Podcasts about war project

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  • 35PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about war project

Latest podcast episodes about war project

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1443 Legacies of 9/11: War on Terror, Islamophobia and Conspiracy Theories

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 71:22


Air Date 9/21/2021 Today we take a look at the parallel legacies of 9/11 including the war on terror and military spending, the casual acceptance of Islamophobia, the adoption of ever-wilder conspiracy theories, and the acceleration of the political divide in America culminating, so far, in the January 6th Insurrection. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript   BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: 9/11: A Story in Three Parts. - Unf*cking The Republic - Air Date 9-10-21 We were tempted to let the 20th anniversary of 9/11 pass given it will be oversaturated with remembrances and armchair punditry as well as the usual tragedy porn imagery. Ch. 2: Endless militarization has bled US society dry - The Real News Podcast - Air Date 9-14-21 It's been 20 years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Since then, the US has channeled an unfathomable amount of its resources into the military-industrial complex. Ch. 3: “Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire”: Deepa Kumar on How Racism Fueled U.S. Wars Post-9/11 - Democracy Now! - Air Date 9-14-21 According to the Costs of War Project, the wars launched by the United States following 9/11 have killed an estimated 929,000 people in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, Yemen and elsewhere. Ch. 4: 20 Years Later: How 9/11 Changed Being Muslim in America - The Brian Lehrer Show - Air Date 9-10-21 Rowaida Abdelaziz, national reporter for HuffPost where she focuses on immigration, Islamophobia, and social justice issues, joins to discuss how being Muslim in the United States changed after the September 11th attacks. Ch. 5: 20 Years Since 9/11, 20 Years of Conspiracy Theories - Doomed - Air Date 9-10-21 Matt looks at the conspiracies, hoaxes, and urban legends that surround the day and the Bush administration. Ch. 6: The road from 9/11 to Donald Trump - Vox Conversations - Air Date 9-12-21 Sean Illing talks with national security reporter Spencer Ackerman, author of the new book Reign of Terror. They discuss the staggering changes to our country in the 20 years since 9/11 Ch. 7: America, 20 years after 9/11 - World Review from the New Statesman - Air Date 9-10-21 Jeremy Cliffeand Sarah Manavis are joined by New Yorker columnist and author Evan Osnos to discuss his new book, Wildland: The Making of America's Fury and how America has changed since the attacks on New York and Washington. Ch. 8: The Direct Line From 9/11 to January 6th - WhoWhatWhy - Air Date 9-10-21 Award-winning journalist Spencer Ackerman examines how 9/11 opened the door to America's worst historical impulses and led directly to Donald Trump and January 6th. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 9: Rescue 9/11 w/ Jim Lobe and Laila Ujayli - American Prestige - Air Date 9-11-21 The boys interview Laila Ujayli, associate editor at Inkstick Media, about growing up as a young Muslim in post-9/11 America. Ch. 10: Congressmember Barbara Lee, the Lone Vote for Peace After the September 11th Attacks - Breaking the Sound Barrier by Amy Goodman - Air Date 9-9-21 Congressmember Lee courageously voted no against the AUMF twenty years ago. FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 11: Final comments on Brian Williams and the campaigns we can win vs the campaigns worth winning MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent SHOW IMAGE: Description: The camera looks up at a young Muslim woman, wearing a black hoodie with the hood up over her black head covering, as she stands outside a glass entryway looking out into the distance. An American flag is wrapped around her shoulders. Credit: "Protest against Donald Trump's Muslim ban" by Fibonacci Blue | License | Changes: Cropped and very slight increase in contrast, brightness and saturation   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com  

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
No Accountability for War on Terror Atrocities

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 37:41


The war on terror has killed nearly 1 million people and cost more than $8 trillion, according to a report by Brown University's Costs of War Project. This week on Intercepted: Journalists Murtaza Hussain and Rozina Ali break down how the 9/11 attacks reshaped U.S. foreign and domestic policies. In the last two decades, the U.S. launched two wars, leading to millions dead and wounded. There was also a rise in unmanned drones killing innocent civilians, the use of widespread domestic and international surveillance, innocent people imprisoned, and perpetual human rights abuses and war crimes. And recently, there was a turning point in the war in Afghanistan, with the Taliban retaking the country. Hussain and Ali walk through the systematic failures across institutions — whether it be the government, military leadership, or the press — and the lack of accountability. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
9/9/21 Joe Dyke on the Civilian Bodycount of American Airstrikes

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 30:39


Joe Dyke from Airwars.org joins the show to discuss his new report, coauthored with Imogen Piper, which attempts to count civilian deaths resulting directly from U.S. airstrikes during the Terror Wars. Dyke says he and his colleagues want civilian deaths to be part of the broader ongoing discussions about the cost of these wars. Scott and Dyke discuss the difficulties involved with trying to count civilian deaths and examine the costs and benefits of different methods. Both agree, regardless of method, it's important work. Especially since the U.S. government has made no official estimates.  Discussed on the show:  “Tens of thousands of civilians likely killed by US in ‘Forever Wars'” (Airwars.org) Cost of War Project at Brown University  “The Other Afghan Women” (New Yorker) “Looser rules, more civilian deaths, a Taliban takeover: Inside America's failed Afghan drone campaign” (Connecting Vets) “The Drone Papers” (The Intercept)  George W. Bush speech after 9/11  “The Iraq War Logs” (Wikileaks)   “Iraq war logs reveal 15,000 previously unlisted civilian deaths” (The Guardian)  Joe Dyke is Senior Investigator at Airwars. He has a decade of experience living and working in the Middle East, carrying out in-depth investigations into conflict-related civilian harm. Follow his work on Twitter @joedyke. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0L0VcEtDiE

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
9/9/21 Joe Dyke on the Civilian Bodycount of American Airstrikes

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 30:39


Joe Dyke from Airwars.org joins the show to discuss his new report, coauthored with Imogen Piper, which attempts to count civilian deaths resulting directly from U.S. airstrikes during the Terror Wars. Dyke says he and his colleagues want civilian deaths to be part of the broader ongoing discussions about the cost of these wars. Scott and Dyke discuss the difficulties involved with trying to count civilian deaths and examine the costs and benefits of different methods. Both agree, regardless of method, it's important work. Especially since the U.S. government has made no official estimates.  Discussed on the show:  “Tens of thousands of civilians likely killed by US in ‘Forever Wars'” (Airwars.org) Cost of War Project at Brown University  “The Other Afghan Women” (New Yorker) “Looser rules, more civilian deaths, a Taliban takeover: Inside America's failed Afghan drone campaign” (Connecting Vets) “The Drone Papers” (The Intercept)  George W. Bush speech after 9/11  “The Iraq War Logs” (Wikileaks)   “Iraq war logs reveal 15,000 previously unlisted civilian deaths” (The Guardian)  Joe Dyke is Senior Investigator at Airwars. He has a decade of experience living and working in the Middle East, carrying out in-depth investigations into conflict-related civilian harm. Follow his work on Twitter @joedyke. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0L0VcEtDiE

