Podcasts about Textile

Material produced by twining, weaving, felting, knotting, or otherwise processing natural or synthetic fibers

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Best podcasts about Textile

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Latest podcast episodes about Textile

South Carolina from A to Z
“D” is for Dent, Frederick Bailey (1922-2019)

South Carolina from A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2023 1:21


“D” is for Dent, Frederick Bailey (1922-2019). Textile executive, U.S. Secretary of Commerce, diplomat.

Lenglet-Co
L'ÉCO & YOU - Kookaï, Pimkie, Go Sports... Notre filière textile est-elle condamnée ?

Lenglet-Co

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2023 3:37


Kookaï, Pimkie, Go Sports... Ces trois enseignes connues du grand public traversent une période très compliquée. Elles rejoignent les Camaïeu, la Halle et bien d'autres qui sont en grande difficulté depuis des années. Beaucoup d'enseignes ont survécu 2 ans de plus car il y a eu le coronavirus et le "Quoi qu'il en coûte" gouvernemental qui les a maintenues artificiellement en vie. C'est ce qu'on a appelé des entreprises "zombies". Elles étaient sans doute condamnées. Depuis 10 ans, la fréquentation dans les magasins baissait doucement de 2 ou 3% chaque année... Depuis le coronavirus, le trafic dans les boutiques est en chute de 17% selon l'Alliance du Commerce. Et ça ne remonte pas. Et les soldes d'hiver sont en dessous des attentes, une fois de plus.

Les enjeux internationaux
A Karachi, l'industrie du textile, la fast fashion et la pègre

Les enjeux internationaux

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 15:02


durée : 00:15:02 - Les Enjeux internationaux - par : Baptiste Muckensturm - Au Pakistan, la cité portuaire et industrielle de Karachi est une véritable citadelle, que décennie après décennie les patrons du textile ont consolidé pour alimenter des grandes enseignes occidentales. L'ouvrage de Laurent Gayer "Le capitalisme à main armé" sort aujourd'hui aux éditions CNRS. - invités : Laurent Gayer Chercheur au Centre d'études et de recherches internationales (CERI/Sciences Po, Paris)

Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins
Angel Chang on why listening to Indigenous knowledge & preserving textile traditions can offer solutions for a more sustainable future

Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 67:57


In episode 284, Kestrel welcomes designer Angel Chang to the show. Over the last decade, Angel has been working with artisans in southwest rural China, making garments using zero carbon design / Indigenous practices (all-natural, locally-made, zero electricity). “For the past 20,000 years, we've been making our own fabric and you know, using ingredients from our own backyard. It's only in the last 150 years that electricity was invented, that chemical dyes were created, that plastic and plastic textiles were created. And all the stuff that we say is polluting for the fashion industry — well, that was all created in the last 150 years. So, if we really want to create quote unquote sustainable clothing, we just have to make clothing like it was before then, before the Industrial Revolution." -Angel The sustainability and fashion narrative has an obsession with whatever is *new and innovative*. The focus regularly leans toward innovations in fabric development or tech-centered approaches to reduce carbon emissions. There tends to be this obsession with looking forward into the future, instead of slowing down to look back and maybe unveil what we could also learn from the past.  This week's guest has deep knowledge around this. After falling in love with the hand-embroidered Miao traditional costumes exhibited in museums around the world, Angel found herself traveling to remote mountain villages in Guizhou Province, China, searching for the elders who made them. And she ended up finding them.  Years later, she's working in collaboration with several communities, in an effort to help preserve their textile traditions that over the last 30 years or so, have been eroding amidst China's rapid modernization. As she says – “Saving these textile traditions is not just about preserving the past. They can also provide tangible solutions for an environmentally sustainable future.” Turns out, zero carbon design – fashion that's all natural and locally-made with no electricity — is possible.  Quotes & links from the conversation: “I think maybe it's human nature to always want to find something that's new and flashy. But I feel like it's also feeding an obsession that will never be satiated. There's always so much emphasis on technology and the future, and the thing is — technology is not going to be the thing that's going to save us from climate change or whatever. We have to learn how to work with nature again.” -Angel (49:59) Alexis Bunten, Angel mentions them and some of their wisdom about the need to reconnect with our own roots “I think not being able to know who you are fuels a lot of insecurity and unrest internally. And so, I feel like learning about where we come from, our ancestral roots, and going to that physical land and just feeling it and spending some time there — I feel like that will give us a lot of solace and calm us down and bring more satisfaction to our hearts and souls.” -Angel (59:38) “How Ancient Textiles Can Help The Future”, Angel's TEDTalk Angel Chang Website > Follow Angel on Instagram > Follow Angel Chang (the brand) on Instagram >

DIVIDE IT WITH GILL
WHAT IT'S LIKE TO BE A TEXTILE DESIGNER

DIVIDE IT WITH GILL

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 32:00


In today's ep, I have my friend Christine who is a textile designer. She has designs in Bloomingdales and has a wealth of knowledge on apparel and home!! We also reminisce on graduating college, fashion trends and more!!! Follow Divideitwithgill IG: https://www.instagram.com/divideitwithgill/Follow Divideitwithgill Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@divideitwithgillChristine IG: https://www.instagram.com/christine.waldhof/

The Laura Flanders Show
The F-Word: Time to Stop Trashing the Luddites?

