Podcasts about Westwood

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Best podcasts about Westwood

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Latest podcast episodes about Westwood

In The Room
161. A Lot More Ups

In The Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 61:03


UWW WORLD CUP INFORMATION: http://worldcupcoralville.com/  Welcome to In The Room, a wrestling podcast from the Des Moines Register's Cody Goodwin. On today's episode, Cody brings you interviews from both Iowa and Iowa State ahead of another full weekend of wrestling. STORIES • Lisbon state champ Brandon Paez commits to Northern Iowa wrestling: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/sports/high-school/2022/11/10/lisbon-wrestling-state-champ-brandon-paez-commits-northern-iowa-recruiting/69637017007/  • Wrestling Mailbag: Iowa State's 3-0 start, Iowa's lineup, Spencer Lee, true freshmen, more: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/sports/college/iowa/wrestling/2022/11/08/wrestling-mailbag-iowa-state-cyclones-beat-wisconsin-iowa-hawkeye-lineup-spencer-lee-ncaa-wrestling/69626890007/  • Westwood's Jackson Dewald commits to Air Force: https://twitter.com/codygoodwin/status/1590793271466668032?s=20&t=yvB2Qvzx6-WNEecPhjKNZw  • Alivia White commits to Iowa women's wrestling: https://twitter.com/codygoodwin/status/1590176843701030912?s=20&t=yvB2Qvzx6-WNEecPhjKNZw  • Connect with Cody: https://linktr.ee/codygoodwin • Subscribe Today

The Bruin Bible: A UCLA Football Podcast
UCLA/ASU Recap: Chip's Masterclass Offensive Play-Calling, The Concerning Defense, and "Game Balls" W/Jamal Madni

The Bruin Bible: A UCLA Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 49:26


Will and Jamal dive into arguably Chip's finest hour thus far play calling while in Westwood, The defense and their struggle allowing ASU back into the game, and 6 game balls to players and coaches that deserve praise for UCLA's 8th win of the yearSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rolling Maul
Double-header, Triple-guester - Hanro Liebenberg, Georgia Westwood and Bobby Bridge

The Rolling Maul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 99:47


With no match to review but a historic double header at Welford Road to look forward to, Mike and Elliott are joined by men's skipper Hanro Liebenberg and women's second row Georgia Westwood to chat about their respective seasons so far. Plus, Bobby Bridge joins us to discuss the situation at Wasps and Tigers' new signing, Charlie Atkinson.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
BARREL WESTWOOD & CO

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 8:07


Guest: Doug ThomasSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Countdown with Keith Olbermann
GOP EDUCATOR TRIES TO REBRAND HITLER AS "SOCIALIST" 10.25.22

Countdown with Keith Olbermann

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 40:51 Very Popular


EPISODE 61: COUNTDOWN WITH KEITH OLBERMANN A-Block (1:44) SPECIAL COMMENT: Am I really seeing this WaPo headline? "ANTISEMITES RALLY AROUND KANYE WEST" (3:20) As his agents, documentarians, and others drop him, Adidas does nothing while Adidas clients like The National Hockey League begin to feel the heat (3:35) and LAPD ties the 405 Freeway sign to antisemitic leaflets in Westwood (4:36) And something worse in Colorado: a Republican member of the State Board of Education has gotten the word "Nazis" replaced by "National Socialist German Workers Party" and demanded America acknowledge "this party was and is a socialist party." (7:05) The next stage has begun: assume a MAGA will come up to you shortly and say "Hitler was a Democrat. The holocaust is your fault. Antisemitism is your fault. Kanye West is your fault." Let's walk through his history: appointed as Chancellor by Conservatives, arrested Communists, sent Union Leaders to concentration camps, dissolved the Social Democratic Party, had Goebbels say "National Socialism opposes liberalism...liberalism broke under the blows." (14:00) On a much much much lighter note: you'll never believe who's advertising for a Concept-to-Consumer Manager? Yep: Adidas and Kanye. B-Block (17:09) EVERY DOG HAS ITS DAY: Jerry in Houston (18:08) POSTSCRIPTS TO THE NEWS: DeSantis freezes when Crist asks him ONE debate question; Senate/Governor polling improves for Dems; Proud Boys embarrass Pen State; Coerce or Caress Walt Nauta and Kash Patel as Document investigators press hard for testimony (22:02) IN SPORTS: Yankees embarrassed themselves but Yankee fans did themselves proud saying helloooooo to Ted Cruz; my fellow giant-head Bruce Bochy gets a new gig; and you'll never believe who predicted, NINE YEARS AGO, that the next Phillies World Series appearance would be in 2022! (25:16) THE WORST PERSONS IN THE WORLD: Soccer's World Cup vies with Right Wing Troll Jacob Wohl and Justice Sam Alito - who gets pounded from beyond the grave by Ted Kennedy - for the honors. C-Block (30:04) THINGS I PROMISED NOT TO TELL: I paid $2000 plus a game ticket for it, but I promised never to run exclusive video of a near-brawl between Yankees' ace Roger Clemens and a Yankees fan in the middle of the 1999 World Series. What happens when you have facts, but not truth? You side with truth - and your bosses start looking for a reason to fire you. It's quite a saga.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THE ADAM BUXTON PODCAST
EP.191 - LORNA TUCKER

THE ADAM BUXTON PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 61:48


Adam talks with British film maker Lorna Tucker about her documentary profile of fashion designer Vivienne Westwood and how she felt when Westwood publicly disowned it. Lorna also explains how she found herself homeless on the streets of London as a teenager and the struggle with addiction that ensued; experiences that informed her new documentary Someone's Daughter, Someone's Son, which considers what can be done to better tackle homelessness.This episode was recorded face to face on 17th October, 2022Thanks to Rachel, Tom and the staff at the Universal building who made us welcome for our recording Thanks to Séamus Murphy-Mitchell for production support.Podcast artwork by Helen GreenRELATED LINKSST MUNGO'S - ENDING HOMELESSNESS, REBUILDING LIVESRough sleeping can become a relentless cycle that's incredibly difficult to escape from. And without urgent help it can drastically shorten, and even take, lives. St Mungo's is one of the only organisations whose frontline workers are out, every night, to bring people in from the streets.THE CONNECTION (AT ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS)The Connection at St Martin's works with people who are rough sleeping to move away from, and stay off, the streets of London. We're alongside people as they recover from life on the streets and move towards a meaningful, fulfilling future away from homelessness and into shelter.SHELTERFor someone at risk of homelessness, our support and advice can be the difference between finding emergency accommodation or spending a night in their car.Shelter's campaigning work can mean the difference between being powerless or seeing legislative changes to fight unfair evictions, rogue landlords and dangerous housing. LORNA LINKSWESTWOOD: PUNK, ICON, ACTIVIST Directed by Lorna Tucker - 2018 (MUBI)VIVIENNE WESTWOOD TO WORK WITH QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE - 2008 (YOUTUBE)AMÁ TRAILER - 2018 (VIMEO)OVID (STREAMING PLATFORM WHERE YOU CAN WATCH AMÁ)OTHER LINKSADAM ON YOUTUBEUNION CHAPEL CHARITY SHOW - NOVEMBER 24th 2022CAN I HAVE MY BALL BACK? By Richard Herring - 2022 (GO FASTER STRIPE) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

High School Hysteria
Week 9: Fort Pierce Central 19 - Fort Pierce Westwood 18: Full Broadcast

High School Hysteria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 219:53


Kevin McCullough Radio
20221020KMC - Spicer, Westwood, Bolar, Mandel, 299Gas

Kevin McCullough Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 55:16


20221020KMC - Spicer, Westwood, Bolar, Mandel, 299Gas by Kevin McCullough Radio

The Loft LA
Westwood 101: Belonging

The Loft LA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 41:37


All of us have a core group of people whom we feel a particular kinship with. Jesus was no exception. Whether it was the twelve disciples, Mary, Martha, or others, Jesus had a community that he belonged to, a community where he could just be himself. In a world that prioritizes individualism, as followers of the religion of Jesus we are called to seek out and cultivate communities to which we can belong. Whether it is the pandemic, racial terrorism, or the fight for bodily autonomy, we must work towards the creation of beloved communities for our survival. At Westwood UMC, we have sought to do this in multiple ways, including developing separate worship services with the goal of expanding the community that we all belong to. Join us this Sunday in The Loft for a joint worship service with the Sanctuary as Pastor Molly and Rev. Dr. Carter explore what it means for Westwood UMC to create a culture of belonging. www.TheLoftLA.org

Westwood United Methodist Church
Westwood 101: Belonging

Westwood United Methodist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 41:53


Sunday, October 16, 2022 Rev. Molly Vetter Rev. Dr. Christopher Carter

The John Batchelor Show
#PacificWatch: Higher prices from Disneyland tickets to Westwood quesadillas. @JCBliss

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 9:19


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #PacificWatch: Higher prices from Disneyland tickets to Westwood quesadillas. @JCBliss https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/disneyland-ticket-prices-now-cost-more-here-s-how-much-a-family-of-4-can-expect-to-pay/ar-AA12VW4s

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
Bean Family Farm In Westwood Reopens More Than A Decade After Close

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 0:52


WBZ's Kim Tunnicliffe reports.

RayofLight TV
Ep. 60 - Postpartum Pandemics

RayofLight TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 29:19


Hey guys! Welcome back to part two of this three-part series with Ebony "Westwood" Boyd. In this episode, Ebony shares her experience landing a "miracle client" during the pandemic (one of her most influential clients yet), and her 5-year battle with postpartum depression after the birth of her daughter. If you or a friend you know is struggling with PPD or has in the past, share this episode with her. You never know how Ebony's story could influence her for the better. Enjoy this episode and see you next week. To follow this platform on social media: https://www.instagram.com/therayoflighttvpodcast/ To engage outside of social media: https://linktr.ee/Ravnlynn SAMHSA's National Helpline, 1-800-662-HELP (4357) In a world where women are dominating various industries in the space of entrepreneurship, there are some who become paralyzed in reaching their goals due to imposter syndrome, lack of support, and various life experiences. Serial entrepreneur Ebony Westwood is no stranger to trials and tribulations on her journey to rising success. The 31-year-old single mom has endured a toxic divorce that pushed her into purpose. Armed with a passion for fashion and a determination to beat the odds, Ebony founded 5th and Westwood, a chic innovative image consulting firm that specializes in working with female entrepreneurs and professionals in need of a transformation, from the inside out. With over 10 years of experience, she's worked alongside brands such as Hanifa, Milano Di Rouge, and more. Ebony is now on a mission to show women how to confidently show up in the marketplace, no matter what they may face.

Petey Podcast
Chilly Air Calls for Chili Cook-off!

Petey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 29:15


Westwood Middle School is bringing back a fan-favorite event: The Annual Chili Cook-off and Auction on Nov. 5! Westwood's Chili Cook-off started almost a decade ago, and it's grown in popularity and participation every year. The ultimate goal of the event is to raise enough money to defray costs associated with the school's annual student field trip to Washington D.C. The cook-off draws competitors from every school building and department in the district--all vying to be crowned the Westwood Chili Cook-off Champion. The event has even perked the interest of community partners, some with previous chili competition experience, such as the Elyria Township Fire Department. Westwood staff and students spend months preparing for the auction portion of the event. The prizes they've gathered even include vacation packages to family-favorite destination spots like Disney World, Universal Studios, Gatlinburg and so much more. Principal Jim Rollence shared details of this and so much more on this episode of Petey Podcast! The Westwood Chili Cook-off will take place Nov. 5, 5-8 p.m., at Westwood Middle School, 42350 Adelbert St., Elyria.  Tickets are $10.It's a great day to be a Pioneer! Thanks for listening. Find Elyria Schools on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube!

Video Game Newsroom Time Machine

Fears of violence in games make coinop jittery Multimedia takes on 3D for the future of gaming Capcom partners up with Sega These stories and many more on this episode of the VGNRTM This episode we will look back at the biggest stories in and around the video game industry in September 1992. As always, we'll mostly be using magazine cover dates, and those are of course always a bit behind the actual events. Wouter, aka Wiedo, is our cohost. You can find his awesome twitter feed here: https://twitter.com/wiedo and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SW2_WXgbbo and https://www.slipseer.com/index.php?resources/quake-brutalist-jam.126/ Get us on your mobile device: Android: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly92aWRlb2dhbWVuZXdzcm9vbXRpbWVtYWNoaW5lLmxpYnN5bi5jb20vcnNz iOS: https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/video-game-newsroom-time-machine And if you like what we are doing here at the podcast, don't forget to like us on your podcasting app of choice, YouTube, and/or support us on patreon! https://www.patreon.com/VGNRTM Send comments on twitter @videogamenewsr2 Or Instagram https://www.instagram.com/vgnrtm Or videogamenewsroomtimemachine@gmail.com Links: 7 Minutes in Heaven: It Came From the Desert (TGCD) Video Version: https://www.patreon.com/posts/7-minutes-in-it-72903123 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Came_from_the_Desert#TurboGrafx-CD https://www.mobygames.com/company/cinemaware-corporation Corrections: August 1992 Ep - https://www.patreon.com/posts/august-1992-71735879 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_Fighter_II:_Rainbow_Edition https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E3 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_data_leak https://www.ncsl.org/research/transportation/daylight-savings-time-state-legislation.aspx https://www.mobygames.com/game/it-came-from-the-desert https://www.mobygames.com/game/windows/press-x-to-not-die https://twitter.com/zaphodgjd 1992 Japanese toy giants enter coinop biz Play Meter Sept. 1992 pg. 28 https://archive.org/details/video-games-computer-entertainment-september-1992. pg 34 Addams Family pinball sets record Replay September 1992 pg. 3 https://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=20 https://ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=738 Coin-op industry investigates the future Replay September 1992 pg. 14 Operators worried about violence in games Replay September 1992 pg. 10 https://archive.org/details/ElectronicGamingMonthly_201902/Electronic%20Gaming%20Monthly%20Issue%20038%20%28September%201992%29/page/n41/mode/1up Street Fighter mania comes home https://archive.org/details/ElectronicGamingMonthly_201902/Electronic%20Gaming%20Monthly%20Issue%20038%20%28September%201992%29/page/n7/mode/1up https://archive.org/details/ElectronicGamingMonthly_201902/Electronic%20Gaming%20Monthly%20Issue%20038%20%28September%201992%29/page/n11/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/game/snes/street-fighter-ii-the-world-warrior https://www.mobygames.com/game/street-fighter-ii-champion-edition Capcom goes Sega https://archive.org/details/ElectronicGamingMonthly_201902/Electronic%20Gaming%20Monthly%20Issue%20038%20%28September%201992%29/page/n75/mode/1up https://archive.org/details/GamePro_Issue_038_September_1992/page/n137/mode/1up Joe Morici - Capcom - https://www.patreon.com/posts/37289815 https://www.mobygames.com/browse/games/capcom-co-ltd/genesis/ https://www.mobygames.com/browse/games/capcom-co-ltd/sega-cd/ https://www.mobygames.com/browse/games/tecmo-inc/genesis/ https://twitter.com/johnandersen21/status/771868802682331136 Nintendo announces the SuperFX chip https://archive.org/details/Game_Informer_Issue_006_September-October_1992/page/n49/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/game/star-fox_/release-info https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_FX Sega keeps improving lock out tech https://archive.org/details/ElectronicGamingMonthly_201902/Electronic%20Gaming%20Monthly%20Issue%20038%20%28September%201992%29/page/n75/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/game/ayrton-sennas-super-monaco-gp-ii Riedel Software Productions gets Donkey Kong license Play Meter Sept. 1992 pg. 28 https://www.mobygames.com/company/rsp-inc https://www.mobygames.com/developer/sheet/view/developerId,802/ https://www.mobygames.com/game-group/spy-vs-spy-licensees https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spy_vs._Spy Hudson announces RISC based console https://archive.org/details/asm_magazine-1992-09/page/n8/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PC-FX https://www.pcengine-fx.com/forums/index.php?topic=1420.0 https://www.mobygames.com/browse/games/pc-fx/ Learn to play the piano on your console https://archive.org/details/Game_Informer_Issue_006_September-October_1992/page/n7/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_Piano_Teaching_System https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocksmith EA wants a piece of the CRPG pie https://archive.org/details/powerplaymagazine-1992-09/page/n21/mode/2up https://www.filfre.net/tag/electronic-arts/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bard%27s_Tale#Novels https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spelljammer https://www.mobygames.com/game/dos/spelljammer-pirates-of-realmspace Wolfenstein gets reviewed https://archive.org/details/vgce_92-09/page/n111/mode/2up https://www.mobygames.com/game/wolfenstein-3d Germany gets Wolfenstein 3D barred from CompuServe https://archive.org/details/video-games-computer-entertainment-september-1992/page/n21/mode/1up https://archive.org/details/video-games-computer-entertainment-september-1992/page/n112/mode/1up https://www.pcgamer.com/people-in-germany-can-at-last-buy-wolfenstein-3d/ https://www.destructoid.com/censorship-in-germany-how-they-changed-your-fav-games/ BBS gets shut down https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg14519701-300-software-pirate-sunk-by-new-law/ https://archive.org/details/video-games-computer-entertainment-september-1992/page/n19/mode/1up Zap Pax makes game characters collectable https://archive.org/details/GamePro_Issue_038_September_1992/page/n137/mode/1up https://retrendo.de/page-en/zap-pax-1992-11697 Amiga makes Babylon 5 fly https://archive.org/details/amiga-world-1992-09/page/n9/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babylon_5 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_Toaster https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Trek:_Deep_Space_Nine Battletoads to take ot the airwaves https://archive.org/details/GamePro_Issue_038_September_1992/page/n137/mode/1up https://youtu.be/mtQ_RSF1jYU https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIC_Entertainment Virgin buys Westwood https://archive.org/details/questbusters-v9n09/page/n1/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westwood_Studios#Later_success_and_acquisition_by_Virgin_Games https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westwood_Studios Microprose misses targets https://archive.org/details/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_98/page/n35/mode/1up Wild Bill Stealey - Microprose - https://www.patreon.com/posts/36710924 Hal labs files for bankruptcy https://archive.org/details/GamePro_Issue_038_September_1992/page/n139/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal_Slader_Glory https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satoru_Iwata Recommended Links: The History of How We Play: https://thehistoryofhowweplay.wordpress.com/ Gaming Alexandria: https://www.gamingalexandria.com/wp/ They Create Worlds: https://tcwpodcast.podbean.com/ Digital Antiquarian: https://www.filfre.net/ The Arcade Blogger: https://arcadeblogger.com/ Retro Asylum: http://retroasylum.com/category/all-posts/ Retro Game Squad: http://retrogamesquad.libsyn.com/ Playthrough Podcast: https://playthroughpod.com/ Retromags.com: https://www.retromags.com/ Sound Effects by Ethan Johnson of History of How We Play. Copyright Karl Kuras Find out on the VGNRTM   30 years ago Fears of violence in games make coinop jittery, Multimedia takes on 3D for the future of gaming & #Capcom partners up with #Sega These stories and many more on this episode of the VGNRTM https://patreon.com/posts/septembe

2500 DelMonte Street: The Oral History of Tower Records
Ep. 19 Dave Coker (Sac, LA, Seattle)

2500 DelMonte Street: The Oral History of Tower Records

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 60:03


This week's guest, Dave Coker, was shopping at the original Tower Records location in Sacramento when he was 10 years old. When he started working at the Tower Broadway store in 1968, the San Francisco Tower store had just opened and soon the world of music retail would open itself up to Coker Dave. Going to College and doing Military service while working on and off for Tower in 1973,  Dave was riding his bike down the street when Russ Solomon flagged him down and asked him if he wanted to go to a new store they were opening in Stockton, CA. Dave talks about the origins of his nickname, running his first store in Stockton, being transferred to Westwood in Los Angeles and partying way too much on company time and off and giving career advice to one of his buyers and future recording artist, Dan Navarro. Getting the offer to move to the lush, green state of Washington at just the time he wanted to get out of the craziness of LA, Dave mad his move, first to Tacoma and then to the U-District store where his video store employed members of the band Green River. Dave explains why top shelf record label people passed up jobs in Los Angeles to stay in Seattle and the camaraderie of the music professionals in the Northwest.  Dave also reminisces about the origins of the Tower Annual Conference (TAC) and how things changed when Tower went from a small, local operation to a world-wide concern. 

The Built To Last Podcast
Andrew Slay - How To Study The Bible

The Built To Last Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 42:48


Andrew Slay serves as Associate Pastor at Westwood Baptist Church. Andrew is a graduate of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary with a Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies. Originally from Birmingham, Alabama, he earned his bachelor's degree in RTVF and a master's degree in Exercise Science from Auburn University. Before joining the Pastoral Staff at Westwood, Andrew spent two years as the Head Strenth and Conditioning Coach at Lee University and a year and a half at Auburn University as a Graduate Assistant. He is an invaluable asset to the Built to Last ministry as he continues to pour into the lives of coaches.

Verbally Effective
SEDRICK ASKEW "VISUALLY IMPACT" | EPISODE 229

Verbally Effective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 36:13


Westwood, TN native Sedrick Askew is the founder of Impact Lyfe Media. Attending one of the prominent high schools by the name of Westwood High, he knew early on that media was his calling by having a camera placed in his hand as early as 13. After graduating in 2004 and attending University of Memphis, media took a major role in his life by filming multiple shows hosted by the school as well as the school's many organizations. During his time at UofM he found a new love and profession of Photography as he earned his BA degree and Masters in Special Education. After graduating he became a SPED teacher for Memphis City Schools, after 3 years in the profession he took a major leap of faith by becoming a business owner, which goes by the name Impact Lyfe Media. Take a listen as Sedrick shares how the landscape of photography has changed through technology and social media. You will also learn about some of his pet peeves when it comes to clients in addition to how he's been profiting off of "REELS" on Instagram.

RayofLight TV
Daring To Do It All with Guest Ebony "Westwood" Boyd - Part 1

RayofLight TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 21:04


In a world where women are dominating various industries in the space of entrepreneurship, there are some who become paralyzed in reaching their goals due to imposter syndrome, lack of support, and various life experiences. Serial entrepreneur Ebony Westwood is no stranger to trials and tribulations on her journey to rising success. The 31-year-old single mom has endured a toxic divorce that pushed her into purpose. Armed with a passion for fashion and a determination to beat the odds, Ebony founded 5th and Westwood, a chic innovative image consulting firm that specializes in working with female entrepreneurs and professionals in need of a transformation, from the inside out. With over 10 years of experience, she's worked alongside brands such as Hanifa, Milano Di Rouge, and more. Ebony is now on a mission to show women how to confidently show up in the marketplace, no matter what they may face.

Dawgman Radio
DawgmanRadio: Our UCLA Pregame Show!

Dawgman Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 43:29


The guys from Dawgman.com - Kim Grinolds, Chris Fetters, and Scott Eklund - break down the top storylines for tonight's game between Washington and UCLA, set for a 7:30 pm kickoff at the Rose Bowl. For Washington, it's their first road game under Kalen DeBoer. It will be their first game on grass. For UCLA, this will be their first true test after playing Bowling Green, Alabama State, South Alabama, and Colorado. The first segment starts with Michael Penix Jr. and how he is putting together a season worth early Heisman Trophy consideration. Just how big an addition has Penix been to an offense that struggled mightily last season but hasn't been stopped so far this year? And when talking about UW's offense versus UCLA's defense, the talk turns to former Husky Laiatu Latu, who is tearing it up with the Bruins. He earned Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Week honors for his play at Colorado. How did he end up at Westwood after not being cleared by the Washington doctors? And will Latu line up against Jaxson Kirkland, or Roger Rosengarten? Speaking of the offensive line, what has gotten into them? The same players that have kept Penix upright and firing on all cylinders is the same group of players that really struggled to lead anything on offense last season. One other thing; UW OC Ryan Grubb coached against UCLA in the Rose Bowl last season with Fresno State, a game they won 40-37. But the Bruins have a new DC and new defensive coaches like Ken Norton Jr. and former UW player and coach Ikaika Malloe. How will that chess match go within the football game? After a quick break, talk turns to the matchup of UCLA's offense versus Washington's defense. It all starts with QB Dorian Thompson-Robinson for the Bruins, as well as RB Zach Charbonnet. What is the guys' take on DTR? And can UW's defense contain them enough to allow Washington's offense to go to work? And which players will the Huskies lean on to get the Bruins on the ground? There's one more quick pause to pay some bills, and then Scott and Kim provide recruiting updates and then the three of them give their final game thoughts before wrapping things up. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

A Trip Down Memory Card Lane
Ep.109 – Command or Conquer?