Today, Explained
The cost of 9/11

Today, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 29:02


The Department of Defense tracks how much US wars cost, but last week President Biden cited instead accounting from the Costs of War Project at Brown University. Its co-director, Stephanie Savell, explains why. Today's show was produced by Victoria Chamberlin with help from Hady Mawajdeh, edited by Matt Collette, engineered by Efim Shapiro, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Support Today, Explained by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The FOX News Rundown
Fox News Rundown EXTRA: The Toll of the Afghanistan Withdrawal on Veterans

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 19:36


The withdrawal from Afghanistan, the Taliban taking over the region and all the deadly events that have followed is having a major impact on many veterans, especially those who served in America's longest war. Even before the deadly terrorist attack in Kabul, the Defense Department and the Marine Corps two top commanders reached out to veterans, especially those wondering is their sacrifice was worth it; praising them for their service while urging them to take advantage of mental health resources if needed. A study released by the Cost of War Project in June estimated that more than 30,000 War on Terror veterans have died by suicide, compared to more than 7-thousan who were deployed, Earlier this week, host Lisa Brady spoke retired U.S. Marine Corps Colonel Christian Cabaniss about veterans' reaction to the Afghanistan withdrawal and the mental health struggles they currently face. The conversation was too long and we could not include the whole interview with the colonel. On today's FOX News Rundown EXTRA you will hear Colonel Cabaniss discuss the progress made on the mental health front, the many challenges that still remain for the men and women who served, what he wants the American public to recognize about those who have served this country and how the government and communities can help.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
7/2/21 Matthew Hoh on Veteran Suicides, Afghanistan and America’s Failed War on Terrorism

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 80:19


Scott and Matthew Hoh have a wide-ranging conversation about America's war on terrorism. The latest news is that the U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan is essentially complete, with the exception of a small number of soldiers, contractors and CIA operatives ostensibly remaining behind for diplomatic purposes. Hoh is optimistic about the possibility of the American military really being finished with Afghanistan now, though he and Scott both fear that the resulting instability could be used as an excuse to lobby for continued intervention. Hoh also discusses veteran suicide rates from the post-9/11 wars, which have surged way beyond those of the general population in recent years. Discussed on the show: "High Suicide Rates among United States Service Members and Veterans of the Post-9/11 Wars" (Cost of War Project) "The Redirection" (The New Yorker) No Good Men Among the Living: America, the Taliban, and the War through Afghan Eyes "Mike Gravel and An Ongoing Road to Courage" (CounterPunch.org) The Pentagon Papers Matthew Hoh is a senior fellow at the Center for International Policy and formerly worked for the U.S. State Department. Hoh received the Ridenhour Prize Recipient for Truth Telling in 2010. Hoh is a member of the Board of Directors for Council for a Livable World and is an Advisory Board Member for Expose Facts. He writes on issues of war, peace and post-traumatic stress disorder recovery at matthewhoh.com. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Photo IQ; Green Mill Supercritical; Zippix Toothpicks; and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://youtu.be/Jkq0zu2LEHE

Liberty.me Studio
The Scott Horton Show - Ben Suitt on the Alarming Suicide Rate Among Post-9/11 War Vets

Liberty.me Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 36:08


Scott interviews Ben Suitt about his work about veteran suicides for Brown University's Cost of War Project. Suitt conservatively estimates that about 30,000 veterans of America's terror wars have taken their own lives, a truly astonishing number. This side of modern warfare often goes undiscussed, but it is every bit as concerning as the physical injuries that soldiers sustain overseas. Discussed on the show: “High Suicide Rates among United States Service Members and Veterans of the Post-9/11 Wars” (Cost of War Project) “Poll: 42 percent of Americans think the US is winning the ‘war on terror'” (Military Times) Ben Suitt is the author of “Finding Resonance Amid Trauma: Moral Injury and the Role of Religion Among Christian Post-9/11 U.S. Veterans.” A recent graduate of Boston University, Dr. Suitt's research investigates the role of religion in the lives of US military veterans as they navigate between competing identities and cultures amid the disruptive experiences of war and trauma. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Photo IQ; Green Mill Supercritical; Zippix Toothpicks; and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
6/24/21 Ben Suitt on the Alarming Suicide Rate Among Post-9/11 War Vets

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 36:05


Scott interviews Ben Suitt about his work about veteran suicides for Brown University's Cost of War Project. Suitt conservatively estimates that about 30,000 veterans of America's terror wars have taken their own lives, a truly astonishing number. This side of modern warfare often goes undiscussed, but it is every bit as concerning as the physical injuries that soldiers sustain overseas. Discussed on the show: "High Suicide Rates among United States Service Members and Veterans of the Post-9/11 Wars" (Cost of War Project) "Poll: 42 percent of Americans think the US is winning the 'war on terror'" (Military Times) Ben Suitt is the author of “Finding Resonance Amid Trauma: Moral Injury and the Role of Religion Among Christian Post-9/11 U.S. Veterans.” A recent graduate of Boston University, Dr. Suitt's research investigates the role of religion in the lives of US military veterans as they navigate between competing identities and cultures amid the disruptive experiences of war and trauma. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Photo IQ; Green Mill Supercritical; Zippix Toothpicks; and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbY1dr1Emlo

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
6/24/21 Ben Suitt on the Alarming Suicide Rate Among Post-9/11 War Vets

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 36:05


Scott interviews Ben Suitt about his work about veteran suicides for Brown University's Cost of War Project. Suitt conservatively estimates that about 30,000 veterans of America's terror wars have taken their own lives, a truly astonishing number. This side of modern warfare often goes undiscussed, but it is every bit as concerning as the physical injuries that soldiers sustain overseas. Discussed on the show: "High Suicide Rates among United States Service Members and Veterans of the Post-9/11 Wars" (Cost of War Project) "Poll: 42 percent of Americans think the US is winning the 'war on terror'" (Military Times) Ben Suitt is the author of “Finding Resonance Amid Trauma: Moral Injury and the Role of Religion Among Christian Post-9/11 U.S. Veterans.” A recent graduate of Boston University, Dr. Suitt's research investigates the role of religion in the lives of US military veterans as they navigate between competing identities and cultures amid the disruptive experiences of war and trauma. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Photo IQ; Green Mill Supercritical; Zippix Toothpicks; and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbY1dr1Emlo

The Indigenous Approach
Vax Facts Update - What's New? What's Changing? Get the Facts Here

The Indigenous Approach

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 16:45


In this episode of the Command Team Corner, we sit down with Maj. Gen. John Brennan, Col. Jamie Riesberg, Lt. Col. Ryan Schloesser, and Lt. Col. Eric Johnson to discuss the latest on the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccines, given the recent changes in guidance with respect to Restriction of Movement (ROM) for fully-vaccinated individuals.Maj. Gen. John Brennan is the Commander of 1st Special Forces Command (Airborne).Col. Jamie Riesberg is the 1st SFC (A) Command Surgeon.Lt. Col. Ryan Schloesser is our Current Operations Division Chief.Lt. Col. Eric Johnson is our former G9, who is researching Disinformation on a fellowship with New America's Future of War Project.

Sligo Life
S2 EP40 Ciaran McCauley - Actor, Wedding Celebrant & Lecturer

Sligo Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2021 34:21


This week on the podcast we chat to Ciaran who is a Self- employed, Actor, Wedding Celebrant & Trainer of Celebrants for weddings and funerals, naming ceremonies, Lecturer in Sligo IT, Drama Adjudicator & Hen party entertainer.Here is some more information that Ciaran shared with us . . . An excellent communicator with a proven track record for delivering high quality theatre both as a performer and a director.A natural facilitator and educator with a passion for sharing theatrical knowledge.Possesses an in-depth practical understanding of working within the challenges of a demanding artistic environment.Key Roles and AchievementsLecturer in Sligo Institute of Technology 2015 - Present• I deliver the Physical Theatre module as part of the Performing Arts BA in 2nd year.I have facilitated Acting classes for 1st , 2nd and 3rd year students on the Performing Arts BA• I deliver the modules Modernism in Drama, Literature and Facilitation and Drama to Performing Arts students.• I direct and produce the public showcase for the New Writing module.MA in Drama and Performance, University College Dublin 2014-2015• Completed an MA. which required for graduation a devised Solo Performance and presentation of a Thesis.• This undertaking demanded excellent time management skills and an ability to think and act strategically also developing my computer literacy and written communication skills.• Advanced my understanding of the importance of the Arts, in particular theatre, to the cultural fabric of a community both locally and nationally.Professional Actor 1991 – present• In 2019, I developed and produced a solo theatrical performance piece “Is Mise le Meas” about the writer Flann O'Brien• I have trained extensively in Corporeal Mime, Viewpoints and Suzuki, all disciplines rooted in sound physical technique, which have been developed to provide the actor with the skills to realise their potential and best artistic expression within a theatrical production.• My vocal training has been developed over the last 30 years under the influence of numerous coaches and teachers but most specifically with the Roy Hart Theatre of Voice, France.• As part of an ensemble since 1991, I have been engaged in all aspects of Theatre Production, prop making, costume sourcing and design, set design and construction, lighting design, Production management on National and International Touring schedules.(For full listings of Theatre, Film and Radio performance credits please see addendum.)Theatre Director 1998 - present• In 2016 I established a Youth Theatre group in Tubbercurry. This project required a scheduled number of theatre workshops culminating in a devised performance to mark the opening of The Western Drama Festival.• I have directed a number of productions for Blue Raincoat Theatre company.• I have been Assistant Director to Kellie Hughes, Director Ad Astra Programme University College Dublin, The War Project with the Ad Astra scholars and UCD choral scholars, and Shakespeare's Women presented by the Drama Studies students.• I was the Assistant Director and Production Manager for Terrible Tales of Tubber which was performed by Tubbercurry Youth Drama Group in 2011.• As Director of Footsteps Theatre Group, I directed and produced a number of shows that were presented as part of Cairde Arts Festival.Training and Facilitation Ongoing• I was the lead driver on a unique project to deliver drama workshops to a group of young adults from Sligo Down Syndrome, this collective became The Footsteps Drama group. Weekly drama workshops were held and the company presented a number of public performances as part of the stated goals of the project.• In 2017, at the request of the Summerhill College English Dept., I created and produced a performance designed to provide students with practi

Here & Now
'The Little Things' Star Jared Leto; Cost Of Counterterrorism

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 43:16


Jared Leto talks about "The Little Things." Leto plays an appliance delivery man who becomes the prime suspect in a series of murders in 1990's California. And, data from the Cost of War Project shows the U.S. conducted counterterrorism operations in more than 80 countries between 2018 and 2020. The co-director of the Cost of War Project joins us.

Veterans for Peace Radio Hour
Veterans for Peace on the Costs of War and the entanglement with Police

Veterans for Peace Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 60:00


We listen to and discuss a talk given by Jessica Katzenstein for a Twenty Years of War Project. She discusses the costs of blood and treasure related to the entanglement of the military and policing and how this entanglement has led to military tactics used during war being implemented on our own citizenry.

Battles of the First World War Podcast
Champagne - Blanc Mont, Pt 3 (featuring Steven Girard)

Battles of the First World War Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 47:40


Having seized part of Blanc Mont and ground beyond, the Marines and Doughboys of the 2nd Division AEF sought to continue to push back the ruptured German lines. They faced days of unimaginable bloodletting as the Germans fought doggedly for every meter of ground.   Be sure to check out “Fix Bayonets! First World War Podcast,” where I have teamed up with Nicole Chicarelli of The War Project on Instagram and Cullen Burke of the Cauldron Podcast (A History of the World Battle by Battle) to tell the story of WW1 from three views: strategic, tactical, and most importantly...human.   Fix Bayonets! First World War Podcast: https://feeds.simplecast.com/7FISmQ37   The BFWWP is on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BattlesoftheFirstWorldWarPodcast.    Any questions, comments or concerns please contact me through the website, www.firstworldwarpodcast.com. Follow us on Twitter at @WW1podcast, the Battles of the First World War Podcast page on FaceBook, and on Instagram at @WW1battlecast. Not into social media? Email me directly at verdunpodcast@gmail.com. Please consider reviewing the Battles of the First World War Podcast on iTunes. 

PARC Media
David Vine on United States of War, U.S. Empire, and Militarism

PARC Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2020 72:56


David Vine is Professor of political anthropology at American University in Washington, DC. David's newest book, 'The United States of War: A Global History of America's Endless Conflicts, from Columbus to the Islamic State,' was just published by the University of California Press. 'The United States of War' is the third in a trilogy of books about war and peace. The other books in the trilogy are 'Base Nation: How U.S. Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World' (Metropolitan/Henry Holt, 2015) and 'Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military Base on Diego Garcia' (Princeton University Press, 2009). David's other writing has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, The Guardian, Mother Jones, Boston Globe, Huffington Post, and the Chronicle of Higher Education. David is a board member of the Costs of War Project and a co-founder of the Overseas Base Realignment and Closure Coalition. David is a contributor to TomDispatch.com and Foreign Policy in Focus. All royalties from David's books and all speaker honorariums are donated to the Chagossian people and nonprofit organizations serving other victims of war. Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/PARCMEDIA Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Vince_EmanueleFollow Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/1713FranklinSt/Follow Us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/parcmedia/?... #PARCMedia is a news and media project founded by two USMC veterans, Sergio Kochergin & Vince Emanuele. They give a working-class take on issues surrounding politics, ecology, community organizing, war, culture, and philosophy.

Battles of the First World War Podcast
Champagne - Blanc Mont, Pt 2 (featuring Steven Girard)

Battles of the First World War Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 37:25


On October 3rd, 1918, the Doughboys and Marines of the 2nd Division, AEF, hurled themselves against a hitherto impregnable German fortress: Blanc Mont ridge, the key to German defenses in Champagne.    Podcast promo! If you’re interested in a daily podcast that gives you a short episode on anything from the history of the US penny to the Tunguska Event of 1908, then you need to head over to Gary Arndt’s “Everything Everywhere” podcast.    Everything Everywhere podcast: https://everythingeverywherepodcast.libsyn.com/rss   Also, very excited to announce that I have teamed up with Nicole Chicarelli of The War Project on Instagram and Cullen Burke of the Cauldron Podcast (A History of the World Battle by Battle) to launch a new podcast project called “Fix Bayonets! First World War Podcast.”   The story of WW1, from three view: strategic, tactical, and most importantly...human.   Fix Bayonets! First World War Podcast: https://feeds.simplecast.com/7FISmQ37   The BFWWP is on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BattlesoftheFirstWorldWarPodcast.    Any questions, comments or concerns please contact me through the website, www.firstworldwarpodcast.com. Follow us on Twitter at @WW1podcast, the Battles of the First World War Podcast page on FaceBook, and on Instagram at @WW1battlecast. Not into social media? Email me directly at verdunpodcast@gmail.com. Please consider reviewing the Battles of the First World War Podcast on iTunes. 

Liberty.me Studio
The Scott Horton Show - Jessica Katzenstein on the Militarization of American Police

Liberty.me Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 35:02


Scott talks to Jessica Katzenstein from the Costs of War Project about her recent paper on the effects of America’s foreign wars on police militarization. She and Scott trace police militarization to the escalation of the war on drugs in the 1990s, when SWAT raids became especially prevalent. Today that trend has reached all-time highs, with Katzenstein estimating 60,000 raids per year. With so much military equipment being funneled to police departments from the military and Homeland Security, Scott describes the situation as hardly any different than a foreign army patrolling—and subjugating—an occupied country. Discussed on the show: “The Wars Are Here: How the United States’ Post-9/11 Wars Helped Militarize U.S. Police” (Costs of War) Nemesis: The Last Days of the American Republic Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces “War Comes Home” (ACLU) “The Wire (TV Series 2002–2008)” (IMDb) Jessica Katzenstein is a PhD candidate at Brown University, whose research interests include the militarization of U.S. policing, whiteness and racism and police reform. Follow her work at the Costs of War Project. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: NoDev NoOps NoIT, by Hussein Badakhchani; The War State, by Mike Swanson; WallStreetWindow.com; Tom Woods’ Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Listen and Think Audio; TheBumperSticker.com; and LibertyStickers.com. Donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal, or Bitcoin: 1Ct2FmcGrAGX56RnDtN9HncYghXfvF2GAh.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
9/25/20 Jessica Katzenstein on the Militarization of American Police

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 34:58


Scott talks to Jessica Katzenstein from the Costs of War Project about her recent paper on the effects of America’s foreign wars on police militarization. She and Scott trace police militarization to the escalation of the war on drugs in the 1990s, when SWAT raids became especially prevalent. Today that trend has reached all-time highs, with Katzenstein estimating 60,000 raids per year. With so much military equipment being funneled to police departments from the military and Homeland Security, Scott describes the situation as hardly any different than a foreign army patrolling—and subjugating—an occupied country. Discussed on the show: “The Wars Are Here: How the United States’ Post-9/11 Wars Helped Militarize U.S. Police” (Costs of War) Nemesis: The Last Days of the American Republic Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces “War Comes Home” (ACLU) “The Wire (TV Series 2002–2008)” (IMDb) Jessica Katzenstein is a PhD candidate at Brown University, whose research interests include the militarization of U.S. policing, whiteness and racism and police reform. Follow her work at the Costs of War Project. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: NoDev NoOps NoIT, by Hussein Badakhchani; The War State, by Mike Swanson; WallStreetWindow.com; Tom Woods’ Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Listen and Think Audio; TheBumperSticker.com; and LibertyStickers.com. Donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal, or Bitcoin: 1Ct2FmcGrAGX56RnDtN9HncYghXfvF2GAh.

GameOver.gr Webcast
GameOver Webcast #434 - Gamescom 2020, CoD Cold War, Project Cars 3

GameOver.gr Webcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 158:42


Σχολιασμός επικαιρότητας και ειδήσεων από την έκθεση Gamescom, σχόλια για το νέο Call of Duty και πολλά άλλα.

Talk World Radio
Talk Nation Radio: Heidi Peltier on the Camo Economy

Talk World Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2020 29:00


This week on Talk Nation Radio: massive, shameless, and endlessly expanding war profiteering by weapons dealers. Our guest is Heidi Peltier, author of a new report called “The Growth of the ‘Camo Economy' and the Commercialization of the Post 9/11 Wars.” Heidi Peltier is the Director of the “20 Years of War” project at Boston University and part of the Costs of War Project at Brown University.  She has written reports and articles on various costs of war, including the hidden costs of financing war through debt, as well as the opportunity costs of spending federal dollars on the war economy instead of on other domestic priorities such as healthcare, education, or clean energy.