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 3:30


The F-Word is released bi-weekly featuring timely commentaries by Laura Flanders and guests.Twenty-three minutes. That's how long it takes for your brain to refocus after shifting from one task to the next. Check your email, glance at a text, and you'll pay for what's called a “switch effect.”“We've fallen for a mass delusion that our brains can multi-task. They can't,” author Johann Hari found out in researching his latest book. We're paying a price for our stolen ability to focus and maybe that's one of the reasons we're falling for autocrats and punting on solving the world's grievous problems.Can we spare a few minutes to focus on Luddites? Read people's historian Peter Linebaugh, or Jacobin writer, Peter Frase; check out a Smithsonian Magazine's feature by Clive Thompson -- and you'll find that Luddites weren't backward thinking thugs, but rather, skilled craftspeople whose lives were about to be wrecked.Textile cutters, spinners and weavers, before factories came along, those British textile workers enjoyed a pretty good life. Working from home, they had a certain amount of autonomy over their lives. The price for their products was set and published. They could work as much or as little as liked. Come the early 1800s – war and recession - and machines and factories threatened all of that. The Luddites – a made up name - didn't start by breaking machines. They started by making demands of the factory owners to phase in the technology slowly. Some proposed a tax on textiles to fund worker pensions. They called for government regulation. Relief from the harms and a fair share of the profits from progress. It was only when they were denied all of that that they started breaking stuff up. Today, the big U.S. social media companies are facing lawsuits. On January 6th, Seattle Public Schools sued TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, SnapChat, and YouTube for their negative impact on students' mental and emotional health. The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments next month over the protections the tech industry enjoys under law when their algorithms intentionally push potentially harmful content for profit. What would breaking the machines look like in our time? I don't know. But if Hari's right, it's not just the quality of our lives that's in danger. It's the state of our minds that's at stake. You can hear this week's show, via this podcast feed, with Johann Hari or catch Laura's full uncut conversation that includes, Noam Chomsky, the subject of his next book -- a man with no problem with focus it seems -- through a patreon subscription to theLFShow 

South Carolina Business Review
Textile innovations continue in SC

South Carolina Business Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 5:49


Over the past several years, our next guest's small manufacturing company has continued to win awards and recognition for their innovations and growth, most recently the 2022 Emerging Manufacturer of the Year award from the South Carolina Manufacturing Extension Partnership. Mike Switzer interviews Donna Brin, president and CEO of bFIVE40 in Little River, SC.

Beat the Often Path
Ep. 132: Tessa Callaghan: Sustainable Seaweed-Based Yarn & Fabric

Beat the Often Path

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 54:29


Tessa Callaghan is the CEO and co-founder of Keel Labs, makers of a seaweed-based yarn they call Kelsun.  In case you didn't know, the textile and fashion industries are a mess, and they contribute enormous amounts of waste to our planet. Tessa and her co-founders set out to create a fully functional yarn with a significantly lower environmental footprint than conventional fibers. They're harnessing a biopolymer from kelp to achieve this, and kelp is one of the most regenerative organisms on our planet.  They've raised tens of millions in funding for their concept, and I'm excited to see what comes next. Here's Tessa Callaghan of Keel Labs.

Clocking In: Voices of NC Manufacturing
E-36 Smart Textile Technology: The Future of Fabrication

Clocking In: Voices of NC Manufacturing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 20:55


NC State University Industry Expansion Solutions' (IES) North Carolina Defense Manufacturing Community Support Program (NC DMCSP), creates opportunities for smart textile innovators.  As our lives become ever connected through smart phones, tablets and other devices, the way we interact has changed dramatically and that even applies to textiles. Textiles come in a wide variety of forms, from clothing to bedding to household items. Smart textiles include the next generation of wearable technologies. They combine textile design with advanced sensing capabilities. This new class of materials promises to revolutionize the future of wearable computing. In 2021, the Department of Defense's (DoD) Office of Local Defense Community Cooperation (OLDCC) awarded North Carolina State University IES a grant under the Defense Manufacturing Community Support Program (DMCSP). The DMCSP is designed to support long-term community investments that strengthen national security innovation and expand the capabilities of the defense manufacturing industrial ecosystem. The program was created to recognize communities that demonstrate best practices in attracting and expanding defense manufacturing by bringing together key local stakeholders and using long-term planning that integrates targeted public and private investments across a community's entire defense industrial ecosystem. In this episode of Clocking In Phil Mintz sits down with Dr. William Reynolds and Dr. Casey Boutwell - two participants in the NC DMCSP sponsored propeller project looking to market their breakthrough smart textile technology.  Founded in 2017, Onda Vision Technologies (OVT) is a North Carolina State University startup company. OVT is a spin-out company from the North Carolina State University's Advanced Self-Powered Systems Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST) Center, which is a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored Nanosystems Engineering Research Center (NERC).  Onda Vision has developed a wearable sensor for real-time hydration monitoring to optimize human performance and health. Onda Vision's Founder, Dr. William D. Reynolds, Jr Ph.D, has over 20 years of experience in research and development between the commercial and government sector. His management experience extends over fifteen years of building and leading high-performing corporate science and engineering teams. Onda Vision are developing a wearable sensor that has the ability to monitor body hydration in real-time. Dr. Reynolds' background and expertise cover signal processing, deep learning and algorithm development. Dr. Reynolds has attended the University of Delaware and the University of Illinois-Chicago.  Dr. Casey Boutwell, Ph.D MBA, is the chief executive officer of DermiSense Inc., a startup company commercializing a medical diagnostic technology developed at NCSU that uses a microneedle patch to extract and analyze interstitial fluids in the skin. DermiSense was founded in 2018 when the founding team licensed the underlying IP from NC State University. The company is extending their manufacturing and process optimization to increase patch area and reduce production time while continuing to collaborate with the originating lab at NCSU to explore new sensing applications. Mintz, Reynolds and Boutwell discuss the history of Onda Vision and Dermisense, Onda Vision's and Dermisense innovative smart textile technologies, how these technologies can help prevent things like heatstroke and detect diseases and more.  LINKS NCMEP Onda Vision DermiSense ABOUT Phil Mintz Phil Mintz is the executive director of NC State Industry Expansion Solutions (IES) and director of the North Carolina Manufacturing Extension Partnership (NCMEP). At NCMEP, Phil drives outreach to NC manufacturers, builds relationships with federal and state leaders and coordinates efforts to drive profitable manufacturing growth in the state. He also leads the broader IES Extension Operations outreach unit of regional managers, technical specialists and business development leaders providing business engagement, assessment and improvement tools. This includes statewide peer networks, ISO 9000 quality management systems, Six Sigma, Lean manufacturing, environmental services, and health and safety solutions. Bill Reynolds  Dr. William D. Reynolds, Jr., has over 20 years of experience in research and development between the commercial and government sector. His management experience extends over fifteen years of building and leading high-performing corporate science and engineering teams. Dr. Reynolds' background and expertise cover signal processing, deep learning and algorithm development. Dr. Reynolds has attended the University of Delaware and the University of Illinois Chicago.  Casey Boutwell Dr. Casey Boutwell, Ph.DMBA, is the chief executive officer of DermiSense. Dr. Boutwell contributes his technical expertise in micro-and nanofabrication, business experience in technology commercialization, intellectual property, and licensing strategy, and professional network in digital health and wearable biosensing systems.

