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Australian-American science entertainment television program

  • 1,331PODCASTS
  • 2,277EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 5, 2022LATEST
MythBusters

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Best podcasts about MythBusters

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Latest podcast episodes about MythBusters

Raging Romantics
#47 Some Like It Scot

Raging Romantics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 61:29


CONTENT WARNING : discussions of racism, colonialism and cultural appropriation as it pertains to romance novels. Also loud bagpipe sounds. This week we're taking a look under the kilt at the dark(?) history behind Scottish romance novels. Do you agree with Jackie- is there something a little off about Scots in romance books? Or is she thinking too deeply about all this...after all, these are *just* fiction books.Shoutout to Dr. Euan Hague at De Paul University for sitting down with Jackie to talk cultural geography! Make sure to tune into minisode #22 to hear that entire interview!Raging Romantics Book List! Questions? Comments? Concerns? Suggestions? Email us at ragingromantics@nopl.org!Authors/Books we mentionDragon Fever by Donna Grant (quote Jackie reads at the beginning)Diana GabaldonJennifer AshleyKaren Marie MoningLyndsay SandsMaya Banks Highlander seriesKinley MacGregor MacAllister seriesRecommended reads:How the Scots Invented the Modern World by Arthur HermanA History of Scotland by Neil OliverThe Highland Furies: The Black Watch by Victoria SchofieldLiterally ANYTHING by Alistair Moffat but especially Scotland; A History From Earliest Times ; The Highland Clans ; and Scotland's Lost FrontierThe Lowland Clearances: Scotland's Silent Revolution, 1760 - 1830 by Aitchinson and CassellThe Highland Clearances by Eric RichardsTo the Ends of the Earth: Scotland's Global Diaspora, 1750-2010 by TM DevineOther resources:"Why Scottish Romances?" (Somerville Public Library, 2006)"Romance Unlaced: Exploring the appeal of Scottish heroes" (Hunter, 2014)"'Och Aye': Reading Scottish Romances as an Actual Scottish Person" (Donaldson, 2017)"The Fetishization of Scottish Highlanders" (Jane, 2009)"Outlander tourism effect a 'double edged sword'" (BBCnews.com, 2020)"The Outlander Effect" (Drysdale)"From tartan to bagpipes: the story behind Scotland's brand" (Dickie, 2019)"A Professor Studies Scottish Romance" (Wordwenches.com, 2013)"Why do Americans love Scotland so much? We visit California's Scotsfestival to find out" (Stephenson, 2020)"Romanticism in Literature: Definition and Examples (Somers, 2019)"Tartan and the Dress Act of 1746" (Scottish Tartans Authority)"Tartan Repeal" (ibid.)"Ancient Highland Dress" (ibid.)"The Act of Proscription" (ibid.)"Mythbusters!" (ibid.)"Scots Gaelic language" (Britannica.com)Jacobite Rebellion of 1745 (British Heritage)"The Scottish Enlightenment and the Romantic Movement" (Rosslyn Chapel)"The Aftermath of the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion: How British Reformatory Measures and Chief Complicity Destroyed Clanship in the Scottish Highlands" (Jones, 2021)"1746 – Highland Dress Proscription Act" (Scotlans.com)"The Act of Proscription, tartan and Gaelic culture" (Sassenach Sticher, 2021)"Scottish Enlightenment" (britannica.com)"The Seventh Romantic: Robert Burns" (Burch)"Gaelic language erosion and revitalization on the Isle of Skye, Scotland" (Smakman, 2008)"UNESCO Project: Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger" (UNESCO.org)

The Financial Answer
Clearing Up Financial Myths

The Financial Answer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 16:34


What financial myths have you heard and perhaps fallen for? What happens when it doesn't work out the way you thought? Let's bust some financial myths today on the podcast. Whether it was true in the past or never true at all, Nathan is here to set the record straight.   Here's what we discuss on the podcast:  1:24 - Remember the TV show Mythbusters? 2:11 - Should you shifting from stocks to bonds? 5:39 - Is life insurance necessary in retirement? 6:31 - Will you need less income in retirement? 11:30 - Is financial planning easier to do because of technology?     For additional resources, visit us online: http://thefinancialanswer.com 

Teach Me, Teacher
Education Can Bring Us Together — Season 7 Intro

Teach Me, Teacher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 21:10 Very Popular


Hello everyone and welcome to season 7 of the Teach Me, Teacher podcast! If you are new to these intro episodes, I treat these as focuses for the season and update listeners on where I am at as the host and guide of the show. Times are changing, the new school year is here, and I am moving on to new and exciting adventures. Enjoy the show and WELCOME to yet another season of Teach Me, Teacher!   I want to let you know about a free, virtual, conference for “cool” science educators coming up on August 5th. Its the 9th ScIC Science is Cool unconference. But of course all science teachers are cool so that means everyone is invited! It's called an unconference because they are curated based on teacher feedback and they are actually fun! Produced by the team at PocketLab, these virtual events always have a great line up of amazing speakers to fill the day. At ScIC9 on August 5th, you will hear from Kari Byron of Mythbusters fame, the Biomimicry institute, The national lab for the International Space Station, OpenSciEd, and so many more.   In the past 2 years, these “unconferences” have attracted nearly 100,000 teachers from over 200 countries around the world join. Every event is inspiring, engaging, and full of resources. To sign up for Science is Cool 9- visit thepocketlab.com/scic9 or click right here.     Your students (and maybe even you) might cringe at the word poetry. For many, poetry feels like finding the hidden meaning the poet worked so hard to hide from the reader. If poetry confuses your students, they're likely to avoid it altogether. In Whispering in the Wind, master educator Linda Rief provides a cure for poetry agony. She introduces “Heart Books,” a project inspired by the Heart Maps of Georgia Heard. Linda has used Heart Books throughout her teaching career to help students read more poetry, connect with it, and see how they, too, could write poetically. Help students find (and respond to) poetry they'll love Linda explains how to create and use Heart Books in any classroom by: helping students discover poets who surprise and delight them using Heart Books as a pathway to find poetry that rings true for each student encouraging students to deepen their understanding of themselves, and others teaching students to respond to poetry with an authentic voice How do you squeeze one more unit into your curriculum? This is not a book about teaching a standalone poetry unit. Instead, you'll learn how to use transition times for this learning—all those in-between times throughout the year, such as right before a new unit, and leading up to, or returning from, vacations or holidays. Linda believes this is work worth doing in any classroom because “poetry is what ‘whispers in the wind,' guiding us toward deeper reading and a heightened awareness of what makes compelling writing.”

MCHD Paramedic Podcast
Episode 136 - Mythbusters 2022

MCHD Paramedic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 39:33


The podcast crew welcomes newly transplanted Texan EMS physician, Dr. Louis Fornage, to join in on some rapid-fire mythbusting for 2022. We run the gamut from post-ROSC vasopressor evidence to whether or not saying "QUIET" affects emergency department volume. REFERENCES 1. https://www.nremt.org/News/National-Registry-of-EMT-s-Resource-Document-on-Sp#:~:text=NREMT's%20use%20of%20the%20term,most%20trauma%20patients%20is%20unproven 2. https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12879-022-07337-y.pdf 3. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10903127.2021.1992053 4. https://rebelem.com/using-the-word-quiet-in-the-ed/?fbclid=IwAR1yAtVPnUSJqWnGWDWy9yhgXNHSie0AgAxWctGq-zwd_xczFrsvaexwvgw 5. https://journalfeed.org/article-a-day/2022/battle-of-the-catecholamines-epi-vs-norepi-for-post-resuscitation-shock/

Urban Wire Media Network
"The Tea" Ep 8 : Monkeypox Myth Busters, Beyonce, Bishop Whitehead, and Trending

Urban Wire Media Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 123:00


"The Tea" Ep 8 : Monkeypox Myth Busters, Beyonce, Bishop Whitehead, and Trending Topics Topics Monkeypox myths and educationGov Desantis attack on the drag communityStates where LGBQT!A could be denied health care servicesBill Mahr's statements pertaining to the trans communityBishop Whitehead robbed and the controversity behind itBeyonce's New album "Renaissance" and the controversity behind it with KelisAnd other news and trending topics.. Cash App: $UrbanWire Listen to our full podcasts at: www.blogtalkradio.com/urban_wire_media_network You can also listen and download our shows on our network on, Spotify, I Heart Radio, Tune-In radio, Stitcher, Google & Apple Podcasts Follow us on our Facebook group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/44496784124/?ref=share Email us for story ideas, advertising, partnership and other business inquires: ucofw.indy@gmail.com

Through the Word
Ephesians 6 | B-Side: Marriage and Parenting Mythbusters

Through the Word

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 11:50


Ephesians 6 B-Side: Marriage and Parenting Mythbusters | Join us as we debunk some very common myths found in the church about marriage and parenting.Journey 4 | Law and Grace. Journey #4 opens the Bible's grand story of redemption in Exodus, as Moses leads the Israelites out of slavery and into the wilderness. God delivers the law in Leviticus - but can the law save? Redemption comes into full glory in the NT letters of Ephesians and Philemon, and Paul delivers his manifesto of grace in Galatians. (94 days)Teacher: Kris LanghamAbout TTW: When the Bible is confusing, Through the Word explains it with clear and concise audio guides for every chapter. The TTW Podcast follows 19 Journeys covering every book and chapter in the Bible. Each journey is an epic adventure through several Bible books, as your favorite pastors explain each chapter with clear explanation and insightful application. Understand the Bible in just ten minutes a day, and join us for all 19 Journeys on the TTW podcast or TTW app!Get the App: https://throughtheword.orgContact: https://throughtheword.org/contactDonate: https://throughtheword.org/givingEphesians 6 Themes: parenting, childrenEphesians 6 Tags: parenting, parents, mother, father, children, marriage, husband, wife, honor, legalism, Key Verses: Quotes: Audio & Text © 2011-2021 Through the Word™ Inc. All rights reserved worldwide.Bible Quotes: The Holy Bible New International Version® NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission of Biblica, Inc.® All rights reserved worldwide.

From Tops to Bottoms
#57: Busting BDSM Myths

From Tops to Bottoms

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:25


[Cassie's audio is a little off this week due to a recording issue! We'll be back next week with our regular audio quality!]This week we're hitting you hard with an episode of sexy Mythbusters! We're delving into some BDSM myths, and we're sharing our hot takes on some of the shitty stereotypes. Is everyone into BDSM a tortured soul? Can BDSM be platonic? How many ways can you do BDSM? Is age play REALLY pedophilia??PS: Sam was a guest on the Date Night China podcast! You can listen to her talk about Fatphobia and dating in China here! (https://open.spotify.com/episode/0FNOBiO0orXdMSD7rDRmiT?si=EmiHGEhkQJ-JebOh5k2leg)

Pelvic Service Announcement

There are so many misconceptions about pelvic health and hygiene. "Does urinating after sex prevent UTIs?", "Will eating pineapple cause changes in vaginal odor?" Callie and Rachel spend this episode separating pelvic health facts from fiction to give you the most accurate information about your body.

