we could organically gush out our own little army of cream tadpoles to swarm our enemies...?

Bigger On The Inside: A Doctor Who Podcast
Chris Chibnall Talks About Wanting To Leave DOCTOR WHO & Planet of the Dead - Bigger on the Inside

Bigger On The Inside: A Doctor Who Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 61:48


On this weeks show, Tim and Harry talk about Jodie Whittaker's thoughts about leaving Doctor Who, Chris Chibnall struggling to find a new showrunner and Doctor Who series 13 episode 1. A London bus takes a detour to an alien world and The Doctor attempts to defeat the terrifying Swarm by joining forces with Lady Christina.Support the show on Patreon - www.patreon.com/biggeronthepodiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1526962362?mt=2&at=1l3vwYfSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6rKhNkxWSu7FyINpp1mZPD?si=346cx7BQSpapVkSFe3GB9gSocial LinksTim's Twitter - https://twitter.com/TimxSaxbyHarry's Twitter - https://twitter.com/hemurdoch?lang=enBigger On The Inside Twitter - https://twitter.com/BiggerOnThePodBigger On The Inside Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/biggeronthepodSend us an email for us to read out on the podcast - biggerontheinsidepod@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sketching Details
The Swarm Review (Film, 2020) #31DaysOfHorror

Sketching Details

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 3:42


The Swarm is a French horror/drama film about a single mother raising locusts as livestock to support her family.Read the full review.Check out the full schedule for #31DaysOfHorror.Check out Haunted: A Slip Story, my new interactive weird fiction collection game coming out 25 October.The Sketching Details store is open with the new Halloween collection. Buy my books at Ko-fi or sign up for a monthly membership for exclusive articles and stories. Join the Fanhouse for free with code SDTESTING for exclusive photos, videos, and behind the scenes content.Shop Books-A-Million.Shop boohooMAN.Follow.★ Support this podcast ★

Locked On Hornets - Daily Podcast On The Charlotte Hornets
So LiAngelo Ball ISN'T A Member Of The Greensboro Swarm?

Locked On Hornets - Daily Podcast On The Charlotte Hornets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 36:02


Walker and Nata explain why Liangelo Ball Isn't A member of the Swarm. The NBA 75 list came out, they quibble. And a weekend preview of the Nets and Cavs games. *** WANT MORE? Patreon.com/loh FOLLOW US ON TWITTER - @LockedOnHornets - @WalkerMehl - @DougBransonLOH MUSIC - Music from https://filmmusic.io - Lobby Time - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), Backed Vibes - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), Casets - Drake Stafford, Buzz - Steve Combs - "Run Amok" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) - License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Indeed Get started RIGHT NOW with a SEVENTY-FIVE DOLLAR SPONSORED JOB CREDIT to upgrade your job post at Indeed.com/locked     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Huntsville Home Video
22: Hell Comes to Huntsville: The Swarm/Le Swarm

Huntsville Home Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 41:50


 Two movies for the price of one! It finally happened...Leeann messed it all up and watched the wrong swarm movie. Enjoy this point-counterpoint episode discussing The Swarm and The Swarm! 

