Podcasts about intergovernmental panel

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Best podcasts about intergovernmental panel

Latest podcast episodes about intergovernmental panel

The Creative Process Podcast
(Highlights) DR. JOERI ROGELJ

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


“A key part of how I go about doing my research is being involved in policy discussions, policy conversations, and also by following the international climate negotiations very closely. Actually, I started my research career as a part of the Presidency of the International Climate Negotiations in 2009. After that I remained an advisor to country delegations in the international negotiations, particularly small island development states or least developed countries. That really helped me to get a sense of what the real questions are that they are struggling with.”Dr. Joeri Rogelj is Director of Research at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College and also at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. He studies how societies transform towards more sustainable futures, connecting Earth sciences to policy. He publishes on 1.5°C pathways, UN climate agreements, carbon budgets and net zero targets. He is a long-serving author on authoritative science assessment reports of the UN Environment Programme and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.· www.imperial.ac.uk/people/j.rogelj· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process Podcast

Dr. Joeri Rogelj is Director of Research at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College and also at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. He studies how societies transform towards more sustainable futures, connecting Earth sciences to policy. He publishes on 1.5°C pathways, UN climate agreements, carbon budgets and net zero targets. He is a long-serving author on authoritative science assessment reports of the UN Environment Programme and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.· www.imperial.ac.uk/people/j.rogelj· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

Red Menace
Climate Leviathan: A Political Theory of Our Planetary Future

Red Menace

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 117:13


In this episode of Red Menace, Alyson and Breht discuss and analyze "Climate Leviathan" by authors Geoff Mann and Joel Wainwright. Book description: "Despite the science and the summits, leading capitalist states have not achieved anything close to an adequate level of carbon mitigation. There is now simply no way to prevent the planet breaching the threshold of two degrees Celsius set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. What are the likely political and economic outcomes of this? Where is the overheating world heading? To further the struggle for climate justice, we need to have some idea how the existing global order is likely to adjust to a rapidly changing environment. Climate Leviathan provides a radical way of thinking about the intensifying challenges to the global order. Drawing on a wide range of political thought, Joel Wainwright and Geoff Mann argue that rapid climate change will transform the world's political economy and the fundamental political arrangements most people take for granted. The result will be a capitalist planetary sovereignty, a terrifying eventuality that makes the construction of viable, radical alternatives truly imperative." Support Red Menace and get access to bonus monthly content on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/TheRedMenace

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network
Telling the Earth's Story with Nobel Peace Prize Winner for Climate Change Professor Terry Root

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 24:01


Dr. Terry Root is an active conservator of the earth and all its species. She was a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change Report in 2007, resulting in Dr. Root being co-awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Vice President Al Gore. In addition to other honors, Root was awarded the “Spirit of Defenders Award for Science” by Defenders of Wildlife in 2010, and a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2016 from the conservation organization Point Blue. She served on the National Audubon Board of Directors from 2010 to 2019, currently serves on the board of Defenders of Wildlife, Birds Caribbean, and is on numerous science advisory boards, including the American Wind and Wildlife Institute. Root earned her undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Statistics from the University of New Mexico, her master's degree in Biology from the University of Colorado and her doctorate in Biology from Princeton University. She was a professor at the University of Michigan for 15 years, and then at Stanford University for 15 years where she still serves as Professor Emerita. She joins us at the microphone from her home in Sarasota, FL. You can contact Dr. Root at TRoot@Stanford.edu The Storytellers hosted by Grace Sammon, focuses on individuals who choose to leave their mark on the world through the art of story. Each episode engages guests and listeners in the story behind the story of authors, artists, reporters and others who leave a legacy of storytelling. Applying her years of experience as an educator, entrepreneur, author, and storyteller herself, Grace brings to listeners an intimate one-on-one experience with her guests. The Storytellers is a copyrighted work © of Grace Sammon and Authors on The Air Global Radio Network. Visit Grace at her website www.gracesammon.net. Contact Grace about being a guest on the show, email her at grace@gracesammon.net Follow Grace: On Facebook https://www.facebook.com/GraceSammonWrites/ On Instagram https://www.instagram.com/GraceSammonWrites/ On Twitter https://www.twitter.com/GSammonWrites On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/grace-sammon-84389153/ #TheStorytellers #Storyteller #Storytellers # Storytelling #AuhtorInterview #LetsTalkBooks #LeaveYourMark #Legacy #AuthorLife #StorytellerLife #ArtofStory #nobelprize #nobelprizewinner #climatechange #theearthsstory #audobon #birds #audobonsociety #universityofnewmexico #stanford #sarasotaflorida #mathematics #science #environment #wildlife #birding #algore #defenseofwildlife #AuthorsOnTheAirGlobalRadioNetwork

More or Less: Behind the Stats

A guide to the most concerning, striking and downright extraordinary numbers of 2021. Tim Harford asks three More or Less interviewees about their most significant and memorable figure over the past year. From the excess death toll of Covid-19; to declining total fertility rates, and a spike in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, we showcase the numbers that tell us something about the year gone by. During this programme, we speak to Hannah Ritchie, head of research at Our World in Data and senior researcher at the University of Oxford; Marina Adshade, Economics Professor at the University of British Columbia; and Heleen De Coninck, professor at Eindhoven University of Technology, and a lead author on several reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 608 (12-20-21): Virginia's Coastal Resilience Planning Moves Forward in December 2021