Teach Me, Teacher
Being Relentless in Education with Hamish Brewer — Off Season Day 4

Teach Me, Teacher

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 60:16 Very Popular


Hello everyone! This is a re-run of our season 3 finale. Enjoy! From the post: I couldn't be any more excited to bring you none other than Hamish Brewer ! If you don't know who Hamish is, the relentless, tattooed, skateboarding principal in Northern Virginia isn't your normal principal. Hamish is high octane, constantly calling on his students to “Be Relentless. Mr. Brewer has become known as an educational disrupter and game changer who transcends the status quo and typical educational norms. He is known for working with some of the most at risk students in America and getting results, and that's exactly what we discuss in this episode! This is the perfect listen for starting the new school year, because those kids in our schools need us to be excited, they need us to be motivated, and they need us to be our best. Hamish knows how to get it done, and he takes us along for the ride! Enjoy! I want to let you know about a free, virtual, conference for “cool” science educators coming up on August 5th. Its the 9th ScIC Science is Cool unconference. But of course all science teachers are cool so that means everyone is invited! It's called an unconference because they are curated based on teacher feedback and they are actually fun! Produced by the team at PocketLab, these virtual events always have a great line up of amazing speakers to fill the day. At ScIC9 on August 5th, you will hear from Kari Byron of Mythbusters fame, the Biomimicry institute, The national lab for the International Space Station, OpenSciEd, and so many more.   In the past 2 years, these “unconferences” have attracted nearly 100,000 teachers from over 200 countries around the world join. Every event is inspiring, engaging, and full of resources. To sign up for Science is Cool 9- visit thepocketlab.com/scic9 or click right here.       This episode is sponsored by Heinemann—the leading publisher of professional books and resources for educators—and their professional book, Textured Teaching: A Framework for Culturally Sustaining Practices by Lorena Escoto Germán. With Culturally Sustaining Practice as its foundation, Textured Teaching helps secondary teachers stop wondering and guessing how to implement teaching and learning that leads to social justice.  Lorena Germán shares her framework for creating a classroom environment that is highly rigorous and engaging, and that reflects the core traits of Textured Teaching: student-driven and community-centered, interdisciplinary, experiential, and flexible.  The actionable strategies Lorena uses to bring Textured Teaching values to life illuminate what is possible when we welcome all types of texts, all types of voices, and all forms of expression into the classroom. Learn more about how to become a culturally sustaining educator. Visit Heinemann.com to download a sample from Textured Teaching.

Noles Anonymous: Florida State Football Fan Support Group
Florida State Conference Realignment Myth Busting. How FSU Can Close the Revenue Gap if Stuck in the ACC?

Noles Anonymous: Florida State Football Fan Support Group

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 38:56


As things stand, FSU is stuck in the ACC until 2036. There are many theories circulating about how the Seminoles could leave for the Big 10 or the SEC. Most of these are based on pure speculation and wishful thinking. In what is hopefully the final conference realignment episode of the offseason, Max and Dave play "Mythbusters" with the various exit strategies that have been raised in the Locked On Seminoles Mailbag this past week. Max explains why unequal revenue sharing could be a short-term band-aide to keep the top schools in the ACC competitive. The two discuss why adding more teams to the ACC does not help Florida State leave the conference. Addressing expansion, Max and Dave discuss how many schools could add more revenue to the ACC than they would take thus being a net addition to the conference. Unfortunately, there aren't many. Finally, they examine the jailbreak strategy discussing if enough ACC schools could find profitable landing spots in other conferences to make a mass exodus feasible. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Seminoles
Florida State Conference Realignment Myth Busting. How FSU Can Close the Revenue Gap if Stuck in the ACC?

Locked On Seminoles

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 38:56


As things stand, FSU is stuck in the ACC until 2036. There are many theories circulating about how the Seminoles could leave for the Big 10 or the SEC. Most of these are based on pure speculation and wishful thinking. In what is hopefully the final conference realignment episode of the offseason, Max and Dave play "Mythbusters" with the various exit strategies that have been raised in the Locked On Seminoles Mailbag this past week. Max explains why unequal revenue sharing could be a short-term band-aide to keep the top schools in the ACC competitive. The two discuss why adding more teams to the ACC does not help Florida State leave the conference. Addressing expansion, Max and Dave discuss how many schools could add more revenue to the ACC than they would take thus being a net addition to the conference. Unfortunately, there aren't many. Finally, they examine the jailbreak strategy discussing if enough ACC schools could find profitable landing spots in other conferences to make a mass exodus feasible. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Practicology Podcast
PP078 Mythbusters: Theology Isn’t Practical?

Practicology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 19:10


There's a pernicious myth out there that theology isn't practical. So Mike and Matthew head over to Acts 15 and draw out three points that expose this myth for what it is: (1) theology is everywhere; (2) theology is life-changing; (3) theology is a war fought with words. Theology isn't practical? Try telling that to the newly-saved Gentile gents in Antioch! Scriptures Referenced: Acts 15; Gal 5:1 Visit PracticologyPodcast.com for more episodes.Follow the Practicology Podcast on Twitter and Facebook

Oops, All Franchises
S01E04 - Jackass

Oops, All Franchises

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 61:52


Should we hire Steve-O to motivate our high school students? Does Chris Pontius have nerve endings in his genitals? Can a lot of dicks make for a lot of laughs? Is Jackass just Mythbusters without the science? On this week's episode, we're high-fiving, cup testing, and holding tight to our Big Red Rockets to see which of the Jackass movies hits the hardest! Keep up with Oops, All Franchises & Partyfish Media: Full info on the show: https://partyfish.media/oopsallfranchises Instagram: @oopsallfranchises Partyfish Media: https://partyfish.media Oops, All Franchises Theme composed by Kurtis Skinner --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/oopsallfranchisespod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/oopsallfranchisespod/support

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer
Mythbuster's Adam Savage and Trip Hunter talk SiliCon--San Jose's premier Comic Con

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 15:45


Creative Director Adam Savage (former co-host of Discovery Channel's MythBusters television series) and Silicon's Executive director Trip Hunter share fascinating insights about the upcoming Silicon Cosplay event in San Jose.

Fueled By Joy Podcast
Episode 12 - Myth Busters Part 2

Fueled By Joy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 50:35


On this myth busting episode Josh and Jed are going to talk about handlers!! What it takes to be a great one, who is the best of all time, and more!!!  So search for the Fueled By Joy Podcast wherever you get your podcasts, hit that subscribe button, and enjoy!!!

Pure Desire Ministries
263 - Myth Busters: Self-Care Is Selfish

Pure Desire Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 53:38


Whether it's been caught or taught, many of us believe self-care is selfish. We can so easily see and encourage it in others, but when it comes to our own self-care, we dismiss it as too “self-focused.”  Why do we believe this? Does this belief cause damage? How can we change this underlying belief? Today, we are joined by Traci Wright (Pure Desire Clinician and author) to explore the myth “self-care is selfish” and discuss how to improve our personal self-care. RESOURCES Full Episode Video (YouTube)

Machshavah Lab
Minhag Mythbusters: Does a Husband Sing Eishes Chayil for His Wife?

Machshavah Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 5:25


Synopsis: This is the audio version of the 1-page article I wrote entitled, Does a Husband Sing Eishes Chayil for His Wife?, in which we answer the titular question by engaging in some "halachic archaeology" in an attempt to trace the minhag back to its origins.  ----------The Torah content for these two weeks has been sponsored by Judah and Naomi Dardik in loving memory of Rabbi Moskowitz zt''l, who taught his students to pursue truth by asking questions, who modeled love of Torah and learning, and who exemplified living a life of the mind.----------If you have questions, comments, or feedback, I would love to hear from you! Please feel free to contact me at rabbischneeweiss at gmail.----------If you've gained from what you've learned here, please consider contributing to my Patreon at www.patreon.com/rabbischneeweiss. Alternatively, if you would like to make a direct contribution to the "Rabbi Schneeweiss Torah Content Fund," my Venmo is @Matt-Schneeweiss, and my Zelle and PayPal are mattschneeweiss at gmail.com. Even a small contribution goes a long way to covering the costs of my podcasts, and will provide me with the financial freedom to produce even more Torah content for you.If you would like to sponsor a day's or a week's worth of content, or if you are interested in enlisting my services as a teacher or tutor, you can reach me at rabbischneeweiss at gmail.com. Thank you to my listeners for listening, thank you to my readers for reading, and thank you to my supporters for supporting my efforts to make Torah ideas available and accessible to everyone.----------Patreon: patreon.com/rabbischneeweissYouTube Channel: youtube.com/rabbischneeweissBlog: kolhaseridim.blogspot.com/"The Mishlei Podcast": mishlei.buzzsprout.com"The Stoic Jew" Podcast: thestoicjew.buzzsprout.com"Rambam Bekius" Podcast: rambambekius.buzzsprout.com"Machshavah Lab" Podcast: machshavahlab.buzzsprout.com"The Tefilah Podcast": tefilah.buzzsprout.comWhatsApp Group: https://chat.whatsapp.com/GEB1EPIAarsELfHWuI2k0HAmazon Wishlist: amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/Y72CSP86S24W?ref_=wl_sharel

Teach Me, Teacher
What it Takes to Teach Today with Alfie Kohn — Off Season Day 3

Teach Me, Teacher

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 42:22 Very Popular


Hello everyone! Today, I am re-releasing what I believe is the one of the most important podcasts in the history of the show. Not only is it filled with honest and real world talk, it is filled with research based advice and insight from one of the premier thinkers on education today. In this episode, I sit down with Alfie Kohn and discuss a range of topics, such as why grading hurts more than it helps, why rewards do more harm than good, and why the testing obsession leads to bad teaching. I consider these the three pillars of what holds up an outdated educational model, and Alfie Kohn is the main reason for that perspective. Without a doubt, Alfie has influenced my teaching in such fundamental ways, and I know his thinking, research, and expertise will encourage you to question some of the norms of our educational climate. Alfie Kohn writes and speaks widely on human behavior, education, and parenting. The most recent of his 14 books are SCHOOLING BEYOND MEASURE…And Other Unorthodox Essays About Education (2015) and THE MYTH OF THE SPOILED CHILD: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom About Children and Parenting (2014).  Of his earlier titles, the best known are PUNISHED BY REWARDS (1993), NO CONTEST: The Case Against Competition (1986), UNCONDITIONAL PARENTING (2005), and THE SCHOOLS OUR CHILDREN DESERVE (1999). I want to let you know about a free, virtual, conference for "cool" science educators coming up on August 5th. Its the 9th ScIC Science is Cool unconference. But of course all science teachers are cool so that means everyone is invited!   It's called an unconference because they are curated based on teacher feedback and they are actually fun! Produced by the team at PocketLab, these virtual events always have a great line up of amazing speakers to fill the day. At ScIC9 on August 5th, you will hear from Kari Byron of Mythbusters fame, the Biomimicry institute, The national lab for the International Space Station, OpenSciEd, and so many more.   In the past 2 years, these "unconferences" have attracted nearly 100,000 teachers from over 200 countries around the world join. Every event is inspiring, engaging, and full of resources. To sign up for Science is Cool 9- visit thepocketlab.com/scic9 or click right here.   This episode is sponsored by Heinemann—the leading publisher of professional books and resources for educators—and their professional book, Textured Teaching: A Framework for Culturally Sustaining Practices by Lorena Escoto Germán. With Culturally Sustaining Practice as its foundation, Textured Teaching helps secondary teachers stop wondering and guessing how to implement teaching and learning that leads to social justice.  Lorena Germán shares her framework for creating a classroom environment that is highly rigorous and engaging, and that reflects the core traits of Textured Teaching: student-driven and community-centered, interdisciplinary, experiential, and flexible.  The actionable strategies Lorena uses to bring Textured Teaching values to life illuminate what is possible when we welcome all types of texts, all types of voices, and all forms of expression into the classroom. Learn more about how to become a culturally sustaining educator. Visit Heinemann.com to download a sample from Textured Teaching.  

Charles Russell Speechlys Podcast Channel
Property Patter: Mythbusters

Charles Russell Speechlys Podcast Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 24:50


Common misconceptions around property disputes  To ease you gently into the summer, the Real Estate Disputes Team takes a look at some common myths or misunderstandings when it comes to property. For example, what's wrong with a landlord changing the locks on a defaulting residential tenant and why is it that an email alone may not be enough to terminate a tenancy?  

Fueled By Joy Podcast
Episode 11: Myth Busters-Part 1

Fueled By Joy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 42:51


On this myth busting episode Josh and Jed are going to talk about the different levels and organizations that one can compete in, what it takes to be a great handler, what kind of dog it takes to compete consistently at both the Pro Classic and the local open event level, what it takes to be a good handler, and most of all.......... we are going to speak actual facts.  This won't be regurgitated lies that are constantly spread on social media, or tall tales told at the clubhouse, or on the tailgate, but only facts for those who want to hear them. 

Leipzig Allerlei
#114 Mythbusters

Leipzig Allerlei

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 75:05


Neue Woche, Neue Folge! Felix hatte eine Hausaufgabe aus dessen Weg Keira Knightley unfreiwillig sexy ist. Lukas braucht dringend Unterstützung von euch in Sachen Jubel, GIF und Videowürfel. Es gibt kein "Woher kommt eigentlich" aber dafür ein paar Alltagsmythen mit denen wir aufräumen. Viel Spaß beim Hören und euch eine angenehme Woche.

Barely Famous
Is Barely Famous Fact or Cap? + Instagram Questions

Barely Famous

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 72:32 Very Popular


Kail talks to Party Shirt (@partyshirt) the duo behind the Fact or Cap videos all over Tiktok. Find out how these House DJs with music aspirations got involved with viral debunking videos. These modern day MythBusters also reveal the best Fact or Cap video they have ever done and what type of videos they hope to make in the future. Also, in the second half of the episode Kail answers questions from Instagram such as: Will she have more kids? Would she ever reconcile with Briana? How is depression affecting her being a mom? + much more. Please support the show by checking out our sponsors! BFB: My listeners get 15% off all hair products when you go to www.bfbhair.com and use code BARELYFAMOUS at checkout Dave: Download the Dave app from the App store right now. Sign up for an Extra Cash account and get up to 500 dollars instantly. BetterHelp: Our listeners get 10% off their first month at BetterHelp.com/BARELY

Off-Nominal
69 - Was That NASA or MythBusters?

Off-Nominal

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 60:15 Very Popular


Anthony is joined by Joe Barnard of BPS.Space and Tim Dodd (the Everyday Astronaut!) to talk about how to cook meat with a very fast rocket, what life is like in Boca Chica lately, and…what has NASA been doing with those chickens?TopicsOff-Nominal - YouTubeEpisode 69 - Was That NASA or MythBusters? (with Joe Barnard and Tim Dodd) - YouTubeSEND IT! - Level 3 Rocket Build - YouTubeSEND IT! - Level 3 Rocket Launch Process - YouTube2022 Elon Musk Explains Updates To Starship And Starbase! - YouTubeGo up SpaceX's Starship-catching robotic launch tower with Elon Musk! - YouTubeElon Musk Explains SpaceX's Merlin Engine! - YouTubeFollow JoeBPS.SpaceBPS.space - YouTubeJoe Barnard (@joebarnard) / TwitterFollow TimEveryday AstronautEveryday Astronaut - YouTubeEveryday Astronaut (@Erdayastronaut) | TwitterFollow JakeWeMartians Podcast - Follow Humanity's Journey to MarsWeMartians Podcast (@We_Martians) | TwitterJake Robins (@JakeOnOrbit) | TwitterFollow AnthonyMain Engine Cut OffMain Engine Cut Off (@WeHaveMECO) | TwitterAnthony Colangelo (@acolangelo) | TwitterOff-Nominal MerchandiseOff-Nominal Logo TeeWeMartians Shop | MECO Shop

Better Buddies
Episode 140: Failure Golf Balls

Better Buddies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 62:56


This week the Buddies discuss which part of their body they would make detachable, how golf balls are a metaphor for failure, and touching grass. Share with a friend! Recommendations: Westworld (show), Mythbusters (show), Nature (place)

Kelly and Company
Animal myth-busters

Kelly and Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 14:49


On Ask a Vet, Dr. Danielle Jongkind brings us another myth-busters segment.

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
#thePOZcast Live: NFT Mythbusters

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 55:07


Joining us in this rare installment of #thePOZcastLIVE is Heather Parady, Andy Storch and Kevin Logan. Heather Parady is the host of the Community Builders in Web 3.0 podcast. Andy Storch is my OG in the Web3 space, an author, and host of the My NFT Journey podcast. Kevin Logan is a rockstar recruiter and my business partner in Probably Nothing Talent. In this episode, we dig right into the wonderful world of Web3, where to start as a newbie, projects we love, and how this will change the world we live in. This Episode's Heavy-hitter's: NFTs so far are a speculative investment at best and it's too early to know everything there is to know about the space. The best way to get ahead is to educate yourself as much as possible, and then take risks that you're comfortable with. Another safe bet to make is on the people and community. Web2 was much more focused on building a following, but this technology is all about forming credibility with the members of your community. It's important to know what role you want to play within the NFT community. There's so many different roles available– whether it be in creating NFTs, flipping them, being a technologist and so much more. You should be intentional about what fits your needs and interests the most. While Web3 lends itself to learning by doing, there's no right answer on when the right time to get involved is. You should think about your risk and education levels as being inverse, and figure out at what point you feel comfortable enough to jump in head first. Once you do feel educated enough, Kevin suggests that you purchase at least one NFT you feel great about so you can have skin in the game to really learn. The POZCAST is brought to you in partnership with Vincere, the Recruitment Operating System. The all-in-one tech platform, purposefully built for recruitment & staffing to unify your Front, Middle & Back office operations. Vincere is designed by recruiters, for recruiters. Both the company and the platform are the unique creations of successful recruiters who sold their business, saw a need for better rec tech, and made it happen. If you're looking to upgrade your recruitment tech and give your recruiters a new, modern OS, visit vincere.io/pozcast for an exclusive offer. Thanks If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a review: https://ratethispodcast.com/thepozcast #thePOZcast is brought to you by our friends at Interseller – the prospecting + outreach platform of recruiters and sellers. Whether you're doubling down on business development or recruiting talent, Interseller does all the heavy lifting of finding contact data, automating the email and follow-up process, and syncs all that rich data into 20+ CRMs and ATSs. Reach out and get going in a 2-week *free* trial today and let them know you heard about them from Adam on #thePOZcast. Check out a free demo today! https://bit.ly/2Fbm/BZ For more, please visit www.thePOZcast.com

Wizard and the Bruiser
Mythbusters

Wizard and the Bruiser

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 69:50 Very Popular


This week Holden and Jake explore the history behind Mybusters and bust, as well as confirm, some myths about the classic series! Want even more WizBru? Support us on Patreon! Patreon.com/WizBru

ASCP Esty Talk
Ep 125 - MythBusters: Skin Care Advice and the Internet

ASCP Esty Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 25:49 Very Popular


In a time where much of our advice comes from the internet, how does one navigate something as unique and personal as skin care advice? Many turn to online advisors or influencers without clarifying their qualifications. In this episode, we offer our own advice, busting 3 myths that you may not have considered in your search. ASCP Esty Talk with Maggie Staszcuk and Ella Cressman Produced by Associated Skin Care Professionals (ASCP) for licensed estheticians, ASCP Esty Talk is a weekly podcast hosted by Maggie Staszcuk and Ella Cressman. We see your passion, innovation, and hard work and are here to support you by providing a platform for networking, advocacy, camaraderie, and education. We aim to inspire you to ask the right questions, find your motivation, and give you the courage to have the professional skin care career you desire. About Ella Cressman: Ella Cressman is a licensed esthetician, certified organic formulator, business owner, and absolute ingredient junkie! As an educator, she enjoys empowering other estheticians and industry professionals to understand skin care from an ingredient standpoint rather than a product-specific view. She has spent many hours researching ingredients, understanding how and where they are sourced, as well as phytochemistry, histological access, and complementary compounds for intentional skin benefits. In addition to running a skin care practice, Cressman founded a comprehensive consulting group, the HHP Collective, and has consulted for several skin care lines, including several successful CBD brands.   Connect with Ella Cressman:   Website: www.ellacress.com   Website: www.hhpcollective.com   About Maggie Staszcuk: Maggie has been a licensed esthetician since 2006 and holds a bachelor's degree in business administration from Stephens College. She has worked in the spa and med-spa industry and served as an esthetics instructor and a director of education for one of the largest schools in Colorado before coming to ASCP as the Advanced Modality Specialist.     Connect with Maggie:    P 800.789.0411 EXT 1636   E MStaszcuk@ascpskincare.com or AMI@ascpskincare.com   About our Sponsors:   Truth Treatment Systems, developed by Benjamin Knight Fuchs, registered pharmacist, nutritionist, skin care chemist, and star of the Rogue Pharmacist podcast series on ASCP Esty Talk, was founded with a scientific and holistic approach to skin care—always taking into consideration the mind, body, skin connection.   Benjamin Knight Fuchs has been developing pharmacy-potent skin health products for estheticians, dermatologists, and plastic surgeons for 30+ years. He believes correcting the skin is about the health of the skin, which directly correlates to the overall health of the body. If you want the “Truth” on results-driven skin care, visit www.truthtreatmentspro.com or download the Truth360 app anywhere apps are found. Get instant access to continuing education from Benjamin Knight Fuchs and Truth Treatment Systems line of products.  ASCP members receive a $70 discount on the VIP PRO Level subscription on the Truth 360 app.  Only $29.95 per month for ASCP members! Log in to your ASCP account and sign up today. For more information on Truth Treatment Systems Products www.truthtreatmentspro.com ASCP Members: Truth360 App Discount   Elleebana continues to push the treatment evolution envelope and influence the global market. Company Director, Otto Mitter is a qualified Cosmetic Chemist of the Institute of Personal Care Science and award-winning global & lash brow educator. Highly passionate about product ingredients, research and development and ongoing education, Otto is the innovator for the world famous Elleebana One Shot Lash Lift system, Elleeplex ReGEN and Elleebana Brow Henna, as well as Co-Producer of the Belmacil Lash & Brow Tinting System. Otto continues to extend the boundaries of product development within the world of beauty and in collaboration with other world leaders in the industry.   Website: https://elleebana-usa.com/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/elleebanausa   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elleebanausa/   About Associated Skin Care Professionals (ASCP):   Associated Skin Care Professionals (ASCP) is the nation's largest association for skin care professionals and your ONLY all-inclusive source for professional liability insurance, education, community, and career support. For estheticians at every stage of the journey, ASCP is your essential partner. Get in touch with us today if you have any questions or would like to join and become an ASCP member.   Connect with ASCP:   Website: www.ascpskincare.com   Email: getconnected@ascpskincare.com   Phone: 800-789-0411   Facebook: www.facebook.com/ASCPskincare   Instagram: www.instagram.com/ascpskincare    

Broke Car Snobs
AJ is a MythBuster, Bruce is a Pokémon, Adam is a masochist | BCS Ep S02E21

