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  • Nov 27, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about Cheetos

Achieving Reality:  The Podcast!
Episode 446 - Heartfelt Acoustic Battles

Achieving Reality: The Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 30:40


Larry and Chris try chili cheese Cheetos, talk about Corpsegrinder and learn some weird facts.  Enjoy!

The Von Haessler Doctrine
The Von Haessler Doctrine S9/E051 - RE-VH

The Von Haessler Doctrine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 100:16


Join Eric, @TimAndrewsHere, @Autopritts, @JaredYamamoto, @EnglishNick, and Greg as they chat about political dummies, flesh Cheetos, static electricity, and much more! (EXPLICIT LANGUAGE) “Brought to you by Findlay Roofing”

Stephs In The City on Radio Misfits
Stephs In The City – 3,2,1…Let's Jam

Stephs In The City on Radio Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 108:14


Adele gets Spotify to kiss her ass. Who is offering Cheeto-flavored wings for a limited time? Also, Five Things, Sex Position of the Day, new music from Guy King, listener voicemail and a lot more! [EP123] The post Stephs In The City – 3,2,1…Let's Jam appeared first on Radio Misfits.

Face Jam
Applebees Cheetos Boneless Wings & Cheetos Cheese Bites

Face Jam

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 75:58


In this episode, Michael Jones and Jordan Cwierz eat and review Applebees Cheetos Boneless Wings & Cheetos Cheese Bites so you know if it's worth eating. They also talk about the food the whole entire time, knowing it was going to be a good trip, supply chain issues, and a special Snack Attack from Jordan himself. Sponsored by Honey (http://joinhoney.com/facejam) and Upstart (http://upstart.com/facejam).

Topic Lords
109. Ultra Rare Cheeto Shaped Like Batman Crying

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 68:53


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * Stevie * Avery * https://averyburke.bandcamp.com/ Topics: * Collectable cheetos on Ebay * https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=rare+cheeto * Japanese websites are stuck in the 90s. Any theories? * https://search.marginalia.nu/ * Medieval European and ancient Egyptian philosophy. * Brad asks "Denatured alcohol: alcohol that has poison added to it to prevent people drinking it. What other things do we / could we intentionally pollute to restrict their usage?" * The unusual puzzles of StarTropics. Microtopics: * Defining poop by its shape. * The lava of the human body. * The Content Distribution Baby growing up into a Content Distribution Man. * An angry internet mob that won't say why they're angry so you just have to fix every problem until they go away. * Legally changing your name to add a silent and invisible Bitcoin logo. * Searching for collectible Cheetos on eBay. * A Cheeto shaped like a lobster claw. * Putting a Cheeto shaped like a cockatiel on eBay for months but nobody's buying so you give up and eat it. * Whether there is a subculture of investors collecting rare Cheetos on eBay or if it's just a subculture of people listing Cheetos on eBay as a joke. * heritageauctionsforcheetos.com * Bidding $40,000 on a Cheeto shaped like Harambe when you have no intention of paying, because the worst that can happen is that your eBay score goes down by one point. * Buying a penis-shaped collectible Cheeto for $1.40 but still waiting on it because it got caught up in escrow. * Bidding on an eBay auction and walking away when you get outbid. * Looking at collectible Cheeto auctions and then eBay won't stop trying to sell you posters of ladies canoodling. * Cheeto misprints and their value on the collectors market. * Arnold Schwarzenegger if his legs were joined together like a seal. * The web sites we visited back before the internet had the power to reach into the real world and strangle it. * A search engine optimized to return pages that are mostly static text. * Loading the bottom of your web page with keywords. * Keeping a designer on payroll so that every few years your interface can alternate between having gradients and being flat. * Asking Jeeves things and he tells you the answers, like a modern day Delphi. * Let's play: Flaming Hot Cheetos or Freezing Cold Cheetos? * A cheerleader pyramid made of butlers. * Scraping Wikipedia and formating the results like a book. * A postcard with a picture of Kim Jong Un saying "Live, Laugh, Love." * Pharaoh culture. * A Canticle for Liebowitz. * Medieval monks stumbling into a bomb shelter. * Making an illuminated manuscript of instructions on how to build a bomb so you can give it to the Pope. * The Learned Bede. * The four dudes in your culture who can write and create original work. * Kingdoms in medieval Europe, centered around the manors of rich noble Romans. * Nearly everyone dying from the plague so all the public servants are in their early teens. * Intelligible Forms. * Aristotelean ideas about science. * Going real alien. * Ultra Rare Cheeto Shaped Like The Venerable Bede. * The first dinosaur of Egypt. * Inventing the razor because of your unsightly back hair. * Waking up from anesthetic to find that the surgeon shaved body parts nowhere near the incision site, "because you're a hairy beast." * First, do no hair. * The Egyptian book of the Dead. * The Egyptian conception of the afterlife, where you go underground and a guy with a crocodile head weighs your heart against the Feather of Truth and if your heart balances, you get to sit in a long line with your male predecessors for eternity, and that's the best possible outcome. * Religions competing to provide the best afterlife. * When we as a species learned to attach afterlife outcomes to ethical behavior, as opposed to dying in battle. * Having a dream once where all the great kings, after they die they go to the House of Dust and eat clay for eternity, and deciding that that's a fact. That's canon now. * The nine parts of the soul. * Being constantly surrounded, your whole life, by monuments to death big enough to see from space. * Adding a scent to natural gas so that you can smell when it's filling your house. * Whether antifreeze is sweet and if so can a cat taste antifreeze. * How one might test whether cats can taste sweet. * Tongue meat analysis: a great way to tell. * The Inverted Qualia Problem. * Asking a cat if it can taste sweet, and the cat asks "what does sweet mean" and you say "sweet my internal experience when I put these white crystals in my mouth" and the cat is like "I also have an internal experience when I put these white crystals in my mouth." * A video game related topic. * Trying to locate your missing uncle who has been abducted by aliens. * A video game NPC asking you for a password and to find it you can to have to dip the video game's manual in water in real life. * An 80s video game puzzle that requires you to be familiar with solfege to solve it. * How you could get away with a lot more bullshit back in the 80s. * The experience of suddenly realizing that it's the piece of paper. * Going into a portable trailer made up like a cool bachelor pad and noticing that you don't have a reflection in the mirror and upon further examination realizing that the mirror is actually a window into the same room reversed, down to the clock running counterclockwise. * Sneaking irrelevant puzzles into someone else's room escape game. * Forcing the employees of an escape room to escape an escape room of their own. (Jail.) * The ultimate unrequited high five.

Green Light with Chris Long
NFL Week 11 Recap! Jonathan Taylor, Colt McCoy Ruining Bets & Jordan Davis. Applebees Cheetos Wings Taste Test.

Green Light with Chris Long

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 82:46


(2:42) - Hello, Layup Line and CFB Mentions: Jordan Davis, UCLA vs USC and Oregon. (17:20) - Ringing the Bell for Two NFL Teams and Colt McCoy Ruining Chris' Bets. (26:05) - AFC Frontrunners: Indianapolis Colts at Buffalo Bills and Best Plane Ride, Dallas Cowboys at Kansas City Chiefs and Night Cap, Baltimore Ravens at Chicago Bears and STL Memorial. (45:06) - Washington Football Team at Carolina Panthers, Cam Newton vs Taylor Heinicke, Fly on the Wall and Viewing Party. (53:43) - Green Bay Packers at Minnesota Vikings, Minnesota Life Alert and Kirk vs Aaron. (1:01:18) - New Orleans Saints at Philadelphia Eagles, Jalen Hurts Can't Be Stopped, Darius Slay's Touchdown and Eagles Playoff Chances. (1:06:17) - Crappy Games: Houston Texans at Tennessee Titans, Miami Dolphins at New York Jets and San Francisco 49ers at Jacksonville Jaguars. (1:18:25) - Chris and Nate Taste Test Applebees' Cheetos Boneless Wings. Green Light Spotify Music: https://open.spotify.com/user/951jyryv2nu6l4iqz9p81him9?si=17c560d10ff04a9b Spotify Layup Line: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1olmCMKGMEyWwOKaT1Aah3?si=675d445ddb824c42 Green Light with Chris Long: Subscribe and enjoy weekly content including podcasts, documentaries, live chats, celebrity interviews and more including hot news items, trending discussions from the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA, NCAA are just a small part of what we will be sharing with you. http://bit.ly/chalknetwork Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

Casey and Danielle are guest-less this episode as is only right for an episode of this gravitas. Still recovering from the 50-hour bus ride to hell (Vail) where secrets were revealed, six lawyers were called and a bag of Cheetos became a character, they're honestly spent. Is Meredith still in the bath as we speak? Most likely. Plus they discuss a Gizelle and Karen moment that brought tears to our eyes and the breeziest show that they've ever laid eyes on, Real Housewives Ultimate Girls Trip!!!! Lastly, 'tis the season for Casey and Danielle's unauthorized Favorite Things segment. Enjoy! HOLIDAY MERCH LINK: you not YOU: https://www.teepublic.com/crewneck-sweatshirt/25676406-you-not-you?ref_id=6572 Bitch Sesh Logo: https://www.teepublic.com/crewneck-sweatshirt/25673597-bitch-sesh-20?ref_id=6572  

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU
Worst Of The RIOT for November 16th, 2021

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 48:08


Hudson and Nikki find out about Denmark's controversial method of cleaning their beaches. They also discuss which other broadcasting jobs they're capable of doing, if any. Cheetos at Applebee's, a new character on Sesame Street, space controversy, and more in today's Worst Of The RIOT.

Woody & Wilcox
The Woody and Wilcox Show for 11-16-2021

Woody & Wilcox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 65:07


Today on the Woody and Wilcox Show: Applebee's has Cheetos wings; Burgess Meredith's birthday; It Happened in Flori-duh; Sucking in your stomach can cause incontinence; Craig's List Price is Right; Manning Cast curse; Jogger saves pets from house fire; United to start serving liquor; And so much more!

Sylvester Stallone Fan Podcast Network
VAN DAMMIT! A Jean-Claude Podcast (Bonus) - Rocky I - V

Sylvester Stallone Fan Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 100:13


Moody and Groo get in the ring and duke it out over Rocky 1-5. Blood (and Cheeto dust) is drawn. Part 2, covering Rocky Balboa and Creed coming soon

The Bledsoe Show
Censorship is F'ing Retarded

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 106:02


00:00.56 mikebledsoe That's how you already canceled you're bulletproof. 00:01.76 Max Shank It's okay I already canceled myself so well, it's like I found I was putting so much of my identity into this illusion that I had masterfully crafted. On the internet I was like the dark night of fitness I was professional I was like once in a while a little bit funny I used all the big fancy words and I only showed people the exact slice of my life I wanted them to see and I was really good at it too and then I was like man this is a. Probably probably not good long term like this whole this whole reality that we've created where people think oh, that's just that's just max all the time I'm just out there. You know going on vacations and lifting huge things all the time and it's not really.. It's not really very honest. So of course I think we all do to fit in I think that's kind of normal and the best friends you have are the ones you don't have to fake around and truthfully. 00:57.30 mikebledsoe Or you are censoring yourself. It sounds like. 01:15.83 Max Shank I don't really hang out with too many people that I have to um, fake it around which is why I say some horrible things that are also really funny like if you've ever played the game would you rather? that's a really, that's a really good 1 Are you played would you rather. 01:20.66 mikebledsoe Four. 01:30.62 mikebledsoe No. 01:34.00 Max Shank So here's it's a hypothetical game. So for example, would you rather have sex with a goat and have no 1 know about it or have a video of you having sex with a goat that's totally fake, but everyone thinks you did. 01:47.44 mikebledsoe Oh that's a good 1 Yeah ah I'm gonna censor myself on that 1 actually I'm I'm having a hard time because yeah I think I might be on the same page as you on that 1 Ah. 01:56.14 Max Shank I would have sex with the goat. 02:04.99 Max Shank Is because there's still such a social stigma against bestiality right now we're not really enlightened about that. 02:07.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's and. 02:13.34 mikebledsoe Ah, well, it's interesting. What you're discussing is self-censorship is ah I hear people say they want to be more Authentic. You know I talk to a lot of people who want to express themselves on the internet and because I think people witnessed me do it and then they're like how do you do it I Want to do it too. And and and I'm definitely somebody Who's who's got a history of censoring myself less So these days than and earlier. But I think people deep down they desire not needing a sensor sensor themselves. They they want to. They want to be widely accepted by everybody but they think that the only way that can happen and it's probably true. The only way you can be popular with everybody is to censor yourself depending on the audience you're talking to and the person you're talking to. 03:03.58 Max Shank It is the most important thing to fit in with the group that you're a part of to fit in with the tribe I mean little kids go Rob seven eleven s and murder people so they can be part of a gang people say things that they don't mean people lie I mean I was a kid once I used to lie. 03:16.69 mikebledsoe Yep. 03:22.26 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 03:22.93 Max Shank Did you ever lie I was great at it I had like think I had like 50 grandparents die as far as teachers knew growing up. Oh I decided I didn't do my homework a grandparents diet or something like that you know like when your're kid and you find out that lying is a. 03:29.54 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah. 03:42.50 Max Shank Like a ten second uncomfortable experience that can save you like weeks of trouble. Potentially it's it's natural that you would do it and if you're talking about how to like fit in better. Oh my god of course we all do that. 03:49.94 mikebledsoe Yeah. 03:57.67 mikebledsoe Yeah, but would you say that everyone on of about everyone. But I think that everyone gets to a point at some point in their life where they don't want to have to censor themselves anymore and I think that they. When they are at that point the language they use to describe what they desire is they want to be free I Want to be free to express myself and ah and what ends up happening is when someone starts exploring how much they want to express themselves. Find out that they're the only ones that are censoring themselves based on wanting to be accepted by the tribe and the likeability and so I've witnessed a lot of people including myself go through this process where a slowly saying fuck it I don't give a fuck What people think. I'm going to be more honest and then watching watching the polarization happen where some people get become more distant from me the more honest I am and other people getting a lot closer because of how honest I am and it's a it's a filter and it's and it's. 04:57.20 Max Shank And. 05:02.56 Max Shank Well, it's just filter. It's a good thing. It's like panning for gold. 05:09.20 mikebledsoe And it's really served me in a way where I experience my experience of my life is ah very enhanced. It's it's unreal at times. Um, and my sister she came to my birthday party a few weeks ago. And she got to witness my community and she was blown away. She didn't realize that people could be like that. But it really is a result of censoring myself less and attracting those people who and then giving permission to other people. Censor themselves less because I think you and I both say things that in. Probably me more publicly but say things that people turn their heads at and go well that's a crazy thing to say I've never heard anyone say that before or put it that way. Um, and I think I think it gives people permission to go oh if he can do it I can do it too. 05:58.42 Max Shank Totally and. Well and there's something to be said about a frictionless experience like if you're in a situation where I guess what I'm saying is it's easy to put other people at ease with the way that you communicate. Like you don't have to draw attention to things that are like if you see someone who's really overweight. You don't have to draw attention to their fatness. You don't have to just speak whatever you instinctually think so we're always choosing what to say as if. 06:32.71 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, it doesn't mean doesn't mean that. 06:40.10 Max Shank It's important or not important. 06:40.61 mikebledsoe Well I would say it's um, yeah, censorship is a form of filter but it's not the only version of Filter. There's There's the the filter of of ah of response you're being responsible with your words and how people receive them. And so it wouldn't behoove me to go out there and tell everybody exactly what I think and the way that I want to say it now. What I do is I say things say what I believe and what I think in a way in which I know it can be received because there's no point and if I'm just saying. You know if I'm just dropping the truth. Ah the way that I want to be heard and understood I'm just going to sound like a crazy person. 07:27.50 Max Shank Well, you just touched on something that I was thinking which is a good communicator doesn't just communicate the information as simply as possible. He considers who the audience is so it will resonate with them the best. So. 07:40.68 mikebledsoe A. 07:46.26 Max Shank The examples that you use or the language you use I mean you and I both understand the the power of communication and getting a resonant message if you and I were writing an exercise program. For 20 year old men or 50 year old women. The program itself might actually look the same but the way that we present that offer would be monumentally different or at least it should be monumentally different. So it's not just about. 08:18.78 mikebledsoe A. 08:23.98 Max Shank Oh I'm like speaking my truth. It's like well why are you talking at all unless you care about the message being received. 08:30.28 mikebledsoe Yeah, well that but that makes me think of like like ah it it it requiring you to have good communication to get your point across in a way that they can receive it is that is ah a good sense. That's good. Ah. Leadership. That's good communication to have good leadership. You have to have good communication and what I think we're witnessing in our society right now is um, it's laziness I see that that censorship when when censorship is being heavily used. It's ah it's a form of laziness. And it's also um, on that note, what we were just saying too is you have to fit it to your audience. So what ends up happening is the larger the audience the harder it is to be good at communicating with that audience. So we we take the United states of America and there's 3 hundred and fifty million people. You now have to create ah get to communicate the narrative in a way that that impacts all 3 hundred million people is that even lowest common and nomin and is that possible and so. 09:35.80 Max Shank Lowest common denominator. 09:42.63 mikebledsoe And then that's why I mean lowest common denominator is the exact reason why any time the average per we look at what's happening with Mainstream I go they're going right? What's left. They're going left. What's right? Okay, what's going on here because when there's being to the low and lower. Low is coming denominator if you want to be average. That's the that's the perfect advice to take that's the perfect information to consume and to believe if you want to be above average. You have to go the other way and that that can be very uncomfortable but to me I look at the difference between good leadership and and. And poor leadership is that ability to communicate effectively and I just see a lot of laziness and when people say do this because I said so is like okay, you just lost it. 10:29.41 Max Shank Well and the other side of that is that you could say it's not laziness. It's just efficiency because you have to trust like. For example, if I get a plumber over at my house. And I don't know anything about plumbing I have to trust that he's going to do a good job and there is an incentive for him to do good job and maybe there's a contract that says if the pipe explodes he's on the hook for it. So I don't blame people for seeking answers outside themselves because it is way more efficient. However, while it is more efficient. It is also so I think about it in terms of concentration of Power. So if you concentrate power into a single point you can get more penetration which means you can do things much faster like a dictatorship but the trick with concentration. Is. You also give leave yourself open to the fast track for concentration Camps. So it's It's ah it's just exactly so. 11:29.88 mikebledsoe Yeah,, but there's also single single points of Failure. So if you if you concentrate your supply chain and everything's going through 1 2 3 ports or something like that. It only takes 1 person to do something Dumb. And the entire population suffers. 11:51.40 Max Shank Investing is a good example too. You know you have your investment portfolio say you have a million dollars or something like that. Do you put equal amounts into 10 companies equal amounts into 1 hundred companies or do you put it all into 1 company and. If you put it all into 1 company and that 1 just happens to do the best you have made the most that you can possibly make. But if it goes to zero. You've also lost everything so it's a real. It's it's tricky with with concentration of power and I think that's really what this all comes back to. Thomas soul I always go back to because he said what we do is not important. It's who decides what we do who decides? what information should be censored and what information should not be censored and that's that's a worthwhile conversation to have um. I think when it comes to the overarching idea of what is the role of government I like the phrase. The role is not to protect people. It is to protect freedom from coercion. Essentially so we're trying to keep people free. To pursue happiness right? Life liberty and pursuit of happiness that doesn't mean you buy food for everybody. It means that you prevent stealing and coercion and fraud and things like that. 13:18.38 mikebledsoe I think I think it's referred to as negative rights is that the the government and ah you know most people in the world and and Americans are included in this unfortunately the assumption is that they have no rights and all rights are granted by the government and. 13:23.60 Max Shank Ah. 13:36.86 Max Shank It's just the opposite. 13:38.60 mikebledsoe And a place if you're looking at from perspective. What's called well I didn't even hear this term until recently and they go oh yeah, negative rights I go okay that actually makes sense and that is you have the right? you have the right to do anything you want as long as you don't impede on someone else's rights and. Ah, the government's there just to ensure that we don't trample over each other's shit and that means not inhibiting. Someone's pursuit of life liberty happiness upholding um ah property rights essentially so the government is it. It was it was there to protect you know in the very beginning. 14:11.97 Max Shank It's really all it's for. 14:16.80 mikebledsoe Started off with people that knew how to fight and had weapons would protect farmers and they made deals with the farmers so they wouldn't get robbed by these thieves and then they demanded you know a five percent of their rations and then of course that's now if you're an american that's up to 30 something percent. Um, are your rations for to pay for your protection. Um, so it's ah that the benefit that the government gets from from censorship but I see is it's ah just a maintenance of power. So if you're if your job. If you're that person that comes in and says I'm going to protect you and ah and then there becomes there's potential competition for protection then ah you know they've got to do whatever they can do to squash that because they don't they don't want competition for being able to. Ah, protect your property and your life. 15:11.39 Max Shank Right? So kind of tying it back into censorship which is the core discussion today. What are the advantages ofor censorship. How is it good for everybody. 15:23.52 mikebledsoe Yeah, so I went online and I did a search and so I found I found 8 that's right fucking? Well you know that's why I use. Ah, that's why I use a duck duck go. 15:30.23 Max Shank And and somebody chose what results that you were able to see from that search. 15:42.12 mikebledsoe With a vpn so I actually so I take steps personally to reduce how much censorship I'm experiencing from Google That's true. That's true. Yeah. 15:49.21 Max Shank Sometimes the results aren't as good though. That's the problem right now. Sometimes they aren't as good and I I try it with both because I do the same thing. 16:00.83 mikebledsoe Yeah I agree. Ah yeah, so these these are I'll go through the list. Ah 1 is hate speech censorship allows us to reduce hate speech number 2 is protect children which is the ah to me is the number 1 excuse for censorship that. Anytime censorships gets questioned. It's like the last stand you know when you used to? yeah we mean privacy. Oh yeah, yeah, but I think that people want privacy from the government. So. It's kind of like if they're the ones censoring that's people are more likely to. 16:21.90 Max Shank Or privacy. Yeah. 16:35.20 mikebledsoe Give their information to Facebook and they are to government. 16:35.28 Max Shank Oh but what I'm saying is if you convince everybody that it's for the sake of protecting kids from getting raped that they have to look through your phone every day then some people will be okay with that is pretty high level persuasion. It's always kids. 16:45.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, so yeah. 16:53.69 Max Shank Always you know, take away the guns cause of the children take away your privacy because of the children take away free speech because of the children won't somebody think of the children. There's a there's a sign in my neighborhood quick tangent that says drive like your kids live here. 17:01.42 mikebledsoe Right? I Wonder how the kids. 17:12.51 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 17:12.68 Max Shank You know there is There's a road to speed limit sign. But there's this extra sign that someone has put out that says drive like your kids here and what I want to do is put up my own sign that says teach your kids. What a road is oh. 17:30.14 mikebledsoe Ah I. 17:30.83 Max Shank Like what like oh my god that's just ridiculous I understand the concept some helicopter Mom is like worry that their kid will run out in the street. But really if her little kid runs out in the street and it's it's too young to know the difference then she's a bad mom. And if it's old enough to know the difference but she doesn't communicate that then she's also a bad mom. So. Either way, it's that parent's fault just like if you see a fat kid. That's not the kid's faultest. Parent's fault 17:53.83 mikebledsoe Yeah, well. Yeah I want to get in I want to get in the who's who's responsible because I think responsibility is is a good way to ah segue this and into some some actionables by end of this show but I want to hit this the rest of this list so hate speech protect children. Reduce conflict in society which I'm not sure that's actually working ah security to a country's government. Actually what was what was on the internet was security. What was it. Ah. 18:41.54 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah to a country's profile censorship can provide another level of security to a country's profile. Um, which to me again, it's they're not trying to censor and that's basically censoring sensitive. Government documents from being exposed like a wikileaks type of conversation. So Um I I like to point out that a lot of people confuse. Ah your country with your government and these 2 things are separate um and it's interesting to run into a blog where they. And make that collapse distinction ipe. Oh yeah, what was it. 19:18.00 Max Shank Mark Twain had a quote about that a man should be loyal to his country all the time and loyal to his government when they deserve it. 19:28.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, beautiful Mark twain 1 of my favorite authors. Um I p I p for artists and inventors so intellectual property copyright so you can't rip off someone else's work. Ah. 19:32.53 Max Shank No, it's funny guy. 19:40.96 Max Shank And then. 19:45.53 mikebledsoe By the way I think I p the idea of I p is not that old I think it's about 1 hundred years old or something like that. Well at least the modern day I p um because we can copy shit now whereas before it wasn't an issue. Um. 19:50.38 Max Shank Are. 20:04.20 mikebledsoe Stop false content. That's 1 that's probably the most popular 1 that's out right now fake news ah improve quality of information. Basically they said improve ah their exact words for like. 20:07.30 Max Shank Fake news. 20:23.40 mikebledsoe Improve a person's knowledge that 1 kind of made me chuckle. Um and and reduce identity Theft. So All these things sound good at face value Hate speech. Protect children reduce conflict in society security to a country's government I P for artists inventors stop False Content. You want just break each 1 of these down. 20:46.80 Max Shank Sure we could I mean Hate Speech is funny because who who decides where's the line. 20:52.36 mikebledsoe Why I think when you jump right to the end max I think I think that um I mean all this all this comes down to who decides on all these topics is and just so you were saying about Thomas so so soul 21:01.16 Max Shank That's what I do. Um, yeah. Soul Oh My God He's the man you should watch ah the out never mind I'll tell you later it's He's good though. 21:11.96 mikebledsoe Haven't read a ship before I have to check it out. Ah so. 21:20.27 mikebledsoe Cool. Ah yeah, it's like who who decides and I think that ah people tend to treat people who are in office as some type of superior being that knows better than them. And I get talking to people about this and the way they talk about it I'm going Wow You really believe that there are people who I I understand there are these people who are experts but ah the people that you've decided to trust are just people who happen to be in office or were appointed by people who were in office. And're not necessarily. They're the best policy makers. They're the best at creating policy which is making rules for other people to follow, but they're not the best that really anything else. They're really good at control. Oh yeah. 22:06.66 Max Shank I Disagree I Disagree I think they I think you can either do good or you can do well and I think the people who can do well who can play the game who can be charismatic sociopaths who are hungry for more power and willing to distribute it. Are the ones who are in Charge. Definitely not the people who are best at making policies that are effective in improving. Oh well I mean yeah, that's. 22:31.36 mikebledsoe Well I'm not saying good policies I'm just saying ah the creation of policies is about control. 22:41.25 Max Shank True and what I'm saying is the people who hold those positions of power aren't even necessarily the ones who are writing those policies. It's just the ones who are the most power hungry who then hire like lawyers and there's lobbying and stuff like that. So when we ask. Who decides? That's 1 of the big problems mean lobbying is a crazy bad problem right? and we don't have time. We don't have time if I mean if you look at how that works you would. It's almost enough to blow your brains out and be like this is game over like how did this happen. 23:06.95 mikebledsoe Insane. 23:16.84 mikebledsoe Oh. 23:19.32 Max Shank But ah now as far as who decides it's always the people who are the most power hungryngry because by definition they're going to have the biggest incentive to get that power because if you're in that situation. It's painful to not have. That level of power and everything comes back from pain being the primary motivator hunger desire pain all Synonyms. So. It's no surprise that the biggest incentive actually is to maintain that authority and the other. Authority is basically just you must trust me Blindly and it goes back to our 2 common rhetorical fallacies or logical fallacies which are appeal to authority and ad homism attack and they're the 2 arguments. Totally disregard the argument and instead focus on the arguer and this is this is where we get into why it's efficient to just trust somebody else like hey doctor science you you make my health decisions for me. 24:19.55 mikebledsoe Yeah. 24:33.62 Max Shank Is load off my mind so much easier I can understand the desire to do that and it's also so much faster to just write somebody off Oh that guy that guy max he's fucking Crazy. Don't listen to him don't even listen to anything he says he's just a. Crazy Conspiracy Theorist Nut Job Jerk I don't know you get it. 24:57.35 mikebledsoe Yeah, amazing thing about ah I've also got a list of which I want to hit I started a list of basically overt and covert censorship and the the labeling of things is. 25:07.40 Max Shank Ah. 25:15.47 Max Shank Um, how about essential how about essential. 25:16.61 mikebledsoe Ah, very interesting right? Yeah yeah, it's yeah I'd say I'm putting down labeling as censorship I Hate speech. 25:34.25 Max Shank What about it? Ah no, it's not nice, but I don't know people basically will dig their own grave by being hateful. 25:35.72 mikebledsoe Is there anything wrong with it. 25:50.63 mikebledsoe Yeah, that's a very wise place to sit from what about for the fools out there. 25:58.30 Max Shank But for well I don't hate the fools I like fools. Um, once again I don't think there's a problem with ignorance. Nothing wrong with that I'm ignorant about most things arrogance which is like I know what's best for you. 26:00.49 mikebledsoe Um. 26:17.34 Max Shank Instead of I know what's best for me. That's rather problematic and yeah I don't understand the the need or even the definition of hate Speech like could I could I call you a homo but not a fag Just for example. 26:29.38 mikebledsoe Um, well, um, yeah. 26:36.69 Max Shank I like homos frankly I think they're a really exuberant bunch. It seems like they almost ah get a. It seems like they crack the code. You know what? I mean like they get like the mail. 26:50.90 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 26:55.29 Max Shank Sexual energy. But they also get the feminine like exuberance and they seem a little bit more liberated like it seems like pretty fun Actually I'm not sexually attracted to dudes. But if I were I would have had it would be so easy. 27:03.58 mikebledsoe Yeah. 27:09.79 mikebledsoe You be so good at it. Yeah, so it's um, well I'm reading this book right now the cuddling of the american mind and 1 of the things they talk about is ah they talk about this view that that. 27:13.70 Max Shank And be such a good homo. 27:29.43 mikebledsoe Words are violence and that you know if you so yeah, yeah, well this is this is what's going on in up and they're looking specifically at colleges and academics in academic settings where people are being. 27:32.11 Max Shank Sounds like a collapse distinction. 27:46.61 mikebledsoe Are invited to come speak and then people basically come out and say that this person is causing violence because they're saying something that causes an emotional trigger inside of them so there is this. Ah, there's this thing where people believe that. Ah, how. 27:55.47 Max Shank Ah. 28:06.15 mikebledsoe How they interpret your intention is your intention you're doing this to hurt me. It's like well I'm just speaking words and and so people have have confused ah emotional pain with physical injury. 28:23.11 Max Shank I Think people should be forced to wrestle and do a little boxing growing up so they can understand the distinction between physical violence and I don't actually think that but there's definitely a common nominator in people I've met at least. 28:23.12 mikebledsoe These these are 2 different things. 28:42.00 Max Shank Those who have some experience with martial arts boxing Jujitsu Judo something like that seem to have a much more realistic perception of the world. They seem to have less of this. Fear based lashing out for things that other people just say there's a big difference. Well and don't didn't we like blame Grand Theft Auto for for violence or something like that. 29:04.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, cause they're they're more in touch with cause and effect. 29:18.68 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 29:20.81 Max Shank Haven't heard about like the hooker murder epidemic that resulted from that probably still way more people die as a result of alcohol but we try to we try to Cherry pick these things and I don't know we're always like fighting each other for a new reason you know the whole. 29:28.49 mikebledsoe Yeah. 29:38.98 Max Shank Idea of hate speech is where do you draw the line like let people say what they want let people um self- select their friend group. You know if if you say ah you know anyone with red hair should be ah shunned from Society. That's that's your opinion. Probably you won't be really popular with red-haired people. But it's like who cares. 30:01.57 mikebledsoe yeah yeah I had this conversation. Um I've had this conversation with my girlfriend a couple times which is like you know she I I ah I'm a fan of freedom so much that sometimes hurt like she's like having to catch up with me. 30:18.33 Max Shank Her her. 30:18.79 mikebledsoe And understanding how how it works and you know and she goes Well, what do you think about like people being able to discriminate on you know who's allowed in their store or not or or ah should someone be able to get fired just because of you know their race and I'm like yeah. I mean people are suing companies for getting fired so but they don't really actually want to work there but you want to work for somebody who's racist but like I think these policies that put people together that would normally not get along. 30:45.10 Max Shank But I. 30:56.15 mikebledsoe Doesn't cause them to actually get along. It's basically forcing people to interact who would who would normally voluntary in voluntarily not interact which could be an argument for reduction in total violence if people just go look you guys are gonna stay over there because I have this worldview and I'm going to stay over here because I have this worldview. 30:56.47 Max Shank The. 31:15.89 mikebledsoe Then Ah, we'd have a lot more peace but I think that. 31:19.40 Max Shank It's like the chess club and the bat the baseball club don't really hang out. 31:21.27 mikebledsoe Right? And so like this this idea that like because that government caused segregation and then all of a sudden ah government becomes the cause for integration and it's in both cases it causes violence. And so I think if you just let people if the government was responsible for segregation which it was and then they just said you know what we're not going to cut no more rules around Segregation Society would a piece of peacefully integrated I believe a lot more quickly and peacefully. Then what we witnessed. Ah, it was extremely violent because it went it just swung from 1 side of the pendulum to another inside of this idea that the government is in ultimate control over who we interact with. 32:11.84 Max Shank Well, and ultimately you can't have a conditional statement for every eventuality back to the whole computer science thing of if this then this if this than this you would just have an even bigger. Book of rules and really the only thing we should be concerned with is coercion right? like it doesn't matter if um, you are a racist like think how hard it is to be a racist you got to carry that hate with you every day. Or or even worse just imagine if you were a pedophile that would be probably like the worst luck of the draw ever and as long as that person doesn't act on that. That's probably just like okay you know what I mean like even. In India for example and I'm just using this example because it's the 1 that is the most inflammatory but in India you have arranged marriage between 30 year old dudes and 12 year old girls all the time that's common practice. But this idea that. We should um basically like minority report people for what they say is problematic like if someone feels a certain way. That's not a crime if someone coerces another person then it is a crime and I think. Extending the jurisdiction. Beyond coercion is a real mistake and that's where you get this more like hive mind Mentality. You get an over concentration of power and no question. There are advantages. To a concentration of power but they're also extreme disadvantages just the same if you are going to put all your eggs in 1 Basket. You know I just remember this video of Mussolini giving a speech and he just raised his fists in the air and goes 1 country 1 decision and everyone's like. Yeah they're so excited that they don't have to make any decisions anymore because he's gonna do all that hard work for him and that is a natural sentiment. We. We want to get we want to get more for less. We don't want to do anything. It's very natural. So. 34:32.56 mikebledsoe Well I think I. 34:41.50 Max Shank We want to be as efficient as possible, but there's a huge cost to that you are putting yourself at risk of total loss rather than diversifying that power along all the people. That's why it's so important to vote with your dollars. 