Screaming in the Cloud
Navigating the Morass of the Internet with Chloe Condon

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:32


About ChloeChloe is a Bay Area based Cloud Advocate for Microsoft. Previously, she worked at Sentry.io where she created the award winning Sentry Scouts program (a camp themed meet-up ft. patches, s'mores, giant squirrel costumes, and hot chocolate), and was featured in the Grace Hopper Conference 2018 gallery featuring 15 influential women in STEM by AnitaB.org. Her projects and work with Azure have ranged from fake boyfriend alerts to Mario Kart 'astrology', and have been featured in VICE, The New York Times, as well as SmashMouth's Twitter account. Chloe holds a BA in Drama from San Francisco State University and is a graduate of Hackbright Academy. She prides herself on being a non-traditional background engineer, and is likely one of the only engineers who has played an ogre, crayon, and the back-end of a cow on a professional stage. She hopes to bring more artists into tech, and more engineers into the arts.Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChloeCondon Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gitforked/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ChloeCondonVideos TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Somehow in the years this show has been running, I've only had Chloe Condon on once. In that time, she's over for dinner at my house way more frequently than that, but somehow the stars never align to get us together in front of microphones and have a conversation. First, welcome back to the show, Chloe. You're a senior cloud advocate at Microsoft on the Next Generation Experiences Team. It is great to have you here.Chloe: I'm back, baby. I'm so excited. This is one of my favorite shows to listen to, and it feels great to be a repeat guest, a friend of the pod. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yes indeed. So, something-something cloud, something-something Microsoft, something-something Azure, I don't particularly care, in light of what it is you have going on that you have just clued me in on, and we're going to talk about that to start. You're launching something new called Master Creep Theatre and I have a whole bunch of questions. First and foremost, is it theater or theatre? How is that spelled? Which—the E and the R, what direction does that go in?Chloe: Ohh, I feel like it's going to be the R-E because that makes it very fancy and almost British, you know?Corey: Oh, yes. And the Harlequin mask direction it goes in, that entire aesthetic, I love it. Please tell me what it is. I want to know the story of how it came to be, the sheer joy I get from playing games with language alone guarantee I'm going to listen to whatever this is, but please tell me more.Chloe: Oh, my goodness. Okay, so this is one of those creative projects that's been on my back burner forever where I'm like, someday when I have time, I'm going to put all my time [laugh] and energy into this. So, this originally stemmed from—if you don't follow me on Twitter, oftentimes when I'm not tweeting about '90s nostalgia, or Clippy puns, or Microsoft silly throwback things to Windows 95, I get a lot of weird DMs. On every app, not just Twitter. On Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, oh my gosh, what else is there?Corey: And I don't want to be clear here just to make this absolutely crystal clear, “Hey, Chloe, do you want to come back on Screaming in the Cloud again?” Is not one of those weird DMs to which you're referring?Chloe: No, that is a good DM. So, people always ask me, “Why don't you just close your DMs?” Because a lot of high profile people on the internet just won't even have their DMs open.Corey: Oh, I understand that, but I'm the same boat. I would have a lot less nonsense, but at the same time, I want—at least in my case—I want people to be able to reach out to me because the only reason I am what I am is that a bunch of people who had no reason to do it did favors for me—Chloe: Yes.Corey: —and I can't ever repay it, I can only ever pay it forward and that is the cost of doing favors. If I can help someone, I will, and that's hard to do with, “My DMs are closed so hunt down my email address and send me an email,” and I'm bad at email.Chloe: Right. I'm terrible at email as well, and I'm also terrible at DMs [laugh]. So, I think a lot of folks don't understand the volume at which I get messages, which if you're a good friend of mine, if you're someone like Corey or a dear friend like Emily, I will tell you, “Hey, if you actually need to get ahold of me, text me.” And text me a couple times because I probably see it and then I have ADHD, so I won't immediately respond. I think I respond in my head but I don't.But I get anywhere from, I would say, ohh, like, 30 on a low day to 100 on a day where I have a viral tweet about getting into tech with a non-traditional background or something like that. And these DMs that I get are really lovely messages like, “Thank you for the work you do,” or, “I decided to do a cute manicure because the [laugh] manicure you posted,” too, “How do I get into tech? How do I get a job at Microsoft?” All kinds of things. It runs the gamut between, “Where's your shirt from?” Where—[laugh]—“What's your mother's maiden name?”But a lot of the messages that I get—and if you're a woman on the internet with any sort of presence, you know how there's that, like—what's it called in Twitter—the Other Messages feature that's like, “Here's the people you know. Here's the people”—the message requests. For the longest time were just, “Hey,” “Hi,” “Hey dear,” “Hi pretty,” “Hi ma'am,” “Hello,” “Love you,” just really weird stuff. And of course, everyone gets these; these are bots or scammers or whatever they may be—or just creeps, like weird—and always the bio—not always but I [laugh] would say, like, these accounts range from either obviously a bot where it's a million different numbers, an account that says, “Father, husband, lover of Jesus Christ and God.” Which is so [laugh] ironic… I'm like, “Why are you in my DMs?”Corey: A man of God, which is why I'm in your DMs being creepy.Chloe: Exactly. Or—Corey: Just like Christ might have.Chloe: And you would be shocked, Corey, at how many. The thing that I love to say is Twitter is not a dating site. Neither is LinkedIn. Neither is Instagram. I post about my boyfriend all the time, who you've met, and we adore Ty Smith, but I've never received any unsolicited images, knock on wood, but I'm always getting these very bait-y messages like, “Hey, beautiful. I want to take you out.” And you would be shocked at how many of these people are doing it from their professional business account. [laugh]. Like, works at AWS, works at Google; it's like, oh my God. [laugh].Corey: You get this under your name, right? It ties back to it. Meanwhile—again, this is one of those invisible areas of privilege that folks who look like me don't have to deal with. My DM graveyard is usually things like random bot accounts, always starting with, “Hi,” or, “Hey.” If you want to guarantee I never respond to you, that is what you say. I just delete those out of hand because I don't notice or care. It is either a bot, or a scam, or someone who can't articulate what they're actually trying to get from me—Chloe: Exactly.Corey: —and I don't have the time for it. Make your request upfront. Don't ask to ask; just ask.Chloe: I think it's important to note, also, that I get a lot of… different kinds of these messages and they try to respond to everyone. I cannot. If I responded to everybody's messages that I got, I just wouldn't have any time to do my job. But the thing that I always say to people—you know, and managers have told me in the past, my boyfriend has encouraged me to do this, is when people say things like, “Close your DMs,” or, “Just ignore them,” I want to have the same experience that everybody else has on the internet. Now, it's going to be a little different, of course, because I look and act and sound like I do, and of course, podcasts are historically a visual medium, so I'm a five-foot-two, white, bright orange-haired girl; I'm a very quirky individual.Corey: Yes, if you look up ‘quirky,' you're right there under the dictionary definition. And every time—like, when we were first hanging out and you mentioned, “Oh yeah, I used to be in theater.” And it's like, “You know, you didn't even have to tell me that, on some level.” Which is not intended to be an insult. It's just theater folks are a bit of a type, and you are more or less the archetype of what a theatre person is, at least to my frame of reference.Chloe: And not only that, but I did musicals, so you can't see the jazz hands now, but–yeah, my degree is in drama. I come from that space and I just, you know, whenever people say, “Just ignore it,” or, “Close