Broke Car Snobs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 72:54


In this week's episode, we bring the jungle to the city by playing Jumanji. Adam goes into detail about why his day was awful when this was recorded. RS4 woes abound, from broken Servotronic valves to torn axle boots, the finish line is within sight to getting the High Mileage Hero back on the road. Since last weekend was also Father's Day, AJ brings us the top gifts if your father also happens to be a petrolhead. In the second half, another truck hits the Onondaga Lake Parkway bridge. We talk the Lightyear 0 (zero), a new EV that can allegedly go months without being charged. Partially thanks to solar panel tech on the car, and a larger battery. Audi is getting crazy with their headlight tech again, this time in the form of lights that can change opacity as well as what design becomes opaque. Michigan becomes the third state to legalize "digital" license plates - a device installed in place of your regular plate, that is actually a digital display that shows your tag. Finally, AJ brings us the trivia in the form of the "Top 10 Collectible Cars", car myths (or not), and some True or False questions. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brokecarsnobs/message

Down Time with Cranston Public Library
113 - Roger Williams Park Natural History Museum & Botanical Center

Down Time with Cranston Public Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:18


This week Tayla is joined by Lee Ann Freitas from the Roger Williams Park Botanical Center and Renee Gamba from the Roger Williams Park Natural History Museum. Many people know the Roger Williams Park Zoo, but our guests join us to discuss some of the other attractions at the park. They also discussed mushrooms and sci-fi books. During The Last Chapter they discuss the question: What is the first book you decided to re-read and why? Like what you hear? Rate and review Down Time on Apple Podcasts or your podcast player of choice! If you'd like to submit a topic for The Last Chapter you can send your topic suggestions to downtime@cranstonlibrary.org. Our theme music is Day Trips by Ketsa and our ad music is Happy Ukulele by Scott Holmes. Thanks for listening! Books Entangled Life by Merlin Sheldrake Gardens of the High Line by Piet Oudolf & Rick Darke Queen's Hope by E. K. Johnston Artemis by Andy Weir Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir Dune by Frank Herbert Must Love Dogs by Claire Cook Cat's Eye by Margaret Atwood The Shipping News by E. Annie Proulx The Stand by Stephen King Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut Fun Home by Alison Bechdel Are You My Mother? by Alison Bechdel AV Dune (2021) Fantastic Fungi (2019) Stranger Things (2016- ) Ted Lasso (2020- ) Obi-Wan Kenobi (2022) MythBusters (2003-2018) Adam Savage's Tested (YouTube) Other Museum of Natural History and Planetarium, Roger Williams Park, Providence, RI Roger Williams Park Botanical Center, Providence, RI James Webb Space Telescope, NASA Cranston Public Library 2022 Adult Summer Reading

Beef And Dairy Network
Episode 85 - Medical Mythbusters

Beef And Dairy Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 33:19


Tom Neenan joins in this month as we ask Dr Sam Archer to bust some medical myths which are prevalent amongst beef and dairy industry workers.Stock media provided by Setuniman/Pond5.com and Soundrangers/Pond5.com  

Culture Factor 2.0
Will Pemble: Backyard Rollercoasters and Digital NFT Simulator Experiences

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 56:23


Will Pemble is a Web1 Pioneer, a Web2 Leader, and a Web3 Futurist. He built and sold Web.com, one of the first and largest domain name registrars on earth. As a Top 50 Domain Name Millionaire, technology futurist, and serial entrepreneur, Will has been building and growing tech companies since before the days of Web1.Will's latest adventure is CoasterPunks.com, an NFT Collection on a mission to build the world's first carbon neutral roller coaster thrill ride, a 200,000 watt solar farm, and an 8 episode educational TV series executive produced by Mythbuster Kari Byron and EXPLR Media.Will has built five backyard roller coasters and been featured on Good Morning America, Discovery Channel, Netflix, Facebook Watch, and dozens of television shows worldwide.New adventurers in Web 3 seem to think that it is separate and built independently of Web2, being a pioneer of Web1 and a leader in Web2, what do you think?Digging into CoasterPunks, your NFT collection, is a digital and phigital experience on a roller coaster? and is the digital footprint carbon neutral bc it minted on a blockchain that is by design low gas?If phitigal experience, is this at Disney? or any other amusement parks?Left-field questions:Your solar farm will support how many acres? And can people buy an NFT to have a stake in the generated power and/or the dollars created? OR a stake in the farm it supports? Like a shared agriculture model?What is the TV series you are creating and will it be on the blockchain?CoasterPunks websiteWill Pemble, TwitterWill Pemble, YouTubeWill Pemble, InstagramHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, TwitterWatch an episode with a former Playboy Playmate #build #rollercoaster #roadmap #mardigras #adventure #community #solarfarm #web.com #futurism #domain #entrepreneur #coasterpunks #coasterpunksnft #mythbusters #karibyron #exploremedia #hackaday #guykawasaki #gusmachado #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #bitcoin #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #community #decentralizedeconomy

Chasing Your Best, TC Golf
MYTHBUSTERS - The Golf EDITION!

Chasing Your Best, TC Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 10:48


PGA Golf Instructor Tim Connor rants about things in golf that interpreted the wrong way. This is a fun episode where we go through common things that could be less than true!  TOPICS INCLUDE: mythbusters golf edition, common practices, keep your head down, you're swinging too hard, plenty of fun little riffs about golf and golf instruction NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL - TIM CONNOR GOLF  Get on my EMAIL LIST

Voices of Excellence from Arts and Sciences
Jesse Fox: Virtual reality mythbuster

Voices of Excellence from Arts and Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 30:47


Jesse Fox, associate professor in the school of communication, researches the effects and implications of new media technologies, including virtual worlds, video games, social network sites, and mobile applications. Virtual reality has gone through booms and busts in the 15 years she's been studying it, so she talks about what it can and cannot do (ex., VR isn't an empathy machine) with David Staley on this week's Voices of Excellence

Nitty Gritty Training
Nitty Gritty Mythbusters

Nitty Gritty Training

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 57:05 Very Popular


OCR Champion Faye Stenning and Olympian Jess O'Connell, have brought their coaching platform to the Obstacle Racing Media family of podcasts. This week, we break down a few common fitness myths that we see in the media or come up with our coaching clients.  We chat about everything from nutrition to training paces to tech and know that clearing up a few of these misconceptions can greatly help your training!  Faye Jess Coaching Website Listen to this and all Nitty Gritty episodes here

The Friendship Onion
Billy & Dom Talk to Adam Savage!

The Friendship Onion

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 67:07 Very Popular


Billy & Dom talk about the scariest horror films they've seen before diving into an interview with Adam Savage as he discusses how he got started, his relationship with WETA Workshop and Peter Jackson, crafting swords, his time on Mythbusters, and his future projects! Adam Whitney Savage is an American special effects designer and fabricator, actor, educator, and television personality and producer, best known as the former co-host of the Discovery Channel television series MythBusters and Unchained Reaction. Get your Friendship Onion merchandise at https://www.thefriendshiponionpodcast.com! Tune in every Tuesday for new episodes and please be sure to rate, subscribe, and leave a comment/review! And be sure to follow and add your favorite funky jams to our Spotify playlist "The Friendship Onion." Feel free to leave Billy and Dom a message with your comments, questions, or just to say hello at https://www.speakpipe.com/thefriendshiponion or write us an email at thefriendshiponion@kastmedia.com TFO's IG - @thefriendshiponion Billy's IG - @boydbilly Dom's IG - @dom_monaghan_ Adam's Twitter  Adam's YouTube Channel Produced by Jon Cvack - IG: @jcvack To score 15% off your Blenders purchase, visit blenderseyewear.com and enter promo code onionvip. Receive 20% off PLUS Free Shipping on your order. I recommend trying their variety pack. Go to DRINKOLIPOP.com/ONION or use code ONION at checkout to claim this deal.  Go to wren.co/ONION, sign up, and they'll plant 10 extra trees in your name! Go to magicspoon.com/ONION to grab a custom bundle of cereal! And be sure to use our promo code ONION at checkout to save five dollars off your order! Get an extra three months of ExpressVPN free at EXPRESSVPN.com/onion.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Build Me Up
Myth Busters: Construction Trade Unions Edition

Build Me Up

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 43:57


This episode, we're joined by Barry Davies, Barb Pecks, and Terry Coleman — individuals all involved in various ways with construction trade unions. The trio helps us debunk stereotypes and common misconceptions associated with trade unions in this myth-busters-esque episode.

Momsfessions Podcast
Adoption Myth Busters :: Momfessions Podcast :: Episode 73

Momsfessions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 36:37


What adoption myths still exist in American culture? Learn more about this evolving conversation by listening to this episode -- and sharing it with others.

GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast
Uncle Tim's Mythbusters

GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 118:29


MYTHBUSTERS Today, Uncle Tim makes his triumphant return to the podcast to deliver a cornucopia of busted myths and preposterous facts that he has uncovered during research for gymnastics-history.com, including: Why was the Sydney vault too low? We finally know! The (less exciting) real story of Vera Caslavska, Larisa Petrik, and the 1968 floor final A 1968 beam protest A men's judging fight! Plus, Jessica and Spencer go head-to-head in a gymnastics history True/False quiz JOIN CLUB GYM NERD Join Club Gym Nerd (or give it as a gift!) for access to Behind the Scenes episodes. Buy our awesome clothing and gifts here. We have a Ukraine Fundraiser design, all proceeds go to the CARE Ukraine Crisis fund. RELATED EPISODES & RESOURCES Donate grips and tape for Ukrainian gymnasts Donate to family of Alabama volunteer assistant coach in Ukraine To follow the effects of the Russian invasion to Ukraine on gymnastics, go to Gymnovosti Athletistry GYMKATA Myths, Legends, and Unexpected Moments Part 1 Myths, Legends, and Unexpected Moments Part 2 The Leotard Episode: Part Deux NCAA Championships