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:18).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-17-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 20, 2021. MUSIC – ~14 sec - - Lyrics: “When the rains come, when the rains come, is it gonna be a new day?” That's part of “Rains Come,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band The Steel Wheels, from their 2019 album “Over the Trees.”  It opens an update of a previous episode on the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan—an effort to prepare for and adapt to sea-level rise, recurrent flooding, and impacts of climate change.  As in the earlier episode, we set the stage with part of “Cypress Canoe,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va., from his 2019 album “I Made It Just for You.”  The song's a commentary on the current and potential impacts of sea-level rise, and in the part you'll hear, the story-teller bemoans a lack of planning and action to avoid or reduce such impacts. Have a listen for about 20 seconds. MUSIC – ~18 sec – Lyrics: “Half of a city awash in the tides; when I think of what happened, it tears my insides. Oh, we could've been smarter, we could've have planned, but the world caught a fever, infected by man.” Facing current and predicted impacts to coastal areas from sea-level rise and recurrent flooding, Virginia has started planning.   On December 7, 2021, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced completion of Phase One of the Coastal Resilience Master Plan.  Work on the plan started about four years ago accelerated after the November 2020 release of a planning framework identifying guiding principles and specific steps to complete the plan.  Since then, a technical study, the work of a technical advisory committee, and input from some 2000 stakeholders have helped form the plan. The 266-page plan covers the area of Virginia from the Fall Line to the Atlantic coastline, which includes about six million residents.  For those areas, the plan identifies vulnerabilities to, and impacts from, current and expected sea-level rise and increased flooding.  It focuses on ways the Commonwealth can increase resilience, which the plan defines as “the capability to anticipate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from hazards to minimize damage to social well-being, health, the economy, and the environment.”  A Coastal Resilience Database compiled for the plan includes over 500 examples of projects to adapt to changing conditions and of initiatives to build capacity in information, skills, and tools.  Funding for such efforts may come from various sources, but one key source is the Virginia Community Flood Preparedness Fund, created by the Virginia General Assembly in 2020 and using money accrued from the auction of carbon allowances. Implementation of the plan will be managed by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation in cooperation with the Commonwealth's Chief Resilience Officer and the Special Assistant to the Governor for Coastal Adaptation and Protection.  Phase Two of the plan, with more data and project information, is to be completed by 2024, and updates to the whole plan are supposed to occur every five years. According to the plan's impact assessment, between now and 2080 Virginia is projected to face large increases in residents exposed to coastal flooding, in flood property damage, in roadway miles exposed to chronic flooding, and in losses of tidal wetlands, dunes, and beaches.  As Gov. Northam stated in a December 7 letter accompanying the plan's release, the plan provides a “clearer picture of the scope and scale” of these challenges, catalogs current resilience efforts, and identifies gaps in actions and in information.  Here's hoping Virginia puts its Coastal Resilience Master Plan to good use. Thanks to The Steel Wheels and to Bob Gramann for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 10 more seconds of Mr. Gramann's “Cypress Canoe.” MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.   In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode is a follow-up to Episode 552, 11-23-20. “Cypress Canoe,” from the 2019 album “I Made It Just for You,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/folksinger.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 552, 11-23-20. “Rains Come,” from the 2019 album “Over the Trees,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  A July 2019 review by Americana Highways of this album and track is available online at https://americanahighways.org/2019/07/09/review-the-steel-wheels-over-the-trees-is-primary-rhythms-and-organic-melodies/.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/ and in a July 2015 article at http://whurk.org/29/the-steel-wheels.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 552, 11-23-20. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Map of the four master planning regions, with their respective and the planning district commissions (PDC) and regional commissions (RC), in the “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, Phase I,” December 2021. Map from the plan document, page 9, accessed online https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan. Chart of population and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the four master planning regions identified in the “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, Phase I,” December 2021. Image from the plan document, page 24, accessed online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE VIRGINIA COASTAL RESILIENCE MASTER PLAN, PHASE I Following is an excerpt from the December 7, 2021, news release from Virginia Governor Ralph Northam's office, Governor Northam Releases Virginia's First Coastal Resilience Master Plan; Virginia takes monumental action to build a resilient coast, combating climate change and rising sea levels. “HAMPTON—Governor Ralph Northam today released the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, providing a foundational and fundamental step towards protecting Virginia's coast. “Virginia's coastal areas face significant impacts from rising sea levels and increased storm flooding.  The Commonwealth, regional and local entities have to take meaningful and continuous action to ensure the long-term sustainability of Virginia's coastal resources and communities. … “Earlier this year, the Commonwealth worked with 2,000 stakeholders to build the Coastal Resilience Master Plan.  This plan documents which land is exposed to coastal flooding hazards now and into the future, as well as the impacts of those future scenarios on coastal Virginia's community resources and manmade and natural infrastructure. “The Master Plan concluded that between 2020 and 2080: the number of residents living in homes exposed to extreme coastal flooding is projected to grow from approximately 360,000 to 943,000, an increase of 160%; the number of residential, public, and commercial buildings exposed to an extreme coastal flood is projected to increase by almost 150%, from 140,000 to 340,000, while annualized flood damages increase by 1,300% from $0.4 to $5.1 billion; the number of miles of roadways exposed to chronic coastal flooding is projected to increase from 1,000 to nearly 3,800 miles, an increase of nearly 280%; and an estimated 170,000 acres, or 89%, of existing tidal wetlands and 3,800 acres, or 38%, of existing dunes and beaches may be permanently inundated, effectively lost to open water. “The Coastal Resiliency Database and Web Explorer is a publicly available database that shows the impact of coastal flood hazards, current and proposed resilience projects, as well as funding sources.  This database will serve as a vital tool to support resilience efforts at the state, regional, and local levels. … “The Commonwealth intends to develop successive updates of the Master Plan on at least a five-year cycle, managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation in consultation with the Chief Resilience Officer, the Special Assistant to the Governor for Coastal Adaptation and Protection, and the Technical Advisory Committee. “The next phase of the Master Plan is anticipated by 2024, will aim to address recommendations of the TAC to broaden the analysis of natural hazards by including rainfall-driven, riverine, and compound flooding, expand and improve the inventory of resilience projects, by continuing to add efforts and working with project owners to better understand the benefits of projects, and extend this critical work beyond the coastal region to encompass statewide resilience needs. …” SOURCESUsed for AudioVirginia Governor's Office News Release, Governor Northam Releases Virginia's First Coastal Resilience Master Plan; Virginia takes monumental action to build a resilient coast, combating climate change and rising sea levels, December 7, 2021. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, December 7, 2021, letter accompanying release of the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/document/CRMP-Gov-Letter.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Community Flood Preparedness Fund Grants and Loans,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/dam-safety-and-floodplains/dsfpm-cfpf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan.  The full document and a two-page summary are available on the page.   “Resilience” is defined in the Master Plan “Introduction” on page 5; the areas covered by the plan are identified in the “Introduction” on page 9; who's coordinating the plan is identified in the “Introduction” on page 6. Virginia Legislative Information System (LIS), online at http://lis.virginia.gov/lis.htm. See particularly the following bills related to recurrent coastal flooding: 2014 HJ 16 and SJ 3, calling for formation of the Joint Subcommittee to Formulate Recommendations for the Development of a Comprehensive and Coordinated Planning Effort to Address Recurrent Flooding; 2016 HJ 84 and SJ 58, continuing the work of the joint subcommittee formed in 2014 and changing it to the Joint Subcommittee on Coastal Flooding;2016 SB 282, establishing the Virginia Shoreline Resiliency Fund;2020 HB 22 and SB 320, continuing the Shoreline Resiliency Fund as the Community Flood Preparedness Fund;2020 HB 981 and SB 1027, establishing a carbon allowances trading program for Virginia and providing that some of the revenue from the sale of carbon allowances go to the Community Flood Preparedness Fund. For More Information about Sea Level Rise, Coastal and Tidal Flooding, and Resilience John Boon et al., “Planning for Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding,” Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), October 2008, online (as PDF) at https://www.vims.edu/research/units/legacy/icccr/_docs/coastal_sea_level.pdf. City of Alexandria, Va., “Flood Mitigation,” online at https://www.alexandriava.gov/special/waterfront/default.aspx?id=85880. City of Norfolk, Va., “Flood Awareness and Mitigation,” online at https://www.norfolk.gov/1055/Flooding-Awareness-Mitigation. City of Virginia Beach Department of Public Works, “Sea Level Wise,” online at https://www.vbgov.com/government/departments/public-works/comp-sea-level-rise/Pages/default.aspx. Coastal Resilience, online at https://coastalresilience.org/. Coastal Resilience/Virginia is online at https://coastalresilience.org/category/virginia/. Sandy Hausman, “Online Tool Helps Coastal Communities Plan for Climate Change,” WVTF FM-Roanoke, Va., 10/11/18, 2 min./34 sec. audio https://www.wvtf.org/post/online-tool-helps-coastal-communities-plan-climate-change#stream/0. This is a report about the Virginia Eastern Shore Coastal Resilience Mapping and Decision Support Tool. Joey Holleman, “Designing for Water—Strategies to Mitigate Flood Impacts,” Coastal Heritage, Winter 2019, South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, online at https://www.scseagrant.org/designing-for-water/. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), “Sixth Assessment Synthesis Report,” online at https://www.ipcc.ch/ar6-syr/.  Sea level rise is addressed in the “Physical Science Basis” section (by Working Group I), online at https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sixth-assessment-report-working-group-i/. The IPCC “Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate,” September 2019, is online at https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/. Rita Abou Samra, “Alexandria is already often waterlogged. How will it adjust to climate change?” 9/13/18, for Greater Greater Washington, online at https://ggwash.org/view/69058/alexandria-is-already-often-waterlogged-how-will-it-adjust-to-climate-change. SeaLevelRise.org, “Virginia's Sea Level Is Rising—And It's Costing Over $4 Billion,” online at https://sealevelrise.org/states/virginia/. U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program (US CLIVAR), “Sea Level Hotspots from Florida to Maine—Drivers, Impacts, and Adaptation,” April 23-25, 2019, workshop in Norfolk, Va., online at https://usclivar.org/meetings/sea-level-hotspots-florida-maine. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “U.S. Sea Level Report Cards,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/products/slrc/index.php. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “Recurrent Flooding Study for Tidewater Virginia,” 2013, available online (as a PDF) at http://ccrm.vims.edu/recurrent_flooding/Recurrent_Flooding_Study_web.pdf.  This study was significant in the Virginia General Assembly's formation in 2014 of the Joint Subcommittee to Formulate Recommendations for the Development of a Comprehensive and Coordinated Planning Effort to Address Recurrent Flooding. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS)/Center for Coastal Resources Management, “Climate Change and Coastal Resilience,” online at https://www.vims.edu/ccrm/research/climate_change/index.php.  This site includes a 40-second video on sea level rise in Virginia and a 40-second video on nuisance flooding. Wetlands Watch, “Dutch Dialogues—Virginia: Life at Sea Level,” online at http://wetlandswatch.org/dutch-dialogues. William and Mary Law School/Virginia Coastal Policy Center, 7th Annual Conference: “The Three P's of Resilience: Planning, Partnerships, and Paying for It All,” November 15, 2019, Williamsburg, Va., online at this link. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject category. Following are links to some previous episodes on climate change, sea-level rise, and coastal flooding in Virginia. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Climate change impacts in Virginia National Park Service units, including Assateague Island National Seashore. Episode 441, 10-8-18 – on sea-level rise and citizen measurement of king tides. Episode 494, 10-14-19 – on sea-level rise and coastal flooding. Episode 511, 2-10-20 – on sea-level rise and the Saltmarsh Sparrow. Episode 552, 11-23-20 – on the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Planning Framework. Episode 602, 11-8-21 – on photosynthesis, including its relationship to climate change. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life Science LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth Science ES.6 – Resource use is complex. ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations. ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Virginia Studies Course VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present Course USII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics Course CE.7 – Government at the state level. CE.8 – Government at the local level. CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography Course WG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. WG.18 – Cooperation among political jurisdictions to solve problems and settle disputes. Virginia and United States History Course VUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government Course GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers. GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels. GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade. Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

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Bigger Than Us
#179 Most popular episode of 2021 - Dr. Graciela Chichilnisky, Co-Founder and CEO of Global Thermostat