your DMs,” I'm like, I want people to be able to reach out to me; I want to be able to message one-on-one with Corey and whoever, when—as needed, and—Corey: Why should I close my DMs?Chloe: Yeah.Corey: They're the ones who suck. Yeah.Chloe: [laugh]. But over the years, to give people a little bit of context, I've been working in tech a long time—I've been working professionally in the DevRel space for about five or six years now—but I've worked in tech a long time, I worked as a recruiter, an office admin, executive assistant, like, I did all of the other areas of tech, but it wasn't until I got a presence on Twitter—which I've only been on Twitter for I think five years; I haven't been on there that long, actively. And to give some context on that, Twitter is not a social media platform used in the theater space. We just use Instagram and Facebook, really, back in the day, I'm not on Facebook at all these days. So, when I discovered Twitter was cool—and I should also mention my boyfriend, Ty, was working at Twitter at the time and I was like, “Twitter's stupid. Who would go on this—[laugh] who uses this app?”Fast-forward to now, I'm like—Ty's like, “Can you please get off Twitter?” But yeah, I think I've just been saving these screenshots over the last five or so years from everything from my LinkedIn, from all the crazy stuff that I dealt with when people thought I was a Bitcoin influencer to people being creepy. One of the highlights that I recently found when I was going back and trying to find these for this series that I'm doing is there was a guy from Australia, DMed me something like, “Hey, beautiful,” or, “Hey, sexy,” something like that. And I called him out. And I started doing this thing where I would post it on Twitter.I would usually hide their image with a clown emoji or something to make it anonymous, or not to call them out, but in this one I didn't, and this guy was defending himself in the comments, and to me in my DM's saying, “Oh, actually, this was a social experiment and I have all the screenshots of this,” right? So, imagine if you will—so I have conversations ranging from things like that where it's like, “Actually I messaged a bunch of people about that because I'm doing a social experiment on how people respond to, ‘Hey beautiful. I'd love to take you out some time in Silicon Valley.'” just the weirdest stuff right? So, me being the professional performer that I am, was like, these are hilarious.And I kept thinking to myself, anytime I would get these messages, I was like, “Does this work?” If you just go up to someone and say, “Hey”—do people meet this way? And of course, you get people on Twitter who when you tweet something like that, they're like, “Actually, I met my boyfriend in Twitter DMs,” or like, “I met my boyfriend because he slid into my DMs on Instagram,” or whatever. But that's not me. I have a boyfriend. I'm not interested. This is not the time or the place.So, it's been one of those things on the back burner for three or four years that I've just always been saving these images to a folder, thinking, “Okay, when I have the time when I have the space, the creative energy and the bandwidth to do this,” and thankfully for everyone I do now, I'm going to do dramatic readings of these DMs with other people in tech, and show—not even just to make fun of these people, but just to show, like, how would this work? What do you expect the [laugh] outcome to be? So Corey, for example, if you were to come on, like, here's a great example. A year ago—this is 2018; we're in 2021 right now—this guy messaged me in December of 2018, and was like, “Hey,” and then was like, “I would love to be your friend.” And I was like, “Nope,” and I responded, “Nope, nope, nope, nope.” There's a thread of this on Twitter. And then randomly, three weeks ago, just sent me this video to the tune of Enrique Iglesias' “Rhythm Divine” of just images of himself. [laugh]. So like, this comedy [crosstalk 00:10:45]—Corey: Was at least wearing pants?Chloe: He is wearing pants. It's very confusing. It's a picture—a lot of group photos, so I didn't know who he was. But in my mind because, you know, I'm an engineer, I'm trying to think through the end-user experience. I'm like, “What was your plan here?”With all these people I'm like, “So, your plan is just to slide into my DMs and woo me with ‘Hey'?” [laugh]. So, I think it'll be really fun to not only just show and call out this behavior but also take submissions from other people in the industry, even beyond tech, really, because I know anytime I tweet an example of this, I get 20 different women going, “Oh, my gosh, you get these weird messages, too?” And I really want to show, like, A, to men how often this happens because like you said, I think a lot of men say, “Just ignore it.” Or, “I don't get anything like that. You must be asking for it.”And I'm like, “No. This comes to me. These people find us and me and whoever else out there gets these messages,” and I'm just really ready to have a laugh at their expense because I've been laughing for years. [laugh].Corey: Back when I was a teenager, I was working in some fast food style job, and one of my co-workers saw customer, walked over to her, and said, “You're beautiful.” And she smiled and blushed. He leaned in and kissed her.Chloe: Ugh.Corey: And I'm sitting there going what on earth? And my other co-worker leaned over and is like, “You do know that's his girlfriend, right?” And I have to feel like, on some level, that is what happened to an awful lot of these broken men out on the internet, only they didn't have a co-worker to lean over and say, “Yeah, they actually know each other.” Which is why we see all this [unintelligible 00:12:16] behavior of yelling at people on the street as they walk past, or from a passing car. Because they saw someone do a stunt like that once and thought, “If it worked for them, it could work for me. It only has to work once.”And they're trying to turn this into a one day telling the grandkids how they met their grandmother. And, “Yeah, I yelled at her from a construction site, and it was love at first ‘Hey, baby.'” That is what I feel is what's going on. I have never understood it. I look back at my dating history in my early 20s, I look back now I'm like, “Ohh, I was not a great person,” but compared to these stories, I was a goddamn prince.Chloe: Yeah.Corey: It's awful.Chloe: It's really wild. And actually, I have a very vivid memory, this was right bef—uh, not right before the pandemic, but probably in 2019. I was speaking on a lot of conferences and events, and I was at this event in San Jose, and there were not a lot of women there. And somehow this other lovely woman—I can't remember her name right now—found me afterwards, and we were talking and she said, “Oh, my God. I had—this is such a weird event, right?”And I was like, “Yeah, it is kind of a weird vibe here.” And she said, “Ugh, so the weirdest thing happened to me. This guy”—it was her first tech conference ever, first of all, so you know—or I think it was her first tech conference in the Bay Area—and she was like, “Yeah, this guy came to my booth. I've been working this booth over here for this startup that I work at, and he told me he wanted to talk business. And then I ended up meeting him, stupidly, in my hotel lobby bar, and it's a date. Like, this guy is taking me out on a date all of a sudden,” and she was like, “And it took me about two minutes to just to be like, you know what? This is inappropriate. I thought this is going to be a business meeting. I want to go.”And then she shows me her hands, Corey, and she has a wedding ring. And she goes, “I'm not married. I have bought five or six different types of rings on Wish App”—or wish.com, which if you've never purchased from Wish before, it's very, kind of, low priced jewelry and toys and stuff of that nature. And she said, “I have a different wedding ring for every occasion. I've got my beach fake wedding ring. I've got my, we-got-married-with-a-bunch-of-mason-jars-in-the-woods fake wedding ring.”And she said she started wearing these because when she did, she got less creepy guys coming up to her at these events. And I think it's important to note, also, I'm not putting it out there at all that I'm interested in men. If anything, you know, I've been [laugh] with my boyfriend for six years never putting out these signals, and time and time again, when I would travel, I was very, very careful about sharing my location because oftentimes I would be on stage giving a keynote and getting messages while I delivered a technical keynote saying, “I'd love to take you out to dinner later. How long are you in town?” Just really weird, yucky, nasty stuff that—you know, and everyone's like, “You should be flattered.”And I'm like, “No. You don't have to deal with this. It's not like a bunch of women are wolf-whistling you during your keynote and asking what your boob size is.” But that's happening to me, and that's an extra layer that a lot of folks in this industry don't talk about but is happening and it adds up. And as my boyfriend loves to remind me, he's like, “I mean, you could stop tweeting at any time,” which I'm not going to do. But the more followers you get, the more inbound you get. So—Corey: Right. And the hell of it is, it's not a great answer because it's closing off paths of opportunity. Twitter has—Chloe: Absolutely.Corey: —introduced me to clients, introduced me to friends, introduced me to certainly an awful lot of podcast guests, and it informs and shapes a lot of the opinions that I hold on these things. And this is an example of what people mean when they talk about privilege. Where, yeah, “Look at Corey”—I've heard someone say once, and, “Nothing was handed to him.” And you're right, to be clear, I did not—like, no one handed me a microphone and said, “We're going to give you a podcast, now.” I had to build this myself.But let's be clear, I had no headwinds of working against me while I did it. There's the, you still have to do things, but you don't have an entire cacophony of shit heels telling you that you're not good enough in a variety of different ways, to subtly reinforcing your only value is the way that you look. There isn't this whole, whenever you get something wrong and it's a, “Oh, well, that's okay. We all get things wrong.” It's not the, “Girls suck at computers,” trope that we see so often.There's a litany of things that are either supportive that work in my favor, or are absent working against me that is privilege that is invisible until you start looking around and seeing it, and then it becomes impossible not to. I know I've talked about this before on the show, but no one listens to everything and I just want to subtly reinforce that if you're one of those folks who will say things like, “Oh, privilege isn't real,” or, “You can have bigotry against white people, too.” I want to be clear, we are not the same. You are not on my side on any of this, and to be very direct, I don't really care what you have to say.Chloe: Yeah. And I mean, this even comes into play in office culture and dynamics as well because I am always the squeaky wheel in the room on these kind of things, but a great example that I'll give is I know several women in this industry who have had issues when they used to travel for conferences of being stalked, people showing up at their hotel rooms, just really inappropriate stuff, and for that reason, a lot of folks—including myself—wouldn't pick the conference event—like, typically they'll be like, “This is the hotel everyone's staying at.” I would very intentionally stay at a different hotel because I didn't want people knowing where I was staying. But I started to notice once a friend of mine, who had an issue with this [unintelligible 00:17:26], I really like to be private about where I'm staying, and sometimes if you're working at a startup or larger company, they'll say, “Hey, everyone put in this Excel spreadsheet or this Google Doc where everyone's staying and how to contact them, and all this stuff.” And I think it's really important to be mindful of these things.I always say to my friends—I'm not going out too much these days because it's a pandemic—and I've done Twitter threads on this before where I never post my location; you will never see me. I got rid of Swarm a couple [laugh] years ago because people started showing up where I was. I posted photos before, you know, “Hey, at the lake right now.” And people have shown up. Dinners, people have recognized me when I've been out.So, I have an espresso machine right over here that my lovely boyfriend got me for my birthday, and someone commented, “Oh, we're just going to act like we don't see someone's reflection in the”—like, people Zoom in on images. I've read stories from cosplayers online who, they look into the reflection of a woman's glasses and can figure out where they are. So, I think there's this whole level. I'm constantly on alert, especially as a woman in tech. And I have friends here in the Bay Area, who have tweeted a photo at a barbecue, and then someone was like, “Hey, I live in the neighborhood, and I recognize the tree.”First of all, don't do that. Don't ever do that. Even if you think you're a nice, unassuming guy or girl or whatever, don't ever [laugh] do that. But I very intentionally—people get really confused, my friends specifically. They're like, “Wait a second, you're in Hawaii right now? I thought you were in Hawaii three weeks ago.” And I'm like, “I was. I don't want anyone even knowing what island or continent I'm on.”And that's something that I think about a lot. When I post photo—I never post any photos from my window. I don't want people knowing what my view is. People have figured out what neighborhood I live in based on, like, “I know where that graffiti is.” I'm very strategic about all this stuff, and I think there's a lot of stuff that I want to share that I don't share because of privacy issues and concerns about my safety. And also want to say and this is in my thread on online safety as well is, don't call out people's locations if you do recognize the image because then you're doxxing them to everyone like, “Oh”—Corey: I've had a few people do that in response to pictures I've posted before on a house, like, “Oh, I can look at this and see this other thing and then intuit where you are.” And first, I don't have that sense of heightened awareness on this because I still have this perception of myself as no one cares enough to bother, and on the other side, by calling that out in public. It's like, you do not present yourself well at all. In fact, you make yourself look an awful lot like the people that we're warned about. And I just don't get that.I have some of these concerns, especially as my audience has grown, and let's be very clear here, I antagonize trillion-dollar companies for a living. So, first if someone's going to have me killed, they can find where I am. That's pretty easy. It turns out that having me whacked is not even a rounding error on most of these companies' budgets, unfortunately. But also I don't have that level of, I guess, deranged superfan. Yet.But it happens in the fullness of time, as people's audiences continue to grow. It just seems an awful lot like it happens at much lower audience scale for folks who don't look like me. I want to be clear, this is not a request for anyone listening to this, to try and become that person for me, you will get hosed, at minimum. And yes, we press charges here.Chloe: AWSfan89, sliding into your DMs right after this. Yeah, it's also just like—I mean, I don't want to necessarily call out what company this was at, but personally, I've been in situations where I've thrown an event, like a meetup, and I'm like, “Hey, everyone. I'm going to be doing ‘Intro to blah, blah, blah' at this time, at this place.” And three or four guys would show up, none of them with computers. It was a freaking workshop on how to do or deploy something, or work with an API.And when I said, “Great, so why'd you guys come to this session today?” And maybe two have iPads, one just has a notepad, they're like, “Oh, I just wanted to meet you from Twitter.” And it's like, okay, that's a little disrespectful to me because I am taking time out to do this workshop on a very technical thing that I thought people were coming here to learn. And this isn't the Q&A. This is not your meet-and-greet opportunity to meet Chloe Condon, and I don't know why you would, like, I put so much of my life online [laugh] anyway.But yeah, it's very unsettling, and it's happened to me enough. Guys have shown up to my events and given me gifts. I mean, I'm always down for a free shirt or something, but it's one of those things that I'm constantly aware of and I hate that I have to be constantly aware of, but at the end of the day, my safety is the number one priority, and I don't want to get murdered. And I've tweeted this out before, our friend Emily, who's similarly a lady on the internet, who works with my boyfriend Ty over at Uber, we have this joke that's not a joke, where we say, “Hey if I'm murdered, this is who it was.” And we'll just send each other screenshots of creepy things that people either tag us in, or give us feedback on, or people asking what size shirt we are. Just, wiki feed stuff, just really some of the yucky of the yuck out there.And I do think that unless you have a partner, or a family member, or someone close enough to you to let you know about these things—because I don't talk about these things a lot other than my close friends, and maybe calling out a weirdo here and there in public, but I don't share the really yucky stuff. I don't share the people who are asking what neighborhood I live in. I'm not sharing the people who are tagging me, like, [unintelligible 00:22:33], really tagging me in some nasty TikToks, along with some other women out there. There are some really bad actors in this community and it is to the point where Emily and I will be like, “Hey, when you inevitably have to solve my murder, here's the [laugh] five prime suspects.” And that sucks. That's [unintelligible 00:22:48] joke; that isn't a joke, right? I suspect I will either die in an elevator accident or one of my stalkers will find me. [laugh].Corey: It's easy for folks to think, oh, well, this is a Chloe problem because she's loud, she's visible, she's quirky, she's different than most folks, and she brings it all on herself, and this is provably not true. Because if you talk to, effectively, any woman in the world in-depth about this, they all have stories that look awfully similar to this. And let me forestall some of the awful responses I know I'm going to get. And, “Well, none of the women I know have had experiences like this,” let me be very clear, they absolutely have, but for one reason or another, they either don't see the need, or don't see the value, or don't feel safe talking to you about it.Chloe: Yeah, absolutely. And I feel a lot of privilege, I'm very lucky that my boyfriend is a staff engineer at Uber, and I have lots of friends in high places at some of these companies like Reddit that work with safety and security and stuff, but oftentimes, a lot of the stories or insights or even just anecdotes that I will give people on their products are invaluable insights to a lot of these security and safety teams. Like, who amongst us, you know, [laugh] has used a feature and been like, “Wait a second. This is really, really bad, and I don't want to tweet about this because I don't want people to know that they can abuse this feature to stalk or harass or whatever that may be,” but I think a lot about the people who don't have the platform that I have because I have 50k-something followers on Twitter, I have a pretty big online following in general, and I have the platform that I do working at Microsoft, and I can tweet and scream and be loud as I can about this. But I think about the folks who don't have my audience, the people who are constantly getting harassed and bombarded, and I get these DMs all the time from women who say, “Thank you so much for doing a thread on this,” or, “Thank you for talking about this,” because people don't believe them.They're just like, “Oh, just ignore it,” or just, “Oh, it's just one weirdo in his basement, like, in his mom's basement.” And I'm like, “Yeah, but imagine that but times 40 in a week, and think about how that would make you rethink your place and your position in tech and even outside of tech.” Let's think of the people who don't know how this technology works. If you're on Instagram at all, you may notice that literally not only every post, but every Instagram story that has the word COVID in it, has the word vaccine, has anything, and they must be using some sort of cognitive scanning type thing or scanning the images themselves because this is a feature that basically says, hey, this post mentioned COVID in some way. I think if you even use the word mask, it alerts this.And while this is a great feature because we all want accurate information coming out about the pandemic, I'm like, “Wait a minute. So, you're telling me this whole time you could have been doing this for all the weird things that I get into my DMs, and people post?” And, like, it just shows you, yes, this is a global pandemic. Yes, this is something that affects everyone. Yes, it's important we get information out about this, but we can be using these features in much [laugh] more impactful ways that protects people's safety, that protects people's ability to feel safe on a platform.And I think the biggest one for me, and I make a lot of bots; I make a lot of Twitter bots and chatbots, and I've done entire series on this about ethical bot creation, but it's so easy—and I know this firsthand—to make a Twitter account. You can have more than one number, you can do with different emails. And with Instagram, they have this really lovely new feature that if you block someone, it instantly says, “You just blocked so and so. Would you like to block any other future accounts they make?” I mean, seems simple enough, right?Like, anything related—maybe they're doing it by email, or phone number, or maybe it's by IP, but like, that's not being done on a lot of these platforms, and it should be. I think someone mentioned in one of my threads on safety recently that Peloton doesn't have a block user feature. [laugh]. They're probably like, “Well, who's going to harass someone on Peloton?” It would happen to me. If I had a Peloton, [laugh] I assure you someone would find a way to harass me on there.So, I always tell people, if you're working at a company and you're not thinking about safety and harassment tools, you probably don't have anybody LGBTQ+ women, non-binary on your team, first of all, and you need to be thinking about these things, and you need to be making them a priority because if users can interact in some way, they will stalk, harass, they will find some way to misuse it. It seems like one of those weird edge cases where it's like, “Oh, we don't need to put a test in for that feature because no one's ever going to submit, like, just 25 emojis.” But it's the same thing with safety. You're like, who would harass someone on an app about bubblegum? One of my followers were. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The biggest question that doesn't get asked that needs to be in almost every case is, “Okay. We're building a thing, and it's awesome. And I know it's hard to think like this, but pivot around. Theoretically, what could a jerk do with it?”Chloe: Yes.Corey: When you're designing it, it's all right, how do you account for people that are complete jerks?Chloe: Absolutely.Corey: Even the cloud providers, all of them, when the whole Parler thing hit, everyone's like, “Oh, Amazon is censoring people for freedom of speech.” No, they're actually not. What they're doing is enforcing their terms of service, the same terms of service that every provider that is not trash has. It is not a problem that one company decided they didn't want hate speech on their platform. It was all the companies decided that, except for some very fringe elements. And that's the sort of thing you have to figure out is, it's easy in theory to figure out, oh, anything goes; freedom of speech. Great, well, some forms of speech violate federal law.Chloe: Right.Corey: So, what do you do then? Where do you draw the line? And it's always nuanced and it's always tricky, and the worst people are the folks that love to rules-lawyer around these things. It gets worse than that where these are the same people that will then sit there and make bad faith arguments all the time. And lawyers have a saying that hard cases make bad law.When you have these very nuanced thing, and, “Well, we can't just do it off the cuff. We have to build a policy around this.” This is the problem with most corporate policies across the board. It's like, you don't need a policy that says you're not allowed to harass your colleagues with a stick. What you need to do is fire the jackwagon that made you think you might need a policy that said that.But at scale, that becomes a super-hard thing to do when every enforcement action appears to be bespoke. Because there are elements on the gray areas and the margins where reasonable people can disagree. And that is what sets the policy and that's where the precedent hits, and then you have these giant loopholes where people can basically be given free rein to be the worst humanity has to offer to some of the most vulnerable members of our society.Chloe: And I used to give this talk, I gave it at DockerCon one year and I gave it a couple other places, that was literally called “Diversity is not Equal to Stock Images of Hands.” And the reason I say this is if you Google image search ‘diversity' it's like all of those clip arts of, like, Rainbow hands, things that you would see at Kaiser Permanente where it's like, “We're all in this together,” like, the pandemic, it's all just hands on hands, hands as a Earth, hands as trees, hands as different colors. And people get really annoyed with people like me who are like, “Let's shut up about diversity. Let's just hire who's best for the role.” Here's the thing.My favorite example of this—RIP—is Fleets—remember Fleets? [laugh]—on Twitter, so if they had one gay man in the room for that marketing, engineering—anything—decision, one of them I know would have piped up and said, “Hey, did you know ‘fleets' is a commonly used term for douching enima in the gay community?” Now, I know that because I watch a lot of Ru Paul's Drag Race, and I have worked with the gay community quite a bit in my time in theater. But this is what I mean about making sure. My friend Becca who works in security at safety and things, as well as Andy Tuba over at Reddit, I have a lot of conversations with my friend Becca Rosenthal about this, and that, not to quote Hamilton, but if I must, “We need people in the room where it happens.”So, if you don't have these people in the room if you're a white man being like, “How will our products be abused?” Your guesses may be a little bit accurate but it was probably best to, at minimum, get some test case people in there from different genders, races, backgrounds, like, oh my goodness, get people in that room because what I tend to see is building safety tools, building even product features, or naming things, or designing things that could either be offensive, misused, whatever. So, when people have these arguments about like, “Diversity doesn't matter. We're hiring the best people.” I'm like, “Yeah, but your product's going to be better, and more inclusive, and represent the people who use it at the end of the day because not everybody is you.”And great examples of this include so many apps out there that exists that have one work location, one home location. How many people in the world have more than one job? That's such a privileged view for us, as people in tech, that we can afford to just have one job. Or divorced parents or whatever that may be, for home location, and thinking through these edge cases and thinking through ways that your product can support everyone, if anything, by making your staff or the people that you work with more diverse, you're going to be opening up your product to a much bigger marketable audience. So, I think people will look at me and be like, “Oh, Chloe's a social justice warrior, she's this feminist whatever,” but truly, I'm here saying, “You're missing out on money, dude.” It would behoove you to do this at the end of the day because your users aren't just a copy-paste of some dude in a Patagonia jacket with big headphones on. [laugh]. There are people beyond one demographic using your products and applications.Corey: A consistent drag against Clubhouse since its inception was that it's not an accessible app for a variety of reasons that were—Chloe: It's not an Android. [laugh].Corey: Well, even ignoring the platform stuff, which I get—technical reasons, et cetera, yadda, yadda, great—there is no captioning option. And a lot of their abuse stuff in the early days was horrific, where you would get notifications that a lot of people had this person blocked, but… that's not a helpful dynamic. “Did you talk to anyone? No, of course not. You Hacker News'ed it from first principles and thought this might be a good direction to go in.” This stuff is hard.People specialize in this stuff, and I've always been an advocate of when you're not sure what to do in an area, pay an expert for advice. All these stories about how people reach out to, “Their black friend”—and yes, it's a singular person in many cases—and their black friend gets very tired of doing all the unpaid emotional labor of all of this stuff. Suddenly, it's not that at all if you reach out to someone who is an expert in this and pay them for their expertise. I don't sit here complaining that my clients pay me to solve AWS billing problems. In fact, I actively encourage that behavior. Same model.There are businesses that specialize in this, they know the area, they know the risks, they know the ins and outs of this, and consults with these folks are not break the bank expensive compared to building the damn thing in the first place.Chloe: And here's a great example that literally drove me bananas a couple weeks ago. So, I don't know if you've participated in Twitter Spaces before, but I've done a couple of my first ones recently. Have you done one yet—Corey: Oh yes—Chloe: —Corey?Corey: —extensively. I love that. And again, that's a better answer for me than Clubhouse because I already have the Twitter audience. I don't have to build one from scratch on another platform.Chloe: So, I learned something really fascinating through my boyfriend. And remember, I mentioned earlier, my boyfriend is a staff engineer at Uber. He's been coding since he's been out of the womb, much more experienced than me. And I like to think a lot about, this is accessible to me but how is this accessible to a non-technical person? So, Ty finished up the Twitter Space that he did and he wanted to export the file.Now currently, as the time of this podcast is being recorded, the process to export a Twitter Spaces audio file is a nightmare. And remember, staff engineer at Uber. He had to export his entire Twitter profile, navigate through a file structure that wasn't clearly marked, find the recording out of the multiple Spaces that he had hosted—and I don't think you get these for ones that you've participated in, only ones that you've hosted—download the file, but the file was not a normal WAV file or anything; he had to download an open-source converter to play the file. And in total, it took him about an hour to just get that file for the purposes of having that recording. Now, where my mind goes to is what about some woman who runs a nonprofit in the middle of, you know, Sacramento, and she does a community Twitter Spaces about her flower shop and she wants a recording of that.What's she going to do, hire some third-party? And she wouldn't even know where to go; before I was in tech, I certainly would have just given up and been like, “Well, this is a nightmare. What do I do with this GitHub repo of information?” But these are the kinds of problems that you need to think about. And I think a lot of us and folks who listen to this show probably build APIs or developer tools, but a lot of us do work on products that muggles, non-technical people, work on.And I see these issues happen constantly. I come from this space of being an admin, being someone who wasn't quote-unquote, “A techie,” and a lot of products are just not being thought through from the perspective—like, there would be so much value gained if just one person came in and tested your product who wasn't you. So yeah, there's all of these things that I think we have a very privileged view of, as technical folks, that we don't realize are huge. Not even just barrier to entry; you should just be able to download—and maybe this is a feature that's coming down the pipeline soon, who knows, but the fact that in order for someone to get a recording of their Twitter Spaces is like a multi-hour process for a very, very senior engineer, that's the problem. I'm not really sure how we solve this.I think we just call it out when we see it and try to help different companies make change, which of course, myself and my boyfriend did. We reached out to people at Twitter, and we're like, “This is really difficult and it shouldn't be.” But I have that privilege. I know people at these companies; most people do not.Corey: And in some cases, even when you do, it doesn't move the needle as much as you might wish that it would.Chloe: If it did, I wouldn't be getting DMs anymore from creeps right? [laugh].Corey: Right. Chloe, thank you so much for coming back and talk to me about your latest project. If people want to pay attention to it and see what you're up to. Where can they go? Where can they find you? Where can they learn more? And where can they pointedly not audition to be featured on one of the episodes of Master Creep Theatre?Chloe: [laugh]. So, that's the one caveat, right? I have to kind of close submissions of my own DMs now because now people are just going to be trolling me and sending me weird stuff. You can find me on Twitter—my name—at @chloecondon, C-H-L-O-E-C-O-N-D-O-N. I am on Instagram as @getforked, G-I-T-F-O-R-K-E-D. That's a Good Placepun if you're non-technical; it is an engineering pun if you are. And yeah, I've been doing a lot of fun series with Microsoft Reactor, lots of how to get a career in tech stuff for students, building a lot of really fun AI/ML stuff on there. So, come say hi on one of my many platforms. YouTube, too. That's probably where—Master Creep Theatre is going to be, on YouTube, so definitely follow me on YouTube. And yeah.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:37:57]. Chloe, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it, as always.Chloe: Thank you. I'll be back for episode three soon, I'm sure. [laugh].Corey: Let's not make it another couple of years until then. Chloe Condon, senior cloud advocate at Microsoft on the Next Generation Experiences Team, also chlo-host of the Master Creep Theatre podcast. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment saying simply, “Hey.”Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

KGO 810 Podcast
October 20, 2021: Pat Thurston: FBI agents swarm Russian oligarch's DC home

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 37:06


Co-founder of two leading international non-governmental organizations fighting corruption -- Transparency International and the Partnership for Transparency Fund, Frank Vogl joins the show. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast
October 20, 2021: Pat Thurston: FBI agents swarm Russian oligarch's DC home

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 37:06


Co-founder of two leading international non-governmental organizations fighting corruption -- Transparency International and the Partnership for Transparency Fund, Frank Vogl joins the show. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The David Pakman Show
10/19/21: Anti-Vaxxers Swarm Over Colin Powell's Death

The David Pakman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 66:20


--On the Show: --Bill Scher, Contributor to the Washington Monthly, Politico Magazine and Real Clear Politics, and host of the history podcast When America Worked, joins David to discuss the latest with the conflict between progressive and moderate Democrats in the House and Senate --Anti-vaxxers swarm to the death of vaccinated, immunocompromised Colin Powell, with Fox News running anti-vaccine propaganda all day long --Fox News propagandist Tucker Carlson goes straight up anti-vaccine in response to the death of Colin Powell --An awkward moment on Fox News as guest Dr. Nicole Saphier calls out anti-vaccine reactions to Colin Powell's death as Fox reporter John Roberts looks on just moments after he tweeted anti-vaccine propaganda in reaction to Colin Powell's death --Right wing media personality Dennis Prager announces he has COVID and is happy about it, and announces he's also taking five medications as a result --Fox News publishes one of their most dishonest graphics in history during the Sean Hannity program, looking to blame Joe Biden for COVID deaths --Donald Trump asks his supporters to donate $45 to "solve" election fraud in the latest attempt to grift his own followers --Voicemail caller, who is a teacher, says that one of his students told him during class that "Joe Biden belongs in prison" --On the Bonus Show: SCOTUS backs qualified immunity for police officers, Democrats eye carbon tax, Biden quietly deciding how to restart student loan payments, much more... ❄️ Get 20% OFF any ChiliSleep sleep system at https://chilisleep.com/pakman

Hoytus Interruptus
That Swarm and Buzzy Feeling

Hoytus Interruptus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 8:01


I'm not sure how it's possible to both love and hate a story at the same time, but that describes my relationship with this one. Act One is horrifying. Act Two provides a (very tiny) bit of comic relief.  TRIGGER WARNING: If you have a checkered history with stinging insects, you might wanna pass on this one.

Tin Foil Hat With Sam Tripoli
#500: The Big 500th Episode Of Tin Foil Hat With Eddie Bravo, Off The Grid Ryan Davis and The Swarm

Tin Foil Hat With Sam Tripoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 102:03


Thank you so much for tuning in for the 500th episode of Tin Foil Hat with Sam Tripoli. This episode we welcomed the Swarm to join the whole crew in Las Vegas for a live celebration of our magical journey together through 500 episodes exploring the world of conspiracy and spirituality. This was truly an extraordinary night that wouldn't be possible without the love and support of you the listeners. You have all changed all of our lives and for that we are truly grateful. We love you so much! Here is to another 500! Thank you so much for your support.Check out Sam Tripoli Live and grab your tickets at Samtripoli.com:Oct 21st-23rd: Miami- Sam Tripoli Headlines the Miami Improvhttps://www.miamiimprov.com/eventsNov 5th-7th: Houston- Skankfest Live at The Secret Group in Houston https://skankfest.netMiami: Nov 8th and 9th- Bitcoin ConferenceNov 11th: Boise, Idaho- The Disobey Tour Crushfest Live at Lounge End Universehttps://www.loungeboise.com/tickets/samtripoliNov 12th: Salt Lake City, Ut- The "Disobey" Crushfest live at Sugar Space Art Warehouse at 8pm!https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sam-tripolis-disobey-crushfest-live-in-salt-lake-city-tickets-167982220343Dec 10th: Tampa Bay, FL- Tin Foil Hat Comedy Live at The Sidesplitters at 10pm https://sidesplitterscomedy.laughstub.com/event.cfm?showTimingID=545512Check out all. of my premium content on ROKFIN.com. 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Right now if you go to HoMedics.com/TINFOIL and use promo code TINFOIL, you'll receive a FREE REPLACEMENT FILTER with the purchase of your Air Purifier…up to a $99 value! That's a free replacement filter when you go to H-O-M-E-D-I-C-S dot com/TINFOIL and use the promo code TINFOIL.Blue Chew: Visit Blue Chew dot com and get your first shipment free when you use promo code tinfoil. Just pay $5 shipping. That's B-L-U-E-Chew dot com promo code tinfoilLucy.Co: LUCY Nicotine is a company founded by CalTech scientists and former smokers looking for a better and cleaner nicotine alternative. Finally, tobacco alternatives that don't suck! Lucy has created a nicotine gum with 4 milligrams of nicotine that comes in three flavors: Tin Foil Hat Listeners - Go to LUCY dot C O and use Promo Code TINFOIL to get 20% off all products, including gum or lozenges!Talkspace.com: Talkspace makes it possible to speak with a licensed therapist right from your phone, tablet, or computer. And unlike traditional therapy, you can message your therapist anytime via text, video, or voice. It's 100% secure and stigma-free. The way therapy should be. Just visit talkspace.com and get $100 off your first month when you use promo code TINFOIL at sign-up. That's $100 off at talkspace.com, promo code TINFOIL.BudVac: BudVac is a one-of-a-kind cannabis stash container that comes with a vacuum pump to extract all the air, allowing cannabis enthusiasts to store their products in an oxygen-free environment. With BudVac's storage jars — you'll be able to taste, smell, and feel the difference! Go to BudVac.com and use promo code TFH at checkout for a 10% discount!Urbanista.com: the stylish range of audio products that get the sound, the look, the fit and the feel just right. look, the fit and the feel just right. Their colorful assortment of lifestyle audio products - including active noise cancelling headphones, true wireless earphones, and wireless/connective speakers - don't compromise on either sound quality or style.Right now, Urbanista has a special offer for Tin Foil Hat listeners – go to Urbanista.com/TINFOIL to get 20% off your entire order. That's 20% off everything! You'll even get free shipping for all orders over $60. Go to Urbanista.com/TINFOIL for 20% off. That's Urbanista.com/TINFOIL.CBDLion.com: With a wide variety of award winning CBD products. For all the Tin Foil Hat listeners goto CBDLion.com and type the word "Tinfoil" to 20% off for every order.Athleticgreens.com: Athleticgreens daily all-in-one superfood powder is your nutritional essential. It is by far the easiest and most delicious nutritional habit that you can add to your health routine today and empower you to take ownership of your health.Simply visit athleticgreens.com/TINFOILBespoke Post: Bespoke Post partners with small businesses and emerging brands to bring you ht most unique goods every month in the Box of Awesome collections. From travel and outdoor gear to breezy summer styles and grooming goods, Box of Awesome has collections for every part of your life. Get 20% of your first monthly box when you sign up at BoxofAwesome.com and use the promo code "TinFoil" at check out!American Home Shield: American Home Shield founded the home service plan industry 50 years ago. Our plans cover the repair or replacement of major parts of home systems and appliances that break down over time. 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Project Zion Podcast
423 | Coffee in The Swarm | Laura Harder

Project Zion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 20:03


Today's episode of Coffee in The Swarm was recorded IN the Swarm at Graceland University! Laura Harder, President of the Council of House Chaplains and one of the Graceland Student Government officers, sits down with Mike Hoffman to talk about life at Graceland and her hopes for the future of Community of Christ. Host: Mike HoffmanGuest: Laura Harder 

Washed Up Walkons
Ettore 'Big E' Ewen | WUW 258

Washed Up Walkons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:47


Hawkeye Alum, and current WWE Champion, Ettore 'Big E' Ewen joins the show. After an electric Saturday of appearances on Fox Big Noon Kickoff, A mid game promo, and finishing his night at Wilder V Fury in Vegas, E sits down to have a chat with the boys! He talks about how he found his way to Iowa City by pure chance, dealing with injuries that ended up derailing his football career, and experiencing the 'best and worst' of times. We talk his crazy feats of strength, winning national powerlifting competitions, and working out with John Cena and Roman Reigns. Then we quickly cover his time in Pro Wrestling from start to finish and the crazy things he has experienced in the last 12 years. Steve Manders gets a mention, we talk George Kittle and his love for the sport, and he lets us know his thoughts on The Swarm in Kinnick vs a WrestleMania entrance! All of this and more!

Dice Tales Live
Dice Tales Live: Episode #77: Snake Eyes, Part 3

Dice Tales Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 49:31


Dice Tales Live: Episode #77: Snake Eyes, Part 3 The episode begins with a quick summary of Episode #76. The adventure begins at 0:23, as the battle comes to a close. The Children of Destiny have dispatched the criminals in the sewer hideout and avenged the dead members of the Swarm, but the illicit dragon egg trade goes much deeper…… Continue reading »

The Hive Jive - Beekeeping Podcast
Bonus - The 85 HP V4 Swarm Trap

The Hive Jive - Beekeeping Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 33:20


What happens when you take the motor cowling from an 85 horsepower V4 Johnson outboard boat motor and turn it into a swarm trap? Well, we don't actually know. However, Ken and his son Max are willing to find out! Tune in now as Ken and John discuss this, and a few other random topics to round out a truly random bonus episode. (Original Air Date: March 5th, 2020)

Locked On Bama
'Bama's Injury Bug is More Like a Swarm of Locusts

Locked On Bama

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 22:12


We need to call Terminex or sumpin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ken Webster Jr
KAYAKTIVISTS SWARM JOE MANCHINS HOUSE BOAT WJ 6AM_ 100421

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 37:23


The State of the Scene (SOTS Podcast)
Fair Bands (Asking Alexandria / Oliver Francis / Dying Wish / Ghostmane)

The State of the Scene (SOTS Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 106:57


This week Sam goes to the fair and Marcos travels to the fantasy realm! Plus we talk new albums from Asking Alexandria, Dying Wish, Oliver Francis, Rivers of Nihil, Bilmuri, Signs of the Swarm, Cherie Amour, Invent Animate, Nominee, and What Lies Below! Not to mention news from Pvris, The Devil Wears Prada, Dance Gavin Dance, Limp Bizkit, Ghostmane, Monuments, Remy, Jutes, Shadow of Intent and more! Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0jp0fpudUz7gvu0SFaXhK3?si=j2BEVESFTGWkOyewnqLgaA Patreon: Patreon.com/sotspodcast. Merch: Sotspodcast.com/merch Twitter: https://twitter.com/SOTSPodcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotspodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sotspodcast