A Trip Down Memory Card Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022


We look back at Command and Conquer, released for DOS in September of 1995. As part of our discussion, we look at the history of Westwood Studios. We talk about where the team at Westwood found inspiration when creating their game. We'll also talk about our own experiences with the game, and why Command and Conquer is important to its genre. So stick around and join us for today's resourceful trip down Memory Card Lane.

Damon, Ratto & Kolsky
Kevin Harlan peels back the curtain on play-by-play broadcasting

Damon, Ratto & Kolsky

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 21:40


Kevin Harlan, a play-by-play broadcaster for the NFL on CBS, for the NBA on TNT, and for Westwood 1, joins Damon and Ratto to discuss the intricacies of broadcasting, the art of working with an analyst, and more.

Joe Rose Show
Fins In Prime Time Tonight

Joe Rose Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 38:21


In Hour 1 Zach, Hollywood and Brain Monroe get you ready for tonight's "Prime" time game on Amazon between the Dolphins and Cincinnati Bengals. The guys talk to Westwood play by play announcer Ian Eagle who will be calling the game tonight.  

Strictly JoJo
59. Stone Ocean: The Secret of Guard Westwood

Strictly JoJo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 45:05


For this episode of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, we review Stone Ocean: The Secret of Guard Westwood (E16 of Part 6). It's JoJo fight club, complete with brutal, uncensored gore. We discuss all the ways Jolyne and Westwood beat each other up, and how Jolyne never gives up thanks to her Joestar resolve.⁠ Join our Discord: https://discord.gg/4Rnq4GTePP Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/thestrictlyseries Website: https://www.thestrictlyseries.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thestrictlyseries Twitter: https://twitter.com/strictlyseries Part of The Strictly Series of podcasts

Beauty and the Biz
100 Percent Non-Surgical Practice by Surgeon — with Alexander Rivkin, MD (Ep.172)

Beauty and the Biz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 71:35


Hello, and welcome to Beauty and the Biz where we talk about the business and marketing side of plastic surgery and how Dr. Rivkin has a 100 percent non-surgical practice. I'm your host, Catherine Maley, author of Your Aesthetic Practice – What your patients are saying, as well as consultant to plastic surgeons, to get them more patients and more profits. Now, today's episode is called "100 Percent Non-Surgical Practice by Surgeon — with Alexander Rivkin, MD." Why would someone go through years of training to be a facial plastic surgeon, only to drop it and focus on non-surgical techniques? Dr. Alexander Rivkin is a trained facial plastic surgeon who founded Rivkin Aesthetics in Los Angeles.  Since 2003, he has specialized in state-of-the-art NON-surgical aesthetic procedures that compete with the outcomes of plastic surgery, delivered in an intimate and luxurious setting. On this week's Beauty and the Biz Podcast, Dr. Rivkin explains his journey from surgery to non-surgical procedures as well as… Building a name as “The Best” by focusing Running a practice with a CEO and COO Staff issues being the biggest challenge Avoiding coat hangers (lasers you don't use) in your office and more He also tells an incredible story about watching the destruction of Ukraine (his mother country) and wanting to help and how he got an entire plane of medical supplies safely to them. Visit Dr. Rivkin's Website  

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo
Kevin Harlan: "When I saw the Bills, I thought that has to be the best in the NFL"

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 15:00


Legendary play by play announcer for CBS, TNT and Westwood 1 Kevin Harlan joins First Up to discuss week 3 of the NFL season, preview of Bills vs Dolphin the game he is calling this weekend, Cowboys vs Giants and the impact of Saquan Barkley on the Giants offense and more!

Craft Parenting Podcast
Ep. 76 – The One Where We Have a Parents' Night Out at West Side Brewing

Craft Parenting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 63:06


In honor of Joe's birthday, Joe and Caroline spend a parents' night out at West Side Brewing –kid free! They discuss a wide variety of topics including Lilly's recent sleepover with her friend, why you should never give Caroline a sledgehammer, and more while drinking some fantastic Bavarian-style beers locally brewed right here on the west side (best side) of Cincinnati.This episode was recorded at West Side Brewing in Westwood, Ohio.What We Are DrinkingWitbierWest Side Brewing - Westwood, OhioABV: 5.4% IBUs: 15OktoberfestWest Side Brewing - Westwood, OhioABV: 5.2% IBUs: 22 FestbierWest Side Brewing - Westwood, OhioABV: 6% IBUs: 32HellesWest Side Brewing - Westwood, OhioABV: 5.4% IBUs: 18Hefeweizen West Side Brewing - Westwood, OhioABV: 4.9% IBUs: 19Smoked Oktoberfest West Side Brewing - Westwood, OhioABV: 5.6% IBUs: 18***Spread the Word and Connect With UsIf you like what you hear, please consider leaving us a rating and reviewFollow us on Facebook and InstagramHelp us spread the word about the podcast so we can grow Send us feedback, comments, and questions at craftparentingpodcast@gmail.comVisit our website at https://www.craftparentingpodcast.com to read our blog posts about life as parents, our family adventures, craft beer, and more.Send us stuff to our PO Box address: Craft Parenting Podcast P.O. Box 112294 Cincinnati, Ohio 45211Buy Us A CoffeeIf you enjoy listening to our podcast and reading our blog posts every week, then you now have the opportunity to help offset our equipment and software costs through Buy Me a Coffee.Here's what you need to know:It's super easy to do. You don't have to set up an account to contribute. You have options. Send us a one-time donation or sign-up as a member to contribute on a monthly or yearly basis.Unlock exclusive content. Choose a membership level that fits your budget and unlock exclusive content.We wouldn't be able to do any of this without the loyalty of our listeners and readers. THANK YOU from the bottom of our hearts for all of your support!Support the show

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
Intrepid Academy At Hale Educates BPS Students Through Nature

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 0:52


Bringing learning outdoors. That's the focus of a non-profit in Westwood that takes students from the inner city and immerses them in nature. WBZ's Kim Tunnicliffe reports.

Bleav in UCLA Basketball
Recapping the Bruins' Win Over South Alabama, Previewing Pac-12 Play

Bleav in UCLA Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 70:33


Sam Connon and Travis Reed sort through UCLA football's last-second victory over South Alabama on Saturday, sharing their thoughts on the ups and downs Bruins' shaky performance and the not-so-fond memories it managed to drum up. Sam and Travis went on to talk about where this leaves Chip Kelly four-plus years into his tenure in Westwood, and how the Bruins can be expected to perform against a Pac-12 slate that appears tougher than originally anticipated.

Good Show
Hour 3: Jimmy G, Cincy Panic, and MNF Preview w/ Ross Tucker + Wake and Rake!

Good Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 46:27


Ross Tucker, former NFL offensive lineman, host of The Ross Tucker Football Podcast, and analyst for Westwood, joins Ailish and Justin to discuss where Tyreek Hill and Jaylen Waddle rank among the NFL's top receiving duos, Cincinnati's 0-2 start, Jimmy Garoppolo taking over as the 49ers' starting quarterback after Trey Lance's season-ending ankle injury, and tonight's MNF doubleheader. Later, Ailish and Justin dive into the Wake and Rake, presented by Unibet! They tee up the betting lines for tonight's Titans-Bills game and Vikings-Eagles showdown. They also select their Wake and Rake “lock” of the day (25:35). The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliate

cd SPILL
#61 Blade Runner

cd SPILL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 80:18


Den legendariske filmen fra 1982 fikk sitt actioneventyrspill fra Westwood i 1997. Mye pek-og-klikk, men også analyser av fotografier, Voight-Kampff-tester og skytesekvenser er å finne. Aksel Bjerke hjelper oss igjennom episoden med sin kunnskap. Om du vil unngå spoilers så spoler du fra 45:00-54:15. Les tilhørende artikkel hos spillhistorie.no

Stories of Scotland
Women Turned to Stone

Stories of Scotland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 54:30


In this episode, Jenny and Annie explore the curious phenomenon in Scottish folklore of the spirits of women being captured by stone. From the glorious mountains of the Five Sisters of Kintail to the Maiden Stone of Drumdurno in Aberdeenshire, we investigate why there are so many stories of women turned to stone. Also, we revisit Smoo cave to hear a tremendous tale of a loch-protecting Cailleach. Want to try out WeeBox? Go to www.weebox.co.uk and enter the code ‘Story10' for an exclusive discount! Interested in visiting the Anatomy: A Matter of Death and Life exhibition at the National Museum of Scotland? Book now! https://www.nms.ac.uk/anatomy You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland This is part of the Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature. Some of the music you heard in this episode was beautifully played by Nicky Murray and Chloe Rodgers. Sources: Canmore.org.uk and historicenvironment.scot on the Maiden Stone and Persephone. Kingshill, S., Westwood, J. B., The Lore of Scotland: A guide to Scottish legends, London, Random House, 2011. McConnochie, A. I., Bennachie, Aberdeen, D Wyllie & Son, 1890. Newspapers from the Aberdeen Evening Express and Highland News.

Eye on Veterans
College Scam Factories, Gov't cancels loan debts for some vets

Eye on Veterans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 13:11


Attention student veterans- Do some homework before you enroll in school. USMC veteran Will Hubbard, Vice President for Veterans & Military Policy for Veterans Education Success explains how colleges like Westwood and ITT Tech were ripping off vets with useless degrees. He also explains the impact on student veterans' federal loans and GI Bill.For more on what Veteran Education Success can do for you check outhttps://vetsedsuccess.orgSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Something's Bruin Podcast
WEEK 1: BOWLING GREEN vs. UCLA: Preview of the game, What UCLA Football needs to accomplish with these early games, And the New Chip Kelly?

Something's Bruin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 49:18


We talk about the keys to the first game and what we are looking for from a fans perspective. And Orange County Register UCLA Football beat reporter takes us deep into coverage of this first game against Bowling Green. And is it time to stop looking for the Chip Kelly from Oregon to show up in Westwood and time to give him a shot with his current style of coaching.Hope you enjoy. Follow us on twitter at Jorge Medina @funkycoalmedinaJames Wiliams @JHWReporterOr follow our podcast @somethingsbruin

The Manuscript Academy
Live Coffee Break with Emmy Nordstrom Higdon, Westwood Creative Artists

The Manuscript Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 46:13


We love this episode! Emmy Nordstrom Higdon, agent at Westwood Creative Artists, was kind enough to join us for a live coffee break with our members—and we ended up talking about so many things! We cover: *How agenting is a style choice *Why writers should have more confidence *How even the IRS probably can't figure out royalty statements *How to reverse-engineer your search for agents from editor data *How the people you naturally like are the ones you're going to work with, so there's no point in forcing it *What in the world agents really want in a synopsis *Why murder is their comfort read *A fantastic explanation of how a book earns out its advance Learn more about Emmy and book a consultation (after September 8 for non-members) here! https://manuscriptacademy.com/emmy-nordstrom-higdon Emmy (they/them) holds a PhD in justice-oriented social work with a focus on critical animal studies from McMaster University, with peer-reviewed publications in public health and psychology. In 2019, they made a lateral career move into publishing after four years as a bookseller at a local indie, and now work as a literary agent with Westwood Creative Artists. They are a queer, trans, and non-binary colonizer, who is autistic, has psychiatric disabilities, and a hormone-related chronic illness. As an agent, Emmy represents across age categories and genres, specializing in identity-driven works. They work in both fiction and non-fiction, from picture book to adult, including commercial, upmarket, book club, and literary. They specialize in contemporary books grounded in reality, with and without speculative elements. Mystery, thriller, suspense, romance, romcom, women's fiction, LGBTQ2S+, magical realism, fabulism, horror, graphic, narrative non-fiction, true crime, religion and spirituality, and humanities and sciences are all areas that pique their interest! Murder is their comfort read.

92.9 Featured Podcast
92.9's Geoff Calkins Remembers Steve White, Former Westwood, UT, and NFL star

92.9 Featured Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 0:59


92.9's Geoff Calkins Remembers Steve White, Former Westwood, UT, NFL star, and weekly guest 

High School Hysteria
Post-Game with Fort Pierce Westwood Head Coach Chris Kokell

High School Hysteria

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 6:04


Conservation Conversations with Sean O'Brien
S2 Ep13: Murphy Westwood: Assessing the Trees of the U.S.

