Podcasts about Obstetrics

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  • 751PODCASTS
  • 1,547EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST
Obstetrics

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Best podcasts about Obstetrics

Show all podcasts related to obstetrics

Latest podcast episodes about Obstetrics

The Quicky
Why Can't I Buy The Pill Over The Counter?

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 14:16


If you've ever taken the contraceptive pill, you might have had one of those 'oh no' moments when you realise that your prescription has run out, you're down to your last pill, and have to make a mad dash to the doctor to get a new script.  But why is that the case? Why can't we just go to a pharmacy and buy the pill over the counter without having to go to see a doctor first? It can be especially annoying if you've been taking the same pill for many years. The Quicky speaks to an expert in women's reproductive health to find out why this is such a controversial topic, even though a number of other countries already offer women this service. If you love The Quicky and want to share your enthusiasm, there is still time to vote for us in the category of Listeners' Choice at the Australian Podcast Awards. You can cast your vote here. Voting closes on Sunday 28th November 2021 at 23.59 (AEDT). CREDITS  Host: Claire Murphy With thanks to:  Dr Deborah Bateson - Medical Director at Family Planning NSW, and Clinical Associate Professor in the Discipline of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Neonatology at the University of Sydney Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri Subscribe to The Quicky at... https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au GET IN TOUCH: Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading or listening to our content, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au  Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast
Cardiac Disease or Preeclampsia? An Unusual Case Study

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 41:48


Suzanne and Stephanie discuss an unusual case demonstrating  the multi system effects of preeclampsia. Listen and learn as they walk through the issues this patient encountered.The experts at Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics pool their decades of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women to discuss the challenges encountered in caring for these vulnerable women.Dr Stephanie Martin is the Medical Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist with expertise in critical care obstetrics.Suzanne McMurtry Baird, DNP, RN is the Nursing Director for  Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics with many years of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women.Julie Arafeh, RN, MS is the Simulation Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a leading expert in simulation.

Health: It's Personal
Sexual Health Series: Reproductive Health and Family Planning with Reproductive Endocrinologist Dr. Leondires

Health: It's Personal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 53:43


Dr. Mark Leondires, Founder, Medical Director and Partner in reproductive endocrinology at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) and Gay Parents To Be (GPTB) shared with us his insights into not just reproductive health and infertility but what it looks like to family plan. He is board-certified in both Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology. (What he calls a "nerd" of the medical field.) ⁠ ⁠His daily experience with patients from all walks of life, with unique hurdles and dreams, and his own experience with family planning, we knew he would be the perfect person to dive into this aspect of the Sexual Health Series with sensitivity, insight, and optimism. ⁠ HEALTH: IT'S PERSONAL INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/thehippodcast/ HEALTH: IT'S PERSONAL FACEBOOK COMMUNITY: https://www.facebook.com/groups/healthitspersonal LOVE the work we are doing? Join our Patreon family, for additional content, recipes, and connection: https://www.patreon.com/thehippodcast OR Buy us a cup of tea. https://ko-fi.com/healthitspersonal --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Sevan Podcast
The Sevan Podcast 212 - Courtney Hunt MD, FACOG

The Sevan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 78:01


Courtney A. Hunt, MD, FACOG attended University of California at Berkeley for her undergraduate studies and continued her education at Loyola School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. She completed her Obstetrics and Gynecology residency at UCLA. Dr. Hunt practiced obstetrics and gynecology for 15 years before stopping obstetrics to pursue her interest in quantum biology and nutrigenetics or the interaction between our environment and our DNA.Dr. Hunt began investigating the intersection between the physics of light, mitochondria, and DNA to determine the best practices and methods to keep us healthy.Looking for Job?Have a job to post?https://www.barbelljobs.comSevan's Stuff:https://www.instagram.com/sevanmatossian/?hl=enhttps://app.sugarwod.com/marketplace/3-playing-brothers

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
FINALLY JUSTICE: Arrest Made for the Murder of 19-year-old UNC Student

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 39:06


19-year-old Faith Hedgepeth is found by her roomate, covered in blood, inside her North Carolina apartment. Autopsy reports show the college student was beaten to death, sustaining severe head injuries. Investigators said an empty liquor bottle found near the body is used in the crime. For nine years, the investigation yields no suspects, but now an arrest has been made.Joining Nancy Grace today:Connie Hedgepeth - Victim's Mother Wendy Patrick - California prosecutor, author “Red Flags” www.wendypatrickphd.com 'Today with Dr. Wendy' on KCBQ in San Diego Dr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial Hospital Dr. Todd M. Barr, M.D. - Deputy Medical Examiner/Forensic Pathologist at Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner's Office (Cleveland OH) Sheryl McCollum - Forensic Expert & Cold Case Investigative Research Institute Founder, ColdCaseCrimes.org Sarina Fazan - Four-time Emmy Award-Winning TV Anchor & Reporter, Sarina Fazan Media, sarinafazan.media, Podcast: "On The Record with Sarina Fazan" @sarinafazannews, YouTube: Sarina Fazan TV See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.18.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:15