Bigger Than Us

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 49:12


Dr. Graciela Chichilnisky is the co-founder and CEO of Global Thermostat, and co-creator of a carbon removal technology that can reverse climate change. Under Dr. Chichilnisky's leadership, the company was awarded a Silver designation on Pepperdine Graziadio Business School's 2020 Most Fundable Companies List, and its technology was chosen by MIT Technology Review as one of the Ten Breakthrough Technologies of 2019, a list curated by Bill Gates. In addition to her role at Global Thermostat, Dr. Chichilnisky is a Professor of Economics and Mathematical Statistics at Columbia University, and Director of the Columbia Consortium for Risk Management. Dr. Chichilnisky acted as the lead U.S. author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which received the 2007 Nobel Prize for its work in deciding world policy with respect to climate change, and she worked extensively on the Kyoto Protocol, creating and designing the carbon market that became international law in 2005. Dr. Chichilnisky is the author of more than 300 scientific articles and more than 15 books, including the recently published Reversing Climate Change and the award-winning Saving Kyoto, which won the American Library Association's 2010 Outstanding Academic Title of the Year and the American Geographical Society's Book of the Month Award in October 2009. She holds two Ph.D. degrees, in Mathematics and Economics, and her graduate studies were at MIT and the University of California, Berkeley. https://globalthermostat.com/ https://nexuspmg.com/

Gerçek gazetesi
İklim değişikliği (4): Liderler ve şirketler

Gerçek gazetesi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 11:08


Glasgow'da gündüz resmî görüşmeler, akşam kokteyl sefası “COP 26 platformunu şirket yöneticilerinden ve lobi kuruluşlarının sorumlularından oluşan bir ordu istila etmişti; akşamları hükümet yetkilileri bunların verdiği kokteyllerde eğleniyordu. Kameralar resmî konuşmalar üzerinde odaklanırken, asıl iş bu akşam partilerinde ve özel görüşmelerde yürütülüyordu. COP 26'da masaya getirilen önerilerin çoğunu biçimlendiren, iklim felaketi konusunda en yüksek sorumluluğa sahip olanların ta kendisi oluyordu. Bu arada, iklim aktivistleri, zirvenin düzenlendiği İskoçya İletişim Yerleşkesi Merkezi'nden uzak bir noktadan mümkün olduğu kadar yüksek sesle olaylara müdahale etmeye çalışıyordu.” “Climate leaks”: Hükümetler ve şirketler bilimin bulgularına karşı mücadelede Sosyalist İtalyan gazetesi Il Manifesto COP 26 öncesinde ve sırasında emperyalist ülke şirketlerinin ve hükümetlerinin iklim değişikliği konusunda alınacak önlemleri engellemek için nasıl çalıştığına ilişkin bir dizi haber yaptı, belge açıkladı. Bunların en önemlisi Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC - İklim Değişikliği Konusunda Devletler Arası Komite) adını taşıyan ve çalışmalarına bütün dünyada güven duyulan bilim insanlarından oluşan kurulun Glasgow'un hemen öncesinde yayınlanan raporunu etkileme çabalarına ilişkin haberdi. Greenpeace'in araştırma platformu olan Unearthed adlı kuruluşa sızdırılan belgelere göre, devletler ve şirketler, IPCC'nin bilimsel bulgularını yumuşatmaya ve fosil yakıtlar konusundaki ısrarlı kısıtlama önerilerini gevşetmeye çalışan 32 bin ayrı yorum yoluyla Komite'nin çalışmasına müdahale etmeye çalışmıştı. Üniversite satın almak, inkâr, sahtekârlık Bu faaliyetler, konferans kararlarını etkilemekten daha derinde bilimin bulgularını değiştirmeye çalışmaya kadar bir yelpazeye yayılıyor. Ama ya bilimi petrol şirketlerinin kendisi yapmaya başlarsa? Sıfır karbon iddiası Bilindiği gibi, karbon salımını asgariye indirme ve giderek sıfırlama çabası çerçevesinde karbon salımlarının yanı sıra atmosfere salınmış olan karbonun giderilmesi de hesaba katılmakta, salınan karbon ile salınmış karbonun telafisi birbirine eşitlendiğinde net sıfır karbondan söz edilmektedir. Karbon salımı zaten kolayca anlaşılabilecek bir kavramdır. Atmosferden karbon giderilmesi ise en kolay ormanlaşma yoluyla karbonun emilmesinin sağlanması süreci yoluyla anlaşılabilir. Çözüm “liderlerimizi” değiştirmek Para, çağımızda yozlaşmanın genel aracı haline gelmiştir. Paranın en kallavisini elinde tutan büyük tekelci sermaye ise kamuoyu araştırmacısından gazetecisine, bilim insanından “liderlerimiz”e hepsini satın almak bakımından en büyük olanaklara sahip toplumsal güçtür. Paranın da ötesinde, devletin, en derin anlamında hâkim sınıfın iktidarını korumakla görevli bir ilişkiler ağı üzerinde yükselen bir aygıt olduğu hatırlandığında, burjuvazinin siyasi sözcülerinin tekelci sermayenin çıkarlarını karşılarına almalarının ne kadar güç olduğu anlaşılır. Öyleyse, sermaye gezegenimizi kirleterek mahveden bir toplumsal güçse, “liderlerimiz”in neden onların hizmetkârı olmaktan bir türlü kopamadığı da anlaşılır. Doğayı kirletmekten vazgeçmeyen, sera gazlarını salarak iklim değişikliğini hızlandıran büyük tekelci sermaye bundan kâr ettikçe, burjuva devletinin yöneticisi olan “liderlerimiz”in iklim değişikliğini durdurma ve önleme çabaları daima kısıtlı, kısmi, ürkek, ikircikli olacaktır.

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA
Scientists have Exposed the False Theory of Climate Change

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 10:42


The most important speculation of our time is that people are blamed for climate change due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions. As an argument, there is a consensus of scientists on this issue, which, supposedly, accounts for 99%. But this is a lie. Those who actively promote the key role of the anthropogenic factor in climate change are silent that this consensus has no scientific basis. This belief is artificially created by not giving a voice to scientists who have a different opinion. And the theory of climate change as a result of CO2 emissions does not have a scientific evidence base. It is built on climate models that are unable to reconstruct past temperatures or explain the rise in global temperatures today. However, despite the strongest pressure on the scientific community, there are real heroes among scientists who do not compromise their principles for profit. And several of them gave detailed comments exclusively for the conference “Global Crisis. Time for the Truth." Hans Borge (Norway) Ph.D. in industrial mathematics, General Director of The Climate Realists Ole Henrik Ellestad (Norway) Professor of Chemistry, MSc in Physical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Jan-Erik Solheim (Norway) Professor Emeritus of The Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics at University of Oslo Gregory Wrightstone Geologist (BS and MS in Geology), Executive Director of CO2 coalition, bestselling author (Inconvenient Facts), and an Expert Reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (AR6). Dr. H.STERLING Burnett Ph.D. in Applied Philosophy, Senior Fellow on environmental policy and Managing Editor of Environment & Climate News Now the world is on the verge of climate collapse, and while we are being distracted from real climate change with lies about CO2, the Truth is more important than ever. Even for people who have been mistaken for a long time about the causes of climate change, it is now important to show their human qualities and set things right. Because only by understanding the true reasons for what is happening, we will be able to understand how to resist the threat of the death of the entire civilization.

Do you really know?
[2021 RETROSPECTIVE] What is the IPCC report?

Do you really know?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 4:41


"Do you really know?" is Bababam's daily podcast, which helps you understand the words, acronyms, and concepts that are making the news every day. From December 6th to 20th, discover the words that have left their mark on the year, with our 2021 Retrospective. From the "Pandora Papers" affair to the "#QuitMyJob" hashtag and of course the "Long Covid" condition, (re)discover these words that sum up 2021.What is the IPCC report? Thanks for asking!There may still be a minority of doubters out there, but it's becoming increasingly difficult to deny the existence of climate change and its disastrous consequences. The summer months of July and August have once again seen extreme and unprecedented weather events, like the North American heat dome we discussed in a recent episode, the fires witnessed in Greece caused partly by a lack of rainfall, or the deadly floods which hit Belgium and Germany, countries usually known for having a mild climate. Released on August 9th, the latest Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change comes as a stark reminder that planet Earth is heating up. It's known as AR6 for short, reflecting the fact that it's the sixth such report, with the first dating back to 1990.Who actually makes up the IPCC? What can we read in the latest edition? Is there any hope? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!To listen to the last episodes, you can click here:What is rape culture?What is Maslow's hierarchy of needs?What is the Covid vaccine pill?A podcast written and realised by Joseph Chance. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Roots of Reality
#47 Roots of Reality Experiences: The Economics of Climate Change with Dr. Alexander Golub

Roots of Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 51:08


Historian Ben Baumann discusses climate economics with expert Dr. Alexander Golub about the importance of shifting away from fossil fuels, the consequences if we don't, and the delicate economic balancing act of transitioning to alternative energy sources. (Dr. Alexander Golub is a leading scholar in climate policy analysis, energy economics, and economics of climate change. His recent research focuses on asset valuation under uncertainty and designing innovative fanatical instruments to hedge risks and monetize potential upsides of the low carbon transition of the global, country, and corporate levels. He has working experience in academia, NGOs, investment banking, and consulting business. After a research appointment at Harvard University in 1998, he worked as a Senior Economist at the Environmental Defense Fund. As the Executive Director for Global Environmental Markets at UBS, he conducted a quantitative analysis of global capital markets in the context of pricing carbon emissions and equity formation in response to global and regional climate policy. Alexander Golub teaches Environmental Risk at American University and serves as a consultant Environmental Defense Fund, UNEP, conducts various research projects in Germany, Russia, Kazakhstan, etc.. His research focuses on the risks and opportunities of the emerging global climate policy and transformations of the global capital markets. He proposed several innovative ideas related to applying real options for benefit-cost analysis of the global climate policy, calculating the value of information, and using call options on REDD+ to bridge the future demand and current supply of offsets from avoided deforestation. Alexander formulated an innovative approach to engage carbon-dependent countries in global climate policy. Alexander Golub also served on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; he was a lead author for the panel's Third Assessment Report in 2001 and a reviewer for the Fourth Assessment Report in 2007. Alexander Golub has published more than 100 peer-reviewed books and papers. He graduated from Moscow State University in 1982 and was awarded his Ph.D. in Mathematical Economics in 1984.) For more on Dr. Alexander Golub check out the following links: Research Gate- https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alexander-Golub-2 University Profile- https://www.american.edu/cas/faculty/agolub.cfm (The memories, comments, and viewpoints shared by guests in the interviews do not represent the viewpoints of, or speak for Roots of Reality)

PlanetGeo
Energy and Climate Part 2: Professor Michael Mann (Re-Release).

PlanetGeo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 33:34


Join us as we re-release of our favorite interviews that we have done, with one of the truly great climate scientists and communicators, Professor Michael Mann!Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor at The Pennsylvania State University, has a long history of studying and discussion climate change.  His new book, titled The New Climate War, is out now!In this episode we interview Mike about his journey in academia, what the new climate war is all about, and what he sees as the best path towards solutions.  We discuss how last climate war has ended, what we all can do to fix the problem, and how Dr. Mann sees the future working out.Remember to leave us a rating and a review, and share PlanetGeo with your friends! Follow us on all the social medias @planetgeocast. Dr. Michael E. Mann received his undergraduate degrees in Physics and Applied Math from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. degree in Physics from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in Geology & Geophysics from Yale University.Dr. Mann was a Lead Author on the Observed Climate Variability and Change chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report in 2001 and was organizing committee chair for the National Academy of Sciences Frontiers of Science in 2003. He has received a number of honors and awards including NOAA's outstanding publication award in 2002 and selection by Scientific American as one of the fifty leading visionaries in science and technology in 2002. He contributed, with other IPCC authors, to the award of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was awarded the Hans Oeschger Medal of the European Geosciences Union in 2012 and was awarded the National Conservation Achievement Award for science by the National Wildlife Federation in 2013. He made Bloomberg News' list of fifty most influential people in 2013.  In 2014, he was named Highly Cited Researcher by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) and received the Friend of the Planet Award from the National Center for Science Education. He received the Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication from Climate One in 2017, the Award for Public Engagement with Science from the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2018 and the Climate Communication Prize from the American Geophysical Union in 2018. In 2019 he received the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement and in 2020 he received the World Sustainability Award of the MDPI Sustainability Foundation. He was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2020. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society, the Geological Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. He is also a co-founder of the award-winning science website RealClimate.org.——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.buzzsprout.com/ 

Association Chat Podcast
Climate Collapse: What Associations Need to Know and Do

Association Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 64:48


The recent report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) laid out our current global situation in stark relief and as United Nations General-Secretary António Guterres declared it is "Code Red" for humanity. We are now past midnight and if the most recent Conference of the Parties (COP26) in Glasgow is any indicator, we are justified in saying our governments have failed us and we have to assume that we are now on our own. It is now too late for sustainability, and regeneration of our economic, social and environmental systems to attempt to preserve as much life as possible is our one and only priority. Join us for an update on the current state of the climate, and a deep exploration of the topic of Transformative Adaptation which is our last and best hope to cope with what is breaking upon our world. Associations are needed more than ever to use their capacity to step into the void of leadership and we will have practical suggestions on how you can motivate yourselves, your members and their workforces to push the needle on the adaptation we need now. Guests: Rupert Read is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, UK, a campaigner for the Green Party of England and Wales, former spokesperson for Extinction Rebellion and co-founder of the Green Activists Network, GreensCAN. He is the author of various books, including Parents for a Future - How loving our children can prevent climate collapse. Shelly Alcorn is a Principal in Alcorn Associates Management Consulting and specializes in strategy and governance for the association community. She is a frequent keynote speaker focusing on critical issues faced by organizations and society at large. Her main interests have been how to be more human in an increasingly machine-driven world and what impacts the rise of artificial intelligence will have on the workplace of the future. She is now laser-focused on our global climate emergency and the role associations need to play in the face of the sixth mass extinction. Find her on Twitter @shellyalcorn.

This Climate Business
IPCC Report Part 3 – The insider's guide, with Prof Dave Frame

This Climate Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 57:56


This week Vincent is joined by Professor Dave Frame, Director of the New Zealand Climate Change Research Institute (CCRI) at Victoria University and a lead author on the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This is the third part of our series on IPCC report, so Vincent asked if Dave could give us an insider's view of how the IPCC works, on the science of warming and the role of methane in global heating a topic of huge importance to NZ.  We'd be hard-pressed to find someone more qualified. Dave has a background in physics, philosophy, and policy. Previous posts have included research positions at the University of Oxford's Departments of Physics and Geography, and as Deputy Director of the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment. He has also worked at the New Zealand Treasury, and served on secondment at the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change.   https://people.wgtn.ac.nz/dave.frame (Dave Frame Profile | Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington (wgtn.ac.nz)) https://www.ipcc.ch/reports/ (Reports — IPCC)

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk
11 - 05 - 2021 Dhabia M. Al - Mohannadi

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 59:11


The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recommends that global CO2 emissions should decrease by 50%–80% by 2050. This goal is particularly challenging for hydrocarbon-based economies that depend on fossil fuel exports and for the oil and gas industry –but there are solutions- such as the use of renewable energy, carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS), among others. It is, however, especially vital that technological solutions be customized based on each country's unique emission profile. This talk will look into different energy transitions, the role of hydrogen, policies and technologies from a systems perspective. . . Do you believe in the importance of international education and connections? The nonprofit World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth is supported by gifts from people like you, who share our passion for engaging in dialogue on global affairs and building bridges of understanding. While the Council is not currently charging admission for virtual events, we ask you to please consider making a one-time or recurring gift to help us keep the conversation going through informative public programs and targeted events for students and teachers. Donate: https://www.dfwworld.org/donate

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast
C2GTalk: How do we include sustainable development when considering climate-altering approaches? with Youba Sokona

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 29:15


Context matters and without clarity on the impacts that climate-altering approaches will have from different perspectives, it will be difficult to deal with the ethical and governance dimensions, said Youba Sokona during a C2GTalk interview. He highlights the need for research that not only considers the global level, but seeks to understand the national and local levels where people's lives are impacted. Sokona has over 40 years of experience addressing energy, environment, and sustainable development in Africa and has been at the heart of numerous national and continental initiatives. Professor Sokona was elected vice chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in October 2015. Prior to this, he was co-chair of the IPCC Working Group III on the mitigation of climate change for the Fifth Assessment Report after serving as a lead author since 1990. In addition to these achievements, Professor Sokona has a proven track record of organizational leadership and management, for example, as inaugural coordinator of the African Climate Policy Center and as executive secretary of the Sahara and Sahel Observatory. This interview was recorded on February 24, 2021, and is available with interpretation into 中 文, Español, and Français. For more, including an edited transcript, please go to C2G's website.  

Field, Lab, Earth
Turfgrass Greenhouse Gas Emissions with Drs. Quincy Law and Jon Trappe

Field, Lab, Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:39


“Greenhouse gas fluxes from turfgrass systems: Species, growth rate, clipping management, and environmental effects” with Drs. Quincy Law and Jon Trappe Greenhouse gases are naturally occurring gases that contribute to climate change. These gases, like carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane, are both absorbed and produced by turfgrasses; however, it is possible that choosing the right grass species and management practices can help reduce emissions. In this episode, Drs. Quincy Law and Jon Trappe discuss two experiments in which they tried to pinpoint which grass species and management practices are most effective at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from turfgrasses. Tune in to learn: How grass growth rates can impact emissions Which grass species are best to plant for reduced emissions Which other factors could impact turfgrass managers' planting decisions What future turfgrass and greenhouse gas research is needed If you would like more information about this topic, this episode's paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.1002/jeq2.20222 It will be freely available from 19 November to 3 December, 2021. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don't forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Quincy, you can find him here: quincy.law@ndsu.edu If you would like to reach out to Jon, you can find him here: jontrappe@gmail.com Resources CEU Quiz: https://web.sciencesocieties.org/Learning-Center/Courses/Course-Detail?productid=%7b674B65AF-FF47-EC11-813A-005056A7AFA5%7d  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC): https://www.ipcc.ch/ Sixth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Chance Assessment Report: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/ Sponsored by Gasmet Technologies. Gasmet Technologies range of portable analyzers are used for environmental research measuring CO2, CH4, N2O, NH3 & H2O gas fluxes simultaneously at sub-ppm levels. Check out www.gasmet.com for more information and to request a quotation.  Sponsored by METER Group. METER sensors deliver real-time, plant, soil, and atmospheric data that fuels environmental research. Listen to METER Group's new podcast We Measure the World to hear how innovative researchers leverage environmental data to make our world a better—and more sustainable—place at www.metergroup.com/fieldlabearth. Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast
C2GTalk: How might ecological civilization consider emerging approaches to alter the climate? with Pan Jiahua