Conservation Conversations with Sean O'Brien

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 32:39


In this episode of Conservation Conversations, Sean speaks with Dr. Murphy Westwood, Vice President of Science and Conservation at the Morton Arboretum, which recently collaborated with NatureServe and other organizations to create a comprehensive assessment of trees in the United States. Find out how many trees in the U.S. are threatened with extinction, what really makes a tree a tree, and how botanic gardens inspire and educate 500 million people around the world each year.

Locked On Bruins - Daily Podcast On UCLA Bruins Football & Basketball
Which Class of 2023 UCLA Recruits Will Head to Westwood?

Locked On Bruins - Daily Podcast On UCLA Bruins Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 30:58


On this episode of Locked On UCLA, Zach Anderson-Yoxsimer is joined by guest Jacob Handy to talk Hit the Trails Tuesday for UCLA recruiting. Brandon Williams and Devin Williams are both close to committing, but which Class of 2023 4-star recruit will come to Westwood and join Mick Cronin? Also, 4-star DB R.J. Jones from St. John Bosco announced he's attending the first UCLA football game. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! LinkedIn LinkedIn jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at Linkedin.com/lockedoncollege Terms and conditions apply. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Lunar Society
37: Steve Hsu - Intelligence, Embryo Selection, & The Future of Humanity

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 141:27


Steve Hsu is a Professor of Theoretical Physics at Michigan State University and cofounder of the company Genomic Prediction.We go deep into the weeds on how embryo selection can make babies healthier and smarter. Steve also explains the advice Richard Feynman gave him to pick up girls, the genetics of aging and intelligence, & the psychometric differences between shape rotators and wordcels.Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform.Subscribe to find out about future episodes!Read the full transcript here.Follow Steve on Twitter. Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.Please share if you enjoyed this episode! Helps out a ton!Timestamps(0:00:14) - Feynman’s advice on picking up women(0:11:46) - Embryo selection(0:24:19) - Why hasn't natural selection already optimized humans?(0:34:13) - Aging(0:43:18) - First Mover Advantage(0:53:49) - Genomics in dating(1:00:31) - Ancestral populations(1:07:58) - Is this eugenics?(1:15:59) - Tradeoffs to intelligence(1:25:01) - Consumer preferences(1:30:14) - Gwern(1:34:35) - Will parents matter?(1:45:25) - Word cells and shape rotators(1:57:29) - Bezos and brilliant physicists(2:10:23) - Elite educationTranscriptDwarkesh Patel  0:00  Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Steve Hsu. Steve, thanks for coming on the podcast. I'm excited about this.Steve Hsu  0:04  Hey, it's my pleasure! I'm excited too and I just want to say I've listened to some of your earlier interviews and thought you were very insightful, which is why I was excited to have a conversation with you.Dwarkesh Patel 0:14That means a lot for me to hear you say because I'm a big fan of your podcast.Feynman’s advice on picking up womenDwarkesh Patel  0:17  So my first question is: “What advice did Richard Feynman give you about picking up girls?”Steve Hsu  0:24   Haha, wow! So one day in the spring of my senior year, I was walking across campus and saw Feynman coming toward me. We knew each other from various things—it's a small campus, I was a physics major and he was my hero–– so I'd known him since my first year. He sees me, and he's got this Long Island or New York borough accent and says, "Hey, Hsu!"  I'm like, "Hi, Professor Feynman." We start talking. And he says to me, "Wow, you're a big guy." Of course, I was much bigger back then because I was a linebacker on the Caltech football team. So I was about 200 pounds and slightly over 6 feet tall. I was a gym rat at the time and I was much bigger than him. He said, "Steve, I got to ask you something." Feynman was born in 1918, so he's not from the modern era. He was going through graduate school when the Second World War started. So, he couldn't understand the concept of a health club or a gym. This was the 80s and was when Gold's Gym was becoming a world national franchise. There were gyms all over the place like 24-Hour Fitness. But, Feynman didn't know what it was. He's a fascinating guy. He says to me, "What do you guys do there? Is it just a thing to meet girls? Or is it really for training? Do you guys go there to get buff?" So, I started explaining to him that people are there to get big, but people are also checking out the girls. A lot of stuff is happening at the health club or the weight room. Feynman grills me on this for a long time. And one of the famous things about Feynman is that he has a laser focus. So if there's something he doesn't understand and wants to get to the bottom of it, he will focus on you and start questioning you and get to the bottom of it. That's the way his brain worked. So he did that to me for a while because he didn't understand lifting weights and everything. In the end, he says to me, "Wow, Steve, I appreciate that. Let me give you some good advice."Then, he starts telling me how to pick up girls—which he's an expert on. He says to me, "I don't know how much girls like guys that are as big as you." He thought it might be a turn-off. "But you know what, you have a nice smile." So that was the one compliment he gave me. Then, he starts to tell me that it's a numbers game. You have to be rational about it. You're at an airport lounge, or you're at a bar. It's Saturday night in Pasadena or Westwood, and you're talking to some girl. He says, "You're never going to see her again. This is your five-minute interaction. Do what you have to do. If she doesn't like you, go to the next one." He also shares some colorful details. But, the point is that you should not care what they think of you. You're trying to do your thing. He did have a reputation at Caltech as a womanizer, and I could go into that too but I heard all this from the secretaries.Dwarkesh Patel  4:30  With the students or only the secretaries? Steve Hsu  4:35  Secretaries! Well mostly secretaries. They were almost all female at that time. He had thought about this a lot, and thought of it as a numbers game. The PUA guys (pick-up artists) will say, “Follow the algorithm, and whatever happens, it's not a reflection on your self-esteem. It's just what happened. And you go on to the next one.” That was the advice he was giving me, and he said other things that were pretty standard: Be funny, be confident—just basic stuff. Steve Hu: But the main thing I remember was the operationalization of it as an algorithm. You shouldn’t internalize whatever happens if you get rejected, because that hurts. When we had to go across the bar to talk to that girl (maybe it doesn’t happen in your generation), it was terrifying. We had to go across the bar and talk to some lady! It’s loud and you’ve got a few minutes to make your case. Nothing is scarier than walking up to the girl and her friends. Feynman was telling me to train yourself out of that. You're never going to see them again, the face space of humanity is so big that you'll probably never re-encounter them again. It doesn't matter. So, do your best. Dwarkesh Patel  6:06  Yeah, that's interesting because.. I wonder whether he was doing this in the 40’–– like when he was at that age, was he doing this? I don't know what the cultural conventions were at the time. Were there bars in the 40s where you could just go ahead and hit on girls or? Steve Hsu  6:19  Oh yeah absolutely. If you read literature from that time, or even a little bit earlier like Hemingway or John O'Hara, they talk about how men and women interacted in bars and stuff in New York City. So, that was much more of a thing back than when compared to your generation. That's what I can’t figure out with my kids! What is going on? How do boys and girls meet these days? Back in the day, the guy had to do all the work. It was the most terrifying thing you could do, and you had  to train yourself out of that.Dwarkesh Patel  6:57  By the way, for the context for the audience, when Feynman says you were a big guy, you were a football player at Caltech, right? There's a picture of you on your website, maybe after college or something, but you look pretty ripped. Today, it seems more common because of the gym culture. But I don’t know about back then. I don't know how common that body physique was.Steve Hsu  7:24  It’s amazing that you asked this question. I'll tell you a funny story. One of the reasons Feynman found this so weird was because of the way body-building entered the United States.  They  were regarded as freaks and homosexuals at first. I remember swimming and football in high school (swimming is different because it's international) and in swimming, I picked up a lot of advanced training techniques from the Russians and East Germans. But football was more American and not very international. So our football coach used to tell us not to lift weights when we were in junior high school because it made you slow. “You’re no good if you’re bulky.” “You gotta be fast in football.” Then, something changed around the time I was in high school–the coaches figured it out. I began lifting weights since I was an age group swimmer, like maybe age 12 or 14. Then, the football coaches got into it mainly because the University of Nebraska had a famous strength program that popularized it.At the time, there just weren't a lot of big guys. The people who knew how to train were using what would be considered “advanced knowledge” back in the 80s. For example, they’d know how to do a split routine or squat on one day and do upper body on the next day–– that was considered advanced knowledge at that time. I remember once.. I had an injury, and I was in the trainer's room at the Caltech athletic facility. The lady was looking at my quadriceps. I’d pulled a muscle, and she was looking at the quadriceps right above your kneecap. If you have well-developed quads, you'd have a bulge, a bump right above your cap. And she was looking at it from this angle where she was in front of me, and she was looking at my leg from the front. She's like, “Wow, it's swollen.” And I was like, “That's not the injury. That's my quadricep!” And she was a trainer! So, at that time, I could probably squat 400 pounds. So I was pretty strong and had big legs. The fact that the trainer didn't really understand what well-developed anatomy was supposed to look like blew my mind!So anyway, we've come a long way. This isn't one of these things where you have to be old to have any understanding of how this stuff evolved over the last 30-40 years.Dwarkesh Patel  10:13  But, I wonder if that was a phenomenon of that particular time or if people were not that muscular throughout human history. You hear stories of  Roman soldiers who are carrying 80 pounds for 10 or 20 miles a day. I mean, there's a lot of sculptures in the ancient world, or not that ancient, but the people look like they have a well-developed musculature.Steve Hsu  10:34  So the Greeks were very special because they were the first to think about the word gymnasium. It was a thing called the Palaestra, where they were trained in wrestling and boxing. They were the first people who were seriously into physical culture specific training for athletic competition.Even in the 70s, when I was a little kid, I look back at the guys from old photos and they were skinny. So skinny! The guys who went off and fought World War Two, whether they were on the German side, or the American side, were like 5’8-5’9 weighing around 130 pounds - 140 pounds. They were much different from what modern US Marines would look like. So yeah, physical culture was a new thing. Of course, the Romans and the Greeks had it to some degree, but it was lost for a long time. And, it was just coming back to the US when I was growing up. So if you were reasonably lean (around 200 pounds) and you could bench over 300.. that was pretty rare back in those days.Embryo selectionDwarkesh Patel  11:46  Okay, so let's talk about your company Genomic Prediction. Do you want to talk about this company and give an intro about what it is?Steve Hsu  11:55  Yeah. So there are two ways to introduce it. One is the scientific view. The other is the IVF view. I can do a little of both. So scientifically, the issue is that we have more and more genomic data. If you give me the genomes of a bunch of people and then give me some information about each person, ex. Do they have diabetes? How tall are they? What's their IQ score?  It’s a natural AI machine learning problem to figure out which features in the DNA variation between people are predictive of whatever variable you're trying to predict.This is the ancient scientific question of how you relate the genotype of the organism (the specific DNA pattern), to the phenotype (the expressed characteristics of the organism). If you think about it, this is what biology is! We had the molecular revolution and figured out that it’s people's DNA that stores the information which is passed along. Evolution selects on the basis of the variation in the DNA that’s expressed as phenotype, as that phenotype affects fitness/reproductive success. That's the whole ballgame for biology. As a physicist who's trained in mathematics and computation, I'm lucky that I arrived on the scene at a time when we're going to solve this basic fundamental problem of biology through brute force, AI, and machine learning. So that's how I got into this. Now you ask as an entrepreneur, “Okay, fine Steve, you're doing this in your office with your postdocs and collaborators on your computers. What use is it?” The most direct application of this is in the following setting: Every year around the world, millions of families go through IVF—typically because they're having some fertility issues, and also mainly because the mother is in her 30s or maybe 40s. In the process of IVF, they use hormone stimulation to produce more eggs. Instead of one per cycle, depending on the age of the woman, they might produce anywhere between five to twenty, or even sixty to a hundred eggs for young women who are hormonally stimulated (egg donors).From there, it’s trivial because men produce sperm all the time. You can fertilize eggs pretty easily in a little dish, and get a bunch of embryos that grow. They start growing once they're fertilized. The problem is that if you're a family and produce more embryos than you’re going to use, you have the embryo choice problem. You have to figure out which embryo to choose out of  say, 20 viable embryos. The most direct application of the science that I described is that we can now genotype those embryos from a small biopsy. I can tell you things about the embryos. I could tell you things like your fourth embryo being an outlier. For breast cancer risk, I would think carefully about using number four. Number ten is an outlier for cardiovascular disease risk. You might want to think about not using that one. The other ones are okay. So, that’s what genomic prediction does. We work with 200 or 300 different IVF clinics in six continents.Dwarkesh Patel  15:46  Yeah, so the super fascinating thing about this is that the diseases you talked about—or at least their risk profiles—are polygenic. You can have thousands of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) determining whether you will get a disease. So, I'm curious to learn how you were able to transition to this space and how your knowledge of mathematics and physics was able to help you figure out how to make sense of all this data.Steve Hsu  16:16  Yeah, that's a great question. So again, I was stressing the fundamental scientific importance of all this stuff. If you go into a slightly higher level of detail—which you were getting at with the individual SNPs, or polymorphisms—there are individual locations in the genome, where I might differ from you, and you might differ from another person. Typically, each pair of individuals will differ at a few million places in the genome—and that controls why I look a little different than youA lot of times, theoretical physicists have a little spare energy and they get tired of thinking about quarks or something. They want to maybe dabble in biology, or they want to dabble in computer science, or some other field. As theoretical physicists, we always feel, “Oh, I have a lot of horsepower, I can figure a lot out.” (For example, Feynman helped design the first parallel processors for thinking machines.) I have to figure out which problems I can make an impact on because I can waste a lot of time. Some people spend their whole lives studying one problem, one molecule or something, or one biological system. I don't have time for that, I'm just going to jump in and jump out. I'm a physicist. That's a typical attitude among theoretical physicists. So, I had to confront sequencing costs about ten years ago because I knew the rate at which they were going down. I could anticipate that we’d get to the day (today) when millions of genomes with good phenotype data became available for analysis. A typical training run might involve almost a million genomes, or half a million genomes. The mathematical question then was: What is the most effective algorithm given a set of genomes and phenotype information to build the best predictor?  This can be  boiled down to a very well-defined machine learning problem. It turns out, for some subset of algorithms, there are theorems— performance guarantees that give you a bound on how much data you need to capture almost all of the variation in the features. I spent a fair amount of time, probably a year or two, studying these very famous results, some of which were proved by a guy named Terence Tao, a Fields medalist. These are results on something called compressed sensing: a penalized form of high dimensional regression that tries to build sparse predictors. Machine learning people might notice L1-penalized optimization. The very first paper we wrote on this was to prove that using accurate genomic data and these very abstract theorems in combination could predict how much data you need to “solve” individual human traits. We showed that you would need at least a few hundred thousand individuals and their genomes and their heights to solve for height as a phenotype. We proved that in a paper using all this fancy math in 2012. Then around 2017, when we got a hold of half a million genomes, we were able to implement it in practical terms and show that our mathematical result from some years ago was correct. The transition from the low performance of the predictor to high performance (which is what we call a “phase transition boundary” between those two domains) occurred just where we said it was going to occur. Some of these technical details are not understood even by practitioners in computational genomics who are not quite mathematical. They don't understand these results in our earlier papers and don't know why we can do stuff that other people can't, or why we can predict how much data we'll need to do stuff. It's not well-appreciated, even in the field. But when the big AI in our future in the singularity looks back and says, “Hey, who gets the most credit for this genomics revolution that happened in the early 21st century?”, they're going to find these papers on the archive where we proved this was possible, and how five years later, we actually did it. Right now it's under-appreciated, but the future AI––that Roko's Basilisk AI–will look back and will give me a little credit for it. Dwarkesh Patel  21:03  Yeah, I was a little interested in this a few years ago. At that time, I looked into how these polygenic risk scores were calculated. Basically, you find the correlation between the phenotype and the alleles that correlate with it. You add up how many copies of these alleles you have, what the correlations are, and you do a weighted sum of that. So that seemed very simple, especially in an era where we have all this machine learning, but it seems like they're getting good predictive results out of this concept. So, what is the delta between how good you can go with all this fancy mathematics versus a simple sum of correlations?Steve Hsu  21:43  You're right that the ultimate models that are used when you've done all the training, and when the dust settles, are straightforward. They’re pretty simple and have an additive structure. Basically, I either assign a nonzero weight to this particular region in the genome, or I don't. Then, I need to know what the weighting is, but then the function is a linear function or additive function of the state of your genome at some subset of positions. The ultimate model that you get is straightforward. Now, if you go back ten years, when we were doing this, there were lots of claims that it was going to be super nonlinear—that it wasn't going to be additive the way I just described it. There were going to be lots of interaction terms between regions. Some biologists are still convinced that's true, even though we already know we have predictors that don't have interactions.The other question, which is more technical, is whether in any small region of your genome, the state of the individual variants is highly correlated because you inherit them in chunks. You need to figure out which one you want to use. You don't want to activate all of them because you might be overcounting. So that's where these L-1 penalization sparse methods force the predictor to be sparse. That is a key step. Otherwise, you might overcount. If you do some simple regression math, you might have 10-10 different variants close by that have roughly the same statistical significance.But, you don't know which one of those tends to be used, and you might be overcounting effects or undercounting effects. So, you end up doing a high-dimensional optimization, where you grudgingly activate a SNP when the signal is strong enough. Once you activate that one, the algorithm has to be smart enough to penalize the other ones nearby and not activate them because you're over counting effects if you do that. There's a little bit of subtlety in it. But, the main point you made is that the ultimate predictors, which are very simple and addictive—sum over effect sizes and time states—work well. That’s related to a deep statement about the additive structure of the genetic architecture of individual differences. In other words, it's weird that the ways that I differ from you are merely just because I have more of something or you have less of something. It’s not like these things are interacting in some incredibly understandable way. That's a deep thing—which is not appreciated that much by biologists yet. But over time, they'll figure out something interesting here.Why hasn’t natural selection already optimized humans?Dwarkesh Patel  24:19  Right. I thought that was super fascinating, and I commented on that on Twitter. What is interesting about that is two things. One is that you have this fascinating evolutionary argument about why that would be the case that you might want to explain. The second is that it makes you wonder if becoming more intelligent is just a matter of turning on certain SNPs. It's not a matter of all this incredible optimization being like solving a sudoku puzzle or anything. If that's the case, then why hasn't the human population already been selected to be maxed out on all these traits if it's just a matter of a bit flip?Steve Hsu  25:00  Okay, so the first issue is why is this genetic architecture so surprisingly simple? Again, we didn't know it would be simple ten years ago. So when I was checking to see whether this was a field that I should go into depending on our capabilities to make progress, we had to study the more general problem of the nonlinear possibilities. But eventually, we realized that most of the variance would probably be captured in an additive way. So, we could narrow down the problem quite a bit. There are evolutionary reasons for this. There’s a famous theorem by Fisher, the father of population genetics (aka. frequentist statistics). Fisher proved something called Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, which says that if you impose some selection pressure on a population, the rate at which that population responds to the selection pressure (lets say it’s the bigger rats that out-compete the smaller rats) then at what rate does the rat population start getting bigger? He showed that it's the additive variants that dominate the rate of evolution. It's easy to understand why if it's a nonlinear mechanism, you need to make the rat bigger. When you sexually reproduce, and that gets chopped apart, you might break the mechanism. Whereas, if each short allele has its own independent effect, you can inherit them without worrying about breaking the mechanisms. It was well known among a tiny theoretical population of biologists that adding variants was the dominant way that populations would respond to selection. That was already known. The other thing is that humans have been through a pretty tight bottleneck, and we're not that different from each other. It's very plausible that if I wanted to edit a human embryo, and make it into a frog, then there are all kinds of subtle nonlinear things I’d have to do. But all those identical nonlinear complicated subsystems are fixed in humans. You have the same system as I do. You have the not human, not frog or ape, version of that region of DNA, and so do I. But the small ways we differ are mostly little additive switches. That's this deep scientific discovery from over the last 5-10 years of work in this area. Now, you were asking about why evolution hasn't completely “optimized” all traits in humans already. I don't know if you’ve ever done deep learning or high-dimensional optimization, but in that high-dimensional space, you're often moving on a slightly-tilted surface. So, you're getting gains, but it's also flat. Even though you scale up your compute or data size by order of magnitude, you don't move that much farther. You get some gains, but you're never really at the global max of anything in these high dimensional spaces. I don't know if that makes sense to you. But it's pretty plausible to me that two things are important here. One is that evolution has not had that much time to optimize humans. The environment that humans live in changed radically in the last 10,000 years. For a while, we didn't have agriculture, and now we have agriculture. Now, we have a swipe left if you want to have sex tonight. The environment didn't stay fixed. So, when you say fully optimized for the environment, what do you mean? The ability to diagonalize matrices might not have been very adaptive 10,000 years ago. It might not even be adaptive now. But anyway, it's a complicated question that one can't reason naively about. “If God wanted us to be 10 feet tall, we'd be 10 feet tall.” Or “if it's better to be smart, my brain would be *this* big or something.” You can't reason naively about stuff like that.Dwarkesh Patel  29:04  I see. Yeah.. Okay. So I guess it would make sense then that for example, with certain health risks, the thing that makes you more likely to get diabetes or heart disease today might be… I don't know what the pleiotropic effect of that could be. But maybe that's not that important one year from now.Steve Hsu  29:17  Let me point out that most of the diseases we care about now—not the rare ones, but the common ones—manifest when you're 50-60 years old. So there was never any evolutionary advantage of being super long-lived. There's even a debate about whether the grandparents being around to help raise the kids lifts the fitness of the family unit.But, most of the time in our evolutionary past, humans just died fairly early. So, many of these diseases would never have been optimized against evolution. But, we see them now because we live under such good conditions, we can regulate people over 80 or 90 years.Dwarkesh Patel  29:57  Regarding the linearity and additivity point, I was going to make the analogy that– and I'm curious if this is valid– but when you're programming, one thing that's good practice is to have all the implementation details in separate function calls or separate programs or something, and then have your main loop of operation just be called different functions like, “Do this, do that”, so that you can easily comment stuff away or change arguments. This seemed very similar to that where by turning these names on and off, you can change what the next offering will be. And, you don't have to worry about actually implementing whatever the underlying mechanism is. Steve Hsu  30:41  Well, what you said is related to what Fisher proved in his theorems. Which is that, if suddenly, it becomes advantageous to have X, (like white fur instead of black fur) or something, it would be best if there were little levers that you could move somebody from black fur to white fur continuously by modifying those switches in an additive way. It turns out that for sexually reproducing species where the DNA gets scrambled up in every generation, it's better to have switches of that kind. The other point related to your software analogy is that there seem to be modular, fairly modular things going on in the genome. When we looked at it, we were the first group to have, initially, 20 primary disease conditions we had decent predictors for. We started looking carefully at just something as trivial as the overlap of my sparsely trained predictor. It turns on and uses *these* features for diabetes, but it uses *these* features for schizophrenia. It’s the stupidest metric, it’s literally just how much overlap or variance accounted for overlap is there between pairs of disease conditions. It's very modest. It's the opposite of what naive biologists would say when they talk about pleiotropy.They're just disjoint! Disjoint regions of your genome that govern certain things. And why not? You have 3 billion base pairs—there's a lot you can do in there. There's a lot of information there. If you need 1000 to control diabetes risk, I estimated you could easily have 1000 roughly independent traits that are just disjoint in their genetic dependencies. So, if you think about D&D,  your strength, decks, wisdom, intelligence, and charisma—those are all disjoint. They're all just independent variables. So it's like a seven-dimensional space that your character lives in. Well, there's enough information in the few million differences between you and me. There's enough for 1000-dimensional space of variation.“Oh, how considerable is your spleen?” My spleen is a little bit smaller, yours is a little bit bigger - that can vary independently of your IQ. Oh, it's a big surprise. The size of your spleen can vary independently of the size of your big toe. If you do information theory, there are about 1000 different parameters, and I can vary independently with the number of variants I have between you and me. Because you understand some information theory, it’s trivial to explain, but try explaining to a biologist, you won't get very far.Dwarkesh Patel  33:27  Yeah, yeah, do the log two of the number of.. is that basically how you do it? Yeah.Steve Hsu  33:33  Okay. That's all it is. I mean, it's in our paper. We look at how many variants typically account for most of the variation for any of these major traits, and then imagine that they're mostly disjoint. Then it’s just all about: how many variants you need to independently vary 1000 traits? Well, a few million differences between you and me are enough. It's very trivial math. Once you understand the base and how to reason about information theory, then it's very trivial. But, it ain’t trivial for theoretical biologists, as far as I can tell.AgingDwarkesh Patel  34:13  But the result is so interesting because I remember reading in The Selfish Gene that, as he (Dawkins) hypothesizes that the reason we could be aging is an antagonistic clash. There's something that makes you healthier when you're young and fertile that makes you unhealthy when you're old. Evolution would have selected for such a trade-off because when you're young and fertile, evolution and your genes care about you. But, if there's enough space in the genome —where these trade-offs are not necessarily necessary—then this could be a bad explanation for aging, or do you think I'm straining the analogy?Steve Hsu  34:49  I love your interviews because the point you're making here is really good. So Dawkins, who is an evolutionary theorist from the old school when they had almost no data—you can imagine how much data they had compared to today—he would tell you a story about a particular gene that maybe has a positive effect when you're young, but it makes you age faster. So, there's a trade-off. We know about things like sickle cell anemia. We know stories about that. No doubt, some stories are true about specific variants in your genome. But that's not the general story. The general story you only discovered in the last five years is that thousands of variants control almost every trait and those variants tend to be disjoint from the ones that control the other trait. They weren't wrong, but they didn't have the big picture.Dwarkesh Patel  35:44  Yeah, I see. So, you had this paper, it had polygenic, health index, general health, and disease risk.. You showed that with ten embryos, you could increase disability-adjusted life years by four, which is a massive increase if you think about it. Like what if you could live four years longer and in a healthy state? Steve Hsu  36:05  Yeah, what's the value of that? What would you pay to buy that for your kid?Dwarkesh Patel  36:08  Yeah. But, going back to the earlier question about the trade-offs and why this hasn't already been selected for,  if you're right and there's no trade-off to do this, just living four years older (even if that's beyond your fertility) just being a grandpa or something seems like an unmitigated good. So why hasn’t this kind of assurance hasn't already been selected for? Steve Hsu  36:35  I’m glad you're asking about these questions because these are things that people are very confused about, even in the field. First of all, let me say that when you have a trait that's controlled by  10,000 variants (eg. height is controlled by order 10,000 variants and probably cognitive ability a little bit more), the square root of 10,000 is 100.  So, if I could come to this little embryo, and I want to give it one extra standard deviation of height, I only need to edit 100. I only need to flip 100 minus variance to plus variance. These are very rough numbers. But, one standard deviation is the square root of “n”. If I flip a coin “n” times, I want a better outcome in terms of the number of ratio heads to tails. I want to increase it by one standard deviation. I only need to flip the square root of “n” heads because if you flip a lot, you will get a narrow distribution that peaks around half, and the width of that distribution is the square root of “n”. Once I tell you, “Hey, your height is controlled by 10,000 variants, and I only need to flip 100 genetic variants to make you one standard deviation for a male,” (that would be three inches tall, two and a half or three inches taller), you suddenly realize, “Wait a minute, there are a lot of variants up for grabs there. If I could flip 500 variants in your genome, I would make you five standard deviations taller, you'd be seven feet tall.”  I didn't even have to do that much work, and there's a lot more variation where that came from. I could have flipped even more because I only flipped 500 out of 10,000, right? So, there's this  quasi-infinite well of variation that evolution or genetic engineers could act on. Again, the early population geneticists who bred corn and animals know this. This is something they explicitly know about because they've done calculations. Interestingly, the human geneticists who are mainly concerned with diseases and stuff, are often unfamiliar with the math that the animal breeders already know. You might be interested to know that the milk you drink comes from heavily genetically-optimized cows bred artificially using almost exactly the same technologies that we use at genomic prediction. But, they're doing it to optimize milk production and stuff like this. So there is a big well of variance. It's a consequence of the trait's poly genicity. On the longevity side of things, it does look like people could “be engineered” to live much longer by flipping the variants that make the risk for diseases that shorten your life. The question is then “Why didn't evolution give us life spans of thousands of years?” People in the Bible used to live for thousands of years. Why don't we? I mean, *chuckles* that probably didn’t happen. But the question is, you have this very high dimensional space, and you have a fitness function. How big is the slope in a particular direction of that fitness function? How much more successful reproductively would Joe caveman have been if he lived to be 150 instead of only, 100 or something? There just hasn't been enough time to explore this super high dimensional space. That's the actual answer. But now, we have the technology, and we're going to f*****g explore it fast. That's the point that the big lightbulb should go off. We’re mapping this space out now. Pretty confident in 10 years or so, with the CRISPR gene editing technologies will be ready for massively multiplexed edits. We'll start navigating in this high-dimensional space as much as we like. So that's the more long-term consequence of the scientific insights.Dwarkesh Patel  40:53  Yeah, that's super interesting. What do you think will be the plateau for a trait of how long you’ll live? With the current data and techniques, you think it could be significantly greater than that?Steve Hsu  41:05  We did a simple calculation—which amazingly gives the correct result. This polygenic predictor that we built (which isn't perfect yet but will improve as we gather more data) is used in selecting embryos today. If you asked, out of a billion people, “What's the best person typically, what would their score be on this index and then how long would they be predicted to live?”’ It's about 120 years. So it's spot on. One in a billion types of person lives to be 120 years old. How much better can you do? Probably a lot better. I don't want to speculate, but other nonlinear effects, things that we're not taking into account will start to play a role at some point. So, it's a little bit hard to estimate what the true limiting factors will be. But one super robust statement, and I'll stand by it, debate any Nobel Laureate in biology who wants to discuss it even,  is that there are many variants available to be selected or edited. There's no question about that. That's been established in animal breeding in plant breeding for a long time now. If you want a chicken that grows to be *this* big, instead of *this* big, you can do it. You can do it if you want a cow that produces 10 times or 100 times more milk than a regular cow. The egg you ate for breakfast this morning, those bio-engineered chickens that lay almost an egg a day… A chicken in the wild lays an egg a month. How the hell did we do that? By genetic engineering. That's how we did it. Dwarkesh Patel  42:51  Yeah. That was through brute artificial selection. No fancy machine learning there.Steve Hsu  42:58  Last ten years, it's gotten sophisticated machine learning genotyping of chickens. Artificial insemination, modeling of the traits using ML last ten years. For cow breeding, it's done by ML. First Mover AdvantageDwarkesh Patel  43:18  I had no idea. That's super interesting. So, you mentioned that you're accumulating data and improving your techniques over time, is there a first mover advantage to a genomic prediction company like this? Or is it whoever has the newest best algorithm for going through the biobank data? Steve Hsu  44:16  That's another super question. For the entrepreneurs in your audience, I would say in the short run, if you ask what the valuation of GPB should be? That's how the venture guys would want me to answer the question. There is a huge first mover advantage because they're important in the channel relationships between us and the clinics. Nobody will be able to get in there very easily when they come later because we're developing trust and an extensive track record with clinics worldwide—and we're well-known. So could 23andme or some company with a huge amount of data—if they were to get better AI/ML people working on this—blow us away a little bit and build better predictors because they have much more data than we do? Possibly, yes. Now, we have had core expertise in doing this work for years that we're just good at it. Even though we don't have as much data as 23andme, our predictors might still be better than theirs. I'm out there all the time, working with biobanks all around the world. I don't want to say all the names, but other countries are trying to get my hands on as much data as possible.But, there may not be a lasting advantage beyond the actual business channel connections to that particular market. It may not be a defensible, purely scientific moat around the company. We have patents on specific technologies about how to do the genotyping or error correction on the embryo, DNA, and stuff like this. We do have patents on stuff like that. But this general idea of who will best predict human traits from DNA? It's unclear who's going to be the winner in that race. Maybe it'll be the Chinese government in 50 years? Who knows?Dwarkesh Patel  46:13  Yeah, that's interesting. If you think about a company Google, theoretically, it's possible that you could come up with a better algorithm than PageRank and beat them. But it seems like the engineer at Google is going to come up with whatever edge case or whatever improvement is possible.Steve Hsu  46:28  That's exactly what I would say. PageRank is deprecated by now. But, even if somebody else comes up with a somewhat better algorithm if they have a little bit more data, if you have a team doing this for a long time and you're focused and good, it's still tough to beat you, especially if you have a lead in the market.Dwarkesh Patel  46:50  So, are you guys doing the actual biopsy? Or is it just that they upload the genome, and you're the one processing just giving recommendations? Is it an API call, basically?Steve Hsu  47:03  It's great, I love your question. It is totally standard. Every good IVF clinic in the world regularly takes embryo biopsies. So that's standard. There’s a lab tech doing that. Okay. Then, they take the little sample, put it on ice, and ship it. The DNA as a molecule is exceptionally robust and stable. My other startup solves crimes that are 100 years old from DNA that we get from some semen stain on some rape victim, serial killer victims bra strap, we've done stuff that.Dwarkesh Patel  47:41  Jack the Ripper, when