Podcasts about Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

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Hospital in New York City, US

  • 258PODCASTS
  • 443EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

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Best podcasts about Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Latest podcast episodes about Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
#167 PhenoTips: Future of Cancer Genetics

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 77:00


DNA Today's host Kira Dineen is also the host of the PhenoTips Speaker Series. This monthly live webinar focuses on relevant genetics topics by featuring discussions with thought leaders and experts in genomic medicine. In this podcast episode we are sharing an installment of the PhenoTips Speaker Series, “The Future of Cancer Genetics”.Thanks to advancements in genome sequencing, physicians are equipped with improved knowledge on the causes of cancer, as well as alternative treatment options for specific cancers. Despite this growing wealth of cancer genomics data, experts remain unclear on how to translate cancer genetics knowledge into realizing precision medicine. To prepare practitioners for the future of cancer genetics, PhenoTips invited Dr. Banu Arun and Dr. Mark Robson to share their insights.Dr. Arun is a Professor in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Co-Medical Director of the Clinical Cancer Genetic Program, and Section Chief of Breast Genetics, Prevention, and Screening at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Hailed by Forbes as one of the top 30 Breast Medical Oncologists in the United States, she has received the FASCO award recognition in 2020 from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the ASCO-American Cancer Society 2021 Award. Dr. Arun has more than 200 peer-reviewed publications with research focusing on identifying risk biomarkers for breast cancer, and characterizing risk factors in high-risk women with hereditary gene mutations as well as assessing their breast cancer biology. In addition she has reviewed for prestigious journals, such as BMJ, JCO, Cancer, Cancer Prevention and Epidemiology, and served in several committees including her current position as the Co-Chair for the SWOG Prevention and Epidemiology Committee.Dr. Robson is the Chief of the Breast Medicine Service in the Department of Medicine at Memorial Hospital, New York, Attending Physician on Breast Medicine and Clinical Genetic Services, and a Member of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. He is an associate editor for the Journal of the National Cancer Institute and a Fellow of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), as well as a past chair of the ASCO Ethics Committee. His clinical research is on the optimal application of germline information to the management of cancer patients. He has been a lead investigator for trials of PARP inhibitors in patients with BRCA mutation–associated breast cancer and is currently developing new models for the acquisition of germline information, including "mainstreaming" through test ordering by primary oncology providers and broad genomic screening in the context of somatic mutational profiling. In addition, he is investigating the use of polygenic risk scores in facilitating decision-making among women with or without an inherited predisposition.In this webinar moderated by Kira Dineen, Dr. Arun and Dr. Robson will illuminate the future of cancer genetics by discussing:The latest technological advancements in cancer genetics.Barriers in the specialty and methods to overcome them.Strategies to prepare practitioners for the future of cancer genetic care.Hope to see you live for the next installment of Phenotips Speaker Series on January 18th about ending the diagnostic odyssey! PhenoTips' Chief Operating Officer and VP of Scientific & Medical Affairs, Dr. Pawel Buczkowicz, will be speaking with Dr. Ana Cohen, Clinical/Research Assistant Director of the Molecular Genetics Laboratory at Children's Mercy's Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine. Register here for the live event on January 18th at 11am-12pmEST. Stay tuned for the next new episode of DNA Today on January 21st, 2022 with Allelica's Giordano Bottà to discuss polygenic risk scores! New episodes are released on Fridays. In the meantime, you can binge over 165 other episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, streaming on the website, or any other podcast player by searching, “DNA Today”. Episodes since 2021 are also recorded with video which you can watch on our YouTube channel. DNA Today is hosted and produced by Kira Dineen. Our social media lead is Corinne Merlino. Our video lead is Amanda Andreoli. See what else we are up to on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and our website, DNApodcast.com. Questions/inquiries can be sent to info@DNApodcast.com.Do you want to connect with other people who have the same genetic variant as you? You should check out “Connect My Variant”, it's an online resource that allows you to do just that. “Connect My Variant” also provides different avenues of informing your family of possible inherited risk of disease. This includes helping find where your variant came from and finding distant cousins that may also be at risk. The University of Washington has supported the “Connect My Variant” project in an effort to help patients and families understand where their unique genetic variants come from. Check out it at ConnectMyVariant.com. (SPONSORED)Did you know that most cancer samples cannot be subjected to some of the most common cytogenetic analyses due to their storage in formalin and other intractable storage conditions? Don't let difficult sample types and convoluted assay cascades get in the way of your research! Phase Genomics has developed a brand new Next Generation Cytogenomics platform to advance discovery in reproductive genetics and precision oncology. A single assay has the ability to do comprehensive testing for chromosomal abnormalities in fresh, frozen, AND even paraffin-embedded FFPE samples. Learn more about Phase Genomics' incredible new platform in cytogenomics by visiting PhaseGenomics.com. You can also hear our in depth interview with them on episode 169 of DNA Today which will be released on January 28th. (SPONSORED). PerkinElmer Genomics is a global leader in genetic testing focusing on rare diseases, inherited disorders, newborn screening, and hereditary cancer. Testing services support the full continuum of care from preconception and prenatal to neonatal, pediatric, and adult. Testing options include sequencing for targeted genes, multiple genes, the whole exome or genome, and copy number variations. Using a simple saliva or blood sample, PerkinElmer Genomics answers complex genetic questions that can proactively inform patient care and end the diagnostic odyssey for families. Learn more at PerkinElmerGenomics.com. (SPONSORED)Are you a genetic counselor or genetic counseling student? Join me in participating in a research study surrounding education on gender-affirming care in genetic counseling. This study is from the University of Michigan Genetic Counseling Program. It requires a pre and post test survey along with an online 2-3 hour educational tool. I just got access to the modules and am looking forward to learning this week! And here's a bonus: you are entered to win one of 10 $50 gift cards! Complete the survey here . (SPONSORED).

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Secret Of The War On Cancer -  Ralph MossRalph Moss •           https://www.mossreports.com/•           Book - Cancer, Incorporated and Immunotherapy: The Battle Within The medical writer Ralph W. Moss, PhD, has written or edited twelve books and four film documentaries on questions relating to cancer research and treatment.Dr. Moss is a graduate of New York University (BA, cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, 1965) and Stanford University (MA, 1973, PhD, 1974, Classics). He is the former science writer and assistant director of public affairs at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York (1974-1977). Since leaving Sloan-Kettering in 1977, Moss has independently evaluated the claims of conventional and non-conventional cancer treatments all over the world. He currently writes Moss Reports, detailed reports on the most common cancer diagnoses and provides informational and personalized consultations for cancer patients and their families. In 2019, he wrote The Ultimate Guide to Cancer: DIY Research, to help lay people research their own cancers. This 50-page report is available free of charge at the mossreports.com website. #RalpMoss #TheRealTruthAbouthealth #Cancer #CancerTreament #CancerFightingFoods CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims.   

A Fashion Moment
Tanya Taylor

A Fashion Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 48:29


At 25, fashion designer Tanya Taylor launched her namesake brand in 2012, taking the New York fashion scene by storm. Equipped with academic training from McGill University, Central Saint Martins, and Parsons, in conjunction with her unwavering belief in her vision, Taylor transformed her clothing line into the successful multifaceted brand it is today. Tanya integrates her love of color into all of her collections, but her dedication to the arts, activism, and inclusivity are most prevalent throughout her work.  Whether it's getting people to register to vote, providing a range of sizes beyond the industry standard, or her ongoing collaboration with Memorial Sloane Kettering, Tanya uses her talents, connections, and love for fashion to make an impact. Host Kirsten Holtz Naim catches up with Tanya to talk about her career journey in the fashion industry, strategic decisions that helped her thrive as a brand during the pandemic, and of course, reflecting on one of her favorite fashion moments of all time. Enjoy the episode? Support the podcast by buying a cup of coffee! Learn more here: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/afashionmoment Connect with Us! Spotify | Apple Shop + Support Instagram: @afashionmoment Twitter: @A_FashionMoment Email: AFashionMomentPodcast@gmail.com Website: A Fashion Moment Show Notes: Shop Tanya Taylor's collections now at https://www.tanyataylor.com/ Follow Tanya Taylor on Instagram @tanyataylor and on Facebook @tanyataylornyc   Shop Tanya Taylor x Paintbox Nail Polish: https://gretta.co/products/tanya-taylor-x-paintbox-nail-polish  Follow Toronto Fashion Week on Instagram @tfw  Learn more about McGill University: https://www.mcgill.ca/  Vogue Business article covering Tanya's commitment to size inclusivity, “The payoffs of plus-size: https://www.voguebusiness.com/fashion/tanya-taylor-plus-size-inclusivity-profit  House Beautiful article, “Fashion Designer Tanya Taylor Launches Home Collection”: https://www.housebeautiful.com/shopping/best-stores/a36674977/fashion-designer-tanya-taylor-launches-spring-summer-home-decor/  Glamour article, “Designer Tanya Taylor Debuts Clever NYFW Film Series to Encourage Voting”:  https://www.glamour.com/story/tanya-taylor-nyfw-film-series-to-encourage-voting  Learn more about Tanya Taylor & Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center:  https://www.tanyataylor.com/pages/msk  Learn more about HENSE's mural work in Washington, D.C.: https://savingplaces.org/stories/slideshow-update-painted-dc-church-now-artistic-inside#.YdIl4mjMLIU  Learn more about the notes left at the White House during that infamous Obama farewell party: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9445203/Dave-Chappelle-says-celebrities-left-dirty-notes-White-House-Trump-Obama-party.html

Lung Cancer Considered
Virtual Tumor Board EGFR With Helena Yu And Alfredo Addeo

Lung Cancer Considered

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 44:14


This episode of Lung Cancer Considered focuses on an EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer virtual tumor board case that involves a 41-year-old woman who is a never smoker and presents with a dry cough, chest pain, and weight loss. Discussing treatment options on this podcast with host Dr. Narjust Duma are Dr. Alfredo Addeo, senior oncologist at Geneva Hospital in Geneva, Switzerland, and Dr. Helena Yu, medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

Healthcare Unfiltered
Will POLARIX Finally Spell Doom for R-CHOP?

Healthcare Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 59:02


Chadi invites a trio of lymphoma experts to weigh the importance of the POLARIX trial – which was presented at the ASH Annual Meeting and looked at frontline therapy for patients with DLBCL. Matthew Matasar, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, co-authored publication of the POLARIX study “Polatuzumab Vedotin in Previously Untreated Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma” in the New England Journal of Medicine and defends the its results with guests Liz Brem, MD, UC Irvine, and Daniel Landsburg, MD, University of Pennsylvania. Can polatuzumab vedotin supplant conventional R-CHOP as the standard of care for previously untreated DLBCL? As they work through the details of the study, the experts share whether they believe the data supports an immediate standard-of-care change or if more research is needed. Read the study published in NEJM https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2115304 Check out Chadi's website for all Healthcare Unfiltered episodes and other content. www.chadinabhan.com/ Watch all Healthcare Unfiltered episodes on Youtube. www.youtube.com/channel/UCjiJPTpIJdIiukcq0UaMFsA

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
The Cancer Growing In Cancer Medicine - Ralph Moss

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 12:17


The Cancer Growing In Cancer Medicine -  Ralph Moss Ralph Moss •           https://www.mossreports.com/•           Book - Cancer, Incorporated and Immunotherapy: The Battle Within The medical writer Ralph W. Moss, PhD, has written or edited twelve books and four film documentaries on questions relating to cancer research and treatment.Dr. Moss is a graduate of New York University (BA, cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, 1965) and Stanford University (MA, 1973, PhD, 1974, Classics). He is the former science writer and assistant director of public affairs at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York (1974-1977). Since leaving Sloan-Kettering in 1977, Moss has independently evaluated the claims of conventional and non-conventional cancer treatments all over the world. He currently writes Moss Reports, detailed reports on the most common cancer diagnoses and provides informational and personalized consultations for cancer patients and their families. In 2019, he wrote The Ultimate Guide to Cancer: DIY Research, to help lay people research their own cancers. This 50-page report is available free of charge at the mossreports.com website. #RalpMoss #TheRealTruthAbouthealth #Cancer #CancerTreament #CancerFightingFoods CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/  

Oncology Today with Dr Neil Love
NSCLC with EGFR Exon 20 Insertion Mutations with Dr Gregory Riely

Oncology Today with Dr Neil Love

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 35:59


Dr Gregory Riely from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City discusses recent advances and future directions in the management of patients with NSCLC and EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations. CME information and select publications here (http://www.researchtopractice.com/OncologyTodayNSCLCEGFR21).

Capital Allocators
Jarrid Tingle and Henri Pierre-Jacques – Harlem Capital (Manager Meetings, EP.24)

Capital Allocators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:43


On today's Manager Meetings, Jason Klein sits down with Jarrid Tingle and Henri Pierre-Jacques. Jason is is the CIO at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and a past guest on Capital Allocators. Jarrid and Henri are co-founders and Managing Partners of Harlem Capital, a venture capital firm seeking to change the face of entrepreneurship by investing in 1,000 diverse founders over the next 20 years and creating a community to support diversity across the industry. Before they get going, Jason and I discuss the attributes that attracted him to Harlem, monitoring and evaluating a first time fund manager, and sizing the position in his portfolio. Learn More Follow Ted on Twitter at @tseides or LinkedIn Subscribe to the mailing list Access Transcript with Premium Membership

Quantum Nurse: Out of the rabbit hole from stress to bliss.  http://graceasagra.com/
#219 - Dr. Kathleen Ruddy - "Breast Cancer Surgeon Speaks on Vaccines"

Quantum Nurse: Out of the rabbit hole from stress to bliss. http://graceasagra.com/

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 43:46


Quantum Nurse www.quantumnurse.life invites you to Quantum Nurse Livestream Nov 22, Monday @ 6:00 PM EST Guest: Dr. Kathleen T. Ruddy Topic: Breast Cancer Surgeon Speaks http://www.breasthealthandhealing.org/ Bio: Author: The End of Breast Cancer: A Virus and the Hope for a Vaccine. The Viability of Roe: Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Institute Kathleen T. Ruddy, MD, is a breast cancer surgeon and one of the doctors on the leading edge or research into the causes of breast cancer. Dr Ruddy trained at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She was the founder and for Barnabas Health Grace Asagra, RN MA Podcast: Quantum Nurse: Out of the Rabbit Hole from Stress to Bless https://linktr.ee/GraceAsagra www.quantumnurse.life

Surgical Hot Topics
Same Surgeon, Different Light S2: Dr. Valerie Rusch

Surgical Hot Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 51:11


In the first episode of Season 2, Dr. David Tom Cooke interviews Dr. Valerie Rusch, esteemed medical researcher and thoracic surgeon from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. Rusch reveals fascinating details about her storied career, excitedly sharing that cardiothoracic surgery is “in a time of wonderful transformation.” She describes growing up in Manhattan with powerful lessons from her mother about being a strong woman. This counsel—along with a summer job as a surgical scrub tech—motivated Dr. Rusch to pursue a career in medicine. She knew it wouldn't be easy, but with persistence and resilience, she carried on and became one of the world's top experts in the management of lung cancer and mesothelioma. Throughout the episode, Dr. Rusch offers valuable advice for young surgeons. “Be nimble and flexible,” she says. In addition, Dr. Rusch explains the importance of being open to new ideas and thoughtful about acquiring new skills to take care of patients. The faces of cardiothoracic surgery are different than they were 30 years ago, which she says, is "a benefit to the specialty, surgery in general, and especially to our patients.” Is the thoracic surgeon of tomorrow different than the thoracic surgeon of today? According to Dr. Rusch, “absolutely.” “Same Surgeon, Different Light” is a program from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons designed to demystify cardiothoracic surgery, revealing the men and women behind their surgical masks. Learn more about STS diversity and inclusion efforts at sts.org/diversity. Patients can learn more about cardiothoracic diseases and their treatments at ctsurgerypatients.org.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 54:04


Grape seed extract found to extend lifespan of old mice Chinese Academy of Sciences and Mayo Clinic, December 7, 2021 A team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions in China and the U.S. has found that injecting procyanidin C1 (PCC1), a chemical found in grape seed extract, into older mice extended their lifespan. In their paper published in the journal Nature Metabolism, the group describes the link between PCC1 and extended lifespan in mice and the experiments they carried out with the material. The researchers screened 46 plant extracts looking for anti-aging capabilities. They came across PCC1. Initial tests during screening showed it reduced the number of senescent cells in the human prostate. Such cells are known to contribute to aging. Intrigued with their results, the researchers tested it further. They found that at low doses it prevented senescent cells from contributing to inflammation, and at higher doses killed them outright without harming other cells. (NEXT) Gratitude may improve your health University of Michigan and University of California, San Francisco, December 6, 2021 Be thankful for what you have—it might improve your physical and mental health, according to a new global study that uses cell phone data. People who were more grateful had lower blood pressure and heart rate, as well as greater feelings of appreciation toward others. The study found that optimism was also linked to health and mental benefits, such as better sleep quality and more positive expectations and reflections. The findings showed that gratitude and optimism are positive psychological dispositions associated with beneficial outcomes. Gratitude highlighted the positive aspects of the day, whereas optimism minimized the negative aspects of the day, the study indicated. In addition, optimism was a better predictor of sleep quality and stress frequency and intensity than gratitude. (NEXT) Higher physical activity is associated with a better metabolic health risk factor profile in menopausal women University of Jyvaskyla (Finland), November 29, 2021 A study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä shows that menopausal transition is associated with unfavourable changes in metabolic health that may be mitigated with a physically active lifestyle. Especially, physical activity alleviated the increase in systolic blood pressure. In the study, the women were divided into three groups based on the change in their menopausal status during the follow-up period and the groups were compared to each other. Body composition, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood lipids and glucose and physical activity were measured twice during the four-year follow-up time. In all groups, the levels of several metabolic health indicators deteriorated. (NEXT) Could glucosamine and chondroitin support a healthy colon? Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, December 6, 2021 Use of the supplements, which are used for joint health support, was associated with a 23% reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer, according to data from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study published in the International Journal of Cancer . “Results of this study suggest a potential beneficial effect of glucosamine and chondroitin supplementation on risk of colorectal cancer, and further support the previously observed association between use of these supplements and risk of colorectal cancer in the VITAL study,” wrote the researchers. “Additional study is needed to better understand the association between use of glucosamine and chondroitin and risk of colorectal cancer, and the mechanisms by which these supplements may affect risk of colorectal cancer.” (NEXT) Cannabis impacts sperm counts, motility in two generations of mice Washington State University, December 2, 2021 An intense but short-term exposure to cannabis vapor lowered sperm counts and slowed sperm movement, or motility, not only in the directly exposed male mice but also in their sons. The Washington State University study, published in the journal Toxicological Sciences, builds on other human and animal studies, showing that cannabis can impede male reproductive function. The current study uses more controlled circumstances than human studies, which often have to rely on surveys, and is the first known reproductive study to use vaporized whole cannabis in mice, which is the more common form humans use. (NEXT) Study suggests giving kids too many toys stifles their creativity University of Toledo, December 6, 2021 A team of researchers at the University of Toledo has found that children are more creative when they have fewer toys to play with at one time. In their paper published in the journal Infant Behavior and Development, the group describes their observational study of toddlers at play, what they learned and offer some suggestions for parents. The researchers found that the toddlers playing with four toys engaged in more creative activities than did the toddlers who had 16 toys to choose from. They also found, unsurprisingly, that toddlers with fewer options tended to play with each of the toys available to them for a longer amount of time. Much of that additional time, the researchers noted, was taken up with finding news ways to play with them. (OTHER NEWS NEXT) TO WATCH THE VIDEO PART OF THE GARY NULL SHOW GO TO PROGRESSIVERADIONETWORK.COM (NEXT) Rap Sheets for Pfizer and J&J PFIZER Rejected the government for distributing the vaccine… will do it itself CEO Albert Bouria – before reining the closing bell at stock exchange.. stated that those who do not vaccinated will be the weak links in stopping the pandemic Pfizer – second largest drug/biotech co in world – 4th highest earner in vaccines Product safety – it is heart valves were defected and caused a hundred deaths – investigation found company intentionally misled regulators knowing about hazards Celebrex.. in wake of vioxx – painkiller.. admitted in its trials the drug increased heart problems.  Settled 894 million – for Celebrex and Bextra (painkiller that causes cardio and GI risks) More recent – 1000 lawsuits or birth defects associated with its drug Zolof… Price fixing – as far back as 1950s with antibiotics. Such as tetracycline Price fixing over the years… AIDS drug, Lipitor (cholesterol drug) In 2016 the Justice Department announced that Pfizer would pay $784 million to settle allegations that it underpaid rebates to Medicaid on two of its drugs. 20 million paid to 4500 doctors for speaking on behalf of its drugs Busted for false Centrum claims for breast and colon health Racketeering fraud over Neurtonin – epilepsy drug Bribery – payments to foreign government officials.. and  bribing overseas doctors to increase foreign sales Selling off label Kickbacks from medicare Tax avoidance – using paper work to “relocate” to Ireland , tax haven Repeatedly paid fines for environmental violations at its research and manufacturing plants. In 2009 - dubious distinction of paying the largest-ever criminal fine at the time — $2.3 billion — for fraudulent and illegal promotion of four drugs, including a painkiller marketed at “dangerously high” doses. In 2016, a British regulator levied a $106 million fine against Pfizer for a 2600% increase in the price of a widely prescribed anti-epilepsy drug that increased the National Health Services' expenditures from one year to the next — for a single drug—from $2.5 million to $63 million. Pfizer is the top drug company spender in state elections, even outspending the industry's own lobbying group, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRM). In 2014 Pfizer launched an effort to take over AstraZeneca that was designed not only to swallow a competitor but also to cut its tax bill by locating the headquarters of the combined operation in Britain. When AstraZeneca resisted the controversial move, Pfizer abandoned the bid. Then in November 2015 Pfizer announced a similar deal, worth $160 billion, to merge with Allergan and move the headquarters of the combined company to Ireland. The plan was dropped when the Obama Administration introduced new tax rules. JOHNSON AND JOHNSON In 2004 J&J agreed to pay up to $90 million to settle lawsuits linking the prescription heartburn medication Propulsid to several hundred deaths and many more cases of cardiac irregularity. During 2009 and 2010 the company had to announce a string of recalls of medications, contact lenses and hip implants. The most serious of these was the massive recall of more than 136 million bottles of liquid Tylenol and Motrin for infants and children after batches of the medications were found to be contaminated with metal particles. The company's handling of the matter was so poor that J&J subsidiary McNeil-PPC became the subject of a criminal investigation and later entered a guilty plea and paid a criminal fine of $20 million and forfeited $5 million. It also came out during a Congressional investigation of the matter that in 2008 J&J had engaged in what was labeled a "phantom recall." When faced with Motrin IB caplets that were not dissolving property, McNeil hired contractors to buy up the products in stores while making no announcement to the public. In 2013 J&J reached a deal with plaintiffs lawyers under which it would pay nearly $2.5 billion in compensation to an estimated 8,000 people who had received flawed hip implants. In 2016 two juries awarded a total of $127 million damages to women who sued J&J claiming that their ovarian cancer was caused by the talc in J&J Baby Powder. An award of $417 million was made by a California jury in 2017 and a verdict of more than $4 billion was awarded in Missouri in 2018 (an appeal court later reduced that to $2.1 billion). The New York Times reported in December 2018 that internal company memos from the 1970s discussed the possibility that its talcum powder could contain asbestos. In 1996 J&J reached a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission under which the company agreed to stop making what the agency called false claims about the failure rates of condoms in the marketing of its K-Y spermicidal lubricant. In 2010 J&J subsidiaries Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical and Ortho-McNeil-Janssen had to pay $81 million to settle charges that they promoted the epilepsy drug Topamax for uses not approved as safe by the Food and Drug Administration The following year, J&J subsidiary Scios Inc. had to pay $85 million to settle similar charges relating to its heart failure drug Natrecor. In 2013 the Justice Department announced that J&J and several of its subsidiaries would pay more than $2.2 billion in criminal fines and civil settlements to resolve allegations that the company had marketed its anti-psychotic medication Risperdal and other drugs for unapproved uses as well as allegations that they had paid kickbacks to physicians and pharmacists to encourage off-label usage In a related Risperdal civil lawsuit, a jury later awarded $8 billion in damages but a Philadelphia judge reduced that by more than 99 percent to $6.8 million. In 2019 J&J and its subsidiary Ethicon, Inc. agreed to pay over $116 million to 41 states and the District of Columbia to settle litigation alleging deceptive marketing of transvaginal surgical mesh devices. In a separate suit brought by California, a state judge ordered the company to pay $344 million. In 2021 J&J reached an agreement with a group of states under which it would pay $5 billion to resolve litigation brought against its subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals alleging improper sale of pain medications, contributing to the national opioid epidemic. In 2001 J&J agreed to pay up to $860 million to settle a class-action lawsuit alleging that the company had misled consumers into prematurely throwing away disposable Acuvue contact lenses. The suits argued that the company drove up sales of its 1-Day Acuvue soft lenses by recommending that consumers use them only once, even though the product was identical to regular Acuvue lenses, which could be worn as long as two weeks. In 2011 J&J agreed to pay a $21.4 million criminal penalty as part of a deferred prosecution agreement with the Justice Department resolving allegations of improper payments by J&J subsidiaries to government officials in Greece, Poland and Romania in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. (NEXT) Weapons trade booms as profits hit record $531bn in 2020 Swedish think tank says world's 100 biggest arms firms were largely shielded from the effect of the pandemic. AL JAZEERA. 6 Dec 2021 Sales of weapons and military services by the world's 100 biggest arms companies reached a record $531bn in 2020, an increase of 1.3 per cent in real terms compared with the previous year, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). The Swedish think tank said 2020 marked the sixth consecutive year of sales growth by the top 100 firms, and came even as the global economy shrank. Overall sales were 17 percent higher than in 2015 when it first included data on Chinese firms. “The industry giants were largely shielded by sustained government demand for military goods and services,” Alexandra Marksteiner, researcher with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme, said in a statement on Monday. “In much of the world, military spending grew and some governments even accelerated payments to the arms industry in order to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 crisis.” Firms in the United States continue to dominate the industry, with total sales of $285bn from 41 companies accounting for about 54 percent of all arms sales among the 100 biggest companies. The top five companies in the ranking since 2018 have all been based in the US, SIPRI said. Arms sales from the top Chinese firms amounted to an estimated $66.8bn in 2020, 1.5 percent more than in 2019. Chinese firms accounted for 13 percent of the Top 100 arms sales' total, ahead of the United Kingdom, which had the third-largest share. “In recent years, Chinese arms companies have benefited from the country's military modernization programmes and focus on military-civil fusion,” said Nan Tian, SIPRI senior researcher. “They have become some of the most advanced military technology producers in the world.” The seven UK companies recorded arms sales of $37.5bn in 2020, up by 6.2 percent compared with 2019. Arms sales by BAE Systems – the sole European firm in the top 10 – increased by 6.6 percent to $24bn. (NEXT) You'd Better Watch Out: The Surveillance State Has a Naughty List, and You're On It John W. Whitehead & Nisha Whitehead, December 7, 2021 No longer does the all-knowing, all-seeing, jolly Old St. Nick need to rely on antiquated elves on shelves and other seasonal snitches in order to know when you're sleeping or awake, and if you've been naughty or nice. Thanks to the government's almost limitless powers made possible by a domestic army of techno-tyrants, fusion centers and Peeping Toms, Santa can get real-time reports on who's been good or bad this year. This creepy new era of government/corporate spying—in which we're being listened to, watched, tracked, followed, mapped, bought, sold and targeted—makes the NSA's rudimentary phone and metadata surveillance appear almost antiquated in comparison. Tracking you based on your health status. In the age of COVID-19, digital health passports are gaining traction as gatekeepers of a sort, restricting access to travel, entertainment, etc., based on one's vaccine status. Whether or not one has a vaccine passport, however, individuals may still have to prove themselves “healthy” enough to be part of society. For instance, in the wake of Supreme Court rulings that paved the way for police to use drug-sniffing dogs as “search warrants on leashes,” government agencies are preparing to use virus-detecting canine squads to carry out mass screenings to detect individuals who may have COVID-19. Researchers claim the COVID-sniffing dogs have a 95% success rate of identifying individuals with the virus (except when they're hungry, tired or distracted). These dogs are also being to trained to ferret out individuals suffering from other health ailments such as cancer. Tracking you based on your face: Facial recognition software aims to create a society in which every individual who steps out into public is tracked and recorded as they go about their daily business. Coupled with surveillance cameras that blanket the country, facial recognition technology allows the government and its corporate partners to identify and track someone's movements in real-time. One particularly controversial software program created by Clearview AI has been used by police, the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security to collect photos on social media sitesfor inclusion in a massive facial recognition database. Similarly, biometric software, which relies on one's unique identifiers (fingerprints, irises, voice prints), is becoming the standard for navigating security lines, as well as bypassing digital locks and gaining access to phones, computers, office buildings, etc. In fact, greater numbers of travelers are opting into programs that rely on their biometrics in order to avoid long waits at airport security. Scientists are also developing lasers that can identify and surveil individuals based on their heartbeats, scent and microbiome. Tracking you based on your behavior: Rapid advances in behavioral surveillance are not only making it possible for individuals to be monitored and tracked based on their patterns of movement or behavior, including gait recognition (the way one walks), but have given rise to whole industries that revolve around predicting one's behavior based on data and surveillance patterns and are also shaping the behaviors of whole populations. One smart “anti-riot” surveillance system purports to predict mass riots and unauthorized public events by using artificial intelligence to analyze social media, news sources, surveillance video feeds and public transportation data. Tracking you based on your spending and consumer activities: With every smartphone we buy, every GPS device we install, every Twitter, Facebook, and Google account we open, every frequent buyer card we use for purchases—whether at the grocer's, the yogurt shop, the airlines or the department store—and every credit and debit card we use to pay for our transactions, we're helping Corporate America build a dossier for its government counterparts on who we know, what we think, how we spend our money, and how we spend our time. Consumer surveillance, by which your activities and data in the physical and online realms are tracked and shared with advertisers, has become big business, a $300 billion industry that routinely harvests your data for profit. Corporations such as Target have not only been tracking and assessing the behavior of their customers, particularly their purchasing patterns, for years, but the retailer has also funded major surveillance in cities across the country and developed behavioral surveillance algorithms that can determine whether someone's mannerisms might fit the profile of a thief. Tracking you based on your public activities: Private corporations in conjunction with police agencies throughout the country have created a web of surveillance that encompasses all major cities in order to monitor large groups of people seamlessly, as in the case of protests and rallies. They are also engaging in extensive online surveillance, looking for any hints of “large public events, social unrest, gang communications, and criminally predicated individuals.” Defense contractors have been at the forefront of this lucrative market. Fusion centers, $330 million-a-year, information-sharing hubs for federal, state and law enforcement agencies, monitor and report such “suspicious” behavior as people buying pallets of bottled water, photographing government buildings, and applying for a pilot's license as “suspicious activity.” Tracking you based on your social media activities: Every move you make, especially on social media, is monitored, mined for data, crunched, and tabulated in order to form a picture of who you are, what makes you tick, and how best to control you when and if it becomes necessary to bring you in line. As The Intercept reported, the FBI, CIA, NSA and other government agencies are increasingly investing in and relying on corporate surveillance technologies that can mine constitutionally protected speech on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram in order to identify potential extremists and predict who might engage in future acts of anti-government behavior. This obsession with social media as a form of surveillance will have some frightening consequences in coming years. As Helen A.S. Popkin, writing for NBC News, observed, “We may very well face a future where algorithms bust people en masse for referencing illegal ‘Game of Thrones' downloads… the new software has the potential to roll, Terminator-style, targeting every social media user with a shameful confession or questionable sense of humor.” Tracking you based on your phone and online activities: Cell phones have become de facto snitches, offering up a steady stream of digital location data on users' movements and travels. Police have used cell-site simulators to carry out mass surveillance of protests without the need for a warrant. Moreover, federal agents can now employ a number of hacking methods in order to gain access to your computer activities and “see” whatever you're seeing on your monitor. Malicious hacking software can also be used to remotely activate cameras and microphones, offering another means of glimpsing into the personal business of a target. Tracking you based on your social network: Not content to merely spy on individuals through their online activity, government agencies are now using surveillance technology to track one's social network, the people you might connect with by phone, text message, email or through social message, in order to ferret out possible criminals. An FBI document obtained by Rolling Stone speaks to the ease with which agents are able to access address book data from Facebook's WhatsApp and Apple's iMessage services from the accounts of targeted individuals and individuals not under investigation who might have a targeted individual within their network. What this creates is a “guilt by association” society in which we are all as guilty as the most culpable person in our address book. Tracking you based on your car: License plate readers are mass surveillance tools that can photograph over 1,800 license tag numbers per minute, take a picture of every passing license tag number and store the tag number and the date, time, and location of the picture in a searchable database, then share the data with law enforcement, fusion centers and private companies to track the movements of persons in their cars. With tens of thousands of these license plate readers now in operation throughout the country, affixed to overpasses, cop cars and throughout business sectors and residential neighborhoods, it allows police to track vehicles and run the plates through law enforcement databases for abducted children, stolen cars, missing people and wanted fugitives. Of course, the technology is not infallible: there have been numerous incidents in which police have mistakenly relied on license plate data to capture out suspects only to end up detaining innocent people at gunpoint. Tracking you based on your mail: Just about every branch of the government—from the Postal Service to the Treasury Department and every agency in between—now has its own surveillance sector, authorized to spy on the American people. For instance, the U.S. Postal Service, which has been photographing the exterior of every piece of paper mail for the past 20 years, is also spying on Americans' texts, emails and social media posts. Headed up by the Postal Service's law enforcement division, the Internet Covert Operations Program (iCOP) is reportedly using facial recognition technology, combined with fake online identities, to ferret out potential troublemakers with “inflammatory” posts. The agency claims the online surveillance, which falls outside its conventional job scope of processing and delivering paper mail, is necessary to help postal workers avoid “potentially volatile situations.” Fusion centers. Smart devices. Behavioral threat assessments. Terror watch lists. Facial recognition. Snitch tip lines. Biometric scanners. Pre-crime. DNA databases. Data mining. Precognitive technology. Contact tracing apps. What these add up to is a world in which, on any given day, the average person is now monitored, surveilled, spied on and tracked in more than 20 different ways by both government and corporate eyes and ears. Big Tech wedded to Big Government has become Big Brother. Every second of every day, the American people are being spied on by a vast network of digital Peeping Toms, electronic eavesdroppers and robotic snoops. In an age of overcriminalization, mass surveillance, and an appalling lack of protections for our privacy rights, we can all be considered guilty of some transgression or other. So you'd better watch out—you'd better not pout—you'd better not cry—‘cos I'm telling you why: this Christmas, it's the Surveillance State that's coming to town, and you're already on its naughty list. (NEXT) Vitamin D: Government Should Have Promoted to Combat Pandemic Joel S. Hirschhorn, December 06, 2021 There seems to be an endless refusal by the public health establishment to fight the pandemic with the best science-based tools.  Instead, they keep pushing vaccines. Great German research provides unequivocal medical evidence that the government should be strongly advocating two actions: 1. Take vitamin D supplements and 2. Have your blood tested for vitamin D. The title for this October 2021 journal article says it all: “COVID-19 Mortality Risk Correlates Inversely with Vitamin D3 Status, and a Mortality Rate Close to Zero Could Theoretically Be Achieved at 50 ng/mL 25(OH)D3: Results of a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.”  [25(OH)D3 refers to metabolite of the vitamin in blood] In other words, there is clear evidence that the lower your vitamin D level the greater your risk of dying from COVID infection.  Moreover, the data clearly show that you need a blood level of at least 50 ng/mL. Odds are, however, that very, very few people have been tested for their vitamin D level.  This is a situation where waiting for testing is not the prudent approach.  Vitamin D pills are pretty cheap and it is perfectly safe to take a healthy daily dose to maintain a good immune system.  I take 4,000 IUs twice daily. Here are a number of highlights from this research and other sources; the discussion is aimed at informing people with information not provided by Big Media, Big Government and Big Pharma. Vitamin D is an accurate predictor of COVID infection.  Its deficiency is just as significant, and perhaps more so, than more commonly discussed underlying medical conditions, including obesity. To be clear, there is a level of vitamin D for an effective strategy at the personal and population level to prevent or mitigate new surges and outbreaks of COVID that are related to reduced vaccine effectiveness and new variants. In the German study, fifteen other studies were cited that showed low vitamin D levels were related to cases of severe COVID infection, and seven studies that found positive results from treating ill patients with the vitamin. The German study noted: “The finding that most SARS-CoV-2 patients admitted to hospitals have vitamin D3 blood levels that are too low is unquestioned even by opponents of vitamin D supplementation.” The German study “followed 1,601 hospitalized patients, 784 who had their vitamin D levels measured within a day after admission and 817 whose vitamin D levels were known before infection.  And the researchers also analyzed the long-term average vitamin D3 levels documented for 19 countries.  The observed median vitamin D value over all collected study cohorts was 23.2 ng/mL, which is clearly too low to work effectively against COVID.” Why does this vitamin work so well?  The German study explained: A main cause of a severe reaction from COVID results from a “cytokine storm.” This refers to the body's immune system releasing too many toxic cytokines as part of the inflammatory response to the virus.  Vitamin D is a main regulator of those cells.  A low level of the vitamin means a greater risk for a cytokine storm.  This is especially pertinent for lung problems from COVID. Other studies On a par with the German study was an important US medical article from May 2021: Vitamin D and Its Potential Benefit for the COVID-19 Pandemic.  It noted: “Experimental studies have shown that vitamin D exerts several actions that are thought to be protective against coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infectivity and severity.  … There are a growing number of data connecting COVID-19 infectivity and severity with vitamin D status, suggesting a potential benefit of vitamin D supplementation for primary prevention or as an adjunctive treatment of COVID-19.  … there is no downside to increasing vitamin D intake and having sensible sunlight exposure to maintain serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D at a level of least 30 ng/mL and preferably 40 to 60 ng/mL to minimize the risk of COVID-19 infection and its severity.” This confirms the German study and its finding of a critical vitamin level of 50 ng/mL. Daniel Horowitz has made this correct observation about vitamin D supplementation: “An endless stream of academic research demonstrates that not only would such an approach have worked much better than the vaccines, but rather than coming with sundry known and unknown negative side effects.“ There are now 142 studies vouching for the near-perfect correlation between higher vitamin D levels and better outcomes in COVID patients. From Israel came work that showed 25% of hospitalized COVID patients with vitamin D deficiency died compared to just 3% among those without a deficiency.  And those with a deficiency were 14 times more likely to end up with a severe or critical condition. Also from Israel, data on 1,176 patients with COVID infection admitted to the Galilee Medical Center, 253 had vitamin D levels on record and half were vitamin D-deficient.  This was the conclusion: “Among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, pre-infection deficiency of vitamin D was associated with increased disease severity and mortality.” Several studies have come from the University of Chicago.  One found that a vitamin D deficiency (less than 20 ng/ml) may raise the risk of testing positive for COVID-19, actually a 7.2% chance of testing positive for the virus.  And that more than 80% of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 were vitamin D deficient.  And Black individuals who had levels of 30 to 40 ng/ml had a 2.64 times higher risk of testing positive for COVID-19 than people with levels of 40 ng/ml or greater. On the good news side is a new study from Turkish researchers.  They focused on getting people's levels over 30 ng/mL with supplements.  At that level there was success compared to people without supplementation.  This was true even if they had comorbidities.  They were able to achieve that blood level within two weeks.  Those with no comorbidities and no vitamin D treatment had 1.9-fold increased risk of having hospitalization longer than 8 days compared with cases with both comorbidities and vitamin D treatment. (NEXT) The explosion of Covid PTSD cases is a mental health crisis in the making The Guardian, 7 Dec 2021 When the Covid-19 pandemic began, people working in the trauma field knew the psychological toll would be colossal. In the spring of 2020, I began interviewing professionals about the mental health fallout of the pandemic, specifically its impact on frontline medical staff. During the first wave, two in every five intensive care staff in England reported symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. That work continued for almost a year, during which time a second wave hit and the initial traumas were exacerbated. But it wasn't only frontline workers who were experiencing trauma symptoms: Covid has posed perhaps the biggest threat to mental health in England since the second world war. Now, at the tail end of 2021, the pandemic is still not over. The NHS forecasts that nationally, there will be 230,000 new cases of PTSD as a result of Covid-19. It is not only social care and medical staff who will be affected. Those who lost loved ones, and those who have been very ill or hospitalised (35% of Covid-19 patients who were put on a ventilator go on to experience extensive symptoms of PTSD) may also suffer. Then there are those living with the effects of domestic and sexual abuse, which may have worsened due to lockdown, and children and young people whose lives changed immeasurably due to our shift to a state of emergency. I imagine that some women whose birthing experiences were marked by the pandemic will also be experiencing symptoms. The explosion of post-traumatic stress disorder is a medical emergency, and a further strain on our creaking services. Without proper action and investment, it is a national mental health crisis in the making.

chicago food google university china chinese california selling american americans german price apple sales santa christmas greece terror ireland new york times uk study bribery poland england british european aids san francisco smart united states ptsd cancer development cia fbi philadelphia turkish target scientists michigan swedish gps missouri police dna terminator body consumer experimental sciences medicaid defense congressional columbia product game of thrones results ky private rolling stones data united kingdom britain d3 odds corporations facial pandemic toledo gi busted headed tax fusion romania arms initial supreme court gratitude nhs whatsapp rapid nsa tracking pfizer grapes corporate america snitch j j ml big brother jyv vitamin d coupled behavioral centrum naughty list researchers nurses firms repeatedly imessage vital al jazeera nbc news big pharma mayo clinic biometrics homeland security tylenol foreign corrupt practices act intrigued big tech obama administration international journal justice department memorial sloan kettering cancer center manufacturers postal service washington state university federal trade commission janssen pharmaceuticals bae systems ius kickback allergan treasury department malicious motrin mcneil astrazeneca big media racketeering lipitor celebrex risperdal pharmaceutical research surveillance state gary null big government sipri peeping toms precognitive ethicon next you from israel hirschhorn popkin meta analysis old st systematic review health study sars cov daniel horowitz covid-19 clearview ai
Our MBC Life
S03 E15 Road to a Cure - drug resistance with Dr. Sarat Chanderlapaty

Our MBC Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 48:22


Welcome to the seventh stop in our series, Road to a Cure. Our goal is not only to educate and give hope to every listener but also to ensure each of these special interviews feels like an intimate conversation with our smartest friend who also happens to be an oncologist researcher. Co-hosts Lisa Laudico and Ellen Landsberger talk with Sarat Chandarlapaty, MD, PhD,   a leading Physician Scientist in the Human Oncology & Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. As both a physician treating patients and a scientist in the lab, Dr. Chandarlapaty gives us an understanding of translational medicine, transferring what he learns from his patients back into the lab to answer questions that advance the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. More info is available on our website www.ourmbclife.org Be sure to rate, review us, and sign up for our newsblast.Got something to share? Feedback? Email:  Ourmbclife@sharecxancersupport.orgSend us a voice recording via email or through speakpipe on our website.Follow on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @ourmbclife

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Oncology As A Business Led To Massive Fraud And Massive Deception Of The Public - Ralph Moss

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 17:41


Oncology As A Business Led To Massive Fraud And Massive Deception Of The Public -  Ralph MossRalph Moss•           https://www.mossreports.com/•           Book - Cancer, Incorporated and Immunotherapy: The Battle Within The medical writer Ralph W. Moss, PhD, has written or edited twelve books and four film documentaries on questions relating to cancer research and treatment.Dr. Moss is a graduate of New York University (BA, cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, 1965) and Stanford University (MA, 1973, PhD, 1974, Classics). He is the former science writer and assistant director of public affairs at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York (1974-1977). Since leaving Sloan-Kettering in 1977, Moss has independently evaluated the claims of conventional and non-conventional cancer treatments all over the world. He currently writes Moss Reports, detailed reports on the most common cancer diagnoses and provides informational and personalized consultations for cancer patients and their families. In 2019, he wrote The Ultimate Guide to Cancer: DIY Research, to help lay people research their own cancers. This 50-page report is available free of charge at the mossreports.com website. #RalpMoss #TheRealTruthAbouthealth #Cancer #CancerTreament #CancerFightingFoods CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/  

Cold Steel: Canadian Journal of Surgery Podcast
E102 Sunil Patel on Robotic Colorectal Surgery and Spin in Surgical Research

Cold Steel: Canadian Journal of Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:01


This week we were joined by Dr. Sunil Patel (https://twitter.com/epipatelmd?s=20). Dr. Patel is a colorectal surgeon in Kingston, Ontario. The group in Kinston is one of the few general surgery groups in Canada that has really utilized robotics in their practice, and we wanted to understand both why and how they introduced robotics into their group. Dr. Patel has also done fascinating research into the topic of spin in surgical research, and he walks us through the concept of spin and how the astute reader can avoid being fooled by it. Links: 1. The use of "spin" in laparoscopic lower GI surgical trials with nonsignificant results: an assessment of reporting and interpretation of the primary outcomes. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24201393/ 2. Spin Is Common in Studies Assessing Robotic Colorectal Surgery: An Assessment of Reporting and Interpretation of Study Results. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26252850/ 3. An Assessment of the Industry-Faculty Surgeon Relationship Within Colon and Rectum Surgical Training Programs. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26966083/ 4. Spin in articles about minimally invasive transanal total mesorectal excision: an assessment of the current literature. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30341922/ 5. Reviewing the Reviewers: Potential Financial Conflicts of Interest in Editorial Boards of Surgery Journals. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34091509/ Bio (https://surgery.queensu.ca/administration/attending-staff/sunil-patel): Dr. Sunil Patel is a fellowship trained colorectal surgeon at Kingston Health Sciences Centre. He has specialized training in minimally invasive surgery, including robotic surgery, laparoscopic surgery and transanal total mesorectal excision (Ta-TME). Dr. Patel and his partners are the only group offering high volume Robotic Colorectal Surgery in the Province. Dr. Patel specializes in treating Rectal Cancer, Colon Cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Diverticular Disease. Dr. Patel and his partners are the only high volume rectal cancer surgeons in Southeast Ontario. Dr. Patel completed his general surgery in London, Ontario. He completed his colorectal surgery fellowship in New York City at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and New York Presbyterian Hospital. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center is considered one of the top Cancer hospitals in the world. He has also completed a Masters of Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in London, UK. Dr. Patel's research interests include barriers to treatment in colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease patients, the use of smart phone technology in delivering clinical care and evidence based health care. Dr. Patel is also a member of the Cancer Care and Epidemiology at the Cancer Research Institute and the Regional Colorectal Cancer Screening and GI Endoscopy Lead (LHIN).

Derms and Conditions
The Scoop on Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Derms and Conditions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 21:14


Episode 15 of Derms and Conditions, has our host James Q. Del Rosso, DO speaking with Anthony Rossi, MD, a Mohs Surgeon at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. First Dr. Rossi discusses the use of the AJCC and Brigham and Women's Hospital squamous cell carcinoma staging system. Next Dr. Del Rosso asks Dr. Rossi for tips on treating keratoacanthomas of the lower extremities with subcutaneous methotrexate. Finally, Dr. Rossi discusses the use of immunotherapy in treating squamous cell carcinoma.  

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
A Very Small Percentage Of People Who Purport To Be Experts On The Complimentary Side of Cancer Treatment Are Actually Knowledgable - Ralph Moss

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 13:50


A Very Small Percentage Of People Who Purport To Be Experts On The Complimentary Side of Cancer Treatment Are Actually Knowledgable -  Ralph MossRalph Moss•           https://www.mossreports.com/•           Book - Cancer, Incorporated and Immunotherapy: The Battle WithinThe medical writer Ralph W. Moss, PhD, has written or edited twelve books and four film documentaries on questions relating to cancer research and treatment.Dr. Moss is a graduate of New York University (BA, cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, 1965) and Stanford University (MA, 1973, PhD, 1974, Classics). He is the former science writer and assistant director of public affairs at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York (1974-1977). Since leaving Sloan-Kettering in 1977, Moss has independently evaluated the claims of conventional and non-conventional cancer treatments all over the world. He currently writes Moss Reports, detailed reports on the most common cancer diagnoses and provides informational and personalized consultations for cancer patients and their families. In 2019, he wrote The Ultimate Guide to Cancer: DIY Research, to help lay people research their own cancers. This 50-page report is available free of charge at the mossreports.com website. #RalpMoss #TheRealTruthAbouthealth #Cancer #CancerTreament #CancerFightingFoods CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/   

Oncotarget
Prolyl 4-hydroxylase Alpha 1 Protein Expression Risk-stratifies Early Stage Colorectal Cancer

Oncotarget

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 8:20


Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 8 reported Independent validation cohorts of 599 cases of early-stage CRC and 91 cases of late-stage CRC were examined. Multivariate and univariate survival analyses revealed that high expression of P4HA1 protein was an independent poor prognostic marker for patients with early-stage CRC, especially of the microsatellite stable subtype. Dr. Michael H. Roehrl from the Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center as well as the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center said, "Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide." However, molecular biomarkers with more precise prognostic value, preferably with an underlying functional pathophysiologic rationale, are needed, as such markers would enable the scientists to better stratify risk of recurrence in resected early-stage CRC after resection and more accurately select patients for adjuvant therapy, while avoiding overtreatment in low-risk early-stage CRC. Proteomics with latest-generation liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry can detect 5,000 - 10,000 proteins in one shotgun sequencing event, and such powerful and sensitive technology may enable the researchers to discover prognostic protein biomarkers for early-stage CRC that previous genomic and transcriptomic analyses would have missed. Combining results from 712 patients, their study shows that collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase alpha 1 protein expression robustly risk-stratifies early-stage CRC. The discovery of P4HA1 outcome stratification in early-stage CRC and, in particular, its MSS subtype, may provide an avenue for early-stage CRC risk prognosis and thus improve cancer treatment outcomes by tailoring follow-up frequency and adjuvant therapy intensity. The Roehrl Research Team concluded, in their Oncotarget Research Paper, that early-stage CRC presents frequent challenges in clinical patient management in that it is currently impossible to predict which patients will have aggressive disease and thus benefit the most from intensive adjuvant chemotherapy vs. those patients who will have less aggressive disease and benefit from surgery alone. Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article DOI - https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.27491 Full text - https://www.oncotarget.com/article/27491/text/ Correspondence to - Michael H. Roehrl - roehrlm@mskcc.org Keywords - P4HA1, colorectal cancer, biomarker, prognosis, pathology About Oncotarget Oncotarget is a biweekly, peer-reviewed, open access biomedical journal covering research on all aspects of oncology. To learn more about Oncotarget, please visit https://www.oncotarget.com or connect with: SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/oncotarget Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Oncotarget/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/oncotarget LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/oncotarget Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/oncotarget/ Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/user/Oncotarget/ Oncotarget is published by Impact Journals, LLC please visit https://www.impactjournals.com/ or connect with @ImpactJrnls Media Contact MEDIA@IMPACTJOURNALS.COM 18009220957x105 Copyright © 2021 Impact Journals, LLC Impact Journals is a registered trademark of Impact Journals, LLC

Oncotarget
Testimonial: Dr. Michael Roehrl from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Oncotarget

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 1:23


Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 8 reported Independent validation cohorts of 599 cases of early-stage CRC and 91 cases of late-stage CRC were examined. Multivariate and univariate survival analyses revealed that high expression of P4HA1 protein was an independent poor prognostic marker for patients with early-stage CRC, especially of the microsatellite stable subtype. Dr. Michael H. Roehrl from the Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center as well as the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center said, "Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide." However, molecular biomarkers with more precise prognostic value, preferably with an underlying functional pathophysiologic rationale, are needed, as such markers would enable the scientists to better stratify risk of recurrence in resected early-stage CRC after resection and more accurately select patients for adjuvant therapy, while avoiding overtreatment in low-risk early-stage CRC. Proteomics with latest-generation liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry can detect 5,000 - 10,000 proteins in one shotgun sequencing event, and such powerful and sensitive technology may enable the researchers to discover prognostic protein biomarkers for early-stage CRC that previous genomic and transcriptomic analyses would have missed. Combining results from 712 patients, their study shows that collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase alpha 1 protein expression robustly risk-stratifies early-stage CRC. The discovery of P4HA1 outcome stratification in early-stage CRC and, in particular, its MSS subtype, may provide an avenue for early-stage CRC risk prognosis and thus improve cancer treatment outcomes by tailoring follow-up frequency and adjuvant therapy intensity. The Roehrl Research Team concluded, in their Oncotarget Research Paper, that early-stage CRC presents frequent challenges in clinical patient management in that it is currently impossible to predict which patients will have aggressive disease and thus benefit the most from intensive adjuvant chemotherapy vs. those patients who will have less aggressive disease and benefit from surgery alone. Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article DOI - https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.27491 Full text - https://www.oncotarget.com/article/27491/text/ Correspondence to - Michael H. Roehrl - roehrlm@mskcc.org Keywords - P4HA1, colorectal cancer, biomarker, prognosis, pathology About Oncotarget Oncotarget is a biweekly, peer-reviewed, open access biomedical journal covering research on all aspects of oncology. To learn more about Oncotarget, please visit https://www.oncotarget.com or connect with: SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/oncotarget Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Oncotarget/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/oncotarget LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/oncotarget Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/oncotarget/ Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/user/Oncotarget/ Oncotarget is published by Impact Journals, LLC please visit https://www.impactjournals.com/ or connect with @ImpactJrnls Media Contact MEDIA@IMPACTJOURNALS.COM 18009220957x105 Copyright © 2021 Impact Journals, LLC Impact Journals is a registered trademark of Impact Journals, LLC