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:46


Finding harmony between man and nature is essential as we tackle the climate crisis, said Professor Pan Jiahua in an interview with C2GTalk. In this episode, he explores the concept of ecological civilization, and how carbon dioxide removal and solar radiation modification approaches aimed at altering the climate might be considered in this framework. Pan Jiahua is professor of economics and director at the Institute of Ecocivilization Studies at Beijing University of Technology. He was elected in 2018 as member of the academic board of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. In 2020, he was appointed by the UN secretary-general as one of the 15 members of the Independent Group of Scientists for drafting the Global Sustainable Development Report 2023. Professor Pan is also editor-in-chief of the Chinese Journal of Urban & Environmental Studies, and a member of the China National Expert Panel on Climate Change and the National Foreign Policy Advisory Group, and advisor to the Ministry of Ecology and Environment. He has edited and authored over 300 papers, articles and books in English and Chinese, and was lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group III 3rd, 4th, and 5th Assessment Reports on Mitigation. This interview was recorded on February 25, 2021, and is available with interpretation into 中文, Español, and Français. For more, including an edited transcript, please go to C2G's website.

7am
COP26: Have we missed our moment?

7am

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 15:55


After two weeks, COP26, the international climate summit in Glasgow is wrapping up. The summit has been called the world's best last chance. So has it worked? The primary goal of the conference was to reach a consensus that would keep levels of global warming below 1.5 degrees.According to research released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), staying below 1.5 degrees is critical to avoid catastrophic climate change. Today, climate scientist and one of the lead authors of that IPCC report, Joëlle Gergis, on what happened at COP26, and what it means for the fate of our planet. Guest: Climate scientist and author, Joëlle Gergis.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Work Like A Woman
Meat isn't the problem it's industrial farming methods, with Glen Burrows, The Ethical Butcher

Work Like A Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 29:45


Food is under increasing scrutiny and meat is high on the agenda. Everyone - from the authors of the UK's national food strategy to the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change – are telling us to eat less of it. But Glen Burrows, co-founder of the Ethical Butcher, argues that meat isn't the problem. It's industrial farming methods that are at fault. So how does that work? And, given that our love affair with meat may be slowing down but doesn't look as if it's going to end any time soon, what should we as consumers be doing to buy better? To get in touch with team Portas, email us at: kindnesseconomy@portasagency.com Subscribe to the Portas POV Newsletter for musings, provocation insights and inspiration. Want to keep up-to-date with all things Portas? Follow us here: Instagram  ** Linkedin **  Twitter

Plant Based Briefing
142: Climate Change and the IPCC's Sixth Assessment Report by Bronwyn Slater at VeganSustainability.com

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 8:54


Bronwyn Slater at VeganSustainability.com explains the findings in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. Vegan Sustainability Magazine is a free, online, quarterly magazine for vegans and non-vegans worldwide who are interested in the Environment and Sustainability. It's rooted in a non-violent ethos that advocates love and compassion for all living beings. They promote a sustainable lifestyle that meets human needs without compromising the ability of other species to meet their needs for present and future generations. Original post: http://vegansustainability.com/ipcc-sixth-assessment-report-2021/  Follow Plant Based Briefing on social media: Twitter: @PlantBasedBrief YouTube: YouTube.com/PlantBasedBriefing  Facebook: Facebook.com/PlantBasedBriefing  LinkedIn: Plant Based Briefing Podcast Instagram: @PlantBasedBriefing   #vegan #plantbased #veganpodcast #plantbasedpodcast #plantbasedbriefing #vegansustainability #vegansustainabilitymagazine #ipcc #climatechange #climatechaos #extremeweather #wildfires #flooding #ghg #methane #COP26 #animalag 

Private Passions
Tamsin Edwards

Private Passions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 34:47


In a special edition of Private Passions for COP26, Michael Berkeley talks to Dr Tamsin Edwards about her career as a climate scientist and her lifelong passion for music. As a child, Tamsin wanted to be a concert pianist and she went on to play the clarinet, saxophone and double bass, and to sing in choirs. Music is still a vital part of her life but now she is one of our leading climate scientists, at King's College London, studying the uncertainties of climate model predictions, particularly in relation to rising sea levels. In 2018 she joined the author team for the reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the UN body responsible for assessing the science related to climate change. Instantly recognizable with her trademark cropped blue hair, she is a passionate science communicator, blogging, writing for newspapers and frequently appearing on radio and television. Tamsin tells Michael how performing music helped her to develop the confidence to speak about science to governments, corporations and the public. We hear part of a Beethoven sonata that brings back memories of the terror she felt playing it for her Grade 8 Piano exam. She chooses music by Liszt for her mother, a concert pianist, and we hear her late father playing the trumpet with his New Orleans jazz band. And Tamsin talks movingly about her debilitating treatment for bowel cancer, paying tribute to the love and support of her partner, the television presenter Dallas Campbell, with piano music by Philip Glass. Producer: Jane Greenwood A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 3

The Science Hour
Jet fuel from thin air

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 73:04


Scientists in Switzerland have developed a system which uses solar energy to extract gases such as hydrogen and carbon dioxide from the air and turns them into fuels for transport. So far they have only made small quantities in experimental reactors, however they say with the right investment their alternatives to fossil fuels could be scaled up to provide a climate friendly way to power transport, particularly aviation and shipping. We speak to Aldo Steinfeld and Tony Patt from ETH Zurich and Johan Lilliestam from the University of Potsdam. And what will rises in global temperature mean where you live? An interactive model developed by Bristol University's Seb Steinig shows how an average global rise of say 1.5C affects different regions, with some potentially seeing much higher temperatures than others. Dan Lunt – one of the contributing authors to this year's IPCC report discusses the implications. We also look at racism in science, with problems caused by decisions on the naming of ancient bones more than 200 years ago. As more is known about human evolution, the way we classify the past seems to make less sense says Mirjana Roksandic. And the issue of colonialism looms large in the international response to conservation. Its legacy has been discussed at COP26 and as Lauren Rudd, author of a new study on racism in conservation tells us, this hangover from colonial times is limiting the effectiveness of current conservation initiatives. And, The science is unequivocal: human-made climate change is leading the world into an environmental crisis, and time is running out to prevent permanent damage to ecosystems and make the planet uninhabitable for many of us humans. As communities around the world increasingly experience the devastating effects of global warming, world leaders, policy makers and scientists from all over the globe are attending COP26, the United Nation's major climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland. Each nation will be frantically negotiating its commitments to tackling emissions - many agree it's a pivotal moment for the future of humanity. Crowdscience hosts a panel of three experts taking part in the conference, to hear their thoughts on what progress has been made so far. They answer listener questions on rising sea levels, explaining that a temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees won't just affect small island nations but will have serious consequences for every country in the world. We hear about an interactive atlas developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that shows the impact of higher temperatures in different regions. And presenter Marnie Chesterton asks about the financial barriers that have prevented many people from traveling to COP26 and discovers why it's vital that people from the global south have their voices heard. Image: President Biden and his wife travelling to the G20 summit in Rome and COP26 in Glasgow. Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images.

CrowdScience
Can COP26 deliver on climate change?

CrowdScience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 39:53


The science is unequivocal: human-made climate change is leading the world into an environmental crisis, and time is running out to prevent permanent damage to ecosystems and make the planet uninhabitable for many of us humans. As communities around the world increasingly experience the devastating effects of global warming, world leaders, policy makers and scientists from all over the globe are attending COP26, the United Nation's major climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland. Each nation will be frantically negotiating its commitments to tackling emissions - many agree it's a pivotal moment for the future of humanity. Crowdscience hosts a panel of three experts taking part in the conference, to hear their thoughts on what progress has been made so far. They answer listener questions on rising sea levels, explaining that a temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees won't just affect small island nations but will have serious consequences for every country in the world. We hear about an interactive atlas developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that shows the impact of higher temperatures in different regions. And presenter Marnie Chesterton asks about the financial barriers that have prevented many people from traveling to COP26 and discovers why it's vital that people from the global south have their voices heard. Featuring: Ko Barrett, Vice-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Dr Saleemul Huq, Director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in Bangladesh(ICCCAD) Dr Tara Shine, Director of Change By Degrees Produced by Melanie Brown and Marijke Peters for BBC World Service. [Image: Delegates in the Action Zone at COP26 UN Climate Summit, Glasgow. Credit: Getty Images]

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast
E35. Michael Shellenberger on the Political Realignment

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 65:05


Ayaan speaks with Michael Shellenberger about the drug addiction crisis taking over major U.S. cities. They also discuss the results of the Virginia elections, the potential of a political realignment and the COP26 conference. Michael Shellenberger is the founder and president of Environmental Progress and is the author of Apocalypse Never and San Fransicko. He has been working as a climate activist for 20 years and an environmentalist for 30. He was Time magazine's “Hero of the Environment” in 2008 and is an invited expert reviewer for the next Assessment Report for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Follow him on Twitter @ShellenbergerMD. Follow Ayaan on Twitter @ayaan. Subscribe to support this podcast at ayaanhirsiali.com.