are we going to solve that mystery?Steve Hsu  47:44  If they can give me samples, we can get into that. For example, we just learned that you could recover DNA pretty well if someone licks a stamp and puts on their correspondence. If you can do Neanderthals, you can do a lot to solve crimes. In the IVF workflow, our lab, which is in New Jersey, can service every clinic in the world because they take the biopsy, put it in a standard shipping container, and send it to us. We’re actually genotyping DNA in our lab, but we've trained a few of the bigger  clinics to do the genotyping on their site. At that point, they upload some data into the cloud and then they get back some stuff from our platform. And at that point it's going to be the whole world, every human who wants their kid to be healthy and get the best they can– that data is going to come up to us, and the report is going to come back down to their IVF physician. Dwarkesh Patel  48:46  Which is great if you think that there's a potential that this technology might get regulated in some way, you could go to Mexico or something, have them upload the genome (you don't care what they upload it from), and then get the recommendations there. Steve Hsu  49:05  I think we’re going to evolve to a point where we are going to be out of the wet part of this business, and only in the cloud and bit part of this business. No matter where it is, the clinics are going to have a sequencer, which is *this* big, and their tech is going to quickly upload and retrieve the report for the physician three seconds later. Then, the parents are going to look at it on their phones or whatever. We’re basically there with some clinics. It’s going to be tough to regulate because it’s just this. You have the bits and you’re in some repressive, terrible country that doesn’t allow you to select for some special traits that people are nervous about, but you can upload it to some vendor that’s in Singapore or some free country, and they give you the report back. Doesn’t have to be us, we don’t do the edgy stuff. We only do the health-related stuff right now. But, if you want to know how tall this embryo is going to be…I’ll tell you a mind-blower! When you do face recognition in AI, you're mapping someone's face into a parameter space on the order of hundreds of parameters, each of those parameters is super heritable. In other words, if I take two twins and photograph them, and the algorithm gives me the value of that parameter for twin one and two, they're very close. That's why I can't tell the two twins apart, and face recognition can ultimately tell them apart if it’s really good system. But you can conclude that almost all these parameters are identical for those twins. So it's highly heritable. We're going to get to a point soon where I can do the inverse problem where I have your DNA  and I predict each of those parameters in the face recognition algorithm and then reconstruct the face. If I say that when this embryo will be 16, that is what she will look like. When she's 32, this is what she's going to look like. I'll be able to do that, for sure. It's only an AI/ML problem right now. But basic biology is clearly going to work. So then you're going to be able to say, “Here's a report. Embryo four is so cute.” Before, we didn't know we wouldn't do that, but it will be possible. Dwarkesh Patel  51:37  Before we get married, you'll want to see what their genotype implies about their faces' longevity. It's interesting that you hear stories about these cartel leaders who will get plastic surgery or something to evade the law, you could have a check where you look at a lab and see if it matches the face you would have had five years ago when they caught you on tape.Steve Hsu  52:02  This is a little bit back to old-school Gattaca, but you don't even need the face! You can just take a few molecules of skin cells and phenotype them and know exactly who they are. I've had conversations with these spooky Intel folks. They're very interested in, “Oh, if some Russian diplomat comes in, and we think he's a spy, but he's with the embassy, and he has a coffee with me, and I save the cup and send it to my buddy at Langley, can we figure out who this guy is? And that he has a daughter who's going to Chote? Can do all that now.Dwarkesh Patel  52:49  If that's true, then in the future, world leaders will not want to eat anything or drink. They'll be wearing a hazmat suit to make sure they don't lose a hair follicle.Steve Hsu  53:04  The next time Pelosi goes, she will be in a spacesuit if she cares. Or the other thing is, they're going to give it. They're just going to be, “Yeah, my DNA is everywhere. If I'm a public figure, I can't track my DNA. It's all over.”Dwarkesh Patel  53:17  But the thing is, there's so much speculation that Putin might have cancer or something. If we have his DNA, we can see his probability of having cancer at age 70, or whatever he is, is 85%. So yeah, that’d be a very verified rumor. That would be interesting. Steve Hsu  53:33  I don't think that would be very definitive. I don't think we'll reach that point where you can say that Putin has cancer because of his DNA—which I could have known when he was an embryo. I don't think it's going to reach that level. But, we could say he is at high risk for a type of cancer. Genomics in datingDwarkesh Patel  53:49  In 50 or 100 years, if the majority of the population is doing this, and if the highly heritable diseases get pruned out of the population, does that mean we'll only be left with lifestyle diseases? So, you won't get breast cancer anymore, but you will still get fat or lung cancer from smoking?Steve Hsu  54:18  It's hard to discuss the asymptotic limit of what will happen here. I'm not very confident about making predictions like that. It could get to the point where everybody who's rich or has been through this stuff for a while, (especially if we get the editing working) is super low risk for all the top 20 killer diseases that have the most life expectancy impact. Maybe those people live to be 300 years old naturally. I don't think that's excluded at all. So, that's within the realm of possibility. But it's going to happen for a few lucky people like Elon Musk before it happens for shlubs like you and me. There are going to be very angry inequality protesters about the Trump grandchildren, who, models predict will live to be 200 years old. People are not going to be happy about that.Dwarkesh Patel  55:23  So interesting. So, one way to think about these different embryos is if you're producing multiple embryos, and you get to select from one of them, each of them has a call option, right? Therefore, you probably want to optimize for volatility as much, or if not more than just the expected value of the trait. So, I'm wondering if there are mechanisms where you can  increase the volatility in meiosis or some other process. You just got a higher variance, and you can select from the tail better.Steve Hsu  55:55  Well, I'll tell you something related, which is quite amusing. So I talked with some pretty senior people at the company that owns all the dating apps. So you can look up what company this is, but they own Tinder and Match. They’re kind of interested in perhaps including a special feature where you upload your genome instead of Tinder Gold / Premium.  And when you match- you can talk about how well you match the other person based on your genome. One person told me something shocking. Guys lie about their height on these apps. Dwarkesh Patel  56:41  I’m shocked, truly shocked hahaha. Steve Hsu  56:45  Suppose you could have a DNA-verified height. It would prevent gross distortions if someone claims they're 6’2 and they’re 5’9. The DNA could say that's unlikely. But no, the application to what you were discussing is more like, “Let's suppose that we're selecting on intelligence or something. Let's suppose that the regions where your girlfriend has all the plus stuff are complementary to the regions where you have your plus stuff. So, we could model that and say,  because of the complementarity structure of your genome in the regions that affect intelligence, you're very likely to have some super intelligent kids way above your, the mean of your you and your girlfriend's values. So, you could say things like it being better for you to marry that girl than another. As long as you go through embryo selection, we can throw out the bad outliers. That's all that's technically feasible. It's true that one of the earliest patent applications, they'll deny it now. What's her name? Gosh, the CEO of 23andme…Wojcicki, yeah. She'll deny it now. But, if you look in the patent database, one of the very earliest patents that 23andme filed when they were still a tiny startup was about precisely this: Advising parents about mating and how their kids would turn out and stuff like this. We don't even go that far in GP, we don't even talk about stuff like that, but they were thinking about it when they founded 23andme.Dwarkesh Patel  58:38  That is unbelievably interesting. By the way, this just occurred to me—it's supposed to be highly heritable, especially people in Asian countries, who have the experience of having grandparents that are much shorter than us, and then parents that are shorter than us, which suggests that  the environment has a big part to play in it malnutrition or something. So how do you square that our parents are often shorter than us with the idea that height is supposed to be super heritable.Steve Hsu  59:09  Another great observation. So the correct scientific statement is that we can predict height for people who will be born and raised in a favorable environment. In other words, if you live close to a McDonald's and you're able to afford all the food you want, then the height phenotype becomes super heritable because the environmental variation doesn't matter very much. But, you and I both know that people are much smaller if we return to where our ancestors came from, and also, if you look at how much food, calories, protein, and calcium they eat, it's different from what I ate and what you ate growing up. So we're never saying the environmental effects are zero. We're saying that for people raised in a particularly favorable environment, maybe the genes are capped on what can be achieved, and we can predict that. In fact, we have data from Asia, where you can see much bigger environmental effects. Age affects older people, for fixed polygenic scores on the trait are much shorter than younger people.Ancestral populationsDwarkesh Patel  1:00:31  Oh, okay. Interesting. That raises that next question I was about to ask: how applicable are these scores across different ancestral populations?Steve Hsu  1:00:44  Huge problem is that most of the data is from Europeans. What happens is that if you train a predictor in this ancestry group and go to a more distant ancestry group, there's a fall-off in the prediction quality. Again, this is a frontier question, so we don't know the answer for sure. But many people believe that there's a particular correlational structure in each population, where if I know the state of this SNP, I can predict the state of these neighboring SNPs. That is a product of that group's mating patterns and ancestry. Sometimes, the predictor, which is just using statistical power to figure things out, will grab one of these SNPs as a tag for the truly causal SNP in there. It doesn't know which one is genuinely causal, it is just grabbing a tag, but the tagging quality falls off if you go to another population (eg. This was a very good tag for the truly causal SNP in the British population. But it's not so good a tag in the South Asian population for the truly causal SNP, which we hypothesize is the same). It's the same underlying genetic architecture in these different ancestry groups. We don't know if that's a hypothesis. But even so, the tagging quality falls off. So my group spent a lot of our time looking at the performance of predictor training population A, and on distant population B, and modeling it trying to figure out trying to test hypotheses as to whether it's just the tagging decay that’s responsible for most of the faults. So all of this is an area of active investigation. It'll probably be solved in five years. The first big biobanks that are non-European are coming online. We're going to solve it in a number of years.Dwarkesh Patel  1:02:38  Oh, what does the solution look like?  Unless you can identify the causal mechanism by which each SNP is having an effect, how can you know that something is a tag or whether it's the actual underlying switch?Steve Hsu  1:02:54  The nature of reality will determine how this is going to go. So we don't truly  know if the  innate underlying biology is true. This is an amazing thing. People argue about human biodiversity and all this stuff, and we don't even know whether these specific mechanisms that predispose you to be tall or having heart disease are the same  in these different ancestry groups. We assume that it is, but we don't know that. As we get further away to Neanderthals or Homo Erectus, you might see that they have a slightly different architecture than we do. But let's assume that the causal structure is the same for South Asians and British people. Then it's a matter of improving the tags. How do I know if I don't know which one is causal? What do I mean by improving the tags? This is a machine learning problem. If there's a SNP, which is always coming up as very significant when I use it across multiple ancestry groups, maybe that one's casual. As I vary the tagging correlations in the neighborhood of that SNP, I always find that that one is the intersection of all these different sets, making me think that one's going to be causal. That's a process we're engaged in now—trying to do that. Again, it's just a machine learning problem. But we need data. That's the main issue.Dwarkesh Patel  1:04:32  I was hoping that wouldn't be possible, because one way we might go about this research is that it itself becomes taboo or causes other sorts of bad social consequences if you can definitively show that on certain traits, there are differences between ancestral populations, right? So, I was hoping that maybe there was an evasion button where we can't say because they're just tags and the tags might be different between different ancestral populations. But with machine learning, we’ll know.Steve Hsu  1:04:59  That's the situation we're in now, where you have to do some fancy analysis if you want to claim that Italians have lower height potential than Nordics—which is possible. There's been a ton of research about this because there are signals of selection. The alleles, which are activated in height predictors, look like they've been under some selection between North and South Europe over the last 5000 years for whatever reason. But, this is a thing debated by people who study molecular evolution. But suppose it's true, okay? That would mean that when we finally get to the bottom of it, we find all the causal loci for height, and the average value for the Italians is lower than that for those living in Stockholm. That might be true. People don't get that excited? They get a little bit excited about height. But they would get really excited if this were true for some other traits, right?Suppose the causal variants affecting your level of extraversion are systematic, that the average value of those weighed the weighted average of those states is different in Japan versus Sicily. People might freak out over that. I'm supposed to say that's obviously not true. How could it possibly be true? There hasn't been enough evolutionary time for those differences to arise. After all, it's not possible that despite what looks to be the case for height over the last 5000 years in Europe, no other traits could have been differentially selected for over the last 5000 years. That's the dangerous thing. Few people understand this field well enough to understand what you and I just discussed and are so alarmed by it that they're just trying to suppress everything. Most of them don't follow it at this technical level that you and I are just discussing. So, they're somewhat instinctively negative about it, but they don't understand it very well.Dwarkesh Patel  1:07:19  That's good to hear. You see this pattern that by the time that somebody might want to regulate or in some way interfere with some technology or some information, it already has achieved wide adoption. You could argue that that's the case with crypto today. But if it's true that a bunch of IVF clinics worldwide are using these scores to do selection and other things, by the time people realize the implications of this data for other kinds of social questions, this has already been an existing consumer technology.Is this eugenics?Steve Hsu  1:07:58  That's true, and the main outcry will be if it turns out that there are massive gains to be had, and only the billionaires are getting them. But that might have the consequence of causing countries to make this free part of their national health care system. So Denmark and Israel pay for IVF. For infertile couples, it's part of their national health care system. They're pretty aggressive about genetic testing. In Denmark, one in 10 babies are born through IVF. It's not clear how it will go. But we're in for some fun times. There's no doubt about that.Dwarkesh Patel  1:08:45  Well, one way you could go is that some countries decided to ban it altogether. And another way it could go is if countries decided to give everybody free access to it. If you had to choose between the two,  you would want to go for the second one. Which would be the hope. Maybe only those two are compatible with people's moral intuitions about this stuff. Steve Hsu  1:09:10  It’s very funny because most wokist people today hate this stuff. But, most progressives like Margaret Sanger, or anybody who was the progressive intellectual forebears of today's wokist, in the early 20th century, were all that we would call today in Genesis because they were like, “Thanks to Darwin, we now know how this all works. We should take steps to keep society healthy and (not in a negative way where we kill people we don't like, but we should help society do healthy things when they reproduce, and have healthy kids).” Now, this whole thing has just been flipped over among progressives. Dwarkesh Patel  1:09:52  Even in India, less than 50 years ago, Indira Gandhi, she's on the left side of India's political spectrum. She was infamous for putting on these forced sterilization programs. Somebody made an interesting comment about this where they were asked, “Oh, is it true that history always tilts towards progressives? And if so, isn't everybody else doomed? Aren't their views doomed?”The person made a fascinating point: whatever we consider left at the time tends to be winning. But what is left has changed a lot over time, right? In the early 20th century, prohibition was a left cause. It was a progressive cause, and that changed, and now the opposite is the left cause. But now, legalizing pot is progressive. Exactly. So, if Conquest’s second law is true, and everything tilts leftover time, just change what is left is, right? That's the solution. Steve Hsu  1:10:59  No one can demand that any of these woke guys be intellectually self-consistent, or even say the same things from one year to another? But one could wonder what they think about these literally Communist Chinese. They’re recycling huge parts of their GDP to help the poor and the southern stuff. Medicine is free, education is free, right? They're clearly socialists, and literally communists. But in Chinese, the Chinese characters for eugenics is a positive thing. It means healthy production. But more or less, the whole viewpoint on all this stuff is 180 degrees off in East Asia compared to here, and even among the literal communists—so go figure.Dwarkesh Patel  1:11:55  Yeah, very based. So let's talk about one of the traits that people might be interested in potentially selecting for: intelligence. What is the potential for us to acquire the data to correlate the genotype with intelligence?Steve Hsu  1:12:15  Well, that's the most personally frustrating aspect of all of this stuff. If you asked me ten years ago when I started doing this stuff what were we going to get, everything was gone. On the optimistic side of what I would have predicted, so everything's good. Didn't turn out to be interactively nonlinear, or it didn't turn out to be interactively pleiotropic. All these good things, —which nobody could have known a priori how they would work—turned out to be good for gene engineers of the 21st century. The one frustrating thing is because of crazy wokeism, and fear of crazy wokists, the most interesting phenotype of all is lagging b