The Bike Shed
338: Meticulously Wrong

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 45:52


Chris switched from Trello over to Linear for product management and talks about prioritizing backlogs. Steph shares and discusses a tweet from Curtis Einsmann that super resonated with the work she's doing right now: "In software engineering, rabbit holes are inevitable. You will research libraries and not use them. You'll write code just to delete it. This isn't a waste; sometimes, you need to go down a few wrong paths to get to the right one." This episode is brought to you by BuildPulse (https://buildpulse.io/bikeshed). Start your 14-day free trial of BuildPulse today. Linear (https://linear.app/) Curtis Einsmann Tweet (https://twitter.com/curtiseinsmann/status/1521451508943843329) Louie Bacaj Tweet (https://twitter.com/LBacaj/status/1478241322637033474?s=20) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: AD: Flaky tests take the joy out of programming. You push up some code, wait for the tests to run, and the build fails because of a test that has nothing to do with your change. So you click rebuild and you wait. Again. And you hope you're lucky enough to get a passing build this time. Flaky tests slow everyone down, break your flow and make things downright miserable. In a perfect world, tests would only break if there's a legitimate problem that would impact production. They'd fail immediately and consistently, not intermittently. But the world's not perfect, and flaky tests will happen, and you don't have time to fix them all today. So how do you know where to start? BuildPulse automatically detects and tracks your team's flaky tests. Better still, it pinpoints the ones that are disrupting your team the most. With this list of top offenders, you'll know exactly where to focus your effort for maximum impact on making your builds more stable. In fact, the team at Codecademy was able to identify their flakiest tests with BuildPulse in just a few days. By focusing on those tests first, they reduced their flaky builds by more than 68% in less than a month! And you can do the same because BuildPulse integrates with the tools you're already using. It supports all the major CI systems, including CircleCI, GitHub Actions, Jenkins, and others. And it analyzes test results for all popular test frameworks and programming languages, like RSpec, Jest, Go, pytest, PHPUnit, and more. So stop letting flaky tests slow you down. Start your 14-day free trial of BuildPulse today. To learn more, visit buildpulse.io/bikeshed. That's buildpulse.io/bikeshed. CHRIS: Good morning, and welcome to Tech Talk with Steph and Chris. Today at the top of the hour, it's tech traffic hits. STEPH: Ooh, tech traffic. [laughs] I like that statement. CHRIS: Yeah. The Git lanes are clogged up with...I don't know. I got nothing. STEPH: [laughs] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, hey, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: What's new in my world? Actually, I have a specific new thing that I can share, which is, as of the past week, I would say, switched from Trello over to Linear for product management. It's been great. It was a super straightforward transfer. They actually had an importer. We lost some of the comment threads on the Trello cards. But that was easy enough to like each Linear ticket has a link back to Trello. So it's easy enough to keep the continuity. But yeah, we're in a whole new world, a system actually built for maintaining a product backlog, and, man, it shows. Trello was a bunch of lists and cards and stuff that you could link between, which was cool. But Linear is just much more purpose-built and already very, very nice. And we're very happy with the switch. STEPH: I feel like you came in real casual with that news, but that is big news, that you did a switch. [laughter] CHRIS: How are you going to bury the lead like that? You switched project management...[laughter] I actually didn't think it was...I'm excited about it but low-key excited, which is weird because I do like productivity and task management software. So you would think I would be really excited about this. But I've also tried enough of them historically to know that that's never going to be the thing that actually makes or breaks your team's productivity. It can make things worse, but it can't make you great. That's the thing that I believe. And so it's a wonderful piece of software. I'm very excited about it but -- STEPH: Ooh, I like that. It can make you worse, but it doesn't make you great. That's so true, yeah, where it causes pain. Well, and it does make sense. You've been complaining a bit about the whole login with Trello and how that's been frustrating. But I haven't even heard of Linear. That's just...that's, I mean, you're just doing what you do where you bring that new-new. I haven't heard of Linear before. CHRIS: I try to live on the cutting edge. Actually, I deeply try to not live on the cutting edge at this point in my life. That early adopter wave, no, no, no, that's not for me anymore. But I've known a few folks who've moved to Linear. And everyone that I've spoken to who has moved to it has been like, "Yeah, it's been great." I've not heard anything negative. And I've heard or experienced negative things about every other product management tool out there. And so, it seemed like an easy thing. And it was a low-cost enough switch in terms of opportunity costs or the like, it took the effort of someone on our team moving those cards over and setting up the new system and training, but it was relatively straightforward. And yeah, we're super happy with it. And it feels different now. I feel like I can see the work in a different way which is interesting. I think we had brought in a Chrome extension for Trello. I think it's like Hello Epics or something like that that allows...it abuses the card linking functionality in Trello and repurchases that feature as an epic management thing. But it's quarter-baked is how I would describe it, or it's clearly built on top of existing things that were not intended to be used exactly in that way. So it does a great job. Hello Epics does a great job of trying to make something like parent-child list management stuff happen in Trello. But it's always going feel like an afterthought, a secondary feature, something that's bolted on. Whereas in Linear, it's like, no, no, we absolutely have the idea of projects, of course, and you can see burndown charts and things. And the thing that I do want to be careful about is not leaning too much into management. Linear has the idea of cycles or sprints, as many other folks think of them, or iterations or whatever you want to call them. But we've largely not been working in that mode. We've just continued to work through the next up list; that's it. The next up list should be prioritized and well defined at the top and roughly in priority order. So just pick up the next card and work on it. And we just do that every single day. And now we're in a piece of software that has the idea of cycles, and I'm like, oh, this is vaguely interesting. Do we want to do that? Oh, but if you're going to do that, you probably do some estimation, right? And I was like, oh no, now we're into a place that's...okay, I have feelings. I got to decide how to approach that. And so, I am intrigued. And I wonder if we could just say like ten carts that's how many come into a cycle, and that's it. And we use the loosest heuristics possible to define how we structure a cycle so that we don't fall into the trap of, oh, what's our roadmap going to look like six months from now? JK, what's anything going to look like six months from now? That's not a knowable fact. STEPH: I was just thinking where you said that you're moving into sprints or cycles, and then there's that push, well, now you got to estimate. And I just thought, do you? Do you have to estimate? [laughs] CHRIS: We need a burndown chart through 2024, and it must be meticulously accurate down to the hour. STEPH: I think meticulously wrong is how that goes. [laughs] CHRIS: Which is the best kind of wrong. If you're going to be wrong, be meticulous about it. STEPH: Be thorough about it. [laughs] Yeah, the team that I'm on right now, we have our bi-weekly planning, and we go through the board, and we pull stuff in. But there's never a discussion about estimation. And I hadn't really appreciated that until just now. How we don't think about how long is this going to take? We just talked about, well, what's in-flight? And how much work do people still have going on? And then here's the list of things we can pull in. But there's always a list that you can go back to. Like, it's very...we pull in the minimum and knowing that if we run out of work, there's another place to go where there's stuff that's organized. And I just love that cadence, that idea of like, let's not try to make guesses about the future; let's just have it lined up and ready for us to go when we're ready to pull it in. Although I know, that's also coming from a very developer's perspective, and there are product managers who are trying to communicate as to when features are going to get out into the world. So I get that there's a balance, but I still have strong feelings and hesitations around estimating work. CHRIS: Well, I feel like there is a balance there. And so many things in history are like, well, this is an overcorrection against that, and that's an overcorrection against this. And the idea that we can estimate our work that far out into the future that's just obviously false to me based on every project I've ever worked on that has tried to do it. And it has always failed without question. But critically, there is the necessity to sync up work and like, oh, marketing needs to plan the launch of this feature, and it's a critical one. What's it going to look like? When's it going to be ready? You know, we're trying to go for an event, it's not just know...we developers never estimate anything past the immediate moment where like, that's not acceptable. We got to find a middle ground here. But where that middle ground is, is interesting. And so, just operating in the sort of we do work as it comes up is the easiest thing because no one's lying about anything at that point. But sometimes you got to make some guesses and make some estimations. And then it gets into the murky area of I believe with 75% confidence that in three weeks, we will have this feature ready. But to be clear, I said with 75% confidence that means one-quarter of the time; we will not be there at that date. What does that mean? What does that failure mode look like? Let's talk about that. And can you have honest, open, transparent, useful conversations there? That's the space that it becomes more subtle if you need to do that. STEPH: You're reminding me of a conversation that I had with someone where they shared with me some very aggressive team goals. And it was a very friendly conversation. And they're like, "How do you feel about aggressive goals?" And I was like, "Well, it depends. How do you feel about aggressive failure?" Because then once I know where you stand there, then we can talk about aggressive goals. Now, if we're being aggressive, but then we fail to achieve that, and it's one of those, okay, we didn't meet the goal that we'd expected, but everything is fine, and it's not a big deal, then I am okay. Sure, let's shoot for the stars. But if it's one of those, we are communicating these goals to the outside world, and it's going to become incredibly important that we meet these goals, and if we don't, then things are going to go on fire, people are going to be in trouble, and it's just going to be awful, then let's not set aggressive goals. Let's not box ourselves into a space where we are setting ourselves up to fail or feel pain in a meaningful way. I agree that estimations are important, especially in terms of you need to collaborate with other departments, and then also just to provide some sense of where the product is headed and when things may be released. I think estimations then just become problematic when they do become definite, and they're based on so many unknowns, and then when I don't know is not an answer. So if someone asked, "What's your estimate for this?" And the very honest real answer is I don't know, like, we haven't done this type of work before, or these are all the unknowns, and then someone's like, "Well, let's just put an estimation of like two weeks on it," and they just sort of try to force-fit it into being what they want, then that's where it starts to just feel incredibly problematic. CHRIS: Yeah, estimation is a very murky area that we could spend entire episodes talking about, and in fact, I think we have a handful of times. So with that, Linear has been great. We're going to see just how much or how little estimation we actually want to do. But it's been a very nice addition to the toolset. And I'll let you know as we deepen our usage of it what the experience is like, but that's the main thing that's new in my world. What's new in your world? STEPH: Well, before we bounce over to my world, you said something that has intrigued me that has also made me start reflecting on some of the ways that I like to work. And you'd mentioned that you have this prioritized backlog that people are pulling tickets from. And I don't know exactly if there's a planning session or how that looks, but I have recognized that when I am working with a team, and we don't have any planning session, if everybody is just pulling from this backlog, that's being prioritized by someone on the team, that I find that a bit overwhelming. Because the types of work being done can vary so drastically that I find I'm less able to help my colleagues or my teammates because I don't have the context for what they're working on. It surprises me. I'm like, oh, I didn't even know we're working on that feature, or I don't have the context for what's the problem that we're trying to solve here. And it makes it just a lot harder to review and then have conversations with them. And I get overwhelmed in that environment. And I've recognized that about myself based on previous projects that were more similar to that versus if I'm on a project where the team does get together every so often, even if it's high level to be like, hey, here's the theme of the tickets that we're working on, or here's just some of the stuff, then I feel much more prepared for the work that is coming in and to be able to context switch and review. And yeah, so I've kind of learned that about myself. I'm curious, are you similar, or how does that work for you? CHRIS: I'm definitely similar. And I think probably the team is closer to what you're describing. So we do have a planning session every week, just a quick 30-minute scan through the backlog, look at the things that are coming up and also the larger themes. Previously, Epics and Trello now projects and Linear. But talking about what are the bigger pieces of work that we're moving on, and then what are the individual tickets associated with that that we'll be expecting to work on in the next week? And just making sure that everyone has broad clarity around what that feature set is. Also, we're a very small team at this point. Still, we're four people total, but one of the developers is on a break for a couple of weeks this summer. And so there are really only three of us that are driving on the code. And so, with three of us working on the projects, we try very intentionally to have significant overlap between the various...like, we don't want any one person to own any portion of things at this point. And so we're doing a good amount of pairing to cross-pollinate and make sure everyone's...not everyone's aware of everything, but at least one other person is sufficiently aware of everything between the three of us. And I think that's been working well. I don't think we have any major gaps, save for the way that we're doing our mobile architecture that's largely managed by one of the developers on the team and a contractor that we're working with to help do a lot of the implementation. That's a known we chose to silo that thing. We've accepted the cost of that for now. And architecturally, the rest of us are aware of it, but we're not like in the Swift code writing anything because I don't know how to write Swift at this point. I'd love to learn it. I hear good things about the language. [12:26] So yeah, I think conceptually very similar to what you're describing of still want to have people be able to review. Like, I don't want to put up a PR and people be like, I don't know, that looks like code, I guess. I'm not sure what it does. Like, I want it to be very...I want us all to be roughly on the same page, and thus far, we are. As the team grows, that will become trickier to maintain because there are just inherently probably more things that are moving, more different feature areas and surface area that we're tackling in any given week, or there are different ways to approach that. I know you've talked about having a limited number of themes for a given cycle, so that's an idea that can pop up. But that's something that we'll figure out as we get further. I think I'm happy with where we're at right now, so yeah, that's the story there. STEPH: Okay, cool. Yeah, all of that resonates with me, and thinking about it a little more deeply in this moment, I'm realizing I think something you said helped me put this together where when I'm reviewing someone's change, I'm not necessarily just looking to see does your code work? I'm going to trust you that your code works. I may have thoughts about design and other things, but I really want to understand more what's the change to the product that we're making? What's the goal that we're looking to achieve? How are we measuring this? And so if I don't have that context, that's what contributes to that feeling of like, hard context switching of not just context switching, but now I have to level myself up to then understand the problem that's being solved by this. Versus had I known some of the themes going into that particular cycle or sprint, I would have felt far more prepared for that review session versus having to then dig through all the data and/or tickets or talk to someone. Well, switching back to what's going on in my world, I have a particular tweet that I want to share, and it's one that Joël Quenneville brought to my attention. And it just resonates so much with all the type of work that I'm doing right now. So I'm going to read the tweet, and then we'll link to it in the show notes as well. But it's from Curtis Einsmann, and Curtis wrote: "In software engineering, rabbit holes are inevitable. You will research libraries and not use them. You'll write code just to delete it. This isn't a waste; sometimes, you need to go down a few wrong paths to get to the right one." And that describes all the work that I'm doing right now. It's a lot of exploratory, a lot of data-driven work, and finding ways that we can reduce the time that it takes to run RSpec on CI. And it also ties in nicely to one of the things that I think we talked about last week, where we discovered that a number of files have a high runtime variance. And I've really dug into the data there to understand, okay, is it always specific files that have these high runtime variants? Are there any obvious contributions to what's causing this? Are we making real network calls that then could sometimes take a long time to return? And the result is there's nothing obvious. They're giant files. The number of SQL commands that are being run for each file varies drastically. They're all high, but it's still very different. There's no single fact about these files that has really been like, yes, this is what's causing these files to have such a runtime variance. And so while I've been in the data, I'm documenting it, and I'm making a list and putting it all together in a ticket so at least it's there to look at later. But I'm going to move on. It's one of those I would love to know what's causing this. I would love to address it because it would put us in an ideal state for how we're distributing tests, which would have a significant impact on our runtime. But it also feels a little bit like chasing my tail because I'm worried, like with some of the other experiments that we've done in the past where we've addressed tentpoles, that as soon as you address the issue for one or two files, then other files start having the same problem. And you're just going to continue to chase and chase, and I don't want to be in that. So upfront, this was one of those; hey, let's look at the data. If there's something obvious, let's address it; if not, move on. So I'm at that point today where I'm wrapping up all of that data, and then I'm going to move on, move on to the next thing. CHRIS: There's deep truth in that tweet that you shared at the start of this segment. The idea like if we knew the work that we had to do at the front, yeah, we would just do that, but often, we don't. And so, being able to not treat it as a failure when something doesn't work out is, I think, so critical. I think to expand on the idea just a tiny bit, the idea of the scientific method, failure is totally an option and is part of science. I remember watching MythBusters, and Adam Savage is just kind of like, "Failure is always an option," and highlighting that as part of it. Like, it's an outcome. You've learned something. You have a new data point. You can take that and then carry it forward with you. But it's rough in the moment. And so, I do think that this is a worthwhile thing to meditate on. And it's something that I've had to revisit a handful of times in my career of just like, man, I feel like I've just been spinning my tires all week. I'm like, we know what we want to get done, but just each approach I take isn't working for one reason or another. And then, finally, you get to the end. And then you've got this paragraph-long summary of all the things that didn't work in your PR and one-line change sort of thing. And those are painful, but they're part of the game. Like, that is unavoidable. I have not found a way to just know how to do the work upfront always. I would love that. I would sign up for whatever seminar was selling that. I wouldn't. I would know that that seminar is a lie, actually. But broadly, I'm intrigued by the idea if someone were selling that, I'd be like, well, I mean, pitch me on it. Tell me why I should believe you; I don't, just to be clear. But yeah. STEPH: This project has really helped me embrace always setting a goal or a question upfront about what I'm wanting to achieve or what I'm looking to answer because a number of times while Joël and I have been spelunking through data...And then so originally, with the saga, we started out with why doesn't our math match reality? We understand that if these tests are distributed perfectly across the CPUs, then that should cut the runtime in half. But yet, we weren't seeing that even though we had addressed the tentpoles. So we dug into understanding why. And the answer is because they're not perfectly distributed, and it's because of the runtime variance. And that was a critical moment to look back and say, "Did we achieve the goal?" Yes, we identified the problem. But once you see a problem, it's just so easy to dig in and keep going. It's like, well, now I want to know what's causing these files to have a runtime variance. But it's one of those we achieved our goal. We acknowledged upfront that we wanted to at least understand why. Let's make a second decision, do we keep going? And I'm at that point where, frankly, I probably dug in a little more than I should because I'm stubborn. But I'm recognizing that now's the time to back away and then go back and move on to the next high-priority item, which is converting for funsies; I'll share. The next thing is converting Test::Unit test over to RSpec because we have, I think, around 25 tests that are written in Test::Unit. And we want to move them over to RSpec because that particular just step in the build process takes a good three to four minutes. And part of that is just booting up Rails and then running the tests very fast. And we're underutilizing the machine that's running them because it's only 25 tests, but there are 86 CPUs to run it. So we'd really like to combine those 25 tests with the rest of the RSpec suite and drop that step. So then that should add minimal time to the overall build but then should take us down at least a couple of minutes. And then also makes it easier to manage and help folks so that way, there's one consistent testing framework that's in use versus having to manage some of these older tests. CHRIS: It's funny; I think it was just two episodes back where we talked about why RSpec, and I think both of us were just like, well yeah. But I mean, if there are tests and another, like, it's fine, you just leave them with the exception that if there's like 2% of our tests are in Test::Unit, and everything else is in RSpec, yeah, maybe that that conversion efforts seem totally worth it. But again, I think as you're describing that, what I'm hearing is just like the scientific method, just being somewhat structured in the approach to what's the hypothesis? And what's the procedure we're going to use to determine if that hypothesis is true or false? And then what do we do? And then what are the results? And then you just do that on loop. But being not just sort of exploring. Sometimes you have to be on exploratory mode. But I definitely find that that tiny bit of rigor of just like, wait, okay, before I actually do anything, what do I think is going on here? What's my guess? And then, okay, if that guess were true, what would I be able to observe in the world? Okay, here we go. And just that tiny bit of structure is so...it sometimes feels highly formal to go into that mode and be like, no, no, no, let me take a step back. Let me write down my thoughts. I'm going to have a little checklist and do the thing. But I've never regretted doing it. I will say that. I have deeply regretted not doing it. I feel like I should make a list of things that fit that structure. I've never regretted committing in Git ever. That's been great. I've always been able to unwind it, but I've never been able to not unwind it or the opposite. I've regretted not committing. I have not regretted committing. I have regretted not writing out my hypothesis or approach. I have not regretted doing it. And so, yeah, this feels like it falls firmly in that category of like, it's worth just a tiny bit of structure. There's a reason it is the scientific method. STEPH: Yeah, I agree. I've not regretted documenting upfront what it is I look to achieve and how I think I'm going to answer the question. That has been immensely helpful. Because then I also forget, like, two weeks ago, I'll be like, wasn't there a question around why this was happening, and I need to understand? And all of that was so context-heavy that as soon as I'm out of the thick of it, I completely forget it. So if I care about it deeply or if I want to be able to revisit it, then I need to document it for myself. It's given me a lot of empathy for people who do more scientific research around, oh my gosh, like, you have to document everything you do and then still be able to prove it five years from now or however long. I'm just throwing out numbers. And it needs to be organized enough that someone, if they do question your research that, then you have it there. My research documents would not withstand scrutiny at this point because they are still just more personal notes. But yes, it's given me a lot of empathy and respect for people who do run very serious research, experiments, and trials, and then have to be able to prove it to the world. Pivoting just a bit, there's a particular topic that resonated with both you and I; in fact, it's a particular tweet. And, Louie, I do apologize if I mispronounce your last name, but Louie Bacaj. And we'll include a link in the show notes to the tweet, but Louis shared, "I managed multiple engineering teams before quitting tech. Now that I quit, I can speak freely. Here are 12 things your manager may not be telling you, but I know for a fact will help you." So there are a number of interesting discussions and comments that are in this thread. The one thing in particular that really caught my attention is number 10, and it's "Advocate for junior developers." So they said that their friend reminded them that just because you don't have 10-plus years of experience does not mean that they won't be good. Without junior engineers on the team, no one will grow. Help others grow; you'll grow too. And that's the part that I love so much is that without junior engineers on the team, no one will grow because that was very thought-provoking for me. It's something that I find that I agree with deeply, but I hadn't really considered why I agree with that so much. So I'm excited to dive into that topic with you. And then, as a second topic to go along with that is, can juniors start with a remote team? I think that's one of the other questions when you and I were chatting about this. And I'm intrigued to hear your thoughts. CHRIS: A bunch of stuff there. Starting with the tweet, I love elements of this. Some of it feels like it's intentionally somewhat provocative. So like, without junior engineers on the team, no one will grow. That feels maybe a little bit past the bar because I think we can technically grow, and we can build things and whatnot. But I think what feels deeply true to me is truly help others grow; you'll grow too. The act of mentoring, of guiding, of training, of helping someone on their journey will inherently help you grow and, I think, change the way that you think about the work. I think the beginner mind, the earlier in the career folks coming into a codebase, they will see things fundamentally differently in a really useful way. It's possible that along your career, you've just internalized things. You've been like, yeah, no, that was weird. But then I smashed my head against it for a while, and now I understand this thing. And it just makes sense to me. But it's like, that thing actually doesn't make sense. You have warped your mind to match the thing, not, quote, unquote, "come to understand it." This is sounding too judgmental to people who've been in the industry for a while, but I found this of myself. Or I can just take for granted things that took a long time to adapt my head to, and if anything, maybe I should have pushed back a little more. And so, I find that junior engineers can be a really fantastic lens for the complexity of a project. Like, the world is truly a complex place, and that's just true. But our job as software engineers is to tame that complexity and manage it. And so, I love the mindset that can come or the conversations that can come out of that. And it's much like test-driven development is a pressure on the complexity of your code, having junior engineers join the team and needing to explain how all of the different features work, and what the overall architecture is, and the message passing under this and that, it's a really useful conversation to have. And so that "Help others grow; you'll grow too" feels deeply, deeply true to me. STEPH: Yeah, I couldn't agree more in regards to how juniors really help our team and especially, as you mentioned, with complexity and ¬having those conversations. Some of the other things that have come to mind for me as well around the importance of having junior developers on your team...and maybe it's not specifically they're junior developers but that you just have a variety of experience on your team. It's going to help you lean into a culture of learning because you have people that are at different stages of their career. And so you want an environment where people can learn together, that they can fail together, and they can be public about it. And having people that are at different stages of their career will lead, well, at least ideally, it'll lead to more pair programming. It's going to lead to more productive code reviews because then people can ask more questions around why did you choose this, or why are you doing that? Versus if everybody is at the same level, then they may just intuitively have reasons that they think someone did something. But it takes someone that's a bit new to say, "Hey, why did you choose this?" or to bring up some other ideas or ways that they could pursue it. They may bring in new ideas for, like, why has the team always done something this way? Let's think about new ways that we could do this. Or maybe this is really unfriendly, the way that we're doing this, not just for junior people but for people that are new to the team. And then there's typically less knowledge siloing because then you're going to want to pair the newer folks with the more experienced folks. So that way, you don't have this more senior developer who's then off in a corner working by themselves. And it's going to improve your communication skills. There's just...I realized I'm just rambling because I feel like there are so many benefits that go along with having a variety of people on your team, especially in terms of experience. And that just leads to such a better learning environment and, ultimately, better software and better products. And yet, I find that so many companies won't embrace people that are newer to software. They always want the senior developers. They want the 10x-er or whatever those are. They want the people that have many, many years of experience. And there's so much value that comes from mentoring the next group of developers. And it's incredibly frustrating to me that one, companies often aren't open to it. But honestly, more than that, as long as you're upfront and honest about like, hey, this is the team that we need right now to build what we're looking to build, I can get past that; I can understand that. But please don't then mislead people and say that you're a junior-friendly team, and then not be prepared. I feel like some teams will go so far as to say, "Yes, we are junior-friendly," and they may even tweak their interview process to where it is a bit more junior-friendly. But then, by the time that person joins the team, they're really not prepared. They don't have an onboarding plan. They don't have a mentorship plan. And then they fail that person because that person has worked hard to get there. And they've worked hard to bring that person onto the team, but then they don't have a plan from there. And I've seen it too many times. And it just frustrates me so much because it puts that junior person in such a vulnerable state where they really have to be an incredible self-advocate to then overcome those hurdles from a lack of preparation on that company's part. Okay, I think that's my event. I'm sure I could vent about this a lot more, but I will cut it off there. That's the heart of it. CHRIS: I do think, like, with anything else, it's something that we have to be intentional about. And so what you're saying of like, yeah, we're a junior-friendly company, but then you're just hiring folks, trying to find folks that may work at a slightly lower pay grade, and that's what that means to you. So like, no, no, that's not what this is. This needs to be something different. We need to have a structure and an organization that can support folks at different points in their career. But it's interesting to me to think about the sort of why of it. And the earlier part of this conversation, we talked about some of the benefits that can come organizationally from it, and I do sincerely believe in that. But I also believe that it is fundamentally one of the best ways to find really talented people early on in their career and be in a position to hire them where maybe later on in their career, that just wouldn't happen naturally. And I've seen this play out in a number of organizations. I went to Northeastern University for my college, and Northeastern is famous for the co-op program. Northeastern sounds really fancy. Now I learned that they have like a 7% acceptance rate for college applications right now, which is wildly low. When I went to Northeastern, it was not so fancy. So just in case anyone's hearing that and they're like, "Oh, Northeastern, wow." I'm not that fancy. [laughs] But they did have the co-op then, and they still have it now. And the co-op really is a differentiating thing. You do three six-month rotations. And it is this fundamental differentiator in terms of when you're graduating. Particularly, I was in mechanical engineering. I came out, and I actually knew what that meant in the world. And I'd used Outlook, and I knew what a water cooler was and how to talk near one because that's a critical thing to learn in the world. And really transformative experience for me. But also, a thing that I observed was many of my friends ended up working at companies that they had co-opted for. I'm one of those people. I would say more than 50% of my friends ended up with a position at a company that they had done a co-op rotation with. And it really worked out fantastically. That organization and the individual got to try things out, experience. And then, I ended up staying at that company for a number of years, and it was a wonderful experience. But I don't know that I would have ended up there otherwise. That's not necessarily the way that would have played out. And similarly like, thoughtbot has the apprenticeship. And I have seen so many wonderful developers start at that very early point in their career. And there was this wonderful structure around them joining the thoughtbot team, intentional, structured, supported. And then those folks went on to be some of the most talented developers that I've ever worked with at a wonderfully talented organization. And so the story of like, you should do this, organizations. This is a thing that you should invest in for yourself, not just for the individual, like, for both. Everybody wins in this case, in my mind. I will say, though, in terms of transparency, I currently manage a team of three developers. And we hired very intentionally for senior folks this early on in where we're at. And that was an intentional choice because I do believe that if you're going to be hiring more junior developers, that needs to be something that you do very intentionally, that you have a support structure in place, that you're able to invest the time in where they're at and make sure we have sort of... I think a larger team makes more sense to bring juniors into broadly. That's the thing that I'm saying out loud that I'm like, I should push on that a little bit. Is that true? Do I really believe that? But I think so, my actions obviously point to it. But it is an interesting trade-off space of how do you think about that? My hope is that as we grow as an organization, that we would then very intentionally start hiring folks in a more junior, mid-level to junior and be very intentional about how we support them, bring them into the organization, et cetera. I do believe it is a win-win situation for everyone when done with intention and with focus. STEPH: That's such an interesting bit that you just said because I very much appreciate when companies recognize do we have the bandwidth to support someone that's more junior? Because at thoughtbot, we go through periods where we don't have our apprenticeship that's open because we recognize we're not in a place that we can support someone. And we don't want to bring someone in unless we can help them be successful. I very much admire that and appreciate that about companies when they can perform that self-assessment. I am so intrigued. You'd mentioned being a smaller team. So you more intentionally hire senior developers. And I think that also makes sense because then you need to build up who's going to be in that mentorship pool? Because then people could leave, people could take vacations, and so then you need to have that support system in place. But yeah, I don't know what that then perfect balance is. It's like, okay, so then as soon as you have like five people available to mentor or interested in mentorship, it's like, then do you start bringing in the conversation of like, let's bring in someone that we can help build up and help them be successful and join our team? And I don't know what that magical number is. I do think it's important for teams to reflect to say, "Can we take on someone that's junior?" All the benefits of having someone that's junior. And then just being very honest and then having a plan for once that junior person does arrive. What does their career path look like while they've joined that team, and who's going to be that person that's going to help them level up? So not only make that choice upfront of yes, we are bringing someone on but let's also think about like the first six months of their work here at the company and what that's going to look like. It feels like an important step that a lot of companies fail to do. And I think that's why there are so many articles that then are like, hey, if you're a junior dev, here's all the things that you should do to be the best junior dev. That's fabulous. And we're constantly shoring up junior devs to be like, hey, here's all the things that you need to be great at. But we don't have as many conversations around; hey, here's all the things that your manager or the rest of your team should be great at to then support you equally as you are also doing your best to meet them. Like, they need to meet you halfway. And I'm not completely unsympathetic to the plight; I understand. It's often where I've seen with teams the more senior developers that have very strong mentorship communication skills are then also the teammates that get pulled into all the meetings and all the different projects, so then they are less available to be that mentor. And then that's how this often fails. So I don't think anybody is going into this intentionally, but yet, it's what happens for when someone is new and joining a team, and it hasn't been determined the next six months what that person's onboarding and career path looks like. Circling back just a bit, there's the question around, can juniors start with a remote team? I can go first. And I'm going to say unequivocally yes. There's no reason a junior can't start with a remote team. Because all the things that I feel strongly about come down to how is your team going to plan for this person? And how are they going to support this person? And all the benefits that you get from being in an office with a team, I think those do exist. And frankly, for someone like myself, it can be easier to establish a bond with someone that you get to see each day, get to see in person. You can walk up to their desk and can say, "Hey, I've got a question for you." But I think all those benefits just need to be transferred into a remote-friendly way. So I think it does ratchet up how intentional you have to be with your team and then onboarding a junior developer. But I absolutely think it's doable, and we should do it. CHRIS: You went with unequivocally yes as your answer. I'm going to go with a qualified maybe as my answer. I want this to be true, and I think it can be true. But I think it takes all the more intentionality than even what we've been describing. To shift the question around a little bit, what does remote work mean? It doesn't just mean we're doing the work, but we're separate. I think remote work inherently is at its best when we also are largely async first. And so that means more structured writing. The nature of the conversation tends to be more well-formed in each interaction. So it's like I read a big document, and then I pass it over to you. And at your leisure, you respond to it with a bunch of notes, and then it comes back to me. And I think that mode of interaction, while absolutely wonderful and something that I love, I think it fits really well when you're a little bit further on in your career when you understand things a little bit better. And I think the dance of conversation is more useful earlier on and so forth. And so, for someone who's newer to a team, I think having the ability to ask a quick question over and over is really useful to someone who's early on in their career. And remote, again, I think it's at its best when it's async. And those two are sort of at odds. And so it's that mild tension that gives me pause of like, something that I think that makes remote work great I do think is at least a hurdle that you would have to get over in supporting someone who's a little bit newer. Because I want to be deeply present for someone who's newer to their journey so that they can ask a lot of questions so that I am available to be interrupted regularly. I loved at thoughtbot sitting next to someone and being their mentor and being like, yeah, anytime you want, just tap on my desk. If I got my headphones on, that doesn't mean I'm ignoring you; it means I just need to make the sounds go away for a minute because that's the only way my brain will work. But feel free to just tap on my desk or whatever and grab my attention for a moment. And I'm available for that. That's an intentional choice. That's breaking up my continuity of the day, but we're choosing that for a reason. I think that's just a little harder to do in a remote context and all the more so if we're saying, hey, we're going to try this async thing where we write structured documents, and we communicate in these larger, more well-formed, communicates back and forth. But I do believe it can be done. I think it should be done. I just think it's all the harder for all of those reasons. STEPH: I agree that definitely makes it harder. But I'm going to push a little bit and say that when you mentioned being deeply present, I think we can be deeply present with someone and be remote. We can reduce the async requirements. So if you are someone that is more senior or more accustomed to the team, you can fall back to more of those async ways to communicate. But if someone is new, and needs more mentorship, then let's just set up time where we're going to literally hang out for a couple of hours each day or whatever pairing environment works best for them because pairing can also be exhausting. But hey, we're going to have a check-in each day; maybe we close out each day and touchpoint. And feel free to still message me and interrupt me. Like, you're going to just heighten your availability, even though it is remote. And be aware, like, hey, this person could message me at more times, and I'm okay with that. I have opted into this form of communication. So I think we just take that mindset of, hey, there's this person next to me, and I'm their mentor to like, hey, they're not next to me, but I'm still their mentor, and I'm still here for them. So I agree that it's harder. I think it falls on us and the team and the mentors to change ourselves versus saying to juniors, "Hey, sorry, it's remote. That's not going to work for you." It totally works for them. It's us, the mentors, that need to figure out how to make it work. I will say being on that mentor side that then not being able to see someone so if they are next to me, I can pick up on body language and facial expressions, and I can tell when somebody's stuck. And I can see that they're frustrated, or I can see that now's a good time for me to just be like, "Hey, how's it going? What are you working on? Or do you need help with something?" And I don't have that insight when I'm away. So there are real challenges like that that I don't know how to address. I have gone the obnoxious route [laughs] where I just message people, and I'm like, "Hey, how's it going? How's it going? How's it going?" And I try not to do that too much. But I haven't found a better way to manage that other than to constantly check in because I do have less feedback from that person that I'm working with unless they are just incredibly open about sharing when they're stuck. But typically, when you're newer to a team or newer to a career, you're going to be less willing to share when you're stuck. But yeah, there are some real challenges, but I still think it's something for us to figure out. Because otherwise, if we cut off access for remote teams to junior folks, I mean, that's where we're headed. There are so many companies and jobs that are headed remote that not being junior friendly and being remote in my mind is just not an option. It's something that we need to figure out. And it's hard, but we need to figure it out. CHRIS: Yeah, 100% on we need to figure that out and that that's on us as the people managing and structuring and bringing folks into teams. I think my stance would be like, let's just be clear that this is hard. It takes effort to make sure that we've provided a structure in which someone newer to a team can be successful. It takes all the more effort to do so in a remote context, I think. And it's that recognition that I think is critical. Because if we go into this with the wrong mindset, it's like, oh yeah, it's great. We got this new person on the team. And yeah, they should be ready to go in like two weeks, right? It's like, no, no, this is a different thing. We need to be very clear about it. This is going to require that we have someone who is able to work with them and support them in this. And that means that that person's output will likely be a little bit reduced for the period of time that we're talking about. But we're playing a long game here. Let's make sure we're clear on that. This is intentional. And let's be clear, the world of hiring and software right now it's not like super easy. There aren't way more software developers than there are jobs; at least, that's been my experience. So this is something absolutely worth investing in for just core business reasons and also good for people. So hey, it's a win-win. Let's do it. Let's figure it out. But also, let's be clear that it's going to be a little tricky along the way. So, you know, let's be intentional about that. But yeah, obviously do it, got to do it. STEPH: Wait, so I feel like we might have circled back to unequivocally yes. [laughs] Have we gotten there, or are you still on the fence? CHRIS: I was unequivocally yes from the beginning, but I couched it in, but...yeah, I said other things. You're right. I have now come around; let's say to unequivocally yes. STEPH: [laughs] Cool. I don't want to feel like I'm forcing you to agree with me. [laughs] But I mean, we just so rarely disagree. So we've either got to identify this as something that we disagree on, which would be one of those rare occasions like beer and Pop-Tarts. CHRIS: A watershed moment. Beer and Pop-Tarts. STEPH: Yeah, those are the only two so far. [laughter] CHRIS: Not together also. I just want to go on record beer and Pop-Tarts; I don't think would be...anyway. STEPH: Ooh, I don't know. It could work. It could work. CHRIS: Well, there's another thing we disagree on. STEPH: I would not turn it down. If I was eating a Pop-Tart, and you're like, "Hey, you want a beer?" I'd be like, "Sure," vice versa. I'm drinking a beer. "Hey, you want a Pop-Tart?" "Totally." CHRIS: Okay. Well yeah, if I'm making bad decisions, I'm obviously going to chain them together, but that doesn't mean that they're a good decision. It's just a chain of bad decisions. STEPH: I feel like one true thing I know about you is that when you make a decision, you're going to lean into it. So like, this is why you are all about if you're going to have a Pop-Tart, you're going to have the highest sugary junk content Pop-Tart possible. So it makes sense to me. CHRIS: It's the Mountain Dew theorem, yeah. STEPH: I didn't know this had a theorem. The Mountain Dew theorem? CHRIS: No, that's just my name. Well, yeah, if I'm going to drink soda, I'm going to drink Mountain Dew, the nonsense nuclear option of soda. So yeah, I guess you're describing me, although as you say it back to me, I suddenly feel very, like, oh God, is this who I am as a person? [laughs] And I'm not going to say you're wrong. I'm just going to spend a little while thinking about some stuff. STEPH: I mean, you embrace it. I think that's lovely. You know what you want. It's like, all right, let's do this. Let's go all in. CHRIS: Thank you for finding a wonderfully positive way to frame it here at the end. But I think on that note, should we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review on iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. ALL: Byeeeeeeee!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

More Than Just Dumbbells
Personal Trainer Questions With Chris Proctor *Part 1

More Than Just Dumbbells

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:12


This week on 'Your Home Fitness Podcast,' we begin a two-part chat with personal trainer, Chris Proctor. On this episode, we unpack some common misconceptions about what it's like to work with a personal trainer, as well as how you may benefit from beginning a program of your own. Chris Proctor, personal trainer, joins us to discuss the cost of personal training, how to find the right personal trainer, and setting realistic expectations. 2:00 - Mythbusters 4:11 - Chris Proctor intro : health history & training background 6:55 - "How much is it going to cost me?" 9:05 - "Are you going to scream in my face?" 11:38 - "How many times a week will we be meeting?" 14:41 - "What certifications do you have?" / "Why should I trust you?" 19:28 - "Can I just sit & watch for a while first?" 21:00 - Meeting someone where they are 23:23 -"Can you make me look like Brad Pitt in Fight Club?" 27:33 - Realistic expectations 29:29 - Outro - Part 2 next week Chris Proctor Social Links: Website: https://chrisproctorwellness.com IG: https://www.instagram.com/chrisproctorwellness/

That Trippi Show
Mythbusters! The "new politics of evasion"

That Trippi Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 35:03


Joe and Alex discuss what's facing Democrats through the lens of a recent Progressive Policy Institute paper by two of Joe's former Mondale team. What have we learned since 1989? And is the key to breaking the streak and beating George HW Bush the same to the key to stopping Trump? With our democracy at stake, it's time to bust some myths about the electoral landscape. Read the report here: https://www.progressivepolicy.org/publication/the-new-politics-of-evasion%20%5Bprogressivepolicy-org%5D/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Out of Bounds Podcast
Big Stick Energy – E29 – Myth Busters Ski Instructors Edition – Nadine Wheelhouse

Out of Bounds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 58:21


Nadine Wheelhouse is a ski instructor from UK who has worked in Canada, America, Georgia, and now New Zealand. She's able to speak to her experience as a woman in this space and dispel some common myths and perceptions about ski instructing as a career.  Instagram: @nadinewheelhouse_ Muir Energy – [...] The post Big Stick Energy – E29 – Myth Busters Ski Instructors Edition – Nadine Wheelhouse appeared first on Out Of Collective.

Customer Service Revolution
084: 4 Price Myth Busters

Customer Service Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 12:31


Have you ever lost a customer and blamed it on your prices? Maybe you assumed that the reason the customer left was that your prices were too high. So, what did you do? You lowered your prices. In this episode, ​​Chief Revolution Officer John DiJulius of The DiJulius Group explains why this is a bad idea. He asserts that ​​when customers complain about your prices, it's more than likely not because they're cheap. Rather, they're not willing to spend that much money because your experience didn't warrant it.  Tune in to learn more about this and hear 4 different examples of companies who mistakenly thought they were losing customers due to lower prices.  You Will Learn: How an industry where nearly 80% of consumer's purchases were based on price was disrupted by experience. How to figure out why customers are leaving. Why you can't outsell poor customer retention. How The Dijulius group helps companies increase customer retention. How to find out your VOO. Resources mentioned: The Customer Service Revolution Podcast  *** EPISODE CREDITS: If you like this podcast and are thinking of creating your own, consider talking to my producer, Emerald City Productions. They helped me grow and produce the podcast you are listening to right now. Find out more at https://emeraldcitypro.com. Let them know I sent you.

The Variable Design Podcast
Fact or Cap? The realities of intuition vs validation in Industrial Design

The Variable Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 56:28


Questions we cover in this episode1- Industrial Designers do human factors testing and ethnographic research to drive all their decisions.When is it appropriate to let intuition trump validation? Is validation always necessary? We always hear about how prospective employers are looking for “good decision making skills” in student portfolios. What the heck does that even mean and how the heck do we show that we're good at making decisions in our design work? Is that just subjective or can we establish some ground rules? 2- Industrial Designers are expected to perform life cycle analysis on products under development. How do we balance sustainability and time constraints for production? Especially consumer electronics product dev, it's like a flash in the fire. So LSA is usually glazed over, especially with smaller startups that aren't held to the same scrutiny as big corporations. 3- A design  grounded in research findings is the best solution that should always be pursued. In the long run, is it more helpful for one's career growth to make a habit of presenting very solid, research based (or very intuitively grounded) solutions or do we think that being a designer that regularly pushes the envelope by presenting ideas waaay out in left field that you'll see quicker gains in notoriety and skill? 4- Industrial Designers regularly are carving foam in the shop to create mockups. 5- Industrial Designers who sketch well are better at communicating ideas.  6- Working at a design consultancy right after graduation is the best way to polish a wide variety of skills. 7- Working for a name brand company developing their own products means you'll design only one thing and your creative diversity is limited. 8- The best way to move up the career ladder is to spend a good amount of time in one place to specialize. TS- Unfortunately no. Most designers will find that the only way to move up is to get out.  My experience has been that in spades.9- You studied ID, but will likely spend most of your time creating graphics for presentations and marketing collateral to promote products. About Tony Shoemaker:Tony has been in various roles, across the country, in the ID industry for over 25 years.  He came to Milwaukee Tool after 10 years with Sears, working for over 8 years in the Kenmore Brand unit, and 1 ½ years in the Craftsman team.  Prior to Sears, Tony worked in consultancies such as Bally Design in Pittsburgh, and Ignition in Dallas.  His experience includes medical design, toys, communications equipment, consumer electronics, housewares, packaging, graphic design, retail, and exhibit design. Once described by a mentor as a “thoroughbred” designer, Tony has always sought to absorb as much information from the world as he can. He seeks odd knowledge and the synergy between its crossings to create those “ah-ha!” moments key to the design process. Just as comfortable in a pile of parts and shop dust as at his desk sketching fervently, Tony is a self-described “mad designer,” a hybrid of a Mythbuster and a Concept Artist. His real energy comes out when recognizing the human link to a concept's genesis. He strives for those moments that are genuinely transformative to his work.LINKS:Support The Variablewww.patreon.com/thevariabledesignWEBSITE: www.thevariable.designUPCOMING EVENTS: https://www.thevariable.design/qnaNOMINATE STUDENTS FOR SPOTLIGHT: https://www.thevariable.design/spotlightBLOG: https://www.thevariable.design/podcastSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thevariabledesign)

Garry Meier Show
Episode 946 - A Better Mouse Trap

Garry Meier Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 32:33


One of Garry's ideas for dealing with potential bank robbers may have been validated by the Mythbusters. Meanwhile, the suspect in a shooting at a wax museum thought the gun was a prop gun when he fired it twice. Plus, an island in Vietnam might need a lesson in animal cruelty. Garrforce t-shirts and coffee mugs are now available by going to "Merchandise" on the website. Your purchase of these items is what keeps the podcast going. Plus, you can always email me garrymeiershow@garrymeier.com or leave a text or voicemail at 773-888-2157 Thank you in advance!

Dad's Kitchen
145: JUST FOR FUN - Old Wives' Tales

Dad's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 17:52


"An apple a day keeps the doctor away. Chicken soup will cure any cold. Fish oil will make you smarter." Mom had a lot to say about the things we eat. But were any of them true? Chris and Phil discuss all the old wives' tales as they relate to food in this fun, fact-or-fiction episode. Follow Dad's Kitchen: @DadsKitchenCo

Stronger U Radio with Mike Doehla
Nutrition Myth-Busters Special Guest Calvin Huynh

Stronger U Radio with Mike Doehla

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 58:37 Very Popular


Join Stronger U Founder Mike Doehla and Calvin Huynh (Coach/Trainer/Writer) as they dive into common nutritional myths and the truth behind them. Mike and Calvin use their time to chat all things from Intermittent Fasting, the risk of overcomplicated weight loss, and much more!To learn more about Stronger U, head to www.strongeru.com or follow us on Instagram at www.instagram.com/strongeru. A special thank you to Calvin for joining us this week! Follow along with him at www.instagram.com/awesomefitnessscience

Who Shot Ya?
Episode 239: 'Titane' Goes Bananas

Who Shot Ya?

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 60:55 Very Popular


Julia Ducournau's horror thriller TITANE won the Palme d'Or at Cannes in 2021 and is now streaming on Hulu. It's a movie that kinda defies description, but that's never stopped us before! Plus, we're nominate some of the Best Movie Cars for the Hall of Excellence. Vroom vroom!!What's Good?Alonso: Burlap & Barrel's Pizza Party seasoningDrea: Stitches out!Ify: n/naka anniversary dinnerTod: Playing basketball with budsITIDICOscars Thoughts…Sounds like there are plans for a Sonic Cinematic UniverseStaff Picks:Drea: The Imposter Alonso: Take Me To the RiverIfy: Anatomy of HellTod: French Lieutenant's WomanVote for your Hall of Excellence winner on our Facebook pageBuy Alonso's book – I'll Be Home for Christmas MoviesThis episode is sponsored by Trade CoffeeTake their coffee-matching quiz at drinktrade.com/maxfilm and get $30 off your first order!With:Ify NwadiweDrea ClarkAlonso DuraldeTod MesirowProduced by Marissa FlaxbartSr. Producer Laura Swisher