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese
COP26 Will Showcase False Solutions That Protect Corporate Profits, Not The Planet

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 60:01


The COP 26 United Nations climate meeting is underway in Glasgow Scotland. Following the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's recent “Code Red” report that proves urgent action is critical, the world is looking at the corporate-dominated COP 26 to do what is necessary. Clearing the FOG speaks with Anne Petermann, executive director of the Global Justice Ecology Project, who says COP 26 is focused on ‘false solutions' promoted by large corporations to protect their profits instead of the planet. Petermann describes a new publication, “Hoodwinked in the Hothouse,” that explains what these false solutions are and what is necessary, the real solutions. She also discusses what people can do to save the planet. For more information, visit PopularResistance.org.

The Big Melt
COP26 and the Race to Zero

The Big Melt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 13:36


Hi Big Melters, I recently got to chat with Nigel Topping - the UN's high level Climate Champion about the upcoming COP - Conference of the parties, aka. the Mack Daddy of all climate conferences!Find out why this year's meeting is SO important.And here is a link to a cool graphic novel about IPCC, The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, of the UN for insight into the way these sorts of meetings work: https://becauseipcc.thesuccession.ca/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast
C2GTalk: How can the most vulnerable have a say in governing climate-altering approaches? with Saleemul Huq

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 36:57


Governance is the key element in any climate-altering approaches being proposed, particularly from the point of view of climate vulnerable nations, says Professor Saleemul Huq in an interview with C2GTalk. His greatest concern is that decisions that have repercussions for the most vulnerable will be taken without them having a chance to take part in the discussion, so it is extremely important that climate vulnerable nations have a say when decisions are taken regarding climate-altering approaches, including carbon dioxide removal and solar radiation modification. Professor Saleemul Huq is the director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD) and chair of the Climate Vulnerable Forum Expert Advisory Group. Huq is an expert on the links between climate change and sustainable development, particularly from the perspective of developing countries. He leads the annual Gobeshona Global Conference, which brings together scholars, policymakers, researchers, and practitioners from around the world to discuss climate change. Huq was the lead author of the chapter on adaptation and sustainable development in the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and was the lead author of the chapter on adaptation and mitigation in the Fourth Assessment Report. His current focus is on supporting the engagement of the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This interview was recorded on March 1, 2021, and is also available with interpretation into 中文, Español, and Français. For more, including an edited transcript, please go to C2G's website.

World Today
Panel: What's at stake at Glasgow climate summit?

World Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 52:08


Will the COP26 held in Glasgow see a significant step forward in global effort to tackle climate challenge? Is there still room to be optimistic about our climate future? Host Ding Heng is joined by Wu Changhua, Executive Director of Professional Association for China's Environment; Hector Pollitt, Head of Modeling at Cambridge Econometrics, a UK-based consultancy; Peter Newman, Professor of Sustainability at Curtin University and a lead author in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The World Next Week
Rome Hosts G20 Leaders, Japanese Citizens Vote, and More

The World Next Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 33:45


The Group of Twenty (G20) holds a pivotal summit in Rome, Japanese citizens head to the polls for parliamentary elections, and the twenty-sixth Conference of the Parties (COP26) begins in Glasgow.   Articles Mentioned in the Podcast   Alice Hill, “A World Overheating,” CFR.org, October 18, 2021   Steven Mufson et al. “Russia allows methane leaks at planet's peril,” Washington Post, October 19, 2021   Sheila Smith, “Japan's Hard Choices,” Foreign Affairs, October 28, 2021   Podcasts Mentioned   Sheila Smith and Robert McMahon, “Quad Leaders Gather, Germany Holds Elections, and More,” The World Next Week, September 23, 2021   Reports Mentioned   Emissions Gap Report 2021, UN Environment Programme, October 28, 2021   Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, August 9, 2021

The Signal
What to expect at 'the last chance saloon'

The Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 18:15


The next two and a bit weeks of the climate summit in Glasgow could decide whether the world is still liveable at the end of the century. The whole point of COP26 is to get world leaders to agree to cut their emissions to a point that will limit warming to less than 2 degrees. So are we currently on track for that? And days out from the start of the conference, what should we realistically expect it to achieve? Today on The Signal, how the next two weeks in Glasgow are likely to play out. Featured: Professor Mark Howden, Director, Institute for Climate Energy and Disaster Solutions, ANU & Vice Chair, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Passive House Podcast
Dr. Diana Ürge-Vorsatz – IPCC

Passive House Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 55:35


Passive House Podcast co-host Matthew Cutler-Welsh interviews Dr. Diana Ürge-Vorsatz, Vice Chair of WGIII of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for her return visit to the Podcast. (Listen to Ürge-Vorsatz's first interview in Episode 12 of the Passive House Podcast: https://passivehouseaccelerator.com/podcast/passive-house-podcast-ep-12-dr-diana-uerge-vorsatz.)Matthew and Ürge-Vorsatz discuss the significant cultural impact of the recent reports released by IPCC as well as the upcoming report of WGIII (Working Group III). Ürge-Vorsatz shares her perspectives about the urgent nature of the climate crisis, the important window of opportunity that we have to address it right now, and the big role that buildings in general, and Passive House in particular, can play in solution-making. For links to the upcoming events that Matthew and co-host Zack Semke discuss, visit: https://passivehouseaccelerator.com/articles/passive-house-week-in-preview-october-25

Biophilic Solutions
John Piotti on the Future of Food and Our Planet

Biophilic Solutions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:23


What do farmland loss and a rapidly changing climate mean for the future of food? How can we harness the power of agriculture, urban farming, and regenerative practices to protect next-generation farmers and the planet? In his presentation at the 2021 Biophilic Leadership Summit, President of American Farmland Trust John Piotti tackles all of these questions and more, illuminating AFT's history as a changemaking organization and looking towards the future of agriculture.Show NotesAbout John Piotti, President and CEO of American Farmland TrustDonate to American Farmland Trust and Help Save the Land that Sustains UsGet Your FREE ‘No Farms No Food' Bumper StickerGet Involved with American Farmland TrustStatement from John Piotti, AFT President and CEO: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Sixth Assessment ReportRegenerative Agriculture is a System, Not a Single Practice, American Farmland Trust

The Destination Angler Podcast
Climate Change and What We Can Do About It with Helen Neville, Trout Unlimited

The Destination Angler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 72:12


Today we have a special edition of the Destination Angler Podcast on a very important issue affecting our cold-water fisheries – climate change.   Like many of you, over the past few years, I've been watching the news and hearing more and more about our climate.  No matter where you stand on man-made or natural, it's hard to ignore things seem to be warming up, especially this past summer, which was the hottest summer on record.    As I began to look into this I came across a report on the Impact of Global Warming on Trout in the Interior West that 50% of cutthroat trout habitat will be gone by 2080 if nothing is done. Can you imagine a world where half of our Cutthroat trout habitat is gone?    To help us better understand climate change, our guests are Helen Neville, Senior Scientist, and Sara Porterfield, Water Policy Associate with Trout Unlimited.  We debunk fact from fiction, the impact of our warming climate on our cold-water fisheries, and most importantly what we can do about it.  With Host, Steve Haigh Climate Change Resources: Ten Strategies for Climate Resilience in the Colorado River Basin The Yale Climate Communication page, which provides interactive maps that can be parsed in myriad ways to explore public perception of climate change based on their annuals surveys:  https://climatecommunication.yale.edu/visualizations-data/ycom-us/ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group I report, Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis, which was just released:  https://www.ipcc.ch/2021/08/09/ar6-wg1-20210809-pr/ TU National Leadership Climate Change Working Group website, which has recordings and slides of that overview talk I created for them:  https://www.tu.org/get-involved/volunteer-tacklebox/council-leader-resources/national-leadership-council/nlc-conservation-workgroups/climate-change-workgroup/ TU Climate Change take action page:  https://www.tu.org/climate/ Citizen's Climate Lobby, whose Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (H.R> 2307) TU is supporting among other national policies.  They have local chapters, national meetings, D.C. advocacy days, and sorts of resources that complement TU's work on the issue:  https://citizensclimatelobby.org/ TU's Western Water 101 (blog & podcast series)   Miller Creek blog (BDAs in burned area) Brad Udall doesn't have a website, but this post from John Fleck links to some good work he did with Brad Impact of Global Warming on Trout in the Interior West by the Natural Resources Defense Council and Montana TU Destination Angler: The Destination Angler Website and Show Notes:   http://destinationangler.libsyn.com/ Get updates and pictures of destinations covered on each podcast: @DestinationAnglerPodcast on Instagram and Facebook Join in the conversation with the @DestinationAnglerConnection group on Facebook: Comments & Suggestions:  host, Steve Haigh, email shaigh50@gmail.com Available on Apple, Spotify, or where ever you get your podcasts Recorded September 30, 2021.  Episode 50. Music on the show by A Brother's Fountain, “Hitch Hike-Man”.    Podcast edited by Podcast Volume  https://www.podcastvolume.com/

Energy 360°
Making Sense of the IPCC Report

Energy 360°

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 39:27


This week, CSIS Energy Security and Climate Change Program Director Joseph Majkut talks with Dr. Robert Kopp, a climate scientist, and professor at Rutgers University, about the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Sixth Assessment Report. The contribution of Working Group 1, which reports the physical science of climate change, was released this past August. Dr. Kopp was the lead author of that report's chapter on sea-level rise. They dive into some of the climate science and modeling that supports the IPCC report and discuss the challenge of communicating the findings of a report of this size and scale.

