Podcasts about Clark Atlanta University

Historically Black University in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

  • 356PODCASTS
  • 553EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 30, 2023LATEST
Clark Atlanta University

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Clark Atlanta University

Latest podcast episodes about Clark Atlanta University

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Memphis police release video showing Tyre Nichols beating; Peaceful protests in Georgia

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 51:10


Monday on Political Rewind: Protestors gathered peacefully over the weekend after the release of four videos showing the brutal death of Tyre Nichols at the hands of Memphis police officers. Meanwhile, Gov. Brian Kemp and Mayor Andre Dickens coordinate to stem violent protest in Atlanta. The panel Eric Tanenblatt, @ericjtanenblatt, Republican insider Jen Jordan, former state senator Patricia Murphy, @MurphyAJC, political reporter and columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Tammy Greer, professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00 - Introduction 5:00 - The city of Memphis released video showing the police killing of Tyre Nichols. 40:00 - The Legislature seemingly has no appetite for cultural issues. Please be sure to download our newsletter: www.gpb.org/newsletters. And subscribe, follow and rate this show wherever podcasts are found.

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Judge weighs release of Fulton probe report; Poll shows were Georgians stand

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 51:10


Tuesday on Political Rewind: A Fulton County judge holds a hearing that will decide if findings from a special grand jury investigating Trump's election interference will be made public. Plus a new poll shows how Georgians feel about major issues this legislative session. The panel: Fred Smith, @fredosmithjr, professor of constitutional law, Emory University Karen Owen, @ProfKarenOwen, professor of political science, University of West Georgia Kurt Young, professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Tamar Hallerman, @TamarHallerman, senior reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Timestamps 0:00 - Introduction 4:00 - The Fulton County probe could release its final report today. 31:00 - What Georgians hope the Legislature will address. 44:00 - Will the Legislature address abortion? Please be sure to download our newsletter: www.gpb.org/newsletters. And subscribe, follow and rate this show wherever podcasts are found.

STEMming in Stilettos with Dr. Toshia
Meet Dr. Muhsinah Morris: Into the Metaverse

STEMming in Stilettos with Dr. Toshia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 64:35


Episode Summary1) Her STEM Story started with her brother's disability and her wanting to understand it and try to find a way to assist in making his life easier. 2) She has been able to bring her STEM education and her imaginative and creative nature to her work.3) She has taught high school and at the collegiate level. She loves working with students to understand how the brain works. It is her life's work. 4) She has been able to pair Maker Spaces and Chemistry together and now the Metaverse and Science together. 5) Her work with the Metaverse and VR is inspiring others throughout the country and is indeed inspiring the next generation of STEM professionals to follow in her footsteps. Dr. Muhsinah Morris BioMuhsinah L. Holmes Morris, Ph.D., is the academic program director and assistant professor of chemistry. Morris received a B.S. in chemistry from Clark Atlanta University with honors (cum laude) and an M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from Emory University (biomolecular division). Her research encompasses working in the Morehouse Makerspace Exploration Center, 3D Printing Specialized Laboratory Equipment for those with Autism and other Developmental Disorders. She is the PI of the Morris Research and Innovation Group, where they research and develop technologically innovative solutions for those with autism. Dr. Morris won the 2021 Vulcan Teaching Award of Excellence and launched her Advanced Inorganic Chemistry course in virtual reality in the spring of 2021 in the digital twin campus created by VictoryXR on the Engage Platform. She is a pioneer in this space as the chemistry content in VR is limited to non-existent. Wife to a gamer and mom to five sons, she is an inventive autism mom, a volunteer advocacy ambassador, National Community Advisory Council member, and grant review committee member for Autism Speaks. Her purpose in life is to create inclusivity in STEAAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, agriculture, and math). She believes that VR provides a pathway for creating that inclusion through immersive education, vocational rehabilitation services, and therapeutic experiences.Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/drmuhsinahmorrisWebsite: unitethemetaverse.com Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the showYou can find out more information about Dr. Toshia here:https://www.drtoshia.comSTEMming in Stilettos Youtube Channel: https://youtu.be/xAc25J7UH9A

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Kemp promises raises during his 2nd term; No mention of Medicaid expansion

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 51:00


Thursday at 2 p.m. on Political Rewind: In his inaugural address, Gov. Brian Kemp highlighted his proposed tax cuts, raises for state employees, and called Georgia the "electric mobility capital of America". Plus, U.S. Rep. Andrew Clyde opposed Rep. McCarthy for speaker, but he received an important committee seat. #gapol The panel: Kevin Riley, @ajceditor, editor-in-chief, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Rick Dent, vice president Matrix Communications Stephen Fowler, @stphnfwlr, political reporter, GPB News Tammy Greer, political science professor, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00- Introductions 4:30 - Themes in Gov. Brian Kemp's second inauguration speech 26:00 - Kemp comments on state of local and national media 39:00 - Former Herschel Walker aide accuses a leading conservative of sexual harassment 47:00 - Georgia House member Rep. Michelle Au files a bill to raise cigarette tax Friday on Political Rewind: Bill Nigut sits down with New York Times theater critic Jesse Green to discuss Mary Rodgers' autobiography, "Shy."

BIG FACTS with BIG BANK & DJ SCREAM
BIG FACTS feat. Aristotle & David Shands (HBCU On The Green)

BIG FACTS with BIG BANK & DJ SCREAM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 58:19 Very Popular


The BIG FACTS crew chops it up with David Shands and Aristotle about financial literacy. This episode was recorded at the historic Clark Atlanta University in ATL! | Visit: www.bigfactspod.com | Follow: @BigFactsPodSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Jan. 6th report releases today; Trump's tax returns; Warnock on voter suppression

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 51:09


Wednesday on Political Rewind: The January 6th Committee is releasing its final report today, days after sending its criminal referrals to the Department of Justice. Also, a House committee signaled it'd be releasing Trump's tax returns. Meanwhile, Raphael Warnock responds to allegations that he's an 'election denier.' The panel Guest host Greg Bluestein, @bluestein, senior political reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Edward Lindsey, @edlindsey14, former member of Georgia state House Fred Smith, @fredosmithjr, professor of law, Emory University Matt Brown, @mrbrownsir, democracy reporter, The Washington Post Tammy Greer, professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00 - Introductions 2:50 - January 6th committee to release its final report 12:20 - Should Fani Willis turn over her finding at the federal level? 13:40 - What charges is Trump facing, and will the DOJ pursue them? 16:00 - Democratic-led House Ways and Means Committee set to release Trump's taxes in the coming days 26:00 - Raphael Warnock does first major interview since winning reelection, voter impression 42:00 - Stacey Abrams campaign still owes $1 million to vendors Please be sure to download our newsletter: www.gpb.org/newsletters. And subscribe, follow and rate this show wherever podcasts are found.

Thrive After Sports w/ Taj Dashaun
211. (Client Testimonial) Jonae Lee | Former Women's Basketball Student-Athlete at Clark Atlanta University, and the University of Northwestern Ohio

Thrive After Sports w/ Taj Dashaun

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 4:17


Jonae Lee is a former women's basketball student-athlete at Clark Atlanta University, and the University of Northwestern Ohio. I had the privilege of coaching her 1-on-1 as a participant in my Thrive After Sports program, and meeting her for the first time in-person at the Athletes Unite Conference in Atlanta this past summer. Visit https://www.tajdashaun.com/ for access to FREE coaching, and free resources for current and former athletes. Check out the full video on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/GRFuT1EAw-E Thanks for tuning in! Order my new book here! http://www.thriveaftersportsbook.com/ Connect with me at https://www.tajdashaun.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tajdashaun/ Instagram: @tajdashaun #NCAA #life #career #entrepreneurship #transformation #passion #mindfulness #purpose #sports #football #basketball #business #coaching #transition #lifeaftersports #thriveaftersports #student #athlete #mentalhealth #adapt #identity #formerathlete

Let Go & Lead with Maril MacDonald
Wendy Short Bartie | How leadership can benefit all of humanity

Let Go & Lead with Maril MacDonald

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 45:49


In this episode of Let Go & Lead, Maril talks with Wendy Short Bartie, Senior Vice President & Chief of Staff to the CEO at Bristol Myers Squibb. The gift for leadership that has made Wendy such a fast riser in the pharmaceutical industry, since leaving her original legal career, shines throughout this vibrant conversation. They discuss Wendy's journey as a leader, and how her focus has shifted, over time, from practicing leadership to preparing others to be great leaders; why empathy has a lot to do with understanding gaps between intention and impact; and the crucial role of the leader as “air traffic controller” — the person who actively creates space for a diversity of perspectives and opinions — during meetings. Learn about: 4:58 Building a leadership legacy in an organization 8:32 Leading using the skill of influence 9:16 The power of listening 11:09 The power to S.P.E.A.K. like a leader 16:09 Mentoring and growing great leaders 19:34: The power of an “I Love Me” letter 23:36 The critical leadership art of meeting management 26:04 Being attentive on mental health 36:32 Teambuilding in a hybrid/remote environment —  Wendy Short Bartie is the Senior Vice President and Head of US Oncology.  In this capacity, Wendy is responsible for leading the strategy and operations for solid tumor program in the US market.  A compassionate and strategic leader, her career journey has taken many turns, but her path has always been clear – the commitment to help people - first as a lawyer/public defender, and then as a pharmaceutical industry professional, continuing to act as a voice for those with unmet needs and unequal access. Prior to joining BMS, Wendy was Vice President and Head of Commercial Operations for US Oncology at Merck.  In this capacity, Wendy was responsible for leading the Sales, Key Accounts, Market Access, Pricing and Policy organizations within the US Business Unit.  Previously, Wendy served as Associate Vice-President of Global Marketing for Genitourinary Cancers (GU), including renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer and bladder cancer and as the Global Disease Lead for Women's Cancer.  Prior to joining Merck, Wendy held a range of commercial roles with increasing responsibility in sales, business analytics and marketing in cardiovascular neuroscience, osteoporosis, lung cancer, supportive care and chronic myeloid leukemia at various companies including Novartis, Heron Therapeutics, Johnson and Johnson, Pharmacia and Abbott Labs.   Prior to her career in pharma, Wendy was a Public Defender in Washington, DC and Bronx, New York. Wendy received her Bachelor of Arts from Clark Atlanta University and her Juris Doctor from Loyola University Chicago, School of Law.   Wendy is an HBA Rising Star and was recognized by HBA as a Luminary in 2020. Wendy's favorite hobbies include painting and reading.  When Wendy isn't working, painting and reading, she is serving as Vice President for the Greater Essex County Chapter of Jack and Jill Incorporated and doing philanthropic work to limit the digital divide for children without access to personal computers or internet. Wendy, her husband, Jared, an attorney, and her daughter, Madison, and the family dog, Joy reside in West Orange, New Jersey. ABOUT LET GO & LEAD Let Go & Lead is a leadership community created by Maril MacDonald, founder and CEO of Gagen MacDonald. Maril brings together provocateurs, pioneers, thought leaders and those leading the conversation around culture, transformation and change.  Over the course of the past 12 years, Let Go & Lead has existed in many forms, from video interviews to resource guides to its current iteration as a podcast. At its core, it remains a place where people can access a diversity of perspectives on interdisciplinary approaches to leadership. Maril is also working on a book incorporating these insights gathered over the past several years from global leaders and change makers.   Maril has interviewed over 120 leaders — from business to academia and nonprofits to the arts — through the years. In each conversation, from personal anecdotes to ground-breaking scientific analysis, she has probed the lessons learned in leadership. From these conversations, the Let Go & Lead framework has emerged. It is both a personal and organizational resource that aims to serve the individual leader or leadership at scale.  ABOUT GAGEN MACDONALD At Gagen MacDonald, we are dedicated to helping organizations navigate the human struggle of change. We are a people-focused consulting firm and our passion is improving the employee experience — for everyone. For almost 25 years, we have been working with companies to create clarity from chaos by uniting employees across all levels around a single vision so they can achieve results and realize their future. We have been a pioneer in bringing humanity to strategy execution, leading in areas such as organizational communication, culture, leadership, and employee engagement. Our Vision is to lift all humanity by transforming the companies that transform the world. Full episodes also available on:   Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/let-go-lead-with-maril-macdonald/id1454869525   Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5Gaf7JXOckZMtkpsMtnjAj?si=WZjZkvfLTX2T4eaeB1PO2A   Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9sZXRnb2xlYWQubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M   Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/let-go-lead   —   Gagen MacDonald is a strategy execution consulting firm that specializes in employee engagement, culture change and leadership development. Learn more at http://www.gagenmacdonald.com.

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Sen. Raphael Warnock wins reelection. Will his victory elevate Georgia in 2024?