34:57.84 mikebledsoe Yeah, did you listen to that you listen to that rogan I don't listen to a lot of rogan but every once in a while something comes on my radar that that North korean woman. Did you listen that whole episode. Yeah, ah 1 of the things that really struck me with that was. 35:00.85 Max Shank It's an it's a self-correting. 35:08.69 Max Shank Um, yeah I did. 35:17.63 mikebledsoe And think we even talked about this now that I'm thinking about it is she said that when she was exposed to freedom. She had a hard time she if she there was too many choices. There are so many choices to make that within five minutes she had become physically fatigued and mentally for. 35:29.81 Max Shank Yeah. 35:37.53 mikebledsoe Fatigue from being exposed to choice because she didn't have any because Kim jong un was making all the decisions for her. Ah her entire life. So as a 13 year old is just oh what do you want to eat well how many options do I have oh a dozen. 35:45.14 Max Shank Right. 35:55.76 Max Shank What What do you want to watch on Tv tonight you can pick from any of these four hundred thousand view options. Yes to it's too many choices. So that's kind of that's the positive side of distributing those choices. 35:55.97 mikebledsoe Okay, this is this really got difficult. 36:01.89 mikebledsoe Oh my God I can't watch Tv because of that. 36:15.90 Max Shank Like part of the reason family units have often worked so well in the past is because you have what's called comparative advantage. You know the lady um will just alienate all the ladies now too. You know back in the day. The lady would take care of the house and. As a homeowner myself I think that's a super important job taking care of a house is is its own job. Especially if you have kids around women are naturally better at nesting and nurturing the guy goes out. He just focuses on 1 thing which is going. And bringing home the bacon whether he's a farmer or a hunter or ah, a businessman of some kind so divvying up the responsibilities based on ability is super beneficial. So it's natural that you would want to. Get the people who are best at what they do to do the job for you. 37:16.58 mikebledsoe Agreeing. Ah, one last note I want to make on the hate speech is 1 of the things that I've noticed is well yeah, um I think if you say something racist is is the number 1 thing. 37:21.91 Max Shank I Still don't even know what that means was it mean naughty words. 37:33.30 Max Shank Shut up Pinky Shut up pinky. 37:33.28 mikebledsoe Or homophobic or something like that. What's that? yeah so that what? um, well yeah, but well my ah my buddy danny who's from Wahaca he's mexican and they. 37:40.87 Max Shank Um, we're hardly white. Definitely definitely Pink. There. 37:53.17 mikebledsoe He's like I don't know why we're called colored people and you're white you guys change colors all the time you get red you get white. You get like you like you're always changing colors like I'm the same color all the time you're the colored people. Ah but the the thing that's made me. Ah, anytime. 38:01.53 Max Shank Like moon. Yeah. 38:12.60 mikebledsoe Somebody in the last couple of years you know racism has been such ah a prominent conversation in the last couple years is people go oh that person's racist and I go well why? and then ah ah, a lot. Ah a lot of times. There's not a specific instance. They just. 38:24.32 Max Shank It's an ad hom attack. So easy. 38:29.98 mikebledsoe It's become the common narrative that that person's racist and then they'll take words out of context for instance like Trump people say Trump's racist. 38:31.37 Max Shank Um, but the. Or how about any of the many things that I've said on this podcast. There are enough 5 to ten second clips on here that could have me pilloried. Ah. 38:43.51 mikebledsoe And so it's people will go Oh there's there's there's like plot for Trump For instance I'm not a Trump fan didn't vote for him. So ah, that makes me good. Well this is There's my caveat to the this my argument here. 38:53.72 Max Shank That makes you good to to most of the listeners. 39:02.65 mikebledsoe Which is I Also don't think he's racist I don't think he's so many of the things that the media made him out to be and ah and because he did a lot of things that if you look at it policy wise he did a lot of things for the black community if you look at it ah at black and white. On paper. He did more than Barack Obama did for the black community and yet he got painted a racist because who the fuck really knows why that that he was. He's unpopular amongst the elites. That's that's what makes me curious about that guy. Again I'm not a big fan I'm not a Q Andon Person. Ah and it has been interesting to watch people go really pro Trump as much as you know is when they I just feel like there's a big opportunity that was missed and that people are they just shift. Who they think should be the Authority instead of realizing that it's that the authority is ah is a artificial construct. But ah. 40:05.98 Max Shank It's. 40:11.45 Max Shank It's all a means of disqualifying the argument of the individual or hyperqualify hey you know trust Doctor science ah fuck this racist pedophile guy I mean if I ever. 40:17.11 mikebledsoe Oop. 40:22.54 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 40:26.32 Max Shank Started if I was ever in a race for office I would never discuss the policy of my opponent I Would only say I can't believe that I have to run against such a racist pedophile with a dog fighting ring in his basement I Don't think the American people. Want to have a racist pedophile dog abuser in office am I right? people I would never I would never I would never talk about policy people don't care I would only attack the worst things this guy could do ever. 40:56.98 mikebledsoe Well I mean that this is what happened the narrative in the last election was the Democrats are pedophiles and the republicans are a racist. It's pretty much like that it was just if you really take a step back. You go? Oh yeah, that was. 41:07.92 Max Shank Um, it's just name. It's just name calling. Yeah. 41:16.80 mikebledsoe That was except the only thing was was it was alternative media that was pumping up the pedophilia conversation. It was mainstream media that was pumping up the racist conversation up. Yeah Abc Nbc cnn. 41:24.10 Max Shank Well, what's mainstream just the big the big names. What's funny if you look at the amount of actual viewers now and the amount of traffic people like Joe Rogan actually have way more. Ah. 41:39.25 mikebledsoe Joe Rogan has more gets more downloads than I think all the major news agencies have combined. 41:46.95 Max Shank Well I was talking to a good friend of mine and even he agrees because very mainstream guy you know watching all the different news stations and he's like you know Joe Rogan We agreed has just built up so much credibility because he has done so many hours and so many hours where. 42:06.62 mikebledsoe Um, no yeah I wouldn't want to fight the man. 42:06.69 Max Shank He's not arrogant and I mean maybe about fighting sometimes but he does know a lot about fighting too. No no, no, no, no, no, definitely not I Just mean about like knowing about styles of fighting like he knows so much and sometimes you're like oh really? okay. 42:20.21 mikebledsoe Right? right. 42:26.70 Max Shank But he doesn't Lie. He doesn't try to hide Anything. He's very open about everything so he's actually built up this crazy credibility and that's something super powerful and I'm sure he has some awareness. The clout that he has developed but that's got to be such a ah scary thing at the same time knowing Yeah, it's amazing I Hope he wins. Yeah yeah I Hope he wins. 42:44.50 mikebledsoe Oh I'm sure. Well you hear he's ah he's suing Cnn Yeah I Hope he gets a lot of money out of them. Yeah, but of course Cnn just has a budget for that kind of shit. So. 43:02.20 Max Shank Um, well it's probably being funded by our taxpayer dollars and money that is printed out of thin air I mean you look at the way that well you look at the way that. 43:09.48 mikebledsoe Well pharmaceutical companies I mean yeah, the money the money's going the money's going from them printing it off to the pharmaceutical companies to the news media. That's that's the line of information. That's how the information is flowing right now. And you can tell because Pfizer is fucking advertising like crazy I I can find a super clip where someone put together that super clip which is basically how much Pfizer is advertising on the news where people are going to get information about. 43:32.50 Max Shank I saw. 43:45.94 mikebledsoe How they're going to live their life basically ah and make decisions and what they believe and then everything is advertised. Do you think that if you were 1 a top Journalist for cnn is there any benefit to you ah talking negatively about vaccinations. That's right. 44:01.19 Max Shank Only if I want to lose my job mike. 44:05.87 mikebledsoe So it's sponsors in a way can be a form of censorship. So if say we say we took on a sponsor and this yeah. 44:14.60 Max Shank Of course flaming hot Cheetos get at us. 44:22.45 mikebledsoe We're never going to talk shit about Cheetos if that happens we're only going to talk about how many cheetahs we had over the weekend. How tasty they were. Oh yeah yeah. yeah 44:26.67 Max Shank We might even invent a fat loss diet based on flaming hot cheetos which would be easy to do I think you could eat a diet of like forty percent of your calories. From flaming hot cheetos and still lose weight as long as everything else was dialed in. 44:40.98 mikebledsoe But ah, something something just jumped into my my awareness here that the conversation we've had so far has actually been very dense even though you know you and I are just having fun but I can imagine somebody says hey you need to listen to this show. Check out this show on censorship that mike and Max did and when they're listening. They might if this is the first time they're exposed to this type of conversation could be getting overwhelmed and going oh shit I don't believe anything and I say that because I've I've been in conversations where before where I can. Watch people physically start to contort their body because they realize how much they don't know they they begin to yeah, they begin to realize and what ends up happening is like you can't unknow what you know ah at ah. 45:23.29 Max Shank Well, it's very uncomfortable. 45:33.67 Max Shank If you drink enough booze you can. 45:35.36 mikebledsoe For certain things. Yeah, it's true. But ah you you can't unknow this shit and people get uncomfortable because it it you begin to realize that 1 hundred percent of the responsibility is on your shoulders when you thought that it was on someone else's Shoulders. And that that responsibility is scary and when you take on the responsibility of developing your own Wisdom. It's a lot of work and going back to your efficiency thing. You know people are become very accustomed to a high amount of. Efficiency and um I mean some could blame capitalism for that and because there's this this level of comfort and not having to think and then all of a sudden we lay something out there. So I I bring that up because I want to acknowledge it for anyone who's listening and just say. You know it's okay, it's okay, you go fuck I don't know what to believe anymore. All the information is false. Um, yeah I mean just and I think that way you got to get to that point is understanding that most of what you think is a lie and yeah. 46:47.75 Max Shank I'll simplify it down if you if you don't mind. Yeah, it's I like to take things to the extremes I don't know if you've noticed that about me. But. 46:50.98 mikebledsoe Please. 46:56.53 mikebledsoe Yeah, I'm not accustomed to that type of lifestyle. 47:01.94 Max Shank You're you're more of a middle ground type of guy. Ah, okay, if you had to choose between believing everything you read and see and believing nothing you believe and see then it would be safer to believe nothing so it's safer to believe nothing. And you can be sure that there's always an intent behind every message that you see to persuasion just to get you to buy to try to cry to laugh. Whatever and my my personal it goes back to once again, computer science which is. So heavily logic based I so I still know like almost nothing about it but the concept of trust but verify and that verify is your responsibility.. It's always your responsibility to verify for yourself and you. 47:58.19 mikebledsoe Yeah, well well, there's there's been Ah, there's been a trick played on the common person and that ah ah, the fact, the fact, the fact checkers. The fact checkers. 48:10.15 Max Shank You can't possibly know. 48:16.16 mikebledsoe Are playing the role of verify people think they're verifying by doing a Google search and seeing fact check in the title and then go. 48:21.97 Max Shank No, no, it's your responsibility to verify. You're right though that is a trap. 48:26.72 mikebledsoe But people people think they are verifying when they do that because people will Google and they go well fact check I'm like really yeah. 48:32.20 Max Shank But that's just that's just trusting another guy like so whenever you're thinking about these things. It's best to try to reduce the number of parties involved. So for example, if there are 3 of us you me and some other guy. And some other guy says hey mike if you give me a hundred bucks now I'll give you a thousand next week and then you're like hu and let me verify that and you ask me and I'm like yeah you can trust him that's like basically the same thing it doesn't change anything right. So you have to keep it always does come back to that responsibility is upon the individual and if you take the responsibility which is your ability to respond also away from the individual then you are opening the door for totalitarianism which. There are advantages and disadvantages. You can move much further much faster I think china has gotten a lot more people out of poverty in the last twenty years than before under a form of totalitarianism. But. 49:46.29 mikebledsoe Ah, totalitarianism combined with capitalism. 49:48.28 Max Shank With that concentration right? That's very good point So we have capitalism combined with we have Crony capitalism. 49:57.96 mikebledsoe A. 49:59.32 Max Shank Unfortunately, which is where you're allowed to lobby and make rules that are not the same for everybody and all these backwards incentives. But my point is there are advantages to concentrating power and there are also huge disadvantages and if you blindly follow something you are opening the door. For a very small minority to call the shots for everybody and that's basically what slavery looks like and you might be a happy little slave but you're still not free or responsible for Yourself. You got to follow the money with all this stuff. That's the best. That's the best. 50:28.64 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah. 50:37.20 Max Shank Paper trail or trail crumbs to find out. What's really going on is how's that money changing hands. And yeah, you know what? I've I've gone through a similar thing just back to what you're saying. It's it's super uncomfortable to realize that. Most of what you taught you were taught was a waste of time and most of the information that's been passed off as news has been flagrant lies with only the intention of making you more dependent and ah obedient. You know by Bye bye trust trust trust. 51:14.63 mikebledsoe But ah, 1 of the things you're talking about you've been talking about you know? Ah, it's trusting someone else creates efficiency but also leaves door open for abuse and 1 of the things that I tell people. 51:15.96 Max Shank Right? It's uncomfortable. But. 51:33.50 mikebledsoe When we start talking about where are you getting your information talking about the verify piece where are you getting your information while I'm getting it from this person. My great and you know say they're talking about something like a virus. It's like yeah I'm not a virologist you know I am not going to know a lot about that I would say that I know a lot about health. 51:35.31 Max Shank My. 51:52.30 Max Shank I would say so I'll verify that you know a lot about health fact I fact checked you? Yeah check mark. 51:52.90 mikebledsoe Which I think is really all you gotta know? Ah, yeah, thank you thank you listen to Max folks. He's smart guy. Yeah fact, check complete. So um, my my thing is when I start talking to people about who I listen to so. Yeah I I don't pretend like I've gone out and obtained all the knowledge and wisdom in the world. But what I do is I listen to wise people and ah and I qualify those people is what's the advice they've given over time which I think people have all our time. Even running that filter people don't really remember their their attention spans pretty fucking short. So what is their track record. That's my first thing when it comes to verifying is is what's their track record. Not not what pieces of paper. They've got not what credentials not what are not what are the letters behind their name. My question is. 52:33.20 Max Shank Everybody man 1 52:42.36 Max Shank Community not. 52:49.12 mikebledsoe What's their track record how sort of I'm listening to somebody about Health I Go What's their health like this is why I listen to Paul Check people go you know? Ah, ah you Know'm I'm gonna listen to this person or this person because they have these credentials and I go yeah but Paul check is is a. Great example of this. Not only has he mastered his own health The dude 60 years old and I'm pretty sure he can outlift me ah and he he ah he moves Well he has you know. 53:16.54 Max Shank Ah, well you you don't really prioritize lifting. But that's true. He could. 53:26.98 mikebledsoe Is sex life is vibrant from what I can tell the way he talks about it anyway. Ah the guy. Ah but all the Paul Trek fans are gonna laugh there. Ah but there. 53:30.98 Max Shank Um, I thought I thought you had participated never mind. 53:45.28 mikebledsoe I think we share a lot of the same audience. Um, but but he's got ah, he's got a track record of helping other people and he's mastered in himself and like who else am I who else has done that at 60 53:46.82 Max Shank I Think it's right What you're saying is right? It's about track record. 53:58.13 Max Shank So he walks the walk. He has a track record that you have seen develop over time and also the other thing that I would add to that is the incentive. 53:59.90 mikebledsoe You know Andy's older and he's got. He's got the wisdom on its side that time. 54:14.37 mikebledsoe A. 54:15.31 Max Shank What's the incentive. So when you're trying to um, decipher a new bit of information and part of it is just reducing the total bits. Otherwise you're going to be bombarded with a fire hose but who is to gain from what you're hearing that that is the number 1 question. So take everything else off the table who who gains from this message that you're hearing that is the number 1 thing is incentive and then because that's just about the argument and then the second part is consider the source. So that's where you start seeing. Okay well this person has led me led me the right way for a long time meanwhile the laundry list of lies and misinformation about health from these allegedly trusted entities. Is a mile long I mean how about eggs and it doesn't matter if the intentions are good even intentions. Good bad doesn't matter. It's more about what is the result of those things. So if if you're afraid of fruit because it's got too much sugar. 55:23.79 mikebledsoe What's the outcome does it this kind of goes in and I hate Speech this goes in the hate speech thing because like what people say what they do are different but this where outcome outcome is ah very important here. 55:29.84 Max Shank Yeah, of course like why would we? Well you know for Healthcare like why would we let the people making the decisions about Healthcare have a different plan than they agreed On. That's insanity. That's crazy. They so the people who create policy for Health. Don't use that same plan. Yeah, that's insane. That's insane like where is the Incentive. So. 55:50.00 mikebledsoe That can you repeat that. So the people Oh oh you talk about the medical care. Yeah. 56:06.42 Max Shank Incentive is the number 1 thing considering the source is probably the number 2 thing and then maybe the third thing is just an overall reduction in the amount of bits that you take in and this is tough because Dopamine is all about an external thing. You take in. You're like oh something something from out there to add in to my my self here and it takes you away from potentially creating really valuable projects and the the thing is you don't need to be. Plugged in all the time you don't need to be absorbing every new bit of misinformation out there. In fact, all it does mostly is distract you from what's really important in your life which is nurturing the relationships that you care about or nurturing the projects that you care about. And creating and expressing yourself in different ways and I I really like the simple idea of if you don't express you will feel depressed simple as that and it doesn't matter if you paint or play music or. 57:16.54 mikebledsoe If. 57:23.70 Max Shank Chat with a friend for a few hours or an hour. There are lots of ways to express yourself? Um, but if you're constantly seeking that the feed from outside you're going to become like mentally obese and it's going to be full of toxic bullshit. 57:42.60 mikebledsoe A a. 57:43.54 Max Shank Right? So just to recap its incentive source and then probably reduction would be like the third if I had to pick 3 57:52.27 mikebledsoe I like it. It's a good that's a good ah order to go in you'll you'll ah I think by just applying the first 2 you'll reduce the amount of people you're even looking at or piece information you're you're paying attention to. 58:04.66 Max Shank Oh yeah, people would say that I'm crazy for how little I trust anything I read or see but not nuds. It's true because. 58:12.44 mikebledsoe Um, well I I think that if you've ever gone through the process of questioning what you believe and what you think I think if you've never done that which most people have never sat there and analyzed their own thinking and gone is what I believe actually true. Once you believe once you have had the experience of realizing that most of your thoughts are complete bullshit then you should then understand that everyone else's thoughts are just they probably have the same amount of bullshit running around and most people are just expressing. They're bullshit all the time and the majority of what's flying around is just bullshit. There's very little truth very little truth in there. Totally unintentional. 58:53.92 Max Shank And it's not ah and and it's often not intentional. You know for a long time I I was told the knees should not cross the toes during a squat if you're bending over your back should not bend. 59:10.31 mikebledsoe Yeah, right? yeah. 59:12.36 Max Shank In fact, basically your back should never bend under load is this thing I believed and some people still believe that some people believe the exact opposite of that and and that's okay too. But oh yeah, oh yeah I mean. 59:21.88 mikebledsoe Have you seen this knees over toes guy on Instagram his shit is good and his whole his whole his whole the name of his Instagram is controversial and he's blowing up. It's good. 59:31.36 Max Shank I. Right? It's it's brilliant as brilliant marketing I think it looks mostly sound. Obviously it's not the way that I would approach overall health and fitness. But I think the message is overall good. Which is you're not fragile and it's good to bravely explore these ranges of motion. Um I got did I tell you about the third round monkeys third round monkey rule is perfect for this episode. 59:59.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:00:07.35 mikebledsoe No. 01:00:12.70 Max Shank Its really short. It's not that short, but it's short enough. Yeah, sure. 01:00:13.14 mikebledsoe Do you want to you want to take this show an hour and a half by the typical hour because I I think we have might I've covered like half of what's in my fucking Notebook right now. 01:00:23.80 Max Shank Well, let's let's let it ride but here's an important thing to realize and it's about Mythology. So Third round I have all these that I try to organize stuff. So it's simpler to remember so I have this 1 called Third round monkeys which is about a scientific study. They did. With monkeys in a room with a ladder and a bowl of fruit at the top and so they had like 6 monkeys in there and 1 starts to go up for the fruit and the researchers immediately hose off all the Monkeys. With a fire hose all of them. Not just the 1 who climbed up for it and so then they all stop doing that so they're all just sitting around not going near the ladder because they know they'll get the hose and then they take out half the monkeys and replace them. With new monkeys. So now you have a combined group a and group b 1 of the new monkeys starts climbing up the ladder and 1 of the older ones are the all the older ones start beating it up because they know that if he does that they're all going to get the hose. So then once again, you have this group of like 6 monkeys or so doing nothing then they take away the first monkeys and they add in the third round monkeys same thing. 1 of the new monkeys. Sees a bowl of bananas or fruit or something up there starts going up the ladder and the second round monkeys beat him up mercilessly and so now you have like 6 monkeys not going near the fruit and none of them have seen the fire hose. They don't know why they don't know why they're beating. They're beating these new Monkeys. They just know that if you go up the ladder you get beaten and that's how a lot of information gets transmitted. It's just I was talking with ah my friend victoria. 01:02:31.56 mikebledsoe Bunch of hearsay. 01:02:34.98 Max Shank The other day and we were playing this game called ah fuck that last guy high five that last guy because so many things from the past are amazing. It's incredible and some things. We're just like oh fuck that guy that guy sucks like he really ruined it for everybody else and that's sort of how we have gotten to this point some things you blindly believe but we don't We don't really know why. 01:02:52.94 mikebledsoe E. 01:03:08.53 mikebledsoe Probably most things so lot lot has just been passed down. 01:03:15.45 Max Shank I'm kind of I'm becoming more and more and of of ah, an objectivist but there's a caveat to that because objectivism is like just believing what you can experience firsthand but I also believe there's obvious be way more than that. 01:03:25.25 mikebledsoe Yeah, but also. 01:03:32.18 Max Shank That is beyond my sensory perception. 01:03:33.54 mikebledsoe Well I think I think that the I would say this the way I'm very objective is the way I operate is is I I Really do my best to believe only what I can verify with my own senses and ah everything else. 01:03:52.70 Max Shank Yeah, that's tricky. 01:03:52.13 mikebledsoe Just take with a grain of salt which like maybe maybe and then also you know the way that I think you and I both live our lives is we have done enough reflection to create our ah philosophy and principles in which we live our lives and which means that. I don't have to know that much information you don't have to know that information to make good choices. Ah, and so for instance, the idea of what we see what we witness in nature is what happens anytime we isolate something. We isolate a cell from being able to talk to other cells in the human Body. What happens the cell starts to replicate in a way that causes cancer right? when it can't communicate with the other cells. Yeah it it dies but and and it's. 01:04:40.15 Max Shank Or it dies right? I mean depends on the environment. 01:04:46.35 mikebledsoe And it's attempt to live on it will replicate unhealth in an unhealthy way. Yeah, it'll die or it'll replicate in a cancer way right? has no direction right? It's not getting the right inputs. Um, what's a. 01:04:50.49 Max Shank Um, in in an in a way that is that has no direction. Basically it's like growth without direction bingo. 01:05:05.40 mikebledsoe But guy who described this. He's a really he used to work in cancer and now he he's ah he's 1 these really great docs to listen to. Ah, he's is my name maybe his name will pop into my head here in a minute but ah, ah, but when things are integrated when you integrate something like. A lot of what happens with health is how well things are integrated with each other and in systems support each other and everything is whether the cell or an organ or your joints if you so if you've studied health and you really recognize? oh. And you witness what are the results of isolation and what are this the results of of integration and then you watch that happen socially to what are the results of isolation and what are the results of integration and. Not force integration but just allowing things to integrate naturally. 01:05:58.30 Max Shank No system works in isolation is a phrase for health. 01:06:02.30 mikebledsoe Yeah, and so I don't need to understand all the details of how these people theoretically think this virus works by the way. It's all theory. The basis in which. The virologists are making decisions. It's based on a theory which is called Germ Theory ah that was the 1 Yeah. 01:06:21.75 Max Shank Ah, crap we're gonna get censored now fuck that was it that was the that was the 1 thing you're not allowed to talk about I said fag earlier we were probably gonna be okay with that. It's because those guys can take a joke. 01:06:33.90 mikebledsoe Ah, we definitelin? Yeah, so but ah, you know people people. It's 1 of those things I get in conversation with people I'm like why are you operating from germ theory or are you more familiar with terrain theory. And then people go I don't know what you're talking about I go oh well, do you believe that you know just being exposed to a germ is going to make you sick and like well yeah, that's that's what's happening they go. Okay, then then you're a germ theory person. You don't even know it and yet that's the postulate in which. All these arguments are being made from the idea of isolating yourself. Don't go outside wear a mask stay 6 feet apart. These are all isolated. This isolation makes sense inside of germ theory. But even the person who founded germ theory. Ah, with his name Louis pasture was 1 of the the people who really put germ theory on the map at the end of his life of saying I made a fucking mistake. You know he was the 1 that was in charge of pasteurizing milk. Best of intentions but seti made a mistake so you got this guy that everyone praises for for inventing pasteurization. 01:07:40.77 Max Shank With the best of intentions. 01:07:50.14 Max Shank Ah. 01:07:50.77 mikebledsoe We passed here and yet at the end of his life. He says don't do what I said earlier stay away from it and yet no 1 listens to that. so so um everybody governments medical boards. All these things bought into germ theory and ah. 01:07:56.64 Max Shank What how tricky. 01:08:09.80 mikebledsoe I go back to? Well, what's the result of our medical system operating from ah germ theory. Well what are we produced. We hav