DODReads: What are you reading?
Richard Kidd IV, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Environment and Energy Resilience

DODReads: What are you reading?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 31:35


In Episode 60, Julie Stabile interviews Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Environment and Energy Resilience, Richard Kidd. They discuss how to develop climate literacy, the role of junior leaders in the response to climate change, and how to manage a diverse portfolio. The DOD's Climate Adaptation Plan discussed was released on October 7, 2021 and is linked below. Recommendations The Stranger by Albert Camus Operation Barbarbossa and Germany's Defeat in the East by David Stahel Dream Catchers by Philip Jenkins The Overstory by Richard Powers DOD Climate Adaptation Plan Summary for Policy Makers from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change All Hell Breaking Loose by Michael Klare Under the Sky We Make by Kimberly Nicholas Drawdown by Paul Hawken Scatter, Adapt, and Remember by Annalee Newitz This Republic of Suffering by Drew Gilpin Faust The Rise and Fall of Great Powers by Paul Kennedy Interested in an interview with a particular leader? Have a question you'd like to hear answered? Contact us @DODReads or podcast@dodreads.com. Finally, head to DODReads for more resources, free books, and interviews with military authors. The views presented in this episode are those of the participants and do not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or its components.

12 Geniuses Podcast
Climate Change: Threat & Opportunity with Andrew Winston

12 Geniuses Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 17:11


In Season One of 12 Geniuses, climate change guru Andrew Winston joined Don MacPherson to talk about how businesses are creating opportunities through the green economy. Since that conversation, a lot has transpired. In this episode, Andrew and Don meet again to discuss the many facets of these changes, including the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, new innovations in the fight against climate change and how having a sustainability plan for companies is a key to attracting talent.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Daily Signal Podcast: LinkedIn Bans Geologist for Climate Change Posts: ‘This Type of Content Is Not Allowed'

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


Greg Wrightstone, a geologist and expert reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, has posted content on LinkedIn for years. It would often spark discussions and debates among his followers—and the occasional trolls.   That changed last month. Wrightstone, who serves as executive director of the CO2 Coalition, says he was banned from LinkedIn […]

Daily Signal News
LinkedIn Bans Geologist for Climate Change Posts: 'This Type of Content Is Not Allowed'

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 37:12


Greg Wrightstone, a geologist and expert reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, has posted content on LinkedIn for years. It would often spark discussions and debates among his followers—and the occasional trolls.That changed last month. Wrightstone, who serves as executive director of the CO2 Coalition, says he was banned from LinkedIn for posting factual information related to climate change. His appeal was denied, leaving him without a voice on a platform where he had cultivated a significant following.Having been stripped of his ability to communicate on LinkedIn, he's now speaking out and sharing his story publicly with The Daily Signal. Wrightstone warns others about social media censorship and the consequences of limiting discussion and debate. Also on today's show, a conservative activist calls out Facebook for suppressing his posts.For more than a decade, Texas native Don Kirchoff has used Facebook to share news and information with fellow conservatives. The longtime Heritage Foundation supporter and Heritage Action Sentinel frequently posts Daily Signal stories as well as content from other conservative organizations and media outlets.But is anyone seeing them?Many of his Facebook posts that have zero likes or comments, prompting Kirchoff to take his case directly to Facebook. While that has worked in the past, he's noticed the problem more often.Kirchoff captured screenshots and shared them with The Daily Signal as well as Facebook. (The Daily Signal is the multimedia news organization of Heritage.) Kirchoff joined the podcast to explain the situation and raise awareness for other conservatives. Enjoy the show! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Good Dirt
61. Fighting Food Insecurity with Jenny Freeman of Community FarmShare

The Good Dirt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 45:22


For today's guest Jenny Freeman, what sprouted as an idea to tackle food insecurity during the pandemic has now grown into a fully registered 501(c)(3) organization that offers individuals and organizations the ability to get involved in the agri-food sector. Her organization, Community FarmShare, is a community-based initiative that connects food-insecure families with local produce farmers in Montgomery County. This organization works by way of donation and is completely volunteer-run, all of the money is put towards purchasing Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm shares. These shares are then used to purchase weekly bags and boxes of organically grown produce at one of seven local participating vegetable farms.  CSA programs have recently received widespread attention for their ability to provide unique benefits to communities, environments, and economies. In a nutshell, CSAs directly connect consumers and producers to help create a more profitable and transparent local food system. This helps in reducing food insecurity among families that cannot afford organically grown foods. Jenny is passionate about tackling this issue by providing a solution that links families experiencing food insecurity with local vegetable and fruit growers. Jenny shares this mission with the rest of her community in order to create transformative change in her local community.  In this week's episode, we will discuss Jenny's journey creating Community FarmShare and how you can get involved with her organization. Join us on this week's episode to find out more about Jenny's story and learn how you can implement a similar project in your community! Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform. Topics Covered: What is a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and how does it work? Learn more about Community FarmShare and Jenny's story as its founder Supporting Afghan refugees in the United States Resources Mentioned: https://www.ipcc.ch/ (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ) https://www.communityfarmshare.org/ (Community FarmShare) https://www.communitycheer.org/ (Community Cheer) https://www.communityfoodrescue.org/ (Community Food Rescue) https://suzannesimard.com/finding-the-mother-tree-book/ (Finding the Mother Tree) http://www.richardpowers.net/the-overstory/ (The Overstory) Guest Info Connect with Jenny on https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-freeman-59a5124/ (LinkedIn). Follow Us: https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website) https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

Humankind on Public Radio
Healthy Planet, Healthy People

Humankind on Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


The chair of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize (along with former Vice President Al Gore), has made a surprising recommendation for the most immediate impact a person can have toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions: change what you eat. Emissions from automotive vehicles are one leading […]

Language of God
90. Katharine Hayhoe | Every Reason to Care

Language of God

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 55:25


A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns that the climate emergency has reached a “code red”. New research also shows that over 50% of Americans agree that climate change is happening and demands urgent action. So why does it seem like so little is being done? Internationally renowned climate scientist, professor and author Katharine Hayhoe returns to the show and tells us what keeps her hopeful despite the dire situation we find ourselves in. She also tells us about her forthcoming book, Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World, which expands on why she's hopeful. Katharine is also an ardent Christian and she shares with Jim the biblical foundation for climate action. Join a conversation about this episode on the BioLogos Forum. Register for the Creation Care Summit presented by BioLogos

Science Friday
Oyster Breeding, Climate Communication, Hellbender Vs Mantis Shrimp. Sept 10, 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 47:22


To Breed An Oyster In the ocean, climate change involves more than just warming temperatures. Water levels are shifting, and ocean chemistry is changing.  Changes to ocean salinity caused by shifting amounts of freshwater could have big effects on the health of oysters, who need a certain range of saltiness in the water to be happy.   As part of her doctoral work at Louisiana State University, researcher Joanna Griffiths bred hundreds of families of oysters, looking for clues to what makes an oyster more able to endure salinity changes. She found that there is a genetic component to an oyster's salinity resilience.  Griffiths joins Scifri's Charles Bergquist to talk about the work, and the challenges of conducting a laboratory oyster breeding program—in which it's difficult convince an oyster that it's time for romance, and often even hard to discern the sex of the oysters involved.     Talking Through The Tangled Terms Of Climate Change When scientists talk about climate change, there are certain words and phrases that get brought up often. Terms like “mitigation,” “carbon neutral” and “tipping point” are used frequently to explain how the climate crisis is unfolding. They're often found in reports meant to educate the public on climate change, such as the latest report from the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. It turns out a lot of words and phrases that scientists use to talk about climate change are not understood by the general public. That's according to a recent study from the University of Southern California and the United Nations Foundation. This begs the question: if the public scientists are trying to reach don't understand what's being discussed, what's the point? Joining Ira to talk about better communicating climate change is Wändi Bruine de Bruin, lead author of the study and provost professor of public policy, psychology and behavioral science at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California. Also joining Ira is Anthony Leiserowitz, founder and director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication in New Haven, Connecticut.      An Aquatic Charismatic Creature Showdown: Mantis Shrimp vs. Hellbender It's time to kick off SciFri's Charismatic Creature Carnival! Welcome to our celebration of creatures that are overlooked or unfairly maligned by the general public, which, if you look a little closer, have an undeniable charm. Six audience-suggested creatures were chosen, but only one will be crowned the very first carnival inductee into the Charismatic Creature Corner Hall of Fame. The first friendly head-to-head battle in this fall's Charismatic Creature Carnival is between the mantis shrimp and the hellbender, a giant aquatic salamander. Defending the mantis shrimp is Jason Dinh, PhD candidate in biology at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. And representing the hellbender is Lauren Diaz, PhD student in fisheries science at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. Find a list of upcoming carnival celebrations below! 