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 51:10


Wednesday at 9 a.m.: Sen. Raphael Warnock will return to Washington, becoming Georgia's first Black candidate to win a full term in the U.S. Senate. What does this historic win mean for Georgia's place in national politics? And what does it mean for the power of Trump's endorsement? The panel Alan Abramowitz, @AlanIAbramowitz, professor emeritus of political science, Emory University Greg Bluestein, @bluestein, political reporter, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Rick Dent, political ad expert and vice president, Matrix Communications Tammy Greer, political science professor, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00 - Introductions 6:04 - What led to Warnock's victory? 12:52 - What happened to split-ticket voters from November 16:00 - The changing look of the suburbs 22:00 - Trump-backed candidates underperform 28:00 - Turmoil inside Walker's campaign 41:00 - Long-term impacts of DNC, early primaries 50:00 - Impact of Trump's endorsement Please be sure to download our newsletter: www.gpb.org/newsletters. And subscribe, follow and rate this show wherever podcasts are found.

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: New poll shows slim Warnock lead; Obama campaigns in Georgia; 2023's legislation

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 51:10


Thursday on Political Rewind: Some Georgians are waiting in lines as long as two hours in order to cast their vote early, as a new poll shows Sen. Raphael Warnock slightly ahead of Herschel Walker, but within the margin of error. Meanwhile, the first pre-file ahead of the 2023 legislative session is a response to Georgia's abortion ban. The panel Kevin Riley, @ajceditor, editor-in-chief, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Kurt Young, professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Leo Smith, @leosmithtweets, GOP consultant and CEO, Engaged Futures State Sen. Sonya Halpern, @sonya4ga, (D) Atlanta 0:00 - Introductions 3:30 - New Emerson College poll 23:50 - Obama's impact on turnout as he stumps for Warnock 30:00 - Geoff Duncan walks out of voting booth 34:00 - Georgia Legislature one of the state's most diverse 44:35 - The Georgia Pro-Birth Accountability Act is the first pre-file of the legislative session. 53:00 - Ralston's widow to run for his seat Please be sure to download our newsletter: www.gpb.org/newsletters. And subscribe, follow and rate this show wherever podcasts are found.

No Pix After Dark Podcast
EP 206 Donae Burston CEO and Founder of La Fete Wine Company

No Pix After Dark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 35:55


Donae Burston is a luxury wine & spirits leader with over 20 years of industry experience. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, Donae achieved a Bachelor of Science degree, majoring in Mathematics from Clark Atlanta University in 1998. He concurrently completed a second degree in Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech before beginning his career in the information technology sector, initially consulting on Healthcare Systems. In 2001, Donae entered the alcohol industry, working on the promotional side of several iconic brands in the US, before joining the luxury group LVMH. During his 10+ years with the company, he worked across brands such as Dom Perignon, Veuve Clicquot, Ruinart, Moet & Chandon, Belvedere Vodka, and Hennessy Cognac. While with LVMH, in 2011, Donae created the first-ever luxury champagne bar in a sports arena at American Airlines Arena during the Miami Heat's championship run. In 2016, Donae became the Regional Director of the Southeast US, Caribbean, and Latin America regions of Armand de Brignac Champagne. He was responsible for the brand's commercial and marketing goals in each territory. Throughout his career, Donae found that, in general, the wine industry was not embracing the multicultural consumer. He wanted to create a quality product inspired by his zest for life and travel that homed in on catering to the margin that had been overlooked, particularly when it came to rosé. With a commitment to creating an authentic and exceptional St. Tropez rosé and breaking tradition and convention by reimagining the luxury wine drinker and energizing the category, in summer 2019, La Fête du Rosé - a brand that speaks to all demographics - was born. The name "La Fête" translates to "the rosé party," one that everyone is invited. In 2021, the company introduced a limited-release white wine - La Fête du Blanc - which became a permanent addition to the portfolio in 2022. Under Donae's leadership, La Fête du Rosé was the fastest-growing luxury imported rosé label of 2021 and is now the #3 luxury imported rosé brand in the US, according to IRI. Since its inception, La Fête has donated a portion of the proceeds from every bottle sold to various programs that send underrepresented youth on unique travel experiences and organizations focused on creating opportunities for the BIPOC community in the wine and spirits industry. www.nopixafterdark.com Sponsors of NoPixAfterDarkPodcast Zeke's Coffee www.zekescoffee.com Maggies Farm www.maggiesfarm.com FoundStudio Shop www.foundstudioshop.com United Way Central Maryland https://uwcm.org Charm Craft City Mafia www.charmcitycraftmafia.com Siena Leigh https://www.sienaleigh.com Open Works https://www.openworksbmore.org Snug Books Baltimore https://www.snugbooks.com Baltimore Fiscal https://www.baltimorefiscal.com Pandora Box Boutique https://pandorasboxboutique.com CarVer Communications Group  https://www.therealcarver.com      

Got InSpiration Podcast
Episode #49 Ms. De'Neia Mabry Whitted - Be True To Yourself

Got InSpiration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 30:41


I met Ms. De'Neia Mabry Whitted while she was a student at Clark Atlanta University and I was leading an aerobic program there.  She is an amazing Wife, Mother, Sorority Sister, and Entrepreneur.  She is the Owner of Events By Day.  I was blessed to work with her personally three years ago this November 2019 at the launch of my children's coloring book and then again in January 2020 for the Grand Opening of InSpira's second location in Newark.  In this episode, De'Neia speaks about her beginnings and how she has grown her business to where it is today.  She is passionate and very intentional about what she does when she works with her clients.  Follow her on Instagram and Facebook at @eventsbyday.  Get Ready to Be Inspired!!!

The Bold Lounge
Sondra S. Phung: How to Find a Way or Make One

The Bold Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 29:30


About This EpisodeSondra Sutton Phung is living proof that saying yes to new opportunities can lead to the best outcomes. She has built her career at Ford Motor Company, continuously growing and advancing all the way to Global Chief Product Marketer. A pivotal decision when she was 25 years old led her to move to Japan, an experience that would not only elevate her career but also lead to lifelong friendships and transformational learnings about patience, authenticity, and building partnerships. She now works as the Marketing General Manager for electric vehicles, which have become a true passion of hers with their vast positive impact. Sondra's bold journey emphasizes that true human connection surpasses all geographical and cultural differences. She encourages everyone to find their tribe, including a mentor and an advocate, that can support and guide you along the way. Tune in to hear Sondra's incredible journey around the world, embracing opportunity, innovation, and human connection along the way. About Sondra Sutton PhungSondra Sutton Phung is the Global Chief Product Marketer who led a team that delivered over $1B of profit for Ford Motor Company's iconic SUV portfolio. Recently named Marketing General Manager for Electric Vehicles, she leveraged her STEM & HBCU education to create her transformational, data-driven marketing approach. Her perspective impacts millions in the Automotive Tech Industry. Featured in Forbes, Fortune, Authority Magazine, and other globally recognized leadership publications and podcasts, Sutton Phung is reducing the learning curve by sharing how leaders can accelerate their results. Sutton Phung currently serves on the Executive Board of Jack and Jill of America, Oakland County, and the Cultural Arts Board for the City of Novi. She also serves as Executive Champion for DEI at Ford Motor Company, Corporate Recruiter/Mentor to first-generation college students via Ford's 1st Gen Program, and Co-founder of the Dr. Melvin Webb STEM Endowment at Clark Atlanta University. Sutton Phung holds a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and a Master of Science in Mathematics from Clark Atlanta University. Additional ResourcesLinked-In

Boston Speaks Up
084: Miranda Perez of HBCU Founders Initiative

Boston Speaks Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 82:07


Miranda Perez is a cross-topic multimedia journalist on a mission to highlight and elevate marginalized voices. Evolving beyond the newsroom, she recently joined the team at HBCU Founders Initiative, a nonprofit organization that is engaging rising HBCU students and alumni interested in pursuing entrepreneurship. For those unfamiliar with the term HBCU, it refers to any historically black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans. Perez is playing a critical role supporting entrepreneurs participating in HBCU Founder Initiative's Pre-Accelerator, an 8-week program for early-stage founders who are past the ideation stage and ready to validate a problem and build a minimum viable product. Beyond her role at HBCUFI, Perez still writes about business, tech, politics, social issues, fashion, and entertainment, among other topics. She also consults with businesses navigating societal and technological change. She grew up as an inner-city kid in Chicago. She describes school “as an escape for a lot of the hardships I faced growing up.” She pushed herself academically and became the first person in her family to graduate from college, earning a Mass Media Arts degree from Clark Atlanta University, a top 25 nationally ranked HBCU and Black Ivy League school. During college, Miranda served as the Editor-In-Chief of CAU's campus newspaper, The Panther, and as the President/Editor-In-Chief of CAU's online magazine, Her Campus. During that time, Miranda had her first national byline in The Nation as a sophomore in college. These accomplishments won the attention of editors across the country, and Perez earned and held editor/reporter roles at BostInno, Insider and BuiltIn upon graduation. She's also appeared on programs such as MSNBC discussing education equity for Hispanic Americans. In this episode, we speak with Perez about the challenges she's overcome in life, and her evolution from a cross-topic multimedia journalist into a dynamic branding and storytelling consultant.

YOU SHOULD GET A LICENSE
EPISODE 35: KAREIM CADE: WHAT UP DOE! DIDN'T YOU KNOW INSURANCE CAREERS ARE DOPE!

YOU SHOULD GET A LICENSE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 81:11


Kareim Cade is a business owner, keynote speaker, and a 20+ year insurance and financial services industry professional from Detroit, MI. As the CEO of Great Lakes Benefits Group, he is focused on relationship-building and creative strategic solutions to help his clients reach their operational goals. However, before he was an Insurance Pro magazine "Broker of the Year" finalist, he was a Detroit youth with entrepreneurial dreams birthed by a school fundraiser. After graduating with a degree in Risk Management from Clark Atlanta University, he returned home to little prospects and began to work with his mother, who had built a successful voluntary benefits practice but was fired for poor performance. After spending two years as a Special Education teacher, and a conversation with one of his mother's agents who visited the school he was teaching at...he took a make-or-break trip that change the course of his career legacy forever. Listen to the story and learn how he went from a college graduate with no plan to building one of the largest black-owned benefits firms in the country....all because he got a license. CONTACT: mhawkins@greatlakesbenefitgroup.com Website: https://www.greatlakesbenefitgroup.com/ Black & White Truth about Benefit Advising: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLM55H_swh3T52yXuUs3PFt2ccOOTeuhAM Linked: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kareimrcade/ YSGAL Podcast is the number #1 source for anyone looking to learn about or join the most underrated opportunity in business today...a career in the Insurance industry. Get educated, motivated, and inspired for your journey, as you learn How and Why..."You Should Get A License" Looking to get into the industry?: https://Bit.ly//Ysgetalicense Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ysgetalicense/support Host Social Media: IG: https://www.instagram.com/ysgetalicense/ Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@ysgetalicense Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12524487/ About me: Greetings! My name is Rod Powell. I'm an insurance and financial services professional in the DC, Maryland, and Virginia areas. I'm multi-state licensed in Life & Health and Virginia licensed in Property & Casualty Insurance, a Registered Employee Benefits Consultant, and a Commercial Lines Coverage Specialist. This channel is not for me to offer my services, but to educate you on careers in the industry that has allowed me to bring a ton of value to others and has been very good to me as well. Hope you enjoy and heard something that makes you think..."You Should Get A License" Rod's Social Media IG: https://www.instagram.com/therodpowell/ Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jarrard-a-rod-powell-sr-86801616/ #Insurance #InsuranceIndustry #InsuranceProfessional #NewCareers #ProfessionalDevelopment #PersonalDevelopment #Finance #Business #Entreprenuership #Economics #EmployeBenefits #MillionDollarBusiness #Finance #FinancialServices #FinancialIndustry #Benefitbroker #HumanResources #HR #BlacksinInsurance #PublicSpeaking #Detroit #WhatUpDoe #Equity#AfricanAmerican #InsuranceProMagazine #BIGI #NAHU #NationalAssociationofHealthUnderwriters#IndependentAgents #Diversity #Equity #Inclusion #Ownership #BlackFriday --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ysgetalicense/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ysgetalicense/support

Post In Black
Editor & Director James D. Wilcox, ACE, on How His Fascination with Storytelling Led Him to Working with Ron Howard

Post In Black

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 36:54


We learn that it was a series of ambitions and dreams that didn't happen, that helped steer James D. Wilcox, ACE, into a vastly successful career as an editor and director. Hailing from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and later, going on to attend Clark Atlanta University, James secured a series of internships that helped usher him into a career as a news editor. It was at that moment that James insists that editing found him and he later relocated to California. In this conversation, James talks about what it was like coming from Pittsburgh and having no linkage to Hollywood and yet, his journey led him to work with legendary director, Ron Howard and edit projects like Genius and Hillbilly Elegy. We get to discuss his latest film, also directed by Ron Howard, called Thirteen Lives, based on the real-life international story about a group of young soccer players and their coach who were rescued after being trapped for over two weeks in an underground cave in Thailand after a massive flood. James' other credits include My Wife and Kids, Soul Food, Dark Angel, Everybody Hates Chris, Reno 911!, CSI: Miami, Roots (2016) and Raising Dion. James has also worked with James Cameron, Mario Van Pebbles and Damon Wayans and is also a member of the Directors Guild of America and on the diversity committee of the Motion Picture Editors Guild. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/postinblack/support