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History Ago Go
Action Park: Fast Times, Wild Rides, and the Untold Story of America's Most Dangerous Amusement Park (Andy Mulvihill)

History Ago Go

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 51:01


The outlandish, hilarious, terrifying, and almost impossible-to-believe story of the legendary, dangerous amusement park where millions were entertained and almost as many bruises were sustained, told through the eyes of the founder's son.Often called "Accident Park," "Class Action Park," or "Traction Park," Action Park was an American icon. Entertaining more than a million people a year in the 1980s, the New Jersey-based amusement playland placed no limits on danger or fun, a monument to the anything-goes spirit of the era that left guests in control of their own adventures--sometimes with tragic results. Though it closed its doors in 1996 after nearly twenty years, it has remained a subject of constant fascination ever since, an establishment completely anathema to our modern culture of rules and safety. Action Park is the first-ever unvarnished look at the history of this DIY Disneyland, as seen through the eyes of Andy Mulvihill, the son of the park's idiosyncratic founder, Gene Mulvihill. From his early days testing precarious rides to working his way up to chief lifeguard of the infamous Wave Pool to later helping run the whole park, Andy's story is equal parts hilarious and moving, chronicling the life and death of a uniquely American attraction, a wet and wild 1980s adolescence, and a son's struggle to understand his father's quixotic quest to become the Walt Disney of New Jersey. Packing in all of the excitement of a day at Action Park, this is destined to be one of the most unforgettable memoirs of the year.HOST:  Rob MellonFEATURED BREW:  A Sunny Day American IPA, Five Dimes Brewery, Westwood, New JerseyBOOK:  Action Park: Fast Times, Wild Rides, and the Untold Story of America's Most Dangerous Amusement Parkhttps://www.amazon.com/Action-Park-Andy-Mulvihill/dp/0143134515/ref=sr_1_2?crid=3U2KWYLUVD7SQ&keywords=action+park&qid=1661136252&sprefix=action+park%2Caps%2C99&sr=8-2MUSIC:  BoneS Forkhttps://bonesfork.com/

Investor's Guide to Memphis Real Estate
103. Memphis ZIP Code Breakdown

Investor's Guide to Memphis Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 80:29


We are breaking down the Memphis ZIP codes so you have the boots-on-the-ground knowledge you need to win in the Memphis real estate market! 1:51 - Frayser 38127 7:22 - Raleigh 38128 12:04 - Bartlett 12:54 - Bartlett 38134 15:07 - Bartlett 38133 18:00 - Bartlett 38135 21:46 - Arlington/Lakeland 38002 25:11 - Cordova 38016 26:57 - Cordova 38018 28:43 - Germantown 38138 30:14 - Germantown 38139 31:53 - Southeast Shelby County 38125 35:13 - Hickory Hill South 38141 37:41 - Hickory Hill North 38115 40:05 - Oakhaven Parkway Village 38118 43:17 - Whitehaven 38116 46:49 - Westwood 38109 49:30 - East Memphis 38117 51:34 - Orange Mound 38114 53:46 - South Memphis 38106 56:20 - North Memphis 38107 58:24 - Rhodes College Area 38112 1:00:23 - Berclair 38122 1:03:16 - Nutbush 38108 1:05:27 - University 38111 1:08:59 - Desoto County 1:16:15 - Midtown 38104 Have any questions? Shoot me an email: dean@crestcore.com Dean Harris, VP of Sales at CrestCore Realty Douglas Skipworth, Founder & Principal Broker at CrestCore Realty Podcast production and design by Parasaur Studios This podcast is brought to you by William N. Griffin, Jr., Atty Griffin, Clift, Everton & Maschmeyer PLLC.

Bleav in UCLA Basketball
Hines Runs, UCLA Men's Basketball Schedule, Football Recruiting Woes

Bleav in UCLA Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 53:50


Sam Connon and Travis Reed shared stories about the Hines Runs on campus at UCLA, with Travis breaking down how certain UCLA men's basketball players looked going up against NBA competition in Westwood. The Bruins' schedule is almost complete, too, giving Sam and Travis a chance to give some early thoughts on UCLA's competition this season. UCLA football continued to churn its way through fall camp, with a few position groups looking thin and recruiting standing out as a cause for concern moving forward.

2500 DelMonte Street: The Oral History of Tower Records

Rick Dorsey is a 20 year Tower Records veteran. Starting his career in West Covina in 1986, Dorsey also worked at, and then in May of 1992 (the first day of the LA riots) ran,  the Westwood, Los Angeles store until 1995. Rick ultimately went back to West Covina where he worked until 2006 when Tower Records went out of business. But long before he worked for Tower, Rick had the bug of being a major music fan. His older sister brought home records by The Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Ramones and she turned Rick onto music greater than what was being played on radio. Music became his main identity as a teenager as he snuck into local clubs to see some of the great LA bands of the time; Oingo Boingo, The Stray Cats, X, Agent Orange and others. In this episode Rick tells us about the managerial influence of Bob Feterl and Anita Bonds, why shopping visits from Michael Jackson were so stressful, conversations he had with George Harrison, what R&B song Al Cowlings and OJ Simpson were looking for the day before the low speed White Bronco chase, why Anita Baker stopped her show at the Greek Theatre to shout out Westwood's Jazz Buyer and why Russ Solomon's style guided his managerial outlook. 

Chuck & Winkler
Scott Graham joins the show

Chuck & Winkler

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 14:34


Scott Graham from Westwood one and NFL Films joined the show to talk about the NFL Hall Of Fame weekend.

The Horn Austin
FLX Interview - Westwood Head Coach Anthony Woods (Aug 4, 2022)

The Horn Austin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 10:36


FLX Interview - Westwood Head Coach Anthony Woods (Aug 4, 2022) by The Horn 104.9 & AM 1260

Pèlerinages Américains
24: Icônes des 50s - Marilyn Monroe, pèlerinage à Westwood pour la reine de l'Amérique

Pèlerinages Américains

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 21:09


« Pèlerinage Américains » est le podcast « Culture et aventure » aux Etats-Unis.  On débute aujourd'hui une nouvelle série consacrée aux plus grandes icônes des années 50. Dans cet épisode, on part en Californie pour celle qui est sans doute la plus grande star du cinéma hollywoodien : Marilyn Monroe.  Comme me l'a dit un admirateur rencontré à Hollywood : en Europe, on a eu des rois et des reines, mais aux Etats-Unis, la reine, c'est Marilyn. La reine de l'Amérique nous a quittés le 4 août 1962, il y a tout juste 60 ans. Depuis le décès de Marilyn, à l'âge de 36 ans, son portrait est celui de la beauté éternellement jeune.  Son décès mystérieux a bouleversé ses admirateurs et provoqué une onde de choc dans le monde entier. A partir de là, les hommages pour Marilyn n'ont cessé de la part de tous ceux qui l'aimaient. Son 2e mari, la star du baseball Joe Di Maggio, a ainsi fait déposer des fleurs sur la tombe de Marilyn 3 fois par semaine pendant 20 ans. Aujourd'hui, cette tombe est le lieu de pèlerinage numéro un pour Marilyn. Elle se situe en Californie, à Westwood, à mi-chemin entre Hollywood et la maison où son corps a été retrouvé rempli de barbiturique, un anesthésiant que Marilyn prenait pour dormir, dans des quantités qui se sont révélées fatales.  Scott, un passionné, me propose de m'emmener là-bas. Ca vous dit de nous accompagner ? Une création d'Alexis Grardel pour le pilgrim qui sommeille en vous. Cet épisode est l'Episode 4 de la saison 2 de Pèlerinages Américains Votre soutien est nécessaire pour la suite de la série. Instagram : @PelerinagesAmericains Site : PelerinagesAmericains.com 

Living in the Sprawl: Southern California's Most Adventurous Podcast
EPISODE 63: 10 SPOTS TO VISIT FOR A MARILYN MONROE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EXPERIENCE

Living in the Sprawl: Southern California's Most Adventurous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 25:36 Transcription Available


In this week's episode of Living in the Sprawl: Southern California's Most Adventurous Podcast, host Jon Steinberg shares his list of 10 spots to visit for the ultimate Marilyn Monroe Southern California experience. His list includes: the Faralone Estate in Chatsworth, the house she lived in Catalina Island, The Forever Marilyn Statue in Palm Springs, her childhood home in Hawthorne, her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, her burial site in Westwood, the apartments in Hollywood she lived in before her career took off, her handprints in front of TCL Theater, her favorite hotel in Hollywood and the house where she died in Brentwood.Instagram: @livinginthesprawlpodcastEmail: livinginthesprawlpodcast@gmail.comWebsite: www.livinginthesprawlpodcast.comCheck out our favorite CBD gummy company...it helps us get better sleep and stay chill. Use code "SPRAWL" for 20% off.  https://www.justcbdstore.com?aff=645Check out Goldbelly for all your favorite US foods to satisfy those cravings or bring back some nostalgia. Our favorites include Junior's Chessecakes from New York, Lou Malnati's deep dish pizza from Chicago and a philly cheesesteak from Pat's. Use the link https://goldbelly.pxf.io/c/2974077/1032087/13451 to check out all of the options and let them know we sent you.Use code "SPRAWL" for (2) free meals and free delivery on your first Everytable subscription.Support the podcast and future exploration adventures. We are working on unique perks and will give you a shout out on the podcast to thank you for your contribution!Living in the Sprawl: Southern California's Most Adventurous Podcast is on Podfanhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/sprawlSupport the show

The Unlimited Potential Show I Relatable Self Development
73. Becoming The “Greatest Coach.” The Life of John Wooden Part 1

The Unlimited Potential Show I Relatable Self Development

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 36:04


Think back to when you were young and ask yourself, who were the adults that had the most impact on your life? Hopefully, a few smiling faces come to mind when you reflect on the people that helped get you where you are today.   Maybe it was a coach, a teacher, a mentor, or a parent that came to mind. Regardless of how you knew them, they made an impact on you and that's what matters the most. Most likely, because of them you now want to leave a positive impact on those around you. Isn't that the way it should work?   When you meet a great leader or coach, it naturally makes you want to be one yourself. That same line of thinking and giving back is what makes today's show so special. This week on The Unlimited Potential Show we are starting our new series on the great Coach John Wooden.    After his famous carree as an American basketball coach, John Wooden was named coach of the 20th century by ESPN.In fact, many often regard him as the best coach of all time and nicknamed "Wizard of Westwood", after he won ten National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) national championships.   Past the fan fair and the trophy collection, you will discover how Coach John Wooden earned these nicknames and more by the way he truly loved his players and how he did everything he could to see them succeed both on and off the court.    This type of leadership is something we can all aspire to be more like. Hit play to hear part one of our conversation about “Becoming The “Greatest Coach.” The Life of John Wooden”   More Of What's Inside: What it takes to stay disciplined  Coaching/Leading the whole person The unfair treatment in College athletics How Dr. Ram is growing in self-disciple The type of boss Chris wants to be How our Summer traveling is going this year A look into the life of John Wooden Why Coach Wooden cared about socks so much How you can become a better leader What's coming up on the next episode And much more!   Connect with Chris and Dr. Ram:    Private Facebook Community:    www.facebook.com/groups/unlimitedpotentialpodcast    Personal Websites:    morrellfirm.com  ramcheruvu.wixsite.com/doctorram    Youtube Channel:    www.youtube.com/channel/UCtSIgawdfsNk0bk4Rwotz7w    Social Media:    www.linkedin.com/in/doctorram  https://www.linkedin.com/in/christopher-morrell  Episode Minute By Minute:    1:24 The life and lessons from John Wooden 4:08 Topic and main conversation starts 9:30 A look into the greatest coach of all time 15:33 Why teams are always stronger together 17:39 Principal #1 from John Wooden 22:17 Why mastering the basics is so critical 28:48 Why no one could cuss on Wooden's court 34:23 Chris's goal for his work environment

The Horn Austin
FLX Westwood VB (Lola And Trinity, 072022)

The Horn Austin

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 17:08


FLX Westwood VB (Lola And Trinity, 072022) by The Horn 104.9 & AM 1260