IJGC Podcast
Prophylactic Negative Pressure Wound Therapy RCT with Mario Leitao

IJGC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 30:05


In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Mario Leitao to discuss prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy RCT. Dr. Leitao is currently an Attending Surgeon in the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medical College. He currently serves as Program Director for the Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship. Dr. Leitao is also the Director for the Minimal Access and Robotic Surgery Program in the Department of Surgery for MSKCC. Dr. Mario Leitao is currently an Attending Surgeon in the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medical College. He currently serves as Program Director for the Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship. Dr. Leitao is also the Director for the Minimal Access and Robotic Surgery Program in the Department of Surgery for MSKCC. Highlights 1. SSI is a common postoperative complication that leads to significant healthcare costs in the near- and far-term 2. In our RCT, the use of a negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) system did not improve wound complications (Superficial SSI) in a cohort of patients undergoing mostly laparotomy for gynecologic malignancies with closed laparotomy incisions. 3. There was also no signal of benefit in the small subgroup of morbidly obese patients. 4. Increasing BMI was the only independently associated risk for the development of a wound complication @leitaomd @sloan_kettering

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Nervous System Toxicities: Management of irAEs Guideline (Part 9)

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 20:11


An interview with Dr. Bianca Santomasso from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, author on “Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update.” She reviews neurologic toxicities in patients receiving ICPis, such as myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, aseptic meningitis & encephalitis in Part 9 of this 13-part series. For more information visit www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. BRITTANY HARVEY: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines Podcast series, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content, and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcasts. My name is Brittany Harvey. And today, we're continuing our series on the management of immune related adverse events. I am joined by Dr. Bianca Santomasso from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, New York, author on Management of Immune Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy ASCO Guideline Update and Management of Immune Related Adverse Events in patients Treated with Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy ASCO Guideline. And today, we're focusing on nervous system toxicities in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Thank you for being here, Dr. Santomasso. BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Thank you for having me. BRITTANY HARVEY: Then I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full conflict of interest information for this guideline panel is available online with the publication of the guidelines in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Santomasso, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to these guidelines? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Yes, I'd like to disclose that I've served as a paid consultant for Celgene, Janssen Pharmaceutical, and Legend Biotech for advising them on the topics of T cell therapy side effects. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you. Then getting into the content of this guideline, what are the immune related nervous system toxicities addressed in this guideline? And what are the overarching recommendations for evaluation of these neurologic immune related adverse events? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So neurologic immune related adverse events actually encompass a very diverse spectrum of neurologic syndromes that can occur as a complication of treatment with checkpoint inhibitors. So the spectrum that is covered by this guideline includes myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, polyneuropathy, aseptic meningitis, and encephalitis. And although these are rarer than many of the other immune related adverse event types affecting other organ systems, they're increasingly being encountered due to more patients being treated with novel combinations of immunotherapies. And they're important to recognize, because along with myocarditis, they have generally more morbidity and even more mortality than irAEs affecting other organ systems. So it's important for clinical care providers to have a high index of suspicion for these events. Studies have suggested that these tend to occur in about 3% to 12% of patients, probably between 1% and 2% of patients developing severe events. So they're rare. But again, the events are probably more commonly seen in patients treated with combination checkpoint blockade. And we're increasingly seeing more combinations. So we should be on the lookout for these. Neurologic immune related adverse events can be divided into syndromes that affect the peripheral nervous system, so meaning the peripheral nerves, the neuromuscular junction, and muscle. So that would be Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and myositis. And those that affect the central nervous system, such as the brain, spinal cord, or leptomeninges. So those would be aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. The peripheral nervous system irAE appear to be more common than those affecting the central nervous system. And patients can present with a number of different symptoms that kind of relate to these syndromes. That can be as diverse as a headache to numbness, tingling, or focal weakness, such as a foot drop or facial weakness. You may see patients with severe altered mental status or personality changes or gait difficulty, walking difficulty, which could actually mean any number of syndromes. It's generally important to be aware that the timing of onset is generally early, a median of four weeks after the start of treatment, but can range anywhere from one week after the start of treatment to greater than a year. And because we know that cancer can spread to many parts of the nervous system, neurologic toxicity should be considered a diagnosis of exclusion. So that means that as part of the workup for neurologic immune related adverse events, it's imperative to rule out nervous system metastasis, stroke, and infection, which we know can occur at higher rates in patients with cancer. So for most neurologic immune related adverse events, diagnostic workup is similar. It should include MRI brain and/or of the spine, with and without contrast, and often a lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid analysis, including cytology to rule out leptomeningeal metastasis. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you for that overview. In addition to those points for evaluation for all nervous system toxicities, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of myasthenia gravis? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So for myasthenia gravis, presenting symptoms usually include fatiguable or fluctuating muscle weakness. It's generally more proximal than distal. And there's frequently ocular and/or bulbar involvement. So that means either ptosis, like a droopy eyelid, diplopia, or double vision, difficulty swallowing, dysarthria, facial muscle weakness, and/or head drop or neck weakness. Again, for any patient with new neurologic symptoms, an MRI of the brain or spine should be performed depending upon the symptoms to rule out central nervous system involvement by disease or some alternative diagnosis. And similar to idiopathic myasthenia gravis, acetylcholine receptor antibodies can be positive. So these should be checked. This is a blood test. But it's important to note that while these antibodies may be confirmatory, their absence does not rule out the syndrome. The rate of acetylcholine receptor antibody positivity in immune related myasthenia gravis has not been definitively established. So depending on the presentation, one might also consider sending a paraneoplastic panel for Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. The single most important point I'd like to make regarding suspected immune related myasthenia gravis is that orbital myositis and generalized myositis from immune checkpoint inhibitors can present similarly. For this reason, early neurology consultation and electrodiagnostic testing with repetitive stimulation or single fiber EMG becomes important and helpful to distinguish the two. And to make matters even more complicated, we've learned that there's an overlap syndrome, where patients may develop not only myasthenia gravis, but also myositis and/or myocarditis at the same time. So basically, the neuromuscular junction is affected. But the local muscle and myocardium, which is heart muscle that's kind of related, may be affected all at once. And this overlap of syndromes may increase disease severity and mortality. So they're important to recognize. So what this means is that when you encounter a patient with suspected myasthenia gravis, you should also be checking CPK, muscle enzymes, aldolase to evaluate for myositis, and troponin and electrocardiogram to evaluate for myocarditis. And this should be done even if there are no obvious symptoms. So onto the treatment of myasthenia gravis, this is similar to the management of the idiopathic form. Therefore, it's helpful to have the involvement of a neurologist. The immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy should be held. And patients with mild symptoms are often started on pyridostigmine and corticosteroids. And patients with more severe symptoms should initiate IVIG or plasmapheresis. And patients with more severe symptoms may need to be admitted to the hospital. So that their neurologic and pulmonary status can be monitored closely for improvement. Some patients may require ICU level of monitoring. And considering adding rituximab if symptoms are refractory, and often, as symptoms improve, the steroids can be de-escalated. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. Those are all very important points for clinicians to consider. So then following that, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of Guillain-Barre syndrome? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So Guillain-Barre syndrome, like myasthenia gravis, also presents with weakness. Most often, patients present with a progressive ascending muscle weakness. The syndrome can start with sensory symptoms or neuropathic pain that can be localized to the lower back and thighs. In addition to the classic ascending weakness, there may be facial weakness, double vision, numbness or tingling in the hands or feet, loss of balance, and coordination. And shortness of breath may occur due to respiratory muscle weakness. The autonomic nerves can also be affected and can present as new severe constipation or nausea, urinary problems, or orthostatic hypotension. The reflexes are often reduced or absent, deep tendon reflexes. So again, as for all of the syndromes, early involvement by a neurologist is recommended, if possible. Usually, MRI imaging of the spine is important to rule out spinal cord compression. And it also may show cauda nerve thickening or enhancement, which can occur with this syndrome. And the second aspect is cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important for diagnosis. This is important really for ruling out leptomeningeal metastasis, since that could present similarly. And often, what can be seen in GBS is an elevated protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid. In addition, unlike idiopathic GBS, there can be an elevated white blood cell count in the cerebrospinal fluid. Electrode diagnostic testing can also be helpful for confirmation, and serum tests for antiganglioside antibodies, and a paraneoplastic antibody workup may also be considered. Bedside pulmonary function test and swallowing evaluation should be performed if there's a concern for respiratory or swallowing dysfunction. And some patients do need to have inpatient admission and monitoring if symptoms are severe or if they appear to be progressing from mild. For management, the checkpoint inhibitor therapy should be held. And patients are most often treated with IVIG or plasmapheresis. Corticosteroids can be added to the IVIG or plasmapheresis. These are not usually recommended for idiopathic Guillain-Barre syndrome. However, in immune checkpoint inhibitor related forms, a trial is reasonable. And steroids are usually given at a higher dose for five days and then tapered over several weeks. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. I appreciate that overview. So then what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of peripheral neuropathy? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So peripheral neuropathy, or polyneuropathy, is a rare but likely underreported complication of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. So in the large databases and meta-analyses, those have really focused on Guillain-Barre syndrome for reporting. But other types of neuropathies, such as painful length dependent sensory and motor axonal neuropathies, or polyradiculopathies or sensory neuropathies do occur after immune checkpoint inhibitors and are probably under-recognized. So evaluation of immune related neuropathy should include neurology consultation to guide the neurology phenotype determination and also the workup. The evaluation primarily relies on a combination of electrodiagnostic studies, serologic tests, and MRI neuroimaging. Because peripheral nervous syndromes can overlap, screening for neuromuscular junction dysfunction with electrodiagnostic testing and myopathy is recommended for any patient who presents with at least motor symptoms that are thought to be peripheral. Serum testing can be helpful for ruling out reversible causes of neuropathy. Spinal imaging is recommended to exclude metastatic disease. And for management, it usually involves holding the checkpoint inhibitor in mild cases, using neuropathic pain medication or steroids in more severe cases. And very severe cases that kind of resembled GBS would be managed as per the GBS algorithm with IVIG or plasmapheresis. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. And it's key to look out for those overlapping adverse events. So then following that, what are the key recommendations for aseptic meningitis? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Right, so now we're getting into the central nervous system toxicity. So aseptic meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges. And it can present with headache, photophobia, neck stiffness. Patients can have nausea, and vomiting, and occasionally fever. The mental status is usually normal. And in patients presenting with headache, which in isolation, could suggest an aseptic meningitis, it's important to evaluate if they have any confusion or altered behavior, which might suggest an encephalitis. And this distinction is important, because suspected encephalitis triggers a different workup, which we'll be discussing later, and also even different management. So the workup for aseptic meningitis includes neuroimaging, usually an MRI of the brain. And on that imaging, we sometimes see abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement. It's important not to assume that this is cancer and to do a lumbar puncture to evaluate cerebrospinal fluid both for inflammation and to exclude other causes of meningeal disease, particularly neoplastic and infectious causes. So cytology, Gram stain, and culture, and other infectious studies should be negative. And it's recommended that empiric antibiotics or antiviral therapy be considered to cover for infectious meningitis until the cerebrospinal fluid results return negative. What's seen in the cerebrospinal fluid in aseptic meningitis is typically reactive lymphocytes, but also neutrophils or histiocytes may be prominent on the cytology. And while the symptoms can be severe, sometimes requiring hospitalization, the management of this entity, these are usually quite treatable. Aseptic meningitis generally responds very well to corticosteroids. So management involves holding the checkpoint inhibitor. And you can often get away with starting a fairly modest dose of corticosteroids, such as oral prednisone, 0.5 to 1 milligram per kilogram or the equivalent. And steroids can usually be tapered over two to four weeks. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great, thank you for reviewing those recommendations. So then you just mentioned the distinction of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. So what are those key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of encephalitis? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So in encephalitis, the mental status is not normal. It's characterized by, really, an acute or subacute confusion, altered mental status, altered behavior, memory deficits, including working memory and short-term memory. There can be, as associated symptoms, headaches, new onset seizures, psychiatric symptoms, which can include delusions or hallucinations. There could be weakness, sensory changes, imbalance, or gait instability, along with the mental status changes. And so similar to aseptic meningitis, the other central nervous system toxicity, it's important to distinguish encephalitis from other causes of altered mental status, such as CNS metastases, stroke, or infection. And as for the other syndromes, it's very helpful to have neurologic consultation early, if possible. An MRI of the brain is critical. And in addition, MRI of the spine may be obtained to evaluate for inflammatory demyelinating ischemic or metastatic lesions. In immune related encephalitis, MRI brain imaging may reveal T2 flare changes, typical of what can be seen in idiopathic autoimmune or limbic encephalitis. But most often, the MRI imaging is normal. So in this situation, a lumbar puncture for CSF studies to evaluate for evidence of inflammation can be very helpful. You can expect to see either a lymphocytic pleocytosis or an elevated protein, or CSF restricted oligoclonal bands. CSF analysis is also helpful for excluding other causes of encephalitis, particularly viral encephalitis. So HSV, Herpes Simplex Virus, or varicella zoster virus encephalitis should be ruled out and treated with antivirals while the tests are pending. So typically, these entities can be excluded by PCR testing for HSV and VZV. Electroencephalogram, or EEG, can also be helpful for revealing subclinical seizures or status epilepticus, which can occur as a complication of encephalitis or as a cause of persistently depressed sensorium. But these are not specific to encephalitis. Other testing that's done includes screening metabolic tests to look for alternative etiologies. And for this entity, serum and CSF autoimmune antibody evaluation should be sent to assess for malignancy associated neurologic syndromes. And your neurologist can help you with the workup and management, in particular which tests to send. There have been reported cases of antibody positive checkpoint inhibitor related encephalitis. For management, in contrast to aseptic meningitis, these are generally not as steroid sensitive. So you often have to treat with either higher steroid doses, even pulsed steroid doses, along with IVIG or plasmapheresis. If no improvement, escalation to rituximab and cyclophosphamide can be considered, with the assistance of neurology. This management guidance is taken from how to treat autoimmune encephalitities that are not related to checkpoint inhibitors. Unfortunately, these can be difficult to treat. The response may only be partial. So this is one area in need of better understanding of best therapeutics. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK, thank you for reviewing that and pointing out where there's future research needed as well. And I appreciate your reviewing the recommendations for each of these neurologic immune related adverse events. So then to wrap us up, in your view, how will these recommendations for the management of nervous system toxicities impact both clinicians and patients? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Yeah, so I think this is a daunting list of toxicities. But I'll say that in most situations, the immune checkpoint inhibitor side effects are often manageable and reversible with proper supportive care. They can be serious, and they require close vigilance and prompt treatment and identification. But by knowing what to look for in early identification, that allows early intervention, which is really the key to reversibility and the best outcomes. So having these toxicities on your differential diagnosis is critical. And I think these guidelines really help inform both clinicians, and care providers, and patients on what the possible manifestations are. So we believe this guideline and its recommendations will help members of clinical teams with the recognition and the management of these unique toxicities. And again, it's timely recognition and early intervention that helps patients, really, by increasing their safety with early management. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great, well, thank you for your work on these guidelines and for taking the time to speak with me today, Dr. Santomasso. BIANCA SANTOMASSO: My pleasure. Thank you so much. BRITTANY HARVEY: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines Podcast series. Stay tuned for additional episodes on the management of immune related adverse events. To read the full guideline, go to www.asco.org/supportive care guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app, available in iTunes or the Google Play store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast. And be sure to subscribe. So you never miss an episode. [MUSIC PLAYING]

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
I Didn't Lie When The Lives Of Millions Of People Were At Stake - Ralph Moss

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 13:02


I Didn't Lie When The Lives Of Millions Of People Were At Stake -  Ralph MossRalph Moss•           https://www.mossreports.com/•           Book - Cancer, Incorporated and Immunotherapy: The Battle WithinThe medical writer Ralph W. Moss, PhD, has written or edited twelve books and four film documentaries on questions relating to cancer research and treatment.Dr. Moss is a graduate of New York University (BA, cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, 1965) and Stanford University (MA, 1973, PhD, 1974, Classics). He is the former science writer and assistant director of public affairs at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York (1974-1977). Since leaving Sloan-Kettering in 1977, Moss has independently evaluated the claims of conventional and non-conventional cancer treatments all over the world. He currently writes Moss Reports, detailed reports on the most common cancer diagnoses and provides informational and personalized consultations for cancer patients and their families. In 2019, he wrote The Ultimate Guide to Cancer: DIY Research, to help lay people research their own cancers. This 50-page report is available free of charge at the mossreports.com website. #RalpMoss #TheRealTruthAbouthealth #Cancer #CancerTreament #CancerFightingFoods CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/  

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
CAR-T Cell Therapy: Management of irAEs Guideline (Part 2)

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 30:13


An interview with Dr. Bianca Santomasso from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Dr. Monalisa Ghosh from the University of Michigan Health System, authors on “Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: ASCO Guideline.” They discuss recommendations for management of irAEs in patients treated with CAR T-Cell Therapy in Part 2 of this 13-part series. For more information visit www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING]   BRITTANY HARVEY: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network. A collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content, and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcasts. My name is Brittany Harvey, and today we're continuing our series on the management of immune-related adverse events. ASCO has developed two guidelines for the management of immune-related adverse events-- one for patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy and a second for patients treated with CAR T-cell therapy. In our last episode, you heard an overview of the Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update. Today, we'll be focusing on the Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated with Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: ASCO Guideline, and we'll have authors join us for future episodes to discuss the key recommendations for organ-specific management for patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Today, I am joined by Dr. Monalisa Ghosh, from the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, Michigan and Dr. Bianca Santomasso from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, New York, authors on both Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated with Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: ASCO Guideline and Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update. Thank you both for being here, Dr. Ghosh and Dr. Santomasso. In addition, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO Conflict of Interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full Conflict of Interest information for this guideline panel is available online with the publication of the guidelines in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Ghosh, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this guideline? MONALISA GHOSH: No. I do not have any relevant disclosures. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you. And, Dr. Santomasso, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this guideline? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Yes. I'd like to disclose that I've served as a paid consultant for Celgene, Janssen Pharmaceutical, and Legend Biotech for advising them on the topics of CAR T-cell therapy side effects. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you. Then, getting into these immune-related adverse events-- first, Dr. Ghosh, can you give us an overview of the scope and purpose of this guideline? MONALISA GHOSH: Sure. The purpose of this guideline is to offer expert guidance and recommendations on the management of immune-related adverse events in patients treated with chimeric antigen receptor or CAR T-cell therapy. This guideline offers guidance on the diagnosis, evaluation, and management of the most common toxicities of CAR T-cell therapy, which includes Cytokine Release Syndrome-- or CRS-- and immune effector associated neurologic syndrome-- or ICANS. As well as other potential, but less common toxicities, such as Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis-- or HLH-- B-cell aplasia, prolonged and recurrent cytopenias, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation-- or DIC-- and infections. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Thank you. Then, Dr. Santomasso-- looking at this guideline, there's a few overarching recommendations. So, what are those general recommendations for the management of immune-related adverse events in patients receiving CAR T-cell therapy? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Yes. The overarching recommendations are, really, first to recognize that these side effects exist. And that, as such, it's important to recognize that patients who develop these toxicities or side effects after CAR T-cell therapy need to be evaluated, or managed in, or transferred to a specialty center that has experience with the management of these toxicities. They're new toxicities. This is a new therapy. And patients are increasingly going to be managed in, or treated in, the outpatient setting, and, as such, they need to remain within a short distance of the treating center for about four to eight weeks post-therapy, and they should then return to their treating center upon experiencing any toxicities. Finally, as its flu season and infection season, it is recommended that inactivated influenza and COVID-19 vaccination be performed on patients and also family members as well. And any patient who does have an active infection, the CAR T-cell infusion should be delayed until that infection has been successfully treated or controlled. I often make a final point, which is that the immunogenicity of and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines is uncertain in these patients with these agents, but the potential benefits outweigh the risks and uncertainties for most patients. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you. Those are important points for patients and treating clinicians. So then, Dr. Ghosh-- as you mentioned, this guideline addresses the seven most common CAR-T-related toxicities, and I'd like to review the key recommendations for each of those. So let's start with, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of cytokine-release syndrome? MONALISA GHOSH: Well, Cytokine Release Syndrome is one of the two major toxicities that occur immediately or within a short time period after infusion of CAR T-cells. We have defined Cytokine Release Syndrome, or CRS, as an immune-mediated phenomenon that's characterized by various symptoms that are indicative of immune activation and inflammation. And patients may experience signs and symptoms that could include fever, hypotension, hypoxia, tachycardia, shortness of breath, rash, nausea, headache, and various other symptoms that are a little less common. These symptoms are caused primarily by the release of cytokines. Cytokines are the messengers of the immune system, and most of them are released by bystander immune and non-immune cells. We know that the onset of Cytokine Release Syndrome is variable depending on the CAR T-cell product that's used, as well as the patient population that's treated. But it generally occurs anywhere from two to seven days after infusion of CAR T-cells, and in some rare cases can occur even a little bit later. A standard grading system has been developed and grade CRS, or Cytokine Release Syndrome, based on three parameters-- fever, hypotension, or low blood pressure; and hypoxia or low oxygen levels. CRS is primarily managed with IL-6 antagonists because IL-6 is an inflammatory cytokine that has been shown to mediate a lot of the systemic effects that we see from Cytokine Release Syndrome. And one of the treatments is the monoclonal antibody tocilizumab, which acts against-- or blocks-- the IL-6 receptor. CRS that is refractory to tocilizumab is generally treated with steroids. Then there's limited experience with additional therapies, especially in the setting of CRS, that does not respond to tocilizumab or steroids. There are other anti IL-6 therapies available. For example, siltuximab, which binds to IL-6 itself rather than the IL-6 receptor. However, there have been no direct comparative studies of these agents. Anakinra, which is also an IL-1 receptor antagonist has also been shown to mitigate CRS in some CAR T-cell recipients that have high grade CRS. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK. Thank you for reviewing those management strategies. So, following that-- Dr. Santomasso, what are key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of immune effector cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Sure. Immune Effector Cell-associated Neurotoxicity Syndrome-- also known as ICANS-- is the second most frequent severe toxicity that can be seen after CAR T-cell therapy. So, what is ICANS? These are transient neurological symptoms that occur in the days after infusion, most commonly with CD19 CAR T-cell therapy. And the clinical manifestations of ICANS include encephalopathy, which is confusion, behavioral changes, expressive aphasia, or other language disturbance, change in handwriting or other fine motor impairment or weakness, and tremor and headache can also be seen. In more severe cases, patients can become obtunded with a depressed level of consciousness or even develop seizures, and they may require a higher level of ICU care, such as intubation for airway protection. And in very rare cases, malignant cerebral edema may develop, which may be fatal. ICANS can occur at the same time as Cytokine Release Syndrome, or can also occur several days after or shortly after CRS resolves, so it's important to have a high index of suspicion even after Cytokine Release Syndrome has resolved, but typically the side effects are self-limited and occur within the one month after infusion. Most symptoms lasts between 5 and 17 days, and the time of onset duration and severity of ICANS may really vary depending on the CAR T-cell product used or the disease state of the patient. So, what do I mean by that? Patients with high disease burden seem to be at increased risk for severe ICANS, so kind of knowing the disease that the patient has and the burden of disease is important. And then also there may be product-specific differences as well, so reviewing the product label is important as well because each may have its own risk evaluation and mitigation strategies that inform both the duration and the frequency of monitoring for ICANS after infusion. For evaluation of ICANS, we recommend, again, the ASTCT ICANS grading system. These allow for monitoring of several different aspects of neurologic function in these patients. Mental status changes are really what define the onset of ICANS. So for CRS, it's fever; for ICANS, it's mental status changes. And the severity of the mental status change can be determined by a standardized score known as the ICE score, which stands for Immune Effector Cell-associated Encephalopathy score. This is a simple 10-point scoring metric where points are assigned for orientation to year, month, city, hospital, ability to name three objects, ability to follow simple commands, write a standard sentence, and count backwards from 100 by tens. And for children younger than age 12 or those with developmental delay, The Cornell Assessment of Pediatric Delirium, also known as the CAPD, can be used in placement of the ICE assessment. Prior to CAR infusion, patients should be evaluated, including with an ICE score, for their baseline neurologic status. And what's nice is that this ICE assessment can be used as a daily screen after CAR infusion for the onset of ICANS during at-risk period. Then, other than the ICE score, there are four other neurologic domains that contribute to ICANS grading, and that's level of consciousness, seizures, severe motor weakness, and signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure or cerebral edema, and patients are graded according to the most severe symptom in any of the five domains. So for patients who develop ICANS, it's recommended that they have workup, including blood work, CRP, CBC, comprehensive metabolic panel, fibrinogen, and coagulation tests. Neuroimaging with a non-contrast CT of the brain should be done and considering MRI of the brain in patients who are stable enough. In addition, electroencephalogram and lumbar puncture should be considered. And the electroencephalogram is really to rule out subclinical seizures, and the lumbar puncture is to assess the opening pressure-- or the pressure within the central nervous system-- and also to send studies to rule out infection. And again, these all have to be considered on an individual case by case basis, but are things to keep in mind. So for treatment of ICANS, the mainstay of treatment is, really, supportive care and corticosteroids. Tocilizumab, while it seems to rapidly resolve Cytokine Release Syndrome and most symptoms, actually does not resolve ICANS and may worsen it, so steroids are really typically used. The typical steroid is dexamethasone at a dose of 10 milligrams, and the interval really depends on the grade of the ICANS. Because of the possibility that tocilizumab may worsen neurotoxicity, ICANS really takes precedence over low grade CRS when the two occur simultaneously. And patients who don't show improvement within 24 hours after starting steroids or other supportive measures should have CSF evaluation and neuroimaging. Often treatment of seizures-- many patients are put on Keppra and levetiracetam or other anti-seizure medicine if they develop ICANS, and patients with grade 3 or greater ICANS may need an ICU level of care and escalation of steroid doses. The steroids are continued until ICANS improves to grade 1 and then tapered as clinically appropriate. And the most important thing to remember is that ICANS just needs to be monitored very closely as patients may worsen as some steroids are tapered. They also may improve rapidly after steroids are started, so steroids should be tapered quickly as patients improve. And, again, as with CRS, there's limited experience with other agents, such as Anakinra and siltuximab, but those could be considered in severe or refractory cases. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. I appreciate you going through when and how clinicians should screen for ICANS and those key management points. So, in addition to that-- Dr. Ghosh, what are the key recommendations regarding cytopenias? MONALISA GHOSH: So cytopenias can occur post-CAR T-cell infusion, and they can occur either in the early phase or in the later phase after CAR T-cell infusion. Meaning that they can occur early within the first few days to weeks post-CAR T-cell therapy or could even occur months to years later. These cytopenias include anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, neutropenia. Many patients may present with fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, frequent infections, fevers, bruising, and bleeding, and the symptoms usually are consistent with how they would present otherwise with anemia, thrombocytopenia, or neutropenia. Acute cytopenias within three months of CAR T-cell therapy are more common. This is due to usually the lymphodepleting chemotherapy that is administered prior to CAR T-cell therapy. Most patients receive a combination of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide prior to CAR T-cell infusion, or they may receive another agent, such as bendamustine. Most patients also come into CAR T-cell therapy with low lymphocyte counts from previous therapies. Early cytopenias, as I mentioned, are generally due to lymphodepleting chemotherapy or other recent therapies. There also could be an immune-mediated process due to the CAR T-cells. Usually prolonged cytopenias which occur beyond three months post-CAR T-cell infusion can be seen in a small number of patients. And the mechanism of prolonged cytopenias is really unclear at this time, but likely multifactorial. Most recipients of CAR T-cells who have prolonged cytopenias beyond three months post-CAR T-cell infusion should have a standard workup to rule out other common causes, such as vitamin or nutritional deficiencies. They should also have testing such as bone marrow biopsy and scans to rule out relapse disease-- relapse lymphoma or leukemia, for instance, that could be causing these cytopenias. Other examples would be myelodysplastic syndrome or other bone marrow failure syndromes. So cytopenias are generally managed with supportive care including growth factor and transfusion support. This applies to both cytopenias in the early period post-CAR T-cell therapy or more delayed prolonged cytopenias. In patients who have prolonged cytopenias of unclear cause that could be immune-mediated, other interventions such as high dose IVIG or even steroids could be considered depending on the situation. For those that have cytopenias in the first few months post-CAR T-cell therapy, generally they are monitored and treated with supportive care, and these cytopenias eventually resolve in the majority of patients. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Those are important considerations. Then, Dr. Santomasso, what are the key recommendations regarding Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: The major recommendations for the identification, evaluation, and management of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis, or HLH-- this is also known as macrophage activation syndrome. First, let's just start by saying that this is a dysfunctional immune response, and it's basically characterized by macrophages which are revved up and hyperactive and also possibly lymphocytes as well. There are high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines during this state and tissue infiltration, and hemophagocytosis, and organ damage. This can occur outside of the context of CAR T-cell therapy, either as a primary HLH or secondary HLH that can be either triggered by infections, or autoimmune disease, or cancer-- especially hematological malignancies, but HLH has also been observed as a rare complication of CAR T-cell therapy. And outside of the setting of CAR T-cell therapy, HLH is defined by fever, cytopenias, hyperferritinemia-- or high ferritin level-- as well as bone marrow hemophagocytosis. And what's interesting is that this is very similar to what's seen during Cytokine Release Syndrome, and that can make it difficult for patients who have moderate to severe CRS to distinguish that from HLH. The laboratory results may be very similar. So the key to recognizing HLH is really to have it on your differential even though it occurs rarely after CAR T-cell therapy. It may occur with slightly different timing and may require more aggressive treatment. The lab alterations can include, again, as I mentioned, these elevated levels of several cytokines, such as interferon gamma. We can't normally send those in the hospital or the clinic, but sometimes soluble IL-2 receptor alpha can be sent and serum ferritin can be sent, and that's an especially useful marker. There have been diagnostic criteria for CAR T-cell-induced HLH that have been proposed, and these conclude very high ferritin levels-- over 10,000-- and at least two organ toxicities that are at least grade 3, such as transaminitis, increased bilirubin, renal insufficiency or oliguria, or a pulmonary edema, or evidence of hemophagocytosis in bone marrow or organs. Unlike other forms of HLH that occur outside of the context of CAR T-cell therapy, the patients may not have hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, or overt evidence of hemophagocytosis. So just because a patient may not show those yet doesn't mean that HLH shouldn't be considered. If we see patients that have a persistent fever without an identified infection source or worsening fever, we basically should be considering HLH and doing the appropriate workup and treatment. Patients with HLH often have low fibrinogen, high triglycerides, and also cytopenias as well. The treatment-- just as there's an overlap kind of in the signs and symptoms, the treatment and the clinical management overlaps as well with CRS, so tocilizumab is typically administered. But corticosteroids should really be added for these patients, especially if there's clinical worsening or grade 3 or greater organ toxicity. And if there's insufficient response after 48 hours of corticosteroid therapy plus tocilizumab, many centers consider adding another medication such as Anakinra. I'll finally make a comment that, outside of the context of CAR T-cell therapy, HLH is sometimes treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy, such as etoposide. This approach generally is not used as a first line for patients undergoing CAR T-cell therapy due to etopiside's documented toxicity to T lymphocytes. And generally, the corticosteroids, plus the anti IL-6 agent, plus Anakinra is considered the first line of management. BRITTANY HARVEY: Got it. That's an important note on the management of HLH, and a great note on distinguishing CRS and HLH. So in addition, Dr. Ghosh-- what are the recommendations for management of B-cell aplasia? MONALISA GHOSH: B-cell aplasia, it's a disorder that's caused by low numbers or absent B-cells. And this is particularly relevant to CD19 directed CAR T-cell therapy, which is what most of the CAR T-cell therapies that are available right now target. They target CD19, and CD19 is present on normal as well as malignant B-cells. So most patients who receive anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy will develop B-cell aplasia at some point, and B-cell aplasia may be temporary or prolonged. It usually does, on one hand, indicate ongoing activity of the CD19 CAR T-cells and can be used as a surrogate marker. And increase in CD19 CAR T-cells could, in some patients, signal impending relapse, or dysfunction, or absence of activity of CD19 CAR T-cells. B-cell aplasia in CAR T-cell recipients is really due to, as I mentioned, an on-target, off-tumor effect. It can be prolonged and there is variability in rates of prolonged B-cell aplasia. The most significant consequence of B-cell aplasia is that it can lead to low immunoglobulin production. And immunoglobulin production is a very important part of the immune response by providing antibody-mediated immunity, so patients may present with frequent infections and low immunoglobulin levels. For most CAR T-cell recipients, this can be managed with infusions of Intravenous Immunoglobulins-- IVIG. However, the presence of B-cell aplasia can also present other challenges-- especially during this current pandemic, as Dr. Santomasso alluded to earlier, that it is unclear if patients will be able to mount a sufficient enough antibody response to the COVID-19 vaccines available since they cannot produce significant amounts of antibodies. This is an active area of research. However, we do advise that all CAR T-cell recipients do get the COVID vaccine and also other seasonal vaccines, such as the influenza vaccine. So it remains to be seen. We need some more long-term follow-up studies on how many people who receive CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy will have prolonged B-cell aplasia and what the consequences will be. At this time, it is suggested that patients have their IgG levels monitored and-- if possible-- their actual B-cell numbers monitored. And if their IgG levels drop below a certain number, then they may receive IVIG infusions intermittently. We recommend in this guideline using 400 as a possible cutoff for IgG levels prior to administering IVIG. However, if patients have higher IgG levels and they have recurrent or life threatening infections, infusion of IVIG is recommended as a consideration to help boost the antibody response. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK. As you mentioned, those challenges are particularly relevant now. So then, Dr. Santomasso, what are the key recommendations regarding Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation is a disorder that's characterized by systemic pathological activation of blood clotting mechanisms, which results in both clot formation throughout the body and also bleeding. There's an increased risk of hemorrhage as the body is depleted of platelets and other coagulation factors. So it's basically important for clinicians to be aware that DIC-- or Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation-- can occur after CAR T-cell therapy, and it can occur either with or without concurrent Cytokine Release Syndrome. The treatment is primarily supportive care and replacing the factors, such as fibrinogen-- based on the levels-- and also replacing factors based on partial thromboplastin time and bleeding occurrences. But corticosteroids and IL-6 antagonist therapy can be used if there is concurrent CRS or in the setting of severe bleeding complications. There is limited evidence for other interventions. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Appreciate you reviewing those. So then, the last category of toxicity addressed in this guideline-- Dr. Ghosh, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of infections? MONALISA GHOSH: So a variety of infections can be seen after CAR T-cell therapy. And there are many factors that can lead to infection after CAR T-cell therapy including the presence of cytokines, such as neutropenia or leukopenia and B-cell aplasia that we earlier discussed-- leading to low immunoglobulin production and protection. As well as the increased risk of infection due to use of high-dose steroids to treat CAR T-cell-related toxicities, such as ICANS or CRS. Early after the infusion of CAR T-cell therapy-- that is, within three months-- patients often develop neutropenia due to lymphodepleting chemotherapy and/or the CAR T-cells themselves. And these patients are particularly susceptible to infection, so most of the infections that occur early on tend to be bacterial infections, and a few fungal infections have been observed as well. Patients who receive high-dose steroids for high grade CRS or ICANS have been shown to have increased serious infectious complications including bacterial infections, fungal infections, as well as viral reactivations. Infectious complications that occur later are often due to hypogammaglobulinemia due to B-cell aplasia and reduced production of immunoglobulins. And treatment is typically directed at the infectious source, as it would be even if these patients did not have CAR T-cell therapy. There are some prophylactic antimicrobials that are recommended for CAR T-cell recipients who have prolonged cytopenias. Especially those with prolonged neutropenia should be on some sort of bacterial and/or fungal prophylactic antimicrobials. Patients should also be monitored for hypogammaglobulinemia long term and should receive intravenous immunoglobulins as needed. As we have mentioned a couple of times already, being very aware that these patients are also more susceptible to seasonal infection, such as influenza, is important, and so vaccinations are very important for this patient population. Vaccinating against influenza and vaccinating against COVID-19. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you both for reviewing those key points for the most common CAR T-related toxicities. So, just to wrap us up-- Dr. Santomasso-- in your view, how will this guideline impact both clinicians and patients? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Well, I think we've seen now that cell therapy is really one of the major advances in cancer treatment in the past decade. And I think it's reasonable to expect more of these cell therapies to be developed, and we'll hopefully see their use extend beyond very specialized centers. But CAR T-cell therapy side effects are manageable if they're recognized, so I think this guideline helps that, and they're reversible with proper supportive care. They can be serious and they require close vigilance and prompt treatment. But, again, we believe this guideline and recommendations will help members of clinical teams with both the recognition and management of all of these toxicities, and that will help patients by increasing their safety. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. That's important to note that these toxicities can be severe, but are also manageable. So I want to thank you both for your work on these guidelines and for taking the time to speak with me today, Dr. Santomasso and Dr. Ghosh. BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Our pleasure. MONALISA GHOSH: Absolutely. It was my pleasure. BRITTANY HARVEY: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. Stay tuned for additional episodes on the management of immune-related adverse events in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. To read the full guidelines, go to www.asco.org/supportive care guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app available in iTunes or the Google Play store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast, and be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode. [MUSIC PLAYING]

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Cancer, Incorporated And Immunotherapy: The Battle Within - Ralph Moss - Offstage Interview 2021

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 98:41


Cancer, Incorporated And Immunotherapy: The Battle Within - Ralph Moss - Offstage Interview 2021 Ralph Moss • https://www.mossreports.com/ • Book - Cancer, Incorporated and Immunotherapy: The Battle Within The medical writer Ralph W. Moss, PhD, has written or edited twelve books and four film documentaries on questions relating to cancer research and treatment. Dr. Moss is a graduate of New York University (BA, cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, 1965) and Stanford University (MA, 1973, PhD, 1974, Classics). He is the former science writer and assistant director of public affairs at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York (1974-1977). Since leaving Sloan-Kettering in 1977, Moss has independently evaluated the claims of conventional and non-conventional cancer treatments all over the world. He currently writes Moss Reports, detailed reports on the most common cancer diagnoses and provides informational and personalized consultations for cancer patients and their families. In 2019, he wrote The Ultimate Guide to Cancer: DIY Research, to help lay people research their own cancers. This 50-page report is available free of charge at the mossreports.com website. Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO's. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction. Connect with The Real Truth About Health: Sign Up for our Membership Club and Get 30 Days Free

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 601 (10-31-21): Halloween, Water, and the Human Body

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for Halloween 2021.  Besides focusing on autumn's festival of fun and fright, this episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND – ~9 sec That eerie sound of a tree creaking in October wind sets a seasonal stage for a Halloween challenge: exploring how Halloween, water, and human biology all connect.  Sound like quite a trick?  Well, have a listen to some Halloween music for about 50 seconds, and then we'll treat you to some examples. MUSIC - ~50 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “A Little Fright Music,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  And here are six matches of Halloween creatures or images with water in the human body. 1.  Skeleton images rattle around everywhere for Halloween, and in living skeletons water is a significant component of bones and cartilage.  2.  Pretend blood covers many-a Halloween costume, and over half of the volume of blood is plasma, which in turn is over 90 percent water, and water is also a major component of blood cells. 3.  A muscular costume is part of pretending to be a super-strong character like Wonder Woman or Superman; and water plays a significant role in muscle structure and function; in turn, muscle is an important water-storage area for the body. 4.  The monster in movie versions of “Frankenstein” was brought to life by electricity, and the cells of our nervous system transmit messages though electrochemical impulses, using sodium and potassium ions in a water-based solution. 5.  If fiery or icy creatures need some temperature regulation, water's the body fluid that does it. And 6.  Flashing and watching from many creatures on Halloween night are eyes, either scary, suspenseful, or super-powered; and eyes have chambers containing aqueous humor and vitreous humour, two fluids that consist mostly of water and that maintain the shape of the eyes. This Halloween, imagine being a creature that's about 60 percent composed of an amazing substance with unique powers to dissolve other substances, absorb and release heat, and withstand being compressed.  What would you be?  Why, the water-based human being that you are! Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last few seconds of “A Little Fright Music.” MUSIC - ~13 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The wind and creaking tree sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on October 5, 2014.  “A Little Fright Music” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was previously used in Episode 548, 10-26-20. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Flow Stopper – used in Episode 599, 10-28-21, on the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE Water uses in the human body.  Illustration from the U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,”  https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. SOURCES Used for Audio Peter Abrahams, ed., How the Body Works: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Encyclopedia of Anatomy, Metro Books, New York, 2007. American Red Cross, “Blood Components,” online at https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/types-of-blood-donations/blood-components.html. Erin Blakemore, “How Twitching Frog Legs Helped Inspire ‘Frankenstein,'” Smithsonian Magazine, December 4, 2015, online at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-twitching-frog-legs-helped-inspire-frankenstein-180957457/. Fandom, “Monster Wiki/Frankenstein's Monster,” online at https://monster.fandom.com/wiki/Frankenstein%27s_Monster. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Science Direct:“Aqueous Humor,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/aqueous-humor;“Vitreous Humour,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/veterinary-science-and-veterinary-medicine/vitreous-humour. University of Michigan Health, “Eye Anatomy and Function,” as of August 31, 2020, online at https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw121946. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Composition of the Blood,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/leukemia/anatomy/composition.html;“Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. For More Information about Human Biology, Including Water Aspects American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics.Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic:“Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body;“Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system. Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. The Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html;“Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/;“Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology (much of the information in this week's episode was taken from these previous episodes). Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 393, 11-6-17.Disease: viruses – Episode 600, 10-25-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21.Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water (with a Halloween theme) – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Following are links to other Halloween-themed episodes. Episode 238, 10-31-14 – focusing on the plant Witch-hazel.Episode 548, 10-26-20 – focusing on water-related readings that are supernatural, mysterious, or imaginative. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals h

kids new york science bay university agency music natural halloween state audio college sound composition materials accent dark tech water frankenstein superman web cells index rain pond research ocean government education plants fandom wonder woman vol school illustration philadelphia netherlands chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow penn environment neuroscience skeleton heart witch oberlin college va disease anatomy amsterdam monster msonormal new year blood atlantic stream flashing normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental american society times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology chemical conservatory grade nutrients oberlin colorful national institutes yale school signature bio wild turkey manhattan school human body watershed transcript nervous system virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean natural resources grades k function pretend erin blakemore name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes medical science circulation smithsonian magazine textbooks bristol england blacksburg american red cross franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center cosgrove msohyperlink hematology runoff sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers elsevier human biology blood vessels bmp acknowledgment muscular virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl michigan health geological survey mayo clinic health system lymphatic system peter abrahams torrin circulatory blood cells living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Hope With Answers: Living With Lung Cancer
Disparities in Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Moving toward Equity and Inclusion

Hope With Answers: Living With Lung Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 39:27


In this Hope With Answers podcast, hear from doctors in the field and researchers on the front lines discuss the disparities in lung cancer clinical trials. Disparities in access to healthcare opportunities occur when there is an absence of health equity. These health differences are closely linked with social, economic, and/or environmental disadvantage. Listen to these lung cancer experts address disparity in all aspects. This includes eligibility, referral programs, healthcare access, and appropriate follow-up for lung cancer screening. They propose strategies to address each of these areas so that we can bridge this disparity, equity and inclusion gap. Missing Out on Treatments: Disparities in Lung Cancer Clinical Trials Advances in lung cancer treatments over the last few years have made it possible to live with lung cancer for years after diagnosis. But minority and ethnic populations represent less than 5% of those getting the latest treatments in clinical trials. Guests Dr. Raymond Osarogiagbon of Baptist Cancer Center in Memphis, Tennessee Vincent K. Lam, M.D., an Assistant Professor of Oncology at Johns Hopkins, is a clinical/translational investigator with a special interest in lung cancer and an LCFA Young Investigator grantee. Dr. Triparna Sen, is an Assistant Attending, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Assistant Professor, Weil Cornell School of Medicine and an LCFA Young Investigator grantee Show Notes | Transcription Patients have the power to make a difference in health disparities in lung cancer clinical trials by: educating themselves on the steps to take asking their doctors questions looking for information on websites like lcfamerica.org or social media oncogene groups.

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine
Dr. Jonas Sokolof: Oncological Rehabilitation Medicine, Part 2

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 17:07


Dr. Jonas Sokolof is Director of the Division of Oncological Rehabilitation and Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at NYU Grossman School of Medicine. He is certified by the American Board of PM&R both in Sports Medicine and in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. His doctor of osteopathy degree is from the New York Institute Of Technology. His Residency occurred at the Harvard Medical School and the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston. He also had a fellowship in sports medicine from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. Prior to arriving at NYU Langone Health in 2018, he was at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. In Part 1, we discussed the following:  if the recent COVID resurgence affected his ability to furnish care for patients with cancer; the types of cancer in which most of his patients can be found; what manual medicine entails; assessment of patients' emotional needs; supportive needs of patients of an informational, spiritual, or social nature;  whether patients are requested to produce autobiographical accounts of how they experience life as a cancer patient and the treatment they receive; and efforts to enable patients to become adept as self-managers of cancer so that they can be effective in self-monitoring, recognizing and reporting symptoms, and treating side effects.    In Part 2, we discussed the following: from the perspective of osteopathic medicine, how rehabilitation can be used to deal with undesirable side effects; extent to which telemedicine is employed in the treatment of patients; current status of an exercise oncology initiative known as “Moving Through Cancer;” challenges involved in motivating patients to exercise whose lifestyle prior to the onset of cancer did not include efforts to be physically fit; and topics involving cancer rehabilitation where more research could prove to be advantageous in improving patient care, along with research that either is underway or projected to occur.

Oncology Today with Dr Neil Love
Chronic Myeloid Leukemia with Dr Michael Mauro

Oncology Today with Dr Neil Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 38:42


Dr Michael Mauro from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, New York, discusses the management of chronic myeloid leukemia. CME information and select publications here (http://www.researchtopractice.com/OncologyTodayCML21).

Lung Cancer Considered
SCLC Research - Charles Rudin and Tripnara Sen

Lung Cancer Considered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 26:28


This episode of Lung Cancer Considered looks ahead to the IASLC 2021 Hot Topic Meeting on Small Cell Lung Cancer, scheduled for Oct 29th and 30th 2021. Host Dr. Stephen Liu discusses the state of the SCLC research with Dr. Tripnara Sen, an Assistant Attending Biologist in the Thoracic Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Dr. Charles Rudin, the co-director of the Druckenmiller Center for Lung Cancer Research and the Sylvia Hassenfeld Chair in Lung Cancer Research, also from Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Our MBC Life
S03 E05 Road to a Cure - Dr. Larry Norton

Our MBC Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 47:46


Our special series, Road to a Cure, makes its first stop at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, with an interview with Dr. Larry Norton. He is the Norma S. Sarofim Chair of Clinical Oncology, Senior Vice President in the Office of the President, and Deputy Director for Clinical and Translational Science in the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.  Dr. Norton's also the Medical Director of the Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center at MSK and a founder of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, serving as Scientific Director and then Founding Scientific Director since the foundation's inception in 1993. .Senior Producer & Host Lisa Laudico and co-host Dr. Ellen Landsberger speak with Dr. Norton on what he sees happening with Metastatic Breast Cancer research today.  They ask him about what lines of research are most exciting to him and also all about how he cares for his own mental health.Join us as we make over 10 stops all over the U.S. (with one stop in Europe) on this Road to a Cure every Monday until the start of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December!More info is available on our website & sign up for our *NEW* Newsblast: www.ourmbclife.orgGot something to share?  Feedback?ourmbclife@sharecancersupport.orgSend us a voice recording via email or through speakpipe on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @ourmbclife

Urology Care Podcast
Imaging for Prostate Cancer with Dr. Michael Morris

Urology Care Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:56


Our guest is Dr. Michael Morris, a medical oncologist and head of the GU Oncology Prostate Cancer Section at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. He talks with us about imaging for prostate cancer to help educate patients about the new advances in imaging as an assessment and detection tool of prostate cancer. Short on time? Use the below timestamps to jump to any section: 0:49 - Introduction 1:28 - What is prostate cancer? 4:03 - Common tests to diagnose prostate cancer 5:41 - What is an imaging test? How does it help with prostate cancer? 8:15 - Process of an imaging test 13:34 - Different imaging agents available 16:31 - Is one imaging agent better than another? 17:49 - Improvements in imaging agents 20:44 - What to ask your doctor about imaging for prostate cancer? 22:31 - Final thoughts For more information, please visit UrologyHealth.org and don't forget to subscribe to our free digital magazine, UrologyHealth extra. This podcast was made possible by the generous support from Lantheus Holdings. **** October 14, 2021

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine
Dr. Jonas Sokolof: Oncological Rehabilitation Medicine, Part 1

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:41


Dr. Jonas Sokolof is Director of the Division of Oncological Rehabilitation and Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at NYU Grossman School of Medicine. He is certified by the American Board of PM&R both in Sports Medicine and in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. His doctor of osteopathy degree is from the New York Institute Of Technology. His Residency occurred at the Harvard Medical School and the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston. He also had a fellowship in sports medicine from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. Prior to arriving at NYU Langone Health in 2018, he was at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. In Part 1, we discussed the following:  if the recent COVID resurgence affected his ability to furnish care for patients with cancer; the types of cancer in which most of his patients can be found; what manual medicine entails; assessment of patients' emotional needs; supportive needs of patients of an informational, spiritual, or social nature;  whether patients are requested to produce autobiographical accounts of how they experience life as a cancer patient and the treatment they receive; and efforts to enable patients to become adept as self-managers of cancer so that they can be effective in self-monitoring, recognizing and reporting symptoms, and treating side effects.         

Health is PowHer's Podcast
68. Reiki as a Spiritual Practice and Self-Care with Pamela Miles, Reiki Master

Health is PowHer's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 52:21


Pamela Miles is the foremost Medical Reiki expert, pioneering the use of Reiki practice in conventional medicine. She has a unique perspective on practicing Reiki on our own selves to raise our vibration and health. She has the experience and credentials including: Collaboration with prestigious healthcare institutions on care, education and research, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), medical schools (Harvard, Yale, Einstein) and hospitals (New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center). Specifically, she has: Been published in peer-reviewed medical journals, including the prestigious Journal of the American College of Cardiology Developed the first hospital Reiki program in an infectious disease clinic Presented and taught Reiki in medical schools across the country, including Harvard and Yale Collaborated on medical research, including an NIH-funded study and a heart rate variability (HRV) study at Yale Served as the lead reviewer for the NIH/NCCAM Reiki Backgrounder Presented at medical conferences, including the NIH/NCI/OCCAM research conference, October 2007 and the Integrative Healthcare Symposium Trained the global Reiki community in skills and perspective needed for conventional healthcare collaboration Consulted with hospital administrators integrating Reiki practice into clinical care She is also the the author of the award-winning book REIKI: A Comprehensive Guide (Tarcher/Penguin) and numerous popular articles. As a leading spokesperson for Reiki in the media, my work has been featured on The Dr. Oz Show, CBS, NBC, The Atlantic, New York Magazine, US News and World Report, The Daily Beast, Refinery29, and Allure magazine. We hope you enjoy this episode and start practicing Reiki!!! Much love, Dr. Anna, MD P.S. She has free global self-practice sessions in hopes of helping you and others collectively across the world. To manifest a beautiful body, mind, soul and rejoice in love.  Sign up HERE! ---------------------------------------------------------------- Our Manifestation 4-Step Hypnosis Recordings is Still Available on Our Website for a Limited Time You can sign up here! ------------------------------------------------------------------ We hope you enjoy the episode and if you do, please SUBSCRIBE, RATE, and REVIEW So you can help us increase our reach to help more women awaken their best selves, have more energy, and live the life they dreamed of while healing and recovering from any pain and health issues! ----------------------------------------------------------------- The Health Is PowHer wellness coaching members club has launched! We'd love to have you and if you're interested in awakening your best self, having more energy, and living the life to your full health potential, and are determined to feel better then check us out with the link below!  And it's going away in just a few months by the end of the year for lifetime access! https://healthispowher.com/health-is-powher-members-club/ ------------------------------------------------------------------ DISCLAIMER   Anna Esparham, M.D.is a medical doctor, but she is not your doctor, and she is not offering medical advice on this podcast. If you are in need of professional advice or medical care, you must seek out the services of your own doctor or health care professional. The opinions of podcast guests are not necessarily those of Dr. Esparham, MD and Health Is PowHer, LLC and do not represent her or the company.  This podcast provides information only, and does not provide any financial, legal, medical or psychological services or advice. None of the content on this podcast prevents, cures or treats any mental or medical condition. You are responsible for your own physical, mental and emotional well-being, decisions, choices, actions and results. Health Is PowHer, LLC disclaims any liability for your reliance on any opinions or advice contained in this podcast.  

Happiness through Hardship
64. Roberta Lombardi: Helping Women with the Hardship of Cancer Costs

Happiness through Hardship

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 42:17


Have you heard of someone who goes through a life-changing experience and looks to change the world...not for themselves but for others? Roberta Lombardi is that wonder woman and on this episode of "Happiness through Hardship" - The Podcast she shares how to help women underserved and uninsured with the costly process of cancer treatment. Roberta is incredible. After her own cancer diagnosis in 2016, this eye-opening experience wasn't about making her life better, it was about truly helping others who didn't have access to the resources she did. And then she did something about it. As the Founder and President of Infinite Strength, Roberta helps struggling women figure out finances and resources during cancer treatment. Through this non-profit, she offers them hope and motivation to keep fighting even though the obstacles go way beyond treatment. On this episode she talks about how important it is to help, shares stories about making a difference and lists a few ways to assist those women in need dealing with cancer. SHOW NOTES 3:57 - Roberta is diagnosed 5:05 - Roberta realizes her bad day is never as bad as others 7:25 - A lightbulb went off and Roberta knew she had to help 8:22 - Roberta questions why she is still struggling despite finishing treatment 10:41 - Establishing the mission of Infinite Strength 12:23 - Roberta helps Sharon with her holiday wishes 19:18 - The emotional impact this had on Roberta, her own family and Sharon's family 20:33 - Roberta knows that she can do more 29:05 - Knowing the importance of having a strong community 30:20 - How you can help out and make a difference, even in small ways 33:59. - The little gestures that make a big impact 36:42 - Caryn and Roberta play The Grateful Game STORIES OF INFINITE STRENGTH IN HER WORDS Stories: https://www.infinitestrength.org/in-her-words WAYS YOU CAN HELP Buy and donate Wildfire Breast Cancer Magazine to your local hospital so that there's relevant and hopeful reading in the hospital waiting rooms: https://www.wildfirecommunity.org/ Buy and donate "Happiness through Hardship" - A Cancer Guide and Journal for Patients and Caregivers to a local hospital: https://checkout.square.site/merchant/YRNBJNKRHK5Z5/checkout/32L5HPFZVIE7YJZJM3KCV57B Reach out to a local non-profit and see if you can volunteer your time, donate items or money: https://prettywellness.com/volunteering/ HELP FUND PROGRAMS for: +Less Fortunate Women Dealing with Cancer - Donate to Infinite Strength: By donating to Infinite Strength you will be giving a single mom the opportunity to pay her mortgage or rent while taking time off from work during treatment. You will insure her children can sleep in their bed at night: https://www.infinitestrength.org/donate +Help Fund Research Labs for Underfunded Stage IV Breast Cancer - Donate to The Cancer Couch Foundation: The Cancer Couch Foundation is a privately funded, non-profit organization that has helped put over 4-million dollars into metastatic breast cancer (MBC) research to date since 2016! 100% of donations and event proceeds are matched and go to fund MBC research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center! https://www.thecancercouch.com/donations.html CONNECT with Roberta and Infinite Strength Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/strengthforhealing/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/strengthforhealing/ CONNECT with us: www.PrettyWellness.com/podcast - for more information on the podcast episodes 
www.PrettyWellness.com/cancer-resources - easily accessible cancer information
 www.Instagram.com/prettywellness - for daily wellness tips www.CarynSullivan.com - for more information on media, speaking engagements and book partnerships Our Social Media:
 www.Instagram.com/prettywellness www.Facebook.com/PrettyWellness www.Twitter.com/PrettyWellness To Buy the Book:
 Happiness through Hardship - The Book: amzn.to/39PAjuT

Your Family's Health
Gynecological Cancer & Surgical Options

Your Family's Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 28:40


Dr. Jeanine Cook-Garard learns more about gynecological cancers and their surgical options with Dr. Jennifer Mueller, a surgeon who specializes in caring for women with gynecological cancers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 175: The Power of Mentorship in Oncology Nursing

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 49:21


ONS member Erica Fischer-Cartlidge, DNP, CNS, CBCN®, AOCNS®, interim director of nursing practice at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and three other ONS leaders join Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, to discuss the importance of mentorship in nursing, mentoring approaches and recommendations, and benefits for mentors and mentees. Fischer-Cartlidge is the 2021 recipient of the Oncology Nursing Foundation's Connie Henke Yarbro Excellence in Cancer Nursing Mentorship Award. The advertising messages in this episode are paid for by Breast Cancer Index. Episode Notes Check out these from today's episode: NCPD contact hours are not available for this episode. Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 99: How to Set Goals for a Successful Nursing Career Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 150: Career Planning for Oncology Nurses ONS Voice article: Find Your Voice With ONS's Leadership Development Committee ONS Voice article: Having a Mentor Helps You Achieve Oncology Nursing Certification ONS Voice article: Mentors Changed My Career at Every Stage, From New Grad to Leader ONS Voice article: Nursing Leadership Has Space for You and Your Goals Learn more about the Connie Henke Yarbro Excellence in Cancer Nursing Mentorship Award. Oncology Nursing Forum article: The Value of Mentoring in Nursing: An Honor and a Gift ONS Leadership Learning Library ONS mentorship programs Receive career guidance with ONS Teach and mentor with ONS. Honor a mentor in your life with a donation to the Oncology Nursing Foundation to ensure future generations of oncology nurses have the same opportunity. To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities. To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org.

Treating Blood Cancers
Clinical Trials: A Healthcare Professional's Perspective

Treating Blood Cancers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 28:25


Lorenzo Falchi, MD and Leah Szumita, MS, RN, CCRN, ACNS-BC Recorded on August 5, 2021 Clinical trials are the foundation of advancing treatment options. Understanding their importance, dispelling myths and fears about enrollment, and acknowledging disparities in access can help providers educate their patients and discuss treatment in a clinical trial as an option at any point in the patient's cancer journey. In this episode, we welcome special guest host Leah Szumita, MS, RN, CCRN, ACNS-BC, Director of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's Clinical Trial Support Center as she speaks with Lorenzo Falchi, MD, Assistant Attending, Lymphoma Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, about the importance of clinical trials, understanding patient concerns, barriers to participation and strategies to overcome these barriers, and how clinical trials have been impacted by COVID-19.

Palliative Care Chat - University of MD Baltimore
Founders, Leaders and Futurists in Palliative Care: Kathleen Foley, MD

Palliative Care Chat - University of MD Baltimore

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 70:32


Trained as a physician, Dr. Foley focused on pain management within neurology and started palliative care. She originated the Project on Death in America and developed an international plan for palliative care worldwide. Dr Foley is emeritus at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 596 (9-27-21): Water and Muscles

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:09).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 27, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall on water connections to the human body and human biology.  This week, we start with some mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds, and see if you know the body system you can hear at work in all of these sounds.  And here's a hint: it'll be a show of strength if you guess this. SOUNDS  - ~23 sec If you guessed the muscular system, you're right!  Walking, dribbling a basketball, lifting weights, and jumping rope all involve some of the over 600 skeletal muscles in the human body.  Skeletal muscles, also called striated or voluntary muscles, are one of three muscle types in the body.  The other two are smooth, or involuntary muscles, found in internal organs; and cardiac muscle in the heart.  Whatever their location or function, muscles have several important connections to water, including the following six. First, water is a major component of muscles, making up over 70 percent of muscle mass. Second, cell volume, that is, the space within cells, is affected by the amount of water that cells contain, or the cells' hydration state.  This is believed to be related to muscle strength and contraction capacity by affecting the shape and function of muscle proteins. Third, water is the medium containing all the dissolved biochemicals that the body needs to function, including those involved in muscular contraction and in nourishing muscle cells. Fourth, water is involved in reactions that release energy from the molecule ATP, and water is associated with the important energy-storage molecule glycogen. Fifth, water helps regulate body temperature, including the heat generated by muscular activity. And sixth, water helps lubricate moveable joints, the structures upon which skeletal muscles act to move parts of the body. Overall, water plays a significant role in muscle strength and function, and muscle, in turn, is an important area of water storage for the body. We close with some music whose title speaks of one of the most common uses of our muscles.  Here's the closing 25 seconds of “Walk This Way For Awhile,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “…you walk this way for awhile; will you walk this way for awhile?  I think you will, I know you still, I hope you will.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on September 23, 2021. “Walk This Way for Awhile,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 14, 2010, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Music; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  The song is also on The Steel Wheel's 2010 album, “Red Wing.”  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  More information about Goose Creek Music is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  More information about the Franklin Park Arts Center is available online at http://www.franklinparkartscenter.org/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 286, 10-19-15. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Structure of a representative human skeletal muscle.  Illustration from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Structure of Skeletal Muscle,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/structure.html. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN MUSCULAR SYSTEM The following information is quoted from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Introduction” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. “The muscular system is composed of specialized cells called muscle fibers.  Their predominant function is contractibility.  Muscles, attached to bones or internal organs and blood vessels, are responsible for movement.  Nearly all movement in the body is the result of muscle contraction.  Exceptions to this are the action of cilia, the flagellum on sperm cells, and amoeboid movement of some white blood cells. “The integrated action of joints, bones, and skeletal muscles produces obvious movements such as walking and running.  Skeletal muscles also produce more subtle movements that result in various facial expressions, eye movements, and respiration. “In addition to movement, muscle contraction also fulfills some other important functions in the body, such as posture, joint stability, and heat production.  Posture, such as sitting and standing, is maintained as a result of muscle contraction.  The skeletal muscles are continually making fine adjustments that hold the body in stationary positions.  The tendons of many muscles extend over joints and in this way contribute to joint stability.  This is particularly evident in the knee and shoulder joints, where muscle tendons are a major factor in stabilizing the joint.  Heat production, to maintain body temperature, is an important by-product of muscle metabolism.  Nearly 85 percent of the heat produced in the body is the result of muscle contraction.” SOURCES Used for Audio Ann Baggaley, ed., Human Body, Dorling Kindersley Publishing, New York, N.Y, 2001. Cedric Bryant and Daniel Green, eds., Essentials of Exercise Science, American Council on Exercise, San Diego, Calif., 2017. Michael Houston, Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science, 3rd Edition, Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ill., 2006. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access).  National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). Scott Powers and Edward Howley, Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y., 2012.U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body, online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. For More Information about Water and the Human Body American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system.Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/.National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine, “Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html. University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Another episode related to human exercise is Episode 483, 7-29-19.  It focuses on buoyancy and drag in the water and is designed for middle school and high school students. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water.Episode 594, 9-13-21 – Neurological system connections to water.Episode 595, 9-20-21 – Skeletal system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy5.2 – Energy can take many forms.5.3 – There is a relationship between force and energy of moving objects. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory.LS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16

kids new york science bay university agency performance music natural state audio college walking live energy accent dark steel wheels tech water heat web cells index rain pond research ocean government education medicine fitness plants vol school force illustration philadelphia netherlands chesapeake snow penn exercise environment neuroscience heart va amsterdam msonormal blood motion stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens san diego ill environmental structure american society times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology lyrics chemical grade nutrients posture muscles colorful walk this way national institutes signature application bio scales human body watershed transcript nervous system calif virginia tech neurological ls essentials atlantic ocean natural resources grades k function name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes medical science circulation exceptions harrisonburg textbooks exercise science bristol england ar sa blacksburg american council mcgraw hill champaign franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center msohyperlink atp awhile red wing hematology sections life sciences stormwater daniel green policymakers elsevier msobodytext blood vessels bmp rockingham county human kinetics new standard acknowledgment virginia department goose creek cripple creek skeletal cumberland gap scott powers sols tmdl geological survey mayo clinic health system lymphatic system skeletal muscle circulatory blood cells living systems purcellville virginia standards water center audio notes covid-19
Community Signal
How Teleheath Provides More Efficient Healthcare for Patients and Providers – and the Role Online Communities Can Play

Community Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 42:22


How did the pandemic impact your relationships with your healthcare providers? Did telehealth enable you to continue seeing or connecting with your providers to receive the care that you needed? In this episode of Community Signal, Denzil Coleman, a telehealth coordinator, developing and maintaining digital health interventions at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Center for Telehealth, discusses how the adoption of telehealth interactions and practices during the pandemic may lead to continued and more long-term improvements and efficiencies in our healthcare system. Denzil explains that telehealth is “anything where healthcare is being impacted by a patient and an actor that are not in the same location. That includes a video, that includes transmissions of information, asynchronous messaging, [and] remote patient monitoring.” Telehealth can create efficiencies for both patients and providers –– giving patients flexibility to see their providers without the burden of travel and with the option to invite more caregivers into these interactions. Whereas in the past, patients may have received pamphlets with details about in-person support groups or other care options, today there are online communities and support groups and insurance companies themselves even offer telehealth options. With these options come more opportunities for patients to be more engaged in the care that they receive and for providers to thoughtfully care for patients. Denzil and Patrick also discuss how: COVID, the shifting landscape of the healthcare profession, and the fact that folks are living longer, healthier lives all impacts the healthcare system The flexibility of telehealth allows a patient's support system to become more involved in their care Creating efficiencies in the healthcare system should not equate to patients receiving less care Value-based care could resemble a community-like investment in overall care Our Podcast is Made Possible By… If you enjoy our show, please know that it's only possible with the generous support of our sponsor: Vanilla, a one-stop shop for online community. Big Quotes What exactly is telehealth? (2:01): “To put it simply, telehealth is … anything where healthcare is being impacted by a patient and an actor that are not in the same location. That includes a video, that includes transmissions of information, asynchronous messaging, [and] remote patient monitoring.” –@denzilcoleman How the pandemic is leading to wider adoption of teleheath interactions (4:55): “Even at the Center for Telehealth at MUSC, where I work, we saw a very significant uptick in telehealth interactions of all kinds since the start of the pandemic, just because pretty much every interaction had to take place that way for patient safety. The forced adoption of the time of the emergency is really what prompted it, but we'll take it because as people are getting more comfortable with these modalities, we're able to push digital health forward a lot quicker.” –@denzilcoleman Online communities can help keep patients engaged in their own care (8:10): “A lot of times, you may give an intervention or a plan of care in which the patient is not fully engaged. Having them as part of one of these [online] communities where they feel supported, encouraged to take part and advocate for their own care, and share experiences, it keeps them engaged. It keeps their focus on their health and on getting better.” –@denzilcoleman Healthcare optimization could lead to online communities (22:51): “[Healthcare optimization means] expanding the reach of what we already do, expanding the reach of providers who are overwhelmed, overworked, and facing a mushrooming population of people who are living longer, healthier lives. Which is great, but at the same time, we are having less and less people graduate from medical school becoming doctors. Of course, those are being supplemented by what we refer to as mid-level providers and a large increase of people becoming physician assistants and nurse practitioners, which is also great, but our providers aren't matching the rate of individuals surviving. We have to create the efficiencies. We have no choice. We have to use technology to do the best we can, and online communities are part of that.” –@denzilcoleman Efficiencies in the healthcare ecosystem do not mean a reduction in care (30:05): “Some [existing healthcare practices] aren't necessary, don't add value, or may even be wasteful. … Imagine if you're with a provider, and you've had a long-term condition over the past 30 years. The last 15 of them, you saw your provider every three months, no matter what. Now, in 2021, your provider tells you, ‘I'm only going to see you in person maybe one time a year instead of four, but you're going to come see me in person. I'm going to do an exam, then I'm going to have a little remote monitoring on a monthly basis. Then we're going to do a three-month video-only checkup. Then we're going to do something in six months.' You only come to the clinic and get an exam the one time. It's not because we don't want to care for you. It's because we want to create efficiencies for everyone in the healthcare ecosystem.” –@denzilcoleman About Denzil Coleman Denzil Coleman has served as a telehealth coordinator, developing and maintaining digital health interventions at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Center for Telehealth since 2017. He holds a Master of Science in Health Information Technology and is completing a Doctor of Education in Educational Practice and Innovation, both from The University of South Carolina. Denzil has worked in healthcare for nearly two decades including stints at Roper Saint Francis and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He also lectures in and facilitates healthcare management and technology education programs in the United States, United Kingdom, and India. Related Links Sponsor: Vanilla, a one-stop-shop for online community Denzil Coleman on Twitter MUSC Health Center for Telehealth The American Telemedicine Association Alzheimer's Society Serena Snoad on Community Signal Community Signal episode about strategies used by anti-vax influencers Dr. Kelli Garber and Dr. Ragan Dubose-Morris, who Denzil works with at MUSC Dr. David Valentine, who Denzil shouted out Dr. Panos Constantinides, who has mentored Denzil Transcript View transcript on our website Your Thoughts If you have any thoughts on this episode that you'd like to share, please leave me a comment, send me an email or a tweet. If you enjoy the show, we would be so grateful if you spread the word and supported Community Signal on Patreon.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Cancer, Incorporated And Immunotherapy: The Battle Within - by: Ralph Moss

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 111:20


Cancer, Incorporated And Immunotherapy: The Battle Within - by: Ralph Moss Ralph Moss • https://www.mossreports.com/ • Book - Cancer, Incorporated and Immunotherapy: The Battle Within The medical writer Ralph W. Moss, PhD, has written or edited twelve books and four film documentaries on questions relating to cancer research and treatment. Dr. Moss is a graduate of New York University (BA, cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, 1965) and Stanford University (MA, 1973, PhD, 1974, Classics). He is the former science writer and assistant director of public affairs at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York (1974-1977). Since leaving Sloan-Kettering in 1977, Moss has independently evaluated the claims of conventional and non-conventional cancer treatments all over the world. He currently writes Moss Reports, detailed reports on the most common cancer diagnoses and provides informational and personalized consultations for cancer patients and their families. In 2019, he wrote The Ultimate Guide to Cancer: DIY Research, to help lay people research their own cancers. This 50-page report is available free of charge at the mossreports.com website. Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO's. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction. Connect with The Real Truth About Health: Sign Up for our Membership Club and Get 30 Days Free

Oncology Data Advisor
Recent Advances in the Treatment of T-Cell Lymphoma: A Conversation With Dr. Steven Horwitz

Oncology Data Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 7:00


In this podcast, Dr. Steven Horwitz from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will be discussing recent advances in the treatment of T-cell lymphoma. If you enjoyed this podcast and want to learn more on Updates on Therapeutic Advances in T-Cell Lymphoma, visit i3Health.com/t-cell-lymphoma-enduring

Ali on the Run Show
422. Deirdre Keane, As Seen on Humans of New York

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 75:43


“I took down all facades. I just could not hold up this fake exterior of everything was OK when I felt like I could barely get out of bed every day. I would just get up, go to work, and the only thing else that was consistent was running. I would run every day, despite how bad I felt. And it was such a sense of refuge at points. I would feel like I would be OK. And that's when I would start planning for the future. I was like, ‘Deirdre, this is transient. This is going to get better. You are going to get better. Dad's looking out for you. Don't give up. Just keep going. Get through today. Tomorrow will hopefully be a better day. And if it's not, that's OK, too. We will get there.' Running reinforced that resiliency that I truly thought I'd lost.” Deirdre Keane normally flies pretty under the radar. But last month, the 33-time marathoner (whose personal best time is 3:14) became a face seen by millions when she was featured on Humans of New York. Suddenly, 11.3 million people on Instagram and 17 million more on Facebook knew Deirdre's story. In the post, Deirdre shared the story of her dad, who was an avid (and fast!) marathoner. She talked about how he ran his final New York City Marathon the day before what turned out to be his final surgery to help treat his melanoma. Deirdre talked about how her dad so badly wanted his kids to be runners when they were growing up, but they weren't interested — until after his passing, when Deidre decided to run her first marathon on what would've been her dad's birthday. Then, Deirdre talked about going through a tough time last year, and how running became her constant — it was what she did to remember who she was, and who she is. On this episode, Deirdre talks about the rest of her story. She talks about waking up at 4 AM to run 10 miles to work from her home in the Bronx to the Upper East Side, where she's a nurse practitioner in the pediatric ICU at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She talks about working through the pandemic in New York City, about leaning into running after her brother was in a near-fatal car accident, and about her big plans for her next year on the run (starting with three fall marathons: Boston, New York City, and Dallas). When she's not working or on he run, Deirdre is pursuing her MBA at New York University, where she is also the editor-in-chief of the school's graduate newspaper. SPONSOR: AfterShokz — Visit ontherun.aftershokz.com for 15% off wireless headphones. What you'll get on this episode: On running through wet cement! (6:10) All about being featured on Humans of New York (11:00) Deirdre talks about her dad and his love for running (24:00) How Deirdre got into marathoning (28:35) How Deirdre has added more meaning to her running over the past year and a half (39:25) On being a “helper” (48:00) The role running has served for Deirdre over the past year (50:10) How training (for the Boston, New York City, and Dallas Marathons) is going, and what's next for Deirdre (1:00:00) Check out: Achilles International Manchester City Marathon 2020 Manchester City Half Marathon Recap From 4:13 To 3:51: My Manchester City Marathon Recap Follow Deirdre: Instagram @deirdremkeane Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 593 (9-6-21): Water's at the Heart of Blood

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:19).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 6, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND - ~3 secHow is a human heartbeat part of a water story?  Have a listen for about 25 seconds to the following mystery sounds, and see if you can guess the heart-and-water connections they represent.  And here's a hint: if you have the energy, you could follow many branches to this solution.SOUNDS - ~21 secYou've been listening to sounds from a platelets donation at the American Red Cross' New River Valley Donor Center in Blacksburg, Virginia.  The sounds—a blood-pressure measurement, a needle stick into an arm vein, and the machine separating blood components and recirculating fluid to the patient—illustrate three connections between the human circulatory system and water.First, the heart provides a force—measured by blood pressure—to keep blood circulating around the body, like the sun's energy powers evaporation and winds that help keep water circulating around the earth.  Second, arm veins are part of an intricately branched system of arteries, veins, and capillaries, resembling a watershed's branching pattern as one travels uphill from ocean to river to headwater streams.   Humans have an estimated 60,000 to 100,000 miles of blood vessels, compared to Virginia's approximately 100,000 miles of rivers and streams.  Finally, blood's components are mostly water: blood plasma is a solution of water and many biochemicals, mixed with water-based red and white blood cells and with platelets.  As a result, blood in the human system has water's physical and chemical properties for transporting materials and regulating heat.Cells and transported substances make blood “thicker” than water, just as the saying goes.  But the water we borrow temporarily from the global water cycle is at the chemical and physical heart of blood and the circulatory system's vital functions.Thanks to staff at the New River Valley Donor Center for participating in this episode, and thanks to Soundbible.com for the heartbeat sound. We close with some music inspired by the action of the human heart.  Here's about 20 seconds of “Heartbeat,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~23 sec –Lyrics - “Feel my heartbeat comin' in next to you; heartbeat, yes you do.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 392, 10-30-17, and Episode 236, 10-20-14. The human heartbeat sound was recorded by Mike Koenig and made available (9/14/09 upload) online at the Soundbible.com Web site, http://soundbible.com/1001-Heartbeat.html, for public use under the Creative Commons license “Attribution 3.0”; for more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. Other sounds heard in this episode were recorded at the American Red Cross New River Donor Center in Blacksburg, Virginia, during an October 19, 2014, platelet donation by Virginia Water Radio host Alan Raflo.  Thanks to the staff at the Donor Center for their help and for allowing the sound recording.  For information about blood and platelet donations, please visit the American Red Cross' “Donating Blood” Web site at http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood.

science bay humans university agency music photo natural earth heartbeat state audio college sound england accent dark shape steel wheels tech water web cells index nature rain dracula pond research ocean government education medicine prevention philadelphia chesapeake snow penn westport environment images skeleton heart va cambridge msonormal blood stream gilbert normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental structure american society times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology engineering chemical grade colorful national institutes signature bio watershed mike koenig soundbible transcript centers disease control conn virginia tech neurological atlantic ocean natural resources attribution grades k environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table circulation harrisonburg ar sa blacksburg american red cross cambridge university press franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center cosgrove msohyperlink hematology sections ben cosgrove stormwater cleveland clinic policymakers msobodytext blood vessels bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl greenwood press circulatory blood cells virginia standards circulatory system water center space systems audio notes covid-19
Healthcare Unfiltered
The FDA: The Gift that Keeps on Giving

Healthcare Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 55:52


Aaron Mitchell (@TheWonkologist), MD, MPH, medical oncologist and health outcomes researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, comes on to discuss the shortcomings and pitfalls of the regulatory processes at the FDA, optimal trial endpoints that provide the strongest evidence for approval, whether the accelerated approval process is enforced as it is written, what power any advisory panel really has when it comes to FDA approvals, and so many more pain points today.

IJGC Podcast
HIPEC in Secondary Cytoreductive Surgery: A Phase II trial with Oliver Zivanovic&Roisin O'Cearbhaill

IJGC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 44:13


In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Oliver Zivanovic and Roisin O'Cearbhaill. Dr. Roisin O'Cearbhaill, MD, is a medical oncologist and the Research Director of the Gynecologic Medical Oncology Service and the Clinical Director of the Solid Tumor Program, Cellular Therapy Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, with a joint faculty appointment at Weill Cornell Medical College. Nationally, she serves as the Chair, Developmental Therapeutics, NRG Oncology. Dr. Oliver Zivanovic MD is a Gynecologic Oncologist at the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Ketteting Cancer Center with a joint faculty appointment at Weill Cornell Medical College. He serves as the Institutional Principle Investigator for NRG Oncology. @ROCearbhaill / @zivanovicmd / @TeamOvary_MSK / @sloan_kettering Highlights: -HIPEC with carboplatin at secondary cytoreductive surgery for first platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer was not superior to secondary cytoreduction without HIPEC. -HIPEC for recurrent ovarian cancer should be conducted in the setting of a clinical trial

Oncology Overdrive
Immune Therapy and Surgical Interventions with Kevin C. Soares, MD

Oncology Overdrive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 38:27


In this episode, Kevin C. Soares, MD, discusses his path to GI oncology, how immune therapy complements surgical interventions, and shares his thoughts on how the pandemic will impact medical practices. Welcome to another exciting episode of Oncology Overdrive :14 About Soares :20 The interview 1:58 Can you tell us a little bit about how you chose your specialty and how you got where you are today? 2:39 How did you decide that you wanted to incorporate researching immunotherapy in these particular diseases? 5:53 What are you looking at when it comes to immune therapy complementing surgical interventions? 8:48 How do patients typically respond when you talk about new trials and studies? 12:56 How did the pandemic impact you and your patients and your practice? What was the last year and a half like? 16:07 Do you think COVID is going to change the way we practice medicine as a whole? 19:42 You're seeing these patients with these cysts … what is your role in those patients' cases? 24:45 Could you talk a little bit about what image-guided ablation is and how it works? 29:00 When you retire what would you like to have seen happen in this particular space? 33:24 Soares's one pearl 36:35 Where to find Soares 37:24 Kevin C. Soares, MD, is a surgical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, with specialty training in hepatopancreatobiliary surgery. We'd love to hear from you! Send your comments/questions to Dr. Jain at oncologyoverdrive@healio.com. Follow us on Twitter @HemOncToday and @ShikhaJainMD. Soares can be reached by calling 212-639-3195 or by going to www.mskcc.org.    Disclosures: Jain reports she is a paid freelance writer for Lippincott. Soares reports no relevant financial disclosures.

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 170: Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplants Can Increase Donor Options for BIPOC

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 33:11


ONS member Naomi Cazeau, RN, MSN, ANP-BC, AOCNP®, nurse practitioner at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center's outpatient bone marrow transplant unit in New York City and member of the New York City ONS Chapter, joins Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, to discuss haploidentical stem cell transplants to increase donor options for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC). Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Earn 0.5 contact hours of nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) by listening to the full recording and completing an evaluation at myoutcomes.ons.org by August 27, 2023. The planners and faculty for this episode have no relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies to disclose. ONS is accredited as a provider of NCPD by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. Episode Notes Check out these resources from today's episode: Complete this evaluation for free NCPD. Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 59: Blood and Marrow Transplant Nursing Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 148: Stem Cell Transplant Nursing in the Home Setting Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 163: HLA Testing and More for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Donor Selection ONS Voice article: The Case of the Cord Blood Match ONS STAT Sheet: Cytokine Release Syndrome ONS book: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Manual for Nursing Practice (third edition) BMTCN® certification American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy National Marrow Donor Program U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration information on transplants 2019 meta-analysis of post-transplant cyclophosphamide therapy 2019 study of racial disparities in access to HLA-matched, unrelated donor transplants 2019 trial comparing Black and White patients following post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based haploidentical transplant 2020 study of cord blood versus haploidentical transplant in Black patients To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities. To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org.

Biotech 2050 Podcast
69. Antibodies in immuno-oncology, Alison O'Neill, Chief Medical Officer, Surface Oncology

Biotech 2050 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 19:35


Alison serves as the chief medical officer at Surface Oncology. She has over 20 years of experience in clinical research, oncology drug development and clinical neuro-oncology. Prior to joining Surface, Alison held several leadership roles in clinical research and development at Radius Health, Synta Pharmaceuticals and at Sanofi in the global oncology division. Prior to entering the biotech industry, she served on faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital where she focused on early phase clinical studies and treating patients with malignancies of the central nervous system. Alison earned both her bachelor's degree and her medical degree from the University of Chicago. She completed her residency training at the University of Michigan in neurology and her neuro-oncology fellowship training at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

Nonfiction4Life
N4L Repost 60: "How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who's Sick" by Letty Cottin Pogrebin

Nonfiction4Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 37:57


At age 70, Letty Cottin Pogrebin felt fit as a fiddle on that fateful day she walked three miles to her routine mammogram. A founding editor of Ms. (magazine) and women's rights activist, she had energy and to spare until she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Facing six weeks of radiation treatment, she was now obligated to join others in the waiting room of Memorial Sloan-Kettering in New York City. So, putting on her journalist hat, she began interviewing fellow patients. The result? How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who's Sick–an invaluable handbook about “The New Illness Etiquette” for both the sick and their friends. 00:10   Intro to Letty Cottin Pogrebin, book author and founding editor of Ms. (magazine) 01:15   Flu and cold season begins 01:45   Pogrebin gets a routine mammogram at age 70 02:10   Breast cancer diagnosis comes without warning signs 04:00   Shares news of cancer and radiation with close friends via email 05:00   Searches in vain for a book about sickness and friendship 05:50   Interviews waiting-room patients for How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who's Sick 06:31   Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center attracts people the world over 07:45   Discovers discrepancies between their the experiences and wishes of sick people 08:15   Unexpectedly learns about caregivers' needs 09:30   Illness has a ripple effect, touching families and friends 09:50   Bottom line: people want to be honest—both the sick and their friends 10:40   What a friend should be able to ask a sick friend 11:10   What a sick person should be able to say to a friend 11:55   Truth-telling and “The New Illness Etiquette” 12:30   A friend reacts perfectly to Pogrebin's diagnosis 13:15   Asking “Do you want to talk about it?” gives a sick person control 13:25   Other lines that are both true and helpful 14:30   Sick people don't want to hear or answer, “How are you?” 15:55   Their responses can overwhelm friends with TMI 16:15   Asking “What's happening?” gives patient control over how much to disclose 17:30   Nobody wants to be labeled sick (such as “cancer girl”) 18:15   Saying, “You look great!” can give false reassurance and seem disingenuous 18:30   “Empathy translated into action equals kindness” 18:50   “Illness is friendship's proving ground” 19:15   Guidelines for visiting sick friends – be considerate 20:40   Guidelines for giving gifts to sick friends – pay attention to diagnoses 21:00   Examples of inappropriate gifts and insensitive comments 22:30   Personalize a friend's illness to the point you know what gifts to give 24:15   Humor and laughter depend entirely on how well you know the patient 24:50   Remembers laughing at Marlo Thomas's funny jokes 26:00   Disparages fruit baskets and extols massages (and other sensitive gifts) 27:20   Why ice cream scoops adorn the book cover 28:50   Contrasts generous gifts with the gift she really wanted 29:15   Follow up “What would you like?” with “You know I'm bringing something.” 30:25   Illustrates differences between sick men and sick women 30:50   25% of men interviewed hadn't disclosed their illness 31:15   Tells a heartbreaking story of Orthodox Jewish man hiding his cancer diagnosis 33:45   Cultural and gender barriers prevent many men from sharing the truth 34:10   Women tend to feel comfortable confiding in close friends 35:30   The book includes many lists for how to be helpful & honest 36:00   First step: learn what to say to a friend who's sick (“Do no harm.”) 36:20   Also, learn appropriate things to say to the bereaved 37:10   Recommendation – Ryan Hamilton: Happy Face (on Netflix) BUY How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who's Sick Watch the trailer for Ryan Hamilton: Happy Face. Connect with Nonfiction4Life on social media: Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube Special thanks… Music Credit Sound Editing Credit

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy
Integrative Health 101 with Dr. Swathi

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 45:36


On this episode, we are joined by Dr. Swathi Varanasi to review adaptogens, nutraceuticals, Ayurveda, and other elements of Integrative Health. We also discuss the upcoming webinar series called Integrative Health 101 that she developed along side Integrative Health expert, Dr. Pam Tarlow. More information about the upcoming webinar is below:  https://www.doctorswathi.com/integrative-health-101/ And remember, Dr. Swathi is offering a student discount for 50% off the webinar series. E-mail her or send her a direct message on Instagram @doctorswathi The resources/apps that Dr. Swathi mentioned in this episode are listed below: - Natural Medicines Database  - Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center's About Herbs App - The Top 100 Drug Interactions by Philip D. Hansten & John R. Horn - Oregon State University Linus Pauling Institute - NIH Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) - NIH National Center of Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) I also attached the Integrative Health Resources pdf to this email.   Thanks for listening! If you want to support the podcast, check out our Patreon account. Subscribers will have access to all previous and new pharmacotherapy lectures as well as downloadable Power Point slides for each lecture. You can find our account at the website below:  www.patreon.com/corconsultrx If you have any questions for Cole or me, reach out to us on any of the following: Text - 415-943-6116 Mike - mcorvino@corconsultrx.com Cole - cswanson@corconsultrx.com Instagram and other social media platforms - @corconsultrx This podcast reviews current evidence-based medicine and pharmacy treatment options. This podcast is intended to be used for educational purposes only and is intended for healthcare professionals and students. This podcast is not for patients and not intended as advice or treatment.