Georgia Votes 2022
Election outcome possibilities live from the Atlanta University Center

Georgia Votes 2022

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 49:25


Georgia Votes is live this week at the Woodruff Library at the Atlanta University Center where we hear from young voters and contemplate various election outcome scenarios. Emma Hurt, Rahul Bali Sam Gringlas and Susanna Capelouto are joined on stage by Clark Atlanta University professor Tammy Greer. This show was made possible by the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: 2nd Walker accuser on GMA; New AJC poll; Affirmative Action case in Supreme Court

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 51:07


Tuesday on Political Rewind: Herschel Walker's second accuser appears on Good Morning America. A new AJC poll leans towards a runoff in the Senate. The panel: Alan Abramowitz, @AlanIAbramowitz, professor emeritus of political science, Emory University Claire Sanders, @SandersPolitics, senior lecturer of political science, Georgia College Tamar Hallerman, @TamarHallerman, senior reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Tammy Greer, professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00 - Introduction 2:00 - The second woman who accused Herschel Walker of paying for her abortion has appeared on camera in a GMA interview. 10:00 - A new poll from the AJC reports a widening gap in the governors' race, a likely runoff for Senate, and potential Republican successes down-ballot. 37:00 - Former VP Pence is campaigning in Georgia for Brian Kemp. 39:00 - The Supreme Court is hearing a case that could eliminate affirmative action. Please sign up for The GA Today Politics newsletter coming out Wednesday. https://www.gpb.org/newsletters

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: 2nd woman alleges Walker paid for abortion; Hispanic vote; Poll workers on alert

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 51:10


Thursday on Political Rewind: A second woman has alleged that Herschel Walker tried to convince her to have an abortion. How will it affect his campaign? Plus, election officials brace for disruptions at polling places motivated by the "big lie" conspiracy. And a look at Georgia's Hispanic electorate. The panel: Kurt Young, @kurtbyoung, professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Mark Niesse, @markniesse, reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Patricia Soto Servin, digital content producer, Univision 34 Atlanta Rene Alegria, publisher, MundoNOW Timestamps: :00 - Introductions 4:04- Second woman alleges Walker paid for her abortion 18:34- Concerns from election workers about continued election conspiracies 29:00- The diversity of the Latino vote 44:00- Redistricting and its effects Friday on Political Rewind: AJC's business and economics reporter Mike Kanell and Emory professor Caroline Folin joins the panel to talk about the economy. You can leave us questions or comments on Twitter, @PoliticsGPB,  or leave us a voicemail (404) 494-0421‬.

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: 1 million Georgians cast votes; Hyundai plant breaks ground; Walker joins Greene

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 51:08


Wednesday on Political Rewind: 1 million Georgians already made their voices heard during the first eight days of early voting. Plus, Hyundai broke ground for a new electric vehicle plant near Savannah. Gov. Brian Kemp touted it as a win for his economic strategy. Meanwhile, Herschel Walker teams up with Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.  The panel: Greg Bluestein, @bluestein, political reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Margaret Coker, @mideastmargaret, editor in chief, The Current Riley Bunch, @ribunchreports, public policy reporter, GPB News Tammy Greer, professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps: 0:00 - Introductions 3:00 - Over 1 million Georgians have voted early. 7:00 - Hyundai broke ground on its new electric vehicle plant near Savannah. Gov. Brian Kemp claimed it as a win for his economic policy. 19:00 - Stacey Abrams and Kemp spar on how to spend the COVID surplus. 31:00 - Runoff fears loom over Thanksgiving if neither candidate for U.S. Senate gets 50% of the vote. 40:00 - Arguments against Georgia's abortion law have concluded in Fulton County court. 48:00 - Recapping the 1st District race between Buddy Carter and Wade Herring. Please sign up for The GA Today Politics newsletter coming out later today. https://www.gpb.org/newsletters

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 69 – Unstoppable Corporate Communicator with Bradley Akubuiro

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 76:23


Bradley Akubuiro's parents raised him to have a deep and strong work ethic. His father came to the United States from Nigeria at the age of 17 and worked to put himself through school. As Bradley describes, both about his father as well as about many people in extremely impoverished parts of the world, such individuals develop a strong resilience and wonderful spirit.   Bradley has led media relations and/or public affairs for Fortune 50 companies including Boeing as it returned the grounded 737 MAX to service and United Technologies through a series of mergers that resulted in the creation of Raytheon Technologies. He also served as an advisor to Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. and to the Republic of Liberia post-civil war. Today Bradley is a partner at Bully Pulpit Interactive, an advisory firm founded by leaders of the Obama-Biden campaign.   As you will see, Bradley is a wonderful and engaging storyteller. He weaves into his stories for us lessons about leadership and good corporate communications. His spirit is refreshing in our world today where we see so much controversy and unnecessary bickering.   I look forward to your comments on this episode.   About the Guest: Bradley is a partner at Bully Pulpit Interactive, an advisory firm founded by leaders of the Obama-Biden campaign. He focuses on corporate reputation, executive communications, and high visibility crisis management and media relations efforts, as well as equity, diversity, and inclusion matters for clients. Bradley has led media relations and/or public affairs for Fortune 50 companies including Boeing as it returned the grounded 737 MAX to service and United Technologies through a series of mergers that resulted in the creation of Raytheon Technologies and has also served as an advisor to Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. and to the Republic of Liberia post-civil war. A nationally recognized expert in his field, Bradley has been quoted by outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, and The Washington Post, and his columns have been featured in Business Insider, Forbes, and Inc. Magazine, where he is a regular contributor. Bradley is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where he currently sits on the Board of Advisers and serves as an adjunct member of the faculty.   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Well, hi, everybody. Thank you for joining us on unstoppable mindset today, we have Bradley Akubuiro with us. Bradley is a partner in bully pulpit International. He'll tell us about that. But he's been involved in a variety of things dealing with corporate communications, and has had a lot of adventures. He deals with diversity, equity and inclusion. But most of all, before we started this, he had one question for me. And that is, how much fun are we going to have on this podcast? Well, that really is up to Bradley. So Bradley has some fun.   Bradley Akubuiro  01:56 Michael, thank you so much for having me is is going to be a ton of fun. I'm really excited. Thanks for having me   Michael Hingson  02:01 on. Well, you're you're absolutely welcome. And we're glad that you're here had a chance to learn about you. And we've had a chance to chat some. So why don't we start as often and Lewis Carroll would say at the beginning, and maybe tell me about you growing up and those kinds of things.   Bradley Akubuiro  02:18 Yeah, I'd be happy to do that. And, you know, I think it would be remiss if I didn't start off talking about my parents a little bit before I talked about myself. My dad grew up in the Biafran war in Nigeria, Civil War, Nigeria. And you know, while he was going through school, they were bombing schools, and it wasn't safe for adults to be out. And so, you know, he was the guy in his family at six years old, who was taking crops from their plantation. They grew up maybe about six hours outside of Lagos, Nigeria, and was moving, you know, some of these crops two miles away, to sell in the marketplace. And you know, at a very early age was learning responsibility, not just for himself, but for the family.   Michael Hingson  03:02 Wow. Which is something that more people should do. So what what all did he do? Or how did all that work out?   Bradley Akubuiro  03:09 Yeah. Well, you know, this was a really interesting time in Nigeria's History, where you had a lot of folks who were in this circumstance, and my dad was a really hard worker, his parents were hard workers before him, his father was a pastor. And so he had a certain level of discipline and support in his household. But, you know, he knew that he had this kind of onus on him. So grew up at a time then where not only do you have this responsibility, but a big family, brothers and sisters to take care of. He was the guy who was chosen later, you know, flash forward a few years, to come to the United States, to be able to find an opportunity here in this country, and to be able to always hopefully, give back to his family.   Michael Hingson  03:59 So he came, and How old was he? When he came here?   Bradley Akubuiro  04:03 When he got to the States, he was about 17. So came to New York City, not a lot going on there. And, you know, he had to put himself through   Michael Hingson  04:15 school. Did he know anyone? Or Was anyone sponsoring him? Or how did all that work? He had a little   Bradley Akubuiro  04:20 bit of family here, but he had to find his own way, get a full time job at a gas station, and work to figure out what this country was all about, but also how to be successful here.   Michael Hingson  04:32 Where did he stay when he got here then   Bradley Akubuiro  04:36 got a little apartment up on the kind of Washington Heights Harlem area of New York, little hole in the wall and, you know, continue to work to pay that off while he was trying to pay off school. So not easy, but at the same time, you know, a really, really great opportunity for him to kind of start fresh and create some opportunity for himself and family.   Michael Hingson  04:58 So did he tell him at least With a little bit of money, how did all that work? It's funny, he   Bradley Akubuiro  05:04 asked that question. He did come with some, but it wasn't a lot. Let's start off there. But you know, what's interesting about that is, you know, he put himself through undergrad, put himself through a master's program, you know, and was doing a PhD program over at University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. And at Penn, he blew through his entire life savings and one semester. And so, you know, was on a great path. You studying engineering, and, you know, a semester and he's like, Oh, what am I going to do ended up going across the street to Drexel, where they were able to bring him in and give him a scholarship, as long as he was one a TA, which he really enjoyed doing. And he was able to put himself through the PhD.   Michael Hingson  05:50 Wow. So he started there as a freshman then   Bradley Akubuiro  05:55 started, so he went to several different schools started in New York. Yep, sorry, started in New York at Hunter College, did a master's program at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, and then came up to do his PhD at Penn. And then went to Drexel, and went to Drexel.   Michael Hingson  06:12 He moved around how, how come? What, what took him to Atlanta, for example? Do you know?   Bradley Akubuiro  06:18 Yeah, well, it was the opportunity. You know, one of the things that he had learned and had been instilled in him growing up, which he's passed on to me is, you follow the opportunity where it's and as long as you're not afraid to take that risk and take a chance on yourself and your future that will ultimately more often than not pay off in the end. And so he followed scholarship dollars, he followed the programs that would have an opportunity for him. And he went exactly where it took,   Michael Hingson  06:45 and what were his degrees in.   Bradley Akubuiro  06:47 So his master's degree was in chemistry, his PhD was chemical engineering. Wow. Yeah. What did he What did he do with that? So well, you know, the world was his oyster, I suppose, in some ways, but you know, he ended up you know, going into a couple of different companies started with Calgon, carbon and Pittsburgh, and spent a number of years there and on later on to Lucent Technologies, and fiber optics. And so, you know, he's moved on to a number of different companies, engineering roles, eventually got his MBA and has been, you know, employed a number of different places and continued over his career to work in a number of different geographies as well, whether it's like going to Pittsburgh, New Jersey, Atlanta, Massachusetts. They're now living in Rochester, New York, which I've never lived in. But it's a very charming place. It's, yeah.   Michael Hingson  07:44 It is. It is a nice place. I've been there many times. Yeah. And for customers and so on, it's a fun place to go. Well, he obviously learned in a lot of ways, some might say the hard way, but he learned to value what was going on with him, because it was the only way he was going to be successful. So nothing was handed to him at all, was   Bradley Akubuiro  08:10 it? That's right. He had a very strong family foundation. And he definitely learned a lot from his parents and from his family, and they were very close. So I think that he would say that's what was handed to him, but he certainly didn't give any get any leg up.   Michael Hingson  08:26 Right. Well, that's a good thing to have handed to you, I guess. Well, how did he meet somebody from Gary, Indiana, which is a whole different culture.   Bradley Akubuiro  08:36 Well, this becomes a love story pretty quickly. That's an article.   Michael Hingson  08:42 You can embellish how you want.   Bradley Akubuiro  08:46 Oh, my parents actually met somewhat serendipitously. They were at two different schools. My mom was going to school in Alabama, Alabama a&m. My dad was going to school at the time and Clark, Atlanta and Atlanta. So about four hours apart, Huntsville, Atlanta. My mom's roommate was dating my dad's roommate. And so my mom agreed to come with her roommate to go and visit her boyfriend at the time. She happened to meet this strapping young Nigerian man in Atlanta, and they ended up hitting it off and as fate would have it, the other two their respective movements didn't make the distance but they had a budding romance that ended up lasting now at this point several decades.   Michael Hingson  09:37 Wow. So they're, they're still with us.   Bradley Akubuiro  09:41 They're both still with us   Michael Hingson  09:42 both going strong. That is, that is really cool. So what do you think you learn from them?   Bradley Akubuiro  09:48 I learned a number of things. You know, I learned first of all, and you heard my father's story, resilience. He has learned to take whatever is thrown at been thrown at him. Be able to not only take it in stride, which I think is good, but more importantly, to turn it around and channel it and to use it to his advantage, no matter what that might be. And he's instilled that in me and my two sisters, two sisters, ones, older ones younger. And that's, that's really been important. You know, when it comes to my two parents, the things that they value a ton are education, family. And when you think about the world around you, how are you leaving it in a better place than you found it. And if you can really focus on those handful of things, then you are going to have a very fulfilling and successful life. And that's how he measured success. I've taken that away from them.   Michael Hingson  10:41 He doesn't get better than that. And if you can, if you can say that I want to make a difference. And that I hope I've made at least a little difference. It doesn't get better than that does it?   Bradley Akubuiro  10:53 That's exactly right. So then   Michael Hingson  10:55 you came along. And we won't we won't put any value judgment on that.   Bradley Akubuiro  11:02 Thank you for that we   Michael Hingson  11:03 could have for Yeah, exactly. But actually, before I go to that, have they been back to visit Nigeria at all?   Bradley Akubuiro  11:11 Yeah, absolutely. And unfortunately, the most recent time that my parents took a trip back was the passing of my grandmother, a handful of years ago. And so that brought them back. But, you know, one of the things that I'm hoping to do, and I haven't done it yet, is just spend some real time out there. I've got plenty of family that's still there. So go in and spend a little time in Nigeria that's longer than a quick in and out trip. I spent some time and we've talked about this before Michael, but in West Africa, generally in Liberia. And that was a great experience. But there's not quite like going back to where it all began with your family.   Michael Hingson  11:49 No, it's still not home. Right. Well, so you you came along. And so what was it like growing up in that household and going to high school and all that?   Bradley Akubuiro  12:03 Well, there's a couple ways to answer that. Go ahead. Well, let's put it this way, I we have a very close family bond. And so you know, when you think about the folks who have finished your senses, who laugh at your jokes, because they think it's funny, and if you hadn't told that joke, first, they probably would have told that joke, the kind of family we have. It's a great, great dynamic. And so I was very fortunate to have grown up in that household with parents who truly, truly embraced that that side. You know, it was also a tough household. You know, my parents were very strict, my father, especially coming from this immigrant mindset, and this Nigerian culture, I mentioned the value of education. What I didn't mention quite, but might have been a little bit implied, and I'll say it more explicitly is anything less than an A was entirely unacceptable. There were a number of times where I found myself on the wrong side of that. And, you know, we grew up in different times, as my parents were trying to provide the best life they could for us, and a number of different urban settings. And, you know, one, one period of life for me was particularly studying in high school, where, you know, the school district of Springfield, Massachusetts at a time graduated about 54% of the students that went through that system. And so you're thinking about one in two kids who don't make it out of high school, much less make it the college, much less have a successful and fulfilling career in life. And my father, especially, but of course, both my parents want us to do absolutely everything in their power to ensure that those would not be our statistics that we would be my sisters, and I would be able to have every tool at our disposal to be successful. And they work hard at that, despite the circumstances.   Michael Hingson  14:08 So how were they when I'm sure it happened? It was discovered that maybe you had some gifts, but there were some things that you weren't necessarily as strong as other things. How did that work out for you?   Bradley Akubuiro  14:21 I want to be very clear, the list of things that I wasn't quite as good at, especially in those days, was long enough to stun you. So you know, it we we work through it together, right? I think one of the things that I admire most about my parents now that I maybe didn't appreciate enough growing up was just the amount that they leaned in, and we're willing to be hands on and helping with our education. And so my father would give us times tables when we were in elementary school and make sure that we worked through them. And if we didn't get them quite right, we would do them again, and we do them again, and we do them again. And And I remember a time when I was in the fifth grade where my father had me up until 1am, doing math problems. And, you know, I was thinking to myself, I cannot imagine doing this with my kids, when I was at that age, and then I swore at that time that I never would, I'll tell you what my blood now I swear that I definitely will maybe not till 1am, I think there's probably a more reasonable time. But to be able to invest that level of effort into making sure that your kid has everything they need to be successful. I just have I admire the heck out of it.   Michael Hingson  15:36 I remember a couple of times, I think one when I was oh seven or eight, when we were living in California, and going back to visit relatives in Chicago, or driving somewhere. And my dad said to me, and my brother who was two years older, you guys have to learn the times tables. And we spent time driving, just going through the times tables. And it took me a little while. And a couple of times, I tried a shortcut that messed me up. But eventually I got it all figured out. And he said, when you say the times tables correctly, we'll give you 50 cents. And they did when I got the time two times tables, right? They did. And also, I was learning algebra from him. My dad was an electronics engineer. And so he really worked because I didn't have books in braille early on until I was in the fourth grade, I had to study with them to a large degree. So he taught me a lot more than the schools were teaching little kids as it were. So I learned algebra early, and I learned to do it in my head, and still do. And in high school, it got me in trouble in my freshman year, because my math teacher said, Now whenever you're doing things, you have to show your work. Well, you know, I kept trying to tell her that, for me, showing my work in Braille isn't going to do you any good. I can tell you what I do and how I do it. And she wouldn't accept that and she was going to fail me literally fail me in math. Until one day I wrote out, I think one of the problems and I think just in case she took it and went somewhere where she could find somebody to read Braille. I wrote it out correctly. But I got to see an algebra one because of that one thing. By the way, after that, I never got below an A in math. She was insistent that you had to show your work, and wasn't flexible enough to recognize that there are a lot of ways to show your work. Oh,   Bradley Akubuiro  17:35 yeah. Well, that's part of the challenge, and not to make this an entire commentary on our education system. But there are so many different ways to your point to get to the right answer. And I don't think there's nearly enough flexibility in our system in many cases, except for those who really, truly tried to find it and create that environment for their students. But at a at a you know, broader look, there isn't nearly enough flexibility to appreciate that we're going to have many different ways to get these answers.   Michael Hingson  18:04 I think that really good teachers, and there are a lot of good teachers. But I think the really good teachers make that leap and allow for flexibility in what they do. Because they recognize everyone learns differently. But the big issue is, can you learn and can you demonstrate that you learned?   Bradley Akubuiro  18:24 Yeah, well, that's what we're all striving for.   Michael Hingson  18:27 It is I was pretty blessed going through school, especially in high school, a lot of the times, I would stay after school and extra period to study in the library because again, not everything was available so that we actually had people who would read material to me or give me information that was written on boards that I didn't get any other way. And usually, the teachers would come in, we would set up days and they would come in and give me tests. And what was fun about that was we would go through the tests fairly quickly and spend most of the hour chatting and I got to know a number of my teachers that way and that was so valuable for me. One of them especially Dick herbal Shimer, I still know and you know, he's going to be what 85 I think it is this year, and he will be at five I think August 28. We still keep in touch, he came to our wedding. And he tells me that I'm getting to be closer in age to him and I point out that I'll never be as old as he is. And he tries to convince me that mathematically I'm getting closer and I say 13 years is still 13 years.   Bradley Akubuiro  19:35 Hmm, yeah, don't let them don't let them try to get you. That's   Michael Hingson  19:39 right. It's not gonna work.   Bradley Akubuiro  19:42 was gonna ask you if you had a favorite teacher because I feel like teachers, if you put together this for many years have such an incredible impact on you and how you see yourself.   Michael Hingson  19:52 I remember a lot of things from a number of my teachers and I can tell you the names of most all of my teachers. I remember in my freshman year English, our teacher was a Mr. Wilson has actually Woodrow Wilson was his name was an older gentleman. And one day we were sitting in class and he was just talking about philosophy. And he's talking about people's ethics. And he said, and I remember it that, you know, a good example is, if you need to borrow a quarter from somebody, be sure you pay that quarterback, where does that come in English? But nevertheless, those are the kinds of things that he said, and other teachers said various things, and they stick with you.   Bradley Akubuiro  20:36 Yeah, no, it's so true. I mean, for me, my favorite teacher was Darlene Kaffee. She was my fourth grade teacher, taught all kinds of, I mean, touch everything you learned in fourth grade. But the most important thing for me was, she gave me confidence in my writing ability. You know, I had always enjoyed writing, but I never really thought of myself as someone who could potentially be a writer. And she was the first person who sat me down and said, Hey, look, you submitted this assignment. And it's really good. You could be a writer one day, and you know, she had me write poems, you had me write a number of different things that weren't class assignments. But there were things that she was like, Hey, if you want to do this, then you got to practice it. And I learned so much from her. But the most important thing I took away was that confidence in my ability to do these things.   Michael Hingson  21:27 Yeah, yeah. And that's one of the most important things that good teachers can bring to us and not tear you down, because you don't necessarily do something exactly the way they do or want. But if you can demonstrate you learn that is so cool.   Bradley Akubuiro  21:42 Yeah, it is. Yeah, it is. So,   Michael Hingson  21:47 as I said, I keep in touch with declarable Shimer won his 80th birthday, I flew to Nebraska where they live and surprise him for his birthday, which was nice. That's awesome. Yeah, it was a lot of fun. And hopefully, we'll get back there one of these days soon. Meanwhile, I'll just give him a hard time on the phone.   Bradley Akubuiro  22:08 Cathy's out here listening when I'm not going to surprise you don't listen to Michael. But if I show up, then I'll have a cake or something.   Michael Hingson  22:17 Yeah, exactly. Well, so. So what was high school like for you? I think you said there were some things that happened in high school.   Bradley Akubuiro  22:26 Yeah, high school was a I mean, when you think about formative man, this was a formative experience for me. So it was between my sophomore and junior year of high school, when one of my very best friends a guy who I consider to be like an older brother to me, was shot and killed in the drive by shooting. It was devastating. You know, I had a period over a few months, where not only was he killed, and I found out about it, 45 minutes after I'd left town to take my older sister, with my family to college and 22 hours away. So this wasn't something he did every night. And I likely had been with him had we not been on that trip. But you know, he unfortunately passed that night with a 45 caliber bullet hole in his heart. You know, my experience with school with with life that I mean, it really took a turn at that point. Because not only had I lost somebody who was very close to me, but the police didn't catch the guy who did it. In fact, they caught a guy who was a friend of ours that had absolutely nothing to do with it, and put him through absolute hell, only to find out that he wasn't responsible for this, any of us could have told you that right up front. You know, that was a terrible time. You know, a couple of months later, Michael, we had another one of our close friends who was shot and killed. And the girl who was with her at the time was shot in the leg trying to get away. And you know, and another month and a half after that another one of our good friends was you know, shot in his own driveway trying to get into his car and head to the grocery store. And it wasn't safe for us. And it was a really, really challenging time, just to exist, much less to try to focus on school and to focus on other things that are going on. How could you do that? When you didn't know if when you left in the morning, you were going to be able to make it home at night?   Michael Hingson  24:32 Why was there so much crime? Well, that's   Bradley Akubuiro  24:36 a million dollar question. You know, there's so many factors that go into it. And since then, I've spent a lot of time thinking more about the kind of, you know, macro factors, but it's a very specific on the ground situation at that time was there was a gang war between two rival gangs, street gangs in the city. And my engineer who I just referred to lived right in the heart of Eastern Avenue, which is the home of the app and Springfield became there. And across State Street was Sycamore and a number of different folks and rivalries had kind of established then. And so, you know, this was not that there's ever, you know, really sensical reasons that, you know, these things happen. But this was as nonsensical as it could be, you know, people who are killing each other and dying for reasons that if you were to ask those who survived now, why they would ever pull a trigger and situation like this, they probably couldn't really tell you or maybe even remember.   Michael Hingson  25:38 So it wasn't race or anything like that. It was just the whole gang environment, mostly.   Bradley Akubuiro  25:45 Yeah, that's right. And at the time, you know, you think about the economic factors that go into this. And I talked about this in the context of Chicago all the time, because that's where I live now. And the situation is just as salient here. But if you were to be on the west side of Chicago, Northwestern most neighborhood within the city limits of Austin, you would be in one of the poorest and one of the most dangerous zip codes in the industrialized world. If you were to go two miles over to Oak Park, one of the suburbs just outside of the city. It's one of the wealthiest in the region, and it is an amazing neighborhood, and the infrastructure across the board when it comes to the education system, and the amount of money per pupil. If you were to look at the crime statistics, if you were to look at the policing, if you were to look at any measure of quality of life, it is night and day different, but it's separated by a couple of streets. And that to me is unfathomable.   Michael Hingson  26:52 It is crazy. Chris, you also have some really serious gangs back in Chicago. You know, the notorious was the cubs in the Sox, for example.   Bradley Akubuiro  27:03 That's right. And you know what the competition? beaters? You don't get in the middle of those two sets of fans?   Michael Hingson  27:09 Ah, no way. and never the twain shall meet, period. That's right. That's very many people who will say they're fans of both.   Bradley Akubuiro  27:20 I don't think that's legal, actually. Ah,   Michael Hingson  27:23 that would explain it. I'll tell you sports fans are really tough. I remember when I lived in Winthrop, mass right outside of Boston. And every year, I would on opening day, I'd be somewhere in Boston. And if the Red Sox lost immediately, basically everybody on the news and everyone else just said wait till next year. Yeah, they were done. It was no faith at all. It was amazing. And and I remember living back there when Steve Grogan was booed off out of the Patriots game one year and just I'll tell you, they're, they're amazing.   Bradley Akubuiro  28:04 Well look at the dynasties they've gotten now. Unbelievable. Although, you know, I live with a die hard. Tom Brady fan. My fiance has been a Patriots fan since the beginning. And it's been a complete complete nightmare trying to figure out are we watching the Patriots? Are we are we watching the Buccaneers? And are we Tom Brady fans are Patriots fans? You know, it's a little bit of everything in that house. But I can't ever say that I'm not happy. I am a fully dedicated supporter of all things. Somebody in SNAP, otherwise, I'm in a   Michael Hingson  28:39 lot of trouble. It is safer that way. Well, I have gained a lot of respect for Tom Brady, especially after he left the Patriots. And not because I disliked the Patriots, but because of all the scandals and the deflated footballs and all that sort of stuff. But he came back and he proved Hey, you know, it's not what you think at all. I really am good. And he continues to be good.   Bradley Akubuiro  29:03 Yeah, it's 100%. Right. Well, and that to make this, you know, given a broader topic about Tom Brady, he gets plenty of press. But you know, the fact that he was able to say, All right, you have decided that I'm done in this sport. You've decided I'm too old to play this sport, but I have not run to the end of my capability. And in fact, I've got a lot more to offer this game. And he went and he took it with someone who would respect that and the Buccaneers and he won another championship. I mean, you can't you can't make this up.   Michael Hingson  29:38 No, absolutely. You can't. And so we'll see what the Rams do this year. I liked the Rams. I grew up with the Rams, Chris, I'm really prejudiced when it comes to sports and probably a number of things because we've been blessed out here in California with great sports announcers. I mean, of course, Vin Scully, the best of all time in baseball, and I will argue that with anyone But then Dick Enberg did a lot of football and he did the rams and he did the angels. And of course we had Chick Hearn who did the Lakers, their descriptions and the way they did it, especially Vinnie just drew you in. And I've listened and listened to announcers all over the country and never got the kinds of pictures and announced me announcing and announcements that I got by listening to people in California, so I'm a little prejudiced that way.   Bradley Akubuiro  30:31 Well, and you shouldn't be you absolutely should be. And I will say this, the power of storytelling that these folks that you just described are able to wield is phenomenal. And it's a skill that I actually wish more folks had and more different industries. Because if you can tell a strong compelling story, you can make it visual, you can bring people and like that the power it has to bring people together, and to motivate them to act is just unbelievable.   Michael Hingson  31:01 Johnny most was a was a good announcer a pretty great announcer in basketball, but not really so much into the storytelling, but he had a personality that drew you in as well. Well, that counts for a lot. It does. I remember living back there when the Celts were playing the rockets for the championship. And the Celtics lost the first two games. And Johnny most was having a field day picking on the rockets and so on. But Moses Malone, Malone was criticizing the Celtics and said, You know, I can go get for high school people. And we could beat these guys. Wrong thing to say, because then the Celts came back and won the next for Johnny most really had a field day with that. That's what happens. Yeah, you don't open your mouth. Alright, so you went to Northwestern, that's a whole different environment.   Bradley Akubuiro  31:59 Totally different environment. And, you know, I gotta tell you, I owe a ton to Northwestern. The exposure, it gave me two more global mindsets, people come to that university from all over the world, all kinds of different socioeconomic backgrounds, and looking to do so many different things, the academic rigor of the institution, and the resources that were at our disposal, were so incredible that it completely changed my experience. And frankly, the outlook I had for my own self and career. How so? Well, I'll put his way I went to school, for example, at the same time, as you know, students who had some similar backgrounds to the one I did, to being in school at the same time, as you know, Howard Buffett is the grandson of Warren Buffett, and you know, Bill polti, you know, whose grandson of, you know, the polti, you know, the namesake of Pulte Homes, and you know, literally billionaire families. And so you start to realize, if you can sit in a classroom with folks like this, and with all of the opportunities that they've had, the education, they've had private schools, things along those lines, and these are good friends, by the way, you know, when you can do that, and then realize, hey, you know what, I can keep up, I can do this. And then you know, you are receiving, you know, grades professors who support you opportunities, in terms of internships, all of these things, and realms that you never even considered possible even just a year or two earlier. It truly broadens your horizons in ways that I don't even think I could have appreciated before I was into it.   Michael Hingson  33:44 Wow. And that makes a lot of sense, though. We're all we're all people. And we all have our own gifts. And the fact that you could compete is probably not necessarily the best word because it implies that there are things that we don't need to have, but you are all able to work together and that you can all succeed. That's as good as it gets.   Bradley Akubuiro  34:05 That's exactly right. And I do find compared to a lot of places, Northwestern have a very collaborative culture. I found that, you know, from faculty, the staff to students, everybody was very interested in seeing everybody succeed. And you know, we believed truthfully, that all of us could there's enough room on the boat for all of us.   Michael Hingson  34:29 What was your major journalism? No surprise being Northwestern?   Bradley Akubuiro  34:36 Yeah, I was I was a big, big, big proponent of the journalism school and actually still remain affiliated. I'm on the faculty over there and sit on the board of the journalism school and have loved every second of my time, wearing the purple t shirt.   Michael Hingson  34:52 There you go. Is my recollection. Correct? Wasn't Charlton Heston, a graduate of Northwestern?   Bradley Akubuiro  34:57 You know, I don't know the answer to that but I will wouldn't be surprised if it really seems,   Michael Hingson  35:02 it seems to me, I heard that he was doing something where he was he was doing something for Northwestern, as I recall. But that just strikes my memory.   Bradley Akubuiro  35:12 Yeah, there's some very remarkable graduates from that organization.   Michael Hingson  35:16 So you were involved, as I recall, in our conversations about and about such things in dealing with minority enrollment, and so on, and you met some pretty interesting people during your time there. Tell me about that, if you would?   Bradley Akubuiro  35:32 Yeah, no, absolutely. So my freshman year, we will actually, this was my sophomore year, we actually only brought in 81 black freshmen. And that was the lowest number in terms of black enrollment in a given year at Northwestern since the 1960s. And so, you know, the university was looking around and trying to figure out what what is it that we're doing? And where are we missing the mark? And how do we not only attract black applicants, because we were able to get folks to apply? The challenge was to actually get them to choose to matriculate. And where are we losing folks in the process. And so, you know, I had been really, really interested in participating in some of the work around minority recruitment enrollment, from the time that Northwestern had recruited me, because I recognized my background wasn't necessarily what you would consider to be orthodox for the folks that got into schools like this. But they took a real hard look at me and said, We think this guy can be successful here. And I wanted to encourage others who might not necessarily think of Northwestern as an option that was attainable to them, and I don't even know about it, to really start to understand the opportunities that could be available to them. And so I was, you know, flying to different schools, not only in the Chicago area, but back in places that looked a lot like where I grew up, and telling, you know, folks, Northwestern wants you, and you should really give it a shot. And so that was a fascinating time for me, and my own development, that space.   Michael Hingson  37:11 So what did you do for the school and dealing with the whole issue of minorities in that time?   Bradley Akubuiro  37:19 Yeah, there were a handful of things. You know, there's there's one was how do you create programs that channel some of the frustration that a lot of students who look like me had, and so a number of folks, actually, this is the spirit of college students, gotten together, you know, put up signs and decided to kind of protest. And so instead of going through, and just kind of registering our anger, what I did was work with the admissions office. And I did actually formally work as a work study student and worked on some of the stuff, it wasn't just volunteer, but take this energy that the students had, and create programs like a pen pal program, like a fly in programs, some volunteer initiatives that we can have, that would allow students who are upset about the outcomes, to help change those outcomes by direct engagement with those who might come to Northwestern, and really improve our metrics for the following year. And we were able to do that, both in the African American and Latino communities. What did   Michael Hingson  38:23 you discover? Or what did the university discover about why people might apply, but then didn't matriculate. And then how did you turn that around?   Bradley Akubuiro  38:32 Yeah, there were a couple of things. So one was, for students who are getting into places like Northwestern, very commonly, we saw that they were getting into places like University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, Harvard, a number of other universities at the same time, particularly if you were to think about the minority students who are applying and getting in, and what those schools had, that Northwestern didn't quite have, was full need blind admissions processes, which Northwestern did adopt. But the short version of this is, if you got into one of those schools, you are probably going to be able to get if this if your circumstances required a full ride. And so, you know, the economic opportunity was really significant. And you were at a disadvantage. If you were a student who was interested in going to Northwestern, or any of these other schools that was really good, but couldn't you couldn't afford to go and you're gonna go to the place that you could afford to go and maybe that's your local school, or maybe that's one of these other schools, but we had to really do something to create the funding to ensure that these folks could go to the school and do it at a at a rate that wasn't going to break the bag.   Michael Hingson  39:49 And you found ways to do that. Well, I   Bradley Akubuiro  39:52 certainly didn't do it alone, but the university   39:55 there see University found ways to do that. Yes, that's right.   40:00 We started up a commission. So a number of students, myself included, foreign petition at the time, Marty Shapiro, who was the President of University took this issue very seriously as a economic scholar, and genuinely his background is in the economics of higher education. And he started at the school as president, while I was in again, my sophomore year, as a lot of these things were kind of taking shape and taking hold. And as one of the most successful leaders that I've met, invited us in students, the leaders in the university who are focused on this, and we had asked for a taskforce to focus on this. And he set one up, and he chaired it. And it was focused on how do we create opportunities for access, particularly for this community that had need, but wanted to be here. And, you know, one of the things that he did pretty early on in his tenure, was to establish a fund that was going to be dedicated to programs to financial need to a number of different things that would directly address this community. And we built on it from there.   41:14 Wow, that's, it's great that you had a strong champion who was willing to be farsighted enough to help with that, isn't it?   Bradley Akubuiro  41:22 Absolutely. It would not have been possible without that.   Michael Hingson  41:25 So you met as I recall you saying Jesse Jackson, somewhere along the way? in that arena, especially since you're in the Chicago area? That makes a lot of sense.   Bradley Akubuiro  41:35 Yeah, you know what I'm starting to put together thanks to you hear that this was a pretty big year for me.   Michael Hingson  41:41 To see, I'm getting impressed. So I did about yourself.   Bradley Akubuiro  41:50 You know, it's funny. But yeah, there was a convergence of things. And so in this particular year, I did meet Reverend Jesse Jackson. And this started a relationship that's been incredible and life changing that remains to this day. But the way that it happened, Michael, is that there was a woman Roxana Saberi, who had been taken political prisoner by Iran, and she worked for the BBC. She had been a former Northwestern middle student. So a number of us who are part of the journalism program, Adele had decided that we were going to get together and as college students are wanting to do, we decided to protest and hopes that we would, on our campus in Evanston, get the State Department to pay more attention to this particular issue. And hopefully, it takes negotiating for her really seriously. And while I have no idea whether, at the time Secretary Clinton saw anything we were doing, my guess, is probably not Reverend Jackson, who to your point was just on the other side of Chicago did. And the connection there is Roxanne's buried, did her first interview with the BBC as a professional reporter with Reverend Jesse Jackson. And he was committed to advocating for her release. And so he actually reached out to us, via the university asked a few of us to come down and join a press conference with him, where he intended to go and negotiate for her release on humanitarian grounds. And I participated in that with another student. And it was absolutely phenomenal and led to so many doors being opened for me.   Michael Hingson  43:35 Wow, what your were you in school at the time?   Bradley Akubuiro  43:38 So this was my sophomore year. Great, great. Again, still part of the great sophomore year. Yeah, and I continue to work with Reverend Jackson, throughout the remainder of my time in college and for some period after college. But there were a number of things, but it all tied back together, because the issue that Reverend Jackson was advocating for at the time that spoke most deeply to me, was this issue of college affordability and access, and you have this program called reduce the rate, which was all about reducing the interest rate on student education loans, because we had bailed out banks. And you know, the autos and so many others, rates of zero to 1% and said, Hey, you're in trouble pass back when you're ready. We'll make it cheap and affordable for you to do that. But we never granted that level of grace to students who are supposed to be our future. And instead, we were breaking their backs was, you know, interest rates of six to in some cases, as high as 18%. Without any, you know, kind of recourse you get stuck with these things for life.   Michael Hingson  44:47 And people wonder why we keep talking about eliminating the loans today or lowering the interest rate and the reality is, as you said, students are our future and we should be doing all we can to say point that that's absolutely   Bradley Akubuiro  45:01 right. I still firmly believe that and, you know, our loan system, and frankly, the cost of education is just crippling. It's, it's, it's crazy. And this is for multiple generations. And I'm sad for what the future will look like if we can't figure this situation out.   Michael Hingson  45:23 Yeah, we've got to do something different than we're doing. And it's just kind of crazy the way it is. It's extremely unfortunate. Well, so you got a bachelor's? Did you go get any advanced degree or?   Bradley Akubuiro  45:36 Well, I did actually attend Northwestern. For a good portion, I masters that integrated the integrated marketing communications program over there. And that dovetails really well into where my career ultimately went and where it currently resides. But you know, Northwestern was the educator of choice for me.   Michael Hingson  45:57 So, career wise, so what did you then go off and do? Since you opened the door? Yeah.   Bradley Akubuiro  46:03 So you know, it's been a number of different things. And this will sound disparate, but it all comes together. I went, after working with Reverend Jackson to Liberia, and I spent time in Liberia working for the president of Liberia on postwar kind of reestablishment of a democracy, which was a big thing. And frankly, way above my paygrade, I got an opportunity to work on it, because I had spent time working with Reverend Jesse Jackson, and that will come back in a second. But there was a student who was doing his PhD program at Northwestern, who had been who is I should say, the grandson of a former president of Liberia, who had been killed in a coup in October. And I had been friends with him, I knew that I wanted to get to West Africa to do some work, particularly around education and social programs. And he connected me with his mother who had been deputy minister of education. And I had been fortunate enough to create an arrangement that I was really excited about to go to Monrovia, and Liberia, the capital city, and to spend some time working on programs out there. And when she found out that I worked with Reverend Jesse Jackson, she called the president and said, This could be a great opportunity. And they cooked up a program where I would actually champion and work on establishing a program and policy around leadership development, and capacity building for the country post Civil War, which was, again, an absolutely amazing and life changing experience, really hard.   Michael Hingson  47:45 What was the world like over there? And what was it like for you being from a completely different culture as it were than over in Liberia?   Bradley Akubuiro  47:53 Well, the first thing I'll say is, if you live in the United States, and you believe, you know, poverty, you ain't seen nothing yet. Because, you know, one of the things that you will find in countries like Liberia, and some of the places and post war, Eastern Europe and the 90s, and different kinds of places is, there is a level of resilience and a level of spirit that is built into society that comes almost entirely from experience with incredible hardship, just absolutely incredible hardship. And Liberia at the time that I was over there was amongst the, you know, five poorest countries in the world, after what had been 14 years of concrete civil war and 30 years of civil unrest. But the people that I met could not have been better spirited, and just nicer, more optimistic and incredible people.   Michael Hingson  48:52 So how long were you over there?   48:54 I was over there for less than a year and spent some time doing consulting, even after I came back to DC, but was on the ground for less than a year.   49:03 And when you came back from Liberia, what did you go off and do?   49:07 When I came back from Liberia and I want to, you know, couch this and my rationale, I had worked for Reverend Jesse Jackson on these big kind of global programs that that presidents and heads of state and you know, business leaders and all these different folks went over to Liberia and got this chance to work on, you know, kind of reinstituting a democracy and meaningful ways with the president who later on became a Nobel Prize, Peace Prize Laureate. And you know, what I came to realize, Michael, was that my opportunities were quickly outpacing my experience. And so what I said is, let's now try to find a place where I can get some of the fundamentals some of the framework for a lot of the work that I had the opportunity to do. And the place that I chose to go is Booz Allen Hamilton is a management consulting firm and you One of the largest public sector practices in the world. And so I went in with the intention of really being able to shore up my skills. And what happened? Well, hopefully they'll tell you that I was successful.   Michael Hingson  50:11 Okay, good.   Bradley Akubuiro  50:16 It was a really fascinating time to be there. You know, Booz Allen, had a lot of significant contracts. This was the time of the Affordable Care Act's passage. And so, you know, at the time that I went over, I got to work almost exclusively on ACA, and a lot is talked about in terms of the legislative kind of process to get that accomplished. But what is talked a lot less about is the actual opera operationalization of it, and what that looks like to stand up state health exchanges, and different states to actually entice somebody coming from, you know, a psychiatry program at top medical school, that choose to put on a uniform and go to a base at, you know, an Air Force base or an army base, and provide clinical care for those who are returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan. And all of these were provisions of the bill. But actually implementing those things, was a very tall order. And so I got an opportunity to really kind of roll up my sleeves and work on a lot of that work. And that was incredibly formative work.   Michael Hingson  51:22 So it was a real challenge, of course, to get the Affordable Care Act passed. I remember in 2009, I was speaking at a an event for a companies whose hospital boards and leaders of the staffs of the hospitals in the network, were getting together and I went to, to speak, and talk about some of my experiences and talk about disabilities and so on. The person right before me, was a medical expert. He was, it was a person who talked about the whole concept of how we needed to change our whole idea and environment of medical care, and what we really needed to do as a country and so on. And he had been involved in every president's investigation of how to change the medical synth system. Ever since I think he went this was 2009, I think he went back to Nixon, Oh, wow. He, he said it all came down to the same thing. And he said The best example is, he was doing this as part of the team for Bill Clinton. And they talked about what needed to be done, how to change the medical system, and everybody bought into it, and so on, until it got down to specifics of saying what it was going to cost. And that they needed to deal with some of the provisions that eventually went into the Affordable Care Act. And he said, As soon as the politicians got a hold of it, and said, This is a horrible thing, you're gonna cause too much controversy, the President's would all run. And that's why no one ever got anything accomplished. And he also said that Obama was probably going to get something passed. And he actually predicted almost to a tee, if you will, what was going to pass. And that's exactly what passed and what didn't pass. And he said, later, we'll actually start to worry about the cost of, of medical coverage in this country, but they're not really willing to face that issue yet. And he predicted we would be able to do something by 2015. Well, that hasn't really happened yet, either. And now we're maybe making a little bit of a dent. But it was very fascinating to listen to him predict, based on so many years of expertise, what was going to happen.   Bradley Akubuiro  53:46 Yeah, I mean, that's incredible. And I will say, a lot of times the policy takes a backseat to the politics on these things. And it takes so much, you know, Will and kind of moral fortitude to get in there and drive these things, particularly when there's interests on the other side of it. But you know, I'm with you. We're not quite where I think you predicted we'd be in 2015. But driving towards it now. And hopefully we'll make more progress.   Michael Hingson  54:16 Yeah, we're slowly getting there. So what did you do after Booz Allen Hamilton?   Bradley Akubuiro  54:21 Yeah, so the things that I really love the most about that work during that time that the the change in a lot of that kind of management strategy was the change communications aspects of it. And so I knew that I wanted to get more fully into communications. And so the next few jobs for me, were discretely corporate communications, if you will. And so I got an opportunity to follow a mentor to a company called Pratt and Whitney jet engine company, you know, builds jet engines from from fighter jets to, you know, the big commercial airplanes that we fly in, and love that experience. It's moved to kind of the corporate side of that company to United Technologies in time and worked on a number of different mergers and acquisitions, including the spin offs of Otis, the big Elevator Company to carry air conditioning both of these which spun off into fortune 200 publicly traded companies their own, to ultimately what became you know, the merger with Raytheon. Raytheon? Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It most recently produced Raytheon technologies. And so a really, really fascinating set of experiences for me there. And then   Michael Hingson  55:35 you along the way, also, I guess, we're part of the formation of bully pulpit international with the Obama Biden administration.   Bradley Akubuiro  55:44 You know, I wasn't part of the founding, this all kind of happened in parallel with folks who I have a ton of respect for who I now work with bully pulpit, interact was formed in 2009, with a number of folks who came out of that Obama campaign, and then White House. And it started in the kind of digital marketing, digital persuasion space, and all of the kind of, you know, really amazing tactics and strategies that they learned on that campaign, particularly, as social media was starting to become more popularized and more mass adopted, they said, how do we start to apply some of that stuff, as you think about not only other campaigns, but to foundations and advocacy groups into corporations? And you know, you flash forward 1213 years now, and this is a fully operational 250 person agency, where we're focused on, you know, how do you help organizations of all types, you know, really express their values and find their voices on these really key important issues. But also, how do leaders make really tough decisions on things like, you know, Roe v. Wade, and what that means for their employee base, and what they're going to do policy wise, and how they're going to communicate around that afterwards? On through gun reform, and what folks do if you know, you are operating, and buffalo or in Texas, when you know, some of the massacres that happened earlier this year happen. And this has been, you know, really fascinating. And I came over here after being chief spokesperson for Boeing. And it's been really fun to reunite with some old friends and folks who have been doing this kind of work for a really long time now.   Michael Hingson  57:37 So Boeing, so when did you leave Boeing   Bradley Akubuiro  57:41 left Boeing, a year, just shy of a year and a half go   Michael Hingson  57:45 around during the whole 737 Max thing?   Bradley Akubuiro  57:49 Well, you know, interestingly, you bring this up, I was brought over to Boeing, in response to the 737. Max, you know, I was asked to come over and to really think about what does a world class Media Relations organization look like? That is going to be transparent, accountable, and 24/7? Around the globe? And more than anything, after you've had, you know, two accidents on the scale that they had, you know, how do we really become more human and how we interact with all of our stakeholders, internal and external on a lot of this stuff? And that was a really, really, really challenging, but rewarding process to be part of and to help lead?   Michael Hingson  58:33 How do you advise people? Or what do you advise people in those kinds of situations, you had a major crisis? And clearly, there's an issue? What do you what do you tell corporate executives to do? And how hard was it to get them to do it?   Bradley Akubuiro  58:49 Yeah. So on the first part of that question, it really comes down to being human, you got to put yourself in the shoes of the people that you're trying to communicate with, and to, if you are a person who lost a loved one, on a plane that went down outside of, you know, Addis Ababa, and Ethiopia, if you if you were, you know, one of the people who lost your, your spouse or your kid, you know, the last thing you want to hear from a company is, you know, we did things right, from an engineering standpoint, what you want to hear from that company, is, we are so sorry that this happened. And we're going to do absolutely everything in our power to ensure it can never happen again. And here are the steps we're taking and here's what we're going to do to try to make things right and you can never completely make things right. In that circumstance. You can at least be understanding.   Michael Hingson  59:48 I remember 1982 When we had the Tylenol cyanide incident, you know about that. Yeah. And if For us, and what was the most impressive thing about that was within two days, the president of company was out in front of it. And as you said, being human, that's a corporate lesson that more people really should learn.   Bradley Akubuiro  1:00:18 Yeah, it's a difficult thing to do. Because I think, and this isn't just lawyers, but it's easy to blame it on lawyers, the natural reaction is to immediately think, well, what's my liability going to be? What are people going to think if they think that I actually did make this mistake? And how do I cover it up? And how do I try to diffuse responsibility? And that is exactly the opposite of what you should do. And this isn't just good communications. This is good leadership.   Michael Hingson  1:00:44 Good leadership. Yeah,   Bradley Akubuiro  1:00:45 that's right. And we need more people to really understand that to your point.   Michael Hingson  1:00:50 Well, and with with Boeing, it sounds like if I recall, all of the stuff that least that we saw on the news, which may or may not have been totally accurate, there were some issues. And it took a while to deal with some of that to get people to, to face what occurred that necessarily things weren't going exactly the way they really should have in terms of what people were communicating and what people knew and didn't know.   Bradley Akubuiro  1:01:15 Yeah, well, then you ask the question, how difficult was it to get the senior executives to get on board with the new approach. And what I would say is, and this goes back to some of we were talking about earlier, the top down kind of approach to this, and what's happening and the most senior role matters the most. And the CEO who came in this was after the former CEO was was like, you know, the chief legal officer, the head of that business, and a number of different executives, you keep going on, had exited the company, the new CEO, who came in they've Calhoun, currently is still the CEO, they're brought in this new wave, this refreshing new approach and culture, and was all about how do we ensure that we are being accountable, and that we're being transparent, because that is what matters in this circumstance. And so with that license to operate, it was a lot easier to come in and convince folks Well, this is how we should approach this from a media perspective, from a communications staff perspective, and across the board, with our customers with regulators, cetera, et cetera, et cetera. Because everybody was on board that this is what we needed to do. And frankly, it's the only way to not only repair our reputation, because this is 100 year old company has been at the first of so many different things historically, from an aviation standpoint, and helped truly invent modern flight. So how do you create a reputation that people expect coming out of that, but also to respect again, those who trusted the company, because when you step on a fly, you know, you know, as Michael, when you stop on a flight, you don't want to think about whether it's gonna make it to the other side or not. You want to trust that it's gonna make it to the other side and focus on what you got to do when you get there and everything else in your life. And people had for a brief period of time lost that faith. And that is what we were really trying to restore.   Michael Hingson  1:03:15 Do you think you were pretty successful at getting faith and confidence restored,   Bradley Akubuiro  1:03:20 I think we've made a good start at bone still remains a client. And I would say that the work that is ongoing is going to take time, because it takes five seconds to lose your reputation. It takes a long time to rebuild it and to regain trust. And I think the company is committed to what it needs to do to do that. But it is a journey.   Michael Hingson  1:03:44 What do you advise people today you do a lot of consulting, and you're in

united states ceo american new york university california texas history president children new york city chicago english new york times phd international philadelphia sales board dc new jersey barack obama oregon alabama pennsylvania african americans forbes afghanistan fortune white house hospitals bbc indiana mba harvard iran massachusetts rev states tom brady pittsburgh blind corporate ceos washington post iraq roe v wade los angeles lakers wall street journal magazine stitcher nigeria thunder civil war stanford patriots journalism ambassadors nebraska air force rams tampa bay buccaneers republic ebooks boston celtics latino snap cnbc nigerians unstoppable boston red sox ethiopia wasn rochester bill clinton panama boeing correct warren buffett business insider operating nobel prize northwestern university eastern europe springfield unbelievable penn west africa northwestern webster state department rutgers university lagos north star malone dictionary affordable care act pratt liberia aca huntsville sox vin scully american red cross communicator calhoun evanston tylenol braille lewis carroll woodrow wilson media relations hunter college charlton heston celts sycamore raytheon jesse jackson drexel national federation state street oak park winthrop addis ababa guide dogs advisers clark atlanta university booz allen hamilton monrovia novato obama biden medill school booz allen united technologies exxon mobile federal express scripps college lucent technologies secretary clinton calgon chief vision officer shimer reverend jesse jackson dick enberg chick hearn michael hingson biafran ink magazine american humane association steve grogan pulte homes eastern avenue howard buffett thunder dog hero dog awards
The Psyce
Girl I Dunno... We Was At Homecoming!

The Psyce

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 79:51


Chile We had a Timmmeeeee lassstttt weekend!!!! So you know cast had to come tell y'all all about it and catch up on mess with our faves, the co-hosts. Muse + Steph, still on a high from a homecoming visit back to their alma mater - Clark Atlanta University, are ready to fire away some hot topics and get to the crux of the industry's latest and greatest. Check in with them as they dish and delve into everything from Megan + Pardi's anniversary, to Nicki vs. The United States of America, Kanye being Kanye, and literally everything in between. We hope y'all missed us. Now hit that play button. Featured Song: Willow - hover like a GODDESS Make sure you subscribe so you won't miss any updates or episodes. And Y'all better be following us everywhere by now @thepsycepodcast.

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Akasha Absher: Pushing Past The Limitations of Whiteness

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 59:04


In this week's episode, we are joined by Akasha Absher, the president of Syntrinsic Investment Counsel, a national investment consulting firm. Akasha and Marisol converse about:Akasha explains how she's not only the president of a firm but a Black woman, friend, boss, colleague, partner, finance professional, dreamer, human with capacity for greatness and with capacity to make monumental mistakes.We talk about how in order to be perceived as successful, you must leave certain “worlds” then decide whether you try to reintegrate back into those communities.We talked about the importance of networking with other POC to build knowledge and increase the likelihood of being successful.It is important to prove, advocate, and assert yourself in order to be taken seriously.Watch this episode here - https://youtu.be/16mj1wiGS4oAbout our guest: Akasha Absher (she/her/hers) is, among many things, the President of Syntrinsic Investment Counsel, a Colorado-based national firm that provides investment advice and strategic consulting to endowment foundations and private clients. The catalyst of her impressive career can be traced back to Clark Atlanta University where she obtained her BA in Finance. Later, after a stint in South America, she earned her MBA from the University of Michigan, Ross School of Business. She's been making moves ever since. Akasha has an extensive background in investment consulting and banking, fixed income trading, risk management, and nonprofit leadership. This unique amalgamation of expertise has ultimately led to her prowess and success as president of Syntrinsic and beyond. In 2020, Akasha was named one of the top 25 Most Powerful Women in Colorado by the Colorado Women's Chamber. To top it all off, Akasha is a dedicated community member. She serves on the Board of Pinnacol Assurance, the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce Board, the Advisory Board of the CLIMBER Loan Fund, and the REI Advisory Committee for Confluence Philanthropy. The latter is a diversity, equity, and inclusion initiative managed exclusively by women and POC. They seek to expand the control of capital beyond "white male gatekeepers" and to provide resources to continue moving the discussion forward. Originally from New York, Akasha and her husband moved from NYC to indulge in Colorado's scenery. When she isn't hustling, Akasha can be found enjoying time with family, hiking, reading, traveling, and practicing yoga.Links:Marisol's website: https://www.marisolerlacher.com/LinkedIn: Marisol - www.linkedin.com/in/marisol-solarte-erlacher Akasha Absher - https://www.linkedin.com/in/akashaabsher/Instagram: @Resilience_and_ResistanceWe have partnered with US Bank to support our communities like this one through responsive and humbled actions focused on addressing racial and economic inequities and creating lasting change through our Community Possible Grant Program,https://www.usbank.com/about-us-bank/community/community-possible-grant-program.htmlIf you are interested in Marisol Solarte-Erlacher supporting your business or organization by speaking or training on topics such as Work Trauma for BIPOC women, Racial Battle Fatigue, supporting mental health in traumatic times, and building resilience in employees and resilient leadership in BIPOC women. Contact her directly at marisol@marisolerlacher.com if you want to learn more.Check out exclusive offers from our sponsors and partners - https://www.theplug-agency.com/sponsorsProduction CreditsArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comMusic: Inte-Gritty by Bianca MikahnPodcast Editing and Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comDistribution by: The Plug Podcast Network - https://art19.com/networks/the-plugSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MTR Podcasts
Q&A with Author, Lucumi Obatala Priest Dr. Koko Zauditu-Salassie

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 51:52


Brief summary of episode:Dr. Kokahvah Zauditu-Selassie is a retired Professor of English at Coppin State University in the Humanities Department. She earned her Doctorate in the Humanities from Clark Atlanta University. She is the author of “I Got a Home in Dat Rock: Memory, Orisa, and Yoruba Spiritual Identity in African American Literature” in Orisa: Yoruba Gods and Spiritual Identity in Africa and the Diaspora, as well as several journal articles including, “Women Who Know Things: African Epistemologies, Ecocriticism, and Female Spiritual Authority in the Novels of Toni Morrison, Dancing Between Two Realms: Sacred Resistance and Remembrance in African American Culture. She is also the author of an award-winning book of critical essays titled, African Spiritual Traditions in the Novels of Toni Morrison a 2009 publication of the University Press of Florida. Her research focuses on highlighting ritual acts of memory and resistance. A priest of Obàtálá in the Lukumi Yoruba tradition, she is a descendant of a matrilineal group of Vodun believers from New Orleans, Louisiana. Currently she is studying the traditions of Osain in the Lukumi system and in other global African cultures, as well as indigenous systems in the Americas. Her current publication is a novel titled, The Second Line. She can be found on social media at @comptonauthor. The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture. Mentioned in this episode:Dr. Kokahvah Zauditu-SelassiePHOTO CREDIT: SCHAUN CHAMPIONTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory. Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode ★ Support this podcast ★

This Morning With Gordon Deal
This Morning with Gordon Deal October 17, 2022

This Morning With Gordon Deal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022


Russian drones attack Ukraine's Kyiv, 4 wounded in shooting outside Clark Atlanta University library, and October tax deadline looms for millions of filers who got extensions.

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Somalia drought The moment a two year old dies from hunger UN condemns deeply distressing discovery of 92 naked migrants at Greece Turkey border Fauci Claims Innocence on School Shutdowns I Had Nothing to Do with It Gripping bodycam shows wounded Bristol officer shooting down cop killer Opioid crisis US teens fastest growing group to die GOP keeps lead for House control, Democrats momentum stalls amid economy worries CBS News Battleground Tracker poll Massive fire breaks out in Irans notorious Evin prison Evin prison fire Gun shots and sirens heard at notorious detention centre Suspected Stockton serial killer arrested, was on a mission to kill What do people in Beijing want from congress China Party Congress Xi Jinping to cement grip on power at historic meeting Liz Truss still in charge despite U turns, says Jeremy Hunt Chinas Xi opens Party Congress with speech tackling Taiwan, Hong Kong and zero Covid Turkey mine deaths President Erdogan criticised over destiny comments Multiple people shot on Clark Atlanta University campus during Homecoming gathering overnight Kinzinger Not clear what will happen if Trump refuses to testify Alex Jones Will a huge legal award crush his Infowars empire US President Biden calls Trusss economic policies a mistake Kari Lake doesnt commit to accepting Arizona election result if she loses CNN

News Headlines in Morse Code at 10 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Chinas Xi opens Party Congress with speech tackling Taiwan, Hong Kong and zero Covid Multiple people shot on Clark Atlanta University campus during Homecoming gathering overnight Kari Lake doesnt commit to accepting Arizona election result if she loses CNN China Party Congress Xi Jinping to cement grip on power at historic meeting Kinzinger Not clear what will happen if Trump refuses to testify Turkey mine deaths President Erdogan criticised over destiny comments Gripping bodycam shows wounded Bristol officer shooting down cop killer Liz Truss still in charge despite U turns, says Jeremy Hunt What do people in Beijing want from congress US President Biden calls Trusss economic policies a mistake Suspected Stockton serial killer arrested, was on a mission to kill Somalia drought The moment a two year old dies from hunger GOP keeps lead for House control, Democrats momentum stalls amid economy worries CBS News Battleground Tracker poll Fauci Claims Innocence on School Shutdowns I Had Nothing to Do with It Massive fire breaks out in Irans notorious Evin prison Alex Jones Will a huge legal award crush his Infowars empire Evin prison fire Gun shots and sirens heard at notorious detention centre Opioid crisis US teens fastest growing group to die UN condemns deeply distressing discovery of 92 naked migrants at Greece Turkey border

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Herschel Walker and Sen. Raphael Warnock to debate in Savannah

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 39:45


Friday on Political Rewind: Herschel Walker and Sen. Raphael Warnock are scheduled to debate tonight in Savannah. Our panel addresses the matchup between the two and reflects on their respective campaigns so far. The panel Jim Galloway, @JimJournalist, former political columnist, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Riley Bunch, @ribunchreports, public policy reporter, GPB News Tammy Greer, professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00 - Introduction 1:00 - Herschel Walker and Sen. Raphael Warnock are scheduled to debate tonight. 13:00 - Herschel Walker's appearance at tonight's debate comes after allegations that he paid for an abortion. 25:00 - Joe Biden's popularity remains low. How will Warnock uncouple himself from the administration? We're in the middle of our Fall Radio Fund Drive. Visit www.gpb.org if you'd like to support Political Rewind with a donation.

Into America
The Power of the Black Vote: Creating A New South

Into America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 37:17 Very Popular


On the final stop of our HBCU tour on The Power of the Black Vote, we travel to Atlanta, home of three of the most prestigious historically Black colleges and universities: Spelman, Morehouse, and Clark Atlanta, to talk with HBCU students about the Black youth vote. Georgia has always played a significant role in the fight for voting rights in this country. And when Stacey Abrams lost her race for governor in 2018, young Black voters who were tired and fed-up began to mobilize on their campuses. For years, Black student voter turnout was on the decline in the state, but with rising voter suppression tactics and voter purges, student organizers and grassroots organizations started a movement to get out the vote. This resulted in an unprecedented Black youth voter turnout in the 2020 general election, which ultimately led to Georgia turning blue for the first time in years. But with the midterm election right around the corner, student organizers like Janiah Henry, a student political activist at Clark Atlanta University, are struggling to keep that momentum going. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine speaks with Henry about how she is energizing the Black youth to get out and vote this November. He also speaks with Ciarra Malone, an organizer forCampus Vote Project, who has made it her mission to strengthen civic engagement on HBCU campuses throughout the state. For a transcript, please visit msnbc.com/intoamerica. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For More: The Power of the Black Vote: Taking Back the ClassroomThe Power of the Black Vote: Knocking Out Student Loan DebtThe Power of the Black Vote: Tackling Our Climate CrisisThe Power of the Black Vote: We Save OurselvesYoung Black voters are dominating the Georgia midterms one student at a time

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Looking at issues voters care about; Quinnipiac poll says Abrams and Kemp are tied

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 39:11


Thursday on Political Rewind: Our panel looks at polled responses in yesterday's poll from GPB News, the AJC, and the Georgia News Collaborative. Voters were asked about a variety of hot-button issues. Plus, a new poll from Quinnipiac says the governor's race is too close to call. The panel Leroy Chapman, @AJCLeroyChapman, managing editor, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Kurt Young, @kurtbyoung, political science professor, Clark Atlanta University Leo Smith, @leosmithtweets, GOP political consultant & CEO, Engaged Futures Timestamps 0:00 - Introduction 3:00 - Breaking down the issues that Georgia voters indicate are most important. 18:00 - Voters say they're struggling with inflation and the economy. 26:00 - The poll asked Georgians if they would invite friends and family to move to the state. We're in the middle of our Fall Radio Fund Drive. Visit www.gpb.org to support Political Rewind with a donation.