Videos for Today: 1. DR Peter C. Gøtzsche Comments – 3 mins   2. PARENTS IN NY TAKE TO THE STREETS TO WARN IGNORANT PARENTS INJECTING THEIR CHILDREN WITH PFIZER SHOT   3, DANIEL NAGASE – EFFECTS OF CV VX ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN   4.The Great Narrative: A call to action speaker Freeke Heijman (start 3 min mark)    5. COMMERCIAL PILOT CODY FLINT: “I DON'T KNOW IF I WILL EVER BE ABLE TO FLY A PLANE AGAIN.”   6. Study, Experts: Vaccinated Are Spreading COVID-19 start 23 seconds in    7. RFK CLIP Start 50 seconds in    Everyone missed this one… vaccinated people are up to 9X more likely to be hospitalized than unvaccinated people Australian War Propaganda Keeps Getting Crazier Are we seeing some new form of Covid-19 Vaccine induced Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome? – Official Government data suggests the Fully Vaccinated are on the precipice of disaster as their Immune Systems are being decimated $285 Billion Tax Cut for the Rich Is Now 2nd Most Expensive Piece of Build Back Better Wall Street's Takeover of Nature Advances with Launch of New Asset Class  Court Deals New Blow to ‘Fatally Flawed' Biden Vaccine Mandates, But What Does That Mean?     Study: Sustainable eating is cheaper and healthier Oxford University, November 11, 2021 Oxford University research has today revealed that, in countries such as the US, the UK, Australia and across Western Europe, adopting a vegan, vegetarian, or flexitarian diet could slash your food bill by up to one-third. The study, which compared the cost of seven sustainable diets to the current typical diet in 150 countries, using food prices from the World Bank's International Comparison Program, was published in The Lancet Planetary Health. It found that in high-income countries: Vegan diets were the most affordable and reduced food costs by up to one third. Vegetarian diets were a close second. Flexitarian diets with low amounts of meat and dairy reduced costs by 14%. By contrast, pescatarian diets increased costs by up to 2%. “We think the fact that vegan, vegetarian and flexitarian diets can save you a lot of money is going to surprise people,” says Dr. Marco Springmann, researcher on the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food. “When scientists like me advocate for healthy and environmentally-friendly eating, it's often said we're sitting in our ivory towers promoting something financially out of reach for most people. This study shows it's quite the opposite. These diets could be better for your bank balance as well as for your health and…the planet.” Miguel Barclay, author of the bestselling “One Pound Meals” series of cookbooks, says, “I definitely agree that cutting down your meat, or cutting it out completely, will save you money. I've written seven budget cookbooks and have costed up hundreds of recipes, and without doubt vegan and vegetarian meals consistently come in at a much lower price than recipes with meat.” The study focused on whole foods and did not include highly-processed meat replacements or eating at restaurants or takeaways. The study also found that in lower income countries, such as on the Indian subcontinent and in sub-Saharan Africa, eating a healthy and sustainable diet would be up to a quarter cheaper than a typical Western diet, but at least a third more expensive than current diets. To analyze what options could improve affordability and reduce diet costs, the study looked at several policy options. It found that making healthy and sustainable diets affordable everywhere is possible within the next 10 years when economic development, especially in lower income countries, is paired with reductions in food waste and a climate and health-friendly pricing of foods. “Affording to eat a healthy and sustainable diet is possible everywhere, but requires political will,” according to Dr. Springmann. “Current low-income diets tend to contain large amounts of starchy foods and not enough of the foods we know are healthy. And the western-style diets, often seen as aspirational, are not only unhealthy, but also vastly unsustainable and unaffordable in low-income countries. Any of the healthy and sustainable dietary patterns we looked at are a better option for health, the environment, and financially, but development support and progressive food policies are needed to make them both affordable and desirable everywhere.” The study, “The global and regional costs of healthy and sustainable dietary patterns: a modeling study,” is published in The Lancet Planetary Health on 10 November 2021. Country-level results are available here. Green One Pound Meals by Miguel Barclay is published on 30 December. It features planet-friendly recipes and includes tips and ideas for shopping smart and avoiding food waste. Meta-analysis concludes resveratrol beneficially modulates glycemic control in diabetics Zagazig University and Suez Canal University (Egypt), October 29 2021.  Findings from a meta-analysis of clinical trials published on October 16, 2021 in Medicina Clinica (Barcelona) revealed an association between supplementing with resveratrol and improvements in glycemic control. “Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive meta-inflammatory disorder, which induces micro and macrovascular complications,” Ibrahim A. Abdelhaleem and colleagues wrote. “Resveratrol is a nutraceutical known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.” “This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to consider resveratrol's efficacy on glycemic and cardiometabolic parameters in patients with T2DM.” Sixteen randomized trials that included a total of 871 diabetic men and women were selected for the meta-analysis. The trials compared resveratrol to a placebo with or without concurrent antidiabetic medications or other drug treatment. Resveratrol doses of 500 milligrams or more were associated with lower fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure in comparison with a placebo. Resveratrol was associated with a greater reduction in hemoglobin A1c (a marker of long-term glucose control) compared to a placebo in trials of three months duration. When HDL cholesterol levels were analyzed, resveratrol was superior to a placebo in trials of less than two months duration. Resveratrol was also associated with a reduction in systolic blood pressure compared to measurements obtained in the placebo group. Furthermore, triglycerides were lower in association with resveratrol in trials that lasted six to twelve months. “We concluded that resveratrol appropriately improved insulin sensitivity by decreasing insulin resistance, fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, and hemoglobin A1c,” the authors concluded. “In addition, it improved other cardiometabolic parameters, including triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The most appropriate glycemic control effect was fulfilled when consumed for at least one month with doses of 500 mg or more.” Exercise linked to better mental health Kaiser Permanente Research, November 11, 2021 Kaiser Permanente research published on November 11 in Preventive Medicine showed people who exercised more during the initial lockdown period of the COVID-19 pandemic experienced less anxiety and depression than those who didn't exercise. It also showed that people who spent more time outdoors typically experienced lower levels of anxiety and depression than those who stayed inside. More than 20,000 people participated in the survey-based study from 6 regions served by Kaiser Permanente across the United States, which included Hawaii, Colorado, Georgia, and the mid-Atlantic states, as well as Southern and Northern California. “What these study findings tell us is that even during an active pandemic or other public health crisis, people should be encouraged to be physically active to help maintain their physical and mental health,” said the study's lead author Deborah Rohm Young, PhD, the director of the Division of Behavioral Research for the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research & Evaluation. “Parks and other nature areas should remain open during public health emergencies to encourage outdoor physical activity.” In March 2020, COVID-19 developed into a worldwide pandemic. With no known treatment, public health officials attempted to reduce its spread by limiting human interactions through stay-at-home policies. Businesses temporarily closed or changed their practices to prevent the spread of the virus, affecting the economy and many people's jobs. These stressful factors, along with fewer opportunities to socialize with friends and family, increased symptoms of depression and anxiety for many people. Since it is known that physical activity and time spent in nature are associated with improved mental health, researchers at Kaiser Permanente in Southern California sought to determine how exercise and time outdoors was associated with people's mental health during the height of the pandemic. In April 2020, researchers sent a series of COVID-19 surveys to more than 250,000 participants in the Kaiser Permanente Research Bank — a collection of lifestyle surveys, electronic health record data, and biospecimens, which Kaiser Permanente members volunteered. People who reported COVID-19 symptoms were not included in this analysis, resulting in 20,012 respondents. They each completed at least 4 surveys between April and July 2020. White women older than 50 accounted for a high proportion of the respondents. Most respondents said they were retired and generally adhered to the “safer-at-home” orders during the period of the survey. The study found that: Reports of anxiety and depression decreased over time Anxiety and depression scores were higher for females and younger people, and lower for Asian and Black people compared with white respondents Participants who reported no physical activity reported the highest depression and anxiety compared to people who had exercised Spending less time outdoors was associated with higher depression and anxiety scores People who had increased their time outdoors the most reported the highest anxiety scores, but the research could not explain the finding “What we learned from these findings is that during future emergencies it will be important to carefully weigh the decisions to close parks and outdoor areas against the negative impact those closures may have on people's mental health,” said Dr. Young. Bedtime linked with heart health University of Exeter (UK), November 9, 2021 Going to sleep between 10:00 and 11:00 pm is associated with a lower risk of developing heart disease compared to earlier or later bedtimes, according to a study published today in European Heart Journal—Digital Health, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). “The body has a 24-hour internal clock, called circadian rhythm, that helps regulate physical and mental functioning,” said study author Dr. David Plans of the University of Exeter, UK. “While we cannot conclude causation from our study, the results suggest that early or late bedtimes may be more likely to disrupt the body clock, with adverse consequences for cardiovascular health.” While numerous analyses have investigated the link between sleep duration and cardiovascular disease, the relationship between sleep timing and heart disease is underexplored. This study examined the association between objectively measured, rather than self-reported, sleep onset in a large sample of adults. The study included 88,026 individuals in the UK Biobank recruited between 2006 and 2010. The average age was 61 years (range 43 to 79 years) and 58% were women. Data on sleep onset and waking up time were collected over seven days using a wrist-worn accelerometer. Participants completed demographic, lifestyle, health and physical assessments and questionnaires. They were then followed up for a new diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, which was defined as a heart attack, heart failure, chronic ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and transient ischaemic attack. During an average follow-up of 5.7 years, 3,172 participants (3.6%) developed cardiovascular disease. Incidence was highest in those with sleep times at midnight or later and lowest in those with sleep onset from 10:00 to 10:59 pm. The researchers analyzed the association between sleep onset and cardiovascular events after adjusting for age, sex, sleep duration, sleep irregularity (defined as varied times of going to sleep and waking up), self-reported chronotype (early bird or night owl), smoking status, body mass index, diabetes, blood pressure, blood cholesterol and socioeconomic status. Compared to sleep onset from 10:00 to 10:59 pm, there was a 25% higher risk of cardiovascular disease with a sleep onset at midnight or later, a 12% greater risk for 11:00 to 11:59 pm, and a 24% raised risk for falling asleep before 10:00 pm. In a further analysis by sex, the association with increased cardiovascular risk was stronger in women, with only sleep onset before 10:00 pm remaining significant for men. Dr. Plans said: “Our study indicates that the optimum time to go to sleep is at a specific point in the body's 24-hour cycle and deviations may be detrimental to health. The riskiest time was after midnight, potentially because it may reduce the likelihood of seeing morning light, which resets the body clock.” Dr. Plans noted that the reasons for the observed stronger association between sleep onset and cardiovascular disease in women is unclear. He said: “It may be that there is a sex difference in how the endocrine system responds to a disruption in circadian rhythm. Alternatively, the older age of study participants could be a confounding factor since women's cardiovascular risk increases post-menopause—meaning there may be no difference in the strength of the association between women and men.” He concluded: “While the findings do not show causality, sleep timing has emerged as a potential cardiac risk factor—independent of other risk factors and sleep characteristics. If our findings are confirmed in other studies, sleep timing and basic sleep hygiene could be a low-cost public health target for lowering risk of heart disease.” Garlic compounds may boost cardio health indirectly via gut microbiota National Taiwan University, November 6 2021 Allicin from garlic may prevent the metabolism of unabsorbed L-carnitine or choline into TMAO, a compound linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, says a new study from the National Taiwan University. TMAO – or trimethylamine N-oxide – has been known to be generated from dietary carnitine through metabolism of gut microbiota, and was recently reported to be an “important gut microbiota-dependent metabolite to cause cardiovascular diseases,” explained Taiwanese researchers in the Journal of Functional Foods . While antibiotics have been found to inhibit TMAO production, concerns over side effects and resistance have limited their use. This has led researchers to examine the potential of natural alternatives. New data indicated that carnitine-fed lab mice showed a “remarkable increase in plasma TMAO levels”, compared with lab mice fed a control (no carnitine). However, when allicin supplements were provided with the carnitine diet, TMAO levels were significantly reduced. “Surprisingly, the plasma TMAO levels in the mice of ‘carnitine diet + allicin' treatment group were as low as that of chow diet [control] group,” wrote the researchers. “This result indicated that the metabolic capacity of mice gut microbiota to produce TMAO was completely inhibited by allicin supplement even though provided with carnitine-rich environment in the gut. “It means the functional alteration of gut microbiota induced by carnitine diet can be prevented by addition of another substance with antimicrobial potential derived from food, such as allicin.” Garlic and heart health The study adds to the body of scientific literature supporting the potential heart health benefits of garlic and the compounds it contains. Consumer awareness of the health benefits of garlic, mostly in terms of cardiovascular and immune system health, has benefited the supplements industry, particularly since consumers seek the benefits of garlic without the odors that accompany the fresh bulb. The benefits have been linked to the compound allicin, which is not found in fresh garlic: It is only formed when garlic is crushed, which breaks down a compound called diallyl sulphide. Study details “This may offer an opportunity to take advantage of plants' delicately designed defense system against microorganisms, to protect ourselves by modulating gut microbiota to a healthier status,” wrote the researchers The Taiwanese researchers divided male C57BL/6(B6) mice into four groups: One group received only the control chow diet; the second group received the carnitine diet (carnitine added to drinking water at a level of 0.02%); the third group received the carnitine diet with supplemental allicin; and the final group received the control diet plus the allicin supplement for six weeks. Results showed that the second group (carnitine diet) had TMAO levels 4–22 times greater than those observed in the control group. However, these increases were attenuated in the carnitine + allicin group, said the researchers. “Our study suggests that antimicrobial phytochemicals such as allicin effectively neutralize the metabolic ability of TMAO production of gut microbiota induced by daily intake of L-carnitine,” wrote the researchers. “It may offer an opportunity for us to take advantage of plants' delicately designed defense system against microorganisms, to protect ourselves by modulating gut microbiota to a healthier status. “Our research also suggested that allicin and dietary fresh garlic containing allicin might be used as functional foods for the prevention of atherosclerosis,” they concluded. Drug used to prevent miscarriage increases risk of cancer in offspring University of Texas Health Science Center, November 9, 2021 Exposure in utero to a drug used to prevent miscarriage can lead to an increased risk of developing cancer, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston). The study was published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The drug, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is a synthetic progestogen that was frequently used by women in the 1950s and 1960s, and is still prescribed to women today to help prevent preterm birth. Progesterone helps the womb grow during pregnancy and prevents a woman from having early contractions that may lead to miscarriage. “Children who were born to women who received the drug during pregnancy have double the rate of cancer across their lifetime compared to children born to women who did not take this drug,” said Caitlin C. Murphy, PhD, MPH, lead author on the study and associate professor in the Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences at UTHealth School of Public Health in Houston. “We have seen cancers like colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, thyroid cancer, and many others increasing in people born in and after the 1960s, and no one really knows why.” Researchers reviewed data from the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan on women who received prenatal care between June 1959 and June 1967, and the California Cancer Registry, which traced cancer in offspring through 2019. Out of more than 18,751 live births, researchers discovered 1,008 cancer diagnoses were made in offspring ages 0 to 58 years. Additionally, a total of 234 offspring were exposed to 17-OHPC during pregnancy. Offspring exposed in the womb had cancer detected in adulthood more than twice as often as offspring not exposed to the drug – 65% of cancers occurred in adults younger than 50. “Our findings suggest taking this drug during pregnancy can disrupt early development, which may increase risk of cancer decades later,” Murphy said “With this drug, we are seeing the effects of a synthetic hormone. Things that happened to us in the womb, or exposures in utero, are important risk factors for developing cancer many decades after we're born.” A new randomized trial shows there is no benefit of taking 17-OHPC, and that it does not reduce the risk of preterm birth, according to Murphy. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed in October 2020 that this particular drug be withdrawn from the market.

HER | Mind Body Life
The Menopause Myth: What Your Mother, Doctor, And Friends Haven't Shared About Life After 35

HER | Mind Body Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


Raise your hand if you're confused about menopause. Well, we're not surprised if your hand is flailing in the air right now.Raise your hand if you're confused about menopause. Well, we're not surprised if your hand is flailing in the air right now. Today we're talking all about menopause myths, tricks, and life after 35.It's all too common for women to go into perimenopause and menopause unprepared, and the whirlwind of fluctuations could make anyone feel confused and a little crazy. In her new book, The Menopause Myth: What Your Mother, Doctor, and Friends Haven't Told You about Life after 35, Dr. Arianna aims to demystify these stages of life for readers, giving them valuable information and tools to navigate changes with more ease and confidence. This comprehensive guide to menopause looks into how many different aspects of your life have a cumulative effect on your overall wellness.We chat with Arianna Sholes-Douglas, MD, FACOG in this episode, who has dedicated much of her career to helping women through the stages of life that are largely neglected by most of the medical community: menopause and perimenopause. She is board certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and Maternal-Fetal Medicine and has been practicing medicine for three decades.

Dr. Chapa’s Clinical Pearls.
Vaginitis: Wet Prep vs DNA Based Tests.

Dr. Chapa’s Clinical Pearls.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 15:09


How do you diagnose vaginitis? Do you treat BV/yeast/trichomoniasis found on Pap smear? Do you use the Wet Prep, or molecular/DNA test? An ePub recently released in Obstetrics and Gynecology (the Green Journal), revealed some disappointing results for the Wet Prep. In the session, we will summarize key points from this article, as well as remind all of us of some key information released by the ACOG in January 2020 regarding vaginitis in the non-pregnant patient.

IJGC Podcast
Prophylactic Negative Pressure Wound Therapy RCT with Mario Leitao

IJGC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 30:05


In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Mario Leitao to discuss prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy RCT. Dr. Leitao is currently an Attending Surgeon in the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medical College. He currently serves as Program Director for the Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship. Dr. Leitao is also the Director for the Minimal Access and Robotic Surgery Program in the Department of Surgery for MSKCC. Dr. Mario Leitao is currently an Attending Surgeon in the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medical College. He currently serves as Program Director for the Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship. Dr. Leitao is also the Director for the Minimal Access and Robotic Surgery Program in the Department of Surgery for MSKCC. Highlights 1. SSI is a common postoperative complication that leads to significant healthcare costs in the near- and far-term 2. In our RCT, the use of a negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) system did not improve wound complications (Superficial SSI) in a cohort of patients undergoing mostly laparotomy for gynecologic malignancies with closed laparotomy incisions. 3. There was also no signal of benefit in the small subgroup of morbidly obese patients. 4. Increasing BMI was the only independently associated risk for the development of a wound complication @leitaomd @sloan_kettering

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 74 - Breast Cancer Screening

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:51


Episode 74: Breast Cancer Screening. Salwa and Veronic discuss who, how, and when to screen for breast cancer. The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine was authorized for use in children 5-11 years of age.Introduction: Pediatric COVID-19 VaccinesBy Lam Chau, MS3, Ross University School of MedicineOn November 2nd, 2021, the CDC endorsed a unanimous recommendation to allow the use of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5-11 years of age. The White House has secured 28 million pediatric doses of the Pfizer vaccine, enough to cover every child ages 5-11 within the United States without cost. The official CDC recommendation is that all children aged 5 and older get vaccinated, regardless of past infection history. The Pfizer vaccine for children is given in two doses, 3 weeks apart.Individuals older than 12 are given a 30-microgram dose, while pediatric individuals are given a 10-microgram dose. For extra precaution, the pediatric vaccine vials are being shipped with a unique orange cap to clearly distinguish itself from higher dose vaccines. Clinical trials with the lower dose vaccine demonstrated a strong antibody response and a prevention rate of symptomatic COVID-19 of 90%. The reported side effects were minimal, and no serious adverse events or myocarditis were reported during the trials. The vaccination of children cannot be understated. The benefits go well beyond just the physiological processes of vaccination. It will foster a safer environment for our children and help improve their emotional and social development. While there is still a lot to be done to end the pandemic, this recent announcement is an enormous step in the right direction in returning to normalcy. This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. ___________________________Breast Cancer.   By Salwa Sadiqali, MS3, Ross University Medical School; Veronica Phung, MS3, Ross University School of Medicine; and Hector Arreaza, MD.   Salwa: Welcome back from Spooky season! Did you see all the flyers and advertisements about Breast cancer awareness last month? Veronica: I did! It's because October was breast cancer awareness month.Salwa: And spooky season, and of course pumpkin spice season! I got my dose of pumpkin spice this morning. Well, every morning to be exact, Starbucks is my second home. What do you know about breast cancer? Veronica: Well...breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. And, fun fact, I know that Angelina Jolie had an increased risk of breast cancer, so she had surgery to remove them.Arreaza: I remember it being all over the news back in 2013. It caused “The Angelina Effect.” There was an increase in people searching about breast cancer on the internet. Let's dive into this topic a bit more. What exactly is breast cancer?Salwa: It's a process in which normal cells of the breast start growing too quickly, out of control. It can happen in males too, but it's much rarer.Veronica: And there are different types of breast cancers that originate from the different types of tissue in the breast. There's ductal carcinoma, lobular, inflammatory, Paget's, and phyllodes to name a few. Salwa: Not only are there different types of breast cancers, but some can also be hereditary meaning mutated genetic information is passed on from generation to generation.Arreaza: That's what happened with Angelina Jolie. She had a BRCA1 gene mutation. Veronica: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are the most common causes of hereditary breast cancer. Normally, the BRCA gene helps make proteins that repair damaged DNA. When this gene is mutated, it can't make those proteins, so damaged DNA stays damaged. But this only makes up 5-10% of all breast cancers.Salwa: Exactly! Here's an interesting fact, women of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage are at a much higher risk of developing a BRCA mutation. There are several other genes that are also linked to hereditary breast cancer. But those genes aren't that common. Non-hereditary breast cancers are much more common - they make up about 85% of breast cancers. Arreaza: Ok so you two gave us a lot of good information, but do you know how to screen for breast cancer?Salwa: When and how often you screen depends on which guidelines your physician is following. Generally, you'll get a mammogram, basically an X Ray of the breast. Veronica: The US Preventative Screening Task Force or USPSTF is a panel of experts that uses medicine-based evidence to make screening and vaccination guidelines. These guidelines are reviewed and updated yearly. For breast cancer, the USPSTF recommends women ages 50-74 have a mammogram every other year. Salwa: The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists recommends mammograms starting at the age of 40 and repeating the test every year or every other year. While the American Cancer Society recommends annual mammograms from 40 to 54 years of age and then every other year for women 55 years or older. Veronica: Dr. Arreaza, you see a lot of patients and I'm sure you've referred plenty of them for breast cancer screening. How do you decide which guidelines to follow? Arreaza: When you have a patient between 40-50 years old, you have an opportunity to talk about screening, and make a shared decision. The USPSTF recommends that women with a personal or family history of breast, ovarian, tubal, or peritoneal cancer or an ancestry associated with BRCA1/2 gene mutation be screened with an appropriate brief familial risk assessment tool. Women with a positive result on the risk assessment tool should receive genetic counseling and, if indicated after counseling, genetic testing.Some instruments use to assess the need for BRCA mutation screening include Ontario Family History Assessment Tool, Manchester Scoring System, Referral Screening Tool, Pedigree Assessment Tool, 7-Question Family History Screening Tool, International Breast Cancer Intervention Study instrument (Tyrer-Cuzick).Salwa: What about the self-breast exams? I remember those were recommended all the time.Veronica: That's a great question! Current research suggests that doing a self-breast exam doesn't necessarily help detect tumors early – whether cancerous or not. And, sometimes, while doing self-breast exams you may feel a lump that's actually normal breast tissue and it may cause unnecessary anxiety. That being said, you should always know how your breasts normally look - as in are they symmetrical, how the nipples look, how the skin normally looks. And of course, if you notice any changes or have any concerns, please visit your primary care provider. Arreaza: Breast awareness. The USPSTF recommends that clinicians offer to prescribe risk-reducing medications, such as tamoxifen, raloxifene, or aromatase inhibitors, to women who are at increased risk for breast cancer and at low risk for adverse medication effects.Salwa: As medical students, we have the opportunity to work with different departments in the hospital. I'm currently doing my surgery rotation and Veronica completed hers in September. As part of the rotation, we had the opportunity to work at the Breast Clinic with Dr. Snyder. We saw a lot of patients from CSV because their PCPs were screening them for breast cancer and all those women were able to get the higher level of care they needed. Find available resources in your community for free screening mammograms. For example, Cancer Detection Program/Every Woman Counts by Clinica Sierra Vista.____________________________Now we conclude our episode number 74 “Breast Cancer Screening.” October was breast cancer awareness month, but it is not too late to remind everyone of the need to screen for breast cancer. Whether you follow the American Cancer Society, the USPSTF or the ACOG guidelines, just do not forget to screen. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Lam Chau, Salwa Sadiqali, and Veronica Phung. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week! _____________________References:AAFP Signs Off on Pediatric COVID-19 Vaccine Recommendations, American Academy of Family Physicians, November 3, 2021. https://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20211103covidvaccchildren.html?%20cid=DM63464&bid=188450701 ACS Breast Cancer Early Detection Recommendations. American Cancer Society. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2021, from https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/screening-tests-and-early-detection/american-cancer-society-recommendations-for-the-early-detection-of-breast-cancer.html. Basu, N.N., Hodson, J., Chatterjee, S. et al. The Angelina Jolie effect: Contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy trends in patients at increased risk of breast cancer. Sci Rep 11, 2847 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82654-x Breast cancer information and support. Breastcancer.org. (n.d.). Retrieved October 10, 2021, from https://www.breastcancer.org/. Breast cancer: Screening. Recommendation: Breast Cancer: Screening | United States Preventive Services Taskforce. (2016, January 11). Retrieved October 10, 2021, from https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/breast-cancer-screening.  Practice Bulletin Number 179: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Screening in Average-Risk Women. (2017). Obstetrics and gynecology, 130(1), e1–e16. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000002158 

Doulas of the Roundtable
Episode 70: Supporting Adoption: Birth Parent(s)

Doulas of the Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 67:32


Like most topics we discuss, there is a lot of nuance surrounding how to support adoption. There are many choices that are available to the birthing parent. Will the adoptive parents be present for the birth?  During the immediate postpartum period will they want to hold and/or feed the baby? Do they desire no contact with the baby? Come join us as we take a deep dive into the ins and outs of supporting birth parents through pregnancy, labor and birth."

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast
A Peripartum Sepsis Case Study

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 37:45


Suzanne and Stephanie discuss a case of peripartum sepsis. Listen and learn how to recognize the pathophysiologic changes that happen in a septic patient.The experts at Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics pool their decades of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women to discuss the challenges encountered in caring for these vulnerable women.Dr Stephanie Martin is the Medical Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist with expertise in critical care obstetrics.Suzanne McMurtry Baird, DNP, RN is the Nursing Director for  Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics with many years of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women.Julie Arafeh, RN, MS is the Simulation Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a leading expert in simulation.

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
Key Decisions in HIV Care: ART in Pregnancy

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 42:39


In this episode from the series “Key Decisions in HIV Care,” Milena Murray, PharmD, MSc, BCIDP, AAHIVP, and Jonah Musa, MBBS, MSCI, PhD, discuss important considerations for ART use in pregnancy, including DHHS and WHO guideline recommendations and data supporting recommended ART regimen options in pregnancy from IMPAACT 2010, Tsepamo, and DoLPHIN-2. They also discuss pharmacokinetic considerations and drug–drug interactions. Following their dialogue, the faculty field questions from healthcare professionals.Presenters:Milena Murray, PharmD, MSc, BCIDP, AAHIVPAssociate Professor  Pharmacy PracticeMidwestern University College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove CampusDowners Grove, IllinoisHIV/ID Clinical PharmacistNorthwestern Memorial HospitalChicago, IllinoisJonah Musa, MBBS, MSCI, PhDProfessor, Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of JosHonorary Consultant Obstetrician and GynecologistJos University Teaching HospitalJos, NigeriaContent based on an online CME program supported by educational grants from Gilead Sciences, Inc.; Janssen Therapeutics, Division of Janssen Products, LP; and ViiV Healthcare.Follow along with the slides at:https://bit.ly/3GRxpGQLink to full program:https://bit.ly/2TXTYWx

IJGC Podcast
GROINSS-V-II/GOG 270 Trial with Ate van der Zee and Brian Slomovitz

IJGC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 46:03


In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Ate van der Zee and Brian Slomovitz to discuss the GROINSS-V-II/GOG 270 Trial. Dr. Brian Slomovitz is a Gynecologic Oncologist at Broward Health and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University. He is an internationally recognized leader in gynecologic oncology clinical trials, specifically in immunotherapy and novel biomarker therapeutics. He also is a leader in sentinel lymph node detection for gynecologic malignancies. Dr. Ate Van der Zee is Chairman of the Board of Directors at the University Medical Center Groningen and professor of Gynaecological Oncology. His current research focuses on translational and clinical research in vulvar cancer. Together with Dr. Oonk he leads a world-wide consortium (GROINSS-V), which performs landmark clinical studies in vulvar cancer. Dr. van der Zee combines his current position chairman position with clinical work and academic research. Highlights •Radiotherapy instead of inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy is a safe treatment option for vulvar cancer patients with a metastasis < 2 mm in the sentinel node •Radiotherapy instead of inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy is associated with less treatment-related morbidity in vulvar cancer patients with a metastasis < 2 mm in the sentinel node •Prospective phase II treatment trials with stopping rules are excellent tools to explore new diagnostic and therapeutic options and to provide evidence-based medicine in rare tumors such as vulvar cancer. •Leading a world-wide consortium (GROINSS-V) is very rewarding and great fun! Ate van der Zee and Brian Slomovitz (@AteZee / @gyncancermd / @umcg / @browardhealth, @FIU)