Alternative News
Excerpts from Politics In The Pub with Dr Margaret Beavis

Alternative News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2020


LinksMedical Association for the Prevention of War (Australia)Politics In The Pub Livestream recordingPolitics In The Pub facebook pageAlternative NewsProduced by the Campaign for International Cooperation and Disarmament (CICD)Broadcasting from the stolen lands of the Wurundjeri people.On 3CR 855AM, 3CR digital and 3cr.org.auMy name is Zachary Doney, CICD member and hospitality worker. and I’ll be playing some audio clips from last week’s Politics in the Pub discussion on ‘Can Australia Have An Independent Foreign Policy?’ with guest speaker Dr Margaret Beavis of the Medical Association for Prevention of War.Politics in the Pub Melbourne is a new initiative led by peace activists, unionists and politically active members of the public. If you are interested in helping form a Politics in the Pub committee please contact Romina at peacecentre@cicd.org.au or 0414 352 542.The full audio and video of the event can be found here:Politics In The Pub https://www.facebook.com/Politics-in-the-Pub-105066541262764/Live stream video: https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=294005101968687Now, let’s hear some clips from the event and discuss if it’s possible for Australia to have an independent foreign policy.Up first is Romina introducing the topic and the speaker:Romina:The subject of the event is "Can Australia have An Independent Foreign Policy and how can we do that?"Austrlaia's ruling class has always sought support from foreign powers, which pre-WWII was Britain. Following the fall of Singapore in 1942 and the withdrawal of British forces from the East the Australian govt. changed our loyalty from Britain to the US. In 1950 Aus followed the US into the Korean war, followed by the Vietnam war. In 2001, Afghanistan. In 2003, Iraq. Syria in 2014. In 2019 Australia followed the US to the Strait of Hormuz. Australia committed to participating in the "shipping protection force."Who better to talk about this topic than Dr Margaret Beavis?Dr Margaret Beavis is a GP with over twenty-five years’ experience in community medicine. Her research, writing and teaching interests include nuclear weapons, nuclear waste and the weapons industry. She is also interested in the Australian government spending on defence, diplomacy and foreign aid and how Australia decides to go to war.  She has a particular interest in health and the environment, both on a global scale, and in her local community. Recent publications have focused on the UN treaty prohibiting nuclear weapons and nuclear waste issues in Australia.Dr Margaret Beavis is the Vice President of the Medical Association for prevention of War, and the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) Australia co-chair.Zachary: As I mentioned before I am going to play clips from the event. Here's Dr Beavis:Dr. B: The subsidising of the military weapons manufacturer is justified as "job job jobs, jobs & growth," we;ve all heard it. If you actually look at the research: when you spend a billion dollars on a particular industry there are better outcomes than weapons. Health, education and renewables all yield better returns. Health and education yield more than double returns. Renewables yield a 140% return. Z: We assume here Margaret is referring to a study done by the Costs of War Project at Brown University. Margaret is going off memory here and says there is a 40% increase in jobs from renewables investment, but the figure is 21 percent increase in jobs for wind energy development per 1 million dollars invested. She is right in saying that education investments create almost double the jobs per 1 million invested, the figure being an increase of 178 percent.In a time when there is 1 job for every 18 Jobseekers, the government should invest money wisely in industries that are more cost effective at producing jobs such as renewables, infrastructure, and especially healthcare and education.[Study at Brown: https://www.brown.edu/news/2017-05-25/jobscow]Dr. B: The place of the weapons industry in education is insidious. People are starting to become aware of this. As state education and tertiary education become increasingly starved of funds the weapons industry has stepped in to offer prizes at the secondary level and education assistance, subsidies. At the teriarty level, for instance in melbourne, they have multi-million dollar partnerships were they sponsor and pay for schlarships for PhD students. The weapons manufacturers then get access to the research. This is very comprimising. In the Melborne example it's Lockheed Martin which is the biggest weapons manufacturer in the world and is closely tied with nuclear weapons systems.Z: This is big news to me. Dr Beavis is talking about Australia’s Defence Science Partnerships program that partners universities with Defence and national security agencies on collaborative research projects.Margaret’s example of these partnerships is Lockheed Martin’s, the largest weapons manufacturer, partnership with University of Melbourne. This is a company that supplies weapons to Saudi Arabia that fuels the war in Yemen and to Israel that fuels their settler-colonial project against Palestinians. Our universities are now complicit in these activities and produce research that is favourable for weapons manufacturers and imperialist conflicts.It is also worth mentioning the US-Australia International Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (AUSMURI). This is a project that facilitates international research between American and Australian universities with US Department of Defense at its core. Australian universities are able to get a grant up to $3 million through the programme, subject approval by the US Department of Defense’s University research initiative.Between Australia’s Defence Science Partnerships program and the US-Australia Research Initiative, our universities are tied up with US Department of Defense and multi-national weapons manufacturers.https://theconversation.com/partnerships-between-universities-and-arms-manufacturers-raise-thorny-ethical-questions-93005Dr. B: Australia was the 4th highest weapons importer in 2018 and we risk starting a [regional] arms race [with the recent announcement of $270bn in military spending over the next decade]. This belligerent, Right-wing rhetoric of enhancing fear in the community to justify the purchases... it's really concerning what's happening.Z: In 2018 we were the 4th biggest importer of weapons but now we are the second biggest importer of weapons, second to Saudi Arabia. Why do we need this many weapons?https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-30/australia-worlds-second-biggest-weapons-importer-behind-saudi/11558762 Dr. B: I found out a few years ago that we have a senior Major General and other ssenior Australian military people in the chain of command in the Pacific. So, the top person is a US person, the second person in command, answering to the top person, is an Australian. We are enmeshed in the US chain of command. This means if the US decides to go to war we're already in their fighting machine.The other astounding piece of enmeshment is that our oil reserves are located in the US. How on Earth do we think that, in a war situation, those reserves are going to cross the Pacific to come to us. It's laughable and it's another piece of enmeshment tying us into the US war machine.Z: It makes sense for us to be able to co-ordinate with our military allies. What seems to be happening, though, is we have let our military alliance with the US become a unilateral affair in which we follow at their beck and call. We cannot exercise an independent foreign policy because our military affairs are so tightly interwoven with the US. An example of this are the activities co-ordinated through Pine Gap. Dr. B: When Australia was fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan a lot of that signals intelligence went through Pine Gap. Pine Gap is controlled by the Americans. Our military missions were, infact, under control of the Americans by default.Z: Also, Pine Gap is used to commit atrocities overseas. The bloodbath in Yemen is further inflamed by US drone strikes, co-ordinated through Pine Gap Dr. B: Of big concern: Pine Gap is used to target drone strikes. it does mean that Australia is culpable in these drone strikes which are effectively extra-judicial killings where suspects have no due process, there's no court of law, there's no hearing. Also the people around those subjects - there have been many civilian deaths documented and Australia is part of this.Z: While we're on the topic of Yemen:  thanks to our govt using taxpayer money to subsidise multinational weapons manufacturers our taxpayer money goes directly to murdering the Yemeni people:Dr. B: The Govt is heavily subsidising weapons companies now, even though most of them are Australian branches of huge multi-nationals. There's a $3.8bn loan subsidy scheme. In addition to that there are direct grants to companies which we do not know about. One we doknow about is #38 million given to EOS Weapons systems in Canberra. This company makes gun emplacements that have rocket launchers and guns which can be placed onto of an armoured vehicle and operated remotely so one does not have to stand outside the armoured vehicle to fire the weapons. It's revolting that $38 million of our taxpayer money went to a weapons system that was then exported to the US and then exported to Yemen. This despite suppososedly good arms control measures preventing Australia selling weapons to places where tehre are human right violations.Z: Last but not least:Dr. B: Pine Gap is also used for nuclear weapons targetting.Z: Boo.Dr. B: I think it's really important, in any war situation, that we talk about the undue influence of the weapons industry. We need to address this and there are ways to address this. They're sort-of half-hearted measures being talked about in Canberra which would be good but are being done very badly. For instance: lobbying. It came out earlier this week that the government's promises to keep a lobbying register, the auditor-general has been given a scathing report to say they're not keeping a proper record of who is lobbying our parliamentarians. Really, lobbying is very important because successful lobbying basically means that vested interests triumph over public interests. Similarly donations: more than half of the donations made in Australia are opaque. We urgently need transparent, real-time donation reporting. In America you know about donations within two weeks, whereas in Australia it can take 14-18 months [for donations to be reported]. Often these donations are hidden by the use of foundations.Z: Yeah, so, we can't understand the full influence of weapons industry lobbying and donation if we haven't addressed lobbying and do not have effective donations reporting mechanism. Dr. Beavis' examples of the US' reporting system vs ours are interesting but obviously this hasn't stopped the US from militarising the world in their interests. I think this point continues into Margaret's next point, which is "war powers reform"Dr. B: War powers reform is terribly important. There's too many times where Australia has gone to war because it was politically convenient. The current process rests with the Prime Minister and the executive. In the US and the UK and various other countries both houses of parliament come together when war is contemplated. They debate what's happening, they debate what the information is, and then they vote. Andrew Wilkie, as you all know, the Tasmanian independent MP resigned over what poor-quality intelligence there was for [Australia's participation in] the Iraq War. And he was, of course, proved right in the end.Z: As we can understand from the examples given, war powers reform is no panacea for Australia's lack of independent foreign policy. It is part of a programme of changes, which include, as Dr Beavis tell us...Dr. B: Diplomacy is the key to peace. It's not terribly exciting. If you prevent a conflict you don't see too much. But it is a hugely cost-effective and a really worthwhile investment. We need electoral reform... what I think we're talking about is strategic independence. What we have now is strategic dependence and it's not strategic [for Australia] at all. We need an independent foreign policy so we're not dragged, yet again, into yet another US war.Z: The Campaign for International Co-operation and Disarmament stands firmly against US wars and stands firmly for a non-aligned and independent foreign policy. Thanks goes to Margaret for coming onto the first Politics In The Pub. As I mentioned earlier, if you are interested in being part of the committee to organise POlitics In The Pub, please reach out to peacecentre@cicd.org.au.[presenter signs off]Coming up next - Concrete Gang. 

Battles of the First World War Podcast
An Interview with Nicole Chicarelli of The War Project

Battles of the First World War Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2020 47:46


Hey Folks, this episode we have an interview with an up and coming voice in the Great War history community.    Nicole Chicarelli is the historian behind “The War Project” on Instagram, which can be found here:   https://www.instagram.com/thewarproject/   And her website is here:   http://www.warprojecthistorian.com/   Click on that follow button!    Nicole and I discuss how her passion for history began, her educational background, and her purpose behind The War Project. She is currently a Master of Arts Candidate in military history at American Military University, with a focus on war theory of the First World War.    The BFWWP is on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BattlesoftheFirstWorldWarPodcast.    Any questions, comments or concerns please contact me through the website, www.firstworldwarpodcast.com. Follow us on Twitter at @WW1podcast, the Battles of the First World War Podcast page on FaceBook, and on Instagram at @WW1battlecast. Not into social media? Email me directly at verdunpodcast@gmail.com. Please consider reviewing the Battles of the First World War Podcast on iTunes. 

None of the Above
Episode 26: Airstrikes in East Africa

None of the Above

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2020 27:21


This episode marks the end of the first season of the Eurasia Group Foundation podcast, None Of The Above. We conclude our season with a topic that gets far too little attention in the mainstream media: the history of the U.S. military’s involvement in Somalia, a country deeply mired in terrorism, poverty, and war. Mark sits down with Nairobi-based journalist Amanda Sperber and anthropologist Catherine Besteman to unpack why the United States is waging an unofficial drone war in Somalia and explores the history and human costs of this conflict. They discuss the evolution of Al-Shabaab (an affiliate of Al-Qaeda), civilian casualties from U.S. airstrikes, and how Somalia exemplifies what many consider to be the strategic and moral failings of America’s global war on terror. Have a listen, let us know what you think, and we’ll see you in August when we return for Season 2.   Amanda Sperber is a Nairobi-based award-winning investigative journalist, foreign correspondent, and multimedia storyteller. Her work focuses on East Africa, specifically on Somalia, and the consequences of U.S. drone strikes. She is the author of “Ilhan Omar Demands Answers on Civilian Deaths in Somalia” in The Daily Beast. @hysperbole   Catherine Besteman is Francis F. Bartlett and Ruth K. Bartlett Professor of Anthropology at Colby College in Maine. Her work focuses on U.S. militarism in Somalia. She is the author of The Costs of War in Somalia from Brown University’s Costs of War Project, and the upcoming book Militarized Global Apartheid (2020).   

Cauldron - A History Of The World Battle By Battle
Slow and Steady - Cauldron Podcast In The Time Of Corona

Cauldron - A History Of The World Battle By Battle

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2020 8:00


Just a check in to let you guys know where things are at on the show. Things have been very hectic and crazy of late, for everyone I'm sure. I wanted to let you guys know that yes, everything is delayed, and content is coming out slower, but it's still coming! I'll have Bud Dajo out soon, some awesome battles are coming up next, and our Livestream on Instagram is a lot of fun. Every Wednesday at 8 pm EST listeners and other podcasters get together and catch up, shoot the breeze, and debate. Coming up, we have a listener presentation on TR, Nicole from The War Project is giving us some WWI key figure profiles, and our Field Commander bracket is in the first round. Also, check out the Youtube channel, I'm starting to get more video content up and soon I'll be doing a Livestream viewing of a movie picked by the audience. Please rate, review, subscribe! And not just to my show but to some excellent other shows out there - Battles of the First World War Pod, Peter HArt's Military History Pod, and Trapped.

Ron Paul Liberty Report
Catastrophe! $6.4 Trillion Wasted On 20 Years Of War!

Ron Paul Liberty Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2019 19:20


A new report by Brown University's Costs of War Project now estimates that by the end of fiscal year 2020, the US will have "spent" $6.4 trillion on a global "war on terror" in which more than three million people have died. And what do we have to show for it? And what will happen when payment is actually due (i.e. the Fed can no longer hide the costs by printing money)?

Focus on Albany
Maureen Aumand talks about Cost of War Project

Focus on Albany

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2019 33:00


Maureen Aumand talks about Cost of War Project

You Don't Have to Yell
Episode 15: Heidi Peltier from The Costs of War Project

You Don't Have to Yell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2019 35:03


We talk about military spending in terms of dollars, but rarely do we talk about the opportunity costs of not investing those dollars in other areas. Economist Heidi Peltier from The Costs of War Project discusses the potential job creating benefits of investing in infrastructure, education, and renewable energy we're currently missing out on.

Cato Institute Event Videos (Full)
The Human Costs of War: Assessing Civilian Casualties since 9/11

Cato Institute Event Videos (Full)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2019 86:18


On September 11, 2001, al Qaeda terrorists killed nearly 3,000 innocent men, women, and children in four coordinated attacks, the deadliest such incident in history and the bloodiest day on American soil in over a century. Since that time, the Pentagon says more than 7,000 Americans have been killed in the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and the Greater Middle East, as well as in other military operations associated with the War on Terror. Many Americans still recall the trauma of 9/11 and are aware of the scale of death and destruction wrought that day. Some have a sense of the numbers of U.S. troops killed in wars since. Very few, however, are aware of the others who have died in these wars. For example, the Costs of War Project counts at least 244,000 civilian deaths in just three countries: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Much higher estimates may be derived from episodic reporting of incidents involving noncombatants killed as a result of U.S. military action worldwide. At this special policy forum, a distinguished panel of experts will explore the nature of these casualties, why the U.S. military’s efforts to limit harm to innocent men, women, and children sometimes fail, how and if recent congressional oversight has helped to shed light on the issue, and whether the U.S. media’s inconsistent coverage of noncombatant deaths is a symptom or a cause of the public’s relative ignorance of the true costs of America’s ongoing wars.

