Podcasts about Bolivian

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Best podcasts about Bolivian

Latest podcast episodes about Bolivian

¡UY QUE HORROR! A Latinx Horror Movie Podcast
Blood Red Ox (USA/Bolivia)

¡UY QUE HORROR! A Latinx Horror Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 117:52


More mind bending on the pod esta semana, but this time make it GAY! Jonny and Aileen watch the Bolivia/USA collab, Blood Red Ox. Amir and Amat are invited to a trip to Bolivia, but their visit quickly takes a bizarre turn as strange visions and the ghostly presence of a giant ox haunt the couple. Jonny and Aileen also discuss popular Bolivian spirit, Singani, one of the shooting locations, Rincón de la Victoria in Tarija, Bolivia and Cuban actress Idalmis Garcia. Remember to subscribe, rate and review! Follow our redes sociales:Insta: @uyquehorrorTwitter: @Uy_Que_HorrorFind all the películas we cover on our LinkTree.

Cognitive Dissidents
Peru Crisis + The Many Lefts of Latin America

Cognitive Dissidents

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 63:37


Elohim Monard rejoins the podcast and pinch-hits for Rob's usually weekly slot to address the ongoing and escalating deterioration of political stability in Peru. Elohim offers insightful perspective about what would happen if Boluarte resigned and shares disturbing allegations of terrorism and Bolivian involvement in the protests that have been circulating in Peru and that may set the stage for a military coup. From there, they take a brief tour of the other major countries of Latin America and how they are doing – and how the fate of the region may ultimately be in Brazil and Mexico's hands. --Timestamps:1:30-28:00 – Peru28:00-39:00 – Brazil39:00-45:10 – Colombia45:10-51:46 – Chile51:46-end – Mexico/Argentina--CI LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cognitive-investments/CI Website: https://cognitive.investmentsCI Twitter: https://twitter.com/CognitiveInvestJacob LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jacob-l-s-a9337416/Jacob Twitter: https://twitter.com/JacobShapSubscribe to the Newsletter: https://investments.us17.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=156086d89c91a42d264546df7&id=4e31ca1340--Cognitive Investments is an investment advisory firm, founded in 2019 that provides clients with a nuanced array of financial planning, investment advisory and wealth management services. We aim to grow both our clients' material wealth (i.e. their existing financial assets) and their human wealth (i.e. their ability to make good strategic decisions for their business, family, and career).--Disclaimer: Nothing discussed on Cognitive Dissidents should be considered as investment advice. Please always do your own research & speak to a financial advisor before putting your money into the markets.This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacyPodtrac - https://analytics.podtrac.com/privacy-policy-gdrp

Rumble in the Morning
Stupid News Extra 1-23-2023 …Problems for the State-Run Bolivian Airline

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 4:06


Stupid News Extra 1-23-2023 …Problems for the State-Run Bolivian Airline

LAPodcast (Local Anaesthetic Podcast) - The Most Trusted Name in Local News
LAPodcast 379: Tragicomic Anecdote to Tell Your Friends and Relations

LAPodcast (Local Anaesthetic Podcast) - The Most Trusted Name in Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 50:19


Stories this week include: Complaints about horny chatbot app continue to rise. US Airport Security finds live cat curled up in suitcase. Bolivian state airline enlists psychic to find cat lost in transit. Man watches fortune go up in smoke. Alex falls victim to a scammer... Subscribe to Patreon for exclusive bonus episodes: https://www.patreon.com/LAPodcastExtra Website: http://www.lapodcast.net/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LAPodcast/ Twitter: @LAPodcast

Regular Features
516: The Prince's Bolivian Fight

Regular Features

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 61:13


Prince Harry's tadger keeps transporting him into realms of reveries, and we simply can't get enough.

Media – SECOLAS
Sarah Hines on water, citizenship and revolution

Media – SECOLAS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 36:07


Dr. Sarah Hines explores residents of Cochabamba struggle for access to water that is linked to broader historical processes such as the dispossession and dismantling of indigenous communities in the 19th century, the Bolivian revolution of 1952, and the dictatorships of the 1960s and 1970s. Her book argues that the Cochabambinos defeated privatization in the Water War in 2000 because they defended something they had fought for and won decades earlier, especially in the context of the 1952 revolution.

Historias Podcast
Sarah Hines on water, citizenship and revolution

Historias Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 36:07


Dr. Sarah Hines explores residents of Cochabamba struggle for access to water that is linked to broader historical processes such as the dispossession and dismantling of indigenous communities in the 19th century, the Bolivian revolution of 1952, and the dictatorships of the 1960s and 1970s. Her book argues that the Cochabambinos defeated privatization in the Water War in 2000 because they defended something they had fought for and won decades earlier, especially in the context of the 1952 revolution.

New Books in Latin American Studies
Carwil Bjork-James, "The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia" (U Arizona Press, 2020)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 56:23


In the early twenty-first century Bolivian social movements made streets, plazas, and highways into the decisively important spaces for acting politically, rivaling and at times exceeding voting booths and halls of government. The Sovereign Street documents this important period, showing how indigenous-led mass movements reconfigured the politics and racial order of Bolivia from 1999 to 2011.  Drawing on interviews with protest participants, on-the-ground observation, and documentary research, activist and scholar Carwil Bjork-James provides an up-close history of the indigenous-led protests that changed Bolivia. At the heart of the study is a new approach to the interaction between protest actions and the parts of the urban landscape they claim. These “space-claiming protests” both communicate a message and exercise practical control over the city. Bjork-James interrogates both protest tactics—as experiences and as tools—and meaning-laden spaces, where meaning is part of the racial and political geography of the city.  Taking the streets of Cochabamba, Sucre, and La Paz as its vantage point, The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia (U Arizona Press, 2020) offers a rare look at political revolution as it happens. It documents a critical period in Latin American history, when protests made headlines worldwide, where a generation of pro-globalization policies were called into question, and where the indigenous majority stepped into government power for the first time in five centuries. Brad Wright is a historian of Latin America specializing in postrevolutionary Mexico. He teach world history at Kennesaw State University currently. PhD in Public History with specialization in oral history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

Media – SECOLAS
Kevin Young on resource nationalism in Bolivia

Media – SECOLAS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 45:30


Kevin Young traces the history of Bolivian struggles over mineral and hydrocarbon resources, highlighting the complex legacies of Bolivia's 1952 revolution. His work also revolves around the various economic projects that party officials, political party leaders, activists, urban factory workers, university students, and mine workers proposed to address a key question for Bolivians: How to overcome economic dependency and underdevelopment? To make sense of these debates, Young uses the term resource nationalism, which he will explain in detail in this interview.

Media – SECOLAS
Natalie Kimball on politics and reproductive rights

Media – SECOLAS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 20:12


Dr. Natalie Kimball analyzes the politics of abortion and reproductive rights in Bolivia from the mid-twentieth century to the present. They focus on the cities of La Paz and El Alto, exploring this open secret that brings to light the complex relationship of Bolivian nationalist, military, neoliberal, and leftist governments with women's reproductive rights.

Media – SECOLAS
Thomas Field on development and dictatorship

Media – SECOLAS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 28:10


Dr. Thomas Field, author of *From Development to Dictatorship: Bolivia and the Alliance for Progress in the Kennedy Era,* discusses the fall of the Revolution in 1964 and the accession to power of General René Barrientos. He argues that, unlike other military regimes, Barrientos did not reverse the most prominent conquests of the Revolution. His interpretation of the Barrientos regime challenges previous understandings of the rise of the military in Bolivia. He also discusses the deep legacies of the Bolivian revolution in today's politics.

New Books Network
Carwil Bjork-James, "The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia" (U Arizona Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 56:23


In the early twenty-first century Bolivian social movements made streets, plazas, and highways into the decisively important spaces for acting politically, rivaling and at times exceeding voting booths and halls of government. The Sovereign Street documents this important period, showing how indigenous-led mass movements reconfigured the politics and racial order of Bolivia from 1999 to 2011.  Drawing on interviews with protest participants, on-the-ground observation, and documentary research, activist and scholar Carwil Bjork-James provides an up-close history of the indigenous-led protests that changed Bolivia. At the heart of the study is a new approach to the interaction between protest actions and the parts of the urban landscape they claim. These “space-claiming protests” both communicate a message and exercise practical control over the city. Bjork-James interrogates both protest tactics—as experiences and as tools—and meaning-laden spaces, where meaning is part of the racial and political geography of the city.  Taking the streets of Cochabamba, Sucre, and La Paz as its vantage point, The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia (U Arizona Press, 2020) offers a rare look at political revolution as it happens. It documents a critical period in Latin American history, when protests made headlines worldwide, where a generation of pro-globalization policies were called into question, and where the indigenous majority stepped into government power for the first time in five centuries. Brad Wright is a historian of Latin America specializing in postrevolutionary Mexico. He teach world history at Kennesaw State University currently. PhD in Public History with specialization in oral history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Carwil Bjork-James, "The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia" (U Arizona Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 56:23


In the early twenty-first century Bolivian social movements made streets, plazas, and highways into the decisively important spaces for acting politically, rivaling and at times exceeding voting booths and halls of government. The Sovereign Street documents this important period, showing how indigenous-led mass movements reconfigured the politics and racial order of Bolivia from 1999 to 2011.  Drawing on interviews with protest participants, on-the-ground observation, and documentary research, activist and scholar Carwil Bjork-James provides an up-close history of the indigenous-led protests that changed Bolivia. At the heart of the study is a new approach to the interaction between protest actions and the parts of the urban landscape they claim. These “space-claiming protests” both communicate a message and exercise practical control over the city. Bjork-James interrogates both protest tactics—as experiences and as tools—and meaning-laden spaces, where meaning is part of the racial and political geography of the city.  Taking the streets of Cochabamba, Sucre, and La Paz as its vantage point, The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia (U Arizona Press, 2020) offers a rare look at political revolution as it happens. It documents a critical period in Latin American history, when protests made headlines worldwide, where a generation of pro-globalization policies were called into question, and where the indigenous majority stepped into government power for the first time in five centuries. Brad Wright is a historian of Latin America specializing in postrevolutionary Mexico. He teach world history at Kennesaw State University currently. PhD in Public History with specialization in oral history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Anthropology
Carwil Bjork-James, "The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia" (U Arizona Press, 2020)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 56:23


In the early twenty-first century Bolivian social movements made streets, plazas, and highways into the decisively important spaces for acting politically, rivaling and at times exceeding voting booths and halls of government. The Sovereign Street documents this important period, showing how indigenous-led mass movements reconfigured the politics and racial order of Bolivia from 1999 to 2011.  Drawing on interviews with protest participants, on-the-ground observation, and documentary research, activist and scholar Carwil Bjork-James provides an up-close history of the indigenous-led protests that changed Bolivia. At the heart of the study is a new approach to the interaction between protest actions and the parts of the urban landscape they claim. These “space-claiming protests” both communicate a message and exercise practical control over the city. Bjork-James interrogates both protest tactics—as experiences and as tools—and meaning-laden spaces, where meaning is part of the racial and political geography of the city.  Taking the streets of Cochabamba, Sucre, and La Paz as its vantage point, The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia (U Arizona Press, 2020) offers a rare look at political revolution as it happens. It documents a critical period in Latin American history, when protests made headlines worldwide, where a generation of pro-globalization policies were called into question, and where the indigenous majority stepped into government power for the first time in five centuries. Brad Wright is a historian of Latin America specializing in postrevolutionary Mexico. He teach world history at Kennesaw State University currently. PhD in Public History with specialization in oral history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in Native American Studies
Carwil Bjork-James, "The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia" (U Arizona Press, 2020)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 56:23


In the early twenty-first century Bolivian social movements made streets, plazas, and highways into the decisively important spaces for acting politically, rivaling and at times exceeding voting booths and halls of government. The Sovereign Street documents this important period, showing how indigenous-led mass movements reconfigured the politics and racial order of Bolivia from 1999 to 2011.  Drawing on interviews with protest participants, on-the-ground observation, and documentary research, activist and scholar Carwil Bjork-James provides an up-close history of the indigenous-led protests that changed Bolivia. At the heart of the study is a new approach to the interaction between protest actions and the parts of the urban landscape they claim. These “space-claiming protests” both communicate a message and exercise practical control over the city. Bjork-James interrogates both protest tactics—as experiences and as tools—and meaning-laden spaces, where meaning is part of the racial and political geography of the city.  Taking the streets of Cochabamba, Sucre, and La Paz as its vantage point, The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia (U Arizona Press, 2020) offers a rare look at political revolution as it happens. It documents a critical period in Latin American history, when protests made headlines worldwide, where a generation of pro-globalization policies were called into question, and where the indigenous majority stepped into government power for the first time in five centuries. Brad Wright is a historian of Latin America specializing in postrevolutionary Mexico. He teach world history at Kennesaw State University currently. PhD in Public History with specialization in oral history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

New Books in Critical Theory
Carwil Bjork-James, "The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia" (U Arizona Press, 2020)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 56:23


In the early twenty-first century Bolivian social movements made streets, plazas, and highways into the decisively important spaces for acting politically, rivaling and at times exceeding voting booths and halls of government. The Sovereign Street documents this important period, showing how indigenous-led mass movements reconfigured the politics and racial order of Bolivia from 1999 to 2011.  Drawing on interviews with protest participants, on-the-ground observation, and documentary research, activist and scholar Carwil Bjork-James provides an up-close history of the indigenous-led protests that changed Bolivia. At the heart of the study is a new approach to the interaction between protest actions and the parts of the urban landscape they claim. These “space-claiming protests” both communicate a message and exercise practical control over the city. Bjork-James interrogates both protest tactics—as experiences and as tools—and meaning-laden spaces, where meaning is part of the racial and political geography of the city.  Taking the streets of Cochabamba, Sucre, and La Paz as its vantage point, The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia (U Arizona Press, 2020) offers a rare look at political revolution as it happens. It documents a critical period in Latin American history, when protests made headlines worldwide, where a generation of pro-globalization policies were called into question, and where the indigenous majority stepped into government power for the first time in five centuries. Brad Wright is a historian of Latin America specializing in postrevolutionary Mexico. He teach world history at Kennesaw State University currently. PhD in Public History with specialization in oral history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Sociology
Carwil Bjork-James, "The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia" (U Arizona Press, 2020)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 56:23


In the early twenty-first century Bolivian social movements made streets, plazas, and highways into the decisively important spaces for acting politically, rivaling and at times exceeding voting booths and halls of government. The Sovereign Street documents this important period, showing how indigenous-led mass movements reconfigured the politics and racial order of Bolivia from 1999 to 2011.  Drawing on interviews with protest participants, on-the-ground observation, and documentary research, activist and scholar Carwil Bjork-James provides an up-close history of the indigenous-led protests that changed Bolivia. At the heart of the study is a new approach to the interaction between protest actions and the parts of the urban landscape they claim. These “space-claiming protests” both communicate a message and exercise practical control over the city. Bjork-James interrogates both protest tactics—as experiences and as tools—and meaning-laden spaces, where meaning is part of the racial and political geography of the city.  Taking the streets of Cochabamba, Sucre, and La Paz as its vantage point, The Sovereign Street: Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia (U Arizona Press, 2020) offers a rare look at political revolution as it happens. It documents a critical period in Latin American history, when protests made headlines worldwide, where a generation of pro-globalization policies were called into question, and where the indigenous majority stepped into government power for the first time in five centuries. Brad Wright is a historian of Latin America specializing in postrevolutionary Mexico. He teach world history at Kennesaw State University currently. PhD in Public History with specialization in oral history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

Historias Podcast
Kevin Young on resource nationalism in Bolivia

Historias Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 45:30


Kevin Young traces the history of Bolivian struggles over mineral and hydrocarbon resources, highlighting the complex legacies of Bolivia's 1952 revolution. His work also revolves around the various economic projects that party officials, political party leaders, activists, urban factory workers, university students, and mine workers proposed to address a key question for Bolivians: How to overcome economic dependency and underdevelopment? To make sense of these debates, Young uses the term resource nationalism, which he will explain in detail in this interview.

Historias Podcast
Natalie Kimball on politics and reproductive rights

Historias Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 20:12


Dr. Natalie Kimball analyzes the politics of abortion and reproductive rights in Bolivia from the mid-twentieth century to the present. They focus on the cities of La Paz and El Alto, exploring this open secret that brings to light the complex relationship of Bolivian nationalist, military, neoliberal, and leftist governments with women's reproductive rights.

Historias Podcast
Thomas Field on development and dictatorship

Historias Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 28:10


Dr. Thomas Field, author of *From Development to Dictatorship: Bolivia and the Alliance for Progress in the Kennedy Era,* discusses the fall of the Revolution in 1964 and the accession to power of General René Barrientos. He argues that, unlike other military regimes, Barrientos did not reverse the most prominent conquests of the Revolution. His interpretation of the Barrientos regime challenges previous understandings of the rise of the military in Bolivia. He also discusses the deep legacies of the Bolivian revolution in today's politics.

We Live Here
We Live Here Auténtico! | Ben Molina | Bolivian Born...Made in STL

We Live Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 36:00


[WLHA 013]: We Live Here Auténtico! | Ben Molina | Bolivian Born... Made in STL Today we're joined by Ben Molina. Originally from Bolivia, Ben is passionate about elder care and his work at the Alzheimer's association is making a difference in the Hispanic community. Ben opens up about his journey with depression, finding love and his calling in his field.  He discusses the challenges of a disease that disproportionately affects Hispanics and gives us some advice on the conversations and planning that we should start to have in our own families. Ben's superpower is Empathy! “I don't know how I discovered it. I was always very sensitive to other people and very observant of other people. Also, my mom had a wonderful way of always encouraging us to think positive about people and situations. It's helped me a lot in the field of social work”, says Ben. What does living Autentico mean to you? Autentico means being comfortable in my own skin regardless of the situation. If I am comfortable and honest in who I am, then you are getting the best version of me that I can be. About Ben Ben Molina is a Bolivian-born St. Louis City resident. He's been living in St. Louis for 8 years. Ben has a master's degree in social work from Washington University and currently serves as Program Manager for the Alzheimer's Association, Greater Missouri Chapter. Ben is also on the Board for Social Work Leaders in Healthcare. Mentioned in this episode: What is Alzheimer's.  https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers Hispanic Americans and Alzheimer's Latinos & Alzheimer's Disease:  New numbers behind the crisis https://www.usagainstalzheimers.org/sites/default/files/Latinos-and-AD_USC_UsA2-Impact-Report.pdf Links to power of attorneys/ financial:  https://missourilawyershelp.org/legal-topics/durable-power-of-attorney-for-health/ Poder Notarial Duradero para el Cuidado de Salud y Directiva de Cuidado Médico https://missourilawyershelp.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Durable-Power-of-Attorney-Full-Booklet-4-25-17-Spanish.pdf Connections: Connect with Ben Molina Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/bennmolina Music Guide: SEGMENT 1 Good as Hell-Lizzo Good As Hell (Clean Version) (Audio) - Lizzo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QskZIrbRt7c    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoAm4om0wTs Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande - Rain On Me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoAm4om0wTs SEGMENT 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tgspkNRIcc&ab_channel=KaceyMusgravesVEVO https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0X03zR0rQk   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpwSV1QBd8M&list=OLAK5uy_m4wNZ2nJPQ9ACIaRbcxcsMxZM6oC6MsSk&index=5&ab_channel=NLaFourcadeVEVO SEGMENT 3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Msl2fl3h59I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSfH2AuhXfw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83S-KtvGM2M&ab_channel=CeliaCruzVEVO

Foodie and the Beast
Foodie and the Beast - Jan. 8, 2023

Foodie and the Beast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 53:57


Hosted by Nycci Nellis. On today's show: · Mary Ann Mohanraj, clinical associate professor of fiction and literature at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She recently published the first vegan Sri Lankan American cookbook, “Vegan Serendib;” · JJ Digeronimo, a two-time award-winning author who helps women raise their frequencies and empower their future impact through tried-and-tested strategies, mindfulness, and energetic practices; · David Hunter of Blugenics, which has harnessed a form of algae for human consumption in the form of supplements and other ingestible products; The leadership team from Casa Kantuta,the first Bolivian cocktail bar in the nation.

Ukraine Daily Brief
January 5, 2022: France sends tanks to Ukraine, Meta fined, and a stay at the Indian Supreme Court

Ukraine Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 12:08


The two hundred-eighth episode of the DSR Daily Brief.   Stories Cited in the Episode France to deliver ‘light tanks' to Ukraine Meta fined €390m over use of data for targeted ads India top court stays demolition of over 4,000 homes in Haldwani  China urges WHO to take 'just position' on Covid-19 after data criticism US sentences former Bolivian minister to 6 years for bribery Al-Shabaab claims twin Somalia car bombings as death toll climbs to 19 Serbian president rejects calls for sanctions against Russia Why this congressman is using Superman comic for swearing-in Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

People are Revolting
Bolivian Activists Fight Mining Industry

People are Revolting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 11:19


Bolivian Activists Fight Mining Industry https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/11/16/bolivian-activists-push-back-against-mining-industry #peoplearerevolting twitter.com/peoplerevolting Peoplearerevolting.com movingtrainradio.com

Black Girl Couch Reviews
Barry: Season 3, Episode 4 ”all the sauces”

Black Girl Couch Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 19:04


Barry: Season 3, Episode 4 "all the sauces" Desperate to solve his Bolivian problem, Noho Hank turns to Barry with a plan; Fuches returns to LA with a vengeance; Sally celebrates the premiere of her show; Gene scrambles to skip town, only to be bombarded with reasons to stay.   Scorecard:  9.6/10      Feedback : blackgirlcouch@gmail.com (audio MP4 or written) Twitter: BlackGirl_Couch   Tumblr: slowlandrogynousmiracle

Weaving the Blanket
S3 E4 The Aymara Revolution: “The Manifesto to the Nation”, the “Bolivian Thesis of Evangelism”, and growing Tensions within the IEMB

Weaving the Blanket

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 35:27


The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #107: Leitner-Poma of America President Daren Cole

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 71:10


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Nov. 23. It dropped for free subscribers on Nov. 26. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoDaren Cole, President of Leitner-Poma of AmericaRecorded onNovember 10, 2022About Leitner-Poma of AmericaHere's the website boilerplate:Leitner-Poma of America offers a complete line of cable transport systems, including surface lifts, chairlifts, gondolas, MiniMetro® urban transport, trams, inclined elevators, and industrial trams.And this, which makes me go cross-eyed:Leitner-Poma of America, Inc. is a North American subsidiary of Poma S.A., a corporation with headquarters in Voreppe, France and a sister company of Leitner AG, a corporation with headquarters in Sterzing, Italy. Leitner–Poma of America engineers, manufactures, installs and services all types of ropeway systems for the ski industry, amusement parks, and urban transport.Cole and I sort through all of this on the podcast. What you need to understand though is that Leitner-Poma is basically one half of the U.S. ski-lift industry. The company also owns Skytrac, which only builds fixed-grip lifts. The other half of the industry is Doppelmayr, though saying “half” is not exactly correct: Doppelmayr claims more market share than Leitner-Poma. Other companies also claim a handful of lift projects most years - MND is building Waterville Valley's new six-pack, for example, and Partek is building the new Sandy quad at Saddleback.Why I interviewed himThe Storm is built around a very specific ethos: that machines are good, and that we should allow them to transport us to mountaintops. I respect and admire Uphill Bro. If I lived in the mountains, perhaps I would be him. But I do not and I am not. I am a tourist. Always and everywhere. I want to arrive to an organized experience. Uphilling is too much work, too much gear, too much risk for my coddled city soul.And so I ride lifts, and I've very specifically focused this newsletter and podcast on the world of lift-served skiing. This is the disconnect between 99 percent of skiers and 99 percent of ski writers. The former live in cities and suburbs and ski Seven Springs three to eight days per year and take a weeklong trip to Park City in February. The latter live in ski towns and hunt the novel by trade, normalizing the fringe. And while I enjoy the occasional Assault Mission recap of the skin up Mount Tahoe Grizzly Ridge, I don't really care (though I do enjoy following - and highly recommend - the WFG on Twitter or simpleskiing.com).What I care about is The Machine: how is this sprawling, tangled world of lift-served skiing continuously morphing into the wintertime realms of the 21st century, in which a relatively unchanging number of ski areas must accommodate a megapass-driven increase in skiers armed with rectangular megaphones capable of instantly broadcasting #LiftFails to Planet Earth's 5 billion internet users? How will an industry still spinning a not-immaterial number of Borvig, Hall, Riblet, and Yan lifts that pre-date the invention of written language modernize without bankrupting the hundreds of family-owned ski areas that still dot the continent? How far can technology push these simple but essential machines, and how high can that technology push their pricetags? How far can ski areas tap them to suck skiers out of the base before they multiply, Midwest cityhill-style, like ants across the mountain and create something more dangerous than congested liftlines – congested, and perilous, trails?This podcast does not really answer any of those questions, though all are recurring themes within The Storm. Instead, it acts as a primer on what is essentially one half of the U.S. ski industry: what is Leitner-Poma (and how, for God's sake, do you pronounce it)? What do they build, and where and how? Why are ski areas building so many lifts all of a sudden, and why are those projects encountering so many and so varied delays, from labor shortages to supply chain knots to permitting issues to locals rocking their pitchfork-and-bag-of-rotten-tomatoes NIMBY starter kits to town meetings? Is all this construction sustainable, and can Leitner-Poma and their main competitor, Doppelmayr, adapt to this demand and streamline their processes to forestall future construction delays?Lift design, construction, and installation is a fascinating, complicated world tucked into - and a fundamental component of - the fascinating, complicated world of lift-served skiing. And it is evolving as fast as skiing itself. Here's a peek inside.What we talked aboutThe wild and unexpected travel routes of an old-school salesman for Purgatory-Durango ski resort; working for Vail Associates in the Arrowhead/pre-Summit County days; Wild West days at Crested Butte; the insane, rapid evolution of the U.S. lift industry; the days when you could order a lift in August and have it spinning by Christmas; how Covid changed the lift game; when you take over a giant company just before a global pandemic; U.S.A.!; the legacies Leitner and Poma, and why the companies merged in 2000; Grand Junction as old-school ski hub and why it's a great place for manufacturing; how the Leitner-Poma subsidiary-parent company relationship works between Europe and America; Direct Drive; U.S. America hates mass transit; “a chairlift or a gondola is essentially an electric vehicle”; what it will take to spur greater urban lift development in America; what Leitner-Poma of America (LPOA) builds in Grand Junction, and what's imported from Europe; why LPOA bought Skytrac; expansion time; why the fixed-grip lift persists in our era of bigger-faster-better; how long can America's antique lift fleet last?; what may finally push independent ski areas rocking ancient Halls and Riblets to upgrade; a record year for LPOA; the changing culture around chairlift permits; breaking down the delays in Jackson Hole's Thunder lift as a mirror for lift-installation delays around the country; why haul ropes aren't made in America, and whether they could be; “at the end of the day, I own those delays”; building a better supply chain; are two-year lift builds the future?; labor shortages and building a better place to work; examining the lifts that are on time and why; building the Palisades Tahoe Base-to-Base Gondola; the differences between building on an all-new liftline versus building a replacement lift; how LPOA, the ski area, and the ski area planner work together to decide which lifts to put where; the return of the high-speed quad; and designing a better 2023 lift-construction season.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewWe are witnessing one of the busiest lift-construction seasons in modern times: 66 new or relocated lifts are rising across North America, according to Lift Blog. Some monsters, too: new gondolas at Palisades Tahoe, Whistler, and Steamboat; eight-packs at Boyne Mountain and Sunday River; 13 high-speed six-packs. Here's an overview of the 25 (or 26, if you insist) lifts that Leitner-Poma of America and its subsidiary, fixed-grip specialists Skytrac, are building:Cole joined Leitner-Poma of America in 2014. The company built six lifts that year (Skytrac, then an independent company, built another six). Scaling up any business is challenging, but scaling up amidst a re-ordering of the global economy and geopolitical environment, and in the midst of a pandemic, is flipping the game to MAXIMUM CHALLENGE mode.The modern world is both miraculous and mysterious. Where does all this crap come from? An incomprehensible network of mines and foundries and factories and warehouses and tools and vehicles and fuel and laborers and engineers and designers transform the raw materials of planet Earth into medicine and chairs and soccer balls and televisions and Broncos and yard furniture and suitcases and Thule boxes and Hanukkah candles and plastic dinosaurs and Optimus Prime toys. And chairlifts. A book documenting that journey would be an atlas of modern life and this spinning ball it occupies. It would also expose the enormous risks and faults in this impossibly far-flung system, and how a haul rope spun out of a European factory can impact construction on a lift rising up a Wyoming mountainside.Questions I wish I'd askedCole said that LPOA had re-sourced all the materials it had been getting in China to U.S. suppliers. I should have followed up to get a clearer understanding of why the company pulled out of China, and which parts had been flowing from that country.What I got wrong* In our discussion of urban gondola networks and whether we could ever see one in the United States, I pointed to how well existing systems had worked in “South America, Central America, and Mexico.” While such networks exist throughout South America (in Colombia, Bolivia, and Venezuela), and Mexico, none yet exist in Central America, as far as I can tell. While such systems have been proposed for Panama and Honduras, the one that appears closest to approval is an 8.9-kilometer, 11-station network in Guatemala City that would be built by Doppelmayr.* I stated that only seven of New York's 51 ski areas ran high-speed chairlifts. The correct number is eight: Belleayre (1), Windham (4), Hunter (3), Gore (2), Whiteface (1), Holiday Valley (4), Bristol (2), and Holimont (1).* I pronounced the name of the company as “Lee-tner-Poma” several times throughout the interview. I actually butchered it so bad that I re-recorded Cole's introduction – during which I included the name four times – after we spoke. Sorry dudes.Podcast NotesCole, in discussing his time with what was then known as “Vail Associates,” referred to the “Arrowhead days.” This is a reference to what is now the Arrowhead section of Beaver Creek, but was for a short time in the 1980s and ‘90s a separate ski area. Here's the 1988 trailmap:The modern Beaver Creek retains some of the old trailnames on what tends to be a very empty part of the resort:Additional thoughts on urban gondolasIt took about four seconds from the invention of the chairlift for engineers to realize they could attach a little house to the overhead cable instead of a chair. Tada: the gondola. Let's go skiing.But a gondola, it turns out, is a pretty efficient means of transit just about anywhere. It just took the world a while to realize it. Since 2014, La Paz, the high-altitude (12,000 feet!) Bolivian capital city, has built a massive gondola network stringing together its far-flung districts:While Mi Teleférico – as the system is known – was not the world's first urban gondola system, it is the first to consist solely of cable cars – other systems complement trains or buses. It is also the longest and most extensive. And it is getting longer – at full buildout, the system could consist of 11 lines and 30 stations. The only thing more astonishing than the speed with which this network has materialized is how incredibly inexpensive it has been to build: gondolaproject.com puts the total cost of the 11-line network at around $1.4 billion. For comparison's sake, New York City's three-station expansion of the Q subway line, which opened in 2017, ran $4.5 billion.Gondolas are relatively cheap, efficient, environmentally friendly, and insanely easy to build compared to new roads or rails. Which of course means U.S. Americans are terrified of them. It's true that the nation, as a whole, is allergic to mass transit, preferring to tool around in 18-wheel-drive F-950s. Fighting anything new is the U.S. American way (where were these NIMBYs when we were punching interstate highways through city centers in the 1950s?). But generations raised in the backs of minivans seem especially horrified by gondolas. The hysteria around the proposed Little Cottonwoods gondola – which would substantially mitigate atrocious powder-day and weekend traffic on a road that probably never should have been built to begin with – is indicative of U.S. American reaction toward non-ski gondolas in general. Everywhere such systems – or even simple, two-station lines – are proposed, they meet instant and widespread resistance.There are practical reasons why the U.S. has not yet developed an urban gondola network: most of our cities are too sprawling to tie together with anything other than surface transportation (i.e. buses). La Paz, the Bolivian model city cited above, is hilly and tight, laced with narrow webs of centuries-old roads that would be difficult to widen. But there are places such systems would make sense, either as standalone networks or as complements to existing train-and-bus lines: Chicago, Portland (Oregon), New York City, many college towns. A forthcoming gondola connecting a Paris suburb to the city's metro, soaring over a “hellish carscape” of highways, demonstrates the potential here.Any such proposal in U.S. America, however, will have to overcome the reflexive opposition that will attend it. In Utah, Little Cottonwood gondola proponents are fighting a basket of idiotic arguments ranging from aesthetic concerns over the height of the towers (as though a car-choked paved road is not atrocious) to indignance over taxpayer funding for the machine (as though tax dollars don't build roads) to warped arguments that mass transit is somehow elitist (instead insisting that we all need personal vehicles equipped with $1,000 sets of winter tires). It's all a little pathetic. And that's for a simple, three-station line way up in the mountains. Just wait until some Portland resident launches a Save Our Cats campaign because a rider in a passing gondola car might glimpse Fluffy pissing in her litterbox.I'm cynical, but Cole, fortunately, is far more optimistic and diplomatic, suggesting that it will really only take one successful instance of a non-ski, non-tourist-attraction gondola for the notion to take hold in America. I hope he's right.The Storm explores the world of lift-served skiing year round. Join us.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 126/100 in 2022, and number 372 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane, which, given the Little Cottonwood take above, I fully expect). You can also email skiing@substack.com. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

How The West Was F****d
Butch Cassidy Pt.2

How The West Was F****d

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 65:14


Butch & Sundance try to go straight, but they just keep getting pulled back in. It wasn't the whole Bolivian army that did 'em in, just 4 of 'em. Get out a pencil and paper and let's figure out our suicide pact! T-Shirts by How the West was Fucked Podcast | TeePublic #howthewestwasfucked #htwwf #americanhistory #oldwest #wildwest #butchcassidy #sundancekid #ettaplace #hairyplace

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Global demand for lithium is changing Chile's Atacama Desert

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022


In the salty waters beneath the world's driest desert, lie vast reserves of a valuable mineral: lithium.  This metal is crucial for the planet's energy transition. It is used to power electric vehicles and store solar and wind energy, which bring some hope to a world faced with a rapidly changing climate.The lithium mines, which occupy more than 30 square miles of Chile's Atacama Desert, are operated by two private companies, Sociedad Química y Minera de Chile (SQM) and Albemarle. They both have rental contracts with the Chilean government.In these facilities, salty ground water rich in minerals gets pumped to the surface. The liquid, called brine, is then stored in huge evaporation ponds that are exposed to the desert heat.“During [a span of] 18 months, the water in the brine evaporates, and [the] lithium becomes more concentrated,” said Oswaldo Yáñez, SQM's manager of innovation and development. This region has some of the highest solar radiation levels on Earth, and it almost never rains. “The water evaporates incredibly fast here,” Yáñez added.The process ends at a closed plant, where lithium is turned into carbonate and shipped abroad, to places like China or the US.In the past 10 years, the global demand for lithium has skyrocketed. And the increase in production of electric vehicles is expected to raise this demand by at least 300% in the next 10 years.This is good news for Chile's economy. The South American country meets about a third of the globe's lithium demands, and plans to boost lithium production in the next few years.Close to 60% of the world's 86 million tons of identified lithium resources are in Bolivia, Chile and Argentina, according to the US Geological Survey, in an area known as the “Lithium Triangle.” Indigenous people in Chile are concerned that the amount of water used in lithium operations is threatening desert irrigation and farming methods they have relied on for centuries. Credit: Tibisay Zea/The World While Chile has successfully transformed the majority of its available resources into reserves available for commercial production, Argentina and Bolivia have not yet done so. This is largely because of unfavorable investment climates and more challenging geographic conditions, according to Juan Carlos Zuleta, a Bolivian researcher who has been following the lithium business for decades.“This metal will soon be a game changer for this region's economy,” Zuleta said.But for him, the real opportunity is not in extracting and selling lithium. He is researching a possible association between six countries in South America to fabricate and sell lithium batteries and electric vehicles, which the country now imports from abroad.“My idea is basically to create a hub of electric vehicles in South America for the regional market,” Zuleta said. “If we are able to produce the next generation of EVs [electric vehicles] in South America, then we could become a superpower.”Lithium will be crucial in the transition to clean energy, but the extraction method used in the Lithium Triangle presents several environmental problems, according to James Blair, an anthropologist at Cal Poly Pomona, who has done research on lithium mining's impact on Atacama's Indigenous communities.“The main concern is its impact on water use and water availability,” Blair said.“When a large percentage of the water from the brine evaporates, yes, this is exacerbating what is already a major problem of depleted water in one of the driest areas of the world.” Indigenous peoples also worry that the amount of water used in lithium operations threatens desert irrigation and farming methods they have relied on for centuries.Rudencindo Espíndola, an Indigenous topographer in this area, and an activist with the National Observatory of Salt Flats in Chile, said there is a conflict over the way that the industry has presented impacts as benign versus what the Indigenous communities experience.“Brine should be treated as water. ... It's part of our hydrogeological ecosystem and it has a lot of ancestral value for us, so it's worth preserving.”Rudencindo Espíndola, Indigenous topographer“Brine should be treated as water,” Espíndola said. “It's part of our hydrogeological ecosystem and it has a lot of ancestral value for us, so it's worth preserving.”He acknowledged that green energies that demand lithium are good for humanity, “but the price to produce them will be paid by Chile's environment.”Lithium mining is not the only industry that uses groundwater from the Atacama salt flat. Two other companies also mine copper in the region.“Any mining has an impact,” Espíndola said. “The question is, how much impact is acceptable?”Blair said there needs to be more independent research on local biodiversity, water flows and local communities' concerns to find out how to reduce damage. Chile's Atacama desert is one of the driest areas in the world. Credit: Tibisay Zea/The World A recent study linked lithium operations with a decrease in the number of flamingos in the Atacama salt flat.Oswaldo Yáñez, a manager at the SQM mine, said the company is already working on improvements regarding water utilization. “The idea is to extract lithium directly from the brine, without having to evaporate groundwater,” Yáñez said. He added that it will take at least five years to research, develop and implement this method.In the meantime, he said, the tradeoff is worth it, in the name of a greener future.As global demand for lithium keeps rising, anthropologist Blair points out that governments and consumers should do their part, too, “by encouraging battery recycling, and really just reducing car dependency, which is especially a problem in the United States.”There are about 16 million electric cars on the roads around the world now, which is three times more than in 2018. And by 2030, that number is estimated to reach around 350 million.Related: Chileans have long struggled with a water crisis. Management practices are partly to blame, study says.

How The West Was F****d
Butch Cassidy Pt.1

How The West Was F****d

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 68:55


Butch was as charming as salad man Paul Newman made him out to be. But was he killed by the whole Bolivian army? No, he retired in Spokane, wore a MAGA hat and yelled at kids to get off his lawn. #howthewestwasfucked #htwwf #americanhistory #oldwest #wildwest #butchcassidy #holeinthewallgang #roobersroost #wyominghistory #mcrib

The Cultural Frontline
How can art help tackle climate change?

The Cultural Frontline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 27:38


Some of the world's most famous paintings have become the central focus of the global debate on climate action. Climate activists have thrown tomato soup on Vincent van Gogh's “Sunflowers” and mashed potatoes at Monet's famous “Haystacks”. Tina Daheley speaks to Nigerian climate activist Gloria Kasang Bulus and British art critic Louisa Buck about the role that the art world can play addressing climate change. Bolivian director, Alejandro Loayza Grisi talks to Beatriz de la Pava about his new film Utama. He explains how making the film, which reflects the real life experiences of Bolivian communities facing drought and crop failure caused by a changing climate, transformed the way he saw his country. Indonesia is a nation made up of over seventeen thousand islands making it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels and extreme weather conditions. The musician Rara Sekar reflects on her relationship with nature in her country and her feelings of eco-grief in sound and in song. (Photo: Climate activists staging a protest. Credit: Just Stop Oil/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Just Trek Podcast
#55 | Escaping Corporate Life to Living the Organic Farm Life, Solo World Traveling through South America, Celebrating 5 Years of LA Trail Killers, and Exploring Machu Picchu with Victor Martinez

Just Trek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 128:49


On this episode I have LA based trekker, peak bagger, outdoor adventurer, solo world traveler, Korea Town Run Club member, mindfulness advocate, community leader, and founder of the LA Trail Killers, Victor Martinez, join me on the show for the second time (he last appeared as our EP 37 guest on the show). We chat about him quitting the corporate life and solo world traveling through South America, celebrating the 5 year anniversary of LA Trail Killers in the Angeles National Forest, his top outdoor adventures on his international travels, working on an organic farm in Peru, tips & advice for solo travelers, exploring a desert oasis, the Bolivian salt flats, major takeaways he learned from his travels, becoming an official ambassador for Highlander USA, and the one place from his travels he wish he could teleport back to. Vic's solo world adventures have been a massive inspiration to his community back in Los Angeles - he is the definition of locally respected and worldwide connected. Follow Victor Martinez and LA Trail Killers on https://www.instagram.com/vic_of_earth/ and https://www.instagram.com/latrailkillers/ Support Just Trek on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/justtrek Shop Just Trek merch on https://www.justtrek.net/shop Listen to more podcast episodes on https://www.justtrek.net Want to send me a message? Email me at justtrekofficial@gmail.com or DM on Instagram @just.trek --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/justtrek/message

The Katie Halper Show
How Lula Won Brazil's Election With Mariana Simões & Ollie Vargas

The Katie Halper Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 60:11


Brazilian journalist Mariana Simões and Bolivian journalist Ollie Vargas talk about Brazil's elections. Mariana covers how and why Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (AKA Lula) defeated Right Wing Authoritarian President Jair Bolsonaro. Ollie will talk about what this mean for Latin America and the role played by the U.S. and The West. Mariana Simões is a journalist at Brazil's "Publica" website. She's also worked as a reporter for The New York Times, The Economist, Al Jazeera, Vice, Hyperallergic e outros. Ollie Vargas is co-founder of @KawsachunNews and the host of the Latin America Review podcast. He is based in Bolivia. ***Please support The Katie Halper Show *** For bonus content, to support independent media and to help make this program possible, please join us on Patreon at - https://www.patreon.com/thekatiehalpershow Follow Katie on Twitter: https://twitter.com/kthalps

New Books in Latin American Studies
Sarah T. Hines, "Water for All: Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 52:51


Sarah T. Hines's Water for All Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia (University of California Press, 2021) chronicles how Bolivians democratized water access, focusing on the Cochabamba region, the country's third largest city and most important agricultural valley. Covering the period from 1879 to 2019, Hines examines the conflict over control of the region's water sources, showing how communities of water users increased supply and extended distribution through collective labor and social struggle. Through analysis of a wide variety of sources from agrarian reform case records to oral history interviews, Hines investigates how water dispossession in the late nineteenth century and reclaimed water access in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries prompted, shaped, and strengthened popular and indigenous social movements. The struggle for democratic control over water culminated in the successful Water War uprising in 2000, a decisive turning point for Bolivian politics. This story offers lessons in contemporary resource management and grassroots movements for how humans can build equitable, democratic, and sustainable resource systems in the Andes, Latin America, and beyond. Water for All is essential reading for Andeanists and scholars of social and environmental movements in the Americas. Elena McGrath is an Assistant Professor of History at Union College Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in History
Sarah T. Hines, "Water for All: Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 52:51


Sarah T. Hines's Water for All Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia (University of California Press, 2021) chronicles how Bolivians democratized water access, focusing on the Cochabamba region, the country's third largest city and most important agricultural valley. Covering the period from 1879 to 2019, Hines examines the conflict over control of the region's water sources, showing how communities of water users increased supply and extended distribution through collective labor and social struggle. Through analysis of a wide variety of sources from agrarian reform case records to oral history interviews, Hines investigates how water dispossession in the late nineteenth century and reclaimed water access in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries prompted, shaped, and strengthened popular and indigenous social movements. The struggle for democratic control over water culminated in the successful Water War uprising in 2000, a decisive turning point for Bolivian politics. This story offers lessons in contemporary resource management and grassroots movements for how humans can build equitable, democratic, and sustainable resource systems in the Andes, Latin America, and beyond. Water for All is essential reading for Andeanists and scholars of social and environmental movements in the Americas. Elena McGrath is an Assistant Professor of History at Union College Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Economic and Business History
Sarah T. Hines, "Water for All: Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 52:51


Sarah T. Hines's Water for All Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia (University of California Press, 2021) chronicles how Bolivians democratized water access, focusing on the Cochabamba region, the country's third largest city and most important agricultural valley. Covering the period from 1879 to 2019, Hines examines the conflict over control of the region's water sources, showing how communities of water users increased supply and extended distribution through collective labor and social struggle. Through analysis of a wide variety of sources from agrarian reform case records to oral history interviews, Hines investigates how water dispossession in the late nineteenth century and reclaimed water access in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries prompted, shaped, and strengthened popular and indigenous social movements. The struggle for democratic control over water culminated in the successful Water War uprising in 2000, a decisive turning point for Bolivian politics. This story offers lessons in contemporary resource management and grassroots movements for how humans can build equitable, democratic, and sustainable resource systems in the Andes, Latin America, and beyond. Water for All is essential reading for Andeanists and scholars of social and environmental movements in the Americas. Elena McGrath is an Assistant Professor of History at Union College Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Environmental Studies
Sarah T. Hines, "Water for All: Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 52:51


Sarah T. Hines's Water for All Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia (University of California Press, 2021) chronicles how Bolivians democratized water access, focusing on the Cochabamba region, the country's third largest city and most important agricultural valley. Covering the period from 1879 to 2019, Hines examines the conflict over control of the region's water sources, showing how communities of water users increased supply and extended distribution through collective labor and social struggle. Through analysis of a wide variety of sources from agrarian reform case records to oral history interviews, Hines investigates how water dispossession in the late nineteenth century and reclaimed water access in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries prompted, shaped, and strengthened popular and indigenous social movements. The struggle for democratic control over water culminated in the successful Water War uprising in 2000, a decisive turning point for Bolivian politics. This story offers lessons in contemporary resource management and grassroots movements for how humans can build equitable, democratic, and sustainable resource systems in the Andes, Latin America, and beyond. Water for All is essential reading for Andeanists and scholars of social and environmental movements in the Americas. Elena McGrath is an Assistant Professor of History at Union College Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books Network
Sarah T. Hines, "Water for All: Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 52:51


Sarah T. Hines's Water for All Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia (University of California Press, 2021) chronicles how Bolivians democratized water access, focusing on the Cochabamba region, the country's third largest city and most important agricultural valley. Covering the period from 1879 to 2019, Hines examines the conflict over control of the region's water sources, showing how communities of water users increased supply and extended distribution through collective labor and social struggle. Through analysis of a wide variety of sources from agrarian reform case records to oral history interviews, Hines investigates how water dispossession in the late nineteenth century and reclaimed water access in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries prompted, shaped, and strengthened popular and indigenous social movements. The struggle for democratic control over water culminated in the successful Water War uprising in 2000, a decisive turning point for Bolivian politics. This story offers lessons in contemporary resource management and grassroots movements for how humans can build equitable, democratic, and sustainable resource systems in the Andes, Latin America, and beyond. Water for All is essential reading for Andeanists and scholars of social and environmental movements in the Americas. Elena McGrath is an Assistant Professor of History at Union College Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

ZLORD
Reflections of the Mysterious and Surprising of Bolivian Travels

ZLORD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 34:47


KUCI: Film School
UTAMA / Film School radio interview with Director Alejandro Loayzo Grisi

KUCI: Film School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022


UTAMA takes us to an arid Bolivian highlands where an elderly Quechua couple, Virginio and Sisa, have been living a tranquil life for years. While Virginio takes their small herd of llamas out to graze, Sisa keeps house and walks for miles with the other local women to fetch precious water. When an uncommonly long drought threatens everything they know, the couple must decide whether to stay and maintain their traditional way of life or admit defeat and move in with family members in the city. Virginio and Sisa's dilemma is precipitated by the arrival of their grandson Clever, who comes to visit with news. The three of them must face, each in their own way, the effects of a changing environment, the importance of tradition, and the meaning of life itself. This visually jaw-dropping debut feature by photographer-turned-filmmaker Alejandro Loayza Grisi is lensed by award-winning cinematographer Barbara Alvarez (Lucretia Martel's The Headless Woman) and won the Grand Jury Prize (World Cinema Dramatic) at the Sundance Film Festival. Director Alejandro Loayza Grisi joins us to talk about identifying the non-professional actors to play Virginio and Sisa, working with the indigenous villagers and the striking right balance of look, pace and tone for this stark personal tale that also addresses the direct impact that the looming climate catastrophe will have on the poorest people on the planet. For more info and screenings go to: kinomarquee.com/UTAMA Watch in LA area starting Nov. 11: laemmle.com/film/utama UTAMA won the Grand Jury Prize in World Cinema Competition at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival

Factal Forecast
Bolivian strike turns deadly as protests grip economic hub Santa Cruz

Factal Forecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 13:21 Transcription Available


Editors Jimmy Lovaas and Jaime Calle Moreno discuss the strike gripping Bolivia's agricultural export hub Santa Cruz, plus more on Elon Musk's pending Twitter deal, a presidential runoff election in Brazil, Israel's general election and Russia's Unity Day.Subscribe to the show: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts and many more. These stories and others are also available in our free weekly Forecast newsletter.This episode was produced with work from Factal editors Jeff Landset, Jess Fino, Agnese Boffano, Alex Moore and Jaime Calle Moreno.  Music courtesy of Andrew Gospe. Have feedback, suggestions or events we've missed? Drop us a note: hello@factal.comWhat's Factal? Created by the founders of Breaking News, Factal alerts companies to global incidents that pose an immediate risk to their people or business operations. We provide trusted verification, precise incident mapping and a collaboration platform for corporate security, travel safety and emergency management teams. If you're a company interested in a trial, please email sales@factal.com. To learn more, visit Factal.com, browse the Factal blog or email us at hello@factal.com.Read the full episode description and transcript on Factal's blog.Copyright © 2022 Factal. All rights reserved.

Military Historians are People, Too! A Podcast with Brian & Bill
S2E15 Elizabeth Shesko - Oakland University

Military Historians are People, Too! A Podcast with Brian & Bill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 59:22


Our guest today is the enthusiastic Dr. Elizabeth Shesko, who is an Associate Professor of History at Oakland University in Oakland County, Michigan. Liz specializes in Latin American History with a special interest in military service and conscription in Bolivia. She received her AB in Spanish and English at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, and went on to earn a PhD in History from Duke University. After completing her PhD, Liz was a postdoctoral research associate and Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in History and Latin American Studies at Bowdoin College and also taught at an American School in Guatemala. Her first book, Conscript Nation: Coercion and Consent in the Bolivian Barracks, was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Her work has also appeared in edited volumes as well as the Hispanic American Historical Review and International Labor and Working-Class History. Liz has held numerous Foreign Language and Areas Studies (FLAS) Grants for Spanish, Portuguese, and Aymara. She is a frequent presenter at the meetings of the Latin American Studies Association, and the American Historical Association, among many others. Join us for a fascinating chat with our first Latin Americanist! Liz discusses language, working in Bolivian archives, the Chaco War, eating guinea pig, the faux pas question of Butch Cassidy's whereabouts (thanks for that, Bill!), and the future of Post-Coach K Duke basketball! And just for Liz - a shout-out to Woodpile BBQ Shack in Clawson, Michigan! Rec.: 09/02/2022

HistoryPod
9th October 1967: Execution of Marxist revolutionary icon Ernesto ‘Che' Guevara in Bolivia

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022


Guevara was shot nine times in a way designed to make the injuries look like they had been caused during a battle with the Bolivian ...

Adventure Deficit
Lead From The Front - Bill Dragoo

Adventure Deficit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 83:44


If you know Adventure Motorcycling, you've likely come across the name Bill Dragoo. Bill's an adventure journalist who specializes in riding big bikes off-road, and instructing others in how to do the same. He recounts a life-lesson from leading a group through the Bolivian jungle. Inky darkness, a wooden bridge, and a harrowing fall. It's sure to capture your attention and inspire more. When it comes to storytelling, Bill's as good as they come! Saddle up and ride! #TakeYourMedicine!

Un Poquito Podcast
Jordans and a Chain feat Martin Amini

Un Poquito Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 83:05


We talk to the comedian Martin Amini about the differences betwen the East and West Coasts, being the new face of Bolivian comedy and he helps Dominic be cool.    Martin Amini: http://martinamini.com/                         https://www.tiktok.com/@themartinamini? Join our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/unpoquitopod Join our Discord: https://discord.gg/uF99HWQK Follow Us: Rian Reyes https://linktr.ee/RianReyes Dominic Angel https://linktr.ee/Domsiethebomsie Un Poquito Podcast https://linktr.ee/unpoquitopod Legacy Teas and Spices: https://legacyteasandspices.com/t/shop-teas?page=2 code: UP20 Theme music by: Piano Blac https://www.instagram.com/piano_blac/?hl=en

Dustin, The Wind.
101. Bolivian Backpacker Series Episode 7- THE END

Dustin, The Wind.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 151:55


Welcome to the final episode of the Bolivian Backpacker Series!! After 4 long months we have arrived at last to the end of the Bolivian journey. Thanks to all who have listened all the way through. I had no idea what I was doing when I started this project, but now with all 7 episodes behind us and the work done to get here the point of the project has revealed itself. My apologies for the endless slogging accounting detail!! I will now turn my attention to crafting this story into a book by creating a chapter by chapter structure with theme and conflict and move it along at least twice the pace of this first draft. In this episode I recount the final 3 weeks of my time in Bolivia- a weeklong stay in Caranavi- the coffee capital of Bolivia, quick pit stop in La Paz, a serediptious discovery in the Andes mountain village of Sorata, a couple days of peace on Isla del Sol, and a frustrating goodbye to good ol Bolivia! Enjoy!!

Chuck Shute Podcast
Tim "Ripper" Owens (ex Judas Priest) & Tom Collier (Held Hostage)

Chuck Shute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 30:41 Transcription Available


Tim “Ripper” Owens is the former singer for Judas Priest who now sings for KK's Priest, The Three Tremors and his own solo career. Tom Collier is the guitarist and singer for the band Held Hostage. The band has a new album out now with guest vocals from Tim. In this episode we discuss the new album, Covid boosters, Bolivian cocaine, mental health and more! I haven't laughed this hard on a podcast in a while! 00:00 - Intro00:56 - Tom's Story 01:20 - Tom Meeting Tim & Shows 03:15 - KK's Priest 04:43 - Held Hostage New Album07:30 - New Songs & Production  on the Album 10:35 - New Song "Be a Man" & Manning Up 13:02 - New Song "Rise" and Suicide 15:55 - Raising Money and Songs About Veterans 17:58 - Joe Lynn Turner 18:33 - Tim's Sense of Humor 19:33 - Covid Vaccine Boosters & Testing 22:02 - Bolivian Cocaine 24:10 - Meet & Greets 25:23 - Seattle Cover Band & Chris Cornell 26:50 - Other Projects for Tim & Solo Career 29:24 - Mental Health Charity 29:55 - Outro Held Hostage website:https://www.heldhostageband.com/Tim "Ripper" Owens website:https://timripperowens.comMental Health Charity website:https://www.nami.org/HomeChuck Shute website:http://chuckshute.comSupport the show

Dustin, The Wind.
100. Bolivia Backpacker Series Episode 6: ONCA II- jaguars, fever dreams, and emergency rooms

Dustin, The Wind.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 200:15


100 episodes of Dustin, The Wind! I'm super excited that this episode and these stories landed this week for episode 100. My time spent at ONCA in the Bolivian amazon was a special experience and a joy to write about and share with you. I hope you enjoy. Part 2 of living and working at ONCA in the Bolivian Amazon. This episode has more stories with capuchin monkeys and we are introduced to Kali, the jaguar. I share the story of how I ended up in a crusty Bolivian emergency room, dengue virus, life at camp in the rainforest, and finally say goodbye to the monkeys, the jaguars, and the people of ONCA.

Duolingo Spanish Podcast
Climate Heroes - Protecting Bears in Bolivia

Duolingo Spanish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 19:23 Very Popular


A Bolivian scientist sets out to study a species of bears critically endangered by drought and loss of habitat. Along the way, she shows the local community how helping the bears can protect their livelihood and the forest against climate change. A transcript of this episode is available at podcast.duolingo.com.

All Fantasy Everything
Chases (w/ Brent Gill, Geoffrey Tice, David Gborie)

All Fantasy Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 90:11


We're all just chasing the weekend anyway so figured we'd start ya off right. Make sure you stay close! The GVG goes fast! The Bolivian government had no comment on Ian's whereabouts. Guests:    Brent Gill: @iambrentgill IG: @iambrentgill Geoffrey Tice: @geoffreytice IG: @geoffreytice Podcast: Grid Penalty: A Formula 1 Podcast Support the show! Join the All Fantasy Everything Patreon for ad-free episodes, mailbags, and video pre-rolls. Check it all out at www.patreon.com/AllFantasy.  Follow the Good Vibes Gang on social media: Ian Karmel @IanKarmel IG: @IanKarmel Sean Jordan @SeanSJordan IG: @SeancougarmelonJordan David Gborie IG: @Coolguyjokes87 Mars Mel@MarsMel IG: @Mars.Mel Show Email: allfantasypodcast@gmail.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.