Piano Music Room
Yuzen-zome is a textile dyeing method

Piano Music Room

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 2:27


Yuzen-zome is a textile dyeing method - #3297 by chair house 12242022.mp3Yuzen-zome is a textile dyeing method《 メリークリスマス!》あなたへのクリスマスカードです!いつだって穏やかで優しく美しいフランです。ではでは..☆☆☆☆☆■PS1:ジャックライン終わってサイコパスのシーズン1視聴中。今回はたぶん5回目くらいなのだけど、初めてわかったことがある。途中でギター弾き..

piano ten thousand leaves project
Yuzen - Zome Is A Textile Dyeing Method - #3297 By Chair House 12242022

piano ten thousand leaves project

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 2:26


Merry Christmas Wishing you a blessed Christmas and every happiness in the new year.. #3297 Dec. 24, 2022: Yuzen-zome is a textile dyeing method (this title is from "A guidebook to Japan and its Cuspoms") Today's pure primal piano music here. Happy if this music makes you feel peaceful.. : ) Looking for absolute natural beauty every day for Piano Ten Thousand Leaves. Target number is 4536 and 3296(72.7%) achieved today. Find my project.. : ) This piece may might have good 1/f fluctuation characteristic although I stopped investigating it each piece. ######## NEW 22nd SELECTION ALBUM JUST RELEASED ######## "Midsummer Light" - the 22nd selection album of piano ten thousand leaves Youtube: Full(20 songs, 50 minutes) and Free 4K Video with Super Beautiful Motion Graphics of Artgrid https://youtu.be/NrGOHU8Oq8I spotify https://open.spotify.com/album/0xbAyejkTEictsVmLxwc0v apple music https://music.apple.com/jp/album/1639517632 amazon music https://www.amazon.co.jp/s?k=chair+house+%E7%9C%9F%E5%A4%8F%E3%81%AE%E3%81%B2%E3%81%8B%E3%82%8A+-+%E3%83%94%E3%82%A2%E3%83%8E%E4%B8%87%E8%91%89%E9%9B%86+-+%E7%AC%AC22%E9%81%B8&i=digital-music&ref=nb_sb_noss_2 Line Music https://music.line.me/webapp/album/mb00000000028c4baf AWA https://s.awa.fm/album/d9a568a7ba17bc6aa983 Other Every music streaming services in the world https://linkco.re/HR7gvxuN

The Nonlinear Library
LW - Think wider about the root causes of progress by jasoncrawford

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 7:15


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Think wider about the root causes of progress, published by jasoncrawford on December 21, 2022 on LessWrong. Too much discussion of the Industrial Revolution is myopic, focused narrowly on a few highlights such as steam and coal. The IR was part of broader trends that are wider in scope and longer in time than its traditional definition encompasses. To understand anything, it is crucial to get the correct scope for the phenomenon in question. Here are some ways in which we have to widen our focus in order to see the big picture. Wider than coal and steam Some explanations of the IR focus on steam engines, and especially on the coal that fueled them. Economist Robert Allen, for instance, has one of the best-researched and most convincing arguments for cheap coal as a requirement for the development of steam power. A weak version of this claim, such as “coal was a crucial factor in the IR,” is certainly true. But sometimes a much stronger claim is made, to the effect that the IR couldn't have happened without abundant, accessible coal, and that this is the main factor explaining why it happened in Europe and especially in Britain. Or more broadly, that all of material progress is driven by fossil fuels (with the implication that once we are, sooner or later, forced to transition away from fossil fuels—whether by geology, economics, or politics—growth will inevitably slow). But much of the early IR wasn't dependent on steam power: Textile machinery, such as Arkwright's spinning machines, were originally powered by water. Henry Maudslay's earliest machine tools were made to manufacture locks; another key application of machine tools was guns with interchangeable parts. This was not motivated by steam power. Improvements in factory organization, such as the arrangement of Wedgwood's pottery manufacturing operation, were management techniques, independent of power sources. The reaper was pulled by horses—even after the development of steam power, because steam tractors were too heavy for use in fields. Even stationary agricultural machines such as for threshing or winnowing were often muscle-powered. You could argue that all of these inventions would have reached a plateau and would not have had as much economic impact without eventually being hooked up to steam or gas engines. But the fact remains that they were initially powered by water or muscle, and they were economically useful in those first incarnations, often achieving 10x or more gains in productivity. They didn't need coal or gas for that, nor were they invented in anticipation that such power would soon be available. So either it was an amazing coincidence that all of this mechanical invention was going on at the same time—or there was some wider, underlying trend. Wider than industry Further, the IR itself only represents a subset of the broader technical innovations that were going on in this period. Here are a few key things that aren't considered “industrial” and so are often left out of the story of the IR: Improvements to agriculture other than mechanization: for instance, new crop rotations Improvements to maritime navigation, such as the marine chronometer that helped solve the longitude problem Immunization techniques against smallpox: inoculation and later vaccination To me, the fact of all these inventions happening in roughly the same time period indicates a general acceleration of progress during this time, reflecting some deep cause, not a simple playing out of the consequences of one specific resource or invention. Wider than invention In many areas, incremental improvements were being made even before the major inventions that make the history books: Roads and canals were improved in the 17th and 18th centuries, speeding up transportation even before railroads Experiments by engineers like John ...

ECO SPEAKS CLE
Creating a Bioregional Textile Community with Rust Belt Fibershed

ECO SPEAKS CLE

Play Episode Play 20 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 43:26


In this episode, we speak with Jess Boeke. Jess and her twin sister Sarah Pottle, are the co-founders of Rust Belt Fibershed and are growing a bioregional textile community within a 250-mile radius of Cleveland. Imagine sourcing your clothing from a regional fibershed where local fiber farmers, workers, and artisans produce natural clothing that originates from the soil and can return to the soil. This is the vision of Rust Belt Fibershed. Jess and Sarah are helping connect us with our clothing the way farmers' markets connect us with our food. It starts with systems thinking and education, then the community magic follows. Listen and hear about alpacas, hemp, flax, natural dyes, microplastics, and what's needed to bring natural textile production into our fibershed and the many ways to engage with this regenerative community.   GuestJess Boeke, Co-Founder and  Executive Director, Rust Belt Fibershed ResourcesRust Belt Fibershed website Community Forum - get plugged into the Rust Belt Fibershed communityDrift Lab Dye Studio - natural and botanical dyeing projectRegenerative Ed - regenerative thinking for our educational systemReading: Fibershed: Growing a Movement of Farmers, Fashion Activists, and Makers for a New Textile EconomyFollow us: https://www.facebook.com/ecospeaksclehttps://www.instagram.com/ecospeakscleContact us:hello@ecospeakscle.com

Conspiracy of Goodness Podcast
10,000 Volunteers Fighting the Waste Created by Fast Fashion

Conspiracy of Goodness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 50:09


What fascinates you? If you wonder how your unique skills and interests could combine to put bread on your table, and make the world a little better place, then our guest, Jessica Schreiber, will change your future. She took an observation in her internship, and turned it into an amazing nonprofit in New York City that has 800+ companies as clients, over 10,000 volunteers, and saves NYC tens of millions of dollars every year. It's a story that any of us could use in our own journeys to discover what we are uniquely built to contribute! Jessica started working on textile waste on 2011 Past the point of sale, it's the public's responsibility to dispose the waste properly New York's budget for textile waste approximately 60 million Textile waste from businesses Making the businesses accountable for their wastes 6% of New York City's waste is textile Business wastes are not regulated the same as individual waste The business model Reusing and recycling The volunteers Students will go to the industry with a whole new perspective There's an opportunity to get involve Girl scout volunteers Mending How mending/alteration can change how you value your clothing Polyester is plastic Spandex is not recyclable Fabric to fabric recycling Law for textile waste management Recycling is delaying the inevitable Fundraising to expand on west coast

Audycje Kulturalne
„Laboratorium możliwości artystycznych”. Miniatury tkackie na Baltic Mini Textile Gdynia

Audycje Kulturalne

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 19:20


50 prac wyróżnionych podczas dwunastej odsłony gdyńskiego triennale miniatur tkackich można oglądać w Muzeum Miasta Gdyni. To pokonkursowa wystawa dzieł artystów z różnych stron świata.… Czytaj dalej Artykuł „Laboratorium możliwości artystycznych”. Miniatury tkackie na Baltic Mini Textile Gdynia pochodzi z serwisu Audycje Kulturalne.

Talking Textiles
Textile Leaders Tackle Supply Chain Strategies

Talking Textiles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 40:35


Supply chain delays and challenges are one of the top issues facing the textiles industry today. Listen in on this special panel discussion of Talking Textiles, where we'll talk to industry leaders about the causes of these problems, the outlook for the coming year and how companies can best prepare themselves to deal with shortages and longer production times.

Afrique Économie
Après la liquidation judiciaire de Camaïeu, les industries du textile marocaines à la peine

Afrique Économie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 2:16


Camaïeu, le géant du textile du nord de la France, a été placé en liquidation judiciaire fin septembre 2022. 2 600 emplois ont été supprimés et 500 boutiques ont fermé. Après une première vente aux enchères des stocks, ce mercredi 7 novembre, ce sont les actifs immatériels de la marque qui ont été vendus aux enchères. Si la fermeture de l'enseigne a de graves conséquences sur l'emploi en France, elle en a également sur l'ensemble de la filière et notamment toute la chaîne manufacturière au Maroc, qui était un grand fournisseur de la marque. L'annonce de la liquidation judiciaire est la douche froide pour Si Mohamed Boubouh, grand industriel de Tanger à la tête de Vita Couture. « Nous n'avons pas de fonds de roulement pour acheter de tissu et tout ça, ça impacte directement sur les chaînes de couture. Avant, on avait 800 personnes et maintenant, on se retrouve pratiquement avec un peu plus que la moitié, dans les 460. Camaïeu représentait avant à peu près entre 38 jusqu'à 40% de ma capacité. Donc, c'était vraiment un client important pour nous. » Un coup d'autant plus dur que l'entreprise de Si Mohamed Boubou ne faisait pas de la simple sous-traitance pour Camaïeu : « Plus que ça, c'est que nous avons travaillé avec Camaïeu en produit fini. C'est-à-dire que nous achetons du tissu, on fait la coupe, la confection et tout et la livraison du produit fini jusqu'en France. Et là, vous pouvez imaginer que le coût est vraiment supérieur à la sous-traitance. Et là, bien sûr, l'ardoise était beaucoup plus douloureuse que si jamais on travaille en sous-traitance. Et le problème majeur que nous avons eu, c'est que nous avons fait confiance parce qu'ils ont promis une chose, et puis après, on se retrouve vraiment avec aucune garantie et pratiquement 2 millions d'euros suspendus ». Plus de 500 emplois supprimés Des stocks sur les bras, des frais de douanes en attente, pas de fonds de roulement pour honorer de nouvelles commandes… Face à la liquidation judiciaire de Camaïeu, les défis sont grands pour les industries du textile au Maroc. Ismail Lemtouni d'Imprima Platform Morocco fait le bilan. « On essaie de s'en sortir tant bien que mal. Cette fermeture nous a laissés avec des impayés et un stock marchandise qu'on n'a pas pu exporter et qui s'élève à un peu plus de 2 millions d'euros. Mais mis à part cela, si vous voulez le business avec Camaïeu représentait plus ou moins 7 à 8 millions d'euros par an, ce qui représente en termes d'emploi dans les 500 à 600 emplois dont on a dû se séparer. Donc, vous pouvez imaginer que ça n'a pas été évident. » Pour Ismail Lemtouni, la marge de manœuvre est serrée... « Si on veut aller de l'avant et qu'on veut continuer, il faut absolument remplacer ce chiffre d'affaires. Moi, je me dis qu'on doit le remplacer dans les 2-3 mois à venir, sinon on risque de licencier bien plus de personnes que ce que l'on imaginait. » Aujourd'hui, c'est un goût d'amertume qui prédomine du côté de ces professionnels du secteur. Ils n'attendent que peu de choses des actions en justice.

Labor Jawn
39 - Hazleton General Textile Strike

Labor Jawn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 78:30


When the United Textile Workers of America declared a general textile strike in 1934, the people of Hazleton, Pennsylvania had a choice: would they stand with the textile workers, or the bosses? Music: Little Black Train, arranged and performed by Young Sam James.Support the showhttps://linktr.ee/laborjawn

Sharing Her Journey
Bienvenue Monique

Sharing Her Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 43:52


Sharing Her Journey is SO excited to welcome Monique Hale to the podcast as one of our permanent MONTHLY co-hosts. This woman has lived many lives...both in America and France. She is admirable in so many ways, and has handled her journey with grace and beauty. Oh, and she is kindly blunt and funny too! Monique was born and raised in France with many brothers and sisters. She was raised in a strict home where her father exposed her to nature, art, architecture, and travels. Her mother encouraged her and her siblings in all of their ambitions. After high school, she spent a year in America...which she had always wanted to discover! Monique then decided to stay and pursue studies in Interior Design. {This is where she meets Kirsten:}  After spending nearly 2 decades in the USA,  she moved back home to France so her children would grow in her beautiful culture and language. After leaving her husband, she stayed in France because of the great support system she has there.  Monique loves to express herself through art by drawing, taking pictures, composing floral arrangements, or decorating interiors.  Each decade of life, has brought its own set of challenges and truths. Her forties have been the most revealing years.  Monique also invests in small real estate properties in France, to plan for the future and she has created her own line of textiles.  Find Monique's Textile company HERE _______________________________________ Connect with Sharing Her Journey on Instagram 

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 224: Sewing Help Line

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 59:18 Very Popular


Hello Caller, this is the Love to Sew Help Line! What's your sewing struggle? We answer questions from our listeners about pattern alterations, interfacing, re-fashioning, regaining sewjo after a long break, and more! We also share an inspiring listener email about whether or not to go to fashion school. Show Notes

Good Morning Business
Christophe Girardier, président et fondateur de Glimpact - 28/11

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 6:45


Christophe Girardier, président et fondateur de Glimpact, était l'invité de Christophe Jakubyszyn dans Good Morning Business, ce lundi 28 novembre. Il s'est penché sur le développement de l'éco-score pour le textile, suite à un appel d'offres lancé par le gouvernement, sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Rags To Riches Podcast
Creative Self Expression with Textile Upcycling

Rags To Riches Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 37:10


Debra Rapoport, a native New Yorker, has been curating her outfits from handmade elements since she was a girl.  Starring in Advanced Style the film and featured in three Advanced Style books, Debra is a creative force of non-traditional materials and reuse.  Her clothing and accessories are designed to be worn and displayed... and she work IS displayed in many museums. This is what the Museum of Arts and Design in NYC published about her: Debra Rapoport is a visual artist working with nontraditional and repurposed materials to create clothing and accessories that she wears with great panache. Her flamboyant embellishments and hats start with A/B/C: Assembling, Building, and Constructing for the body, incorporating color, texture, and layering. Embracing the idea that frugality is fun, she constantly re-invents and curates her closet without being a conspicuous consumer. Rapaport's work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, NY), Museum of Arts and Design (New York, NY), LA County Museum of Art (Los Angeles, CA), Museum of Fine Arts (Houston, TX), Philadelphia Museum of Art (Philadelphia, PA), Ilias Lalaounis Jewelry Museum (Athens, Greece) and the Hermitage Museum (St. Petersburg, Russia) and the Helen Williams Drutt Collection.

Les matins
Made in France : l'épreuve du terrain derrière le slogan politique

Les matins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 105:52


durée : 01:45:52 - Les Matins - par : Guillaume Erner - Après des années de délocalisation, plusieurs entreprises revendiquent aujourd'hui leur ancrage sur le territoire français et se font les promoteur du "Made in France". Textile, industrie pharmaceutique, nouvelles technologies...Peut-on retrouver une souveraineté industrielle ? - invités : Elie Cohen Economiste, directeur de recherche au CNRS; David Simonnet PDG fondateur d'Axyntis, société spécialisée dans la fabrication de principes actifs présents dans les médicaments, qui a relocalisé une partie de sa production en France; Karine Renouil-Thibergien Cheffe d'entreprise

TEXINTEL
TEXINTEL TALKS - EPISODE 080 - RACHEL LI OF FUJIFILM EXPLORES THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY - OPPORTUNITIES AND INNOVATIONS

TEXINTEL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 46:31


In this informative podcast we speak with Rachel Li, Segment Marketing Manager - Textile, Sign & Display and Industrial at FUJIFILM Ink Solutions Group.FujiFilm have been driving the digitisation of the print industry for many years. In this podcast we explore the big opportunity that the Textile industry presents and dive deep into the challenges it faces and how we must adapt. Sustainable manufacturing must be accelerated and adopted worldwide, to do so we must deliver a tailored solution that meets the industries specifications, whilst constantly keeping the future in focus. Rachel shares her experience and vision for FujiFilm technology, their innovations in chemistry and the shifting adoption of printing inks.

TEXINTEL
TEXINTEL TALKS - EPISODE 079 - MEET THE TALENTED TEXTILE DESIGNER AND LIFESTYLE BRAND MARYLENE MADOU

TEXINTEL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 38:20


Creating your own business takes talent, drive and resilience – three essential qualities for success. Marylene Madou has all three and has over the last 5 years built a successful lifestyle brand for Fashion and Interior products.In this charming podcast interview she explains how she has achieved her creative vision, how she faces each challenge with a positive mindset and how she has works tirelessly to build a loyal customer base and online community. It's been steep a learning curve but one that Marylene has approached with a positive ethos and a wisdom beyond her years. We wish her every success in the years ahead…

SBS Hindi - SBS हिंदी
India report: India-Australia trade deal gives boost to IT, textile and pharma industries

SBS Hindi - SBS हिंदी

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 7:26


Listen to the latest SBS Hindi news from India. 23/11/2022

La France bouge - Elisabeth Assayag
À l'occasion de la semaine de la réduction des déchets, l'industrie textile invente des solutions

La France bouge - Elisabeth Assayag

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 40:43


Dans “La France bouge”, Elisabeth Assayag fait le tour de France des initiatives positives et novatrices. Travail, éducation, santé… Ils œuvrent aux quatre coins du pays pour faire bouger les lignes et casser les codes : qui sont ces citoyens, ces entreprises, ces collectivités qui s'engagent et inventent le monde de demain ? Des portraits et des témoignages inspirants.

Where We Live
Jen Hewett on identity, community and inclusivity in craft

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 48:28


How does craft deepen your understanding of your history, your community, or yourself? And how can predominantly-white craft spaces better welcome diverse experiences?Textile artist and printmaker Jen Hewett threads the needle on these questions in her latest book, This Long Thread: Women of Color on Craft, Community and Connection. The book includes interviews with 19 fiber artists, and surveys hundreds of creators of color, all of whom draw on their relationship with making. This hour, we hear from Hewett – and briefly, from writer Mia Nakaji Monnier. Plus, Susi Ryan is an author and social justice activist from Connecticut who co-founded the quilt guild, Sisters In Stitches Joined By The Cloth. Ryan recently wrote a piece about how craft connects her to her ancestors, titled "Cloth Has Given Me A Voice," for Mass Humanities' We, Too, Are America series. She says, "Cloth has given me a voice to recall the memory of my enslaved ancestors. The quilts that I create visually depict and document in cloth the life journeys of my family, my ancestors, and the many others who lived through the African diaspora," Ryan writes. "The stories my quilts tell allow me to ease into uncomfortable conversations about such critical issues as racism, social and medical justice, prison reform, African American history and literature, farm, food and housing sustainability, climate change, women's rights, religion, politics, and human trafficking, that sadly still exists today." GUESTS: Jen Hewett: Printmaker; Textile Artist; Author, This Long Thread: Women of Color on Craft, Community, and Connection Susi Ryan: Author; Speaker; Fiber Artist; Social Justice Activist; Co-Founder, Sisters In Stitches Joined By The Cloth Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired April 28, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 223: Fancy Weaves

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 53:34


We dive into fancy weaves - those fabrics that are made with special looms, special tools, special yarn twists, or otherwise unusual processes! We cover satins, jacquards, velvets, dobby weaves, and more, describing what they're like, how they're made, and how to sew with them. We also give advice to a listener who's starting her own business. Show Notes

Circular Economy Podcast
92 Elmar Stroomer – circular textile solutions in Africa

Circular Economy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 48:42


Elmar Stroomer is the founder of Africa Collect Textiles (ACT). Africa Collect Textiles does exactly that – collecting used textiles across Africa, for reuse, recycling and upcycling. Elmar Stroomer has a strong background in the circular economy and design, and lived in Kenya and Uganda between 2012 and 2017 to get Africa Collect Textiles up and running. Now, Elmar is working full time on the expansion of ACT in Kenya and Nigeria. ACT aims to develop solutions to end the textile waste issues across Africa. It distributes free and affordable clothing to underprivileged communities, and currently has over 40 collection points in Nairobi and Lagos for used textiles. It provides employment to more than 50 people, who help collect, sort and upcycle fashion waste, used uniforms and off-cuts, creating products such as rugs, backpacks, toys and much more. On top of this, for every kilogram of used textiles it recycles, Africa Collect Textiles (ACT) donates 10 Kenyan shillings to charity. We hear about how fashion waste imported from the global north has undermined the existing textile and clothing sector in Kenya, and why Elmar decided to create a circular economy for locally produced textiles. Elmar tells us about some of the circular initiatives that ACT has set up, including repurposing workshops, services for resellers that overcome some of the major issues with the system for reselling imported end-of-use textiles, and innovative ways of repurposing end-of-life clothing for local businesses.

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 222: Machine Stitches

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 48:32


Have you ever looked at all the stitches you can do on your machine and wondered, “What's that one for?” In this episode, we explain the function of each stitch, give tips on how to get the best results from machine stitching, and share some ideas for how to use decorative stitches. We also share listener feedback about sewing social media platforms! Show Notes

Thought Behind Things
282 | Building Textile Business In South Punjab Ft. Anees Khawaja

Thought Behind Things

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 87:52


Be part of our community by joining our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/thoughtbehindthings In tonight's conversation with our special guest, Anees Khawaja. What was his early life & education like? How did he get involved in his family business? How do short courses help his education career? What is it like to live & grow a business in Multan? What are the other businesses he is dealing with? Why all his businesses are situated in South Punjab? What is its political & economic value? What are the differences South Punjab would make if it will become a province? What is the future of textiles in Pakistan? How will it expand? The importance of defining strategies for the industries? How does Anees view the production & export of the agri market? What is the potential opportunity behind a climate-friendly business? How can we be sustainable human beings? How can we deal with the unfortunate events in Pakistan? Opportunities in South Punjab Vs. other parts of Pakistan? Thriving stock market & creating corporate structures? Will there be any mentality shift in the legacy businesses? How does Anees envision Pakistan in 2050? Catch this and much more in tonight's episode. Do not forget to subscribe and press the bell icon to catch on to some amazing conversations coming your way Connect with us: • https://www.instagram.com/thoughtbehindthings • https://www.instagram.com/muzamilhasan Anees Khawaja's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anees-khawaja-0990075/ One8nine Media: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6akyz6EpkwyzBmKh0L2rSQ Support our podcast: https://anchor.fm/syed-muzamil-hasan-zaidi3/support You can also audio stream our podcast on the following platforms: • Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3z1cE7F • Google Podcast: https://bit.ly/2S84VEd • Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/3cgIkfI --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/syed-muzamil-hasan-zaidi3/support

The Modern Cotton Story
Cotton and Technology: A Discussion with Mike Rodriguez, Textile Technologist

The Modern Cotton Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 21:09


Hear from a leading engineer, Mike Rodriguez, Textile Engineering Consultant, as we discuss many of the latest innovations in the cotton and textile industries. For Mr. Rodriguez, it's an exciting time to be in textiles as there's so much change and opportunity while at the same time new innovations have helped cotton to maintain its status as a preferred fiber for textile mills globally. In this important program, we also discuss the importance of sustainability, and the role new technologies play in realizing sustainability goals in the industry. This is a fascinating program with one of the leading textile technologists in the world. Hosted by Ray Daniels of BASF, and interviewed by Bob Antoshak, Gherzi Textile Organization.

Good Morning Business
Guillaume Gibault, fondateur du Slip français - 11/11

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 6:24


Guillaume Gibault, fondateur du Slip français, était l'invité de Christophe Jakubyszyn dans Good Morning Business, ce vendredi 11 novembre. Ils se sont penchés sur l'installation d'une usine textile de l'entreprise Slip français au sein du salon MIF Expo,sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Woman's Hour
Textile designer Althea McNish, Albanian female asylum seekers, endurance athlete Jenny Tough

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 57:33


Following, Elon Musk's announcement that Twitter will permanently suspend any account on the social media platform that impersonates another, Nuala McGovern is joined by crime writer, Denise Mina who changed her twitter display name to ‘Elon Musk'. Jenny Tough is an endurance athlete who's best known for running and cycling in some of world's most challenging events. For a forthcoming film - SOLO - she set herself an audacious objective: to run – solo and unsupported, across mountain ranges on six continents, starting with one of the most remote locations on earth in Kyrgystan. She joins Nuala to describe how mountains give her a sense of home and why travelling solo is a “force for joy”. We speak to Anti Trafficking Social worker Lauren Starkey and Human rights Journalist about new research that suggests Albanian women are more likely to have their asylum applications approveddue to the threat they face from trafficking. They'll be sharing the experiences of some of the women with Nuala McGovern and give us an insight into the dangers that female asylum seekers face day to day. Textile designer Althea McNish was the first Caribbean designer to achieve international recognition and is one of the UK's most influential and innovative textile designers. There's currently a major retrospective of her, Althea McNish: Colour is Mine at the Whitworth in Manchester on tour from William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow. Rose Sinclair a Lecturer in Design Education at Goldsmiths, University of London co-curated the exhibition. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 221: Home Decor Sewing

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 60:05


Home decor sewing can make your house into a warm, inviting home! In this episode, we chat about the home decor fabrics, notions, and tools you'll need to do a bevy of projects. We also give home-decor specific sewing tips, share the projects we've made ourselves, and discuss inspiring project ideas. Plus, listener feedback about our quilted garments episode! Show Notes

Entendez-vous l'éco ?
Textile : le retour du tissu industriel

Entendez-vous l'éco ?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 59:05


durée : 00:59:05 - Entendez-vous l'éco ? - par : Tiphaine de Rocquigny - Alors que les plans sociaux se succèdent pour les enseignes moyen de gamme, le secteur de l'habillement subit depuis plusieurs décennies les effets de la mondialisation. Pourtant, l'industrie textile est loin d'avoir dit son dernier mot, et l'espoir de relocalisation souffle sur le secteur... - invités : Jean-Michel Minovez Professeur à l'université Toulouse Jean Jaurès.; Dominique Jacomet professeur à l'Institut Français de la Mode; Yves Dubief ancien président de l'Union des Industries textiles

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 220: Bralettes

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 42:15 Very Popular


Soft, cute, and always wire-free, we are HERE for bralettes! In this episode, we talk about the fabrics, patterns, and techniques you can use to make the perfect bralette for you. We review the different ways bralettes can give support, notions you might need, and how to switch out finishes. We also share listener feedback about chalk hem markers! Show Notes

A Cancer & A Capricorn
Episode 13: Clothing Industry & Textile Production

A Cancer & A Capricorn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 61:16


Hello spooky babes, we hope you had a very sPoOkY Halloween and a lovely spooky season, and we hope you want to keep the spooky times rolling with us, cuz we've got a SPOOKY story for you today. It's a little story about consumerism and waste in the clothing production and fashion industries! It's a scary tale, indeed, but there are simple things we can do to help Kenz #savethewhales. Remember, if something matters to you, make a change!

Making Stitches Podcast
THE GREAT NORTHERN TEXTILE SHOW 2022

Making Stitches Podcast

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 43:23 Very Popular


Last Sunday, the  first ever Great Northern Textile Show opened its doors to the public, welcoming crafters to mingle with artists and craftspeople from a wide range of disciplines and enjoy a celebration of creativity.The event was Tracy Fox's idea - my guest for the previous episode of Making Stitches - as an artist, print maker and dyer of fabric herself, she felt there was a gap in the market for a show celebrating local talent in Manchester and the wider area. As a city built on textiles during the industrial revolution, Tracy believed there should be a showcase for talent from the world of textiles, and so, after much thought and meticulous planning, the Great Northern Textile Show was born. I went along to experience it for myself and took my microphone with me to capture some of the atmosphere.  I hope you enjoy listening to the conversations I had with some of the people  I met there.Thank you to everyone who spoke to me for this episode including:Tracy Fox, the event organiserLeah Higgins, artistLouise from Sincerely LouiseHolly Palmer from Planet QuiltsIan Fothergill from The Knitting Gift ShopTanya from the Woolly TangleJulie from Tilly Flop DesignsChristine and Ally from the International Feltmakers AssociationCaroline from Montague Patchers in SaleLiz Carrington from the North Cheshire Guild of Spinners, Weavers & DyersHelen & Carrie from the Yarn Addicts of ManchesterGreat Northern Textile ShowTo join the mailing list for the new Making Stitches Newsletter, please click onto this link.For full show notes for this episode, please visit the Making Stitches website.The music featured in this episode is Make You Smile by RGMusic from Melody Loops.The Making Stitches logo was designed by Neil Warburton at iamunknown.You can support Making Stitches Podcast with running costs through Ko-fi.Making Stitches  Podcast is supported by the Making Stitches Shop which offers Making Stitches Podcast merchandise for sale as well as Up the Garden Path crochet patterns created by me & illustrated by Emma Jackson.Making Stitches Podcast is presented, recorded and edited by Lindsay Weston.

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 219: Sewing Horror Stories

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 36:46 Very Popular


Is there anything scarier than a really bad sewing mishap? Okay, there are a few things, but this episode is about the sewing moments that made our listeners' hearts drop. We share their funny and harrowing stories, plus answer a listener question about getting a flat bias tape-finished neckline. Happy Spooky Season! Show Notes

Heart Stock Radio Podcast
La Rhea Pepper Chief Executive Officer at Textile Exchange

Heart Stock Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 30:00


La Rhea is the founder and CEO of Textile Exchange.  In addition to developing standards, they also publish critical industry data that enables brands and retailers to measure, and track their use of preferred fibers and materials. With their Climate positive strategy, Textile Exchange is the driving force for urgent climate action on textile fiber and materials with a goal of 45% reduced CO2 emissions from textile fiber production by 2030.  La Rhea shares her story in this episode which begins with her experiences as A fifth-generation farmer. Heart Stock is a production of KBMF 102.5 and underwritten by Purse for the People.

Sustainable(ish)
[158] Engaging young people with slow fashion – with Tze Ching Yeung

Sustainable(ish)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 44:15


Often one of the first ways that young people start to express themselves is via fashion, but fashion comes with a considerable environmental footprint. Textile production accounts for around 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions, and uses 1.5 trillion litres of water annually. And we all wear clothes. In today's episode I'm chatting to someone […]

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 218: History of Sewing Patterns

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 44:00 Very Popular


Home sewing patterns put knowledge and power in the hands of ordinary people, changing fashion forever. In this episode, we go back to the beginnings of sewing patterns in the mid-19th century (and a little bit earlier). We talk about the enormous shifts in technology and lifestyles through the nearly two centuries that followed - and we even predict the future of sewing patterns! Plus, a listener question about fashion school and life direction. Show Notes

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 217: Sewing Quilted Garments

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 54:51 Very Popular


This episode is all about making cozy cool quilted garments! We talk you through every step: choosing fabric, making patchwork, quilting, assembling, and finishing. We also review batting options, give seam finishing tips specifically for those bulky quilt seams, and chat about inspiring quilted garments we love. In our listener question section, we recommend A-line skirt patterns in plus sizes and name a source of nickel-free jeans buttons and rivets. Show Notes

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 216: Caring for your Me-Mades

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 43:26 Very Popular


From laundering to mending, this episode is all about caring for your precious me-made garments! We cover pre-washing, sewing tips to make your clothes last, stain removal, storage, and more. Plus, a listener letter about swim trunks notions! Show Notes

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 215: Surprising Gadgets and Guidance

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 39:48 Very Popular


We share your most unexpected tips and tools in this community episode! From fun gadgets to expert guidance, be prepared to have your mind blown! Show Notes

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 214: What's your Me-Made Style?

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 37:43 Very Popular


In this episode, we review components of design (volume, colour, texture, print, and more) so that you can pinpoint your ideal personal style. Then we offer suggestions to bring your ideal down to earth so that it's wearable in your everyday life. Plus: how to have fun with fashion, a listener question about getting flat knit neck bands, and our favourite part: the phrases listeners use to describe their style!  Show Notes

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 213: Hems

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 50:30 Very Popular


A-HEM! In this episode, we get to the bottom of hems: techniques, tools, and tips for wovens and knits. Plus: marking hems, adjusting hem depth, and fancy hems! The listener feedback is all about changing robes/ponchos. Show Notes

Love to Sew Podcast
Episode 212: 5th Anniversary Special

Love to Sew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 54:50 Very Popular


We celebrate five years of Love to Sew with a chatty catch-up, a bit of reflection, and a bunch of sewing-themed games! Thank you for five wonderful years! Show Notes