Science Friday
COVID Fact Check, Ocean Circulation and Climate, Bread Culture. Sept 3, 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 47:30


Fact Check My Feed: Why Are People Taking Discredited Horse Medicine For COVID-19? If you've been online at all in the past few weeks, you've probably seen discussion about the drug ivermectin. It was originally developed as an antiparasitic treatment for livestock, and in 2015, the Nobel Prize in Medicine went to scientists who found that it helped control parasitic diseases in humans as well. But recently, non-medical groups have been incorrectly promoting the drug as a treatment for COVID-19—even though the coronavirus is a virus, not a parasite. Virologist Angela Rasmussen of the University of Saskatchewan joins Ira to look at the data behind sometimes hyperbolic COVID-19 claims, from the latest on booster shots to the emergence of a new coronavirus variant in South Africa.     What Happens If Atlantic Ocean Currents Cease To Churn? Early last month, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its latest report. It was a grim document, concluding that global warming had already set in motion irreversible levels of sea level rise, along with other changes that are threatening lives and health around the globe. The report focused in part on climate tipping points, or phenomena that, if they occur, could lead to a long term re-setting of our global climate and cascades of dangerous changes. Included among tipping points like the loss of the Amazon rainforest and melting of the permafrost, was the potential shutdown of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation—the AMOC, for short. That circulation, a set of currents that includes the Gulf Stream, ferries cold water from the poles toward the equator, and distributes heat from the equator to northern latitudes. And it's powered by two things that are both changing as the climate warms: the temperature of ocean water, and the varying concentrations of salt in that water.  Climate models that use data from thousands of years ago can help us predict what might happen if the AMOC shuts down. Because the currents are a huge source of heat redistribution globally, a shutdown could have a complex array of consequences, from rainfall disruptions in the southern hemisphere, to even greater sea level rise on North America's east coast. And if it shuts down completely, it may not come back on again in any of our lifetimes. Unfortunately, researchers have been finding evidence that the circulation is, in fact weakening, including a study published in the journal Nature Climate Change in early August. Ira talks to Levke Caesar, a researcher at Maynooth University's ICARUS Climate Research Center. While not affiliated with the latest research, her work has helped map the ongoing pattern of weakening in the AMOC.       A Sourdough Saga, From Starter To Slice What makes sourdough taste sour? Was the first bread invented, or discovered? How did scientists eventually figure out that yeast and bacteria were the true master bakers? Will commercial bread ever be as good as that hand-baked loaf? Ira releases his inner breadmaking nerd in this conversation with Eric Pallant, author of the forthcoming book Sourdough Culture: A History of Breadmaking From Ancient to Modern Bakers.  

An Acquired Taste Podcast
347: Real Milk, No Cows & How to Defend Yourself Like Sherlock Holmes

An Acquired Taste Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 88:16


So much milk! Kathleen is talking about a new company that has figured out how to make milk WITHOUT cows. And it's chemically identical to actual milk! Fermented milk! But does it count as vegan? And can we even call it “milk?” Then, Bethany shares info about the “Gentleman's Martial Art” and how Sir Arthur Conan Doyle used it to justify Sherlock Holmes' surviving a cliff fall. Learn how to defend yourself with an umbrella against a full pub of ne'er-do-wells and rapscallions!  ------ Check out our merch! —> https://store.dftba.com/collections/an-acquired-taste-podcast  ------ What We Talked About: Tedd Lasso: https://tv.apple.com/us/show/ted-lasso/umc.cmc.vtoh0mn0xn7t3c643xqonfzy Mayhem (the very good horror movie Kathleen talked about): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4348012/ Our "Daisy Chains" theme song by Ms. Triniti: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0izf5fTYME Bake Squad on Netflix: https://www.netflix.com/title/81218438 No Demo Reno on HGTV: https://www.hgtv.com/shows/no-demo-reno ------ Please support the companies that support us!  Magic Spoon - Go to magicspoon.com/TASTE to grab your delicious cereal and try it today! And be sure to use our promo code TASTE at checkout to get $5 off your order! Joybird - Create a space that brings you joy with Joybird! Visit joybird.com/TASTE and get 30% off your purchase! Talkspace - Start feeling better with a single message. Match with a licensed therapist when you go to talkspace.com and get $100 off your first month with the promo code TASTE.  Acorn TV - If you're reading for a streaming service that offers new stories, new characters, and breathtaking scenarios every week, get Acorn TV! Try Acorn TV free for 30 days by going to Acorn.TV and use our promo code “taste” (but you HAVE to enter the code in all lowercase letters)! ------ KATHLEEN'S SOURCES: https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25133470-900-real-milk-no-cows-needed-lab-made-dairy-products-are-now-a-reality/ https://perfectdayfoods.com/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intergovernmental_Panel_on_Climate_Change https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-58138714e  https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/sources-greenhouse-gas-emissions https://spoonuniversity.com/lifestyle/5-weird-facts-all-milk-drinkers-need-to-know https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/lactose-intolerance/definition-facts#:~:text=Experts%20estimate%20that%20about%2068,world's%20population%20has%20lactose%20malabsorption.&text=Lactose%20malabsorption%20is%20more%20common,most%20people%20have%20lactose%20malabsorption. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2019/11/29/drinking-cows-milk-good-adults-its-health-benefits-explained/4309035002/ https://invisiverse.wonderhowto.com/how-to/fascinating-disturbing-story-yogurt-was-accidentally-invented-0170049/ BETHANY'S SOURCES: “The Sherlock Holmes School of Self-Defense: The Manly Art of Bartitsu as Used Against Professor Moriarty,” E.W. Barton-Wright https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781907332739  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartitsu  VIDEO: “Bartitsu: The Gentleman's Martial Art I Best of British” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEu5_v1iv-k 

FiveThirtyEight Politics
Model Talk: How Climate Models Work

FiveThirtyEight Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 44:13


Earlier this month, the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC) released the first part of its Sixth Assessment Report on the state of climate change globally. The report relies on advanced climate modeling to illustrate where global warming is headed. In this installment of Model Talk on the FiveThirtyEight Politics podcast, Nate Silver and Galen Druke are joined by two climate modelers and authors of the latest IPCC report, Friederike Otto and Baylor Fox-Kemper.

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Hygiene Debates, Skipping Showers, And Climate Change, Oh My!

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 33:11


#ShowerGate. Sam talks to Carl Zimring, professor of sustainability studies at Pratt Institute and author of Clean and White, about the online debate over celebrities showering habits and how it taps into a long history linking hygiene and race.Then, we hear from Yessenia Funes, climate editor for Atmos Magazine, about this week's report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan
The Era of Climate Denial is Over

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 47:46


This week the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, released the first part of its latest report on the state of the Earth's climate. It details with greater certainty than ever before the links between human activity and extreme weather patterns: fires, floods, and rising sea levels. Journalist David Wallace-Wells and sociologist Dana Fisher join Ryan Grim to discuss the takeaways from the new report. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Political Gabfest
The “Little Fires Everywhere” Edition

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 58:03


Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report  Little Fires Everywhere, by Celeste Ng   Public Citizens: The Attack on Big Government and the Remaking of American Liberalism, by Paul Sabin Paul Sabin for the New York Times: “How Liberals Can Attack From the Left—and Win” Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration, by Emily Bazelon The Genius Factory: Unravelling the Mystery of the Nobel Prize Sperm Bank, by David Plotz The Most Dangerous Writing App Here's this week's chatter: Josie: How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America, by Clint Smith; Maya and the Robot, by Eve L. Ewing Emily: Ally Mutnick and Zach Montellaro for Politico: “Redistricting Sprint Begins With Major Census Data Drop” David: Jen Senior for the Atlantic: “What Bobby McIlvaine Left Behind” Listener chatter from Matt Gousman: “Starbase Tour With Elon Musk”  For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment, Josie, David, and Emily share their experiences and advice about trying to write a book. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jess Miller. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap and Grace Woodruff. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-08-09 Monday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 59:00


The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issues a "code red for humanity" in a new report that states the climate crisis is inevitable and irreversible but there is still time to prevent runaway global warming if direct action is taken; Millions are still at risk of losing housing despite the CDC's temporary two-month moratorium on evictions. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe