Podcast appearances and mentions of Johnson Johnson

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Hero of a series of mystery novels by Dorothy Dunnett

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Latest podcast episodes about Johnson Johnson

Startup Selling: Talking Sales with Scott Sambucci
Ep. 129: Converting Free Trials, Soft Contracts & Why Sales Prospects Love Video: An Interview with Showpad's Louis Jonckheere

Startup Selling: Talking Sales with Scott Sambucci

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 50:40


In this episode of the Startup Selling Podcast, I interviewed Louis Jonckheere.   Louis is Co-founder and Co-CEO of Showpad. Showpad activates millions of pieces of content for over 850 companies around the world, including Johnson & Johnson, Fujifilm, Audi, Intel, and Kimberly-Clark.   Some of the key topics and questions that we covered in this podcast are:   What types of content works best to drive sales prospect engagement? How Showpad uses a 14-day free trial and “Soft Contracts” The importance of video for your sales and communication Company culture and hiring practices Customer engagement and customer success Links & Resources   Showpad Website: www.showpad.com   Louis Jonckheere on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/louisjonckheere   Louis Jonckheere on Twitter: www.twitter.com/louisjonckheere Listen & subscribe to The Startup Selling Show here:   BluBrry | Deezer | Amazon | Stitcher | Spotify | iTunes | Soundcloud | SalesQualia   Thanks so much for listening! Tell a friend or ten about The Startup Selling Show, and please leave a review wherever you're listening to the show.

Relationships & Revenue with John Hulen
Episode 78 Elite by Choice with Lauren Johnson

Relationships & Revenue with John Hulen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 62:46


In today's episode, John talks with Lauren Johnson - a mental performance coach and speaker, athlete, daughter, and wife. As a mental performance coach, Lauren has worked with great organizations like the New York Yankees, Google, Johnson & Johnson, FBI, Hello, Square, MassMutual, and many more. Listen to this episode to learn more: [03:11] - Her backstory [05:52] - Her life after graduation [07:28] - How a drive-thru at Starbucks changed her life [10:45] - The pain of change [13:44] - Lauren explains, "Be brave enough to suck at something new." [16:21] - There are two costs that we should always consider [19:51] - The benefits of failure [24:10] - The battle between talent and efforts [27:32] - How she coaches a client who has never had mental coaching [33:33] - Being adaptable with mental performance [34:42] - How to eliminate distractions [38:45] - What does a mental performance coach do? [41:06] - An exercise to figure out your feelings [47:51] - Lauren's ideal client [49:19] - The challenges that Lauren has seen her clients work through [53:03] - Lauren's definition of success [55:15] - What Lauren is doing to improve her significant relationships [1:01:45] - About her first live event NOTABLE QUOTES: "Pain is a part of life. But many times, we have a choice. Not a choice of whether or not there's going to be a pain, but the choice of what type of pain we are going to allow in our lives." "We can have the pain of staying the same or we can have the pain of change." "Be brave enough to suck at something new." "If we want to be good at something, we have to go through being bad at it." "Professionals are amateurs like us. The only difference is that they tried, failed, learned, and improved more than anybody else." "Failing is you're trying something new; you didn't do it right. And you have the opportunity to learn from it and get better. Failure, on the other hand, is an active choice to stay exactly where you are and not move forward." "Even if you have the best achievement of your life, you are never done growing." "If you stop evolving, someone is going to take your position." "Mental toughness doesn't make you invincible. It makes you adaptable." "Good results aren't always the result of good things. And bad results aren't always the result of bad things." "Good results alone will not make you better. Doing the right things will." BOOKS MENTIONED: The Molecule of More: How a Single Chemical in Your Brain Drives Love, Sex, and Creativity and Will Determine the Fate of the Human Race by Daniel Z. Lieberman and Michael E. Long Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds by David Goggins USEFUL LINKS: https://www.laurenjohnsonandco.com/  https://www.instagram.com/laurennicolejohnson/  https://www.facebook.com/lauren.abarca.1  https://twitter.com/_laurenjohnson_  https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurenjohnsonn/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAgiinhnP664j96geaFkdFg   CONNECT WITH JOHN Website - https://thejohnhulen.com  Clubhouse - https://www.joinclubhouse.com/@johnhulen  Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/johnhulen  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/johnhulen  Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/johnhulen  LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnhulen   YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLX_NchE8lisC4NL2GciIWA  EPISODE CREDITS Intro music provided by Tony Palacios - https://www.instagram.com/tonytonedog/  Outro music provided by Jeff Scheetz - https://jeffscheetz.com/ 

See You Now
61: Reporting Powers: Insights in Action

See You Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 46:21


While the recent pandemic caused devastating loss of life and strained health systems, it also brought into sharp focus nurses' pivotal role in healthcare and their enormous, and largely untapped potential to shape patient care, rethink how healthcare is organized and where it's delivered.   Moved by the unprecedented stress and strain on nurses and our health systems, Johnson & Johnson, in partnership with the American Nurses Association and the American Organization for Nursing Leadership, set out to understand the various ways that the nursing profession evolved amidst the pandemic. From the stories and data emerged the pointed Accelerating Nursing, Transforming Healthcare report -- one that offers a deeper understanding on how the pandemic transformed nursing practice and how the momentum of these innovations can steer us to a much better and preferred future of the profession.   In this second of a multi-episode series centered on the Accelerating Nursing, Transforming Healthcare report we go behind the scenes on a “listening adventure” and hear how the pandemic changed people's access to care, their care needs, and the impact on the well-being of the healthcare workforce, and learn through thought-provoking stories, experiences, and fine details how three nurse changemakers are weaving the needed innovations into their organizations, care delivery, and workforce to Accelerate Nursing and Transform Healthcare. Email us at hello@seeyounowpodcast.com. For additional resources, visit our website at www.seeyounowpodcast.com.

MoneyBall Medicine
Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:48


Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place. The big goal guiding Seqster, he says, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare. Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you've ever gotten a copy of your medical files from your doctor or hospital, you probably know these records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. They aren't designed to be clear or user-friendly for patients. In fact, it's usually just the opposite.The data itself is highly technical. And on top of that, there's the inscrutable formatting, which is dictated by whatever electronic medical record or “EMR” system your provider happens to use. But the problem isn't just that EMR data is incomprehensible.It's also that different EMRs are often incompatible with each other.So if you're being treated by multiple providers, it can be really tricky to share your data across institutional boundaries. That's why medicine is one of the last industries that still uses old-fashioned fax machines. Because sometimes a fax is the only way to send the data back and forth.But my guest today is trying to fix all that.His name is Ardy Arianpour, and he's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster.It's a company in San Diego that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster quote-unquote “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place.The big goal guiding Seqster, according to Ardy, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.At the moment, however, consumers can't sign up for the service directly. Seqster's actual customers are players from inside the healthcare industry. For example, a life science companies might hire Seqster to help them make the experience of participating in a clinical trial more user friendly for patients.Or a health plan might use a Seqster dashboard to get patients more involved in their own care.Seqster did let me do a test run on my own medical data as part of my research for this interview. And I was impressed by how quickly it pulled in data that normally lives in a bunch of separate places. I'm hoping Seqster and other companies in this space will continue to make progress.Because, frankly, I think poor patient access to health data and the lack of interoperability between EMRs are two of the biggest factors holding back improvements in healthcare quality.If we can finally get those two things right, I think it can help unlock the data-driven healthcare revolution that I describe in my new book, The Future You. Which, by the way, is out now in paperback and ebook format at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.When we spoke back in September, Ardy and I talked about better EMRs and many other things. And now here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, welcome to the show. So, it's good to have you here, and you know, for everybody who doesn't know your story and the story of the company, I'd love to, you know, start covering some basics like, you know, the when, the what, the how, the why. What's the founding story of Seqster and what was the problems that you were really trying to go out there and solve when you started the company in 2016?Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry. Always been a fan. I think we've known each other for quite some time, but it's been a long time since we've ran into each other since the genomic and precision medicine days. So great to see you. I hope you and your family are well and yeah, look, Seqster is super special and there's a secret story, I guess, that never has been told. It really starts way beyond 2016 when I founded the company. So I spent 15 plus years in DNA sequencing, next gen sequencing genomic market. And during that time in the 2000s to early 2010s, I was fortunate enough of being part of some amazing endeavors and organizations that allowed my team and I to take some risk. And when you take risk, when you're in biotech, pharma, precision medicine, genomics, bioinformatics, you learn new things that most people don't learn because you're you're you're, you know, trailblazing, I guess you could say. And we were able to do that back with one of my old companies where we were able to launch the first clinical exome test, launch the first BRCA cancer panels, launch the first next gen sequencing panels in a CLIA lab. Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it wasn't about the testing. It was all about the data, and we didn't realize that till later and we kept on seeing that wow genome data is really only one set of all the other data pieces, right? I think the genomics folks, me being a genomics guy, I guess you could say, for a decade and a half, we're so forward thinking that we forget about the simple things within science, and we never really thought, Oh, collect your medical data and pair it with your genomic data. We never really thought there would be a wearable out there. That data was going to be siloed, too. We never thought there was going to be, you know, many different medical devices and instruments that would be Bluetooth and sensor enabled, where there would be data that would be siloed. Claims data, pharmacy data. Never even crossed our minds. So, you know, when you put this all together, my inspiration with Seqster was actually really simple. And when I founded the company, I wanted to combine the genomic data with your EMR medical data as well as your wearable data, because in 2016, the tailwinds of those other, you know, services was really taken off.Harry Glorikian: Right. Totally understand it. And you know, as we were talking about before I hit record, it's like it was funny because I was just talking to another company that's working on NLP and they're able to look at, you know, papers and see drugs being used in different, you know, medical conditions. And then they figured out, well, they needed to tap into the unstructured data of a medical record to really, like, add the next layer of value to it. So, you know, there's a lot of activity going on about there. But how do you guys, how do you, how do your co-founders, you know, Zhang and Dana play into like the science, the technology and what's the sort of angle that you guys have taken to solve this problem? Or what's your idea on how to fix it? I'm not saying it's been solved yet, because that would be a Herculean task in and of itself. But how are you guys approaching it that? Is a little different than the. You know, maybe any any of your other you would you would consider anybody else out there, the working on this?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, look for us we spent a lot of time understanding the power of data. But how what makes Seqster different is no one knows the power of the patient better than us. We've spent time with our platform with, you know, tens of thousands of patients: rare disease patients, oncology patients, parents, autoimmune disease patients, patients that have that are seeing functional medicine folks. Patients that were having issues sharing data through telemedicine, clinical trial patients. All these sorts of patients are very different. At Seqster we focused on putting the patient at the center of health care in order to smash all the data silos from their medical institutions to their wearable technology that they wear to the DNA testing that they get and even maybe a COVID test or a vaccine. How do you bring a 360-degree patient view? And you know, you tried the system, so I think you got a small teaser of how we can do that and we've really cracked this large problem. It is Herculean, I believe, and a lot of people believe because it's interoperability, it is the number one problem in all of health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I had the pleasure of trying it and imported my data and was able to see, you know, individual pieces. I mean, I made some suggestions on what might make it easier for me to hone in in different areas, right, and have the system highlighting different things. But I guess each data stream is being brought in separately and then at some point you're going to create a master dashboard above it, because now each one is separate from when I go into each record, right, When I go into my medical record, it gives me one set of data with my lab results and everything else and the notes, and then it pulls in my wearable data separately that I have to look at, right? So you've got to look at it separately. It doesn't. Then I guess the next step would be creating a master sort of view of how everything would look in a sort of I don't want to say integrated, but at least a timeline view of the world. But. You know, following up on the the sort of the what question, you know, how do you sort of combine data from different EMRs, tests, apps, devices in a sort of scalable, repeatable way? I mean, it seems like to date, that's been a hugely manual process, and I can imagine you could figure out every provider's ontology and then create a table that shows what's equivalent to. And but you know, there's got to be sort of a translation scheme that would be required that that provides some constant readjustment as the main providers tweak and evolve their own systems, right? Because if the provider is tweaking their system, your system has then got to adapt to changes that are happening in that end. So how are you guys managing all that craziness?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. So I think it all and you hit on so many points, I'll try and cover them if I remember them all. Look, the number one thing for us is we can connect to any data source. It doesn't matter. And you saw it. And just before I continue, just tell the audience how fast, how fast, how long did it take for your data to be populated after you connected it?Harry Glorikian: Oh, it was. I mean, yeah, as soon as I created it, I could see that it was, you know, it was digesting and then populating. And, you know, I was just I was watching it as a matter of fact, when I was on the phone with your person, that was helping me. Yeah. At first I said, Oh, it's not there. And then a couple of seconds later, I'm like, Oh no, it's showing up, right? So it was happening in, I don't want to say real time, but it was happening as as we were watching it evolve, right? It was sort of it was. It was almost like watching time lapse.Ardy Arianpour: And that's actually a great way. That's a great way to actually describe it. We created the time lapse of all your health data. Now let's get to the what and the how. So we connect to any health data source. The patient is fully in control. You own your data, you control it. It's all consented by you. We don't own your data and we connect to every single medical record. And that's huge that we've achieved nationwide coverage. We didn't know what data you have, but we're you're able to connect to it. Why? Because our team, which our engineering team gets all the credit for six years now, almost since founding of the company we have written, I don't know, seven million lines of code, that standardizes and harmonizes all of the ICD 9, ICD 10, SNOMED codes and every single lab result to every single wearable terminology, from biking to cycling to, you know, you name it, VitaminDB, you know, characterized in 40 different ways. You know, we're harnessing data to improve patient lives at scale. We built it for scale because you can't do it by the traditional method of just faxes and PDFs. Now, you know, being able to do that is not a bad thing.Ardy Arianpour: We can bring that service into our platform as well. It's already integrated, but that type of service takes 30 to 60 days and it's static data. It's not real time right now. If Harry goes, I don't know, you go on a bike ride and you fall and you go to the E.R. and you had whatever data connected automatically in your sister portal, it'll be populated without you even touching Seqster. That's how our real time data works and another way that we're totally differentiated than anything else in the marketplace. I was never a fan of API businesses because they're just data in data out. I truly wanted us to create a patient engagement platform, a PEP right, or a patient relationship management system, what I call a PRM instead of a CRM. And that's what we created with Seqster. So that is beyond an API, beyond just data. We're visualizing the data, as you saw. We really nailed the longitudinal health record or the individualized health record. And I think it's, I always say this, health data is medicine. The reason why it's medicine is because our platform has saved patient lives.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, how do you, how are you handling the free form notes, right, because I noticed that I could look at all my notes, but they weren't necessarily, it wasn't pulling from the note and sort of making sense of it. I mean, I could look at all of it and it was all in one place. But the the system wasn't necessarily processing it, sort of. I was talking to Jeff Felton from ConcertAI and they do a lot of sort of, their big thing is the NLP that sort of tries to choose chew through that, which is not trivial, you know, yesterday today, context matters in health care.Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. Look, if we created the the the Tesla of health care, let's just say, right, we're we're changing the game. From static data to real time data. Ok. Well, you're talking about is, are you going to create a helicopter as well? Right, OK. And all right. So, no, we're not going to go create the helicopter. Is there going to be an electric helicopter by Tesla? There's no market for that, right? So that's why they're not doing it now. I'm not saying there's not a market for NLP. It's just the fact that we'll go ahead and partner with a third party NLP provider. And we already have we have like four of them and they all have their strengths and weaknesses because it's not a one size fits all thing. And you know, we can already run OCR, you know, over the free text and pull certain ontology information out. And then, you know, when you partner with an NLP company, once you have a system that can capture data, you could do anything. So people always ask me, Are you going to get into AI? It's just the buzzword. There's a million A.I. companies. What have they really done right in health care? It's not really there. Maybe for imaging they've done some things, but it's more of a buzzword. AI only becomes valuable if you have a system, Harry, that can instantly populate data, then you can run some great artificial intelligence things on it. So NLP, AI, OCR, all those things are just many tools that can add. Now, in your experience, you only got to see about 5 percent of the power of Seqster, and that probably blew you away, even though it was five percent of the power. Because you probably never -- I don't know, you tell me, have you ever been able to collect your data that quickly? It took, what, less than a minute or two?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, thank God, I don't have a lot of data. So, you know, just when I tap into my my health care provider, you know, my data is there and it's funny, I always tell people, being a not exciting patient is a really good thing in one way, and it's a really bad thing because you can't play with all the data. But you know, like even when I did my genome, it's an extremely boring genome.Ardy Arianpour: My question is it's not about it being exciting or not, because thankfully you're not a chronically ill patients. But imagine if you were and how this helps, but take a step back. I'm just asking the speed, yes, and the quality of the presentation of the data that seeks to you. It was less than what hundred seconds?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, it was very quick. And I've already it's funny because I texted my doctor and I was like, I need to talk to you about a couple of these lab results that look out of out of norm, right? And they weren't anything crazy. But I'm just curious like, you know, how do I get them in norm? I'm just I'm always trying to be in in the normal band, if I can be.Ardy Arianpour: So it's interesting you say that because as a healthy individual. You know, and even a chronically ill patient, it doesn't matter. The best way to actually QC data is through visualization, and this is what this is. That's foundational to interoperability. So we hit on semantic and structural interoperability with our, you know, backend engine that we've created to harmonize and standardize the data. We built many different types of retrievers and then we parse that data and then it's standardized and harmonizes it. But that visualization, which some people call the Tableau of health data, you know that we've created when they see it, is really, we got to give the credit to the patients. We had so many patients, healthy ones and unhealthy ones that told us exactly how they want it to look. We did this on the genomic data, we did this on the wearable data. We did this on the medical device data and we have some great new features that can superimpose your clinical data with your fitness data on our integrated view and timeline.Harry Glorikian: Oh, that? See, now that would be, you know, another level of value, even for a healthy patient, right to be able to see that in an integrated way. I made a suggestion, I think that when a panel shows up is. You know, highlight the ones that are out of Norm very quickly, as opposed to having to look at, you know, the panel of 20 to find the one that's out of whack, just either color them differently or reorient them so that they're easier to find. But those are simple changes just from a UI perspective. But so. How would you describe that that Seqster creates value and say translates that into revenue, right? I'm just trying to figure out like, what's the revenue model for you guys? I know that you're I can actually, I'm not even sure if I can sign up for it myself. I would probably have to do it through a system if I remember your revenue model correctly. But how do you guys generate revenue from what you're doing?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, I'll share another secret on your show here from the founding of Seqster. My dream was to empower seven billion people on our little mothership here called Earth to have all their health data in one place. And I had a direct to consumer model in 2016. The market wasn't really ready for it, number one. Number two, it was going to cost $500 million worth of marketing to just get the message out for people to know that it exists. So long story short, in 2016, you know, when I founded the company, not that many people wanted to talk to us. They thought we were just like nuts to go after this problem. 2017, we got some calls from some investors, we raised some great seed funding after I personally put in some money in in 2016 to get the company going. And then in 2018, I got a call from Bill Gates and that was when everything changed. Bill called and wanted to meet in person, I was supposed to get 30 minutes with him. And the reason why he called is because our first beachhead was with Alzheimer's patients. My grandmother, both my grandmothers, passed away due to Alzheimer's disease. Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers and being a caregiver for my mom's mom and being very close to her since she raised me, I learned a lot about a multigenerational health record, so I actually filed patents in 2016 on a multigenerational health record because I wanted to have my grandma's data, my mom's data, my data, and be able to pass it on to research as well as to generations down my family.Ardy Arianpour: Long story short there, Bill gets all the credit for telling me after I showed him our platform, "You got to take this enterprise. You guys built something that Google Health failed at and Microsoft Vault Health Vault failed at." And it's funny we're talking about this. Look, Google just dismantled their health division again. Why? Because tech companies just don't get it. They have a lot of money. They have a lot of power. They've got a lot of smart people. But they they they don't know where, I'll give you an example. It's like a tourist with a lot of money coming into a city. You don't know where the really good local bar is, right? Why is that? You don't know where the really good, you know, slice of pizza is. You're going to go to the regular joints that everyone finds on TripAdvisor and whatever. You know your friends told you, but if you're a local, you know where to get the authentic cocktails and the authentic, you know, drinks and food. Why? Because you've lived and breathed it in the city. So we've lived and breathed it right. And so we know what not to do. It's not about knowing what to do in health care or in genomics or in biotech. It's actually knowing what you shouldn't be doing. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And knowing I got to tell you, there's some problems where I'm like, OK, I know exactly who to call for that problem, because there aren't, you know, they're not falling off trees in that particular problem. There's a small handful of people that understand that problem well enough that they can come in and sort of surgically help you solve that problem. And you can have all the money in the world and have all the smart people you want. Doesn't mean they're going to be able to solve that particular problem, especially in health care, because it's so arcane.Ardy Arianpour: And it's getting, you know, this is a problem that is growing like cancer, interoperability. Just on this 20 minute conversation with you it has grown by hundreds of millions of dollars. Do you know why? Because data is being siloed.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I think, look, I've always I've said this on, you know, whatever show or and I've actually I've written letters to Congress. You know, I think this this needs to be mandated because expecting the large EMR companies to do anything is a waste of time. They're not going to do it on their own if their feet are not put to the fire and it changes. And honestly, I believe that if anything will stop the innovation of health care or slow it down is the EMR systems. You know, if you don't have the data, you can't do the work.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. But you know what people don't understand. And not to go off that tangent, but I'll get back to the business model in a second to answer that question because I just recalled in my mind here that I didn't answer that. Look, people don't understand that at least the EMR companies, even though they're like Darth Vader, you know, they needed. They've put some foundation there at least. If that wasn't there, we would be in a much worse situation here, right?Harry Glorikian: Correct, but if Satya Nadella hadn't really changed Microsoft, really redone it right, it wouldn't be the company it is now, and I think they [the EMR companies] are just back in the dark ages.Ardy Arianpour: Of course, I totally agree. I'm surprised, actually. Microsoft, as an example, didn't come up with their own EMR system and launch it to the hospitals to go, compete with the servers and all scripts and Epics of the world. If I was Microsoft, that's what I would do. I would have enough money in power, know exactly what to do. I would take a system like Seqster and I would explode it in a good way and be the good guys and have it completely open source and open network. But that's a whole cocktail conversation if anyone's listening on the on the podcast that wants to talk about that. Give me a call or shoot me an email or find me on LinkedIn.Ardy Arianpour: Let me go back to the business model real quick so people understand. So direct to consumer was what I wanted to do. We built it for the consumer, for the patients. It was the smartest and dumbest thing I ever did. Let's go to why it was the dumbest thing first, because it was really, really hard. It was the smartest because we would not be where we are today. You wouldn't have called me to talk on your podcast and all these other great, you know, amazing people that want to hear about how we're, you know, cracking the code on interoperability now and changing the health care system, changing clinical trials, changing decentralized trials with our system.Ardy Arianpour: Why? Well, it's because our system was built by patients. Right, and so it's a patient centric, real time, real world data platform that layers in engagements for both the providers, the payers, the pharma companies and any other enterprise that white labels our platform. We have both iOS and Android SDK and Web available. It gets fully branded. We're the Intel Inside with the Salesforce.com business model. It's a Software as a Service service that we offer to enterprises. Patients never pay for the service. And we do give VIP codes to chronically ill patients and VIPs, you know, journalists, podcasters and to be honest, anyone who emails me that wants to try it. I've been always giving on that. That costs us time and money, and I'm happy to do it because it's my way of giving back to the community and health care because I know our team and I have built a system that have saved lives. It's been covered by the news multiple times.Harry Glorikian: So, so in essence, a large provider comes, buys the access to the system and then offers it to its patient population to utilize to aggregate all this information, right? How can the platform stay patient centric if the patients aren't directly paying for it?Ardy Arianpour: Ok, very simple. All of these enterprises in health care, whether that's Big Pharma, right, or Big Oayer from Pfizer to Cigna, to United Healthcare group to Humana to even Amazon, right, to other tech companies, they all want to go down a patient centric way. It's just what's happening. You know, I've been talking about this since 2016 because we pioneered patient centric interoperability. That's what we did. That's what Seqster did. That's that's what we set out to do. And we did it. Some, you know, a lot of people say they can do it. Very few actually. Do we fit in that model now, right? And you had the experience yourself. And I think the first time I saw patient centric ads was. 2020. No, sorry. Yeah, 2020, JP Morgan Health Care Conference in January, just three months before the lockdowns and the pandemic started. It was the first time I went to Johnson & Johnson's afterparty in downtown San Francisco. And saw a huge banner saying, you know, blah blah blah, patient centricity. It's the 22nd century, you know, whatever. So they add a bunch of ads that were all patient centric, and I looked to my co-founder, Dana, and I'm like, Look at this, these guys finally caught on. I wonder if they've been, because we've been in discussions with a lot of these folks, long story short, it's not because of Seqster, I think it's just the market was headed that way. We were so far ahead of the market and there was no tailwinds. Now it is all there. And the pandemic afterwards accelerated digital health, as I say, by 7 to 10 years.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you enjoy hearing from the kinds of innovators and entrepreneurs I talk to on the show, I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is out in print and ebook format from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just go to either site and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian. Thanks. And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So the platform combines EHR, genetic, and fitness data, so. Why did you start with those three?Ardy Arianpour: So we started with those three, and I'll get to that, but we also do pharmacy, social determinants of health, and claims data as well. So we've added three other very large pillars. We can connect to any data source. We've created a universal interoperability platform that's patient centric that brings real time, real world data. And we're just super excited about all the business opportunities and the big pain points that we're solving for enterprise as well as for the patient. Why did we start with genomics, EMR, fitness. Ok. Here's the story. So I named the company Seqster after actually going on a five or six mile run in downtown San Diego, coming back and watching The Italian Job. And in the movie The Italian Job, it's one of my favorite movies, actually. I love that movie. I could just keep watching it over again, the real Napster was in the movie, and I used to be a Napster user where, you know, it was the way of actually pulling all your music and having it kind of in one place. Not really exactly Seqster's model, Seqster's model is is much more legal because it's patient centric. Yes, Napster was kind of stealing the data, right? So long story short, I was trying to think of a company name and I'm like, Oh my God. I don't know what hit me. I'll remember that moment like it was yesterday, Harry. Sequster came up because I had dived into DNA sequencing. We are doing everything that you can on next gen sequencing. And so I was like, Wow! Seqster. S-E-Q-S-T-E-R.Ardy Arianpour: And I went on GoDaddy.com. I bought it for $9.99. And the story started from right then. It was just me and the website. No co-founders, no onee else. I was just thinking, this is a great name. Now, you fast forward to why it's medical data plus genomic data, plus fitness data, to begin with. Well, the genomic data was an easy one because, right, I have 15 years underneath my belt on genomic sequencing technologies and clinical diagnostics and doing a lot of great things for patients in that arena. And I knew that it couldn't just be the genome, right? That's where the medical data came in because we knew and I never knew that we would be able to actually build something that would be able to pull it on together. I knew it was going to be really tough. I didn't think it was going to be this tough. We would have never done it if I knew that it was this tough. It's so great that we did because we solved it. But if you go back and say, "Ardy, would you do it again if you knew it was going to be this tough?" I wouldn't, because it's really, it's not the number two problem, it's the number one problem. And we're just, you know, I'm a peon. I'm a very small dot. I'm not anyone special. I'm just very passionate about solving this problem. That's it. And so is my team, and we got a great team and we've execute on. So great.Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it was my idea. I was forcing the wearable and fitness data because I was interested in that. And when the Apple Series One Watch came out, it was very limited, but I saw how it was going to change, you know, just connection of data. And my team being bioinformaticians and from the genomics world were so against bringing it in, I mean, I could show you emails of fights about me saying, get fitness data in here. They were not interested. I forced it on them. And then next thing you knew, clinical trials. One of the biggest things was how do you bring sleeping data and wearable data to x y z data? And that market started taking off. Decentralized trials. You can't even do it if you don't have wearable data. And so everyone started saying, you know, OK, you were right. That was one. I get one big pat on the back. And then we realized we can't be limited to just those three pillars. So what are the next three that we can work on? And that was claims data so we can marry it with the EMR and medical data for payers. And then we ran into pharmacy data. We just signed our first digital pharmacy deal three weeks ago with Paragon Health. And if we didn't have those capabilities, we wouldn't have the business opportunities. And the social determinants of health data being our last integrations comes in very handy for various different use cases.Harry Glorikian: So, three sort of things, right? You know, you combine all this data. What can you learn that wasn't obvious before? How do you translate into better health outcomes for consumers or, say, smarter decision making by consumers, right, so those are two potentially different ways to look at it.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. So one word for you: Seqster's longitudinal health record drives health economics, outcomes, research. It drives it.Harry Glorikian: Is that your clients doing that, you doing that, a third party group coming in?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. We don't do that. We're just the patient engagement and data aggregation operating system that gets implemented for enterprise. And then the enterprise can run the analytics on top of it. They can, you know, take all of the raw data. So we're the only 21 CFR Part 11 compliant platform too. We're fully FDA compliant, Harry. It took us 19 months working with the FDA in order to get our compliance letter in September, October of last year, 2020. So about a year ago. And not only are we HIPAA compliance, not only are we High Trust certified and 256 bit encrypted on all the data that comes in, but having that FDA compliance sets us apart number one. Number two, because we're not an API, we have FHIR fully integrated. We have an API for sharing data, but we're not an API business. We're a SaaS business in health care, in digital health. We can make any company a digital health company. Let's say it's Coca-Cola, and they want to empower their 200,000 employees. They could launch a Coca-Cola Seqster white label in 72 hours to 200,000 employees. That's what we've created. Now, take that and imagine that now within pharma, within precision medicine, within clinical trials, within the payer network, which we're the only platform that's CMS ONC interoperability compliance from the Twenty First Century CURES Act as well.Harry Glorikian: So let me let me see if I... I'm trying to figure out like the angle, right? So I mean, ideally for interoperability, if we talk about the highest level right, you really want to get Epic, Cerner, Kaiser, et cetera, all in a room right? And get them to agree to something. Which is like an act of God.Ardy Arianpour: Some people say, we're doing, you know, it's not my words, but again, a figure of speech, people say, we're doing God's work.Harry Glorikian: But stepping back here for a second, what I see you guys doing is actually giving a platform to the patient and the patient is then connecting the record, not necessarily the systems themselves allowing for interoperability to take place.Ardy Arianpour: So yes, but you're speaking of it because of the direct to consumer experience that you had. The experience we gave you is much different than the experience from the enterprise side. We have a full BI platform built for enterprise as well. Right. And then we have the white label for the enterprise where they launch it to a million patients.Harry Glorikian: That's what, I'm trying to think about that, right? So. Coca-cola says, like, going down your example, Coca-Cola says, "Love to do this. Want to offer it to all of our employees." We make it available to them. But it's the employee that has to push the start button and say, yes, I want my electronic medical record to be integrated into this single platform, right?Ardy Arianpour: But that's that's an example with Coca-Cola. If we're doing something with Big Pharma, they're running a clinical trial for 500,000 COVID patients, as an example. They're getting data collection within one day versus two months, and guess what, we're going to be driving a new possible vaccine. Why? Because of the time it takes for data collection at scale. We empower patients to do that and they get something back. They get to track and monitor all their family health.Harry Glorikian: Right. So so it's sort of, you know, maybe I'm being dense, but sort of the same thing, right? Big Pharma makes it available to the patient. The patient then clicks, Yes, I want to do this and pull in my medical records to make it all everything to be in one place. Yes.Ardy Arianpour: Yes. And I think it's about the fact that we've created a unique data sharing environments. So that's, you know, Harry and Stacey and John and Jennifer and whoever, you know, with whatever use case can share their data and also consent is built with E-consent and digital consent is built within that process. You don't share anything you don't want to share.Harry Glorikian: Right. So let me see if I got this correct. So Seqster is providing a translation and aggregation between systems through a new layer of technology. Not creating true interoperability between systems, right?Ardy Arianpour: Yes. There's a spider web. And. We have untangled the spider beb in the United States of America. We've done all the plumbing and piping to every single health institution, doctor's office clinic, wearable sensor, medical device pharmacy, the list goes on and on, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So let's... Another question. So how does the 21st Century CURES Act of 2016 relate to your business? I think you know you've said something like Seqster has become law, but I'm trying to. I'm trying to understand, what do you mean when you say that?Ardy Arianpour: So when we founded Seqster, we didn't know there was going to be a Twenty First Century CURES Act. We didn't know there was going to be GDPR. We are GDPR compliance before GDPR even came out. Right? Because of our the way that we've structured our business, number one. Number two, how we built the platform by patients for CMS ONC interoperability, you know, final rulings and the Twenty First Century CURES Act, which is, they're synonymous. We worked hand in hand with Don Rucker's team and Seema Verma on the last administration that was doing a lot of the work. Now a wonderful gentleman, Mickey Tripathy has taken the role of ONC, and he understands, you know, the value of Seqster's technology at scale because of his background in interoperability. But what was interesting in the two years that we worked with HHS and CMS was the fact that they used Seqster as the model to build the rules. I was personally part of that, my team was personally part of that, you know, and so we were in private meetings with these folks showing our platform and they were trying to draft certain rules.Ardy Arianpour: We didn't know that they were going to be coming out with rules until they did. And then that's when high level folks in the government told us specifically on calls and also even at Datapalooza when I gave a keynote talk on on Seqster, when Don Rucker did as well right before me. You know, we're sitting in the speaker room and folks are like, "You're going to become law in a month." And this was in February of 2020. March 9th, those rules dropped. I was supposed to give a keynote talk at HL7,  at HIMMS. HIMMS got cancelled in 2020. I just got back from HIMMS 2021 in Vegas just a week and a half ago. It was fantastic. Everyone was masked up. There was only three cases of COVID with 10,000 people there. They did a great job, you know, regulating it. You had to show your vaccine card and all that good stuff. But you know, I would have never thought Seqster becomes law when we were founding the company. And so this is really special now.Harry Glorikian: So what does success look like for Seqster?Ardy Arianpour: It depends how you measure it. So we're in the Olympics. It's a great question. Here's my answer to you. We're in the Olympics just finished, right? So we started out in track and field. We were really good at running the 400 Meters and then somehow we got a use case on the 4x1 and the 4x4. And then we did really well there, too. And then because of our speed, you know, we got some strength and then they wanted us to get into the shot put and the javelin throw and then we started winning there, too. And then somehow, now people are calling us saying, "Are you interested in trying to swim?" We got the 100 meter butterfly. Well, we've never done that. So success for us is based off of use cases. And every use case that we deal with, within clinical trials and pharma, we've define 24 distinct use cases that we're generating business on. Within the payer community now, because of the CMS ONC Twenty First Century Cures Act, there's a major tailwind. Within life insurance for real time underwriting, there's, you know, a plethora of folks that are calling us for our system because of the patient engagement. So this patient centricity for us has been a central pillar, and I've never allowed anyone in our company, whether it's the board or our investors or employees, you know, get sidetracked from that. We've been laser focused on the patients and success at impacting patient lives at scale.Harry Glorikian: So as a venture guide, though, right, like I'm going to, there's only so much money on so much time to tackle, so many different opportunities, right? So it's there is a how do we create a recurring revenue stream and keep plugging along and then generate either enough revenue or raise enough money to do more? And so just trying to think through that for what you guys are trying to do, I get the 4x100 and the swimming. But all of that takes money and resources right to be able to prove out, of course.Ardy Arianpour: And here's another thing we're in a different state. Look, my team and I had a major exit before. We built a billion dollar company out of $3 million. And even though we weren't founders of that company, you know, I was the senior vice president and we we did really well. So, you know, that allowed us to not take salaries that allowed us to take our money and put it into doing something good. And we did that in 2016 to seed it. And then afterwards, I raised, you know, millions of dollars from folks that were interested in, you know, this problem and saw that our team had a track record. And I actually was not interested, Harry, in raising a Series A because of our experience, but we kept on getting calls. And then just six months ago, we announced, you know, our series a funding. Well, we actually announced it in March, I think it was, but we closed our Series A in January of this year and it was led by Takeda Pharma, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe and United Healthcare Group's Equian folks that created Omniclaim and sold to UnitedHealth Group Omni Health Holdings.Ardy Arianpour: So check this out. Imagine my vision in 2016 of having medical data, genomic data fitness data. Well, if you look at the investors that backed us, it's pretty interesting. What I reflect on is I didn't plan that either. We got amazing genomic investors. I mean, it doesn't get better than getting Anne Wojcicki and 23andMe. Amazing female entrepreneur and, you know, just the just the force. Secondly, Takeda Pharma, a top 10 pharma company. How many digital health startups do you know within Series A that got a top 10 pharma? And then also getting some payer investors from UnitedHealth Group's Omniclaim folks and Equian OmniHealth Holdings. So this is to me, very interesting. But going to focus our focus has been pharma and clinical trials. And so Takeda has been phenomenal for us because of, you know, they they built out the platform and they built it out better for us and they knew exactly what to do with things that we didn't know. And with things that patients didn't know on the enterprise, you know, Takeda did a phenomenal job. And now other pharma companies are utilizing our platform, not just Takeda.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, they want their data aggregation. They want as much data on the patient aggregated in one place to make sense of it.Ardy Arianpour: So not necessarily that they actually want to empower patients with a patient centric engagement tool. That's pharma's number one thing right now, the data part, obviously is important, but empowering patient lives at scale is the key, and that's that's our mission. And so, yeah, that's that's a whole 'nother cocktail conversation when I see you soon hopefully in a couple of weeks.Harry Glorikian: Hopefully as life gets, or if it gets back to normal, depending on the variants, you know, we'll hopefully get to meet him in person and have a glass of wine or a cocktail together. So it was great to speak to you. Glad we had this time, and I look forward to, you know, hearing updates on the company and, you know, continually seeing the progress going forward.Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry, for having me. Big fan of Moneyball, so thank you to you and your organizers for having me and Seqster on. If anyone wants to get in touch with me personally, you can find me on LinkedIn or you can follow Seqster at @Seqster. And again, thank you so much for. For having a great discussion around, you know, the the insights behind Seqster.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode.  You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

Stock Club
Why Are General Electric and Johnson & Johnson Splitting Themselves Up?

Stock Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 36:54


Over the past few weeks, both General Electric and Johnson & Johnson have announced that they are breaking up their existing businesses into new companies.  Why is this happening now and what does it say about the existence of old-world conglomerates in the modern market? In this episode, we also discuss: Opendoor's earnings and what it said about the future of iBuying. Airbnb's phenomenal quarter. And two companies we're researching at the minute — Sweetgreen and Alarm.com.  Get your early Black Friday deals of $30 off a MyWallSt subscription (https://bit.ly/30Ht6NP) or $150 off a Horizon subscription (https://bit.ly/3Dx7SAM) now! MyWallSt operates a full disclosure policy. MyWallSt staff may hold long positions in some of the companies mentioned in this podcast.

ASCO Daily News
Dr. Oliver Sartor on the VISION Trial and Improving Care for Patients With mCRPC

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 12:52


Guest host Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, editor-in-chief of ASCO Daily News and director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at the University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, interviews Dr. Oliver Sartor, medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center in New Orleans, on the practice-changing VISION trial and its impact on the current treatment paradigm for mCRPC. Transcript ASCO Daily News: Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast. Our topic today is the practice-changing VISION trial, a phase III trial of radioligand therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our guest host, Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, the editor-in-chief of the ASCO Daily News and director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute, will speak with one of the trial's investigators, Dr. Oliver Sartor, the medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center and Laborde Professor for Cancer Research. Their full disclosures are available on the transcript of this episode, and disclosures relating to all episodes of the Daily News Podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Hi, my name is Dr. Neeraj Agarwal. I am with Dr. Oliver Sartor. Today, we are going to discuss one of the practice-changing trials in the context of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast, Dr. Sartor. Thanks for taking the time to be with us today.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. A pleasure to be here.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: You recently published the primary results of the phase III VISION trial, which tested the efficacy of a novel radioligand therapy, Lutetium-177-PSMA-617, in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Could you please tell us more about this compound and why you did this study?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  So I'll start off with the compound itself. Radioligand therapy is a therapy that has a little warhead, and that warhead in this case is Lutetium-177. But it's guided by binding to PSMA. Now, PSMA is prostate-specific membrane antigen, and many of us are familiar with it, but some may not be. So PSMA is a protein expressed on the surface of most prostate cancer cells. Not all patients have it, but most do. And the ability of the PSMA Lutetium-177 to target the cancer was indicated in some preliminary studies, but they have not been to phase III. So the purpose of the phase III VISION trial was really to design a definitive study to look at overall survival, in particular, to determine whether or not this agent was truly active. And the good news is, it is truly active. And in the VISION trial, we were able to not only extend life with an overall survival benefit, haz ratio 0.62, but there was also a time-to-progression image-based radiographic progression-free survival. It was also much in favor of the PSMA Lutetium with a haz ratio of 0.4. So whether or not you look at time to cancer progression or whether or not you look at overall survival, this is an effective therapy. It, of course, does have some adverse side effects. We can talk more about that, but it's reasonably well tolerated. And I do anticipate that there'll be an FDA approval as a consequence of these pivotal findings.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: These are wonderful results and news for our patients. Please tell me how it will affect the current treatment paradigm of our patients with mCRPC. As we know, you selected patients who had disease progression on chemotherapy with taxanes and novel hormonal therapy. But real-world studies, many of which were published by you, have shown that docetaxel is received by a minority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. So how do you envision treating your patients who do not want to be treated with chemotherapy as many of my patients do? How will you apply Lutetium-177 in their treatment?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  Well, Neeraj, I think that we're going to be restricted in accordance with the label that the FDA provides. And I fully expect that the label will include a progression after treatment with docetaxel or at least one taxane-based therapy because that's the way the VISION trial was constructed. Now, you're raising a very critical point, and that is, what about the individuals that do not want to receive or are ineligible to receive a chemotherapy such as docetaxel? And for those individuals, we now have a new trial called PSMA4, and that trial is going to be testing the Lutetium-177-PSMA-617 in the context of chemotherapy-naive patients. So I think we're going to have to wait until we have more results, more clinical trials completed, prior to the application of PSMA-617 into the more general population of chemotherapy-naive patients. But those clinical trials are now underway.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: That's great. So, Oliver, in the VISION trial, you did mandate a diagnostic PSMA PET scan, and patients who were positive on the diagnostic PSMA PET scan were deemed to be eligible for enrollment on the VISION trial. Do you expect FDA to include diagnostic PSMA scan for eligibility for treatment with the Lutetium-177 in the real-world setting? If it doesn't or if it does, how it is going to affect the treatment of our patients, that availability of treatment for our patients?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's really a great question. And I do expect that PSMA PET imaging will be a criteria given that it was used for patient selection. Now, as it turned out, about 87% of the patients actually did qualify after getting a PSMA PET scan. And given that that was part of the inclusion criteria, I anticipate that the FDA will also incorporate such imaging. Now, it does get to be a bit of an issue because it turns out that PSMA PET is just now coming into more widespread use. We did have, in May of this year, the approval by the FDA for the PSMA PET imaging agent and-- I shouldn't say "the"-- a PSMA PET imaging agent. Prior to that, in December of last year, there was both UCLA and UCSF approval by the FDA for yet another PSMA PET imaging agent. As we move forward, I anticipate that PET imaging is going to be more widely available. And of course, we don't have the approval as of yet today for the PSMA-617-Lutetium-177. And when we do get the anticipated approval, which likely will be in 2022, then I also anticipate that PSMA PET will be more widely available. Now, there are still issues with reimbursement for PSMA PET, and we've encountered those in our own practice. But that's a rapidly changing area, and we're working with the insurance companies in an effort to ensure that patients will get the imaging that they need.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Got it. And obviously, I asked this question because many of my community friends and colleagues have asked me this question.  Before we talk about the side effects of Lutetium-177, would you have any message for our friends and colleagues in the community who are bracing themselves for treating their patients with the Lutetium-177, whether they should be proactive in establishing contacts and relationships with the nuclear medicine facilities and so on?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's a great question, Neeraj, because I think you're raising a very important point. This is going to be the type of therapy that involves multidisciplinary care. We can see that there'll be diagnostic PET imaging as being a component of the study. There'll be the necessity of licensed physicians, typically either nuclear medicine or radiation oncology, to actually administer the drug. And then, quite frankly, the medical oncologists or those urologists who are trained in advanced prostate cancer are going to need to manage the patient. This is a lot more than just getting an injection. Many of these patients are ill. They need to have symptom management. They need to manage their bone health. They need to manage their hormonal manipulations. They need management with regard to pain. So this is not just about giving an injection. And I encourage those people who are interested to involve multidisciplinary teams starting now. And I realize that the therapy is not available now, but you have to anticipate that it will be. And I think it will be a game changer of a therapy, and many patients are going to want it. So that means it's incumbent upon the physicians to be prepared, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neearj Agarwal:  Excellent point. So basically, we should be ready. We should start establishing relationships with nuclear medicine facilities or radiation oncologists who are going to deliver Lutetium-177. Overall, when I was reading the New England Journal paper, the side effect profile seemed very reasonable. I did not see any red flags. To me, it sounded like a pretty well-tolerated drug. So what is your take on the side effects of Lutetium-177?   Dr. Oliver Sartor: I think the side effects are quite manageable. One of the unique side effects is that of dry mouth and that's because the PSMA can actually be expressed in the salivary glands and that there is some potential for salivary gland binding in the PSMA-617-Lutetium. And that means that you can have damage to the salivary glands, and that means dry mouth. It turns out that a little over 40% of the patients actually did complain of a dry mouth, and that needs to be managed typically with fluid intake or various ways of mouth moisturizers. Fatigue is a potential issue. It was raised, as well as some bone marrow suppression. And if you look at the grade 3/4 toxicities, anemia was present a little more than 10% of the time. And that, of course, needs to be monitored. There is some potential collateral damage to the bone marrow. So these patients need to have their counts monitored. They need to have their symptoms assessed. And they need to be managed as they go through the process. It's not just about giving an injection, but clearly, the licensed individuals, including nuclear medicine and radiation oncology, need to be engaged, because without them, there is no injection. So this is a complex multidisciplinary care paradigm. And emphasizing the point, symptom management, yes; adverse event management, yes. But you have to deliver the drug, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Those are fantastic points. Thank you very much, Dr. Sartor, for taking time to be with us. And I'm really hoping that this podcast will be very enriching to our listeners. Thank you very much.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. Glad to be here.   ASCO Daily News:  You've been listening to Dr. Neeraj Agarwal of the Huntsman Cancer Institute and Dr. Oliver Sartor of the Tulane Cancer Center. Our listeners will find a link to the VISION study in the transcript of this episode. Thank you to our listeners for joining us today. If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.   Disclosures: Dr. Neeraj Agarwal Consulting or Advisory Role: Pfizer, Medivation/Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Nektar, Lilly, Bayer, Pharmacyclics, Foundation Medicine, Astellas Pharma, Exelixis, Merck, Novartis, Eisai,    Seattle Genetics, EMD Serono, Janssen Oncology, AVEO, Calithera Biosciences, MEI Pharma, Genentech, Astellas Pharma, Foundation Medicine, and Gilead Sciences   Research Funding (Inst.): Bayer Your Institution, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Takeda, Pfizer, Exelixis, Amgen,    AstraZeneca, Calithera Biosciences, Celldex, Eisai, Genentech, Immunomedics, Janssen, Merck, Lilly, Nektar, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, crispr therapeutics, and Arvinas     Disclosures: Dr. Oliver Sartor Stocks & Other Ownership Interests: Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbvie, Cardinal Health, United Health Group, PSMA Therapeutics, Clarity Pharmaceuticals, Noria Therapeutics, Inc., Clovis Consulting or Advisory Role: Bayer, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Dendreon, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Bavarian Nordic, EMD Serono, Astellas Pharma, Progenics, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Myovant, Myriad Genetics, Novartis, Clarify Pharmaceuticals, Fusion, Istopen Technologien Meunchen, Janssen, Noxopharm, Clovis, Noria Therapeutics, Point Biopharma, TeneoBio, Telix, Theragnostics Research Funding (Inst): Sotio, Janssen, Progenics, Bayer, Sanofi, Endocyte, Merck, Invitae, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Dendreon, AstraZeneca Expert Testimony: Sanofi Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Bayer, Johnson & Johnson, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Progenics   Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.   Dr. Oliver Sartor on the VISION Trial and Improving Care for Patients With mCRPC       ASCO Daily News: Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast. Our topic today is the practice-changing VISION trial, a phase III trial of radioligand therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our guest host, Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, the editor-in-chief of the ASCO Daily News and director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute, will speak with one of the trial's investigators, Dr. Oliver Sartor, the medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center and Laborde Professor for Cancer Research. Their full disclosures are available on the transcript of this episode, and disclosures relating to all episodes of the Daily News Podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Hi, my name is Dr. Neeraj Agarwal. I am with Dr. Oliver Sartor. Today, we are going to discuss one of the practice-changing trials in the context of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast, Dr. Sartor. Thanks for taking the time to be with us today.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. A pleasure to be here.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: You recently published the primary results of the phase III VISION trial, which tested the efficacy of a novel radioligand therapy, Lutetium-177-PSMA-617, in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Could you please tell us more about this compound and why you did this study?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  So I'll start off with the compound itself. Radioligand therapy is a therapy that has a little warhead, and that warhead in this case is Lutetium-177. But it's guided by binding to PSMA. Now, PSMA is prostate-specific membrane antigen, and many of us are familiar with it, but some may not be. So PSMA is a protein expressed on the surface of most prostate cancer cells. Not all patients have it, but most do. And the ability of the PSMA Lutetium-177 to target the cancer was indicated in some preliminary studies, but they have not been to phase III. So the purpose of the phase III VISION trial was really to design a definitive study to look at overall survival, in particular, to determine whether or not this agent was truly active. And the good news is, it is truly active. And in the VISION trial, we were able to not only extend life with an overall survival benefit, haz ratio 0.62, but there was also a time-to-progression image-based radiographic progression-free survival. It was also much in favor of the PSMA Lutetium with a haz ratio of 0.4. So whether or not you look at time to cancer progression or whether or not you look at overall survival, this is an effective therapy. It, of course, does have some adverse side effects. We can talk more about that, but it's reasonably well tolerated. And I do anticipate that there'll be an FDA approval as a consequence of these pivotal findings.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: These are wonderful results and news for our patients. Please tell me how it will affect the current treatment paradigm of our patients with mCRPC. As we know, you selected patients who had disease progression on chemotherapy with taxanes and novel hormonal therapy. But real-world studies, many of which were published by you, have shown that docetaxel is received by a minority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. So how do you envision treating your patients who do not want to be treated with chemotherapy as many of my patients do? How will you apply Lutetium-177 in their treatment?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  Well, Neeraj, I think that we're going to be restricted in accordance with the label that the FDA provides. And I fully expect that the label will include a progression after treatment with docetaxel or at least one taxane-based therapy because that's the way the VISION trial was constructed. Now, you're raising a very critical point, and that is, what about the individuals that do not want to receive or are ineligible to receive a chemotherapy such as docetaxel? And for those individuals, we now have a new trial called PSMA4, and that trial is going to be testing the Lutetium-177-PSMA-617 in the context of chemotherapy-naive patients. So I think we're going to have to wait until we have more results, more clinical trials completed, prior to the application of PSMA-617 into the more general population of chemotherapy-naive patients. But those clinical trials are now underway.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: That's great. So, Oliver, in the VISION trial, you did mandate a diagnostic PSMA PET scan, and patients who were positive on the diagnostic PSMA PET scan were deemed to be eligible for enrollment on the VISION trial. Do you expect FDA to include diagnostic PSMA scan for eligibility for treatment with the Lutetium-177 in the real-world setting? If it doesn't or if it does, how it is going to affect the treatment of our patients, that availability of treatment for our patients?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's really a great question. And I do expect that PSMA PET imaging will be a criteria given that it was used for patient selection. Now, as it turned out, about 87% of the patients actually did qualify after getting a PSMA PET scan. And given that that was part of the inclusion criteria, I anticipate that the FDA will also incorporate such imaging. Now, it does get to be a bit of an issue because it turns out that PSMA PET is just now coming into more widespread use. We did have, in May of this year, the approval by the FDA for the PSMA PET imaging agent and-- I shouldn't say "the"-- a PSMA PET imaging agent. Prior to that, in December of last year, there was both UCLA and UCSF approval by the FDA for yet another PSMA PET imaging agent. As we move forward, I anticipate that PET imaging is going to be more widely available. And of course, we don't have the approval as of yet today for the PSMA-617-Lutetium-177. And when we do get the anticipated approval, which likely will be in 2022, then I also anticipate that PSMA PET will be more widely available. Now, there are still issues with reimbursement for PSMA PET, and we've encountered those in our own practice. But that's a rapidly changing area, and we're working with the insurance companies in an effort to ensure that patients will get the imaging that they need.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Got it. And obviously, I asked this question because many of my community friends and colleagues have asked me this question.  Before we talk about the side effects of Lutetium-177, would you have any message for our friends and colleagues in the community who are bracing themselves for treating their patients with the Lutetium-177, whether they should be proactive in establishing contacts and relationships with the nuclear medicine facilities and so on?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's a great question, Neeraj, because I think you're raising a very important point. This is going to be the type of therapy that involves multidisciplinary care. We can see that there'll be diagnostic PET imaging as being a component of the study. There'll be the necessity of licensed physicians, typically either nuclear medicine or radiation oncology, to actually administer the drug. And then, quite frankly, the medical oncologists or those urologists who are trained in advanced prostate cancer are going to need to manage the patient. This is a lot more than just getting an injection. Many of these patients are ill. They need to have symptom management. They need to manage their bone health. They need to manage their hormonal manipulations. They need management with regard to pain. So this is not just about giving an injection. And I encourage those people who are interested to involve multidisciplinary teams starting now. And I realize that the therapy is not available now, but you have to anticipate that it will be. And I think it will be a game changer of a therapy, and many patients are going to want it. So that means it's incumbent upon the physicians to be prepared, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neearj Agarwal:  Excellent point. So basically, we should be ready. We should start establishing relationships with nuclear medicine facilities or radiation oncologists who are going to deliver Lutetium-177. Overall, when I was reading the New England Journal paper, the side effect profile seemed very reasonable. I did not see any red flags. To me, it sounded like a pretty well-tolerated drug. So what is your take on the side effects of Lutetium-177?   Dr. Oliver Sartor: I think the side effects are quite manageable. One of the unique side effects is that of dry mouth and that's because the PSMA can actually be expressed in the salivary glands and that there is some potential for salivary gland binding in the PSMA-617-Lutetium. And that means that you can have damage to the salivary glands, and that means dry mouth. It turns out that a little over 40% of the patients actually did complain of a dry mouth, and that needs to be managed typically with fluid intake or various ways of mouth moisturizers. Fatigue is a potential issue. It was raised, as well as some bone marrow suppression. And if you look at the grade 3/4 toxicities, anemia was present a little more than 10% of the time. And that, of course, needs to be monitored. There is some potential collateral damage to the bone marrow. So these patients need to have their counts monitored. They need to have their symptoms assessed. And they need to be managed as they go through the process. It's not just about giving an injection, but clearly, the licensed individuals, including nuclear medicine and radiation oncology, need to be engaged, because without them, there is no injection. So this is a complex multidisciplinary care paradigm. And emphasizing the point, symptom management, yes; adverse event management, yes. But you have to deliver the drug, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Those are fantastic points. Thank you very much, Dr. Sartor, for taking time to be with us. And I'm really hoping that this podcast will be very enriching to our listeners. Thank you very much.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. Glad to be here.   ASCO Daily News:  You've been listening to Dr. Neeraj Agarwal of the Huntsman Cancer Institute and Dr. Oliver Sartor of the Tulane Cancer Center. Our listeners will find a link to the VISION study in the transcript of this episode. Thank you to our listeners for joining us today. If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.   Disclosures: Dr. Neeraj Agarwal Consulting or Advisory Role: Pfizer, Medivation/Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Nektar, Lilly, Bayer, Pharmacyclics, Foundation Medicine, Astellas Pharma, Exelixis, Merck, Novartis, Eisai,    Seattle Genetics, EMD Serono, Janssen Oncology, AVEO, Calithera Biosciences, MEI Pharma, Genentech, Astellas Pharma, Foundation Medicine, and Gilead Sciences   Research Funding (Inst.): Bayer Your Institution, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Takeda, Pfizer, Exelixis, Amgen,    AstraZeneca, Calithera Biosciences, Celldex, Eisai, Genentech, Immunomedics, Janssen, Merck, Lilly, Nektar, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, crispr therapeutics, and Arvinas     Disclosures: Dr. Oliver Sartor Stocks & Other Ownership Interests: Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbvie, Cardinal Health, United Health Group, PSMA Therapeutics, Clarity Pharmaceuticals, Noria Therapeutics, Inc., Clovis Consulting or Advisory Role: Bayer, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Dendreon, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Bavarian Nordic, EMD Serono, Astellas Pharma, Progenics, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Myovant, Myriad Genetics, Novartis, Clarify Pharmaceuticals, Fusion, Istopen Technologien Meunchen, Janssen, Noxopharm, Clovis, Noria Therapeutics, Point Biopharma, TeneoBio, Telix, Theragnostics Research Funding (Inst): Sotio, Janssen, Progenics, Bayer, Sanofi, Endocyte, Merck, Invitae, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Dendreon, AstraZeneca Expert Testimony: Sanofi Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Bayer, Johnson & Johnson, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Progenics   Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.   Dr. Oliver Sartor on the VISION Trial and Improving Care for Patients With mCRPC       ASCO Daily News: Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast. Our topic today is the practice-changing VISION trial, a phase III trial of radioligand therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our guest host, Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, the editor-in-chief of the ASCO Daily News and director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute, will speak with one of the trial's investigators, Dr. Oliver Sartor, the medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center and Laborde Professor for Cancer Research. Their full disclosures are available on the transcript of this episode, and disclosures relating to all episodes of the Daily News Podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Hi, my name is Dr. Neeraj Agarwal. I am with Dr. Oliver Sartor. Today, we are going to discuss one of the practice-changing trials in the context of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast, Dr. Sartor. Thanks for taking the time to be with us today.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. A pleasure to be here.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: You recently published the primary results of the phase III VISION trial, which tested the efficacy of a novel radioligand therapy, Lutetium-177-PSMA-617, in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Could you please tell us more about this compound and why you did this study?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  So I'll start off with the compound itself. Radioligand therapy is a therapy that has a little warhead, and that warhead in this case is Lutetium-177. But it's guided by binding to PSMA. Now, PSMA is prostate-specific membrane antigen, and many of us are familiar with it, but some may not be. So PSMA is a protein expressed on the surface of most prostate cancer cells. Not all patients have it, but most do. And the ability of the PSMA Lutetium-177 to target the cancer was indicated in some preliminary studies, but they have not been to phase III. So the purpose of the phase III VISION trial was really to design a definitive study to look at overall survival, in particular, to determine whether or not this agent was truly active. And the good news is, it is truly active. And in the VISION trial, we were able to not only extend life with an overall survival benefit, haz ratio 0.62, but there was also a time-to-progression image-based radiographic progression-free survival. It was also much in favor of the PSMA Lutetium with a haz ratio of 0.4. So whether or not you look at time to cancer progression or whether or not you look at overall survival, this is an effective therapy. It, of course, does have some adverse side effects. We can talk more about that, but it's reasonably well tolerated. And I do anticipate that there'll be an FDA approval as a consequence of these pivotal findings.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: These are wonderful results and news for our patients. Please tell me how it will affect the current treatment paradigm of our patients with mCRPC. As we know, you selected patients who had disease progression on chemotherapy with taxanes and novel hormonal therapy. But real-world studies, many of which were published by you, have shown that docetaxel is received by a minority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. So how do you envision treating your patients who do not want to be treated with chemotherapy as many of my patients do? How will you apply Lutetium-177 in their treatment?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  Well, Neeraj, I think that we're going to be restricted in accordance with the label that the FDA provides. And I fully expect that the label will include a progression after treatment with docetaxel or at least one taxane-based therapy because that's the way the VISION trial was constructed. Now, you're raising a very critical point, and that is, what about the individuals that do not want to receive or are ineligible to receive a chemotherapy such as docetaxel? And for those individuals, we now have a new trial called PSMA4, and that trial is going to be testing the Lutetium-177-PSMA-617 in the context of chemotherapy-naive patients. So I think we're going to have to wait until we have more results, more clinical trials completed, prior to the application of PSMA-617 into the more general population of chemotherapy-naive patients. But those clinical trials are now underway.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: That's great. So, Oliver, in the VISION trial, you did mandate a diagnostic PSMA PET scan, and patients who were positive on the diagnostic PSMA PET scan were deemed to be eligible for enrollment on the VISION trial. Do you expect FDA to include diagnostic PSMA scan for eligibility for treatment with the Lutetium-177 in the real-world setting? If it doesn't or if it does, how it is going to affect the treatment of our patients, that availability of treatment for our patients?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's really a great question. And I do expect that PSMA PET imaging will be a criteria given that it was used for patient selection. Now, as it turned out, about 87% of the patients actually did qualify after getting a PSMA PET scan. And given that that was part of the inclusion criteria, I anticipate that the FDA will also incorporate such imaging. Now, it does get to be a bit of an issue because it turns out that PSMA PET is just now coming into more widespread use. We did have, in May of this year, the approval by the FDA for the PSMA PET imaging agent and-- I shouldn't say "the"-- a PSMA PET imaging agent. Prior to that, in December of last year, there was both UCLA and UCSF approval by the FDA for yet another PSMA PET imaging agent. As we move forward, I anticipate that PET imaging is going to be more widely available. And of course, we don't have the approval as of yet today for the PSMA-617-Lutetium-177. And when we do get the anticipated approval, which likely will be in 2022, then I also anticipate that PSMA PET will be more widely available. Now, there are still issues with reimbursement for PSMA PET, and we've encountered those in our own practice. But that's a rapidly changing area, and we're working with the insurance companies in an effort to ensure that patients will get the imaging that they need.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Got it. And obviously, I asked this question because many of my community friends and colleagues have asked me this question.  Before we talk about the side effects of Lutetium-177, would you have any message for our friends and colleagues in the community who are bracing themselves for treating their patients with the Lutetium-177, whether they should be proactive in establishing contacts and relationships with the nuclear medicine facilities and so on?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's a great question, Neeraj, because I think you're raising a very important point. This is going to be the type of therapy that involves multidisciplinary care. We can see that there'll be diagnostic PET imaging as being a component of the study. There'll be the necessity of licensed physicians, typically either nuclear medicine or radiation oncology, to actually administer the drug. And then, quite frankly, the medical oncologists or those urologists who are trained in advanced prostate cancer are going to need to manage the patient. This is a lot more than just getting an injection. Many of these patients are ill. They need to have symptom management. They need to manage their bone health. They need to manage their hormonal manipulations. They need management with regard to pain. So this is not just about giving an injection. And I encourage those people who are interested to involve multidisciplinary teams starting now. And I realize that the therapy is not available now, but you have to anticipate that it will be. And I think it will be a game changer of a therapy, and many patients are going to want it. So that means it's incumbent upon the physicians to be prepared, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neearj Agarwal:  Excellent point. So basically, we should be ready. We should start establishing relationships with nuclear medicine facilities or radiation oncologists who are going to deliver Lutetium-177. Overall, when I was reading the New England Journal paper, the side effect profile seemed very reasonable. I did not see any red flags. To me, it sounded like a pretty well-tolerated drug. So what is your take on the side effects of Lutetium-177?   Dr. Oliver Sartor: I think the side effects are quite manageable. One of the unique side effects is that of dry mouth and that's because the PSMA can actually be expressed in the salivary glands and that there is some potential for salivary gland binding in the PSMA-617-Lutetium. And that means that you can have damage to the salivary glands, and that means dry mouth. It turns out that a little over 40% of the patients actually did complain of a dry mouth, and that needs to be managed typically with fluid intake or various ways of mouth moisturizers. Fatigue is a potential issue. It was raised, as well as some bone marrow suppression. And if you look at the grade 3/4 toxicities, anemia was present a little more than 10% of the time. And that, of course, needs to be monitored. There is some potential collateral damage to the bone marrow. So these patients need to have their counts monitored. They need to have their symptoms assessed. And they need to be managed as they go through the process. It's not just about giving an injection, but clearly, the licensed individuals, including nuclear medicine and radiation oncology, need to be engaged, because without them, there is no injection. So this is a complex multidisciplinary care paradigm. And emphasizing the point, symptom management, yes; adverse event management, yes. But you have to deliver the drug, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Those are fantastic points. Thank you very much, Dr. Sartor, for taking time to be with us. And I'm really hoping that this podcast will be very enriching to our listeners. Thank you very much.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. Glad to be here.   ASCO Daily News:  You've been listening to Dr. Neeraj Agarwal of the Huntsman Cancer Institute and Dr. Oliver Sartor of the Tulane Cancer Center. Our listeners will find a link to the VISION study in the transcript of this episode. Thank you to our listeners for joining us today. If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.   Disclosures: Dr. Neeraj Agarwal Consulting or Advisory Role: Pfizer, Medivation/Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Nektar, Lilly, Bayer, Pharmacyclics, Foundation Medicine, Astellas Pharma, Exelixis, Merck, Novartis, Eisai,    Seattle Genetics, EMD Serono, Janssen Oncology, AVEO, Calithera Biosciences, MEI Pharma, Genentech, Astellas Pharma, Foundation Medicine, and Gilead Sciences   Research Funding (Inst.): Bayer Your Institution, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Takeda, Pfizer, Exelixis, Amgen,    AstraZeneca, Calithera Biosciences, Celldex, Eisai, Genentech, Immunomedics, Janssen, Merck, Lilly, Nektar, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, crispr therapeutics, and Arvinas     Disclosures: Dr. Oliver Sartor Stocks & Other Ownership Interests: Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbvie, Cardinal Health, United Health Group, PSMA Therapeutics, Clarity Pharmaceuticals, Noria Therapeutics, Inc., Clovis Consulting or Advisory Role: Bayer, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Dendreon, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Bavarian Nordic, EMD Serono, Astellas Pharma, Progenics, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Myovant, Myriad Genetics, Novartis, Clarify Pharmaceuticals, Fusion, Istopen Technologien Meunchen, Janssen, Noxopharm, Clovis, Noria Therapeutics, Point Biopharma, TeneoBio, Telix, Theragnostics Research Funding (Inst): Sotio, Janssen, Progenics, Bayer, Sanofi, Endocyte, Merck, Invitae, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Dendreon, AstraZeneca Expert Testimony: Sanofi Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Bayer, Johnson & Johnson, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Progenics   Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

Profit By Design
167: Growing Through Your Pain Points with John Bates

Profit By Design

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 52:00


We have to write our relationship with our businesses, and not let the businesses take over our lives, but as successful as we can become as entrepreneurs, success doesn't automatically carry over into our personal lives. Today's guest has a very powerful life experience he would like to share and his story is featured in Dr. Sabrina's newly-released The 4 Week Vacation™ book! Listen in as John Bates walks us through some of his most challenging professional and personal moments and the lessons that came out of it. John Bates‘ mission is to bring out what is awesome inside you, so it can live in the world and make a real difference. He designs his programs using principles derived from neurobiology so your communication is as mighty as your ideas. John is an in-demand executive coach. He is also one of the most prolific TED-format coaches in the world. Executives from organizations like Johnson & Johnson's JLABS, NASA (including the Astronauts), US Navy Special Operations, Boston Scientific, and more recommend him to their colleagues as the best leadership communication coach working today. He knows the power creating a TED-like talk can bring to anyone, in business, and in life. John's training is derived from human evolutionary biology and human neurophysiology, so you learn not only what works, but also WHY it works. That gives you principles you can apply to your unique style, which will allow you to achieve ever-increasing success and the ability to play and create in the areas of communication and leadership. John has trained thousands of TED/TEDx/TED-format speakers all over the world. He also works with C-level executives at top companies to make their communications "TED-Worthy." His ongoing program, Live Like a Leader, supports executives, entrepreneurs, influencers, and leaders in being fully integrated, influential leaders. And his podcast, SpeakLikeaLeader.show, inspires people from all over the world. Profit by Design is a Tap the Potential Production in collaboration with Small Business Consulting Group. Show Highlights: John relates a personal, life-changing experience. Dr. Sabrina shares the importance of completing the stress cycle. What a “mid-week weekend” can do for you! Take four weeks away from my business, seriously? (Yes, seriously.) If you're a “one-man band”, you will always play small. Be clear on the idea that you want to bring to the world. John and Dr. Sabrina discuss public speaking and suggest tips for effective communication. Are you ready to Speak Like a Leader? Check out the courses that John offers! If you're ready to take your life back from your business, purchase your copy of The 4 Week Vacation™  (plus you get a bonus!) and join us in the Entrepreneurs Take Your Life Back! Community Facebook group. Connect with John! Find him on his Website, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Links and Resources: New! Now Available!! The 4 Week Vacation™ book with bonuses! Download Dr. Sabrina's Introductory Training: How to Make Your Time Worth $10,000 an Hour Join Dr. Sabrina in our Entrepreneurs Take Your Life Back! Community  

All Gallup Webcasts
Special Edition - State of the Global Workplace - 2021 Report with Raul Almeida

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:00


Called to Coach em Português - Edição Especial - State of the Global Workplace: Relatório 2021 "E se a próxima crise global for uma pandemia de saúde mental? Ela está aqui agora" - Jim Clifton Presidente e CEO Yuri Trafane e Raul Almeida, vão discutir neste Called to Coach em Português, como trabalhar uma cultura focada em talentos e pontos fortes pode colaborar com o engajamento e bem-estar dos colaboradores e principalmente, como nós Coaches de Pontos Fortes, podemos apoiar líderes, clientes e pessoas ao nosso redor nessa jornada de transformação da saúde mental, alcançando a prosperidade pleno na vida pessoal e profissional. Raul Almeida is Business Development & Consulting Account Lead - Brazil/LatAm at Gallup. Ele é um brasileiro que teve a incrível oportunidade de trabalhar não só no Brasil, mas em belos países como Índia, Portugal e atualmente o México. Nesses cenários, ele lidou com inúmeros projetos incríveis envolvendo (mas não se limitando a) lançamentos de produtos / sites e plataformas móveis, ferramentas de experiência do usuário, desenvolvimento de conteúdo, gerenciamento de operações e, agora, abordagem baseada em dados em desenvolvimento de negócios e análise de consultoria. Atualmente, ele trabalha como líder de contas de consultoria e desenvolvimento de negócios para o mercado brasileiro na Gallup, uma empresa de classe mundial que oferece impacto extraordinário nos negócios por meio de análises e consultoria. Raul também trabalha muito bem em equipe e acredita fortemente na inovação tecnológica em todos os setores de nossa vida cotidiana, ele adora trabalhar em um ambiente multicultural de ritmo acelerado e pode realmente ser confiável para executar qualquer tarefa com o máximo de diligência e perfeição. Raul TOP 05: 1. Ativação 2.Foco 3.Disciplina 4.Estratégico 5.Comunicação English Version Called to Coach in Portuguese - Special Edition - State of the Global Workplace: 2021 Report "What if the next global crisis is a mental health pandemic? It is here now" - Jim Clifton Chairman and CEO Yuri Trafane and Raul Almeida, will discuss in these Called to Coach how working a culture of talents and strengths can collaborate with the engagement and Wellbeing of employees and mainly, how, as Strengths Coaches, we can support leaders, clients and people around us in this journey of mental health transformation, achieving the full prosperity in their personal and professional lives. Raul Almeida is Business Development & Consulting Account Lead - Brazil/LatAm at Gallup. He is a Brazilian national that had the awesome opportunity to work not only in Brazil but in beautiful countries such as India, Portugal and currently Mexico. In those scenarios he had dealt with countless amazing projects involving (but not limited to) Product/ Website and Mobile Platform Launches, User Experience Tools, Content Development ,Operations Management and now, data driven approach on Business Development and Consulting Analysis. He is currently employed as a Business Development and Consulting Account Lead for the Brazilian market at Gallup, a World Class Company that provides extraordinary business impact through analytics and advice. Raul is also a team player and strong believer of technological innovation in every sector of our day-to-day life and loves working in a fast paced cross-cultural environment and can really be trusted upon to perform any task with utmost diligence and perfection. Raul´s TOP 05: 1. Activator 2.Focus 3.Discipline 4.Strategic 5.Communication Yuri Trafane formou-se em Gestão de Marketing pela ESPM após ter cursado Química na UNICAMP. Possui dois MBAs, um pela USP e outro pela FGV, seguido de um pós-MBA pela FIA, uma certificação em coaching pela ATD USA e uma especialização em Strength Based Coaching pela Gallup USA. Com sólida formação acadêmica, construiu sua experiência profissional como executivo em empresas renomadas, como Johnson & Johnson, Unilever, Parmalat, Bauducco e Grupo Abril.Atualmente dirige a Ynner Treinamentos, empresa de treinamento e consultoria especializada em Gestão, Estratégia, Vendas e Marketing, onde teve o privilégio de formar executivos de empresas de destaque como Bayer, Nestlé, Bosch, Nívea, Walmart, 3M, Eaton , Emerson, Mercedes-Benz, FMC, Mary Kay, Sanofi, Saint Gobain e várias outras. Ynner é a representante oficial da Gallup no Brasil. Yuri's Top 5 CliftonStrengths: Input (Input), Estudioso (Learner), Ativação (Activator), Significância (Significance), Relacionamento (Relator) Learn more about Gallup's other resources for strengths-based coaching: • Articles & Videos • Webcasts • Guides & Reports • Subscribe to our Newsletter To learn about Gallup's other resources for strengths-based coaching, visit Gallup Access. Called to Coach is a Gallup Webcast (via YouTube) that allows current and prospective coaches to interact with strengths coaches who have found success in strengths-based development.

Into The Wild
94. How to Market to Gen Z Consumers with Tina Wells

Into The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:28


Tina Wells is a business strategist, advisor, author, and the founder of RLVNT Media, a multimedia content venture serving entrepreneurs, tweens and culturists with authentic representation.  She has been recognized by Fast Company's 100 Most Creative People in Business, Essence's 40 Under 40 and more. For over two decades, Tina has led Buzz Marketing Group, an agency she founded at age 16 with clients like Dell, The Oprah Winfrey Network, Kroger, Apple, P+G, Johnson & Johnson, and American Eagle.  She is also the author of seven books, including the best-selling tween fiction series Mackenzie Blue, its 2020 spinoff series, The Zee Files, and the marketing handbook, Chasing Youth Culture and Getting It Right. Tina's board positions have included THINX, the United Nations Foundation's Global Entrepreneurs Council, The Franklin Institute and Young Entrepreneur's Council. She has also served as the Academic Director for Wharton's Leadership in the Business World Program at the University of Pennsylvania and is a member of the 2017 Class of Henry Crown Fellows within the Aspen Global Leadership Network at the Aspen Institute. Grab something hot and listen in to hear what you need to focus on when marketing to Gen Z consumers.  In this episode you will learn about: What prompted Tina to start her business at 16 year old Building on foundations  What it's like to write middle-grade fiction What compelled Tina to write books for middle-grade fiction Where the idea of the book series came from  The keys to marketing to Gen Z The importance of authenticity and creativity when marketing to Gen Z The Gen Z mindset and what we need to know  What it means to be a wild woman: "Existing on my own terms, and not letting anyone define for me what that means." ------------- Got a minute? Would love a review! Click here, scroll to the bottom, tap, and give me 5-stars. Then select "Write a Review." Make sure to highlight your favorite take aways. Subscribe to level up your businessSubscribe here. ------------- Connect with Tina Wells Tina Wells RLVNT Media @tinawells_ Facebook LinkedIn @tinacwells Connect with Renée Warren @renee_warren @we.wild.women www.wewildwomen.com  

AP Audio Stories
Johnson Johnson to split into 2, aim for faster growth

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 1:32


Squawk Pod
J&J Spins-off & Ray Dalio on Remote: “We've been given a gift”

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 36:08


Big changes in big business. Johnson & Johnson is planning to split into two public companies. CEO Alex Gorsky tells Squawk Box's Becky Quick why the decision to break off the brand-name-heavy consumer business from its prescription drug and medical device division will be “in the best long-term interest” of the company's stakeholders.  As companies continue to evolve, workplaces and traditional roles continue to change as well. CNBC's @Work Summit examines the evolution of work since the pandemic began and ways innovative companies are finding and keeping the best workers, investing and developing creative solutions. Bridgewater Associates Founder Ray Dalio and former Netflix Chief Talent Officer Patty McCord spoke with Becky at CNBC's At Work Summit to discuss how workplaces are changing -- and which buzzwords are dead!In this episode:Alex Gorsky, @JNJNewsRay Dalio, @RayDalioPatty McCord, @PattyMcCord1Becky Quick, @BeckyQuick

Motley Fool Money
Inflation and Investing

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 38:37


Consumer prices rise by more than 6% in October, the biggest increase in inflation in more than 30 years. Johnson & Johnson announces plans to split into two companies. Rivian Automotive records one of biggest IPOs of all time. And Disney slips on slowing streaming growth. Motley Fool analysts Andy Cross and Jason Moser discuss those stories and weigh in on the latest from Roblox, The Trade Desk, Upstart Holdings, and PayPal. Plus, our analysts debate the merits of Arby's Vodka and share two stocks on their radar: Sea Limited and Unity. And Motley Fool analyst Maria Gallagher talks with bestselling author Ben Mezrich about his new book, The Antisocial Network: The GameStop Short Squeeze and the Ragtag Group of Amateur Traders That Brought Wall Street to Its Knees.

TechCheck
Bullish Options Run Wild, Nvidia Gets a Downgrade & Mark Zuckerberg's Hail Mary Play

TechCheck

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 44:17


Our anchors start off the morning with a discussion on what Big Tech break-ups would look like after this week's break-up announcements from General Electric, Toshiba and Johnson & Johnson. Then, The Wall Street Journal's Gunjan Banerji joins to discuss retail investors, options trading and much more. Also, CNBC's Julia Boorstin is here to talk Disney as the company celebrates the 2-year anniversary of its streaming service. Next, Wedbush Securities SVP Matt Bryson is here on his latest note downgrading Nvidia to neutral today. Also, CNBC's Courtney Reagan joins to cover the performance of direct-to-consumer companies like Warby Parker and Allbirds. We also have The New Yorker Contributor Charles Duhigg to talk Mark Zuckerberg's metaverse, which he calls a hail Mary play. Plus, we cover the SEC turning down Vaneck's plans for a spot Bitcoin ETF. And later, we check in on Rivian's performance since its public debut this week.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 8a - This Week on 'Unsolved' with Steve Gregory and HOTN [LE]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 27:52


Bill Handel is joined by KFI News Reporter and 'Unsolved' Host to talk about what listeners can expect to hear on this week's show, airing Saturday from 8-10pm. Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee join Bill for the Late Edition of Handel on the News. The three of them discuss news topics that include: Johnson & Johnson is set to split into two companies, L.A. businesses will face fines up to $5,000 for violating the COVID-19 vaccine rules, and Kellogg has filed a lawsuit against its striking cereal workers.

The Real Investment Show Podcast
What Happens If You Retire in Debt?

The Real Investment Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 44:08


Johnson & Johnson's announced division into three entities offers interesting options for investors; what happens if you retire in-debt? Rosso's Inflation Station Blues; Transitioning from portfolio accumulation- to withdrawal-mode in retirement; the thrift philosophies of Grandma Rosso. ------ SEG-1: What Opportunities Does a J&J split offer investors? SEG-2: What if you retire in debt? SEG-2B: Richard Rosso's Inflation Station Blues SEG-3: Shifting from Accumulation to Withdrawal Mode in Retirement SEG-4: Grandma Rosso's Thrift Philosophy NOTE: You can watch the commercial-free version of this video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFvYUmBHkmY&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1 -------- Hosted by RIA Advisors Director of Financial Planning, Richard Rosso, CFP w Sr. Relationship Mgr., Jon Penn, CFP -------- Our Latest "Three Minutes on Markets & Money: Markets Smacked Down by Higher Inflation" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKTnsX3XhyU&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1&t=12s -------- Our previous show, "CPI is "en fuego" --What does it mean for Investors?" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFvYUmBHkmY&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1&t=4s -------- Register for our next Candid Coffee: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/6816352856714/WN_p3ja8GYaQROUvj65YhbyuQ -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- SUBSCRIBE to The Real Investment Show here: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealInvestmentShow -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #Retirement #Debt #Johnson&Johnson #Portfolio #Accumulation #Withdrawal #Inflation #Thrift #Markets #Money #Investing

See You Now
60: Reporting Powers: Rehearsing The Future

See You Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 51:57


While the recent pandemic caused devastating loss of life and strained health systems, it also brought into sharp focus nurses' pivotal role in healthcare and their enormous, and largely untapped potential to shape patient care, rethink how healthcare is organized, and where it's delivered.  Moved by the unprecedented stress and strain on nurses and our health systems, Johnson & Johnson, in partnership with the American Nurses Association and the American Organization for Nursing Leadership, set out to understand the various ways that the nursing profession evolved amidst the pandemic. From the stories and data emerged the pointed Accelerating Nursing, Transforming Healthcare report -- one that offers a deeper understanding on how the pandemic transformed nursing practice and how the momentum of these innovations can steer us to a much better and preferred future of the profession. In this first of a multi episode series, we center on the Accelerating Nursing, Transforming Healthcare Report and how it coincides with the National Academy of Medicine's Future of Nursing Reports, and The Future Today Institute's Tech Trends Report to serve as relevant, actionable playbooks for reducing uncertainty, managing complexity, and building on the momentum of positive change emerging from the COVID pandemic to accelerate nursing and transform healthcare.  Email us at hello@seeyounowpodcast.com. For additional resources, visit our website at www.seeyounowpodcast.com.

Insight On Business the News Hour
The Business News Headlines 9 November 2021

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 11:05


They say what goes up must come down and that's what happened today on Wall Street but...it could have been worse. Here are some of the top business news headlines of the day and make sure you click through to listen to my conversation with entrepreneur and Veteran, Gerald Young...fun stuff about BBQ sauce is just ahead. But, first the news: Johnson & Johnson wins...Oklahoma loses; Hotel workers are just saying, "No."; Today is a special day for...chicken; Door Dash to buy another company and it's big; Tesla stock is having a rough go lately and why; General Electric to split into three companies; The Wall Street Report; And, get ready for another baby boom?  Could be! Those stories and we've got Gerald Young back to check on his BBQ sauce story. Gerald from Young G's BBQ Sauce has been a very busy entrepreneur. And, because it's also Veterans Week...we figured this fit.  A Vet who is also an entrepreneur...and this is a fun interview.  To listen, click here. Thanks for listening! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour.  

Get Home Safe
Johnson & Johnson

Get Home Safe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 94:50


Valerie Johnson has been a teacher at both Pearl Prep and Rio Hondo Prep. She has taught many different age groups and is also married a teacher who happened to be one of the best athletes to ever play at RHP. Valerie has a unique perspective having not just one but two sons who play on the current Rio Hondo Prep football team. As Rio goes into one of the biggest games in in school history this Friday night, Valerie shares what it's like to be a team mom and how special it is for her family to carry on the Johnson family football legacy. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/15mph/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/15mph/support

Financial Residency
Guiding Patients Through Challenging Decisions with Talya Miron-Shatz, PhD

Financial Residency

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 43:40


Dr. Bradley Block of The Physician's Guide to Doctoring has got something special for our audience up his sleeve! Join us every Friday for a new show and new sound on our podcast for the month of November! Let's begin episode 1 of 5!   Talya Miron-Shatz, PhD, is a leader in research at the intersection of medicine and behavioral economics.  She is CEO of CureMyWay, an international health consulting firm whose clients include Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, and Samsung. She wrote the book Your Life Depends on It: What You Can Do to Make Better Choices About Your Health. She wrote it for patients and clinicians alike. We discuss how patients are frequently overwhelmed with the information we give them. How to give it to them in a more digestible way, while still being time efficient, how we can tell if they are understanding us and how to tell if they don't plan on following our recommendations. She also teaches us how to increase the chances that a patient will choose us as their doctor. Find her at www.talyamironshatz.com Today's Sponsor is Locumstory. To find out more visit: doctorpodcastnetwork.com/locumstory

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Guiding Patients Through Challenging Decisions with Talya Miron-Shatz, PhD

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 42:14


Talya Miron-Shatz, PhD, is a leader in research at the intersection of medicine and behavioral economics. She is professor and founding Director of the Center for Medical Decision Making at Ono Academic College in Israel, senior fellow at the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest in New York, and a visiting researcher at the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication at the University of Cambridge. Miron-Shatz was a post-doctoral researcher at Princeton University, and a lecturer at Wharton, the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of over 60 academic papers on medical decision making. She is CEO of CureMyWay, an international health consulting firm whose clients include Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, and Samsung.   She wrote the book Your Life Depends on It: What You Can Do to Make Better Choices About Your Health. She wrote it for patients and clinicians alike. We discuss how patients are frequently overwhelmed with the information we give them. How to give it to them in a more digestible way, while still being time efficient, how we can tell if they are understanding us and how to tell if they don't plan on following our recommendations. She also teaches us how to increase the chances that a patient will choose us as their doctor. Find her at www.talyamironshatz.com   Today's Sponsor is Locumstory. To find out more visit: doctorpodcastnetwork.com/locumstory  

Fairygodboss Radio
Wanda Hope - Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer, Johnson & Johnson

Fairygodboss Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:00


In this episode of Fairygodboss Radio, Romy is joined by Wanda Hope, Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer at Johnson & Johnson. Wanda shares her experiences (and advice!) of her flourishing 30-year career at J&J – from being the first in many roles as a young sales professional to advancing DEI as a thought leader. Wanda Bryant Hope is an accomplished business executive with significant experience in general management, marketing, sales, commercial operations, and human resources. She currently serves as Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer at Johnson & Johnson, and is responsible for globally advancing the company's diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) outcomes, strengthening DEI capabilities, and driving growth through innovation. Prior to this role, Wanda held a variety of leadership positions across Johnson & Johnson including Vice President, Sales & Marketing; Vice President, Commercial Analytics, Development & Operations; and Vice President, Global Performance & Development. She has been recognized for her ability to exceed business results, deliver innovative solutions to complex challenges, lead global change, develop people for optimal results and DEI global outcomes. Wanda is a sought-after speaker and thought leader on advancing DEI to drive business performance and results. Her passion and performance have been recognized with several awards including the Elite 100 of Black Women leaders by Diverse Women Media, Penn State Smeal Diversity Award, and the Most Powerful Women in Corporate Diversity by Black Enterprise Magazine. Wanda received her Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing from The Pennsylvania State University. She and her husband Bobby are the proud parents of Tyler, their 14-year-old son.

Montana Public Radio News
Pfizer vaccines for children headed to Montana; VA will offer booster shot clinics

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 2:01


Thousands of doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for 5- to 11-year-olds are being distributed to state-enrolled providers across Montana. The Montana Veteran Affairs health care system is offering Johnson & Johnson and Moderna COVID-19 booster vaccinations starting Nov. 4.

Voices: River City
195 - Boosted and Floosted (11.2.2021)

Voices: River City

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 59:59


In a welcome rarity, we've got a full house today! Resident epidemiologist Dr. Flo talks us through the big news of the week related to COVID-19. Here in California, the state is setting up 4,000 sites to give out 1.2 million vaccines for kids aged 5-11 in the first week of availability. Meanwhile, the Center for Disease Control is recommending that every adult who has had a Johnson & Johnson shot (as long as they're at least two months removed) get a booster of any kind. Kempa went with Pfizer for round two. It was nice.  We also discuss the 'Striketober' phenomenon last month, in which Americans saw an incredible number of workers (by our current standards) stand up after nearly two years of risking their lives working through the pandemic. American billionaires got some $1.2 trillion richer since coronavirus hit. And don't think the workers haven't noticed. The big question: Is this the start of a mass movement, or just a moment? Thanks for listening, defund the police and, as always: Twitter: @youknowkempa, @ShanNDSTevens, @Flojaune, @guillotine4you, @aolbites Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/voicesrivercity   Sacramentans can hear us on 103.1 KUTZ Tuesdays at 5 pm and again Wednesdays at 8 am. If you require a transcript of our episodes, please reach out to info@voicesrivercity.com and we'll make it happen. And thank you to Be Brave Bold Robot for the tunes.  

RM PODCAST FL
123 | Building resilience in young generation with Dr. Michele Borba

RM PODCAST FL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 33:24


Dr. Michele Borba is an educational psychologist, best-selling author, and TODAY show contributor who has spoken to over one million participants on five continents and to countless media about child development issues. She blends 40 years of teaching and consulting experience with latest science to offer sound, realistic advice to parents teachers and child advocates about helping children thrive. Dr. Borba is an NBC contributor who has appeared 150 times on the TODAY show and countless shows including Dateline, Dr. Phil, The View, NBC Nightly News, The Doctors, Dr. Oz, Anderson Cooper, MSNBC, Fox & Friends, Countdown, Fox, The Early Show, and CNN. Her work is featured in TIME, Washington Post, Newsweek, People, Boston Globe, U.S. News & World Report, The New York Times. Reader's Digest and Globe and Mail. Dr. Borba is recognized globally for her work in bullying and youth violence prevention. She's a media spokesperson for major corporations including 3M, Office Depot, Unilever, Similac, General Mills, Mastercard, All, Galderma, V-Tech, Cetaphil, Splenda, Walmart, Johnson & Johnson and consultant to Apple TV, McDonalds and Disney. To learn more about Dr. Borba connect with her on YouTube by CLIKCING HERE or visit her website https://www.micheleborba.com/ GET YOUR ONLINE COURSE TODAY (Promo code ROMINA) VISIT WWW.CONNECTWITHROMINA.COM TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SHOW AND ROMINA

El Daily con el Gato
#606 El Daily con El Gato 11_02_21

El Daily con el Gato

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 7:49


Día Internacional para Poner Fin a la Impunidad de los Crímenes contra Periodistas; Un comando del ISIS atacó un hospital militar en Kabul: al menos 19 muertos y 50 heridos; COP26: líderes mundiales se comprometieron a detener la deforestación en 2030; La vacuna de Johnson & Johnson aumentaría el riesgo de coágulos de sangre en el cerebro; EEUU anunció que el 70 % de los adultos están completamente vacunados contra el COVID-19; Maduro recibió al fiscal de la Corte Penal Internacional; Justicia de EEUU desestimó siete de los ocho cargos por lavado de dinero contra Alex Saab; Preocupación por Messi: se perdería varios partidos; Chelsea, Manchester United, Barcelona y Bayern juegan en la Champions; Jon Bon Jovi cancela concierto tras dar positivo a COVID; Desfile de Macy's de Acción de Gracias regresa con Baby Yoda

Doctor Vaughan's COVID-19 Updates
Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

Doctor Vaughan's COVID-19 Updates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 3:08


The Johnson and Johnson COVID vaccine has an association with a blood clot in the veins around the brain. It is rare, and it is 30 times more rare in the group most likely to experience it than severe effects of COVID 19 if they don't get the vaccine. This is not a problem with the mRNA vaccines by Pfizer and Moderna. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/covidupdates/message

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Author / Journalist Gregory Zuckerman / Gaby Goldstein and Amanda Litman on GOTV for Tuesday

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 79:23


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more  35 mins A SHOT TO SAVE THE WORLD: The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a Covid-19 Vaccine by award winning Wall Street Journal reporter and bestselling author Gregory Zuckerman is the untold, riveting chronicle of the scientists' epic sprint to create Covid-19 vaccines. Zuckerman takes us inside the top-secret laboratories, corporate clashes, and high-stakes government negotiations that determined the trajectory of the vaccine efforts. He interviewed more than 300 scientists, executives, and investors behind the most important pharma players, including Moderna, BioNTech, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Novavax and Merck, as well as top decision makers and stakeholders within Oxford University, the US government and key academic institutions. Gregory Zuckerman is a Special Writer at the Wall Street Journal where he writes about business, economic, and investing topics. He's a three-time winner of the Gerald Loeb award, the highest honor in business journalism. Zuckerman regularly appears on such media outlets as CNBC, Fox, MSNBC, and is the author of The Greatest Trade Ever, The Frackers, and The Man Who Solved the Market. Gaby Goldstein and Amanda Litman  Gaby Goldstein is co-founder at Sister District, whose mission is to build progressive power in state legislatures. As Senior Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, she leads programs that strengthen the pipeline of diverse, progressive candidates, as well as programs that educate the public about the importance of state legislatures and policy, and which support progressive state legislators once elected. Prior to founding Sister District, Gaby was a bioethics lawyer and health policy researcher. She holds a BA from UC Berkeley, JD from Boston University School of Law, and PhD in health policy from UC Berkeley. Amanda Litman is the co-founder and executive director of Run for Something, a PAC that helps recruit and support young, diverse progressives running for down-ballot office. Previously, she was the email director for Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign, digital director for Charlie Crist's 2014 Florida gubernatorial campaign, deputy email director for Organizing for Action, and an email writer for Barack Obama's 2012 re-election campaign. She graduated from Northwestern University in 2012 with a B.A. in American Studies. She lives in Brooklyn with her rescue dog, Sadie. For more information, visit RunForSomething.net and follow @AmandaLitman on Twitter. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page  

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Utility, Meaningfulness, and Relevancy . . . Aha!

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 33:13


Leeann Leahy is CEO at VIA, a full-service advertising agency/communications company and winner of AdAge's 2019 Small Agency of the year. Via‘s 100 or so employees work their creative magic to unleash growth for such name brands as Arm & Hammer, Unilever (ice cream novelties Klondike, Good Humor, Popsicle), Perdue Chicken, and CarGurus. The agency has a few clients in Maine . . . a lot more nationally . . . and even some that are global.  Leeann says the agency makes small budgets work “much bigger and harder than they should” and runs on a critical balance of head and heart. In this interview, Leeann outlines the agency's 5 responsive principles: “be curious,” “think like the audience,” “be on time,” “be on budget,” and “create respect,” and 5 artistic principles: “figure it out,” “find the magic,” “believe,” “do work that makes you proud,” and “honor the process.” It's a formula that succeeds . . . as evidenced by the agency's 28 years in the business.  In this interview, Leeann talks about VIA's strategy for building two-way brand/consumer conversations and the magic of the “Aha! Moment,” when the mind jumps from “facts” to understanding. The process? Dig deep with clients to get beyond the facts and gain meaningful insights;  Understand who a brand's customers are, their experience with the brand, and their “journey  Analyze insights to reveal and unlock a pathway to connect consumers with the brand Bring real emotion to the table  Present the brand in a way that's useful, practical, and meaningful at a personal level . . . and not just talking at the customer. Leeann says, “It's not just selling attributes, but selling utility and meaningfulness and relevancy.” Six years ago, in order to streamline operations, the agency eliminated departmental siloes and set up interdisciplinary pods which are led by four equal partners:  A client strategy lead (who elicits from the client what is to be done and why),  A planning lead (who aligns work with client needs, market trends/ opportunities, and strategies),  A creative lead (who invents new products, generates advertising promotion, or “produces the show”), and  A project management lead (who oversees resourcing, time management, budgets, and scopes – how the work is done and when).  Then, three years ago, the agency established VIAlocity, a remote pool of diverse (culturally, ethnically, life-stage-wise, and ability-wise) freelance consultants (who may or may not be in advertising). These journalists, painters, photographers, or stay-at-home moms, who are kept on retainer, can be tapped for projects for an additional fee to collaborate on VIA's offerings. The program recently expanded to include some full-time remote workers. Leeann can be found on her agency's website at: https://theviaagency.com/. Transcript Follows: ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I'm joined today by Leeann Leahy, CEO at VIA based in Portland, Maine. Welcome to the podcast, Leeann. LEEANN: Hi. Thank you for having me. ROB: Excellent to have you here. Why don't you kick us off by telling us about VIA and what the agency's superpowers are? LEEANN: VIA is a magical place that operates out of Portland, Maine. We are a full-service advertising agency, although advertising is a narrow term. We're really a communications company that helps unleash the growth potential of our clients' brands. We're about 100 people. I say we operate from Portland, Maine because that's where we're headquartered, but our clients actually are all over the country and indeed the globe. I used to say we don't have any clients in Maine, but we do work with a couple now. We're on a quest to bring the fun back into our industry. I think our superpower is that we believe in magic. We believe in the power of magic. We have 10 principles, and they range from “be curious,” “think like the audience,” “be on time,” “be on budget,” and “create respect,” which are the responsive ones, to “figure it out,” “find the magic,” “believe,” “do work that makes you proud,” which are the artistic ones. There's a really great balance between the head and the heart in those principles. The heart side of it I think is our superpower because we do believe in magic. We believe that it can be found if you have a smart enough strategy, or indeed, the strategy itself could be magic if you can dig deep enough and find some insights that are revealing and unlocking a pathway to connect a consumer and a brand. We believe that creatively, the choices you make and the craft you construct and the way you engage consumers – there's a lot of magic in that. And we believe all of this works to grow brands. We've seen it over and over again. I guess the last thing I would say is in our own culture, we believe that joy and happiness and fearlessness lead to better creative work. That's not just in the creative department; that's across the whole agency. So we find the magic and we believe it's possible. That's our superpower. I think it sets us apart from other agencies, because as I said, we're having fun where very few are. ROB: Right, a little bit of magic, a little bit of joy, and just this pervasive sense of optimism over pure execution. The head and the heart, as you said. Pull us a little deeper and give us a picture. A typical client is not in Maine, apparently, for the most part, but what does a common client look like for you all? What size, what stage, what type of brand? LEEANN: It really ranges. We've worked with Perdue Farms chicken for the last 10 years, and we're their agency of record and the lead of their integrated agency team. We set all the strategy for them. We help them understand their brand portfolio, architecture. We dig deep on consumer insights. We help them manage their branded versus private label conundrum that they're in in the marketplace. We create all the communications, whether it's broadcast-based or digital. We generate lots of social assets. And then we work with all of their other agencies – shopper, marketing, promotional, etc. – to make sure everyone's operating off the same strategy. That's one kind of relationship. Another one is we work with the ice cream novelties portfolio of North America for Unilever, so Klondike, Good Humor, Popsicle. In that instance, we're really unleashing a lot of work the client has done strategically and we're setting it free creatively. We come back with creative solutions that take what are sometimes considered small budgets competitively, and we make them work much bigger and harder than they should. They punch above their weight. We work with Church & Dwight. Arm & Hammer is one of our clients. They exist, believe it or not, in about 17 categories in the grocery store. You think of it as baking soda, but actually it's everything from baking soda to laundry detergent to kitty litter to toothpaste to deodorant to licensing agreements with Hefty and other garbage bags and things like that. It is a really wide range. For them, again, we're thinking through everything, from the customer experience on those brands and where we can hit touchpoints to creating the advertising itself to putting it in the market to doing the analytics. So we really have varied relationships with our different clients, and that's what I think keeps it fun for us. I've always loved being in advertising and on the agency side because we go deep, deep, deep on very different categories. I can be talking about baking soda for hours one day, and the next day I'm talking about people buying cars online with CarGurus, or I'm talking about modern commerce with another client, or I'm talking about financial services. We really run the gamut. Check into financial services. You can't get bored. ROB: You're talking about digging into that customer experience, and it seems like that's where some of the magic can come from. When you're talking about novelty ice cream, you're not selling features. For a lot of people, you are thinking through to an experience, an emotional attachment, a different season in their life, even, perhaps. You just can't get there if you're sitting up in an ivory tower, thinking creatively by yourself. LEEANN: Absolutely. We do a lot of deep digging and consumer research and ethnographies and anthropological digging into our consumers and our prospects, and we try to talk about them as if they're family members or friends. We don't describe targets as 18- to 24-year-old white men who play these following sports and believe these five things. That's not going to help us. We really need to think of them as maybe people who seriously don't take life that seriously. That would be a way you want to talk about the target. We try to get to the mindset, because that's where the magic happens. It's not that there's not a lot of rigor to get to that mindset; there is. But there's a difference between a fact and an insight, and too often, I think people confuse them, or companies confuse them. They do the research, they get the answers, they have a bunch of facts, and then they say, “This is what we need to talk to.” Facts are important, but they are really just stimulus from which you can find and articulate the insight, because the insight has to be much deeper and more meaningful. The way I like to think about it, you know you have an insight when somebody says it when you're describing a consumer or their mindset or their need state or something, and you go, “Oh my God, that is so smart and also so completely obvious.” It's like, “Why didn't I see that before?” That to me is an insight. I think we spend a lot of time differentiating between facts and insights, and that helps us to get to a richer understanding of who we're talking to. Once you have that richer understanding, you can create work that really hits that nerve dead-on. And when it hits that nerve, it becomes an engaging two-way conversation because now you've filled into my life as a brand in a way that's useful, practical, and meaningful to me, not just talking at me. ROB: That's really grounded, really human. Leeann, if we rewind a little bit, talk about the origin story of VIA. How did the agency come to be in the first place? LEEANN: The agency was founded 28 years ago by John Coleman and a couple of other founders and partners. Specifically, John Coleman and Rich Rico were working at a big software company together. Rich was in charge of the design of marketing materials and John was a salesman. As any good salesman does in an internal marketing organization, they call up and complain about the materials they're given and have rich conversations about how they can be better, which I'm sure came very, very happily across the phone lines. [laughs] But the two struck up a relationship where they really could trust each other and rely on each other and understand how they could make materials even to sell these multimillion dollar programs in a more meaningful way. It was, again, by digging into those insights and being different strategically and not just selling attributes, but selling utility and meaningfulness and relevancy. The two of them spun out and started with one division of that company, which was called ABB. By the end of that year, they had 12 divisions of ABB as clients. So the agency was born doing B2B work to support sales teams. Over the years, it evolved many, many times. We have a saying at VIA: Born in 1993, reborn every year since. Because John was an engineer by education, they were very at the forefront of the digital era and did a lot of big technology website strategy as the internet emerged in the late '90s, early 2000s. Then pivoted again after the dot-com bust of the early 2000s. Pivoted again to do a lot of design and corporate work, really built on the strategic consultancy background they had. They were doing really deep strategic projects for clients, and then also design components and nomenclature and visual vocabularies for clients. All sorts of things. Then evolved again to be more focused on some B2C, direct-to-consumer work, but on a more regional basis, and then evolved again to be nationally recognized, national brands targeting primarily towards consumers. Now, I would say we're the best of all of those bits because we understand the digital landscape in a way that many don't, which is why we work with Chick-fil-A as their social and digital AOR. We understand big business and complications, which is why we work with some B2B clients and we take very, very complicated stories and make them very simple and digestible and important, and why we have these very, very powerful consumer brands like a Perdue or a Popsicle or Golden Corral. These are clients that have real meaning and bring real emotion to the table with consumers. We get to do all of those things every day, and that's, as I say, the best bits of all parts of our history. ROB: It's quite a path to navigate, too, because a lot of people crashed on the rocks. They got fat and happy from the late '90s, the era of the million-dollar website. I'm sure some things were almost like shooting fish in a barrel for people who were digitally savvy. We kind of went through that again with social for a season, where people were splashing similar budgets. But it's kind of matured in. It doesn't feel like there's as much of that splash, and now it has to be substance. Go ahead, it sounds like you've got something to drop in. LEEANN: I agree with you. I think what people were doing was saying, “Ooh, I have to be on social because that's where my consumer is” – again, a fact but not necessarily an insight. Just because they're there, doesn't mean you have to be there. They would just create content and, as we say, “spray and pray.” Just throw it out on the social channels and figure, “Oh, that's good. People will want to engage with me.” And that busted. I think what we're seeing is now the brands that are most successful in the social sphere are the ones who are understanding their place in the conversation and maintaining that place in the consumer's heart and mind and being respectful of the conversation they're entering, but also offering and being additive to it. Maybe it's utilitarian. Maybe it's something that is a little bit of shared brand custody, as we call it, when you want the consumer to take ownership of some of the brand elements. I think it requires deep strategy and a lot of thoughtfulness. It's not just, “I had a television ad and I made a shorter version of it and threw it all over Facebook and Instagram,” because that's not how those platforms work. ROB: Let's look at the intersection of VIA and its origin story with you. How did you come into the business and then end up in such a position of ultimate trust? What did that journey look like? LEEANN: I started in the business as a planner, at the time called an account planner. In my days as a planner, I was an account planner, a brand planner, a strategic planner. I wore every single version of that title. But I grew up in this world of consumer insights and understanding that the agency role could be to be the conscience or the therapist, really, between the consumer and the brand – connecting and listening to both and connecting the dots: being the conscience of the brand so they didn't overstep, and being the conscience of the consumer so they didn't turn away or block out the brand. So I grew up in planning. I was Chief Strategy Officer on a global level at an agency, and then at a more local level at an agency, I worked on blue chip brands like JPMorgan Chase, the NFL, AT&T, and Johnson & Johnson, all those good things. Then I transitioned in about 2012 to general agency management. That was because I had a relationship with someone who ran an agency called Translation in New York, and he was looking to make it go from just a project-based consultancy to a full-service agency. He and I had a friendship and relationship and really respected one another's intellects and points of view on how to turn brands on. So I joined him and I was there for a couple of years. The agency was exploding. We were doing great things. But in that time, I actually met John Coleman, our founder, and we had a lunch that struck me because we shared a lot of the same values. We talked a lot about what the business could be and what we wanted it to be and the kind of work we wanted to do. Honestly, again, it goes back to we find magic and we believe, and that's that optimism. We felt like we could do work that would not only move people, but maybe even leave the world a better place. We had a great talk, a couple hours, and we walked away friends. It occurred to me after that conversation that I was laughing a lot, and I realized – thanks to my husband actually pointing it out – that in my role as president of that other agency, I was having a lot of success, but I wasn't really having any fun. I went into this business because I thought it would be fun and magical and creative, and that was the part that was being stifled. Over the course of like six months, John and I became friends; he offered me the opportunity to come up to Maine. I was like, “I can't believe we're moving from New York.” I was born and raised in the New York area. But we moved ourselves to Maine, and I have not looked back once. I absolutely love it, and we do feel like we tend to put people before profits. We tend to have a lot of fun. We enjoy each other. John has since stepped out of the day-to-day of the business, but the management team and the associates – everybody here, really – we strive to create an environment where people enjoy each other because it creates a baseline of collaboration and inspiration that leads us to better work. Kind of a roundabout answer to your question, but I started out on the insight side. I've always really been invested in the creative aspect of what we do. I think the culture in which we do that really feeds the creative, so VIA gives an opportunity to do all of those things: really, really smart strategic consultancy background, really important focus on culture, and now we've also brought in a Chief Creative Officer who has fabulous expertise in crafting. His name's Bobby Hershfield, and he's amazing at crafting ideas so that the way they're presented and put out into the world really engages the consumer in a very intimate way. ROB: What a journey. You've mentioned a couple of times this AOR, agency of record designation. You've probably seen that phrase change meaning a few times. What does it mean now versus what it used to mean, and how should ambitious agencies that are chasing that designation think about it? LEEANN: There was a time when all we wanted was to be AOR. We couldn't be bothered with projects. Not VIA “we”; I mean “we,” the industry. We kind of shunned the idea that we could pop in and be experts on a project, or consultants. I think that's not true anymore. There are lots of amazing, interesting projects out there that you can work with really interesting partner agencies on, and partner clients. We do a combination of AOR and project work. But I think when you are AOR, it is a lot more than just “we set the campaign and everybody else executes it.” That is not what it is at all. I think it really is about understanding deeply the business that the client has, how it sits within the competitive marketplace, what their operational realities are, what the political realities are, how that business can grow, identifying that growth opportunity, and then unleashing creative to optimize it and to really go out and get that growth. That means thinking through everything, understanding the consumer experience and the customer journey and where the brand can plug into it and where it shouldn't, and then concepting ideas that go through that journey with the customer. That means way more than “I'm making an advertising campaign around a single idea and then everyone's executing it.” Now it's “I'm understanding the business. I'm understanding the consumer. I'm bringing those two together in a thoughtful way, and I'm going to create an idea that hits at different points in different ways so that the effect is not redundant, but it is in fact cumulative. ROB: That would seem probably more channel-specific, which is why some of the AOR designations have gone more channel, do you think? LEEANN: Yeah, possibly. But I think it's also because we're in a business now where we're competing not just with other people who do the same thing we're doing, but we're competing with agencies that do different things than we do. You might have a client who goes, “I have a traditional agency of record and then I have a digital agency of record.” But in fact, that's just false silos. If you have somebody who truly understands your business, they're thinking of it as how the consumer is experiencing this, not just what channel it's going to be on. The channels are very secondary to the story you're trying to tell and how you want the consumer to experience that story. ROB: Right. The brand still has to live somewhere. You can't just have a bunch of fractured brands. LEEANN: Yeah, exactly. ROB: Leeann, as you reflect on your time in leading VIA, and even before that maybe, in the industry, what are some things you've learned along the way that you might do a little bit differently if you were going back and giving yourself some advice? LEEANN: I kind of had a feeling a long time ago, well before I was even in a managerial role in an agency at large – I was in a managerial role in my discipline of planning, but not at the agency at large, and as a planner, I didn't have to know the business of our business. That's one piece of advice. I don't care what level you are or what discipline you are; you should understand how this industry makes money. I got away with living in la-la land as a planner for a good portion of my career, not really ever even understanding how we billed clients. You can get bogged down by it, but I think it's also important to understand. There's a balance. But I had this intuitive sense that there was a lot of waste in agencies. A lot of wasted hours, a lot of wasted discussion, a lot of wasted time, and we weren't getting to the meat. We were passing a baton around the agency in the hopes that somebody would stop and hold the baton and be like, “Okay, now I'm going to work on this.” I refer to it as the “See below” email. You may have gotten one of these from someone once upon a time. I consider these evil. Someone gets an email from someone else requesting something, and they just pass it along to someone who works with them and say, “See below” – which they might as well have said, “I didn't bother to read this. I'm making it your problem.” The person under them very often sends it to a person under them, and it just continues from there. That's what I mean by passing the baton and not really stopping and thinking. About six years ago at VIA, we got rid of all of the department silos within the agency and got rid of the gatekeeper mentality that perpetuated that baton passing. We rebuilt the agency from the bottom up to be much more agile, to be much more collaborative, and to have much more fun together. We created these interdisciplinary pods that work around clients, and each pod is led by four equal partners and leaders. There's a client strategy lead who's responsible for understanding what's being asked of us and, more importantly, why. There's a planning lead who helps us to honor insights and market trends and opportunities to have a strategic pathway. So they're responsible for the way. We have a creative lead who's responsible for the “wow,” whatever that means, whether it's inventing a new product or doing an advertisement or producing a show. It's all under the “wow.” Then we have the project management lead, who's responsible for the how and the when, which is really about resourcing, time management, budgets, scopes, all of that. When we put them all on equal footing, something really wonderful happened. They started acting like real partners. They started understanding that they were mutually accountable for this client's growth and that they were all part of the same sentence. Longer than a sentence; it would be a run-on. But you get what I'm saying. [laughs] You couldn't just have a client call one of them and ask a question and necessarily get the “Yes, you can have that Tuesday at 3:00,” because they're not responsible for that. They have to go, “Wait, are you asking the right question? Why are you asking that? Let's think about that strategically. Let's see if there's a different creative response. And oh, by the way, I have to go check with somebody else to see how our resources go.” It became honestly faster, which is sort of counterintuitive, but it's faster to get things done. It's inherently more collaborative. And as a result of it being more collaborative, everybody feels included and they can see their fingerprints on the work, and that makes it more fun. I would've done that a lot sooner. I kind of had that specced out in my brain I want to say almost 20 years ago, and we wrote it up and then I didn't do anything with it. It took a long time, but six years ago we did it, and it has helped shape our agency. It's helped get to better work. It gets to better insights. We have deeper client relationships. As I said, we have a happier populace all around because everyone feels included. And frankly, as everyone else is complaining that procurement is out there squeezing the profitability out of agencies, I feel like we regained our ability to be profitable because we eliminated the fat. So I would've done that sooner. ROB: Certainly less layers. Some of that seems to also come along with the evolution of communication channels that are available. Maybe this is more relevant to – it sounds like your org is largely in Portland, even if your clients are elsewhere. But even on distributed teams, you almost get stuck in the “See below” thing; when your choices are “Am I going to call someone, am I going to text them, or am I going to email them?”, you fall into email. But now we have some tighter lines on messaging. People will hop in a quick chat now, even online, even on a Zoom or a Slack group chat. LEEANN: Absolutely. Listen, dispersed teams are the reality of the future. We at VIA do believe that we are better when we are together in person as much as possible, so we really do try to do that, and we're being very thoughtful about how to do that safely. We did go back to the office in July. But we also really appreciate that some people have certain tasks or certain roles that are just more productive when they're working as individuals and remotely. So we have a hybrid model, and it really boils down to what task you have and what role you're playing on a given day. But you're right. We've retrained everyone, because now I know I have to consider others as thoughts pop into my head. I can't just sit there and do my own work. Even if I am remote, I've got to reach out to my partners. So I'm going to jump on Slack, I'm going to jump on Zoom, I'm going to pick up the phone, I'm going to even shoot them a text. But the conversation is much more free-flowing, and I think it gets to better solutions. Then to your other point, the channels that are available to us are changing so much. We took that model that we used at the top of every piece of business and we then applied it in the creative department. Like, why do we always just have our directors and copywriters concepting? That doesn't make sense. Maybe there's a product design person or maybe a technologist or a promotional person who should be in those concepting phases. So we actually work in creative roundtables where it's not just a two-person team; we assemble the right team for each assignment and we draw from all different areas of expertise, and it's the same kind of collaboration. You're all mutually responsible for the concept, so whatever concept we have is born able to fit all those different places. ROB: There's a lot to pull on there as well, but I want to be mindful of our time here. What is coming up, Leeann? What's coming up for VIA and the industry as a whole that you're excited about? LEEANN: I think it's a great time to be in advertising, honestly. I'm excited that our competitive set changes every day. I'm excited that sometimes we're competing with media companies and other times with creative boutiques and other times with consultants. I think that's really interesting. I'm excited that the smartest and best agencies can get deeper in with the C-suite and not just the marketing department or the CMO. I'm excited for how we utilize remote workforces and invite more diverse populations into our agencies and into our industry as a result of that opportunity, because we can reach further afield. I think that fundamentally changes the experiences and thoughts that come to the table. Of course, if you want to really have a great brainstorm and great creative, bring together two completely disparate things and throw them into a room and see what explodes out of it. People who are together, people who are dispersed, people of different backgrounds, people at different life stages – it's all an opportunity for us to think more broadly. And because clients are starting to see that they need more partners in helping them think – even in-house agencies. I don't see that as a threat. I see that as an opportunity, because we can get in there and help them think through things strategically and stop them from navel-gazing, but also leverage them for their expertise that we don't have from being in the four walls. So I think the most exciting thing is how our competitive sets are changing and how that opens up creative opportunities for us. And in order to get there, I think we need to – well, I know, and we all know, but we're actively working to diversify our workforce so we can come to the table with different ideas that catapult businesses forward. ROB: That's a whole other area where distributed helps tremendously. LEEANN: It definitely does. ROB: Different circumstances, different places. You can tap a lot broader pool of people to come together. LEEANN: Yeah, we have a program called VIAlocity that we started three years ago, before COVID, if there was a before COVID. [laughs] We hired talent from all over the world who were different from us, whether they were different culturally, ethnically, life stage-wise, ability-wise. We hired them into this collective and put them on a retainer. They were mostly freelancers who worked in different fields all around, or people who weren't traditionally in advertising. They were journalists or painters or photographers or stay-at-home moms. We put them in this collective so that we could tap into them. The retainer bought us the right to have them engaged in our email system and assigned to a pod so they knew what was going on, and then when we activate them on a project, we pay them a project fee on top of that. They're able to work for other people as well, but it gave us access to a much bigger pool. And that was fully remote, with the idea that we asked VIAlocity participants to be in Maine five days out of each quarter. They didn't have to be five consecutive days, but five days, just so that we could get that chemistry and get to know each other. Now, post-COVID, we've actually expanded VIAlocity to not just be our fractional workers who are on retainer and get project fees, but we have a couple of full-time remote workers who are part of VIAlocity also. If you're full-time remote, you have to be at the headquarters for 10 days out of each quarter. Obviously, the health situation, dependent on that. But so far, so good. ROB: Assuming they can get back into their home country. We have a guy who's out of country and he hasn't been able to come see us because he's not sure he can get back in. He's a U.S. citizen living elsewhere. It makes it interesting. But I think we're getting closer, is what I can say. LEEANN: I think so. We're getting better at working together in different ways, and that's great. I still think there's nothing like a good old-fashioned collaboration when you're in person because you just can't interrupt each other or build on each other's ideas on Zoom the way you can naturally in a room. The energy's just not there the way it is physically. But if you can combine the best of the physical togetherness with the best of the remote work and what it gives you, then there's magic to be found. ROB: Magic. Right back where we started with the magic. Magic here at VIA. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast, Leeann. LEEANN: My pleasure. Thank you for having me. ROB: And for sharing your experience, your wisdom. You've got it very well-formed and very well-communicated. Glad to have you. LEEANN: Thank you. Sometimes I just nerd out on it, though, so that's a little weird too. [laughs] ROB: [laughs] All good. Wonderful, Leeann. Be well. Bye. LEEANN: Great. Thank you, Rob. ROB: Thank you for listening. The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast is presented by Converge. Converge helps digital marketing agencies and brands automate their reporting so they can be more profitable, accurate, and responsive. To learn more about how Converge can automate your marketing reporting, email info@convergehq.com, or visit us on the web at convergehq.com.

The Dallas Morning News
10/27/21: Dallas Mayor Eric Johnson tests positive for COVID-19...and more news

The Dallas Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 4:05


Dallas Mayor Eric Johnson tests positive for COVID-19; Dallas County to receive $2.3 million from Johnson & Johnson in opioid settlement; Dallas District Attorney drops charge against homeless man kicked repeatedly by paramedic; Federal judge tosses attempt by Southwest Airlines pilots to stop vaccine mandate

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What you need to know about mixing and matching COVID vaccines, getting boosters

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 5:27


Beginning Friday, COVID-19 booster shots for both Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available to eligible populations. The CDC and FDA also authorized mixing and matching vaccines and boosters. Amna Nawaz discusses the latest with Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
What you need to know about mixing and matching COVID vaccines, getting boosters

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 5:27


Beginning Friday, COVID-19 booster shots for both Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available to eligible populations. The CDC and FDA also authorized mixing and matching vaccines and boosters. Amna Nawaz discusses the latest with Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

TODAY
TODAY 3rd Hour: Latest on CDC approving Moderna and J&J booster shots. Consumer confidential: cookies and privacy. Kermit The Frog on his mission to protect the planet.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 35:48


Overnight, the CDC approved booster shots for both Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines and gave the green light to mix-and-match — NBC medical contributor, Dr. Natalie Azar, has the latest and is answering your questions. Plus, a consumer confidential, Vicky Nguyen has tips on how to protect your privacy online. Also ahead, in our series #TODAYClimate, Kermit The Frog is telling Al Roker, Sheinelle Jones and Vicky Nguyen about his mission to celebrate and protect the planet.

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams
DAY 275: Nine House Republicans vote with House Democrats to hold Bannon in contempt

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 42:55


The Department of Justice will decide whether or not to pursue the criminal contempt charge. At a CNN Town Hall, Pres. Biden remained optimistic about his domestic agenda. He also indicated his support for changing the filibuster to pass certain legislation. And the CDC approved Moderna and Johnson & Johnson booster shots. Philip Rucker, Robert Costa, Barbara McQuade, Don Calloway, Mark McKinnon and Don Winslow join.  

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
¿Si tuvieses una máquina para viajar en el tiempo a donde irías?

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 248:21


En el día de Volver al Futuro, hablamos con nuestros oyentes sobre la posibilidad de tener un DeLorean como el del Doc y viajar en el tiempo, para corregir ciertas cosas de las que te arrepientes o simplemente de vivir un evento histórico en particular.Un estudio de Harvard determinó que pensar en un futuro positivo, nos da una posibilidad de vivir sanamente hasta nuestra vejez.Si tu primera vacuna fue de Moderna y la segunda es de Johnson & Johnson, ¡no hay pex! estudio determinó que la mezcla de vacunas puede ayudar a elevar los anticuerpos contra el Coronavirus. 

TODAY
October 21: Human remains found in search for Brian Laundrie. FDA authorizes boosters for Moderna and J&J. Inside the efforts to rescue kidnapped missionaries in Haiti. What's next for Queen Elizabeth?

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 33:17


Breaking overnight: an attorney for Brian Laundrie's family says the human remains found in a Florida nature reserve are likely to be his. Plus, the FDA has authorized extra doses of the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines and backing a mix-and-match approach to boosters. Also ahead, inside the desperate efforts to rescue the 17 kidnapped missionaries in Haiti. And, what's next for Queen Elizabeth? The 95-year-old has canceled several events after being advised by doctors to rest.

PharmaTalkRadio
J&J Vision on Progress in Eyecare and Meeting the Needs of Future Patients

PharmaTalkRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 23:00


About the Episode: What does the future of eyecare look like? How does a global company stay innovative? Listen to this podcast to hear Dr Xiao-Yu Song, Johnson & Johnson Vision, providing the latest information on J&J Vision's new products, and her approach to innovation.    Key Takeaways:  How to encourage innovation in a large, global company What the current and future eyecare needs are How Johnson & Johnson Vision is expanding and innovating their products, including a first-in-class drug delivery contact lens About the Speaker: Xiao-Yu Song is the Global Head of Research & Development for Johnson & Johnson's eye health business. She has overall R&D responsibility for new product development and life cycle management support as well as portfolio management and innovation governance across all platforms in Johnson & Johnson Vision. Xiao-Yu earned her Ph.D. in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, her M.S. in Biochemistry and Medical Degree at China Medical University, and completed postdoctoral training in autoimmunity and immunology at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.    For more information: About disruptive innovation in clinical research, click here. About drug delivery and partnerships, click here.  For more information about PharmaTalk Radio, visit theconferenceforum.org.

Earnings Season
Johnson & Johnson, Q3 2021 Earnings Call, Oct 19, 2021

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 60:16


Johnson & Johnson, Q3 2021 Earnings Call, Oct 19, 2021

The Real Investment Show Podcast
Stocks to Watch as the Earnings Parade Continues

The Real Investment Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 3:47


NOTE: Watch the video version of this report by subscribing to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgBSGXS0vpQ&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1 (10/19/21) Earnings season is well underway, and there are companies of interest to us: Nexflix' adding of classic shows, like "Seinfeld," and investingi on new, original programming, portend for subscriber growth. UnitedAirlines has been struggling, thanks to the pandemic travel phobia, so there's room to grow. Johnson & Johnson have also been under pressure, but look at the retinue of items the offer that people need to buy. Similarly, Procter & Gamble has been doing better following a correction; also a well-diversified staples company. Transportation is an area of interest, Kansas City Southern reports today; products have to be shipped by truck and train as supply chains revive. KCS suffered a pullback, creating an opportunity to buy. - Hosted by RIA Advisors Chief Investment Strategist, Lance Roberts -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #Netflix #UnitedAirlines #Johnson_and_Johnson #Procter_and_Gamble #Kansas_City_Southern #Stocks #Trading #Rates #Money #Markets #Finance

Short Wave
COVID-19 boosters are here

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 11:09


The United States is on the verge of dramatically expanding the availability of COVID-19 vaccine boosters to shore up people's immune systems. As NPR health correspondent Rob Stein reports, the Food and Drug Administration is poised to authorize the boosters of the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines. Still, many experts argue boosters aren't needed because the vaccines are working well and it would be unethical to give people in the U.S. extra shots when most of the world is still waiting for their first.

NBC Nightly News
Friday, October 15, 2021

NBC Nightly News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 20:43


FDA panel recommends Johnson & Johnson booster shot, Covid vaccine mandates fueling showdowns nationwide, and former President Bill Clinton hospitalized with infection.

The News with Shepard Smith
Hollywood Strike, J&J Boosters, Two-Headed Turtle

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 49:43


Founding partner of Puck News Matt Belloni explains how the Hollywood strike would not only be disastrous for Hollywood, but also for the entire economy. CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports on a FDA advisory panel's unanimous vote to recommend boosters for the nearly 15 million people who received Johnson & Johnson's vaccine. NBC's Sam Brock updates from a Ft. Lauderdale courthouse where the confessed Parkland shooter is set to plead guilty to all the charges related to the 2018 massacre. CNBC's Kate Rogers discusses a new report that says the U.S. labor shortage may get worse in the years to come. CNBC's Contessa Brewer reports on the rising popularity of digital fashion. Plus, CNBC's Perry Russom reports on a rare two-headed turtle brought into a Massachusetts wildlife center

PBS NewsHour - Segments
FDA panel backs another shot for some Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine recipients

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 10:10


An FDA advisory panel on Friday recommended a second booster dose for Johnson & Johnson's single-shot vaccine. Dr. Celine Gounder, an infectious disease specialist and epidemiologist at New York University's Grossman School of Medicine, and Dr. Ashish Jha, the dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, join William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Up First
Thursday, October 14, 2021

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:12


A study suggests Johnson & Johnson vaccine recipients could benefit from another booster brand. Also, investigators looking into the Jan. 6 riot await answers from four former Trump administration officials. And the White House calls on ports and private industry to help unstop shipping bottlenecks and rescue the holiday shopping season.

The NewsWorthy
Wind Energy Boost, Supply Chain Solution? & Netflix's Biggest Series - Thursday, October 14th, 2021

The NewsWorthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:14


The news to know for Thursday, October 14th, 2021! What to know about offshore wind farms that could be going up all around the U.S. Also, a new study that might impact anyone who got the COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson. And the World Health Organization is trying something new to find the true origin of the virus. Plus, a new plan to help fix supply chain issues causing product delays, why the government will be sending more money to some Americans next year, and the series "Squid Game" set an official Netflix record. All that and more in around 10 minutes... Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com/shownotes for sources and to read more about any of the stories mentioned today. This episode is brought to you by BetterHelp.com/newsworthy and Rothys.com/newsworthy Support the show and get ad-free episodes here: www.theNewsWorthy.com/insider            

Making Elephants Fly | Conversations with High Octane Leaders, Dreamers, & Creatives
080: A Journey from Cult to Content | A Conversation with Julia McCoy

Making Elephants Fly | Conversations with High Octane Leaders, Dreamers, & Creatives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 67:16


On this episode of Making Elephants Fly, Terry sits down with Julia McCoy. As a content marketing influencer, educator, and author, Julia is committed to helping people break out of the content ruts that stop success. After failing out of college by trying to do things “the right way,” Julia followed her dream to write for a living at 19 years old. In 2011, three months after teaching herself online writing after dropping out of college, Julia founded Express Writers. She's built her company to over $5M in gross revenue completely through ad-free content marketing. Her agency team has more than 90 members that work from home, and together, Express Writers has served more than 5,000 clients, from Johnson & Johnson and Nordstrom to small B2Bs, completing over 35,000 content projects successfully for clients. She's spoken at Content Marketing World, led workshops for MarketingProfs as a guest expert, and was interviewed on Forbes as a content marketing thought leader. Julia is the author of four bestselling books and counting. Her memoir, Woman Rising: A True Story, tells the whole unbelievable life story: how she escaped her father's cult (right after she started her business), and built a life of freedom, happiness & joy. Today, she focuses on The Content Hacker as a way to pass her growth-focused content knowledge on to a new generation of content marketers — the mavericks, the radicals, the outside-the-box thinkers. Join Julia and Terry as they talk about her journey from leaving her own Father's cult, launching a business, releasing best-selling books, and scaling and eventually selling Express Writers. We talk leveraged what she knew to actually find actual freedom and now helps others do the same through creating their own content. Find out more at http://terryweaver.com and join Terry & Julia at the Thing at http://thething.live and use the code PODCAST for a discount.

Very Happy Stories
38. Harvard to Minimum Wage: A Missed ADHD Diagnosis

Very Happy Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:54


How does a Harvard graduate end up broke, divorced, and working minimum wage? In this episode, Liza interviews Aron Croft, Harvard-trained ADHDer with a Master's degree in Coaching Psychology. Aron shares his personal story of how he was finally diagnosed with ADHD in his mid-thirties. If you are frustrated parenting a kid who seems completely unmotivated, listen to this episode. Aron reveals realistic and reliable best practices to motivate our kids outside of medication. More importantly, he reveals how we can help regulate our kids when they are constantly being bombarded with artificial dopamine hits all day long. This interview is a wake-up call. Kids with ADHD are not going to perform just to make us happy. Find out what lights them up. About Liza's Guest: Aron Croft appeared to have it all when he got into Harvard. But that was the beginning of his demise. He struggled nonstop for 15 years until he was broke, divorced, and earning minimum wage, failing out of his first 7 jobs and businesses. But after getting a Master's degree in Coaching Psychology and a diagnosis of Inattentive ADHD, his life changed. He built a successful Fortune 500 career consulting to companies such as Marriott, Deloitte, Johnson & Johnson, McDonald's, KPMG, and United Healthcare. He also got remarried, and most importantly, discovered how to get sh*t done with a neurodivergent brain. Now he's on a mission to raise awareness about Inattentive ADHD, how it goes under the radar, and how to rebuild your life post-diagnosis. www.HiddenADD.com *This episode is sponsored by Green Compass CBD.* Liza's favorite CBD brand for her family is Green Compass, which is USDA Certified Organic. Click here to learn more. https://veryhappystories.greencompassglobal.com/ Connect with Liza: Follow Liza and Very Happy Stories on Facebook and Instagram  https://www.facebook.com/veryhappystorieswithLizaBlas https://www.instagram.com/lizasveryhappystories/ Download Liza's free Thrive Guide for more of Liza's best practices on empowerment and happiness. Subscribe to Liza's newsletter at http://VeryHappyStories.com/

TODAY
October 12: Raiders' head coach Jon Gruden resigns. Breaking news on vaccine mandates from Texas. More on what's behind Southwest delays.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:39


The Raiders' head coach, Jon Gruden, resigns after offensive emails surfaced — the latest and the reaction. Plus, overnight Texas Governor Greg Abbott banning all entities in the state from requiring the covid vaccine – even private businesses. This as an FDA committee moves closer to clearing Moderna and Johnson & Johnson boosters this week as cases, hospitalizations and deaths decline. Also, more on what's behind those Southwest Airlines cancellations and delays.

The Daily
The State of the Pandemic

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 19:21


The coronavirus seems to be in retreat in the United States, with the number of cases across the country down about 25 percent compared with a couple of weeks ago. Hospitalizations and deaths are also falling.So, what stage are we in with the pandemic? And how will developments such as a new antiviral treatment and the availability of booster shots affect things?Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The authorization for booster shots applies to groups of people in the United States fully vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine, but about 45 percent of the country's fully inoculated people received Moderna or Johnson & Johnson doses.Merck said it would seek authorization for molnupiravir, an antiviral pill that the company says is effective against Covid. Experts said such treatments could be a powerful tool against the virus.Despite a fall in new cases, hospitalizations and deaths, public health officials said the pandemic remained a potent threat.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
The Un-Squeaky Wheel: How Inattentive ADHD Goes Under the Radar w/ Aron Croft

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 22:12


Aron Croft appeared to have it all when he got into Harvard. But that was the beginning of his demise. He struggled nonstop for 15 years until he was broke, divorced, and earning minimum wage, failing out of his first 7 jobs and businesses. But after getting a Master's degree in Coaching Psychology and a diagnosis of Inattentive ADHD, his life changed. He built a successful Fortune 500 career consulting to companies such as Marriott, Deloitte, Johnson & Johnson, McDonald's, KPMG, and United Healthcare. He also got remarried, and most importantly, discovered how to get sh*t done with a neurodivergent brain. Now he's on a mission to raise awareness about Inattentive ADHD, how it goes under the radar, and how to rebuild your life post-diagnosis.  Today we learn how his ADHD diagnosis at 34 led him to recover from being broke, divorced, and earning minimum wage to a successful Fortune 500 career, and turned this Influencer's side hustle into his full-time job… Enjoy! In this episode Peter and Aron Croft discuss:   2:00 - Intro and welcome Aron!  3:14 - So you got into Harvard and things were going great- what happened? 4:28 - Ref: FTN “The One with the ADHD PhD, Featuring Rachel Cotton”  5:15 - How did you feel when things started going off the rails and you didn't know why? 6:24 - What was it like when you finally got diagnosed; and the year prior when you rented half of a bed? 8:32 - And just when things were turning around with Aron's new job…  9:42 - So how did you pull out of that situation?  Ref:  At the time of publishing Seinfeld is now on Netflix   11:25 - Aron on Adderall akin to the scene in Limitless with Bradley Cooper on NZT  13:58 - On those ‘waking up' moments and for the first time realizing you're not a total loser! 15:40 - So you get diagnosed and things begin changing- then what happened? 16:52 - When did you give up the Sweet Tarts and come to the epiphany that you were unfulfilled? 17:49 - On finding Dopamine via other sources 18:48 - See, podcasts ARE fun!  19:22 - How can people find you? https://hiddenadhd.com  @aroncroft on Twitter  @HiddenADHD on Facebook  INSTA  YouTube and hidden_adhd on TikTok 20:33 - What is it with TikTok anyway?! 21:03 - Thank you Aron!  Guys, as always, we are here for you and we love what the responses and the notes that we get from you. So please continue to do that, tell us who you want to hear on the podcast, anything at all, we'd love to know.  Leave us a review on any of the places you get your podcasts, and if you can ever, if you ever need our help, I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  21:28 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits — TRANSCRIPT:  — I want to thank you for listening and for subscribing to Faster Than Normal! I also want to tell you that if you're listening to this one, you probably listened to other episodes as well. Because of you all, we are the number one ADHD podcast on the internet!! And if you like us, you can sponsor an episode! Head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ It is a lot cheaper than you think. You'll reach... about 25k to 30,000 people in an episode and get your name out there, get your brand out there, your company out there, or just say thanks for all the interviews! We've brought you over 230 interviews of CEOs, celebrities, musicians, all kinds of rock stars all around the world from Tony Robbins, Seth Godin, Keith Krach from DocuSign, Danny Meyer, we've had Rachel Cotton, we've had  the band Shinedown, right? Tons and tons of interviews, and we keep bringing in new ones every week so head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ make it yours, we'd love to have you, thanks so much for listening!  Now to this week's episode, we hope you enjoy it! — My name is Peter Shankman. You are listening to Faster Than Normal. I am thrilled that you're here. It is a great day outside, probably one of the last warm days we're going to have this year until like, I don't know, sometime in 2022, but it is a good day, there is good news on the horizon. Life is good. Everyone is happy. I'm happy. I hope you're happy.  So who do we have today? We have someone who was pretty happy. He got into Harvard and he's like, holy crap. I got into Harvard. I'm pretty sure he was happy then. But as he told me, when I talked to him about coming on the podcast, he said that was the beginning of his demise. After getting into Harvard, he proceeded the struggle nonstop for 15 years until he was broke, divorced, earning minimum wage bailing out of his first seven jobs and businesses. I'm talking about Aaron Croft. It is great to have him on the podcast because- after he got a master's degree in coaching psychology and a diagnosis of inattentive ADHD, his life changed. He a built successful fortune 500 career consulting to companies such as Marriott, Deloitte Johnson, Johnson, McDonald's KPMG and healthcare. He got remarried. Most importantly, he discovered how to get shit done with a neurodivergent brain and now he's on a mission to raise awareness about Inattentive ADHD, how it goes under the radar and how to rebuild your life if you get a diagnosis of the same.  Peter. Thank you. It's so awesome to be here. And I do have to say that it's actually a really shitty day in Chicago. It's just been raining and everything.  So, uh, probably that means it'll hit us probably in about 24 hours, 20, 36 hours. That's usually how it happens so we will enjoy it while we have it. But I have no doubt that later in the week, we'll be crap on a stick, anyway. Good to have you here, man. It is great to finally talk to you. I know your story. Um, so you grew up, you weren't diagnosed and you're just like, Hey, going through life and you wind up getting into Harvard and you're like, man, I'm the shit. And then you, in fact, as the announcer would say, in fact he was not the shit. Tell us what happened.  Yeah. I mean, I had, I was a really just naturally good test taker. I had this great support structure growing up. Like, I mean, I had parents that were pushing me. I had older sisters who paved the way for me in school and built a good reputation with teachers and I just had really smart, ambitious friends that would invite me to study with them and that sort of thing. And you know, all those factors converged and I pulled off, you know, an amazing heist of sorts and somehow managed to graduate number one in my high school class, get into Harvard like woo hoo! My life is set like que que the trumpets and, uh, yeah, it turned, it turns out it wasn't. When I got to Harvard, the wheels just fell off. Lack of structure. And honestly Peter, you know, what I used to get through high school was just massive amounts of procrastination followed by minor heart attacks, followed by getting my work done. And by the time I got to Harvard, you know, I had freedom for the first time in my life. I was like, I don't, I'm done with that. I don't want to do that.  What I find interesting is that you're not the first person. Uh, on this podcast, who's gotten into Harvard and realized holy crap, nothing is working. Um, we actually had someone, uh, several years ago named Rachel Cotton. Uh, she was doing her PhD at Harvard and, uh, she had been, she got through undergrad and her graduate degree by uh, mainlining Adderall and no.. no not Adderall, NoDoze and mainlining, uh, uh, caffeine pills. And, you know, she finally had good healthcare at Harvard and she went to it for physical induction and the doctor asked if there's anything else there's anything else they should know and she goes, yeah. I drink about, you know, 14 cups of coffee a day, and take about nine, nine NoDoze. Um, and she just said it nonchalantly and the doctor goes to that's that's, that's, that's probably not normal. And that was the beginning of her diagnosis. So there's something about Harvard, but, um, you know, so you get into it and, and shit starts going off the rails and talk to us about how you must've felt, because I'm assuming much like I did when things would go off the rails for me, you know, it's obviously 100% entirely my fault. I'm the fuck up. It's obviously there's nothing else that could be wrong with it. It's totally me. Um, how could I be such a horrible.  100%. Yeah. I mean, I feel like you just put my brain on loud speaker there, Peter, so thank you for that. Yeah, no, I completely, I mean, so I didn't get diagnosed until my mid thirties. And so this is all like under the radar, undiagnosed and you know, the only explanation that I had was the one that my mom had, which was Aron thinks you better than everyone, that he doesn't have to play by the rules. And he's just lazy and, you know, it's sorta like, well, I'm cutting all these corners and I'm getting away with these last minute saves, like, I guess she's right. And I mean, you know, to this day, I'm still piecing back together my self image and self confidence from all those years of misinformation.  What was it like when, tell us about the, the, sort of the great reveal moment when you finally got diagnosed and, you know, you'd been gone for 15 years how, and if I get diagnosed, like, holy shit, there's a name for this and it starts to make sense. Yeah, totally. Um, let me, let me tell you that. And let me just tell you, uh, what happened about a few months before that, just to get an idea of kinda where, how we got here, because when we go from Harvard we sort of have to paint the real picture. So, uh, A year before I'm diagnosed. Uh, I, I've got all of my possessions, all my belongings in a few suitcases and my wife's just basically kicked me out of the house. So we're getting divorced and I'm broke and I'm earning minimum wage. So anyway, so I'm carrying my two suitcases up the stairs of this shared house, uh, that I'm now going to share with four other acquaintances and I'm in, I'm in the room and I'm unpacking my stuff in the closet. And then Billy this 26 year old tech support agent from Vietnam comes and flops down on my king size bed. Kind of starteling me and I'm like, Hey, Billy, what's up, you know, but he looks really comfortable and that's when it hits me. He hasn't flopped down on his, on my king size bed.  Oh no.  He's flopped down on his half of OUR king size bed because renting half of a bed was all that I could afford at that point in my life.  Wow.  That's that's, that's only a bump. It was, it was such a wake-up call, right.  Did he at least smell good?  I mean, you know, I mean, I think it was, uh, I think it was, uh, Obsession, you know by CK, it was pretty, pretty delightful, you know, it's kinda musky. Uh, and yeah, so anyway, so of course the, the heart attack of that experience got me into action. I got a better job. And then. And then from that better job, which I only was at for seven months, I was able to move into a new company and get a raise. And I'm like, oh, this is great. Like I've, you know, I've rebuilt my life, blah, blah, blah. And anyway, so I'm three months into that job and it's all like high fives and backslaps everyone loves Aron and, uh, then history repeats itself. All of a sudden I got a call from my manager saying the client doesn't like your work. They think that it's subpar and you need to stay late for every night this week and maybe every night next week, if you don't get it done and redo all the work you've done the last few months. And you know, it doesn't mean you can't get done everything else you have to get done this week and you can't charge, you know, bill the time to the client more or anything. And like, Peter, I literally just freak out. Like, I mean, I'm thinking like I'm already, I mean, I'm already taking NoDoz and you know, I'm already at the edge of, at the edge of my bandwidth. Like I don't have another gear to stay late, you know, and redo work that I've already done in addition to a full day job. Like no way.  And, uh, yeah, go ahead. No, this is what happens. So, so you're sitting there in the, you know, probably like deer in the headlights type thing. W what was the next step?  Total, total deer in the headlights. And like, you know, like people say, like, when you die, like your whole life flashes in front of your eyes, there's something in slow motion. Like for me, It was kind of flashing in front of my eyes at that point, because what I was seeing was this whole image of rebuilding my life was going to be gone. At that point I was effectively a 34 year old divorce, a living with my mom. It wasn't technically living with my mom because it was living with my mom's sister, but it's basically the same thing.  And I'm reminded of the Seinfeld episode where, uh, you know, George, is that when we look to you should go talk to her. Yeah. Because balding middle-aged men with no job who live with their parents have a really good success rate there,  Love it, love it. Right. And those, and you can't see this at home, but Peter and I are chatting and I've got the nice bald round dome. And, but what he said is totally true. I'll, uh, George Costanza. And so anyway, like I see my life, I see my life just falling apart for my eyes. I freak out and a friend had mentioned his ADHD and Adderall. He mentioned that socially, like going out drinking, but all I knew because I'd never tried Adderall even really paid any attention to it. But. He said it helped him stay up late to go out drinking. So I'm like, dude, I need to stay up late for this like thing! Or I'm going to get fired and live in my mom's sister's house.  That's how Pfizer originally marketed Adderall is. “Hey, here's the stay up late going out, drinking a drug, right?” Yeah. I totally can imagine. I can totally imagine him saying that. And that's what, what you glom on. So I totally get.  Yeah. And like, exactly. And, uh, and then, yeah, so, so anyway, so I get to work that Monday and like, I go through the day and then kind of midday, cause that was sort of the, the advice that I got like that I could take it and it would get me through the night or through like, you know, staying until 9:00 PM or 8:00 PM. So about mid day I take it anyway, I walk around like I walk around and just kill some time and I come back and I sit down at my laptop. And, you know, it's like in a conference room because I'm a consultant. There's like other people and distractions. And I'm like, of course, working on some super boring shit, like PowerPoint slides and Excel spreadsheets. And, uh, I sit down, I do some work like for a few minutes and then I look off and I look back at my boring stuff and I keep working on it. And then I look away for a little bit. Like, a minute. And then I look back and I keep working. I was like, holy crap. I'm working on this thing without stopping, even though it's not exciting and interesting, like.. is this book people have been talking about this whole time when they've said, Aron, just sit down and work on it!?! You had the Bradley Cooper NZT moment in Limitless, where he sits, where he takes the pill. He sits down, everything becomes clear and in color.  Like, it was literally as if like you'd given a blind person site and it was like, it was like, oh, this is what purple looks like. Like I didn't realize whatever I was everyone was talking about.  That is spectacular, but it's entirely true. Everyone who's been there has had that. I call it that Limitless moment. If you haven't seen this film, dude, go out this afternoon, stop what you're doing and go see this film. He literally, he takes his pill of NZT, which gives him quote, unquote access to the other 90% of his brain. And, and he there's the scene. It's a stairway scene. He walks in the stairway and it goes from black and white drab to super high Def color where every single sound like the ticking of a bicycle, he hears the ticking of the wheel of greatness every day. And he's like, I get it. Right. And, and, and the, the landlord lady who is like, who's like on his ass to pay the rent, you know, five minutes later, he's sleeping with her. Right. It's just. That thing where he's just like, everything makes sense now. Yeah. We've all had that!  Right. Exactly. And if you, if you take Peter's suggestion and you go and see the movie, uh, I also look like Bradley Cooper- so that's like a bonus as well.  Hey, I'll, I'll, I'll sure, why not?  Don't don't look at the show notes! [And you're totally reading the show notes now aren't you- Aron's picture is on the main page ;)] But you know, it's, it's funny because those moments, everyone talks about this one, right. And he talks about the sort of those, those Zen moments, those wake up moments. I think the thing that people don't mention the most about those moments is that it's the wake up call is not only, wow- look at all this shit I can DO, but also holy crap, I'm not the complete loser that I thought I was.  Wow. So, you know, what's amazing about that, Peter, um, is.. I only came to that realization like a week or two ago, because I was putting together this like nine minute TED talk that ADDA is putting out, uh, next month as part of ADHD awareness month. And that literally is the theme of my talk, but I didn't make that connection until I wrote it. And you just like, I should have been just talking to you because you just said it so perfectly clearly. We've all been there man. That's, you know, that literally comes from years of, I remember, you know, back in high school, I remember back in college, like my fourth day of my freshman year, I said something stupid. And I, you know, my, my social acuity didn't kick in and I said something stupid. And I know that's it, I just fucked up 4 years. I remember, I remember screwing up four years ago. I think I was just stood up for his college and it, it, it, why am I just so different? Why am I such a loser? Why am I, and, and. It's amazing how you, how you see that. Um, in people who haven't been diagnosed and they get diagnosed, they under, it's not even so much the diagnosis, you break your leg, you have a, you have a bone sticking on your leg. You pretty much know you've broken your leg. This isn't, this is a secret, this is a secret disease. Right? And so you, you get diagnosed for the first time. You understand it, right. You didn't have a bone sticking out of your brain. You couldn't tell that there was something wrong with you. That could be fixed. So that's it's yeah, it's a massive wake up call. So, all right. So you're diagnosed things, start changing. Now what.  Uh, yeah, so then, then I live happily ever after, and shit just works perfectly. Um, no. So then, then I get medication and it's like a game changer, right? Right, so I go and get diagnosed. The week, like as soon as after, as I could, and then I get medications, it's a game-changer and I go from being an under performer where to like an average and then an above average performer a nd I was like, this is great. Um, and it was really the first time in my adult life that I performed in any meaningful capacity, because as you said, I failed out of my first seven jobs in businesses and it was just like shit show after shit show. And, uh, so I then did what any responsible 34 year old does that's living on his own? I got home from work every day, broke out the weed, played video games and ate freaking sour patch, kids and sweet tarts like every effing day.  I love it. How'd you come out of that?  Uh, well, it was about a few years later and I was like, crap. This, this like hedonic pleasure of doing all that isn't fulfilling. Like, yes, I enjoy it in the moment, but it's also, it's also not making me happy, deep down and you know, my social relationships weren't thriving because of it. Um, and. You know, I also wasn't achieving my fullest potential, you know, like Abraham Maslow, ‘what one can be one must be'. And that was creating like an internal lack of fulfillment and dissonance. So I finally just said that, Hey, maybe holding down a job, isn't my biggest achievement that I can have in life. Maybe I could have something bigger and do something more and make a bigger impact. And so that for me, I finally said, okay, I stopped finding dopamine in those artificial pleasures, if you will. And I started discovering, I could find dopamine through achieving personally meaningful goals and striving to be better, and to constantly improve myself.  What happens when, uh, how many times have you had that moment where you're like, I can't believe I'm getting paid to get this high, essentially the high, the high being, what you love to do. Cause I come off the stage every day and I'd have to shake whenever I speak, as it was to shake my head and be like still, they still don't know. They still think that I'm, you know, I'm still getting paid for this crap. Unbelievable. I still get that.  I think, I think about that. I mean, I think of that in my coaching sessions with clients, like, I love to talk about this shit. Like, you want to talk about how to like improve your life and be productive or like strategy!? Like that is candy, even podcasts, right? Like, like, I mean, obviously I'm not getting paid directly on this, but, this is like the most fun thing in the world. I get to hang out with someone awesome, we get to talk about the shared interests, which, you know, we're both so passionate about and we had to make a difference, like, yeah, same. Yeah. Like you hit it. I love, I love how clearly, uh, and I don't mean this as a knock against anyone else I've talked to, but I feel like there's a clarity of not purpose, but a clarity of thinking, and how you've processed so much of this stuff. That is just a level above.  Thank you. I think a lot of it comes to comes to the point where you're just like, you know what? I know what works. I know what doesn't. I know how I got here. Fuck it. I'm just gonna, I'm gonna say how I feel. Um, tell us, I want to keep it to 20 minutes, I wanna be respectful of your time and the audience's time; cause it's been 20 minutes, you know, ADHD and all that. Um, how can people find more of you? Because there's a lot more that we will discuss next time I have you on but where can they find you? Where can they, where can they learn more about you? Because you have some interesting backstory and some interesting future story. And I think that our audience will want more of that. Tell us.  Yeah, absolutely. So, um, the future story stuff that Peter's referring to, just so we don't leave people with a complete view of me as a fuck up.  No, obviously I told you in the very beginning, you know, you're doing, you're doing fortune 500 coaching now you're doing tons of stuff, you know? So obviously you, you figured it out.  [19:22 - How can people find you? https://hiddenadhd.com  @aroncroft on Twitter  @HiddenADHD on Facebook  INSTA  YouTube and also at hidden_adhd on TikTok] Okay. So then we don't, we don't need to go into it. So I would say then just, uh, just Google hidden ADHD. Uh, so the “hidden” is kind of like a nod to a bit of the inattentive going under the radar and you'll be able to find my TikTok with over a hundred thousand people and you'll be able to find my free downloads and stuff. I've got some cool ADHD one-on-one and productivity guides and stuff. Uh, so you can get all that. And, uh, I would love to connect with you.  Awesome Aron Croft yeah, his TikTok's pretty off the charts you should definitely follow that. I'll give you that. I, you know, it's funny. I've been trying desperately. I tried to get into it, I just, I couldn't, I couldn't fall in love with it. I, I, I fell in love with Twitter. I fell in love with Facebook. I fell in love with Instagram. I couldn't, I still can't fall in love with TikTok, maybe because I know the company in China and I've been to their headquarters in China and it just scares me, but I just, I still can't fall in love with TikTok. I'm trying. I just can't make them a, B,  Maybe you can't. Maybe you can't have more than three loves, like maybe. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, like, you know, your heart's full.  My girlfriend would argue. I can have more than one, but no, I see where you're going with that. Um, all right, cool guys, you've been listening to Aron Croft! I love this guy who's shit is awesome. Definitely check him out. You've also been listening to Faster Than Normal. That's me. You know how to find me. I'm not going to waste your time. I'll be back next week with a new episode. My name is Peter Shankman.  I appreciate you listening. I appreciate you taking 20 minutes of your day. I know that's a lot. And for those who actually listened to this on anything less than 1.25 times speed; you're my people. I thank you for that! See ya soon! — Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week. 

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Johnson & Johnson asks FDA to approve its COVID-19 booster shot

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 5:03


In our news wrap Tuesday, Johnson & Johnson asked the Food and Drug Administration to allow boosters for its single-shot COVID-19 vaccine. The U.S. Coast Guard now says something dragged a pipeline that spilled oil off Southern California over the weekend. An independent commission in France estimates 330,000 children were sexually abused in the country's Roman Catholic Church over 70 years. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders