Podcasts about Central Command

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Best podcasts about Central Command

Latest podcast episodes about Central Command

The Critical Hour
Trump Sues Twitter for Reinstatement; Pandora Papers Expose Corruption

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 117:40


Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss the Pandora Papers. A trove of 11.9 million documents containing financial information on some of the world's richest and most powerful people has been released by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. The documents have already created embarrassing situations for powerful politicians in Ukraine and England.Dr. Yolandra Hancock, board-certified pediatrician and obesity medicine specialist, joins us to discuss covid. Drugmaker Merck is about to release a powerful new antiviral medicine that is believed to be a breakthrough tactic for addressing the covid pandemic. Also, the winter approaches and observers expect the delta variant to begin spreading rapidly soon.Daniel McAdams, executive director of the Ron Paul Institute, joins us to discuss censorship. The Ron Paul Institute for Peace and Prosperity temporarily lost their YouTube channel last week and no reasonable excuse was given by YouTube. Also, former President Donald Trump has filed papers in a Florida court arguing that Twitter acted on behalf of Democrat operatives in removing his personal account.John Burris, civil rights attorney, joins us to discuss the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS). The conservative SCOTUS is scheduled to make major decisions regarding issues that have both political and social ramifications. The major cases on the SCOTUS docket will address gun control, abortion, religious liberty, national security, and capital punishment, among other issues.George Koo, journalist, social activist, international business consultant, and chemical engineer, joins us to discuss China. China has shocked the US military planners with its aggressive response to the Taiwan threat. China has begun regularly flying warplanes in and around Taiwan, and has stated that they will be prepared to attack whenever the order is given. Also, they have admonished the EU to "mind their own business" regarding China's internal affairs.John Kiriakou, journalist, author and host of The Back Story, joins us to discuss a Common Dreams article on torture. The article addresses the issue of torture. Guantanamo Bay is discussed, but the article also speaks of another little-known remote torture site in Poland. Leo Flores, Latin America coordinator for Code Pink, joins us to discuss the Global South. An interesting war of words is taking place between Venezuelan President Nicholas Maduro and the former prime minister of Spain, José María Aznar. Maduro has recently argued that Spain should apologize for its colonial rampage of genocide and slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean, while Aznar simply laughs off the demands for acknowledgment of the evil deeds.Scott Ritter, former UN weapon inspector in Iraq, joins us to discuss Centcom. In his latest Responsible Statecraft article, Andrew Bacevich argues that the very existence of the Central Command and its 10 sister command centers is a horrible mistake for the US empire and the world. Bacevich goes on to point out that regional stability has decreased since the development of the command system.

Post Reports
Can military leaders answer for Afghanistan?

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 18:32


This week in Congress, top military officials are testifying on what went wrong in the U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan. Will anyone in the government be held accountable? Read more:Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and U.S. Central Command chief Gen. Kenneth F. McKenzie are on Capitol Hill testifying in front of the Senate and House Armed Services committees on the fall of Kabul and the disastrous U.S. exit from Afghanistan. As lawmakers press for answers, Alex Horton reports on whether this hearing will result in accountability for the years of government missteps in handling the end of America's longest war.

Daily Signal News
Teacher Fired for Using ‘Wrong' Pronoun for Student Discusses Ongoing Legal Case

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 29:19


Can you be forced to use language you fundamentally disagree with? Many schools across the country are instituting policies to do just that, compelling teachers to use transgender students' "preferred” pronouns even if it violates their beliefs.Peter Vlaming, a former high school French teacher in West Point, Virginia, who was fired from his job for refusing to refer to a biological girl using male pronouns, is suing his old school board for violating his rights. He filed his suit two years ago this week.Vlaming says he isn't doing that out of spite or some vendetta, but rather to protect everyone's free speech rights."I'm trying to protect their freedoms as much as my freedoms—the freedom of conscience, the freedom of speech, the freedom to hold your own convictions," he says.Vlaming and his attorney, Caleb Dalton from Alliance Defending Freedom, join "The Daily Signal Podcast" to talk about the case and the implications of anti-free speech policies.We also cover these stories:Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Gen. Kenneth McKenzie Jr., head of U.S. Central Command, testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee about the hasty withdrawal from Afghanistan. Milley also addresses phone calls he made to Chinese military officials during the last few weeks of former President Donald Trump's administration.Vice President Kamala Harris calls for national voting standards.Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen issues a warning that congressional leaders have until Oct. 18 to raise or suspend the debt ceiling, or else risk defaulting on the U.S. national debt. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Milley, military leaders contradict Biden on support for complete Afghanistan withdrawal

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 5:36


The end of America's 20-year war in Afghanistan was a "strategic failure," according to the assessment of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley. Milley, Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and Gen. Frank McKenzie, who runs U.S. Central Command, all appeared before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday to discuss the withdrawal. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Louisiana Now
Answering God's Call: A Conversation with Bill Howell

Louisiana Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 22:55


In this episode of Louisiana NOW, we visit with Bill Howell, recently hired as the new Director of the Office of Missional Engagement and Outreach. This office manages the Conference's disaster response ministry. Howell, a certified lay minister from Jacksonville, Florida, has extensive missions and emergency response training. His background ranges from mission training with Global Ministries to vision research at Florida State University as a published researcher to active duty service in the United States Air Force and reserve duty at the U.S. Central Command as an intelligence officer.    If you would like to help the relief efforts in Louisiana, please visit www.la-umc.org/relief or text RELIEF to 800-500-5858.    If you would like to call the Louisiana NOW podcast, please call (504) 507-1542. Folks from all over the country have been calling the hotline to leave us a message of hope. 

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
Liberals Still Obsessed with Rush & Path to 9/11

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 11:36


RUSH: This next story — I'm sure you've seen this, heard about it. This is the kind of thing that infuriates me, and I have to tell you, when I watched The Path to 9/11. (By the way, we're going back to audio sound bites three and four next, Ed.) When I saw all of the hesitation and all the rules and all the regulations that prevented us from taking out Bin Laden or other terrorists, my blood boiled, and now there's this story in the New York Post today. Taliban — and there's a picture of it. “Taliban terror leaders who had gathered for a funeral – and were secretly being watched by an eye-in-the-sky American drone – dodged assassination because U.S. rules of engagement bar attacks in cemeteries, according to a shocking report.  “U.S. intelligence officers in Afghanistan are still fuming about the recent lost opportunity for an easy kill of Taliban honchos packed in tight formation for the burial…” NBC had the pictures. It looked like there might have been a hundred and ninety of them there! “The unmanned airplane, circling undetected high overhead, fed a continuous satellite feed of the juicy target to officers on the ground. ‘We were so excited. I came rushing in with the picture,' one U.S. Army officer told NBC. But that excitement quickly turned to gut-wrenching frustration because the rules of engagement on the ground in Afghanistan blocked the U.S. from mounting a missile or bomb strike in a cemetery, according to the report. Pentagon officials declined comment and referred The Post to Central Command officers in Afghanistan, who did not respond to a request for comment or explanation,” by press time.  https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2006/09/13/liberals_still_obsessed_with_rush_path_to_9_11/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Congressional Dish
CD238: Losing Afghanistan

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 97:18


The war in Afghanistan is over. In this episode, we document how and why the Biden administration finally admitted defeat in our 20 year attempt to create a new government in Afghanistan and we take a hard look at the lessons we need to learn. Afghanistan is a country in a far away land, but there are disturbing similarities between the Afghanistan government that just collapsed and our own. We'd be wise not to ignore them. Executive Producer: Rachel Passer Executive Producer: Anonymous  Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD218: Minerals are the New Oil CD210: The Afghanistan War CD124: The Costs of For-Profit War How We Got Here Craig Whitlock. The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War. Simon and Schuster, 2021. Patrick Tucker. August 18, 2021. “Trump's Pledge to Exit Afghanistan Was a Ruse, His Final SecDef Says.” Defense One. Eugene Kiely and Robert Farley. August 17, 2021. “Timeline of U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan.” FactCheck.org. Eric Schmitt and Jennifer Steinhauer. July 30, 2021. “Afghan Visa Applicants Arrive in U.S. After Years of Waiting.” The New York Times. Craig Whitlock, Leslie Shapiro and Armand Emamdjomeh. December 9, 2019. “The Afghanistan Papers: A secret history of the war.” The Washington Post. Mark Landler and James Risen. July 25, 2017. “Trump Finds Reason for the U.S. to Remain in Afghanistan: Minerals.” The New York Times. John F. Harris. October 15, 2001. “Bush Rejects Taliban Offer On Bin Laden ” Washington Post. The Evacuation: Those Left Behind William Mauldin. September 2, 2021. “Afghanistan Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Staff Left Behind.” Wall Street Journal. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Annie Karni. August 29, 2021. “Series of U.S. Actions Left Afghan Allies Frantic, Stranded and Eager to Get Out.” The York Times. Sami Sadat. August 25, 2021. “I Commanded Afghan Troops This Year. We Were Betrayed.” The New York Times. Marjorie Censer. August 18, 2021. “US contractors rush to get former employees out of Afghanistan.” Defense News. Siobhan Hughes. August 18, 2021. “Afghanistan Veterans in Congress Trying to Prevent ‘a Death Warrant' for Helping America.” Wall Street Journal. Alex Sanz and Tammy Webber. August 18, 2021. “US friends try to rescue brother in arms in Afghanistan.” AP News. Seth Moulton. June 04, 2021. "Moulton, Bipartisan Honoring Our Promises Working Group to White House: Evacuate our Afghan Partners.” Contractors in Afghanistan Matt Taibbi. August 18, 2021. “We Failed Afghanistan, Not the Other Way Around.” TK News by Matt Taibbi on Substack. Jack Detsch. August 16, 2021. “Departure of Private Contractors Was a Turning Point in Afghan Military's Collapse.” Foreign Policy. Matt Stoller. July 15, 2021. “‘A Real S*** Show': Soldiers Angrily Speak Out about Being Blocked from Repairing Equipment by Contractors.” BIG by Matt Stoller. Lynzy Billing. May 12, 2021. “The U.S. Is Leaving Afghanistan? Tell That to the Contractors.” New York Magazine. Oren Liebermann. March 29, 2021. “Pentagon could open itself to costly litigation from contractors if US pulls out of Afghanistan this year.” CNN. Lucas Kunce and Elle Ekman. September 15, 2019. “Comment Submitted by Major Lucas Kunce and Captain Elle Ekman.” [Regulations.gov(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulations.gov). Aaron Mehta. Oct 25, 2016. “30 Years: William Perry — Reshaping the Industry.” Defense News. Jared Serbu. August 22, 2016. “DoD now awarding more than half its contract spending without competitive bids.” Federal News Network. 41 U.S. Code § 3307 - Preference for commercial products and commercial services. Money: Lost and Gained David Moore. August 23, 2021. “Lawmakers Benefit From Booming Defense Stocks.” Sludge. Lee Fang. August 20, 2021. “Congressman Seeking to Relaunch Afghan War Made Millions in Defense Contracting.” The Intercept. Anna Massoglia and Julia Forrest. August 20, 2021. “Defense contractors spent big in Afghanistan before the U.S. left and the Taliban took control.” OpenSecrets.org. Stephen Losey. April 16, 2021. “The Bill for the Afghanistan War Is $2.26 Trillion, and Still Rising.” Military.com. Eli Clifton. February 16, 2021. “Weapons Biz Bankrolls Experts Pushing to Keep U.S. Troops in Afghanistan.” Daily Beast. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Lobbying, 2021. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Money to Congress. Laws S.1790 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 Sponsor: Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK) Status: Became Public Law No: 116-92 on December 20, 2019 H.R. 3237: Emergency Security Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 Sponsor: Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) Status: Signed into law, 2021 May 20 House Vote Breakdown Congressional Budget Office Score Law Outline TITLE IV: BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXTENSION AND MODIFICATION OF THE AFGHAN SPECIAL IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM Sec. 401: Amends the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 to expand eligibility to include Afghans who worked not only for the US Government for more than 1 year but also our allies as an off-base interpreter or if they performed "activities for United States military stationed at International Security Assistance Force (or any successor name for such Force). Increases the number of Special Immigrant Visas (SIV) to Afghan partners by 8,000, for a total of 34,500 allocated since December 19, 2014. Sec. 402: Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security and Secretary of state to jointly waive for 1 year (maximum 2 years with an extension) the requirement that Afghan partners eligible for SIVs get a medical exam before they can receive their visa. The Secretary of Homeland Security has to create a process to make sure Afghan SIV holders get a medical exam within 30 days of entry into the United States. Sec. 403: Allows the surviving spouse or child or employee of the United States Government abroad to be eligible for immigration into the United States if the employee worked for our government for at least 15 years or was killed in the line of duty. It also expands entry permissions for Afghan SIV applicants in addition to those who have already been approved. This is retroactive to June 30, 2021. Policies for Visa Processing: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Policy Manual, Chapter 9: Certain Afghan Nationals U.S Department of State -- Bureau of Consular Affairs. “Special Immigrant Visas for Afghans - Who Were Employed by/on Behalf of the U.S. Government.” Audio Sources Gen. Mark Milley: "There was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days." August 18, 2021 General Mark Milley: The time frame of rapid collapse that was widely estimated and ranged from weeks to months, and even years following our departure, there was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days. Central Command submitted a variety of plans that were briefed and approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Secretary of Defense and the President. These plans were coordinated, synchronized and rehearsed to deal with these various scenarios. One of those contingencies is what we are executing right now. As I said before, there's plenty of time to do AARs(After Action Reviews) and key lessons learned and to delve into these questions with great detail. But right now is not that time. Right now, we have to focus on this mission, because we have soldiers at risk. And we also have American citizens and Afghans who supported us for 20 years also at risk. This is personal and we're going to get them out. President Biden on Afghanistan Withdrawal Transcript July 8, 2021 Sound Clips 01:30 President Biden: When I announced our drawdown in April, I said we would be out by September, and we're on track to meet that target. Our military mission in Afghanistan will conclude on August 31. The drawdown is proceeding in a secure and orderly way, prioritizing the safety of our troops as they depart 3:40 President Biden: Together with our NATO allies and partners, we have trained and equipped nearly 300,000 current serving members of the military, the Afghan national security force, and many beyond that are no longer serving. Add to that hundreds of thousands more Afghan national defense and security forces trained over the last two decades. 04:04 President Biden: We provided our Afghan partners with all the tools, let me emphasize, all the tools -- training, equipment -- of any modern military. We provided advanced weaponry, and we're going to continue to provide funding and equipment and we'll ensure they have the capacity to maintain their Air Force. 5:54 President Biden: We're also going to continue to make sure that we take on Afghan nationals who worked side by side with US forces, including interpreters and translators. Since we're no longer going to have military there after this, we're not going to need them and they'll have no jobs. We're [sic] also going to be vital to our efforts. they've been very vital, and so their families are not exposed to danger as well. We've already dramatically accelerated the procedure time for Special Immigrant Visas to bring them to the United States. Since I was inaugurated on January 20, we've already approved 2,500 Special Immigrant Visas to come to the United States. Up to now, fewer than half have exercised the right to do that. Half have gotten on aircraft and come commercial flights and come and other half believe they want to stay, at least thus far. We're working closely with Congress to change the authorization legislation so that we can streamline the process of approving those visas. And those who have stood up for the operation to physically relocate 1000s of Afghans and their families before the US military mission concludes so that, if they choose, they can wait safely outside of Afghanistan, while their US visas are being processed. 8:13 President Biden: For those who have argued that we should stay just six more months, or just one more year, I asked them to consider the lessons of recent history. In 2011, the NATO allies and partners agreed that we would end our combat mission in 2014. In 2014, some argued one more year. So we kept fighting. We kept taking casualties. In 2015, the same, and on and on. Nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms that just one more year of fighting in Afghanistan is not a solution, but a recipe for being there indefinitely. It's up to the Afghans to make the decision about the future of their country. Others are more direct. Their argument is that we should stay with the Afghans and Afghanistan indefinitely. In doing so they point to the fact that we we have not taken losses in this last year. So they claim that the cost of just maintaining the status quo is minimal. 9:19 President Biden: But that ignores the reality, and the facts that already presented on the ground in Afghanistan when I took office. The Taliban is at its strongest militarily since 2001. The number of US forces in Afghanistan had been reduced to a bare minimum. And the United States and the last administration made an agreement that they have to with the Taliban remove all our forces by May 1 of this year. That's what I inherited. That agreement was the reason the Taliban had ceased major attacks against US forces. 9:55 President Biden: If in April, I had instead announced that the United States was going to go back on that agreement, made by the last administration, the United States and allied forces will remain in Afghanistan for the foreseeable future, the Taliban would have again begun to target our forces. The status quo was not an option. Staying would have meant US troops taking casualties, American men and women back in the middle of a civil war, and we would run the risk of having to send more troops back in Afghanistan to defend our remaining troops. Once that agreement with the Taliban had been made, staying with a bare minimum force was no longer possible. 10:34 President Biden: So let me ask those who want us to stay: how many more? How many 1000s more Americans' daughters and sons are you willing to risk? How long would you have them stay? Already we have members of our military whose parents fought in Afghanistan 20 years ago. Would you send their children and their grandchildren as well? Would you send your own son or daughter? After 20 years, a trillion dollars spent training and equipping hundreds of 1000s of Afghan National Security and Defence Forces. 2,448 Americans killed, 20,722 more wounded, and untold 1000s coming home with unseen trauma to their mental health. I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving a different outcome. 11:51 President Biden: Today the terrorist threat has metastasized beyond Afghanistan. So, we are repositioning our resources and adapting our counterterrorism posture to meet the threats where they are now: significantly higher in South Asia, the Middle East and Africa. 12:07 President Biden: But make no mistake, our military and intelligence leaders are confident they have the capabilities to protect the homeland and our interests from any resurgent terrorist challenge emerging or emanating from Afghanistan. We're developing a counterterrorism over-the-horizon capability that will allow us to keep our eyes firmly fixed at any direct threat to the United States in the region and act quickly and decisively if needed. 12:38 President Biden: We also need to focus on shoring up America's core strengths to meet the strategic competition competition with China and other nations that is really going to determine our future. 14:58 Reporter: Is the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan now inevitable? President Biden: No. It is not. Because you have the Afghan troops, 300,000. Well equipped, as well equipped as any army in the world, and an air force against something like 75,000 Taliban. It is not inevitable. 15:45 President Biden: Do I trust the Taliban? No, but I trust the capacity of the Afghan military who is better trained, better equipped, and more competent in terms of conducting war. 18:07 Reporter: Your own intelligence community has assessed that the Afghan government will likely collapse President Biden: That is not true 18:53 President Biden: And I want to make clear what I made clear to Ghani, that we are not going to walk away and not sustain their ability to maintain that force. We are. We're going to also work to make sure we help them in terms of everything from food necessities and other things in the region. But there is not a conclusion that in fact, they cannot defeat the Taliban. I believe the only way there's going to be -- this is now Joe Biden, not the intelligence community -- the only way there's only going to be peace and secure in Afghanistan, is that they work out a modus vivendi with the Taliban, and they make a judgement as to how they can make peace. And the likelihood there's going to be one unified government in Afghanistan, controlling the whole country is highly unlikely. 21:30 Reporter: Mr. President, how serious was the corruption among the Afghanistan government to this mission failing there? President Biden: First of all, the mission hasn't failed yet. 22:00 President Biden: There were going to be negotiations between the Taliban and the Afghan national security forces, and the Afghan government that didn't come to fruition. So the question now is where do they go from here? The jury is still out, but the likelihood there's going to be the Taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely. 23:20 Reporter: Mr. President, "speed is safety," as you just said in your remarks. Are you satisfied with the timeline of relocating Afghan nationals? Is it happening quickly enough to your satisfaction if it may not happen until next month at the end? President Biden: It has already happened, there have already been people, about 1000 people have gotten on aircraft and come to the United States already on commercial aircraft. So as I said, there's over 2500 people, that as from January to now, have have gotten those visas and only half decided that they wanted to leave. The point is that I think the whole process has to be speeded up -- period -- in terms of being able to get these visas. Reporter: Why can't the US evacuate these Afghan translators to the United States to await their visa processing as some immigrants of the southern border have been allowed to? President Biden: Because the law doesn't allow that to happen. And that's why we're asking the Congress to consider changing the law. President Biden Remarks on Afghanistan Strategy Transcript April 14, 2021 Sound Clips 00:38 President Biden: I'm speaking to you today from the Roosevelt -- the Treaty room in the White House -- the same spot where in October of 2001, President George W. Bush informed our nation that the United States military had begun strikes on terrorist training camps in Afghanistan. It was just weeks, just weeks after the terrorist attack on our nation that killed 2,977 innocent souls, that turned Lower Manhattan into a disaster area, destroyed parts of the Pentagon and made hallowed ground in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and sparked an American promise that we would never forget. We went to Afghanistan in 2001, to root out al Qaeda to prevent future terrorist attacks against the United States planned from Afghanistan. Our objective was clear, the cause was just, our NATO allies and partners rallied beside us. And I supported that military action along with the overwhelming majority of the members of Congress. More than seven years later, in 2008 weeks before we swore the oath of office -- President Obama and I were about to swear -- President Obama asked me to travel to Afghanistan and report back on the state of the war in Afghanistan. I flew to Afghanistan to the Kunar Valley, a rugged, mountainous region on the border of Pakistan. What I saw on that trip reinforced my conviction that only the Afghans have the right and responsibility to lead their country. And that more and endless American military force could not create or sustain a durable Afghan Government. I believed that our presence in Afghanistan should be focused on the reason we went in the first place: to ensure Afghanistan would not be used as a base from which to attack our homeland again. We did that, we accomplished that objective. I said, along with others, we would follow Osama bin Laden to the gates of hell if need be. That's exactly what we did. And we got him. It took us close to 10 years to put President Obama's commitment into form. And that's exactly what happened Osama bin Laden was gone. That was 10 years ago. Think about that. We delivered justice to Bin Laden a decade ago. And we've stayed in Afghanistan for a decade since. Since then, our reasons for remaining in Afghanistan have become increasingly unclear, even as the terrorist threat that we went to fight evolved. Over the past 20 years, the threat has become more dispersed, metastasizing around the globe. Al Shabaab in Somalia, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, on Al Nusra in Syria, ISIS attempting to create a caliphate in Syria and Iraq and establishing affiliates in multiple countries in Africa and Asia. With the terror threat now in many places, keeping 1000s of troops grounded and concentrated in just one country at a cost of billions each year makes little sense to me and our leaders. We cannot continue the cycle of extending or expanding our military presence in Afghanistan, hoping to create ideal conditions for the withdraw and expecting a different result. I'm now the fourth United States President to preside over American troop presence in Afghanistan: two Republicans, two Democrats. I will not pass this responsibility on to a fifth. After consulting closely with our allies and partners, with our military leaders and intelligence personnel, with our diplomats and our development experts, with the Congress and the Vice President, as well as with Mr. Ghani and many others around the world. I concluded that it's time to end America's longest war. It's time for American troops to come home. 5:01 President Biden: When I came to office, I inherited a diplomatic agreement, duly negotiated between the government of the United States and the Taliban, that all US forces would be out of Afghanistan by May 1 2021, just three months after my inauguration. That's what we inherited. That commitment is perhaps not what I would have negotiated myself, but it was an agreement made by the United States government. And that means something. So in keeping with that agreement, and with our national interest, the United States will begin our final withdrawal beginning on May 1 of this year. 8:11 President Biden: You all know that less than 1% of Americans serve in our Armed Forces. The remaining 99%, we owe them. We owe them. They've never backed down from a single mission that we've asked of them. I've witnessed their bravery firsthand during my visits to Afghanistan. They've never wavered in their resolve. They paid a tremendous price on our behalf and they have the thanks of a grateful nation. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) High-Risk List Center for Strategic and International Studies Transcript March 10, 2021 Speaker: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Sound Clips 7:40 John Sopko: But right now, that state is under threat. In the wake of the February 2020 withdrawal agreement, all is not well. Compromise appears in short supply on either side. Taliban attacks have actually increased since the agreement was signed. Assassination of prominent officials, activists, journalists, aid workers and others have also increased, including an unsuccessful attack on one of the female members of the peace negotiating team. And the Taliban offensive on Kandahar city last October, as peace negotiations were ongoing, may well have succeeded, were it not for U.S. air support. Peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban have achieved little for Afghanistan so far, and only time will tell as to whether the new Biden administration initiative will bear fruit. And the Afghan people's fears for its own government survival are exacerbated by the knowledge of how dependent their country is on foreign military and financial support. 12:56 John Sopko: Another equally serious threat to Afghanistan's stability has also largely been ignored as we focus on the boots on the ground in Afghanistan. And that is the provision of last year's U.S.-Taliban agreement that stipulates that in addition to the departure of U.S. and coalition troops, or non-diplomatic civilian personnel: private security contractors, trainers, advisors, and supporting service personnel also must leave the country by May 1. Should this come to passSIGAR and many others believe this may be more devastating to the effectiveness of the Afghan security forces than the withdrawal of our remaining troops. Why is that? Because the Afghan government relies heavily on these foreign contractors and trainers to function. In the first quarter of fiscal year 2021 there are over 18,000 Defense Department contractors in Afghanistan, including 6000 Americans, and 7,000 3rd country nationals, 40% of whom are responsible for logistics, maintenance, or training tasks. Now, it is well known that the Afghan security forces need these contractors to maintain their equipment, manage supply chains, and train their military and police to operate the advanced equipment that we have purchased for them. For example, as of December, the Afghan National Army was completing just under 20% of its own maintenance work orders, well below the goal of 80% that was set and the 51% that they did in 2018. So that's actually going down. The Afghan National Police were just as bad if not worse, undertaking only 12% of their own maintenance work against a target of 35% and less than the 16% that we reported in our 2019 high risk list. Additionally, and more troubling. The Department of Defense does train, advise and assist command air, or commonly called TAC air recently reported that since late 2019, they have reduced their personnel in Afghanistan by 94%, and that the military drawdown now requires near total use of contract support to maintain the Afghan Air fleet. They assess that quote “further drawdown in the associated closure basis will effectively end all in country aviation training contracts in Afghanistan.” Again, why is this significant? Why do we view this as a high risk? Namely because contractors currently provide 100% of the maintenance for the Afghan Air Force, UAE 60 helicopters and CE 130 cargo aircraft and a significant portion of Afghans Light Combat Support aircraft. TAC air this January gave a bleak assessment, namely, that no Afghan airframe can be sustained as combat effective for more than a few months in the absence of contractor support. 17:51 John Sopko: Continued funding for U.S. reconstruction programs aimed at promoting economic development, rule of law, respect for human rights, good governance and security for the Afghan people may be more significant, because it may be the primary lever left for the US and other donors to influence that country. It appears that even the Taliban understand Afghanistan's dire need for foreign assistance. Because, as one of the few commitments that the US had to make last year was, “to seek economic cooperation for reconstruction, with the new post settlement, Afghan Islamic government.” Now how much the donor community wishes to stay involved will of course depend on what that government looks like and how it behaves. Numerous officials, including then Secretary of State Pompeo and Ambassador Halley, have stated that the US will be able to advance its human rights goals, including the rights of women and girls with the Taliban by leveraging or conditioning this much needed financial assistance. But unfortunately, as SIGAR has long reported, even when conditionality involved only dealing with the Afghan government, donors do not have a stellar record of successfully utilizing that conditionality to influence Afghan behavior. 27:19 John Sopko: Today our report suggests the donor community should realize the Afghan government is focused on a single goal, its survival. Afghanistan is more dependent on international support than ever before. It may not be an overstatement that if foreign assistance is withdrawn and peace negotiations fail, Taliban forces could be at the gates of Kabul in short order. Hearing: A PATHWAY FOR PEACE IN AFGHANISTAN: EXAMINING THE FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE AFGHANISTAN STUDY GROUP House Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on National Security February 19, 2021 Testimony was heard from the following Afghanistan Study Group officials: Kelly A. Ayotte, Co-Chair; News Corp Board of Directors since April 2017 BAE Systems Board of Directors since June 2017 Blackstone Board of Directors Boston Properties Board of Directors Caterpillar Board of Directors Board of Advisors at Cirtronics General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. (Retired), Co-Chair Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the Obama and Trump presidencies. Lockheed Martin Board of Directors since February 2020 Nancy Lindborg, Co-Chair President and CEO of the David Lucile Packard Foundation Former President and CEO of the US Institute for Peace Former Assistant Administrator for the bureau for democracy conflict and humanitarian assistance at USAID During the mid-Obama years. Sound Clips 3:13 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): I'd also like to take a moment to thank the nonpartisan US Institute of Peace for the support and expertise they provided to the study group during the course of its work. 3:23 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): In the fiscal year 2020 omnibus bill Congress led by Senator Graham Senator Patrick Leahy and the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee of state foreign ops and related programs. They tasked the independent and bipartisan Afghanistan study group to quote, consider the implications of a peace settlement or the failure to reach a settlement on US policy, resources and commitments in Afghanistan. After nearly nine months of review and consultation with current and former US and Afghan government officials, allies and partners and other key stakeholders, the Afghanistan study group issued its final report earlier this month. 15:12 Kelly Ayotte: We recommend that US troops remain beyond may 1. We believe a precipitous withdrawal of US and international troops in May, would be catastrophic for Afghanistan, leading to civil war, and allow the reconstitution of terror groups which threaten the United States within an 18 to 36 month period. 15:41 Kelly Ayotte: Let me be clear, although we recommend that our troops remain beyond may 1, we propose a new approach toward Afghanistan, which aligns our policies, practices and messaging across the United States government to support the Afghan peace process, rather than prosecute a war. Our troops would remain not to fight a forever war, but to guarantee the conditions for a successful peace process and to protect our national security interests to ensure that Afghanistan does not become a haven again, for terrorists who threaten the United States of America. 37:15 General Joseph F. Dunford: Do we need to increase forces if the Taliban don't accept an extension past the first of May, and if they then would re initiate attacks against US forces? and Chairman, we heard exactly what you heard. In the fall. What we were told by commanders on the ground in the department of fence was that 4500 US forces, in addition to the NATO forces that are there was the minimum level to address both the mission as well as protection of our forces in the context of the conditions that existed in the fall in as you've highlighted, those conditions have only gotten worse since the fall so in in our judgment 2500 would not be adequate. Should the Taliban re initiate attacks against the United States Hearing: Examining the Trump Administration's Afghanistan Strategy House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on National Security January 28, 2020 Witness: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) Sound Clips 48:54 John Sopko: We've almost created a system that forces people in the government to give happy talk success stories because they're over there on very short rotations. They want to show success. The whole system is almost geared to give you, and it goes up the chain of command, all the way to the President sometimes. He gets bad information from people out in the field because somebody on a nine month rotation, he has to show success, and that goes up. 54:24 John Sopko: Maybe incentivize honesty. And one of the proposals I gave at that time,be cause I was asked by the staff to come up with proposals, is put the same requirement on the government that we impose on publicly traded corporations. Publicly traded corporations have to tell the truth. Otherwise the SEC will indict the people involved. They have to report when there's a significant event. So put that onus, call it The Truth in Government Act if you want, that you in the administration are duty bound by statute to alert Congress to significant events that could directly negatively impact a program or process. So incentivize honesty. 1:10:25 John Sopko: Over 70% of the Afghan budget comes from the United States and the donors. If that money ended, I have said before and I will stand by it, then the Afghan government will probably collapse. Wartime Contracting Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs September 21, 2011 Witnesses: Charles Tiefer: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Clark Kent Ervin: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Sound Clips 1:11:30 Charles Tiefer: Our private security in Afghanistan appears to be a major source of payoffs to the Taliban. Our report has the first official statement that it's the second-largest source of money for the Taliban. Sen. Carl Levin: After drugs. Charles Tiefer: After drugs, that's right. 1:25:18 Clark Kent Ervin: It's critical that the government have a choice, and that means that there needs to be at least a small and expandable, organic capacity on the part of these three agencies to perform missions themselves, so the next time there's a contingency, the government has a choice between going with contractors and going in-house and the determination can be made whether it's more effective to do it either way, whether it's cheaper to do it either way. As we said at the inception, right now the government doesn't have an option. Contractors are the default option because they're the only option. President George W. Bush announces U.S. Military Strikes on Afghanistan October 7, 2001 President George W. Bush: Good afternoon. On my orders, the United States military has begun strikes against Al-Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. These carefully targeted actions are designed to disrupt the use of Afghanistan as a terrorist base of operations and to attack the military capability of the Taliban regime. More than two weeks ago, I gave Taliban leaders a series of clear and specific demands: close terrorist training camps, hand over leaders of the Al-Qaeda network, and return all foreign nationals including American citizens unjustly detained in your country. None of these demands were met and now the Taliban will pay a price by destroying camps and disrupting communications. We will make it more difficult for the terror network to train new recruits and coordinate their evil plans. ** International Campaign Against Terrorism Senate Foreign Relations Committee October 25, 2001 Witness: Colin Powell: Secretary of State Sound Clip 27:00 Colin Powell: Our work in Afghanistan though, is not just of a military nature. We recognize that when the Al Qaeda organization has been destroyed in Afghanistan, and as we continue to try to destroy it in all the nations in which it exists around the world, and when the Taliban regime has gone to its final reward, we need to put in place a new government in Afghanistan, one that represents all the people of Afghanistan and one that is not dominated by any single powerful neighbor, but instead is dominated by the will of the people of Afghanistan. Executive Producer Recommendations Elect Stephanie Gallardo 2022 Krystal Kyle and Friends. August 21, 2021. “Episode 35 Audio with Matthew Hoh.” Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

china truth ceo staying american america americans north director war numerous audio friends democrats military losing republicans congress new york times president series donald trump peace stranded syria iraq united states white house cnn trump administration government force pennsylvania africa pakistan afghanistan harris seeking code secretary washington post middle east vice president defense barack obama osama assassination bush roosevelt waiting donations laden lower manhattan new york magazine schuster get out collapse air force tac sen prevent remain south asia commission wall street journal troops joe biden pentagon joint chiefs somalia pledge intercept testimony reform departure citizenship timeline foreign policy afghan retired compromise al qaeda nato kabul sec armed forces taliban hwy daily beast patrick tucker co chair strategic increases music alley treaty uae regulations advisors osama bin laden united states presidents afghans moulton dod contractors us government subcommittee policies publicly sludge dunford homeland security jennifer steinhauer trillion george w bush ruse qaeda behalf arabian peninsula amends preference withdrawal james risen eager al shabaab kandahar united states government fiscal year open secrets oversight turning point john f ap news afghan national police national defense authorization act matt stoller special inspector general defense department congressional dish substack immigration services matt taibbi defense news us institute defense one nancy lindborg death warrant state pompeo ghani afghanistan veterans sivs fact check york times federal news network international security assistance force sound clips lee fang seth moulton cover art design central command authorizes afghan government matthew hoh state bureau david ippolito craig whitlock afghan air force sigar jared serbu defense contracting afghan national army oren liebermann defence forces annie karni mark landler zolan kanno youngs al nusra eli clifton eric schmitt crestview government act s department
Jerusalem Studio
Watchmen Talk - LTG (Ret.) Ehud Barak, Israel's former Prime Minister (Part II)

Jerusalem Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 27:33


Please join host Amir Oren for the second of a three-part interview with Ehud Barak. If there is one Israeli who deserves to be the proverbial man who needs no introduction, it is Ehud Barak. For some 35 years a soldier, in the next 25 years or so moving in and out of politics, Barak has served in virtually every senior position, up to Prime Minister. He has led the most elite of units, Sayeret Matkal, on both clandestine intelligence missions and lethal commando raids. Rushing home from abroad to take part in war, he commanded a tank battalion in fierce battle. As a General officer he had five key posts, was Director of Military Intelligence, headed Central Command and eventually was promoted to Ramatkal, Chief of General Staff. Drawn into the cabinet by Yitzhak Rabin, a mentor, he was Foreign Minister, Leader of the Opposition and in 1999-2001 Prime (and Defense) Minister. He later held the Defense portfolio for another five years. You are welcome to join our audience and watch all of our programs - free of charge! TV7 Israel News: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/563/ Jerusalem Studio: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/18738/ TV7 Israel News Editor's Note: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76269/ TV7 Israel: Watchmen Talk: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76256/ Jerusalem Prays: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/135790/ TV7's Times Observer: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/97531/ TV7's Middle East Review: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/997755/ My Brother's Keeper: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/53719/ This week in 60 seconds: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/123456/ Those who wish can send prayer requests to TV7 Israel News in the following ways: Facebook Messenger: https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Email: israelnews@tv7.fi Please be sure to mention your first name and country of residence. Any attached videos should not exceed 20 seconds in duration. #IsraelNews #tv7israelnews #newsupdates Rally behind our vision - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/donate/ To purchase TV7 Israel News merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/tv7-israel-news-store Live view of Jerusalem - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/jerusalem-live-feed/ Visit our website - http://www.tv7israelnews.com/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/tv7israelnews Like TV7 Israel News on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Follow TV7 Israel News on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/tv7israelnews/ Follow TV7 Israel News on Twitter - https://twitter.com/tv7israelnews

THE PETA PODCAST
Ep. 188: PETA: The Truth About The Dogs Left Behind in Afghanistan

THE PETA PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 30:10


When social media blew up regarding whether military dogs were left behind in the evacuation of Afghanistan, people sought PETA's help. PETA Sr. VP Daphna Nachminovich tells Emil Guillermo how PETA got a response from Central Command explaining that "no military dogs" were abandoned. But that still left 150 dogs of some military contractors, and even some dogs who were domestic companions in Kabul behind. PETA was told the dogs were not caged but released on Kabul airport grounds when the decision was made not to bring them on C-17s that had more than enough room to accommodate them. PETA continues to be in touch with folks in the military and on the ground in Kabul about the dogs. For the latest go to PETA.org. The PETA Podcast PETA, the world's largest animal rights organization, is 6.5 million members strong and growing. This is the place to find out why. Hear from insiders, thought leaders, activists, investigators, politicians, and others why animals need more than kindness—they have the right not to be abused or exploited in any way. Hosted by Emil Guillermo. Powered by PETA activism. Contact us at PETA.org Listen to the very first PETA podcast with Ingrid Newkirk Music provided by CarbonWorks. Go to Apple podcasts and subscribe. Contact and follow host Emil Guillermo on Twitter @emilamok Or at www.amok.com Please subscribe, rate and review wherever you get your podcasts. Help us grow the podcast by taking this short survey. Thanks for listening to THE PETA PODCAST! Originally released Sept. 7, 2021. Copyright, all rights reserved.

Jerusalem Studio
Watchmen Talk - LTG (Ret.) Ehud Barak, Israel's former Prime Minister (Part I)

Jerusalem Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 27:39


Please join host Amir Oren for the first of a three-part interview with Ehud Barak. If there is one Israeli who deserves to be the proverbial man who needs no introduction, it is Ehud Barak. For some 35 years a soldier, in the next 25 years or so moving in and out of politics, Barak has served in virtually every senior position, up to Prime Minister. He has led the most elite of units, Sayeret Matkal, on both clandestine intelligence missions and lethal commando raids. Rushing home from abroad to take part in war, he commanded a tank battalion in fierce battle. As a General officer he had five key posts, was Director of Military Intelligence, headed Central Command and eventually was promoted to Ramatkal, Chief of General Staff. Drawn into the cabinet by Yitzhak Rabin, a mentor, he was Foreign Minister, Leader of the Opposition and in 1999-2001 Prime (and Defense) Minister. He later held the Defense portfolio for another five years. You are welcome to join our audience and watch all of our programs - free of charge! TV7 Israel News: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/563/ Jerusalem Studio: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/18738/ TV7 Israel News Editor's Note: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76269/ TV7 Israel: Watchmen Talk: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76256/ Jerusalem Prays: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/135790/ TV7's Times Observer: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/97531/ TV7's Middle East Review: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/997755/ My Brother's Keeper: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/53719/ This week in 60 seconds: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/123456/ Those who wish can send prayer requests to TV7 Israel News in the following ways: Facebook Messenger: https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Email: israelnews@tv7.fi Please be sure to mention your first name and country of residence. Any attached videos should not exceed 20 seconds in duration. #IsraelNews #tv7israelnews #newsupdates Rally behind our vision - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/donate/ To purchase TV7 Israel News merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/tv7-israel-news-store Live view of Jerusalem - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/jerusalem-live-feed/ Visit our website - http://www.tv7israelnews.com/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/tv7israelnews Like TV7 Israel News on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Follow TV7 Israel News on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/tv7israelnews/ Follow TV7 Israel News on Twitter - https://twitter.com/tv7israelnews

Apple News Today
Danger and darkness: Louisiana reels from Hurricane Ida

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 8:15


CNN reports on the dangerous impact of Hurricane Ida. Around a million customers lost power as the devastating storm moved inland, flooding streets and destroying homes. The U.S. says it launched a drone strike Sunday targeting suspected suicide bombers near Kabul’s airport, the Wall Street Journal reports. U.S. Central Command is investigating reports of civilian deaths from the strike. Military families move frequently, which creates problems for the careers of civilian spouses. The Washington Post looks at new legislation that could make it easier for them to get the licenses they need to work in different states. African governments and businesses are spending more on space exploration. Quartz explains how this increase is driven by a need to expand internet access via satellites. Entrepreneurs are trying to teach computers how to smell, which has proven a real challenge. Bloomberg Businessweek explores how robot noses could change many industries, from food, to security, to health.

Don Lemon Tonight
U.S. Strikes Back Against ISIS-K

Don Lemon Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 80:06


BREAKING NEWS: The U.S. has conducted an air strike against an ISIS-K 'planner'. U.S. Central Command spokesman, Navy Captain Bill Urban, has said the unmanned air strike occurred in Afghanistan and initial indications are that the target was killed. No civilian casualties are known of at this time. The U.S. embassy in Kabul advises U.S. citizens to leave the gates of Hamid Karzai Airport immediately to avoid traveling to the airport following a warning from the President's National Security Team that another terror attack is likely. The Pentagon has confirmed there was one explosion in the ISIS-K terror attack outside the airport yesterday not two, as they originally reported. The bomber wore a suicide vest. Louisiana and Mississippi face both hurricane and storm surge warnings as Hurricane Ida bears down on the Gulf Coast with the concern it will make land-fall as a category 4 tomorrow. A Judge has ruled against Florida Governor Ron DeSantis' ban on mask mandates in schools. Despite his continual threats of removing funding, the majority of school districts in large populated areas rebelled against the Governor. Florida reported more Covid cases in the last week than any other since the beginning of the pandemic with 17,000 cases in schools. The assault on voting rights is spreading across the country. 18 states have enacted 30 new laws just this year. House Democrats passed the John Lewis Voting Rights Act this week, but the bill faces an uphill climb in the Senate. On tonight's panel: CNN's Kaitlan Collins, Alex Marquardt, Lieutenant General Mark Hertling, Karen McGinnis, John Harwood, James Clapper, Dr. Larry Brilliant and Suzanne Malveaux. Plus: William Cohen, Matthew Dowd, Colonel Scott Mann, Afghanistan Veteran Lieutenant Jason Redman and political commentator Amanda Carpenter. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Friday August 27 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 104:28


President Biden holds a weird press conference blaming Trump for his failures. Central Command confirms that the US is relying on the Taliban for security while sharing intel. Names are released of the fallen heroes from the attack in Kabul. The Dana Show has its first on-air vaccine debate. We go live to the White House Press Conference. Kurt Schlichter joins us to discuss his reaction the latest from military leadership.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaPut your trust in Patriot Mobile. Now get 50% off the first 2 months OR $100 off any phone in stock with a 1-year commitment, as well as free premier activation with promo code Dana. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comBuy 2 bags of SuperBeets Heart Chews and get a bag of Vitamin D3 Chews AND a free bag of SuperBeets Heart Chews. My Pillowhttps://mypillow.comSleep better with My Pillow Giza Dream Sheets. Now only $49.99 with Radio Specials code DANA.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Friday August 27 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 104:28


President Biden holds a weird press conference blaming Trump for his failures. Central Command confirms that the US is relying on the Taliban for security while sharing intel. Names are released of the fallen heroes from the attack in Kabul. The Dana Show has its first on-air vaccine debate. We go live to the White House Press Conference. Kurt Schlichter joins us to discuss his reaction the latest from military leadership.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaPut your trust in Patriot Mobile. Now get 50% off the first 2 months OR $100 off any phone in stock with a 1-year commitment, as well as free premier activation with promo code Dana. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comBuy 2 bags of SuperBeets Heart Chews and get a bag of Vitamin D3 Chews AND a free bag of SuperBeets Heart Chews. My Pillowhttps://mypillow.comSleep better with My Pillow Giza Dream Sheets. Now only $49.99 with Radio Specials code DANA.

Newshour
Senior TDF commander: "We had no choice"

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 43:03


General Tsadkan Gebretensae, a member of the Tigray Defence Forces' Central Command, tells Newshour they had no choice but to take the battle to the Ethiopian government Also in the programme: a Belarussian athlete is under police protection in Tokyo after Belarus sports officials tried to put her on a plane home against her will; and we hear from the frontline in the western Afghan city of Herat as Taliban forces continue their offensive. (Image: abandoned ammunition boxes lie on the ground following a battle between the Ethiopian military and Tigray forces along the road between Sheweate Hugum and Yechila in south-central Tigray, Ethiopia, July 10, 2021 / Credit: REUTERS/Giulia Paravic

Intentional Living and Leadership with Cal Walters
#66: General (Ret.) David Petraeus — Mentors, Building a Team, & Culture Keys

Intentional Living and Leadership with Cal Walters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 53:41


General (US Army, Ret.) David H. Petraeus is a Partner and Chairman of the KKR Global Institute, which he established in May 2013. He is also a member of the boards of directors of Optiv and FirstStream, a venture investor in more than 15 startups, and engaged in a variety of academic endeavors. Prior to joining KKR, General Petraeus served over 37 years in the U.S. military, culminating his career with six consecutive commands, five of which were in combat, including command of the Surge in Iraq, command of U.S. Central Command, and command of coalition forces in Afghanistan. Following retirement from the military and after Senate confirmation by a vote of 94-0, he served as Director of the CIA during a period of significant achievements in the global war on terror, the establishment of important Agency digital initiatives, and significant investments in the Agency's most important asset, its human capital. General Petraeus graduated with distinction from the U.S. Military Academy, and he is the only person in Army history to be the top graduate of both the demanding U.S. Army Ranger School and the U.S. Army's Command and General Staff College. He also earned a Ph.D. from Princeton University's School of Public and International Affairs. General Petraeus taught international relations and economics at the U.S. Military Academy in the mid-1980s, he was a Visiting Professor of Public Policy at the Honors College of the City University of New York from 2013 through 2016, and he was for 6 years a Judge Widney Professor at the University of Southern California and a Senior Fellow at Harvard University's Belfer Center. He is currently a Visiting Fellow at Yale University's Jackson Institute, Co-Chairman of the Global Advisory Council of the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, Senior Vice President of the Royal United Services Institute, and a Member of the Trilateral Commission, as well as a member of the boards of the Atlantic Council, the Institute for the Study of War, and over a dozen veterans service organizations. Over the past 15 years, General Petraeus was named one of America's 25 Best Leaders by U.S. News and World Report, a runner-up for Time magazine's Person of the Year, the Daily Telegraph man of the year, a Time 100 selectee, Princeton University's Madison Medalist, and one of Foreign Policy magazine's top 100 public intellectuals in three different years. General Petraeus has earned numerous honors, awards, and decorations, including four Defense Distinguished Service Medals, the Bronze Star Medal for Valor, two NATO Meritorious Service Medals, the Combat Action Badge, the Ranger Tab, and Master Parachutist and Air Assault Badges. He has also been decorated by 13 foreign countries and is believed to be the only person who, while in uniform, threw out the first pitch of a World Series game and did the coin toss for a Super Bowl. On this episode, General Petraeus and I discuss how to find the right mentors, how to cultivate a great mentor/mentee relationship, how to build a highly functioning team, what he looks for in team members, and much more!

The Cognitive Crucible
#46 Ryder on Public Affairs

The Cognitive Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 31:30


During this episode, US Air Force Brig. Gen. Patrick Ryder discusses the evolution of military public affairs, media relations, and strategic communications. Our discussion covers how public affairs integrates with other information related capabilities, partnerships with other agencies, and trust in media. Link to full show notes Guest Bio: Brig. Gen. Patrick S. Ryder is the Director of Public Affairs, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force, the Pentagon, Arlington, Virginia. In addition to advising the Secretary, Chief of Staff of the Air Force, and Chief of Space Operations on Public Affairs matters, he is responsible for developing and executing global communication processes to build understanding and support for the Air Force and Space Force. He provides guidance and support for nearly 4,500 active duty, Guard and Reserve Airmen and civilians in their mission to broadcast internal Air Force and Space Force information, conduct community and media relations, plan and synchronize Department of the Air Force communication efforts, and execute security review programs. Brig. Gen. Ryder was commissioned in 1992 through the Air Force ROTC program at the University of Florida in Gainesville. His staff assignments include serving as the Special Assistant for Public Affairs to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Director of Public Affairs for U.S. Central Command, Director of Media Operations for the Secretary of the Air Force Office of Public Affairs, and Director of Public Affairs for the Office of Defense Representative-Pakistan. During his career, Brig. Gen. Ryder has led public affairs operations in numerous overseas contingency operations. He served as the PAO for the Air Force's initial cadre at Taszar Air Base, Hungary, during the 1995 peace-keeping mission, Operation Joint Endeavor, and led 48th Fighter Wing public affairs operations in support of NATO during the 1999 Kosovo Air Campaign. In support for Operation Iraqi Freedom, he served as a strategic communications planner for the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad from March–July 2004 and led the DoD Public Affairs response to highlight U.S. military humanitarian support to Pakistan during floods in 2010. While at U.S. Central Command, Brig. Gen. Ryder oversaw the command-wide public affairs operations in support of the counter-ISIS campaign Operation Inherent Resolve from 2014-2016 and conducted bi-weekly press briefings with the Pentagon press corps from Headquarters U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Florida. About: The Information Professionals Association (IPA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the role of information activities, such as influence and cognitive security, within the national security sector and helping to bridge the divide between operations and research. Its goal is to increase interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and practitioners and policymakers with an interest in this domain. For more information, please contact us at communications@information-professionals.org. Or, connect directly with The Cognitive Crucible podcast host, John Bicknell, on LinkedIn.

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Top General Concerned With Withdrawal From Afghanistan

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 10:18


General Kenneth McKenzie, head of U.S. Central Command, said yesterday that Afghan security forces will have a tough time holding back the Taliban following a full withdrawal of U-S forces. The concerns the General expressed before the Senate Armed Services Committee Thursday ranged from the lack of U.S. air support the Afghan Security Forces would get, to the basic maintenance of those aircrafts, which is done largely by American contractors. FOX's Trey Yingst speaks with FOX News Pentagon Correspondent Lucas Tomlinson about the concerns of some in the military and congress about the complete withdrawal from Afghanistan.  

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
Evening Edition: Top General Concerned With Withdrawal From Afghanistan

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 10:18


General Kenneth McKenzie, head of U.S. Central Command, said yesterday that Afghan security forces will have a tough time holding back the Taliban following a full withdrawal of U-S forces. The concerns the General expressed before the Senate Armed Services Committee Thursday ranged from the lack of U.S. air support the Afghan Security Forces would get, to the basic maintenance of those aircrafts, which is done largely by American contractors. FOX's Trey Yingst speaks with FOX News Pentagon Correspondent Lucas Tomlinson about the concerns of some in the military and congress about the complete withdrawal from Afghanistan.  

GovExec Daily
Priorities and the Pentagon Budget

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 14:43


Earlier this month, the Biden administration released its budget proposal for fiscal 2022. While some of the administration’s political opponents assailed the over $700 billion in money budgeted for the Pentagon, the Biden proposal allocates $753 billion for national defense programs, a 1.7% increase over fiscal 2021 defense spending. While an annual increase in Defense spending is seemingly a given in the 21st century, it’s worthwhile to dig deep into the ways we fund defense and how we prioritize and define national security.  Mandy Smithberger is the director of the Center for Defense Information at the Project on Government Oversight. She previously was a national security policy adviser to Rep. Jackie Speier and has served as an analyst at the Defense Intelligence Agency and U.S. Central Command. She joined the podcast to discuss the Defense budget.

Seminole Wars
SW049 Irish-Immigrant U.S. Army Private Paddington "Paddy" McCormick Discusses Soldiers' Perspectives at Living History Events

Seminole Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2021 40:31


Irish-Immigrant Army Private Paddington McCormik meets us this week along the Dade Battlefield historic trail in Bushnell, Florida. He's at his post, guarding the trail from any potential hostile Seminole incursions. The lot of a private -- and an immigrant one at that, was a miserable one. Paddy explains how he ended up at what he calls "this Godforsaken place", what Soldier life is like -- the rotten pay, the inhuman heat, the dicey rations -- and his hope that if he just keeps his head down, he just might get out of the war alive. Paddy may be a private, but when he steps out of his 1830s-era sky blue fatigues, he becomes Seminole Wars Foundation president, Steve Rinck. Steve is instrumental in a multitude of ways in bringing awareness about the Seminole Wars throughout Florida. Steve chats about how he created the Paddy character and about how he went from mild-manner school teacher and later school principal to joining the ranks of Seminole War historians.  Above, Pvt. Paddy McCormick, ever vigilant at his post along the Dade Battlefield trail, says Army life is miserable and he is just trying to keep his head down so he can get out of the war alive. Below, Steve Rinck (far right) as Pvt Paddy McCormick joins other Seminole War living historians, such as George Webb (second from left) playing a sutler/trader and Ken Wood portraying his main impression, a Seminole fighter called "Hawkwood". To the left is British Air Commodore (Air Cdre) Stephen R. Thornber, the senior UK  officer from the British contingent visited the Dade Battlefield as part of a militaray staff ride from U.S. Central Command, at MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa, Florida.  Such staff rides help contemporary military personnel to learn and apply lessons to current operations from past military battles and conflicts, such as the Dade Battle and the Second Seminole War.    Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us

Global Tennessee
Career Panel | Diplomacy, U.S. Foreign Service & State Dept. | Mar 25

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 76:05


The Tennessee World Affairs Council in association with Belmont University Center for International Business, Tennessee Technological University Department of Foreign Languages, Middle Tennessee State University and Lipscomb University and the Peoria Area World Affairs Council International Careers & Jobs Panel A Conversation On Working in the World of Diplomacy The United States Foreign Service and the U.S. State Department Featuring Foreign Service Officer Allen O. DuBose Diplomat in Residence Hosted By Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Ryan President, Tennessee World Affairs Council March 25, 2021 5:30 PM CT Allen DuBose Allen DuBose is a management career track Foreign Service Generalist with more than 14 years of experience at the U.S. Department of State. Prior to joining the Foreign Service, DuBose enjoyed a 20 year career that included positions in finance at corporations like IBM and Digital Equipment Corporation. He also rose to the position of regional director of operations for North America at satellite telecommunications provider, Iridium LLC. Since joining the Foreign Service, DuBose served overseas as a Vice Consul in Hermosillo, Mexico; General Services Officer in Guayaquil, Ecuador; and Management Officer in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. He has also served as an Area Manager for Latin America with the Department of State’s Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations; in human resources with the Executive Office of the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs – South Central Asian Affairs; and as a Post Management Officer with the Executive Office of the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs – International Organizations Affairs. DuBose graduated from The College of William and Mary with a B.A in economics, and Atlanta University with an M.B.A. and concentration in finance. Since he travels frequently, the fastest way to contact him is via his email address, DuBoseA@state.gov. Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Ryan, USN (Ret) Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007.

Seminole Wars
SW045 Dade Battlefield Staff Rides Instruct Present-Day Military Leaders in Challenges of Command When Under Fire in Irregular Conflict

Seminole Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2021 47:40


George Webb, a former Florida State park ranger, portrays a trader of the 1830s. He briefs British officers and NCOs from US Central Command on a military staff ride to the Dade Battlefield. The Dade Battle of December 28, 1835 is considered one of the U.S. Army’s most lopsided defeats. How an Army column could allow itself to be caught so unaware of a hostile adversary in its midst is a question that military professionals still ask to this day. One way to answer that question is through what's called the Military Staff Ride. The staff ride puts military leaders in the figurative shoes of the officers and men of Dade's column. Although the battle was part of what is now called “irregular warfare,” today’s leaders—uniformed and civilian—can find ample opportunity to highlight the role of all warfighting functions with a particular emphasis on intelligence, fires and protection. Was the outcome foreordained? Would it be foreordained in the contemporary world? How might today's leaders have conducted the march and the battle differently had they been in charge? Listeners will not be surprised that the insights gleaned from conducting the Dade’s Battle staff ride are as relevant today as they were over 175 years ago. With us today to discuss the Military Staff Ride and specifically how one is conducted at the Dade Battlefield is David A. “Scotty” Dawson, the civilian command historian for U.S. Central Command, at MacDill Air Force Base, in Tampa, Fla. Scotty is a retired Marine Corps colonel with numerous combat deployments to his credit.  Reenactor Steve Rinck, Seminole Wars Foundation president, portrays Irish-immigrant Pvt. Paddington McCormick -- Paddy to his friends. Paddy explains the miserable life of a U.S. Army recruit in Florida to British officers and NCOs from US Central Command visiting Dade Battlefield on a military staff ride in the summer of 2016. The British Army military contingent (in civilian clothes) and three living history reenactors (front row) portraying a trader, a Seminole warrior, and a U.S. Army soldier, pose for a group photo after completing the Dade Battle staff ride. The reenactors explained their character and the part they played in the Second Seminole War. Our guest this week, Scotty Dawson,  command historian for US CENTCOM, is standing in the back row, third from the left (white hat). Seminole Wars podcast host, Patrick Swan, is in center rear (wearing safari hat). Summer 2016.  The Staff Ride Handbook for Dade’s Battle, Florida, 28 December 1835 is published by The Combat Studies Institute at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Authored by Michael G. Anderson, this extensively researched handbook examines this opening conflict of the Second Seminole War. He uses it as a vehicle to allow organizations at any echelon to study leadership at the tactical level. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

Global Tennessee
Global News Review | March 24

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2021 63:42


Global News Review - March 24, 2021 Join our team of Ambassador Dick Bowers, Dr. Breck Walker and LCDR Patrick Ryan for expert analysis of current global developments. Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence. Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 42: Tango Alpha Lima: Black History in the Military

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 39:06


In honor of Black History Month, Team Tango has collected a group of stories about Black members of the military. Ashley shares the story of Retired Adm. Cecil Haney, who was one of the first Black four-star admirals in Navy history, serving as the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and the U.S. Strategic Command, where he oversaw nuclear weapons before retiring in 2017. Jeff shares a historical story of German POWs at a camp in Texas who were shocked by the shoddy treatment of the Black Americans who were their guards and who they worked alongside at local farms. CV shares the Medal of Honor story of Army Sgt. William H. Carney, who posthumously recieved the honor in 1900 for his actions during the charge of Fort Wagner in Charleston, S.C. during the Civil War. Rapid Fire Team Tango is inspired by three stories of Black History being made today by Black servicemembers * 2017 U.S. Naval Academy graduate Lt. JG Madeline Swegle who recently became the Navy's first Black female strike pilot * Former U.S. Central Command leader Lloyd Austin, who was confirmed as the nation's first Black Defense Secretary * 81-year-old retired Army Col. Paris Davis, who may finally recieve a long-delayed Medal of Honor for his actions to save wounded teammates during a gunfight in Vietnam in 1965.

Ladiespromotingtransparentadvocacy
SHA PTA' - Fantastic Fellas Friday - 1st Black Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin, III

Ladiespromotingtransparentadvocacy

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 39:07


EPISODE #79 - This Fantastic Fellas Friday – We celebrate 4-STAR General, now Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin, III.  In honor of Black History Month, we honor the First African American Secretary of Defense.  Here is his military history:  Years of service: 1975–2016, Battles/Wars: War in Afghanistan; Iraq War, Awards: Combat Action Badge, Expert Infantryman Badge, Education: Auburn University, United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., Austin served 41 years in uniform, retiring as a four-star Army general after three years as commander of U.S. Central Command. previously served as the 12th commander of United States Central Command from 2013 to 2016.  He retired United States Army four-star general and now the 28th secretary of defense, sworn in on Jan. 22, 2021.  I am sad that his speech in 2010 as he becomes Commander in Iraq can be said to America in 2021 addressing fair elections, insurgents (which what happened January 6, 2021 at the Capitol in America), and racism and extremists in the military.  WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO SAY?  LINKS BELOW FOR: APPLE, GOOGLE, PANDORA, AND SPOTIFY. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ladiespromotingtransparentadvocacy/id1526382637https://www.pandora.com/podcast/ladiespromotingtransparentadvocacy/PC:52161?corr=17965216&part=ug&_branch_match_id=819557998249581330https://open.spotify.com/show/5x7xSxWi2wj2UXPsWnZ0cw?si=peGax6j6SIumBT5tq7_hhghttps://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkLnBvZGJlYW4uY29tL2xhZGllc3Byb21vdGluZ3RyYW5zcGFyZW50YWR2b2NhY3kvZmVlZC54bWw&ep=14 Sources: Department of Defense - www.deffense.gov, www.Politico.com, www.apnews.comFollow us on Twitter: @AdvocacyLadies Podcast Email: podcasthostshapta19@gmail.com Org. Email: Ladiespromotingtransparentadvo@gmail.com Podcast Call-in Line: 404-855-7723

Global Tennessee
Global News Review | Feb 17

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 57:00


Global News Review - February 17, 2021 Join our team of Ambassador Dick Bowers, Dr. Breck Walker and LCDR Patrick Ryan for expert analysis of current global developments. Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence. TOPICS FOR FEBRUARY 17, 2021 TOPIC 1 – Early Obstacles for Biden Foreign Policy TOPIC 2 – France and the Sahel Check our bio for link TOPIC 3 – The World Trade Organization Gets a New Face Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

Middle East Brief
The Middle East and America's Global Posture

Middle East Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2021 17:51


Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin has launched a global posture review, shortly after taking office. To discuss the process and the likely implications for U.S. posture in the Central Command area of operation, Aaron speaks this week with Becca Wasser, a Fellow at the Center for New American Security's Defense Program and Co-Lead, The Gaming Lab.

Global Tennessee
Global News Review | Feb 10

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2021 62:09


Video: https://youtu.be/ge1xTTyo8M4 TOPIC 1 – BIDEN FOREIGN POLICY SPEECH TOPIC 2 – IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL: THE CLOCK IS TICKING TOPIC 3 – REMEMBERING GEORGE SCHULTZ Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence. Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

Global Tennessee
Global News Review | Feb 3

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2021 55:09


Global News Review - February 3, 2021 Join our team of Ambassador Dick Bowers, Dr. Breck Walker and LCDR Patrick Ryan for expert analysis of current global developments. Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence. TOPICS FOR February 3, 2021 Covid-19: Global Update Myanmar: Leadership Trouble India's Farmers: Growing Trouble for Modi and remembering Ralph Bunche This week we're pleased to welcome Austin Travis as a guest panelist on the Global News Review. Austin will provide background, context, and analysis of the unfolding drama of a coup in Myanmar. Austin Travis is a senior at Lipscomb University studying political science and international affairs. He is currently interning with the Tennessee World Affairs Council. Travis is a member of Lipscomb's Model U.N. team and has led Lipscomb's delegation to the Tennessee Intercollegiate State Legislature for three years. Additionally,  he volunteers with the YMCA Center for Civic Engagement's Model U.N. conferences for Tennessee high schoolers. Travis is from Dickson, Tennessee, and graduated from Dickson County High School. Since then, he has worked on various campaigns, most recently managing the successful re-election to the Tennessee House of Representatives for Rep. Mary Littleton. Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 1/20/21: #TrumpsNewArmy

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2021 18:00


A chilling new viral video from a New York Times best-selling author calls for liberals to spy on their (conservative, Republican) neighbors and report their activities to authorities. 5) Biden inauguration inside heavily fortified DC “Green Zone”; 4) Liberals call for citizen spies and deprogramming of Trump supporters; 3) Israel moves from US Europe Command to Central Command because of normalized relations between Israel and Arab nations; 2) Vatican blames $1.7 billion in mysterious money transfers on accounting software glitch; 1) Science author claims we might find bits of dinosaur bone on the Moon.

Intentional Living and Leadership with Cal Walters
#55: GEN (Ret.) David Petraeus — Get Results and Win as a Team

Intentional Living and Leadership with Cal Walters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2021 71:18


General (Ret.) David H. Petraeus served over 37 years in the U.S. military, culminating his career with six consecutive commands, five of which were in combat, including command of the Surge in Iraq, command of U.S. Central Command, and command of coalition forces in Afghanistan.  Following retirement from the military and a unanimous confirmation vote in the Senate, he served as Director of the CIA.  General Petraeus graduated with distinction from the West Point, and, get this, he is the only person in Army history to be the top graduate of both the demanding U.S. Army Ranger School and the U.S. Army’s Command and General Staff College. He also earned a Ph.D. from Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs.  General Petraeus was named one of America’s 25 Best Leaders by U.S. News and World Report, a runner-up for Time magazine’s Person of the Year, the Daily Telegraph man of the year, a Time 100 selectee, Princeton University’s Madison Medalist, and one of Foreign Policy magazine’s top 100 public intellectuals in three different years. General Petraeus hasn’t slowed down in retirement.  He now serves as a Partner and Chairman of the KKR Global Institute.  He is also a member of the boards of directors of Optiv and FirstStream, a venture investor in more than 15 startups, and engaged in a variety of academic endeavors. On this episode, General Petraeus was very kind to let me explore what life was like for him growing up and how his parents shaped him.  We also discuss how he met his wife, what it’s like to be a grandparent, his time at West Point, Ranger School, his impressions of President Bush, President Obama, and President-elect Biden, the role of mentors in his life, and much more. For show notes, visit https://www.calwalters.me/  

Courageous! Entrepreneur Podcast with Dr. Rollan Roberts
The Huddle: for African Enterprise Development with H.E. Dr. Rollan Roberts.

Courageous! Entrepreneur Podcast with Dr. Rollan Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 124:16


www.Transform-Africa.com. His Excellency Dr. Rollan Roberts is an advisor and resource to national governments on strong Artificial Intelligence and quantum-proof Cybersecurity and was nominated to Central Command's Department of Defense Civilian Task Force. He is the founder and Chairman of Transform Africa, Inc., Rollan College, and CEO of Courageous!, an Artificial General Intelligence and Cybersecurity research and product development think tank that serves advanced national security initiatives of national governments. He served as CEO of the Hoverboard company, creating the best-selling consumer product worldwide in 2015, and has a record of crafting viral global brands as CEO of both public and private SMB to multi-billion dollar companies.

Courageous! Entrepreneur Podcast with Dr. Rollan Roberts
KBC TV - Bailout Recovery for African SMEs

Courageous! Entrepreneur Podcast with Dr. Rollan Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 20:19


His Excellency Dr. Rollan Roberts is an advisor and resource to national governments on strong Artificial Intelligence and quantum-proof Cybersecurity and was nominated to Central Command's Department of Defense Civilian Task Force. He is the founder and Chairman of Transform Africa, Inc., Rollan College, and CEO of Courageous!, an Artificial General Intelligence and Cybersecurity research and product development think tank that serves advanced national security initiatives of national governments. He served as CEO of the Hoverboard company, creating the best-selling consumer product worldwide in 2015, and has a record of crafting viral global brands as CEO of both public and private SMB to multi-billion dollar companies.

Global Tennessee
Global News Review - December 9. 2020

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2020 58:50


Join our team of Ambassador Dick Bowers, Dr. Breck Walker and LCDR Patrick Ryan for expert analysis of current global developments. Here’s our December 9th topics: --2021 - What's in Store for America in the World --Iran: Maximum Pressure at the Barrel of a Gun --Brexit: Disorderly Conduct Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence, along with a little fun and your questions. Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

The Lawfare Podcast
General Austin as Secretary of Defense

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 36:01


President-elect Joe Biden has selected a new defense secretary, retired general Lloyd Austin, former commander of Central Command. The selection has received somewhat mixed reviews, and to discuss why, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Brookings senior fellow Mike O'Hanlon, a defense policy analyst, and Kori Schake, the head of defense and foreign policy at the American Enterprise Institute. They talked about why people are upset about General Austin's nomination, his background, the experience he has and doesn't have, who would have been a better choice and whether it matters that this is the second administration in a row that begins by putting a retired general at the head of the Pentagon.

Global Tennessee
Global News Review - December 2, 2020 - EP-108

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2020 59:43


Global News Review - December 2, 2020 Special Edition 2021 - What's in Store for America in the World With Special Guest Ambassador John Kornblum Former U.S. Ambassador to Germany and Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs And The Usual Gang of Three Ambassador Charles (Dick) Bowers, U.S. Foreign Service (Retired) Former U.S. Ambassador to Bolivia Dr. Breck Walker, Ph.D. Historian of U.S. Foreign Policy LCDR Patrick Ryan, USN(Ret) Former Naval Intelligence Officer Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence. Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

Bible in the News
The Merchants of Tarshish

Bible in the News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2020 27:25


Today, November 21 is the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s final arrival at Provincetown Harbor. The Pilgrims settled on American soil on November 21, 1620, four hundred years ago today. With them was the Geneva Bible. The message of that book has shaped American history and continues to do so today. Welcome to the Bible in the News, at www.bibleinthenews.com, this is David Billington with you. American Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo just wrapped up a visit to Israel. The Washington Post said of the visit, “Pompeo’s Christian Zionism takes center stage”. Pompeo visited an Israeli settlement in the region of the tribe of Benjamin, said to be a first for an American Secretary of State. The winery he visited named a wine after him. There he announced that the US would label goods made in settlements as “made in Israel.” Pompeo visited the strategic Golan Heights where America recognized Israeli sovereignty last year. He said, “This is a part of Israel and central part of Israel”. He condemned those in Europe who believe Israel should return the strategic highlands to Syria. During the visit he also announced that the American government would formally designate the anti-Israel “BDS” boycott movement as “anti-Semitic”. Today, in a message to Iran, the USA has deployed B-52 bombers to the Middle East. According to Fox News, “U.S. Central Command said the U.S. Air Force B-52H “Stratofortress” aircrews conducted the mission on “short notice” to “deter aggression and reassure U.S. partners and allies.””

Global Tennessee
Global News Review - November 4, 2020

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2020 78:09


Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence. Today we are going to check into the global response to the U.S. election. Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

Global Tennessee
Global News Review - November 11, 2020

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2020 58:20


Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence. Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

Global Tennessee
Global News Review - November 18, 2020

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2020 51:29


Give Dick, Breck and Pat 45 minutes and they'll give you the world. Analysis and entertaining commentary on the top events and issues leading global news reports. Hard to find insights and perspectives from diplomacy, academia and intelligence. Topics for November 18, 2020 1 – White House Transition: Global Reactions and Jiggery-Pokery 2 – Mammoth Asia-Pacific Trade Deal: America Outside, Looking In 3 - Peru’s Presidency Problems: Musical Chairs in Lima Charles Richard (Dick) Bowers served as the US Ambassador to Bolivia from 1991 through 1994. During that time, the American Embassy in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, was the largest and most complex U.S. embassy in South America. Ambassador Bowers grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, attended the University of California, Berkeley. He entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1967. From 1961 to 1964 he served in the U.S. Army as a Russian linguist in West Berlin at the height of the Cold War. As a career member of the U.S. diplomatic corps, Ambassador Bowers served in the U.S. Embassies in Panama, Poland, Singapore, Germany and Bolivia. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1995. Amb Bowers has been a Board Member of the Tennessee World Affairs Council since 2012. Patrick Ryan is a native of New York City. He enlisted in the Navy at age 17 and volunteered for submarine duty. He served aboard nuclear fast attack and ballistic missile boats during the Cold War, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1982 he was commissioned and served aboard a cruiser in the Western Pacific before becoming a Navy Intelligence Officer. Ryan served aboard the carrier Constellation in the Pacific, the Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate in the Pentagon, the Center for Naval Analysis, and the Intelligence Directorate of U.S. Central Command. Ryan retired from the Navy in 1998 and worked as a consultant on Intelligence Community projects and as the VP/COO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. Ryan ran a newsletter publishing business on international affairs from 1999-2016. He founded the Tennessee World Affairs Council in 2007. Breck Walker received his PhD in Diplomatic History from Vanderbilt in 2007. His dissertation was on the foreign policy of the Carter administration. He taught at Sewanee, the University of the South, 2007-2012, and on the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea Program in Spring 2013 and Fall 2015. He worked as a historian in the Historical Office of the Office of Secretary of Defense 2013-2016, researching and writing a book on early Pentagon cyber policy. Prior to becoming a history professor, Breck worked for twenty years as an investment banker, the last ten as co-head of the Corporate Finance Group at J.C. Bradford & Co in Nashville. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas, and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Breck serves as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee World Affairs Council.

Irregular Warfare Podcast
David Petraeus on Irregular Warfare and Countering Violent Extremism

Irregular Warfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 41:27


This episode features a conversation with retired Gen. David Petraeus. He served over thirty-seven years in the US military, including as commander of coalition forces during the surge in Iraq, commander of US Central Command, and commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan. He outlines lessons he argues the United States should have learned from two decades of fighting Islamist extremists, explains how US dominance in the particular areas allows it to support partners against violent extremist organizations using small and sustainable footprints, and provides his thoughts on the recently released Irregular Warfare Annex to the National Defense Strategy and how irregular warfare is situated within the context of rising great power rivalry. Intro music: "Unsilenced" by Ketsa Outro music: "Launch" by Ketsa CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 General David Petraeus served over 37 years in the U.S. military to include as commander of coalition forces during the surge in Iraq, commander of U.S. Central Command, and commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan. Following his service in the military, Gen. Petraeus served as the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. He is a 1974 graduate of West Point and received his Ph.D. in international relations from the School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. General Petraeus currently is a Partner at KKR, a global investment firm, and Chairman of the KKR Global Institute.

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
China has Everything They Need on Joe Biden to Control the Narrative

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2020 58:11


It was a systematic private computer scheme within the Obama Administration to use private off the record business and policy arrangements, at the expense of US National Security and Foreign Policy. Rest assured, China has everything they need on Joe Biden to control the narrative. Joe Biden and his son, Hunter Biden know the CCP has everything, emails, pictures, videos, etc.. This is a clear example and case of extortion and blackmail by a foreign government (China) against Biden's. The Biden family used Hunter's laptops as their private computer system just like Hillary Clinton did to hide and cover their tracks in their personal business affairs utilizing Joe's office of the VP, as access to numerous foreign countries; Ukraine, Russia, Romania, Kazakhstan, and China. We'll discuss the billion-dollar laptop and just how compromised Joe Biden is on the Voice of a Nation. Col Jim Waurishuk is retired from USAF, he is a career senior intelligence and special missions officer, former Deputy Director of Intelligence at U.S. Central Command, and served on the White House National Security Council staff.

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
Plausible Deniability, Democrat Urban Policies, Economic Growth

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2020 115:51


Today’s two-hour Voice of a Nation special broadcast is focused on 3 Huge Reasons Not to Vote for Joe Biden. (1) The Biden family have intertwined their business dealings with foreign governments⏤which could compromise US National Security. (2) The destruction of America’s cities go well beyond long-standing democrat policies which have failed the people⏤the current day looting, vandalizing and torching of businesses and homes in the name of social justice has become all too commonplace in our urban markets. (3) Threats of a national lockdown and a national mask mandate policy continues to be a theme from the Biden Campaign. Who is best to lead America out of the Covid-pandemic and positively jumpstart the US economy? We are already experiencing record economic growth with all indicators looking very positive, and in some cases historic numbers, from the Trump Administration. We discuss each of these factors in great detail with these national experts: Michael Johns is a national co-founder and leader of the U.S. Tea Party movement who endorsed President Trump on the first day of his candidacy in June 2015. He has served previously as a White House speechwriter to President George H.W. Bush, a senior aide to a U.S. Senator and Governor, and a policy analyst at The Heritage Foundation. (starts at 2:51 and 1:42:57) Lt Col Tony Shaffer (retired), is the President of the London Center for Policy Research, and a CIA trained intelligence operations officer with 35 years of experience in global and national security. (starts at 33:21) Col Jim Waurishuk is retired from USAF, he is a career senior intelligence and special missions officer, former Deputy Director of Intelligence at U.S. Central Command and served on the White House National Security Council staff. (starts at 59:06) Sgt. Betsy Brantner Smith is spokesman for the National Police Association. (starts at 1:21:58)

Ever Vigilant
004: Redbeard Combatives

Ever Vigilant

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2020 71:06


*******Audio is Rough on this one, the Skype recording failed to upload correctly, so I did the best that I could to get this episode out in a listenable state.******* I had a great conversation with Ben from Redbeard Combatives covering everything from Brazilian jiu-jitsu to church security. I learned a lot from this conversation and I feel that you will too. Ben has over 14 years of experience working with the U.S. Government and Private Security sectors, with a focus on training, physical security, and vulnerability assessments. He has deployed multiple times to austere locations including the Middle East and South America, as well as numerous at sea deployments providing training in vessel security aboard commercial ships transiting high-risk waters. Ben was the Assistant Team Leader on a US Department of State contract supporting humanitarian operations in Bolivia and Peru, conducting site security surveys and PSD operations in areas of civil unrest. He further provided physical security and personnel escort duties while attached to Task Force 3-10, working alongside U.S. military personnel at a forward operating base in Northern Afghanistan. Ben has provided courses of instruction in combatives to the: Army’s 101st Airborne Division at Fort Cambell, Kentucky; Joint Special Operations Command personnel in Afghanistan; various law enforcement agencies and a personal security detail for a senior general officer at Central Command in Tampa, Florida. He is also one of the primary self-defense and hand-to-hand combat instructors for Tactical Intelligence International, a military defense contractor in Orlando, Florida. He holds the rank of 2nd degree black belt in brazilian jiu-jitsu from Fabio Novaes of the Carlson Gracie Academy in Brazil, as well as numerous competitive accomplishments. Finally, Ben possess over 20 years of experience in the fields of civil and structural engineering design and holds a formal education in Intelligence Studies from American Military University, with advanced certifications in Counterintelligence. He is a certified protection specialist, weapons instructor, licensed private investigator and guest writer for numerous security publications. www.redbeardcombatives.com Please consider Donating, Reviewing, Sharing, and Promoting this Podcast to help advance the mission. Merch. has arrived! Coffee. T-Shirts, and Swag PrepareDefendLead.com Follow Prepare. Defend. Lead. on FB and IG

Foreign Podicy
The U.S. Military’s Southern Exposure: Trouble in the Neighborhood

Foreign Podicy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2020 56:06


The U.S. Southern Command, SOUTHCOM, is one of six geographic combatant commands. It’s responsible for planning, operations and security cooperation in Central America, South America, and most of the Caribbean. It’s a joint command including military and civilian personnel from the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Marine Corps, the Coast Guard, and several federal agencies.  Its mission is to deter aggressors, defeat threats, respond to crises, and work with allied and partner nations to defend the U.S. homeland and America’s national interests. The SOUTHCOM Commander, Admiral Craig S. Faller, is a Naval Academy graduate who served as Commander of the John C. Stennis Strike Group / Carrier Strike Group 3 in support of Operations New Dawn (in Iraq) and Enduring Freedom (in Afghanistan).  He has also served as the Director of Operations (J3) in U.S. Central Command, and as the Chief of Navy Legislative Affairs, which is where he worked with Bradley Bowman, senior director of FDD’s Center on Military and Political Power (CMPP).   Both join FDD Foreign Podicy host Cliff May for a discussion of the challenges and threats posed by America’s enemies and adversaries in this vital region.

Gridlock Break
General David Petraeus Discusses Strategic Leadership

Gridlock Break

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2020 64:58


David Petraeus is a retired United States Army General, having served in the military for 37 years. During that time, he was commander of U.S. Central Command and led combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. After retiring from the service, he served as director of the CIA during the Obama Administration. He is now chairman of the KKR Global Institute. Today, he discusses what kind of strategic leadership is needed to run and manage successful organizations. General Petraeus identifies four tasks of a strategic leader: (1) First and foremost, get the big ideas and strategies right. (2) Communicate those big ideas throughout your organization. (3) Oversee the implementation of big ideas. (4) Determining how to refine the big ideas and adopt new ones. According to Petraeus, this last task is often overlooked and can make the difference between a currently successful organization and a continuously successful one. Go to NoLabels.org to learn more about how we are bringing together a bipartisan group of public and private leaders working to solve America’s toughest problems.Follow No Labels and Gridlock Break Twitter • Facebook • Instagram

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
The Barack Obama – Hillary Clinton CoverUp

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2020 58:10


There are three takeaways you will discover in these recent revelations from Director of National Intelligence (DNI) John Ratcliffe, and they are: 1) Hillary Clinton manufactured a Russian Collusion scheme against Donald Trump. 2) CIA Director John Brennan briefed President Barack Obama. 3) FBI Director James Comey was a key player in their scheme. “In late July 2016, U.S. intelligence agencies obtained insight into Russian intelligence analysis alleging that U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton had approved a campaign plan to stir up a scandal against U.S. Presidential candidate Donald Trump by tying him to Putin and the Russians’ hacking of the Democratic National Committee. According to his handwritten notes, former Central Intelligence Agency Director Brennan subsequently briefed President Obama and other senior national security officials on the intelligence, including the ‘alleged approval by Hillary Clinton on July 26, 2016 of a proposal from one of her foreign policy advisors to vilify Donald Trump by stirring up a scandal claiming interference by Russian security services.’” “On 07 September 2016, U.S. intelligence officials forwarded an investigative referral to FBI Director James Comey and Deputy Assistant Director of Counterintelligence Peter Strzok regarding ‘U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s approval of a plan concerning U.S. Presidential candidate Donald Trump and Russian hackers hampering U.S. elections as a means of distracting the public from her use of a private mail server.’” Col Jim Waurishuk is retired from USAF, he is a career senior intelligence and special missions officer, former Deputy Director of Intelligence at U.S. Central Command and served on the White House National Security Council staff.

Bill Whittle Network
Commander in Tweet: Trump Says U.S. Troops Home by Christmas, Taliban Rejoices

Bill Whittle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2020 19:04


President Trump tweets he'll bring the remaining U.S. troops home from Afghanistan by Christmas. Hours earlier, his National Security Advisor Robert O'Brien, said U.S. forces would draw down to 2,500 sometime early next year. The Taliban rejoices at Trump seems poised to fulfill the terms of a peace agreement even though the Taliban has not lived up to its end of the deal. How U.S. Central Command respond to mixed messages from the administration of the Commander in Tweet. Bill Whittle Now with Scott Ott is a production of our Members. Join us at https://BillWhittle.com

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

Brig. Gen. Chad T. Manske is the 30th Commandant of the National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C. The mission of the National War College is to prepare future leaders of the armed forces, Department of State, foreign military officers and other civilian agencies for high-level policy command and staff responsibilities by conducting a senior-level course of study with emphasis on the formulation and implementation of national security strategy and policy. As the commandant, Brig. Gen. Manske is responsible for formulating academic policies, supervising curriculum planning, preparation and ensuring excellence in classroom teaching. Prior to assuming his current position, Brig. Gen. Manske was the Deputy Commander, Canadian North American Aerospace Defense Region and Deputy Combined/Joint Force Air Component Commander for 1 Canadian Air Division, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Brig. Gen. Manske was commissioned in 1989 following his graduation from Michigan State University and has commanded at the squadron, group and wing levels. Additionally, he has deployed in support of ongoing operations in Central and Southwest Asia as an Air Expeditionary Group Commander, the Deputy Director and Director of the U.S. Central Command’s Deployment and Distribution Operations Center and as an Air Expeditionary Wing Commander for operations Odyssey Dawn and Unified Protector.