Amber & Tanner On Demand
173 - Cheetos and the CMAs

Amber & Tanner On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 27:13


November 10th, 2021 -- Tanner and his girlfriend had their first argument. Plus, Sonoma County selected their choice for CMA Entertainer of the Year.

The Leading Voices in Food
We've Had it Backwards - New Model Explains Weight Gain and Obesity

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:20


A paper just released in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition challenges, and I mean really challenges conventional thinking about nutrition, weight gain, and what has caused the very rapid and profound increase in obesity rates over the last 50 years. This is a landmark paper by any standard, and saying that it will raise eyebrows is an understatement. The paper is authored by a number of distinguished nutrition scientists. The lead author is Dr. David Ludwig from Harvard University. Interview   David Ludwig MD, PhD is Professor of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, and Professor of Pediatrics in the Harvard Medical School. He has published innumerable books and papers on nutrition, contributors to obesity and diabetes, and what might be done with both practice and policy to improve things. He has a real remarkable breadth and scope of his work. David, Time Magazine once named you a warrior in work on obesity. This is exactly how I see you as well. You're really challenging the traditional ways of thinking, and as I said, you've broken new ground. So I'm proud to say that you and I have been friends for a number of years, and I'm also proud to say that we've written a number of things together. So thanks so much for being with us today. It's a real honor to have you.   Thanks, Kelly. Great to be with you. And I'm sitting here in my office looking at a plaque I have on the wall of an op-ed we wrote for the Washington Post almost two decades ago, so it's been a real honor and productive pleasure to know you.   The pleasure has been mine. So let's talk about the paper. So in this paper, you and your co-authors challenged the widely-embraced energy balance model. So can you say what the energy balance model is?   Well, the notion of energy balance is really just a restatement of physics, the first law of physics that says, that speaks to energy conservation, and it's commonly interpreted that in order to gain weight, you have to have a positive energy balance, that is you have to consume more calories than you burn off, and that to lose weight, you have to reverse that. You have to have a negative energy balance. You have to consume fewer calories than you burn off. But we argue first off that this doesn't tell us anything about causality, cause and effect, what's actually driving obesity. We use the example of a fever. Of course, a fever can only happen if the body generates more heat than it dissipates, more heat into the body than heat out of the body. But that's obvious that's, it's, you know, we don't need to be emphasizing that in textbooks. We don't need to be teaching patients that notion. The question is what's cause and what's effect? And the conventional way of thinking is that the positive energy balance is driving weight gain, is causing obesity. So we're surrounded by all these convenient, inexpensive, energy-dense, hyper-palatable, highly tasty foods. We lose control. We overeat them. We don't burn off those excess calories with our modern lifestyle, and so those excess calories get forced into fat cells, and we gain weight. So ultimately this view considers all calories are alike to the body, and that we have to eat fewer calories, and ideally burn more of them off by exercise to address the problem. So that's the conventional way of thinking.   So you have a different, and very science-based explanation for all of this that I'll get to in a minute, but before we do that, why did the field come to adopt this energy balance model?   Well, it does seem to make sense, and certainly over the short term, we know that this way of viewing things applies. If you force feed an animal, or if we just intentionally overeat ourselves, we can gain weight, and conversely, if we put ourselves on a low calorie diet, we can lose weight for a while, but characteristically, we know the body isn't a, you know, an inert energy storage depot. The body fights back in a dynamic way against changes in body weight and in energy balance, and this is something that almost every dieter has experienced, right? If it were just a matter of eating less and moving more, 150 calories less a day, that's a serving of juice, 150 calories out more a day, that's walking moderately for half hour, then virtually every weight problem should be solved within, you know, months to at most, a few years, but that's not the case. Very few people can adhere to, can stay with low calorie diets for very clear reasons. The first thing that happens is we get hungry, and hunger isn't a fleeting feeling. It's a primary biological signal that the body wants more calories. And even if we could, those few of us who are highly-disciplined, and can resist hunger, the body fights back in other ways, most notably by slowing down metabolism, which means that to keep the weight coming off, even as we're getting hungrier. We have to keep eating less and less, because the body's getting more efficient. So the conventional way of thinking about things, all calories are alike, calorie in calorie out, just eat less and move more. Doesn't seem to address the difficulty that people are facing, and recognize that despite a lot of attention to calorie balance, the obesity epidemic is getting worse and worse every year. I mean, the data just from the last year suggests that the weight gain during the pandemic was even faster than it was just prior.   Well, let's talk for a minute about what's at stake here. So vast numbers of people in the United States, both adults and children are overweight. This is increasingly becoming true of essentially every country in the world. The amount of weight that people have been gaining seems to be going up over time, and people find it very difficult, perhaps for the reasons you mentioned, to lose weight and keep it off, so it's a pretty dire situation then, and given the health consequences of excess weight, and the psychosocial implications of things, there's really a lot at stake here, isn't there?   Certainly so. We know that in childhood, obesity can affect virtually every organ system in the body, and set the stage for a lifetime increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, even many cancers. Among adults, the majority, and in fact 70% of adults in the United States have at least overweight, if not obesity, and this is becoming a huge driver of the chronic health burden on the healthcare system, and which so many patients themselves experience, in terms of diabetes, risk for heart disease, fatty liver, orthopedic problems, sleep apnea. So we have a problem that has gotten so much attention, and yet keeps getting worse with every effort that we can bring to bear. My coauthors and I have this new paper in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, arguing it's time for new thinking. And the carbohydrate insulin model that we are proposing is perfectly consistent with the laws of physics around energy balance, but it suggests that we've been coming at the problem in exactly the opposite way than would be most effective.   So let's talk about that. So if you have a different explanation than the traditional energy balance model, what is it exactly?   So the usual way of thinking, as we considered earlier is that overeating causes weight gain, and that certainly happens in the short term, but that model has a hard time explaining why people are gaining weight year after year, and their bodies are wanting to hold onto those calories. So we argue that a metabolic perspective would better explain this continuing creep upward in the so-called body weight set point. So the carbohydrate insulin model suggests that we've had it backwards, that overeating is not the primary cause of weight gain, that the body's process of gaining weight, and storing too much fat is driving overeating. So overeating and a positive calorie balance certainly has to exist. That's a law of physics, but it's a downstream effect. It's not at the source of the problem. And so this may sound a little surprising. How could the body gaining weight cause us to overeat? Well, let's take the example of an adolescent during the growth spurt. We know a teenager might consume hundreds, or a thousand calories more than he or she might have a few years earlier, and that adolescent is growing really quickly, but which comes first? Is the overeating that that child is doing causing the growth, or is the rapid growth and the deposition of many calories into new body tissue causing that adolescent to get hungry and to eat more? Neither explanation violates any law of physics, but they have radically different implications to how we understand growth, and what we might do about growth disorders. In the case of the adolescent, it's clearly the other way. It's the growth that's driving the overeating, and how do we know that? Well, Kelly, neither you or I, no matter how much we're going to eat or overeat are going to grow any taller. So something in the body is regulating hunger, based on the needs of growth, and we argue that the same thing is happening in the case of obesity, that the aspects of our diet, importantly, including the processed carbohydrates that flooded our diet during the low fat years, that these are triggering fat cells in the body to hoard too many calories, to hold onto too many calories, so there are fewer calories available for the muscle, the liver, and the brain, and our body recognizes that. We get hungry, and we eat more as a consequence.   You mentioned the highly processed foods, especially carbohydrates that bombarded the American scene during the low fat craze. Explain more about that.   These processed carbohydrates, that at one point, just 20 to 30 years ago, people thought, and you can find many examples of this written in the literature. In fact, the first food guide pyramid is a clear illustration of the fact that all fats were considered unhealthy, because they have so many calories per bite, more than twice the calories per gram than carbohydrates. Whereas the bottom of the food guide pyramid, you know, we were supposed to eat six to 11 servings of grains, many of which were highly processed. Sugar was considered benign, and a good way to, and this is what they said, dilute out fat calories. The problem is that these processed carbohydrates, white bread, white rice, potato products, virtually all of the prepared breakfast cereals, and of course, concentrated sugars, and sugary beverages. So when you eat these foods in substantial amount, and it's worse if the meal is also low in fat and protein, because they tend to slow down digestion. So if you just eat a lot of these processed carbohydrates, the body digests it into glucose literally in minutes. So blood sugar shoots upwards 10, 20, 30 minutes later, and that causes a lot of the hormone insulin to be produced. I sometimes refer to insulin as the Miracle-Gro for your fat cells, just not the sort of miracle you want happening in your body. We know that when a person with diabetes gets started on insulin, they'll typically gain weight, and if insulin is given in excess dose, they'll gain a lot of weight. So insulin is the hormone that promotes fat storage, and we argue that basically just endocrinology 101, all these processed carbohydrates, by stimulating more insulin than we would normally make on a less processed, lower carbohydrate diet, are driving too many of the incoming calories from a meal into storage and fat cells, instead of into muscle where they can burn. And so when you store, all it takes us to store one gram of fat too much a day to explain basically the whole of obesity, if one looks from childhood to adulthood.   So David, provide some context for this, if you would. So what fraction of the American diet is comprised of these kinds of foods, and what would that number be if people followed the recommended dietary guidelines you suggested?   Well, back in the 1950s, it's not as if Americans were extremely healthy. We had much higher rates of heart disease, although much of that related to smoking, and we of course, had many fewer medications, and surgical procedures to help prevent or treat heart disease. But at that time, obesity rates were much, much lower, you know, about only one third of the rates they are today. And at that time in the 1950s, Americans ate about 40% of their calories as fat, and about 40% as carbohydrate, and maybe 15 to 20% as protein. Because of concerns around saturated fat and heart disease, which then got generalized to all fats being bad, well, we got the low fat diet of the 1980s, nineties, and the beginning of the century. Fat came down as a proportion of our diet. Carbs went up, but also the processing of those carbs. We got foods like the fat-free SnackWells cookies, a whole range of these fat-reduced products that simply took out fat, dumped in sugar and starch. These are after all processed foods, so they're not going to be putting in fruits and vegetables. And these products were considered healthy. We ate them as we were told to eat them, and at that time, obesity rates really exploded. And we're arguing that this is not just an association, that this change to our diet has played an important role in driving obesity, and that by bringing both the total amount of carbohydrates down, not necessarily a very low carb or ketogenic diet, but bringing them back down, maybe to what might oftentimes be characterized as a Mediterranean diet, focusing on getting rid of the processed carbs, eating more of the delicious and nutritious high fat foods, like nuts and nut butters, olive oil, avocado, even real dark chocolate. All of these high fat high, calorie foods look a whole lot healthier than the processed carbohydrates do in the best cohort studies.   You know, it's a somewhat hopeful message, isn't it? Because you're not just telling people you have to eat less of everything, but there are actually some things that are quite delicious where you can eat more, and maybe that hope will lead more people to try this sort of approach.   That is exactly the issue with the conventional approach. If all calories are alike, and overeating is the primary problem, then we really just have to control our appetites. We have to discipline ourselves. Yes, clearly the conventional thinking recognizes that environment has a lot to do with it, and psychology of behavior, but ultimately, one way or another, you have to cut back on calories, because overeating is driving the problem. But if the driver is at the fat cells, if the foods that we're eating are triggering our fat cells to store too many calories, and that's what's causing the hunger and the overeating, then just eating less doesn't solve the problem, and it actually could make it worse by slowing down your metabolism. So this model argues that a focus on what you eat, not how much is more effective. You focus on controlling the quality of the foods, importantly, the processed carbs, but there are other aspects that can help hormonal and metabolic response. That's what the person focuses on, and we let the body, based on our hunger levels, and satiety levels, determine how much we need to satisfy metabolic requirement.   So you've got what we call in the field a testable hypothesis, that people will do better if they follow the approach that you've mentioned, compared to the traditional approach. And you put that to a test in a study that we're going to be talking about in a second podcast. But before we get to that, what sort of pushback, if you had, as your paper has been published, are corporate interests involved in this picture at all?   Yeah, let me just say that we recognize that these ideas are not fully proven. There are animal studies, we've done one of them that provides what we could call a proof of concept, that when you give rodents, and this has been reproduced by many different groups. This is a very rigorous finding. When you give rodents high glycemic index, versus low-glycemic index starch, so that's fast-digesting, versus slow-digesting starch. You keep everything else the same, the ones that get the fast-digesting starch, that's like, all of those processed carbs we're eating that raise insulin a lot, well, they in fact show this whole sequence of events. Their insulin levels initially go up, they start getting fatter, and their energy expenditure goes down. They start moving less, and if you restrict their calories to that of the control animal, they're still fatter, because more calories wound up getting stored than burnt in muscle. So they wind up getting more fat tissue, and less lean tissue, even at the same total body weight when you prevent their weight from going up. So we argued that there's no way to explain that finding based on the conventional, calorie in, calorie out way of thinking. We need to examine whether this applies in humans, and to whom, you know? It may be that one model explains certain situations, or certain people better than the other, but it is a testable hypothesis. Unfortunately, this debate has become polarized, and we, in our article, specifically invite opponents to work with us on generating common ground. There's plenty of basis for common ground already, and in our article, which is freely available online at American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. We put out a diagrammatic model in which each step leads to another step, and each of these steps is testable. So we can figure out what we got right, what needs improvement, you know, and where common ground is. After all, this is what science is supposed to be about, to come up with new ways of thinking for intractable problems.   You know, you reminded me when you talked about the animal studies of work that occurred many decades ago on something that people in the field were referring to as the cafeteria diet. And I remember the slide that I used for years in my own talks that was given to me by Ted Van Itallie, one of the pioneers in the obesity field, that showed a rat sitting on top of basically a junk food diet, where they take animals, and in the cage, they would put Cheetos and Hershey bars, and marshmallows, and things like that. And the animals would eat a lot of those things, and gain an enormous amount of weight. But people were really attributing the weight gain to the fact that these were highly palatable foods. The animals would eat a lot of it just because it tasted really good, and that would bring a lot of calories, and that was the reason for the weight gain. And what you're saying is just, "Wait a minute, what happens to be that food that goes in there is a really important part of the picture," And that's been proven by controlling the calories in the experiment that you set.   Well, I think that's a really great point that you raised that it's easy to think in the cafeteria diet model, that the animals are getting fat because of the tastiness of the food, but these studies can't distinguish tastiness, and whatever that means, and we could come back to that point, because tastiness is elusive. It's a very squishy term to define, for reasons we can consider, but it's impossible in these studies to distinguish tastiness from the nutrient content of the foods, and they tend to be full of sugar and processed carbs. In fact, the few studies that have aimed to disentangle this provide clear support for the carbohydrate insulin model that tastiness by itself, when you control nutrients, does not result in obesity, but the nutrients, even in a bland or untasty diet does result in weight gain in animals.   Fascinating science. So, David, what do you think are some of the main policy implications of all this?   Well, there has been push back. Some of that relates to just the difficulty of paradigm change, amidst scientific uncertainty. You know, we need ultimately to be all working together on all sides of this. But in addition, there's resistance from the food industry that loves the notion that all calories are alike. All calories are alike, and there are no bad foods, and that you can drink a sugary beverage, have any kind of junk food, as long as you eat less of other things, or burn off those calories with physical activity. Whereas if this way of thinking, involving the carbohydrate insulin model, this opposite cause and effect conception is correct, then those foods have adverse effects on our metabolism above and beyond their calorie content. And that from that perspective, you really, can't just outrun a bad diet, that we really need to be thinking about how our food is influencing our hormones and metabolism, otherwise we're going to set ourselves up for failure, and that's not a message that many, although not all in the food industry like to hear, because it requires corporate responsibility for helping to create the nutritional nightmare that confronts so many of us, and especially children throughout so much of their days.   You reminded me about an interesting parallel with tobacco here, where the tobacco companies, you know, long after it was known that cigarettes were killing people, just said that it's not the tobacco that's killing the people, it's the fact that they're just consuming too much of it, and the food companies have made very much that same argument. And then the tobacco researchers said, "No, tobacco is bad in any amount, and even a little of it can be harmful." And that's not totally true of the processed foods you're talking about. I'm assuming people can have them in small amounts, but the parallel really kind of exists there, doesn't it? That these things are risky, and dangerous really, after you go beyond whatever that small amount is, and then you're going to have trouble, no matter what you're doing elsewhere in your diet?   The metaphor with tobacco is useful to a point, although it can also elicit some strong responses, because obviously, tobacco products aren't needed for survival, food clearly is. But I do think that there are some parallels that if these highly processed carbohydrates are undermining our metabolism, and also triggering, in part because of the metabolic changes. Fat cells communicate with the brain in many ways, including by releasing or withholding nutrients. If these foods are also triggering pathways in the brain that make managing calorie balance increasingly difficult, then we do really begin to need to think about food way beyond calorie issues, and that all calories aren't alike, and that the food industry may indeed have to manage the food supply in a way that makes weight control easier rather than harder.   The paper we were discussing today was published in September, 2021 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and is publically available for free.   Bio: David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is the founding director of the Optimal Wellness for Life (OWL) program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of diet on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease – with a special focus on low glycemic index, low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. He has made major contributions to development of the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model, a physiological perspective on the obesity pandemic. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations totaling over $50 million and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. He appears frequently in national media, including New York Times, NPR, ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN. Dr. Ludwig has written 3 books for the public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.  

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
BEST OF HMS PODCASTS - BR - TUE - Chimp Fling Poop On Grandma - Renewable Cheeto Fingers For Brady Debate - 04-04-17

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 35:59


BEST OF HMS PODCASTS - Monday November 8, 2021

Deviant Little Darlings
Episode 44: Chester the Dover Demon Cheetah

Deviant Little Darlings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 74:22


Do you like Cheetos? Lululemons? And those toy dogs with a little body and a big head? Then you are going to LOVE this episode of #DLD where Katie and Olivia explore the bizarre sightings of Massachusetts's own Dover Demon (a.k.a. Chester the Cheetah). If you stick around, you'll also hear a quick history about King Tut and the anthropologists who fell victim to the "mummy's curse". Or did they...

PokerNews Podcast
PokerNews Podcast: Doyle Brunson Returns, Ivey Reveals if He'll Be at WSOP

PokerNews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 44:10


On the latest episode of the PokerNews Podcast, Jeff Platt and Chad Holloway come to you from the 2021 World Series of Poker (WSOP)! They highlight Doyle Brunson's much-bantered return to the WSOP since his last event in 2018, and also offer an audio clip from Phil Ivey discussing whether or not he'll be at the WSOP this year. Chad then talks about partying with Ivey at the launch party for his NFT while Jeff offers a 2021 WSOP Player of the Year update. Toss in bracelet winner interviews with Shaun Deeb, Brian Rast, Darrin Wright, Farzad Bonyadi, Nicholas Julia, and Gershon Distenfeld, and it's a must-listen episode of the PokerNews Podcast. Speaking of Distenfeld, find out how and why he donated all his $204,000 in winnings to charity. Big thanks to the special sponsor this week in Elite Chip Care. Time Stamps *Time|Topic* 00:24 | Welcome to the show 00:35 | Chad parties hard with Phil Ivey 03:00 | Phil Ivey shares whether or not he'll be at the WSOP 03:37 | Sponsor: Elite Chip Care 04:20 | Doyle Brunson plays 2021 WSOP Super Seniors Event 05:55 | What sort of Cheetos does Doyle Brunson enjoy? 06:48 | Will Doyle play any more events? 08:43 | Sponsor: partypoker 09:23 | Shaun Deeb wins $25K PLO for 5th WSOP gold bracelet 11:17 | Winner interview w/ Shaun Deeb 16:27 | Update on the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year race 17:14 | Brian Rast also captures 5th career bracelet; makes Poker Hall of Fame case 19:00 | Winner interview w/ Brian Rast 23:15 | Darrin Wright wins Event #50: $600 Mixed NLHE/PLO Deepstack 24:05 | Winner interview w/ Darrin Wright 25:30 | Farzad Bonyadi wins 4th bracelet in $10K 2-7 NL Single Draw 26:35 | Nicholas Julia wins Event #54: $2,500 Nine-Game Mix 6-Handed for $168,608 27:03 | Winner interview w/ Nicholas Julia 28:15 | Gershon Distenfeld wins Event #48: $1,500 Shootout No-Limit Hold'em; donates $204K in winnings to charity 34:33 | Winner interview w/ Gershon Distenfeld 41:40 | Sarah is set to return! New episodes of the PokerNews Podcast are slated to be released every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday bringing you all the latest from the 2021 WSOP along with interviews straight from the tournament floor!

The Babylon Bee
THE BEE WEEKLY: A G.K. Chesterton Special With Dale Ahlquist and Cheese

The Babylon Bee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 58:29


It's Chestermania 2021 at The Babylon Bee and Kyle and Ethan are joined by the President of the Society of G.K. Chesterton, Dale Ahlquist. Dale has been called the greatest living authority on the life and work of G.K. Chesterton and has authored five books on Chesterton, including Common Sense 101: Lessons from Chesterton and G.K. Chesterton: Apostle of Common Sense. Why should people start reading Chesterton and where should they begin? What are some of Chesterton's big concepts that help to unlock an understanding of his writings? What would Chesterton say about Cheetos? Be sure to check out The Society of Gilbert Keith Chesterton at: https://www.chesterton.org/ Kyle, Ethan, and Dale, accompanied by Adam Yenser play a special edition of Real or Fake where the headlines are all supposedly weird news headlines from a hundred years ago. They discuss how prophetic Chesterton was and talk about his prominent books and essays that you must read to not waste your life. Then in the subscriber portion, they discuss cheese and Chesterton's big concepts that he returned to again and again throughout his life's work. Dale answers subscriber-submitted G.K. Questertons and is subjected to The Ten Questions!

We Everywhere Baby
Gym, Cheetos, Laundry

We Everywhere Baby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 76:15


Twisted Sisterds
169 - Wipe the Cheeto Dust Off of My Hands and Yell at the Spirits

Twisted Sisterds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 83:27


Join Nicole and Becky this week as they jump right in to talking about their dietary needs, how toasted cinnamon sticks make all the difference, and why if you have a morning routine, you may already be a witch.    She wasn't a guest this week, but she was mentioned. Shut up and listen to Ally Henny.   You can hear bonus episodes of past guests answering our 10 nerdy and ridiculous questions by becoming a $5 patron at patreon.com/twistedsisterds.   If you have questions or want to chat with us, tweet at us @twistedsisterds or drop a comment on our Facebook page, or better yet, head over to Patreon and become a $1 or more subscriber to join the Twisterds Tavern private FB group. We always enjoy sharing our magick.   Subscribe and drop us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts.   Support us at patreon.com/twistedsisterds to join our private FB group the Twisterds Tavern, get Sisterds swag, and even shape the content of the episodes.   Tweet at us @TwistedSisterds   Follow us on Instagram @twistedsisterds   Follow us on Facebook facebook.com/sisterdspodcast   Twisted Sisterds is now part of the Wild Goose GooseCast Network, a network of faith based podcasts discussing issues of inclusion and social justice. To learn more about The Wild Goose Festival, go to wildgoosefestival.org   This episode was edited by Natalie Wells.   Theme song by Michael Baysinger, cover performance by Key and Nuts.   Logo by Cheyenne Davis at Chey's Designs.   Transition bumpers by Sean Ozee.   Outro music by Andy Moore.

Varyete
Varyete - Bölüm 7 (Eğitimin ve Satanizmin merkezi Akmar, içip içip Cheetos'un köpeeni aramak)

Varyete

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 37:54


Alper Çelik, Ömür Okumuş ve Nuri Çetin ile varyantlı hususlara yolculuk

The Innovative Mindset
How Bob Lesser‘s Peak Performance Formula Can Turn You Into a Peak Performer

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 56:24


Bob Lesser, Author, Coach, Psychotherapist on His Peak Performance Formula and How it Can Help You Become a Peak Performer This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset It's also brought to you by Gloria Chou's PR Starter Pack. If you want to get featured in the media, this is your best first step. https://izoldat.krtra.com/t/so6Aw0yCuva4 Bob Lesser is a founder, psychotherapist, and executive coach. From 2010-2017 Bob founded and led Mott Hall Charter School, an innovative public school serving low-income students in the South Bronx section of New York City. The school combined rigorous academics with cutting-edge social and emotional health supports enabling its students to defy the odds and attend top, college-bound high schools in New York and beyond. During that time Bob managed a rapidly growing organization that tripled in size over three years. Bob is also a trained psychotherapist and executive coach working primarily with start-up founders in the San Francisco Bay Area, New York City, Boston, Canada, and elsewhere. He studied management, negotiation, and leadership at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government where he holds a Master's Degree and obtained his BA in sociology from Vassar College. Bob lived in Vietnam where he studied meditation and Buddhism. He lives in Oakland, California with his wife and three children. Connect with Bob to Learn More About Peak Performance Twitter - @lesser_bob Instagram - @bob_lesser www.boblesser.com https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-951412-20-3   Episode Transcript [00:00:00] Bob Lesser: The purpose helps us clarify what really matters. And it points us to what we should be using our skills and talents for. It gives us courage to act in conditions of uncertainty and difficulty, and it functions as both. This kind of it's sort of a grounding for us, but it also helps us move forward. So it's kind of like our north star. [00:00:25] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hello, and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host Izolda Trakhtenberg. On the show, I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you. [00:00:43] Focus meditate and even sleep. I love it and have been using it to write, create and do some of my deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative mindset. To check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% [00:01:00] off with the coupon code, innovative mindset. [00:01:03] And now let's get to the show. [00:01:09] Hey there. And welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg. I'm your host. I'm super happy that you're here and I'm really excited to speak to this week's guest. You have got to hear this. This is so cool. Bob lesser is a founder psychotherapist and executive coach. From 2010 to 2017, [00:01:28] bob founded and led. Mott hall, charter school an innovative public school, serving low income students in the south Bronx section of New York city. And you know how much that is close to my heart since I'm a new Yorker. Now the school combined rigorous academics with cutting edge, social and emotional health supports, enabling its students to defy the odds and attend top college bound high schools in New York and beyond. [00:01:50] Yes, I'm all about education. So this is thrilling for me. During that time, Bob managed a rapidly growing organization that tripled in size over three years. [00:02:00] He's also a trained psychotherapist and executive coach working primarily with startup founders in the San Francisco bay area, New York city, Boston, Canada, and all sorts of other places. [00:02:10] He said he management negotiation and leadership at Harvard's Kennedy school of government, where he holds a master's degree and obtained his BA in sociology. From foster college, Bob lived in Vietnam. Wow. Where he studied meditation and Buddhism also. Wow. He lives in Oakland, California with his wife and three children. [00:02:27] Bob, thank you so much for being on the show. Welcome [00:02:29] Bob Lesser: pleasure. Or that, that guy that you just introduced. Sounds really interesting. I'd love to hang out, hang out with them. [00:02:35] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Let's go have a cup of coffee, [00:02:36] Bob Lesser: hard to, hard, to hard to believe, but that's me. My hair at all. [00:02:41] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah. I, you know, all at once it can sometimes be a little like really. [00:02:45] Okay. I guess that yes, I did that step into that power. Right. So I I'm, I am excited beyond. Imagining talking to you about everything that you've done. I'm a huge proponent of education. I was a NASA master [00:03:00] trainer working in schools all over the world for many years. And I, I want, I'm dying to find out from you how you combined. [00:03:09] The flow of I'm going to start an innovative public school working with low-income students to being an executive coach for fortune 500 companies. Where, how did that start and what led you down that path? [00:03:24] Bob Lesser: Yeah, it's a, it's a great question. And I think it's, it's kind of the crux of it is, has to do with purpose and has to do with. [00:03:33] Identifying sort of the essence of who I am and the impact that I want to have. And so, you know, like most of us, you know, young getting out of college, you know, trying to figure out what I wanted to do with the rest of my life, or at least, you know, the next few years of my life. Following following my passions, I'm a native new Yorker. [00:03:52] I came back to New York city and, and participated in a very cool fellowship in New York city government called the New York city urban fellows [00:04:00] program and worked in city government for the first, the first part of my career first at the New York city correction department. And then for the New York city police department and ultimately from the New York city department of education. [00:04:12] Where I worked with aspiring school leaders who were founding schools, founding new schools, founding charter schools. And we're creating these innovative new school models. And I got into my, into my head that I could do it just as well or better than the folks that I was I was working with and supporting. [00:04:31] And so I pulled together a team and we wrote up a charter application and. We got approved and we opened a school and that school was my hall charter school, which, which coincidentally is, is celebrating its 10 year anniversary this year. And yeah, and so so I did that and I did it and it was really hard. [00:04:51] It was, it was, it was harder than I ever thought it would be. And it really kicked me out. And while I think I did a great job, I also know that [00:05:00] I was quite exhausted by, you know, the, the fourth year, the fifth year. And I was kind of running out of gas and I knew I needed to hand it over to somebody who had, you know, sort of like hand the Baton to somebody who had more energy and, and, and, and, and, and, and endurance and more passionate about. [00:05:17] Than I had. And, you know, I found a great successor and transferred, you know, transition the leadership of the school over to her, and she's still there and doing an amazing job. And when I was really soul searching about, well, what, what, you know, what's next for me? And what about this experience is you know, was essential. [00:05:36] What I determined was that it was, it was that process of start. Creating something from nothing. That was what my passion was and, and what kind of, what my sort of deeper purpose was, was that sort of create that, that, that component of creativity, you know, taking an idea and making the reality and doing the heavy lifting of getting it up and running. [00:05:57] And so that's how I transitioned over then to working [00:06:00] with with founders as an executive coach. And working primarily now with founders of startups mostly in the, in the tech startup space, because that's, you know, that's obviously, that's sort of where the, the sort of the, the, the startup ecosystem is still working with some education leaders and organizations. [00:06:17] But primarily we're working with some of the kind of best and brightest minds in Silicon valley helping to, you know, get these amazing ideas that they have for changing the world off the ground. [00:06:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yea, all of that. I I'm going gonna, I want to take a second and, and sort of so-called have that in because every word that you just said was music to my ears. [00:06:40] And first of all, kudos to you for realizing when your work with the school was done and passing the Baton. I think that's, that's very self-aware and, and I'm grateful that you. That you did that because it allowed you to go to this next place. And you said, you're going to, you're you're moving into, or you've moved [00:07:00] into working with tech startups who want to change the world, which again, music to my ears. [00:07:04] And yet I can't help thinking that there, that that word that you used early on purpose is really a part of. The sort of the foundation of what you do. And it seems like it was that way with students and it seems like it could be. And is that way with the founders that you're working with in Silicon valley? [00:07:24] Can you talk a little bit more about what you mean by purpose? Is that an internal purpose or is it the purpose of the startup or what you want for other people to experience? How does all of that flow and what do you bring to it? And. [00:07:40] Bob Lesser: Yeah. Yeah, yeah. It start, it starts off as a very individual thing is, is what is my purpose? [00:07:45] What's my why. And the way I, I define it is it's really the expression of what's most deeply meaningful. You can know who you are at your essence. We've we all have this sort of deeper level of purpose of, of kind of [00:08:00] who we are at our essence. What's most deeply meaningful to us. And you know, it, it purpose helps us clarify what really matters and it points us to what we, what we should be using our skills and talents for. [00:08:14] Right. It gives us, it gives us courage to act in conditions of uncertainty and difficulty, and it functions as both this kind of it's sort of a grounding for us, but it also helps us move forward. So it's kind of like our north star. And so knowing, knowing our essence, knowing who we are at our essence and how we want to express that in the world is in my mind, that's required for anyone that wants to do anything. [00:08:41] And, you know, starting, starting a company, you know, that it has never been started before in you know building and creating a product that's never been created before creating anything that's never been, been done before, or, or even that you've never done before is going to be hard. And so having this strong sense of grounded. [00:08:59] [00:09:00] Of this is part of this is deeply personal and meaningful to me and, and it's, it's on purpose for me. So it starts with that and it starts, and that's often where I start with the founders that I work with is helping them to clarify their purpose and articulate their purpose. Purpose also extends to organizations, organizations need to know why they exist. [00:09:22] They need to know, you know, kind of who they are at essence and so far. So great organizations have well articulated purpose statements and, and purpose has kind of for many organizations supplanted, the old mission statement, you know, the sort of, you know, we exist to blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. [00:09:41] Versus. Our purpose is, this is, this is why we exist. This is our why, this is why we do this work. As one request an organization, this is the impact that we seek to have. And so it's, it's very powerful for organizations as well, to know who know who they are, know what impact they're trying to have [00:10:00] and be able to clearly articulate that for both their employees and their clients or customers or people they serve. [00:10:07] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And I would imagine. Extending that to the community, the organization is in that, that, that, that knowledge of purpose serves a bigger ecosystem than just the organization or the company. Can you talk a little bit about. If, if there is, because one of the things that I do when I work with people and companies and organizations, we talk a lot about compassion. [00:10:32] That's that's in intwined with purpose and compassion to me means that you're not just thinking about yourself or your organization. You're thinking about how you. Everyone in that ecosystem for you, when you work with a founder who has this vision to make these changes, how much of the extended family, if you will, are you focusing on or is it first an internal process and then maybe someday they'll get to that other place.[00:11:00] [00:11:00] Bob Lesser: Yeah, that's a great question. I, I, I would say that. The vast majority of ones, you know, sort of, if you take sort of everyone, who's sort of thought about their purpose and has a kind of well articulated sense of, or even a, you know, half halfway, half baked, you know, articulated sense of that purpose. [00:11:20] It, their purpose has to do with with the community with others. Very rarely is one's purpose solely focused on. Themselves. Okay. And you know, you'll see this, you know, sometimes you'll see this with elite athletes who are sort of, you know, training for themselves training training for, for their own sort of to achieve their own highest potential. [00:11:39] But very often you'll hear them talk about how they want to be an inspiration or a role model for others. They want to show they want to show that, you know, someone from this city or this town or, or, or this, you know, th this background. Can make it and so, so very, very often I'd say more often than not, there is a component that [00:12:00] involves being of service to inspiring helping others in, in one's purpose. [00:12:07] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I'm taking all of that in for a second because I, it, the Olympics just happened and we just had all of these people when all of these metals and so many of them. When they were talking about having one we're talking about, you know, winning it for the team or for their country, it's always something that is, that is greater than themselves. [00:12:29] And when you do the work you do and. Everything I've read about you. Doesn't say that you were specifically with athletes, you're working with founders, but it's still, they're still trying to be the very best. And so I know we're going to talk a little bit about the book that you've written, which I'm excited to delve into, but the big thing, I there's something about the words. [00:12:51] Cause I talk about this also peak. That just inspires me. It's also, like you said, it's [00:13:00] grounding, but also it lets you fly a little bit because it means that you've, that you've got this vision that you want to achieve someday. Can you talk a little bit about what it means to be a peak performer, physically, mentally, professionally? [00:13:12] What does peak performer mean to you? That you are spending so much of your life and your work studying it and working. [00:13:20] Bob Lesser: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. My definition of peak performer is, is maybe a little different than, you know, some of the others are some, some, you know, what, what sort of, how it's talked about in the field. [00:13:30] I defined peak performer as, as being your best, not being the best necessarily, but being your best, really living up to your potential. And it's, and it sort of has two parts to it. One is it is about achieving results or, or, you know, sort of meeting your goals, but it's also about 50. And being, being, and feeling fulfilled. [00:13:54] And I, I, you know, I kind of believe that one without the other ultimately is kind of [00:14:00] flimsy and on some level is empty. So just achieving you know, without a sense of fulfillment, still feeling like you're not enough or still feeling like you haven't really done what you've been put on earth to do is, is not going to be that satisfying being just fulfilled and sort of feeling great and, you know, You know, feel happy and I'm hanging out on the beach here and, you know without achieving your goals, the things that, you know, you know, you are capable of or you believe you're capable of, or you're, you wonder if you're capable of is also going to ultimately feel this, you know, maybe hedonistic and, you know, at the end of the day, Kind of get boring. [00:14:35] So it's, it's both of those things. It's achieving your goals that you set for yourself feeling feeling you know, kind of optimal fulfillment and being, being the best that you can be being your best. And that's how I think about peak performance. And I think most, if not everyone wants that. [00:14:56] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Sorry, I'm taking all that in that last sentence made me go. Hmm. [00:15:00] I wonder if they do I do, because, because there are lots of people, you know, I've heard, I've heard therapists say this before that in any moment whoever's doing the, they might be doing the most awful thing, but they are doing the very best they can in that moment. [00:15:14] And so, so that, so that I get, but at the same time, I wonder sometimes. How, how do you know if you're being a peak performer is somebody who's spending their life on the couch, watching jeopardy and eating Cheetos. Being a peak performer, if that's what they want to do, like if their goal is I'm just going to chill through my life all as well. [00:15:39] Is that them being a, be a peak performer or is that them being a little lackadaisical about the goals they might have? [00:15:47] Bob Lesser: Yeah, it's a, it's a kind of a slippery question because if it is truly that person's goal. And if, if I sort of, before I get into [00:16:00] goals, I talk about vision and vision for me is one of the, is one of the peak performance pillars. [00:16:06] There are three peak performance pillars. There's purpose, there's values, and there's vision. Vision is about where we want to. And in our life, it's, it's the, it's the destination. And the more clear we can be about that, the more, more able we are to design our lives and our actions and behaviors to get there. [00:16:28] So if that is really, truly Aligned with an in support of one's vision, if, you know, hanging out, you know, sort of on a couch and, you know, eating, what are they eating? Doritos [00:16:40] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Cheetos. [00:16:43] Bob Lesser: Yeah. Well, if you know, if they're snacking and that, and they're doing that, you know, you know, for, you know, large parts of the day, and that is, is somehow aligned with their ultimate vision, then yes, I would say, and they're feeling fulfilled and they're achieving then. [00:16:56] Yes, I would say they are, they are being a peak performer under [00:17:00] my definition. However I would say we, there, there, and this, this is, this is what I, I, I termed the performance paradox. There are a number of ways in which we work against ourselves from really getting what we want, achieving what we want and feeling fulfilled. [00:17:20] And we can, in some ways, fool ourselves or talk ourselves out. Doing the things that will actually get us what we want or even, or even really being honest about what we want. And so there, there are ways that we're, it's, it's, it's, we're, we're kind of built in and I have sort of five major ways that I think about this. [00:17:43] We're kind of built to kind of work against ourselves and work against our achievement of what it is we really want. [00:17:51] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I that's there. Believe it or not. This reminds me of a Terminator movie. I am a huge that my, a friend of mine coined the [00:18:00] term cinephile nose tele parable. That's what it is. I am a cinephile, but he quoted, he, he coined the term tele parable because I use movie quotes. [00:18:08] To give lessons a lot. And there's a moment in which Arnold Schwarzenegger's Terminator says, you know, you humans, it is in your nature to destroy yourselves. And what you said kind of sparked that for me, because I I'm sitting here and I'm going, is that part of it? Is it, is, is it that, or is it fear? [00:18:27] Like what keeps us from acting in our own best interests in, in that. [00:18:34] Bob Lesser: Yeah. Yeah, I love it. I don't think it's, it's this sort of death wish that, you know, sort of Suman Freud talked about early on in his, in his, in his theory. I think it's actually more maladaptive mal adaptive survival mechanisms that have not evolved with us in our, in our modern world and our sort of vestiges of, you know, sort of the old. [00:18:58] When we were, you know, [00:19:00] evading the, the saber tooth tiger. And when we had predators and when we were, when we were really you know, it was all about survival and, and, and our lives were literally in danger. You know and, you know, for most of us, that's not the case anymore, but our minds and our nervous systems have really not evolved to kind of to meet, meet the demands of the modern world. [00:19:22] And I think, I think it's mostly, I think it's, it's more of that. And if, if you want, I can, I can also, you know, kind of quickly go over these sort of five things that I think sort of stand in our way of really really, you know, sort of being a peak performer, achieving what. The stage [00:19:38] Izolda Trakhtenberg: is yours. [00:19:38] Absolutely. I'd love to hear them. Are you [00:19:40] Bob Lesser: kidding? All right. Wonderful. So the first, the first one is the unconscious mind. This is our unconscious mind. This is where, you know, 95% of the action is happening in our mind is unconsciously out of, out of conscious awareness. We, we don't know it at times. It, it sort of peaks up and become semi-conscious and we have [00:20:00] some, some idea of it, but mostly it's happening out of our conscious awareness. [00:20:03] These are our organizing patterns. This is where our, our self-limiting beliefs live. You know, it's, it's, I'm not good enough. You know, I'm unworthy, I'm unlovable. You know, the world is unfair. That's where all that stuff lives. It's where our internal saboteurs live. You know, and this sort of, you know, sneaky, you know, and insidious thing called imposter syndrome that many of us face. [00:20:25] So that's where all of that stuff kind of lurks and it lurks again without our awareness and without our consent and, and it's, but it's there and it's sort of running us you know, personality experts believe that our, our personalities are mostly. Defined by the time we're about five years old in terms of our sort of basic organizing patterns and beliefs about the world. [00:20:46] So essentially, you know, that means we have a, five-year-old running the show and that's kind of scary to think about, you know, I know at five, at five years old, I was, you know, I was eating dirt. So, you know, So that's the first one, [00:21:00] our unconscious mind. The second one is our self-conscious mind. This is to the X, the extent to which we value and probably overvalue other people's opinions. [00:21:10] And we are so concerned and worried about what other people will think. How we will look about belonging to the in-group that we it, it, it keeps us from doing things that we want, that we think where we may look dumb, or we may look, you know, we may be rejected. And it also, when we become overly, so self-conscious when we are trying to do, to do, to do something, to perform it impedes performance. [00:21:35] We we've all been there where, you know, once you start sort of, you know, wondering what other people are thinking about, you, you know, you start, you know, it really messes up. Right. So that's the second one. Self-conscious mind. The third one is, is squarely the sort of biology physiology that I was talking about. [00:21:50] You know, we're designed to conserve energy as, as animals, as, you know, as a, as a species like other animals are, we want to conserve energy. [00:22:00] We don't want to expend energy when we don't have to. So that is, that is. We may want to sit on the couch and eat Doritos instead of, you know, go out for that run or, you know, do the thing we know that's going to be really hard. [00:22:10] And so we need to be able to push through that that energy con conservation, because most things that we want to do in life that are going to be really fulfilling and rewarding are also going to be demanding and challenging, and we're going to require us to expend some energy. The other part of that is, you know, this is sort of the. [00:22:30] No human capacity to worry. Have anxiety stress out that animals, you know, don't have other animals don't have that we have. And it really makes, keeps our nervous systems kind of on high alert. You know? So there's this, this, you know, the stress response system is, is sort of is, is, is, is primed to activate you know, when we get cut off in traffic it's as if the saber tooth tiger is like, is coming to. [00:22:57] And, and when, you know, when, in fact it's not. [00:23:00] And so so the, the way that our stress response system is sort of is, is, is, is overactive for, for many people, unless somebody, unless you've really trained yourself through meditation and yoga and breathing and, and practices of that, of that nature you are often getting hijacked by your by your amygdala and the stress response. [00:23:21] System is again, running, running your responses rather than your rational mind. So that's the third one. The F the fourth one is I call the hedonic treadmill. And this is a psychologist Barry Schwartz talks about, about this in his book that the paradox of choice and this to me, the, so the hedonic treadmill is this notion of how we, our brains are wired to be attracted, to shiny the shiny new object, right? [00:23:47] Novelty novelty is one of the. That our motivation system works. It's how we become excited about things is when they're new and novel. That's great for getting out in the world and sort of finding food and, you know, you [00:24:00] know, you know, kind of inventing tools that are help us survive. But we also quickly get disinterested in things. [00:24:07] And we get excited about the next. And we get disinterested in that and we get excited about the next thing, and we get disinterested in that. And that's this treadmill, hedonic, treadmill metaphor. And what that does is it makes it hard for us to sustain our focus on things that matter. When things start getting feeling a little mundane or boring, we've got to put in repetition to do things and to become really good at, we got to, we know we have to put in, you know, we've got the 10,000 hour rule. [00:24:35] It's it's, it becomes hard to stay focused and interested in things. Are meaningful to us, but because of the way our brains work become boring. And our minds you know, men in Buddhism, there's this notion of the monkey mind, the way our minds work, our distracted mind. It's very hard to focus very hard to kind of keep our minds on one thing. [00:24:58] And [00:25:00] and to not give into this, this hedonic treadmill of, you know, the next shiny new object that we're ultimately gonna get. The last one is this the way our minds are wired for negativity. This is something that, you know, neuroscientists have dubbed the negativity bias. We are much more attuned to and amplify negative things. [00:25:21] Things that are pretend may be potentially harmful to us. Maybe threatening to us than we are to, you know, the good things. So this is, you know, we're walking through the forest and we're much more attuned to, you know, that twig that looks like a snake, you know and stepping out of the way of that and looking for, you know, looking for anything that might be dangerous than we are noticing the beautiful flowers that you know, can sort of leave us in. [00:25:48] And so this, this negativity bias really over it has this, over-index some things that may be dangerous or harmful. It leads to anxiety, risk, aversion and pessimism that [00:26:00] you know, is not so helpful to us in our pursuits. When what we really need is optimism, especially when things are getting checked. [00:26:08] So those are, those are the five, you know, performance paradoxes that I kind of outlined the ways in which, you know, we are in many ways designed to work against ourselves and what it is we really want. [00:26:23] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Wow. Wow. Okay. So much, so much. I, I, I appreciate you outlining them and I, a lot of this. First of all, it's so succinct and I'm really grateful that you have it so well down. I'm excited to talk about the book and and see more about how you detail these things. I have a couple of questions though, about, about these five and about something that you said. [00:26:52] About the five-year-old the, the, the emperor, the five-year-old emperor of your, of your brain. [00:27:00] When you talk about that. Cause I do want to talk about these five pillars, but there's this is, this is something that I wonder about children who go through. For example, if, if we're in that space of child abuse or some other kind of, of trauma of children in war zones, what kind of challenges, extra challenges do those children then have to get past? [00:27:24] Not just the inner five-year-old, but the trauma that they survived in order to become peak. [00:27:31] Bob Lesser: Yeah, it's a great question. I mean, they, they, they certainly are going to have organizing patterns, limiting beliefs about themselves in the world that are going to impact how they behave. The actions they take, the actions, they don't take the, the, the relationships with others. [00:27:51] And You know, not to say that it's going to be, you know, impossible for them. Cause you know, certainly people who have suffered trauma have gone on to [00:28:00] be, you know, perform at the highest selfless to become, you know, to be elite performers. But it's, it's, you know, they're gonna, they're gonna struggle. [00:28:08] They're gonna suffer in the ways that we all do, but maybe more. And you know, so it does, it does go back to this sort of ultimately the question becomes what are their core beliefs about themselves and what are their core beliefs about the world? And You know, how will that enable them or get in the way of their doing the work to get what it is they want in life and to feel fulfilled doing it. [00:28:34] So that would be the, sort of the big question that I would have, or I would look at with anyone who has suffered a trauma early. Early in life is, you know, are they are they able to do still do the things that are necessary to achieve their goals and, and feel fulfillment? And a lot of that does come down to, you know, their, their perceptions in themselves or perceptions of others, or ability to have re have healthy relationships[00:29:00] their ability to stay the course when things get difficult and be consistent, you know, the consistency required. [00:29:06] To do anything worthwhile and challenging. So, you know, certainly not not impossible, but you know, it's, it's it's, it's hard, you know, it's hard anyway. And especially if you've had trauma, hopefully they've been able to get support and get help and, you know, be able to, to, to come to terms, you know, with with what happened and maybe use it as. [00:29:26] You know, I think, I think you see that in a lot of elite performers who have had early hardship is they've been able to use it as fuel to help motivate them and to keep them going and to sort of, you know you know, and it's, it's, in some ways, you know, built their resilience and their, and their, and their they're on their toes. [00:29:43] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, it's so interesting that you, that you said that, that, that that's this notion of using it as fuel because these pillars that you're talking about, I can see the self-conscious part of that and the sort of the expectation of being cared for as a baby, all of a sudden that's [00:30:00] not there. Right? So how people think of you and how you think they think of you is, is an unstable foundation. [00:30:07] So that's why I was wondering about how someone who has survived trauma. Deal with these five pillars and, and still perform at a peak level. I wonder the other one that I, that sort of was like, Hmm. What about people who have attention deficit issues? How do they deal with those issues to then sort of climb up and become peak performers? [00:30:34] Bob Lesser: Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I mean, hopefully, you know, they have been able to find ways to manage their ADHD. They've maybe they've found, you know, a meditation practice. Maybe they found medication that has worked for them. Hopefully they've chosen endeavors that are well sort of, well-suited to you know, to sort of you know, maybe more distractable. [00:30:57] And, you know, have maybe gravitate it to something that, you know, [00:31:00] maybe, you know, that's like sort of like startup entrepreneurs tend to be people who are like interested in a lot of things and you have to be focused on a lot of different things when you're starting and leading a company. And, and so, you know, hopefully they found pursuits that are. [00:31:14] You know, sort of you know, not impeded, not overly impeded by, you know, their, their challenges in focusing. And you know, and yeah, it's, you know, you know, again, you know, I think. These, these couple of questions that you have you know, we're all, we are all flawed. We are all, you know, challenged, we all suffer. [00:31:37] So, so it is, it is the human condition and it is about figuring out. How to work within the constraints that we have to meet our highest potential. And we all have constraints, you know, I am never going to be an NBA basketball player because I'm five, seven. Right. So, you know, and I'm never going to be an astronaut because I'm too old [00:32:00] right now. [00:32:00] So these are real constraints. So when we talk about one's potential, we're not talking about, you know The sort of, you know sort of potential without constraints. And I think that's important is for us all to understand who we are, what the constraints are that are, are kind of, you know, sort of you know, that we're, we're working with. [00:32:19] And so the question becomes, how do we maximize ourselves, given the constraints that we face, given who we are. And, and, and not, you know, deny those things or not be ashamed of those things, but to really know, like, this is a constraint I have, so I got, I have to work with, you know, I have to work with it. [00:32:37] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And that goes back right to the very first thing you said, which was, it's not about being the best, it's about being your best. Right. And, and I, I love that. And it ties beautifully into this idea of, of what you said about vision values and purpose that having that amalgam and then being able to work through. [00:32:58] And with it allows you to get to [00:33:00] that place, which dovetails beautifully into talking about the peak performance formula, your book. I would love it. If you would talk a little bit about, let me, let me just give the whole title because I love it. I think it's so wonderful. The peak performance formula, achieving breakthrough results in life and work. [00:33:17] Yes. You're again, you're singing my song, Bob. So I would love to hear from you a little bit about. First of all, what prompted you to write it? And second of all, what is it that you want the book to do for the people who read it? [00:33:34] Bob Lesser: Yes. Well, what prompted me to write it was really, you know, I, you know, work with my clients is an executive coach. [00:33:42] And prior to that, as a psychotherapist and, you know, do this really. Intentional work that you know, yields great results helps people to be their best and developing tools and techniques throughout the years that have been really effective in helping people deal [00:34:00] with the. Unique, but not but unique, but also somewhat universal challenges that that, you know, these, these founders and executives and leaders you know, we're facing and. [00:34:13] I wrote the book because I wanted to make it accessible to a larger audience, not just, you know you know, the, the, the you know, the, the tech, startup CEO, or though, you know, leader of the big organization you know, that I'm working with to my executive coaching practice, but I want to make it accessible to really anyone, anyone who's trying to get better at anything, whether that's, you know, a student who's trying to get their grades up in school, you know, The new college grad, that's trying to figure out how to, you know, kind of, you know what to do with, with, you know, the sort of next phase of their lives. [00:34:43] A manager in a company who is trying to move up somebody who's thinking about starting their own company you know, really anyone who's like, you know, I need some tools and tactics to to, to. Achieve the things that I, that I want to achieve. And I, and I want to do it in a way that [00:35:00] is about me, what matters to me and will bring me fulfillment, not what society says or thinks I should do. [00:35:06] So, so that that's, that's why. To sort of make it, make it try and make that more accessible. And the set was the second part of the [00:35:15] Izolda Trakhtenberg: question. What is it that you want readers of the book to get out of it? Like what, what is, what is your desire for someone picks up the book reads it? What do you want them to have that they didn't have before they picked up the book? [00:35:31] Bob Lesser: Yeah, I, I think it's, it's a sort of tools and tactics to, to allow each individual reader to become a peak performer in their, in their own lives. And, and, and, you know, make the kind of you know, breakthrough achievements that maybe have. Holding the things that have been holding them back or or things that they've been, you know, really wanting to do, but just, you know, you haven't had the tools to do that to really provide those, [00:36:00] those sort of tangible tools and tactics to allow people give people some tools to really know themselves, better understand themselves better. [00:36:07] There's a lot of that in the book of, you know, helping them, giving them guided exercises to. Define what their purpose is to articulate their core guiding values, to to articulate their vision from, for themselves and where they want to go in their lives. So, so, so that sort of self knowledge, then those tools and tactics to, you know, to be one's best to, you know, transform, you know, the imposter syndrome, if that's something that they face to. [00:36:39] Con be able to come to see failure as, you know, not somebody to be scared of, but actually something to embrace to, you know, really make sure that they are doing the sort of baseline things that we know will help anyone trying to do to do anything important in their lives around physical health and energy [00:37:00] management training one's mind. [00:37:02] To again, overcome some of these performance paradoxes that we talked about in the beginning and to sort of master the techniques that they need to master in whatever endeavor it is that they're that they're pursuing and to, to, to, you know, use tried and true tools and tactics to do that. [00:37:20] Izolda Trakhtenberg: You keep stopping me. I kind of go, ah, I need to take all this in because there's so much there's so, so much rich stuff in, in, in what you're saying, something that I'm really curious about with, within that. I love that it's tactical. I love books that, that don't just go, let me just strategize for you. [00:37:39] And then you go and try and do it all by yourself. So I'm so glad that that's, that that's in the book. Something that I. That I'm wondering about is when, like you've said this a couple of times already, not in these words, but that we have a tendency toward entropy that we kind of don't [00:38:00] work at our best within the book. [00:38:04] What are the steps? Someone who has that tendency to sit on the couch and eat Cheetos and then dream about doing more. What's the first step? What do they do for. [00:38:16] Bob Lesser: That's a good question. I mean, I, I start, the book starts with. Because I think, I think purpose is this really, this sort of motivator, the purpose gives us motivation, the stronger our purposes. [00:38:28] The more motivated we will be, the more motivated we are, the more energy we will direct to do something. It'll get us off the couch, the stronger our purposes. And, you know, you hear these stories about, you know, parents were able to lift heavy cars up, you know, you know, to save their children, you know, this sort of the strength. [00:38:46] It, that comes from purpose, the motivation, the energy that comes from purpose. So I like to start there because that is a sort of an Energizer. And then, you know, I, I do think [00:39:00] You know, vision coming, you know, really helping people sort of co if they, if they don't have that strong vision from themselves. [00:39:06] Cause that's that you know, Lewis, Carroll, the author said, you know, if you don't know where you're going, any road, any road will do. And, and so, you know, we need to know where we're going, where we want to go. And once we know that once we have a, a as clear a picture of where we want to go, what we want in life as we can, then we can start to set some goals around it that are based on you know, this, this, this real, you know sit this real sense of like, wow, if I could, you know, if I could just make it. [00:39:37] You know, how great would that be? And so, so then, you know, so you've got the, you've got purpose, you've got vision and then values are the beliefs that drive our behaviors. And so once we begin to, you know, we, we know who we are, what's deeply meaningful to us or energized around that. Our purpose, we have our vision, which is telling us, you know, Hey, this is kind of, this is where I want to [00:40:00] go. [00:40:00] I've got some now some concrete goals that are gonna are gonna make sure that. I'm getting there, then our values become about what are the behaviors that are going to, if I do those things day in, day out, I practice those behaviors day in, day out. They're gonna, they are gonna you know, kind of like the oars of you know, of a, of a canoe. [00:40:20] They're going to row me in that, in that right direction. They're going to be the thing, that sort of guy that keeps me moving in that right direction through these, through. Practice of these core values. So that's how the kind of the peak performance formula works in practice. So purpose, vision values. [00:40:39] Come together to give us this really strong foundation. And then, and that's the first part of the book. And then the second part of the book is about these sort of tools and tactics. And these are these things, you know, you know, I break down into sort of three categories, you know, physical, the physical. [00:40:54] The second is that is, is, is the ticket. And the third is, is, is the mind [00:41:00] training the mind? So the physical is, is stuff that we, most of us know about. But we need to be reminded about, about the optimal amount of sleep to get that kind of diets. We should be eating the ways we should be moving our body and the amount of exercise we should be getting the ways we should really be managing our energy to optimize that energy for the things that are important. [00:41:20] That the technique piece is giving people some, some tools through a method called deliberate practice. Your PR you probably need to get better at you're at some technique. So if you know, part of my goal or vision is maybe to, you know, play competitive tennis I'm going to need to work on aspects of my game. [00:41:38] I'm going to need to, you know, practice my, you know, my serve or my overhead, or, you know, whatever shot needs improving or shots need improving. So I, I need to I need to design some deliberate practice in order to actually get better. At the, at my craft. And so, so that section of the book really addresses some best [00:42:00] practices and how to improve your technique and whatever it is you're trying to improve. [00:42:04] The third, third piece of this is, is training the mind. And this, this, again goes back to a lot of the performance products stuff that gets in our way. And this is through, you know, through things like meditation. Practice, you know, I'm a big proponent of, of meditation because of the, you know, the, the incredible benefits that it has and the scientific data that is now available, that backs up the benefits of meditation in terms of, of, you know, what it can do for our nervous system, our immune system how it can help us focus and constant. [00:42:35] Better. And so it's really this mental training. That's important in order to kind of, and, you know, and, and to overcome the negativity bias, to be able to practice optimism and learn to I learned optimism. So things of that nature tools of that nature that are gonna help us to have some control over our minds to, you know, kind of make sure that we're able to stay on the [00:43:00] path of, of, of our, of our vision. [00:43:06] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Again, I'm thinking I want to take all of that in. Ah, wow. So it's, I mean, yay. This is so exciting and it's, it takes me back to something. That I'm that a lot of times when I work with my own clients, we talk about the, the foundation, which is you have to remind yourself that you deserve to be here. You know, that, that that's so much of it. [00:43:32] And as a meditator, I that's, that's part of my daily meditation. Right. So when I'm, and I'm gonna use myself as, as the The research tool, I guess when I'm meditating, when I'm in that space. And if I'm trying to do my vision and purpose and values, and I'm trying to get to a place where I feel like I can act on the things that you're talking about, the tactics, the actual step-by-step stuff [00:44:00] that you detail in the book, how do I remain consistent? [00:44:06] What does someone need to do? If, if for example, they're not having results yet, or, or it's taking a long time or things are moving slower than they might want or need. How do you maintain a consistent level of the practices that, that you outline in the book? If you are someone who's, who doesn't have Bob lesser as a coach to sort of talk through it. [00:44:30] So you're the you're, you know, Jane Schmoe and you are. Trying to work through and develop these, this, the values, the vision and the purpose. [00:44:41] Bob Lesser: Yeah. Yeah, yeah. That's it. It's a good question. There's a couple things. So one of the things I talk about in the book is an as again of practice practices of high-performers one of them is to build. [00:44:52] Around you that will support you. And, you know, the team is going to look a little different depending on, you know, what it is you are trying to achieve and get [00:45:00] better at and and, and optimize. So, but we all need, we all need a team. We all need a support. We all need support. Nobody does it alone. That team part of that, part of what that team does is hold you account. [00:45:10] As well as support you. And, and so having a team in place that will help you to stay on track, stay on the path that when things aren't working, we'll brainstorm with you, what's not working, what do we need to do differently? And and, and so, so thinking about yourself, just like athletes, do athletes have their, you know, tennis players have their teams of, you know, Their coach, their physiotherapists, their acupuncturist, their dietician they're right there. [00:45:36] You know, their fitness coach. They've got all these people that are specialized to help them be the best tennis players they can be. Right. What I'm suggesting is that we all need that in our lives. We need our own sort of personal teams that will help us be. You know, w person that we can be the best, you know, whatever it is, you know, fill in the blank that we want to be. [00:45:58] So part of it is, is, is [00:46:00] really formulating that team and, and, and using that team. And then the other piece is at the very end of the book, I include a 30 day peak performance challenge which walks the reader through how to implement the concepts in the book over a 30 day period on anything that they want. [00:46:17] They want to get better at anything they want to make sort of breakthrough performance in and what that does. And the reason I included that is because it's both showing people how tangibly and practically to implement these concepts and day-to-day life. And it also helps to make it. Doing this over 30 days is gonna, is gonna start to build these practices as habits. [00:46:42] And, you know, it is checking in on purpose, going back to purpose. It is checking in on your values and make sure you're doing those behaviors. It is checking in with your vision. And, and it is also making sure. The goals that you have said are are the right goals and that you are monitoring and measuring them. [00:46:59] And so I [00:47:00] include a process that's taken, actually taken from Google and w what Google uses to manage its its own performance. Called objectives and key results. And I've adapted that to personal use so that you are basically setting goals for yourself. And then you're breaking those goals down into, into monthly objectives and key and key results that are kind of the measurable indicators that tell you the, what progress you're making towards achieving those objectives. [00:47:32] And you score yourself. On them and, and it's as great tool for staying. Seeing where you're where you're not on track, where you're maybe behind and where you need to pick up the pace on things. So that's a, that's a very concrete tool that I offer and I use myself that I've been doing for years that really has helped me stay consistent. [00:47:53] Because every week I'm looking at my goals, my objectives for the month that are based on my goals for the year that are based on. [00:48:00] Long-term vision for myself. And I score them and I say, yeah, you're doing, you know, you're on track this week or, Hey, you're, you're behind schedule and you have to pick up the pace. [00:48:09] And I used that process to, you know, to kind of, you know, stay, stay on, you know, on track, you know, month by month till I hit six months. And I revisit my annual. To make sure that it's still relevant and see if anything has changed or if I want to make any modifications. And then I keep going and hopefully by the end of the year, I'm a step closer to achieving my vision. [00:48:33] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that. I love that. That's again, to me, consistency is so important because you can have the absolute best intentions, but, but if you're not consistent with it, then. Then you're going to have a lot of extra challenges, I think. Yeah. [00:48:49] Bob Lesser: I, and I, and I actually just won one saying that I really love is that elite performers are not consistently great. [00:48:57] They're great at being consistent. And [00:49:00] so. Consistency showing up day in, day out is, is the name of the game. And so I'm glad you brought that up because that, that is, you know, it's not about these heroic performances or, you know you know, going, you know, all 110% all the time. It's about showing. You know, doing our best day in day out and being consistent and by being consistent is going to be how we become better and ultimately great at something [00:49:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: 10,000 hours. [00:49:32] Yes, absolutely. And that's, that's the epitome of consistency. You have to do it for 10,000 hours on Malcolm Gladwell. We love him and we hate him at the same time. Bob, I'm so grateful that you. Took the time to chat with me about your work and the book. I'm super, super excited about it. I would love it if you wouldn't mind. [00:49:53] Cause I'm sure, you know, someone's listening to this going, I need this book. I need to know more about [00:50:00] Bob Lester and the work he's doing. How does someone connect with you? What, where are the places that someone could find you and also where can the book be found? [00:50:09] Bob Lesser: Yeah. Awesome. Yeah. I mean, you know, I'm on social media. [00:50:12] You can find me on Instagram at, at Bob underscore lesser. I'm also on Twitter at lesser underscore bomb. So you can find me both of those places. And you can also go to my website to learn a little bit more about me and my work and. Read some, some articles that I, you know, kinda my new, my new stuff. [00:50:31] And that's www.boblesser.com. The book can be ordered it's out and can be ordered on Amazon Barnes and noble bookshop and indie bound. So, you know, any anywhere, you know, where you prefer to, to, to buy books, those are all the online sources. And the name of the book is the peak performance formula achieving breakthrough results in life. [00:50:53] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Fabulous. And I'll put the links to everything in the show notes so that we don't have to be typing furiously down [00:51:00] everything. So writing it all, noting it all down. Whenever somebody says to me, you know, oh, can you spell that for my name? For example, I'm always like, oh, you don't want to do that. Let me just send it to you either that, or I say write small because my name is very long. [00:51:14] Once again, Bob, I'm so grateful that you took the time to be here. I have just one last question that I. Everybody who comes on the show. And it's a silly question, but I find that it yields some profound results. And the question is this. If you had an airplane that could sky write anything for the whole world to see, what would you say? [00:51:41] NEF said. All right. Well, that's, that's about the most succinct I've had there. That's yeah. Three, three words. That's good. Cause you can't, you can't. Too many words. So there you go, Bob. Thank you once again for being here. I really appreciate it. [00:51:59] Bob Lesser: Although my pleasure. [00:52:00] Thanks for having me. [00:52:01] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Wow. So you have gotten it from Bob lesser. [00:52:04] You're going to need to go out and get the peak performance formula. Be consistent in your practices. Figure out your vision, your purpose, your values, and live your best life and do your best work. It's really the way it's all about. I am. Izolda Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast. And I'm hoping that you enjoyed the show. [00:52:24] I'm hoping that you are enjoying your day, and I'm hoping that if you do like what you're hearing. Drop a review, tell a friend about this episode so that more people can learn about Bob and the incredible work he's doing to help people be peak performers until next time, remember to listen, learn, laugh, and love a whole lot. [00:52:49] thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people. [00:53:00] And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on patrion.com/innovative mindset. [00:53:06] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters there today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg and his copyright 2020. As always, please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative mindset.  

Withywindle
Kate Albus Kicks Things Off

Withywindle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 73:38


We're back! It's time for a new season of Withywindle and the guys are back with more jokes, more riddles, more book-talk, and more wonderful guests. This week, Kate Albus, author of the wonderful new book, A Place to Hang the Moon, drops by to talk about her favorite books, where her ideas come from, whether she likes Cheetos or Doritos, and plenty more. Plus, we introduce E.B. White and prepare for this season's book. Happy listening! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Same Peaks Y'all
SPY: The Return Ep. 09

Same Peaks Y'all

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 84:26


Around the dinner table the conversation is lively, and around the podcast the conversation is hopefully tolerable. We're back to discuss Part 9 of “Twin Peaks: The Return.” Chantal gives Booper some Cheetos, the Detectives Fusco discuss an expensive tail light, Ike the Spike takes his leave, Lucy takes her lunch, Diane takes a cigarette […]

Mess Hall Podcast
201-Cheese with Kevin

Mess Hall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 22:45


Welcome to the Mess Hall Podcast, part of the Alberta Podcast Network, Locally grown. Community supported. Avery, Lena, and Kevin try cheese treats: Cheetos pasta and Moon Cheese.  Our bonus item is honey mustard Pringles. Follow us and send a message at: Twitter @themesshallpod Facebook @messhallpodcas Instrgram @messhallpod  email: messhallpodcast@gmail.com  We want to tell you about ATB's new podcast - The Future Of. Join Todd Hirsch, ATB's Vice President and Chief Economist, as he connects with special guests who offer unique and useful perspectives about the future. Explore how our economy and communities can not only brace for change, but embrace the opportunity it creates. From the future of women in business to the changing nature of work itself, The Future Of helps us understand what's coming, and what we need to do today to get the tomorrow we want. Featuring two episodes each month, plus bonus episodes, The Future Of includes interviews with top community and business leaders from Alberta and around the world.  Subscribe to The Future Of in the Apple Store, Google Play, Spotify and everywhere podcasts are found, and connect to ask your questions about the future by emailing thefutureof@atb.com. This week's podcast shout out is going to QUANTUM KICKFLIP Six Edmonton comedians play Slugblaster, a sci-fi tabletop roleplaying game developed in Alberta. Find out more at quantumkickflip.com

2 Queens and a What?
Breakfast At Tiffany's with a side of Cheetos Puffs

2 Queens and a What?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 70:20


Mike's work weekend Ted Lasso disappoints Mike We love Only Murders In The Building On the road with Knightrider Adventures This week's movie is Breakfast At Tiffany's watch next weeks with us Breaking Away from 1979 email us your Cheetos Feelings at 2QueensWhat@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/john-burns1/message

Complaints and Observations
Episode 91 - Oops! It's ALL GRIPES! & Three Gripes

Complaints and Observations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 50:00


It's an entirely all gripes episode! Yeah, that's right, it's just a whiny, fat white guy complaining about entire dumb and innocuous shit. In other words, exactly what probably should be expected. Jags Twitter, September by Earth Wind & Fire, eating Cheetos with a plastic glove, WASPs ordering drinks no one's ever heard of, false advertising/abortions, Boo Berry, The Romantics, killing someone with an Optimus Prime and potential questions of the week. Then it's on to the usual Three Gripes: "DM for a collab", corporate fibs and bullshit and couples with joint Facebook pages. 50 minutes of drivel! Check it out! #TellYourFriends #TellYourMoms --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/complaintsandobservations/message

The Kluck Index
September 22 2021

The Kluck Index

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 3:26


Britney is back baby! Old bananas may save your life, Cheetos and Doritos Flamin Hot sauces are heading your way and only half of seniors are out there on the interwebz... See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 57: Halloween Ranch, Stevie vs Lindsey, & Resurrecting The Woolly Mammoth

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 91:28


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Holy Donut Stout by Maine's Lone Pine Brewing, brought to her by her friend and fellow comedian Kelly MacFarland. She also gives a shoutout to Little Big Town for the “Day Drinking” trucker hat that was sent after Kathleen tasted their Day Drinking canned wine on a previous Pubcast. TERMITE SHOUTOUTS: Kathleen gives thanks to the Termites who leave notes at shows and send mail to her PO Box. She begins by thanking Termite Adam, who made his mother proud by sending the completed set of South Carolina rocks glasses. Also big thanks to Termite Summer for the Trader Joe's Carolina Gold bbq sauce and the “Calm Down Karen” t-shirt. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Pumpkin Spice Cheerios, which she doesn't like because she doesn't like ANY pumpkin flavor (she and her dad always ask her mom to make a chocolate pie for any holiday), and then moves onto Taco Bell's Avocado Ranch sauce, which she recommends putting on anything. Kathleen finishes her tasting by sampling Cheeto's Crunch Pop Mix, telling Termites to stick with the original Cheeto's. ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM REVIEW: As a follow-up to Episode 38, Kathleen visited the ISGM when she was recently in Boston for shows. She describes the rooms and the artwork exhibited (which you can also see video of on her YouTube channel), with her favorite area being the iconic courtyard. Then in continuing to do the Lord's work, Kathleen mentions her official chowder tasting at Black Rose, the Chart House, and Legal Seafood in downtown Boston. UPDATE ON KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen provides an update on the Queens, reporting that Queen Tanya has canceled the remainder of her 2021 Tour dates, stating that she needs to concentrate on rehabilitating her hip after her recent surgery. Tanya has also recorded a very cool song with RuPaul called “This Is Our Country,” which Kathleen recommends cranking UP and listening to. In super breaking bombshell news, Queen Stevie has delivered a TKO to former boyfriend and bandmate Lindsey Buckingham after his latest rant to the press challenging Stevie's involvement in his firing from Fleetwood Mac. Buckingham dissed all of his former bandmates in his tirades, which Kathleen advises is probably not the best way to approach a possible reunion. HIDDEN VALLEY HALLOWEEN: Kathleen is thrilled to read an announcement that Hidden Valley is releasing limited-edition Halloween treats for Ranch lovers, as well as a Ranch bottle costume. BALTO HOLMES AND MORE THERANOS TRIAL UNCERTAINTY: In another chapter of the saga of Elizabeth Holmes' lies, Kathleen reports to the Termites that in 2017, Vanity Fair reports that Holmes flew first-class across the U.S. to adopt a 9-week-old Siberian husky. She named him Balto after the world-famous sled dog that made a dangerous 600-mile journey in 1925, bearing medicine to save an entire village from diphtheria. Holmes went on to boast to people that Balto is a wolf, which his AKC paperwork states otherwise. Kathleen then goes into detail on the latest developments in the Theranos trial, including issues with jurors, the ways in which Holmes as altered her appearance to look more “maternal,” and the and exquisite home that she's residing in with her new baby and billionaire husband while on trial for fraud. RESURRECTING THE WOOLLY MAMMOTH: Kathleen reads an article outlining where scientists are making a pitch to resurrect the woolly mammoth from extinction. Colossal, a biosciences and genetics company, has raised $15 million to bring back the mammoth in an altered genetic form. The move could help restore the fragile Arctic tundra ecosystem, however, the ethical issues involved are creating a firestorm with the Genetics community. Kathleen asks listeners what they think of the campaign, and Paddles votes to proceed as long as the end result produces a mini mammoth (much like a baby goat). BITCOIN BECOMES LEGAL TENDER IN EL SALVADOR: As listeners of the Pubcast know, Kathleen holds mad love for cryptocurrency. She's thrilled to read an article announcing that El Salvador has adopted Bitcoin as an official currency alongside the US dollar. Supporters argue the move will make it cheaper and easier for migrants to send money home to El Salvador, which is important given such remittances account for over 24 percent of the country's gross domestic product, according to figures from the World Bank reported by CNBC. Baby steps for big gain states Mama T. RIPPER THE TALKING DUCK: Kathleen reads an article from New Zealand where a duck, who was raised in captivity in the late 1980s, was recorded uttering the phrase: “You bloody fool!” Scientists have analyzed the recordings, and have added musk ducks to a small number of animals able to imitate human speech.THE BEST PLACE TO LIVE IN THE USA: Kathleen is excited to announce that Money Magazine has evaluated big cities and small towns all over the US and has determined that the best place to live is Chanhassen, Minnesota. The magazine revealed its 35th annual "50 Best Places to Live" list last week, looking at metrics across nine different categories to create its definitive ranking for 2021-22. Situated southwest of the Twin Cities, Chanhassen made the #1 pick overall, with two additional cities in Minnesota making the top fifty as well. Skol!A $400B UTOPIAN DESERT CITY PLANNED: Kathleen reads an article where former Walmart president and billionaire Marc Lore has announced his plans for a $400 billion utopian city. Lore wants to capture the cleanliness of Tokyo, the diversity of New York, and the social services of Stockholm, and his vision will incorporate 5-million-people. He has appointed world-famous architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group to finalize the design and location, using scouting teams to review possible targets including Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Arizona, Texas, and the Appalachian region. Stay tuned for UPDATES ☺THE CAROLINA MURDAUGH MURDERS: Kathleen's ID Channel love attracts her to the bizarre details surrounding the murder of the family of a South Carolina lawyer, Alex Murdaugh. News of the deaths of Paul Murdaugh, 22, and Maggie Murdaugh, 52, has led to national headlines, not only for the mystery surrounding their murders but for the ties to other death investigations in the Lowcountry area: Stephen Smith in 2015, Gloria Satterfield in 2018 and Mallory Beach in 2019. Kathleen reads through the timeline of events leading up to the recent arrest of Alex Murdaugh, after admitting to enlisting a hitman to end his own life in an effort to release an insurance policy for his remaining living son. More to come as details unfold…See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

You Tried Dat??
153: Sweet Potato Kettle Chips, Tex Mex Trail Mix, and Life Savers Orange Mint (w/ Lance Gilstrap)

You Tried Dat??

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 62:44


This week, You Tried Dat?? is joined by Lance Gilstrap of the Garfield podcast Hungry Cat Daily to cover orange snacks. Why orange? Because Garfield is orange. They taste Good & Gather Sweet Potato Kettle Chips, Good & Gather Tex Mex Trail Mix, and Life Savers Orange Mint Candies. They also discuss Tesla Bot, cats eating Cheetos, and John Rockefeller before taking an orange quiz. Check out Lance's hilarious Garfield recap podcast Hungry Cat Daily!  Follow him on twitter @regularkarate and the show @hungrycatdaily. Follow us on Instagram to see pictures of the snacks @youtrieddat.

Achieving Reality:  The Podcast!
Episode 436 - A Cheddar Cheese Lay

Achieving Reality: The Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 31:45


Larry and Chris discuss veterinary alternatives to common sense, Cheetos flavored chips and the Nirvana baby.  Enjoy!

Just for Variety with Marc Malkin
Eva Longoria on the Power of Poderistas, Directing the Cheetos Movie “Flamin' Hot” and More

Just for Variety with Marc Malkin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 23:13


Eva Longoria talks politics, tequila and making her feature film directorial debut. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Word Salad Radio
253. You-Turn #7. The Wright Stuff (Sarah Wright)

Word Salad Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 12:54


Wilbur and Orville Wright have wasted their lives in a haze of Cheeto dust and Nintendo games, but when their sister Sarah dares them to build a flying machine, the entire course of human history is changed forever. Today we celebrate Patron Sarah Wright with her own original piece of fan fiction! Support the podcast with 5-star ratings and reviews on Apple Podcasts: tinyurl.com/y8t8k5ag If you want to support the show by sending us a few bucks, you can become a Patron, which also earns you access to exclusive content! www.patreon.com/wordsalad If you're looking for other ways to support the show, recommend us to a friend! Any and all support is greatly appreciated. You guys keep us going! Email us at WordSaladProductions@gmail.com Check out the Word Salad Radioheads Facebook group: www.facebook.com/groups/WordSalad Follow Word Salad Radio on Twitter: www.twitter.com/WordSaladRadio Follow Joe on Letterboxd: www.letterboxd.com/j4sanders Intro: “Rules of War” by Shattered Helium https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfdHsP5MgbPP3-HBPi_vHYA Cover Art created by Joe Ketchum Episode edited by Joe Ketchum Other shows featured on Word Salad Radio: Blockbuster Autopsy: Highly qualified professionals diagnose the cause of death on some of the biggest budget movies and TV corpses around. Commentary Commissary: Host and guests watch movies they enjoy and talk over them. Dick Picks: Where host and guest choose terrible movies to subject the other to and try to defend them. Doc n Roll: An examination of documentary films. Fic/off: Competitors are given 2 fictional characters to mashup into original short stories. Flux Capacitors: A show analyzing the time travel mechanics in various movies and TV shows. Ghost of Oscar Past: An annual Oscar retrospective looking at winners/nominees from 20 years ago to see if they still hold up. High Five: Host and guest compile top five lists that are related but don't overlap. The List of Shame: One person tries to guess what a classic film they've never seen is about and then tries to convince the other person they were right after watching it for the first time. Loose Canons: Where our cohosts review movies that don't actually exist, like Jaws 19 from Back to the Future Part II. The Mooby Awards: An annual show where co-hosts rip apart a movie they agree is overrated. Page Turners: A show all about the art of adaptation. Quote Unquote Guilty: All about guilty pleasure movies, tv shows, music, scientific principles, etc. Rock Cops: A Patreon-Exclusive mini-series breaking down every episode of the 90s musical cop drama Cop Rock. Stranger Themes: Co-hosts force each other to make weird analyses of different movies and defend their argument with evidence from the text. Test Pilots: A show about failed TV pilots and where they might've gone from here. You-Turn: A podcast dedicated to Word Salad fans! Patrons of the show star in original fan fiction short stories. © 2016-2021 Joe Ketchum

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU
Worst of The RIOT for September 13th, 2021

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 42:02


Hudson and Nikki talk about a 17 page relationship contract. They also try the new Nashville Hot Cheetos. Opening weekend for the NFL, empty taco bell sauce packets, naked in the toll lane, and more on this episode of Worst of The RIOT.

The Garcia Diaries
About Our Son's Earrings...

The Garcia Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 41:55


Bethanie gives a mini health updates, Anthony addresses his "haters" lmao, they talk about Deuce's earring situation, fantasies, Cheeto catapults, and so much more!! This episode is sponsored by Dame Products. To shop all things Dame, visit dameproducts.com/bethaniegarcia and use BETHANIEGARCIA for 10% off!! This week on the Patreon, we talk about the funniest manscaping situation ever. You can subscribe for $5 a month and listen! Patreon.com/thegarciadiaries

Snack Queens
Chip Flavored Chips

Snack Queens

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 30:24


This week, the Queens are excited to try Lay's newest limited edition flavors: Cheetos, Cool Ranch Doritos, and Funyuns. Chip flavored chips may be our most meta snacks yet!

Quilt Buzz
Episode 038: Elise of @elisebaek

Quilt Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 36:07


Show Notes:0:45 - English paper piecing (EPP)0:49 - Adobe Illustrator0:52 - Southern California1:01 - EPP (English Paper Piecing)3:40 - Art Gallery Fabrics, Americana Bundle Up collection5:49, 6:37 and 6:46 - Glue basting5:51, 6:39, 6:48 and 6:54 - Thread basting6:26 - Elise's EPP academy7:13 - Elise's EPP academy8:39 - Crochet9:17 - Facebook 9:20 - Zoom 10:52 - Elise's EPP Block Club11:43 and 12:06 - Adobe Illustrator13:16 - Example of one of Elise's curve shaped flower EPP block 13:29 - Elise's acrylic EPP templates16:26 - ¼in stick17:09 - Hollow / window EPP templates18:07 - Glue baste18:09 - Thread baste18:37 - Fat quarters18:46 - Fussy cutting 18:49 - Fat quarters19:41 - Grandmother's Flower Garden EPP block21:00 - Cross stitch21:18 - Elise's first major cross stitching project21:21 - Fat Quarter Shop21:26 - The Shine On stitch along21:32 - The Bonnie & Camille Quilt Bee Quilt and Cross Stitch Book by Bonnie Olaveson & Camille Roskelley21:35 - Bonnie and Camille's Shine On sampler quilt pattern21:54 - Aurifil Thread21:57 - Aurifloss21:59 - Aurifil Thread22:03 - Fat Quarter Shop22:05 - Aurifil Artisan 22:14 - Fat Quarter Shop22:17 - Hilary Jordan of By Hilary Jordan (@byhilaryjordan) (listen to episode 28 to find out more about her)23:41 - Inflatable chairs from the 90s24:36 - Shine On Sampler by Bonnie and Camille24:59 - Bonnie Olaveson of Cotton Way and Camille Roskelley of Thimble Blossoms (@thimbleblossoms)28:16 - Elise's EPP academy29:55 - Cheetos, white cheddar puffs30:00 - Log Cabin traditional quilt block30:06 - Atsuko Matsuyama30:14 - Atsuko Matsuyama30:32 - Quilt Gate30:43 - Fat Quarter Shop30:58 - Clover31:04 - Aurifil Thread32:46 - Glue basting33:06 - Florida33:08 - Jennifer of Red Threads Studio Online (@redthreadstudioonline)33:17 - Yoko Saito of Quilt Party (@yokosaito_quiltparty)33:59 - Sunny Day Supply (@sunnydaysupply)34:10 - Mary Dugan and Shawn Morris of Sunny Day Supply 34:22 - Wa Wa Wi Wa Comics (@wawawiwacomics)34:31 - The Tiny Chef Show (@thetinychefshow)34:51 - Sunseeker Quilt Pattern by Elise 34:58 - Coffin shaped EPP paper pieceFollow Elise:Instagram - @elisebaekhttps://www.elisebaek.com/Follow us:Amanda: @broadclothstudio https://broadclothstudio.com/Wendy: @the.weekendquilter https://the-weekendquilter.com/Anna: @waxandwanestudiohttps://www.waxandwanestudio.com/Quilt Buzz: @quilt.buzzhttps://quiltbuzzpodcast.com/Intro/Outro Music:Golden Hour by Vlad Gluschenko

Taste Radio
How Do You Make It ‘Pop' On TikTok? And, Why A Flamin' Hot Drink Has Us Divided.

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 24:16


Taste Radio hosts Ray Latif, Jacqui Brugliera and Mike Schneider discussed recent headlines on BevNET and NOSH, including how prebiotic soda brand Poppi leveraged its presence on TikTok in support of a recent $13.5 million round of capital, why MTN DEW's limited-edition Flamin' Hot variety works (whether we like it or not) and the potential pitfalls of brand positioned as a better-for-you Hot Pocket. They also riffed on a number of new products, including those marketed by an indoor greenhouse giant, a legacy flour company, a vegan frozen food brand and the maker of beer-centric beef jerky. Show notes: 0:34: Ronaldo Comes Home. Jacqui Is Def Into This 80's Band. Plus, Bings and Jing. -- The episode opened with a chat about t-shirts and an iconic rock outfit, Ray glowing on the heels of a massive shift in global soccer and what makes Poppi's Tik Tok content so compelling. The hosts also spoke about the thoughtful planning and execution of MTN DEW's limited-edition spicy flavor, a recent article on NOSH about chef Ming Tsai's plant-based frozen sammies (aka bings), chatted (again) about the remarkable Fly By Jing and discussed some of their favorite products sampled over the past couple weeks. Brands in this episode: Poppi, Holy Kombucha, MTN DEW, Cheetos, Van Leeuwen, Kraft Foods, Boston Beer Co., Natural Light, Nutpods, Essentia, MingsBings, Hot Pockets, Gotham Greens, King Arthur, Fly By Jing, Clo-Clo, Good Planet, Earth & Star, BrewPub Jerky, HopTea

Wonderful!
Wonderful! 195: Transubstantiated Cheetos

Wonderful!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 32:46


Griffin's favorite little robot grocery stores! Rachel's favorite American Idol performer!Music: “Money Won't Pay” by bo en and Augustus – https://open.spotify.com/album/7n6zRzTrGPIHt0kRvmWoyaSupport AAPI communities and those affected by anti-Asian violence: https://www.gofundme.com/c/act/stop-aapi-hateSupport the AAPI Civic Engagement Fund: https://aapifund.org/

The Alexander Taylor Show
Lil Boosie Breakfast Club Interview, Dylan Roof, & Hot Cheeto Flavored Mountain Dew

The Alexander Taylor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 60:57


Lil Boosie Breakfast Club Interview, Dylan Roof, & Hot Cheeto Flavored Mountain Dew

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 2 | Elex Michaelson Recall Update @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 32:52


Reporters get hiccups / Flamin hot cheetohs/ Teenage pilot//Stricter Furniture standards after toddler died//Elex Michaelson – Recall//Vet participating in Para Olympics in Tokyo

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU
Worst of The RIOT for August 27th, 2021

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 38:38


Hudson, Nikki, and Isaia have a very eventful day as their Crisp Apple Macchiato Food Fight goes horribly wrong. They also look at when it is appropriate to bill your friends. Cheetos costume, Hudsons late arrival, 5 minute long TikToks, and more on this episode of Worst of The RIOT.

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU
Worst of The RIOT for August 26th, 2021

Worst of The RIOT by RadioU

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 38:42


Hudson and Nikki celebrate International Dog Day! They also find the newest Flamin Hot Cheeto craze and determine if it is worth a try. Cat calling dogs, dying from a poop, free Tim Hortons, and more on this episode of Worst of The RIOT.

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 3 - Creepy Mascots

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 18:34


We discuss how you can get Nashville hot-flavored Cheetos, CJ Morgan's fun meme-inspired game, and which Texas school has a top ten creepy mascot. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bestie Breakdown
S2 EP 13: Breaking Down Birth

The Bestie Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 59:51


Buckle up for another fun episode from the Besties! This week, they are breaking down all things BIRTH! Erika and Shay are sharing their experiences with infertility, miscarriage, morning sickness, exercising, postpartum recovery, delivery, doctors, cravings (Uncrustables and Cheetos, anyone!?), mental health, breastfeeding and so much more! They're getting specific about vaginal deliveries and c-sections too. Every awkward moment is covered in today's episode. Grab some coffee and settle in with this girlfriend chat that just proves how each and every birth and pregnancy journey is different and that no one way is the right way! The two books Shay references that she loved to read while pregnant: Belly Laughs The Girlfriends Guide' to Pregnancy

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 2 - What's The Best Hot Chip?

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 21:21


We discuss Tyga starting his own knock-off OnlyFans that allows sexually-explicit content, why Emily thinks wine tastings are bunk, and which brand of hot chips is the best. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

8-4 Play
8-4 Play 8/20/2021: GOOD TIME TO BE A HUNTER

8-4 Play

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 113:21


Look: if you aren't Monster-Hunter-positive or at least MH-curious, might wanna just skip this ep. Otherwise, enjoy as GaijinHunter Adam Evanko joins to chat about the new Netflix special, Rise and MH Stories 2, what's next for the series, and (of course) Cheetos vs. Potato straws.

An Acquired Taste Podcast
344: Movies That Tricked Us & Nom Nom Food News

An Acquired Taste Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 84:42


Have you ever thought you were watching a rom-com, only to find out that it's incredibly sad? Or a movie was advertised as horror but was actually a superslow coming-of-age story? Bethany just had that happen with the movie “Adoration,” so she's sharing other films that bait-and-switched the audience. (Who saw THAT coming in “Snow Dogs?”) Then, Kathleen has a roundup of the latest food news. There are some fun new flavors coming for Fall! Would YOU eat Cheetos ice cream?? Plus, #Papasan and your voicemails! ------ Check out our merch! —> https://store.dftba.com/collections/an-acquired-taste-podcast  ------ What We Talked About: @dannythetransdad's crow video: https://www.instagram.com/tv/CSKxShqBmjx/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link  Book: The Wrong Family by Tarryn Fisher Find your local indie bookstore -- https://www.indiebound.org/ ------ Please support the companies that support us!  ThirdLove - ThirdLove knows you deserve to feel comfortable and confident, 24/7, so right now they are offering you 20% off your first order! Go to THIRDLOVE.com/TASTE now to find your perfect-fitting bra... and get 20% off your first purchase!  Purple - Purple is comfort reinvented! Right now, get 10% off any order of $200 or more by going to Purple.com/taste10 and use the promo code “taste10" Liquid IV - Grab your Liquid I.V. in bulk nationwide at Costco or you can get 25% off when you go to LIQUIDIV.COM and use the code TASTE at checkout.  ------ BETHANY'S SOURCES: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adoration_(2019_film) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujrBaHS8UTg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grey_(film) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qs8reiEn2bM https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funny_People https://www.looper.com/140533/movies-that-baited-and-switched-fans/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txb85lE-iRE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZZpS7tSZcs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4R72KROZ20 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweeney_Todd:_The_Demon_Barber_of_Fleet_Street_(2007_film)#Cast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BWWWQzTpNU https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passengers_(2016_film) ------ KATHLEEN'S SOURCES: https://www.foodandwine.com/news/pumpkin-spice-ramen-cup-noodles https://www.foodandwine.com/news/london-bar-cocktail-menu-dogs https://www.foodandwine.com/news/chicken-fat-spill-mississippi https://www.foodandwine.com/news/ikea-meatball-candle https://www.foodandwine.com/news/barilla-pasta-box-handbag-nik-bentel https://www.foodandwine.com/news/flamin-hot-cheetos-ice-cream-shakes-marble-slab https://www.foodandwine.com/news/frenchs-mustard-buns

The Howie Carr Radio Network
DeSantis Goes After Biden -- And It Is Beautiful - 08.04.21 - Hour 3

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 38:11


Grace hits on a variety of topics including Cheetos ice cream, parents masking around their kids and a Democrat who won't concede an election loss.

Bad Friends
When the Plane Goes Down

Bad Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 72:27


Thank you to our Sponsors: https://www.liquid-iv.com code: badfriends & https://www.meundies.com/badfriends & https://hellofresh.com/badfriends14 code: BADFRIENDS14 & https://www.coinbase.com/badfriends YouTube Subscribe: http://bit.ly/BadFriendsYouTube Audio Subscribe: https://apple.co/31Jsvr2 Merch: http://badfriendsmerch.com 0:00 Rudy University Merch Announcement 1:19 Rudy doesn't want to have a nice moment with Bobby 5:52 Bobby's last two words on a plane crash 14:21 Rudy's bad attitude 17:20 Cheetos that taste like state 24:23 The Jenga champion and the magic from Shin Lim 35:06 Kissing Bradley Cooper 44:32 Bobby's experience at a mix sauna 48:26 Tanning your nuts 53:13 Andrew's favorite prank videos 59:20 Kevin Samuels gives the best relationship adviceMore Bobby Lee TigerBelly: https://www.youtube.com/tigerbelly Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bobbyleelive Twitter: https://twitter.com/bobbyleelive Tickets: https://bobbyleelive.com More Andrew Santino Whiskey Ginger: https://www.youtube.com/andrewsantinowhiskeyginger Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cheetosantino Twitter: https://Twitter.com/cheetosantino Tickets: http://www.andrewsantino.com More Bad Friends iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bad-friends/id1496265971 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/badfriendspod Twitter: https://twitter.com/badfriends_pod Official Website: http://badfriendspod.com Opening Credits and Branding: https://www.instagram.com/joseph_faria & https://www.instagram.com/jenna_sunday Credit Sequence Music: http://bit.ly/RocomMusic // https://www.instagram.com/rocom Character Design: https://www.instagram.com/jeffreymyles Bad Friends Mosaic Sign: https://www.instagram.com/tedmunzmosaicart Produced by: George Kimmel & Bryce Hallock - 7EQUIS Podcast Producers: Andres Rosende & Pete Forthun