Cato Event Podcast
The Human Costs of War: Assessing Civilian Casualties since 9/11 Audio

Cato Event Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2019 86:18


On September 11, 2001, al Qaeda terrorists killed nearly 3,000 innocent men, women, and children in four coordinated attacks, the deadliest such incident in history and the bloodiest day on American soil in over a century. Since that time, the Pentagon says more than 7,000 Americans have been killed in the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and the Greater Middle East, as well as in other military operations associated with the War on Terror.Many Americans still recall the trauma of 9/11 and are aware of the scale of death and destruction wrought that day. Some have a sense of the numbers of U.S. troops killed in wars since. Very few, however, are aware of the others who have died in these wars. For example, the Costs of War Project counts at least 244,000 civilian deaths in just three countries: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Much higher estimates may be derived from episodic reporting of incidents involving noncombatants killed as a result of U.S. military action worldwide.At this special policy forum, a distinguished panel of experts will explore the nature of these casualties, why the U.S. military’s efforts to limit harm to innocent men, women, and children sometimes fail, how and if recent congressional oversight has helped to shed light on the issue, and whether the U.S. media’s inconsistent coverage of noncombatant deaths is a symptom or a cause of the public’s relative ignorance of the true costs of America’s ongoing wars. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Changing Character of War
The Law and Practice of Cross-border Humanitarian Relief Operations: Syria as Case Study

Changing Character of War

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2019 46:51


Dapo Akande and Emanuela-Chiara Gilliard from ELAC (Oxford) discuss humanitarian relief in Syria The extremely severe restrictions on humanitarian operations have been one of the defining features of the Syrian conflict. Humanitarian operations have been severely impeded by a range of constraints, including active hostilities, repeated attacks against those providing humanitarian and, in particular, medical assistance, shifting front lines, proliferation of parties to the conflict, and the instrumentalisation of assistance by all belligerents. It is unquestionable though that a principal impediment have been the constraints imposed by the Government of Syria, particularly, but not exclusively, on relief operations for people in opposition-held areas. These were so severe that, following repeated requests to allow and facilitate rapid and unimpeded access, that went unheeded, the Security Council took the unprecedented step of authorising cross-border and cross-line operations without the need for the consent of the Government of Syria, in Resolution 2165 (2014). Prof Dapo Akande and Emanuela Gillard will discuss the legal framework regulating cross-border relief operations and how it has been modified by the Security Council in the Syria crisis. They will offer some reflections on what this had meant operationally in Syria and beyond. Dapo Akande is a Fellow of Exeter College and Co-Director of the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC). Emanuela-Chiara Gilliard is a Senior Research Fellow at ELAC, a Research Fellow in the Individualisation of War Project at the European University Institute in Fiesole and an Associate Fellow in Chatham House’s International Law Programme.

MyNDTALK with Dr. Pamela Brewer
MyNDTALK Man O' War Project Dr. Prudence Fischer

MyNDTALK with Dr. Pamela Brewer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2019 30:00


The Man O’ War Project is the first university-led research trial aimed specifically at veterans diagnosed with PTSD to determine the effectiveness of Equine-Assisted Therapy for treating PTSD (EAT-PTSD) and to establish manualized guidelines for the application of EAT-PTSD.

Life talkz
Cold War project

Life talkz

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2019 5:24


We talk about the Cold War

The Critical Hour
Mueller Report: Will It Be A 2 Year Big Reveal Or $25 Million Big Flop

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2019 57:33


US Attorney General Bill Barr is preparing to announce as early as next week the completion of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, with plans for Barr to submit to Congress soon after a summary of Mueller's confidential report. Under the special counsel regulations, Mueller must submit a "confidential" report to the attorney general at the conclusion of his work, but the rules don't require it to be shared with Congress, or, by extension, the public. And, as Barr has made clear, the Justice Department generally guards against publicizing "derogatory" information about uncharged individuals. What's the media to do? Americans have been whipped into a frenzy about this report, and it looks like it's going to be anti-climatic in terms of its legal scope. Politically, who knows?The Supreme Court struck an extraordinary blow for criminal justice reform on Wednesday, placing real limitations on what many have called policing for profit across the country. Its unanimous decision for the first time prohibits all 50 states from imposing excessive fines, including the seizure of property, on people accused or convicted of a crime. What are the real implications of this decision? As the deadline approaches for the withdrawal of US forces fighting the Daesh in Syria, America's closest European allies have turned down a Trump administration request to fill the gap with their own troops, according to US and foreign officials. France and Britain are the only other countries with troops on the ground in the US-led coalition battling Daesh. French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said last week that he was mystified by Trump's policy. On Tuesday, British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said that “there is no prospect of British forces replacing the Americans” in Syria. What does mean for Syria going forward? On the website Grayzone Project, Anya Parampil writes, "Maria Faría, the daughter of a would-be Hugo Chávez assassin, illegally barged into Venezuela's embassy in Costa Rica and declared herself ambassador. The embarrassing stunt highlighted everything wrong with Juan Guaidó's reality-show government." We'll take a deep dive into everything wrong in Venezuela, the US attempt to overthrow President Nicolas Maduro and set the facts straight on the legitimacy of Juan Guaido. The Costs Of War Project released a report showing that "the American public has largely ignored the post-9/11 wars and their costs. But the vastness of Washington's counterterror activities suggests, now more than ever, that it's time to pay attention." What does his mean? They "set out to map all the places in the world where the United States is still fighting terrorism so many years later, since September 2001 when the Bush administration launched the 'Global War on Terror.'” What did they find? How much has this cost in blood and treasure? Their project's research shows that, "since 2001, the US war on terror has resulted in the loss — conservatively estimated — of almost half a million lives in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan alone. By the end of 2019, we also estimate that Washington's global war will cost American taxpayers no less than $5.9 trillion already spent and in commitments to caring for veterans of the war throughout their lifetimes." What's going on here?GUESTS:Brian Becker — Co-Host of Loud & Clear on Sputnik News Radio. Barbara Arnwine — President and founder of Transformative Justice Coalition, internationally renowned for contributions on critical justice issues including the passage of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1991 and the 2006 reauthorization of provisions of the Voting Rights Act.Hassan El-Tayyab — Co-director of Just Foreign Policy. Over the past two years, he has been working to end the war in Yemen through direct lobbying, publishing his writings, grassroots organizing and speaking at rallies, living rooms, board rooms, college campuses, the radio and TV to create a larger platform for Yemeni voices working for peace.Anya Parampil — Washington, DC-based journalist. She previously hosted a daily progressive afternoon news program called "In Question" on RT America. Ariel Gold — National co-director for Codepink. She carries out creative actions for peace and justice in the US and throughout the world. Ariel has been published in The Forward, Huffington Post, Tikkun Magazine and more. Stephanie Savell — Co-director of the Costs of War Project at Brown University's Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs.

Politics with Amy Walter
Pentagon's First-Ever Audit Exposes Massive Accounting Fraud

Politics with Amy Walter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2018 48:17


The military budget is at its highest level since World War II, but where exactly does all that money go and what wars are we even fighting these days? In this episode, Amy Walter finds out how much is being spent and how the money aligns with the military's strategic goals for the future of warfare. Plus, a look at how active duty service members feel about their commander-in-chief. And one retired colonel raises concerns about the way President Trump is politicizing the military.  Guests: Staff Sergeant Patricia King Ambassador Eric Edelman Dave Lindorff, an investigative reporter and a contributor to The Nation Meghann Myers, a Senior Reporter for Army Times Neta C. Crawford, Professor of Political Science, Boston University and co-director of the Costs of War Project at Brown University Dr. Isaiah Wilson III, a retired Army colonel, and a senior lecturer with Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs Note: Mark Skidmore reached out directly to us to clarify his position: "My opinion is that the reports from the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) are too vague to draw any conclusions and we need access to the underlying data. I am unable to determine whether these massive adjustments are "plugs" or potentially large amounts of money flowing in and out of the DOD financial system. For reasons described here, I do not dismiss the possibility that these unverified transactions could represent more than made up numbers or plugs."

Around The Empire
Episode 41 The Cost of Empire

Around The Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2018 66:50


Dan and Joanne talk about the cost of the Empire, the War on Terror aka “Empire Preservation Wars,” current events and the new “Costs of War Project” done by Brown University. We are independent media and we rely on your contributions Patreon: patreon.com/aroundtheempire Donations: aroundtheempire.com Find all of our work at our website aroundtheempire.com Follow @aroundtheempire Follow Dan & Joanne: @USEmpireShow,  @joanneleon Please subscribe/follow us on iTunes, YouTube, Facebook.   Recorded on January 17, 2018. Music by Fluorescent Grey.   Reference Links: Costs of War Project, Brown University Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs Seeing Our Wars for the First Time, TomDispatch KBOO interview with Costs of War Project co-director Neta C. Crawford Where in the World Is the U.S. Military? Everywhere, US News & World Report

Liberty Discovers
In Conversation with Giles Duley - photojournalist behind the Legacy of War project

Liberty Discovers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2018 50:28


What happens to a country and its people once a war is over? Giles Duley has been asking this question for over 10 years in his career as a photojournalist.  In the podcast, Giles talks to Jonathan Heaf of British GQ, and recounts more than a handful of incredible stories.  You can show your support by purchasing an exclusive Legacy of War tee created by Citizens of Humanity, available in-store on 2, with all proceeds going to the project.  

Mentioned in Dispatches
Ep22 – Donegall Pass Heroes of the Great War Project – Ron McMurray

Mentioned in Dispatches

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2017 0:12


Ron McMurray from the Donegall Pass Heroes of the Great War Project explains the community based initiative that has been used to discover the stories of men from South Belfast who fought in the First World War.

Stageworthy
#20 – Alysa Pires

Stageworthy

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2016 46:34


Choreographer Alysa Pires has created works for Ballet Jorgen, Citie Ballet (Edmonton, AB), Canadian Contemporary Dance Theatre, Cadence Ballet, Ryerson University, Dancestreams Youth Dance Company, Victoria Academy of Ballet, McMaster Dance Company, Helix Dance Theatre, the Parahumans, Kalos Collective, and her own company Alysa Pires Dance Projects. Her work in theatre includes choreography for ten musicals, a series of world premiere plays by Judith Thompson (CAN), Velina Hasu Houston (USA) and Timberlake Wertenbaker (UK) that toured through Greece (The Women and War Project) and the first workshop of a new commission for the Los Angeles Opera. In July 2014, Alysa represented Canada and performed as part of the Tin Forest Theatre Festival in Glasgow, Scotland in celebration of the Commonwealth Games. Her work ...keeping in mind they may be behind you was reimagined for the 2014 Emerging Artist Intensive in Toronto. Alysa was the sole North American and the only female selected from a pool of international applicants as one of four choreographers to participate in DanceEast's ChoreoLab in Ipswich, UK in April of 2013, where she developed “i am vertical.” The work recently received its Canadian premiere at the dance:made in Canada Festival in Toronto. She is the Heliconian Club of Toronto’s 2015-2016 Dancer-in-Residence. Alysa is an Honours BFA graduate of Ryerson Theatre School. Look for a full-length work from Alysa Pires Dance Projects at the 2016 Toronto Fringe Festival. For more information go to www.alysapires.comAlysa Pires Dance Projects is a Toronto based contemporary dance company. Founded in 2015 as a home for choreographer Alysa Pires, APDP aims to utilize the extreme physical ability of the dancers while maintaining their humanity so that the audience can see their own trials and tribulations expressed through a heightened but relatable physical language. Through highly dynamic physicality and tender intimacy, Alysa Pires makes contemporary dance works that aim to transcend their abstraction and connect to an audience beyond dedicated dance lovers. For more information, visitwww.alysapires.com/APDP or follow us on Instagram @alysapiresdanceprojects. INSTAGRAM - @alysapiresdanceprojects TWITTER - @alysapires FACEBOOK - www.facebook.com/alysapiresdance FUND WHAT YOU CAN - bit.ly/APDPFringeStageworthy:http://www.stageworthypodcast.com Twitter @stageworthyPod Facebook: http://facebook.com/stageworthyPod

Medact
C3 - Assessing the Health Impacts of War and Violent Conflict

Medact

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2015 90:39


The effects of war on people and the planet can last for many decades, if not longer. From psychological trauma to unexploded ordinance, the damage done by armed conflict lives on well after the fighting has ended. In this session, learn about different aspects of the legacy of armed conflict from experts researching different post-conflict issues. Researchers face considerable difficulty in comprehensively documenting the long-term impacts of war; this session will end by exploring how ‘Citizen Science' might be able to help fill the research gap. SPEAKERS: Dr Maria Kett (Leonard Cheshire Centre for Disability), Dr Mina Fazel (Psychiatry, Oxford University) Professor Muki Haklay (Participatory Data & Citizen Science, University College London) and Doug Weir (Toxic Remnants of War Project).

Stand at Ease
Episode 32: Maximizing Graffiti

Stand at Ease

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2012 63:35


We rejoin the Graffiti of War Project, a collaboration of veterans, service-members, military family members and civilians whose focus is on raising awareness for those suffering from the invisible wounds of war, primarily post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and on developing and providing alternative solutions for the healing of those afflicted. Like war itself, there are lives that are touched forever, and lives that have to pay a price. In this episode we learn how The Graffiti of War Project has grown to a feature in Maxim Magazine and how their commitment to serving others may mean the cost of a relationship.File Download (63:35 min / 29 MB)

Webcasts from the Library of Congress I
Through Veterans' Eyes: The Iraq and Afghanistan Experience

Webcasts from the Library of Congress I

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2011 48:14


Larry Minear discusses his book "Through Veterans' Eyes: The Iraq and Afghanistan Experience," based on interviews culled from the Library of Congress Veterans History Project collection. Speaker Biography: For the past twenty years Larry Minear has worked as a researcher on international and internal armed conflicts, interviewing aid workers, soldiers and local populations in Africa, the Balkans, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean. Director of the Humanitarianism and War Project at Brown and then at Tufts universities, he is the author, co-author or editor of several dozen research monographs and fourteen books, including (with Ian Smillie) "The Charity of Nations: Humanitarian Action in a Calculating World."