Creatively Christian
Fashion, Art, and Education: BJ Artnett

Creatively Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 38:52


Fashion designer and professor BJ Arnett is on the Creatively Christian podcast, interviewed by Brannon Hollingsworth. BJ came from a deeply creative and entrepreneurial background but still needed a mindset shift to fully come into her God-given talent. She shares her spiritual testimony and how she got into fashion design, art, and education. Through her journey, BJ learned that you have to be very careful with who you surround yourself and how many compliments you accept. BJ Arnett is the host and co-producer of the award-winning BJA Today, a CamyArnett Production Studios original and host of TV 57's This Day with BJ Arnett. BJA Today recently garnered a Telly Award for editing and the Audience Choice for a TV Show award from the International Christian Film and Music Festival. She is also the creator of the very first HBCU Art and Fashion Week established in 2021. BJ has an MBA, BA in Fashion Merchandising and an AA in Fashion Design and is currently the Interim Chair of the Art and Fashion Department at the prestigious Clark Atlanta University (CAU). This episode can also be found on YouTube. Show Notes The following resources were mentioned in the show or are useful resources recommended by the guests. Links might be marked as affiliates, meaning we earn a commission if you buy through the link. Clark Atlanta University website: https://www.cau.edu/Her husband Cameron Arnett's website: https://www.cameronarnett.com/ Learn More About Our Guest You can follow this guest on several platforms, including: BJ's website: https://www.bjarnett.com/BJ's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bjatoday/BJ's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/billi.arnettBJ's production company: https://www.camyarnett.com/ Credits Today's episode is hosted by Brannon Hollingsworth the Chief Creative Officer of Brainy Pixel, who was born to create. An author, speaker, poet, publisher, game designer, content creator, scriptwriter, art director, and unapologetic Christ-follower, Brannon is a passionate creator and teacher of youth who promotes family-oriented ministries. Follow Brainy Pixel on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook. Support this show and get access to exclusive content by donating at https://www.patreon.com/creativelychristian. This show is produced by Theophany Media (https://www.theophanymedia.com). The theme music is by Bill Brooks and Andrea Sandefur. Our logo is by Bill Brooks. This show is hosted by Brannon Hollingsworth, Andrea Sandefur, Dave Ebert, and Rachel Anna. Jake Doberenz produces. Follow Theophany Media and the podcast on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

The Great Women Artists
Amy Sherald

The Great Women Artists

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 40:07


THIS WEEK on the GWA Podcast, we interview one of the most acclaimed painters working in the world right now, AMY SHERALD! With their striking elegance and commanding yet inviting gazes, Amy Sherald's subjects exude grace, dignity, power, and joy. Unrooted in time, place, or space – and on the threshold between surreality and reality – they feel at once familiar yet utterly otherworldly as they glow in hues of gold, pinks, blues and oranges, often meeting our gaze with their dazzling aura. Sherald, through figurative painting, documents the contemporary African American experience in the United States. By engaging with the traditions of photography and portraiture, she opens up discussions about who has been immortalised, historicised, and who has been able to write, paint and dictate these narratives. As a result, her paintings open up vital debates about race and representation. But they're also just as much about capturing and creating a record of the joy and everydayness of life. With a process that includes working from photographs that she stages and takes of individuals that capture her interest, the artist has said: “The works reflect a desire to record life as I see it and as I feel it. My eyes search for people who are and who have the kind of light that provides the present and the future with hope”. And it is this that we see in her paintings. Born in Columbus, Georgia, Sherald received her MFA in painting from Maryland Institute College of Art and BA in painting from Clark-Atlanta University. Sherald was, in 2016, the first woman and first African-American artist to receive the prestigious Portrait Competition from the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C., and in 2018, was selected by First Lady Michelle Obama to paint her portrait. Depicted as both triumphant and approachable (with the pattern on her billowing dress referencing the Gee's Bend Quiltmakers), Obama's gaze is full of wisdom and optimism. Now in some of the most prestigious museum collections in the world, we meet Sherald today in London, at Hauser & Wirth, where she has just opened her first ever European solo exhibition, The World We Make. -- LINKS:::::: They Call Me Redbone but I'd Rather Be Strawberry Shortcake (2009) https://nmwa.org/art/collection/they-call-me-redbone-id-rather-be-strawberry-shortcake/ Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance) (2013) https://portraitcompetition.si.edu/exhibition/2016-outwin-boochever-portrait-competition/miss-everything-unsuppressed-deliverance After winning this award, Sherald was put forward as a contender for First Lady Michelle Obama's official portrait. Michelle Obama Official Portrait (2018) https://npg.si.edu/Michelle_Obama EXHIBITION: ‘The World We Make' at Hauser &Wirth (until 23 Dec) https://www.hauserwirth.com/hauser-wirth-exhibitions/38424-amy-sherald-the-world-we-make/ MORE – Simone Leigh, Amy Sherald and Lorna Simpson for NYT Mag: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/08/magazine/black-women-artists-conversation.html https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/12/arts/design/amy-sherald-michelle-obama-hauser-wirth.html NYT interview on Michelle Obama portrait: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/23/arts/design/amy-sherald-michelle-obama-official-portrait.html New York Times Magazine, Amy Sherald and others on being Black cultural leaders and being seen: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/23/t-magazine/black-artists-white-gaze.html Peter Schjeldahl on the Amy Sherald Effect for the New Yorker 2019: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/09/23/the-amy-sherald-effect -- ENJOY!!! Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Research assistant: Viva Ruggi Sound editing by Nada Smiljanic Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/ -- THIS EPISODE IS GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY CHRISTIES: www.christies.com

Black Women Amplified
Black Women in the Arts Series Welcomes: Alacia Reynolds, Copywriter, BMG

Black Women Amplified

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 58:04


Welcome family to part 1 of our "Women in the Arts" Podcast series. I am excited for you to hear a story of innate power and resilience. Alacia Reynolds, known as Alacia LaRobin in the entertainment world, began singing at an early age and has always dreamed of writing and performing her own songs. Alacia began her professional career as a teacher after graduating from Clark Atlanta University with a bachelor's degree in English.  After years of working in education, Alacia decided to pursue her life-long dream of completing a music degree.  She recently earned her second bachelor's degree in commercial voice with an emphasis in songwriting from Belmont University and a master's in the music business from the University of Miami. The shutdown of 2020 exposed Alacia to more opportunities in the music industry other than performing, and she now works in copyright at a major music publisher in Nashville.  Alacia is still actively writing songs and plans on releasing new music at the beginning of 2023.  Alacia has high expectations for her music career and other artistic aspirations and hopes that her willingness to share her life experiences through the arts will allow her to reach audiences both nationally and internationally.Enjoy the episode and share it with your squad. Black women are living incredible lives and it's time for the world to hear them. Blessings and Love, Monica WisdomHost, Black Women AmplifiedThank you for listening! Please share with your tribe and leave us a great review. Appreciate it!Join our waitlist for the Power Story Formula. An incredible course designed to help you choose, build and monetize an impactful story. www.monicawisdomHQ.com to sign up. Join our private community. Women EmergedEnjoy your day, Monica Wisdom

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Report alleges Walker paid for a woman's abortion; Campaign denounced by adult son

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 51:10


Tuesday on Political Rewind: Herschel Walker's campaign is on the defensive. Walker's adult son Christian alleged that he threatened and abandoned his family for other women, amid a Daily Beast report that Walker paid for an abortion, in opposition to his anti-abortion stance. The panel: Chuck Williams, @chuckwilliams, reporter, WRBL-TV Columbus Maya King, @mayaaking, politics reporter, The New York Times Tamar Hallerman,@TamarHallerman, senior reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Tammy Greer, political science professor, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00 - Introductions 2:00 - The Daily Beast has reported receipts for an abortion that Herschel Walker paid for. 14:00 - Walker's son Christian tweeted a blistering thread against his father. 34:00 - Updates on the gubernatorial race. 46:00 - Stacey Abrams' skin was darkened in an ad put out by the Kemp campaign. Please sign up for the team's newsletter: https://www.gpb.org/newsletters

Innovators
Data Science: Academia's Newest and Fastest-Growing Field (with Dr. Talitha Washington, Professor of Mathematics and the Director of the Atlanta University Center Data Science Initiative)

Innovators

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 33:21


Dr. Talitha Washington is Professor of Mathematics and the Director of the Atlanta University Center Data Science Initiative.   On leave to the National Science Foundation, she received the NSF Director's Award for Superior Accomplishment in 2020 “for exceptional stewardship in establishing the first NSF Hispanic-serving Institution program.” She is a graduate of Spelman College and earned her Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut, then completed a research post-doctorate at Duke University.   The Atlanta University Center Data Science Initiative is a unique collaboration among four historically black colleges and universities (Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, Morehouse School of Medicine, and Spelman College) aiming to infuse data science within and across each institution, and led by its Director, Dr. Washington, who responded to these questions: How did the four institutions of the consortium come together to seek to establish a data science initiative and why? What is the scope of the AUC Data Science Initiative and what outcomes are being pursued? You and your staff are tasked with integrating data science into and across the curricula of four separate institutions and therefore have to know how courses and curricula are made. How do you go about making change take place? Moreover, aren't you also changing faculty? As a mathematician and data scientist yourself, it seems likely that you have looked at data on the relative success of cross-institutional, multi- and inter-disciplinary curricular and instruction initiatives such as you are directing. What do the data tell you? A final question is prompted by good news for you and your colleagues. The National Science Foundation announced that Clark Atlanta University will be awarded a $10 million grant to establish the National Data Science Alliance. The new Alliance will extend the University's efforts to expand participation in data science to the nation's HBCU institutions and increase the numbers of credentialed Black data scientists.  As the new Alliance's principal investigator, tell us what is the scale of this effort? How many more institutions will be involved and what do you aim to accomplish in terms of additional student data scientists?   Innovators is a podcast production of Harris Search Associates.  *The views and opinions shared by the guests on Innovators do not necessarily reflect the views of the interviewee's institution or organization.* For additional insights on data science, see previous INNOVATORS podcasts:    Digital Health – Technological and Scientific Invention and Innovation in Healthcare;    The Burgeoning and Expanding Field of Data Science; and Artificial Intelligence and Precision Medicine.

Got InSpiration Podcast
Episode #46 - Mr. Michael Dones - Refocus, Recharge...Take A Sabbatical

Got InSpiration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 51:02


Mr. Michael Dones and I have known each other since we were Freshmen in High School at Bishop O'Dowd.  After high school, he and I both headed to the Atlanta University Center for College.  He at Morehouse and I at Clark Atlanta University (then Clark College).  He is an amazing Husband to his wife Judy (whom I adore and she also went to O'Dowd and college at Spelman), Father, Son, and just a wonderful person.  I am grateful to call him my Brother.  In this episode, he speaks about how he has been on a one-year sabbatical.  After receiving an MBA from Clark Atlanta University, he has had an amazing career.  He has been a Corporate Exec for Fortune 100 Companies and living his best life.   The pandemic and other factors caused him to take a pause.  He's so glad he did.  Get ready to be intrigued and inspired!  Be sure to check out his Blog on LinkedIn #MichaelDones, #EastOakland, #Oakland, #BishopODowd, #MorehouseCollege, #ClarkAtlantaUniversity, #sabbatical 

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Abortion key issue; Potential runoff for Senate; Coffee County election equipment

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 51:06


Monday on Political Rewind: A potential U.S. Senate runoff looms over voters for the second time in two years. Meanwhile, Democrats are running on abortion rights, even in deep red parts of Georgia. Plus: the latest on the Coffee county election office data breach. The panel: Edward Lindsey, @edlindsey14, former state representative (R) Atlanta Kurt Young, @kurtbyoung, political science professor, Clark Atlanta University Patricia Murphy, @MurphyAJC , political reporter and columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution State Sen. Sonya Halpern, @sonya4ga, (D) Atlanta Timestamps 0:00 - Introduction 3:00 - Democrats are campaigning on abortion rights throughout Georgia. 27:00 - For the second time in two years, the race for U.S. Senate in Georgia may trigger a runoff. 45:00 - Coffee County will receive all-new election equipment following a potential security breach. Sign up for our newsletter coming out later today: https://www.gpb.org/newsletters.

Closer Look with Rose Scott
Atlanta to launch ambulance service; Clark Atlanta University expands commitment to prostate cancer research

Closer Look with Rose Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 50:40


Today on Closer Look with Rose Scott: Frustration over long response times for medical emergencies is only expected to grow with the announced closing of the Atlanta Medical Center. But Atlanta is preparing to launch its own ambulance service to help. City councilmember Dustin Hills shares details.And Clark Atlanta University has a long-standing commitment to prostate cancer research. Now the school is teaming up with the Cancer Treatment Centers of America to bring greater awareness and education to the issue. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.