Cardionerds
158. Cardio-Obstetrics: Pregnancy and Valvular Heart Disease with Dr. Uri Elkayam

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 66:57


CardioNerds (Amit Goyal and Daniel Ambinder), Cardio-OB series co-chair and University of Texas Southwestern Cardiology Fellow, Dr. Sonia Shah, and episode FIT lead and UT Southwestern Cardiology Fellow Dr. Laurie Femnou discuss valvular heart disease in pregnancy with cardio-obstetrics expert Dr. Uri Elkayam, Professor of Medicine and OB Gyn at the University of Southern California. In this pearl-packed episode, we discuss the diagnosis, acute management, and long-term considerations of valvular heart disease in pregnancy. Through a series of cases, we review the physiologic changes in pregnancy that make certain valvular lesions well-tolerated, while others are associated with a much higher risk of peripartum complications. We also discuss which patients to consider referring for valvular intervention, the ideal timing, and which valvular interventions are safest in the peripartum period. We promise, you won't want to miss this clinically high-yield episode with Dr. Elkayam, the father of cardio-obstetrics and an absolute legend in the field! Audio editing by CardioNerds Academy Intern, Adriana Mares. Pearls • Notes • References • Guest Profiles • Production Team CardioNerds Cardio-Obstetrics Series PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Pearls Most women with severe valvular heart disease can be managed medically throughout pregnancy.Right sided valvular lesions are generally better tolerated than left-sides lesions, and regurgitant lesions are generally better tolerated than stenotic lesions. However, the context and etiology of the valve dysfunction must be taken into consideration. Severe tricuspid valve regurgitation, for example, can be associated with a failing right ventricle and undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension. Changes in BNP, severity of symptoms, and right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) assessed by echocardiography can be helpful in differentiating normal pregnancy-related symptoms from symptoms due to hemodynamically significant valvular lesions.Valvular interventions during pregnancy are safe when well-planned and performed by experienced operators, and they can significantly improve morbidity and mortality in women who remain symptomatic despite medical management.A multidisciplinary team-based approach is important when managing patients with valvular heart disease during pregnancy. Quatables “We do not need to perform prophylactic valvular intervention in women prior to pregnancy if they do not meet criteria for intervention otherwise. A patient with regurgitant lesion will tolerate pregnancy well, provided that they are not                candidates for surgery already.” “Valvuloplasty during pregnancy is a great and effective procedure, but restenosis occurs. For women who desire future pregnancies, preconception evaluation is important to determine if valve intervention is indicated prior to conceiving.” Show notes What is the epidemiology of valvular heart disease in pregnancy?Cardiovascular conditions affect up to 4% of pregnancies, with valvular heart disease being the most common cardiac pathology encountered during pregnancy worldwide.In the developing world, rheumatic valve disease is still the most common etiology, with mitral valve most commonly affected, followed by the aortic valve.In the developed world, congenital aortic valve pathology is most common. What are the hemodynamic effects of stenotic vs. regurgitant lesions during pregnancy?In normal pregnancy, there is a significant drop in systemic vascular resistance as early as 5 weeks gestational age. This drop leads to a transient decrease in perfusion to the kidneys, causing an increase in fluid retention and expansion of plasma volume. At the same time, there is an increase in heart rate which becomes more pronounced la...

The Covexit.com Podcast
Vaccines Injuries & Mandates - Expert Testimonies & Remarks by US Senator Johnson

The Covexit.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 114:16


This is the second podcast episode devoted to the November 2nd Round Table convened by US Senator Ron Johnson about vaccines injuries and mandates. This episode presents the testimonies of prominent experts as well as of advocates for vaccines safety and truly informed consent.You will hear in this episode remarks by:- US Senator Ron Johnson (introductory remarks)- Brianne Dressen, Astra Zeneca clinical trial participant from Utah, co-founded react19.org, a patient advocacy organization dedicated to increasing awareness of adverse events- Dr. Linda Wastila, Professor and Parke-davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy- Dr. Theresa Long, MD, MD, MPH, FS, Army Flight Surgeon & Army Aerospace Medicine Specialist- Dr. Robert Kaplan, faculty member at the Stanford School of Medicine Clinical Excellence Research Center- Dr. Peter Doshi, Associate Professor of pharmaceutical health services research at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy- Dr. David Healy, Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Ontario- Dr. Linda Wastila, Professor and Parke-davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (2nd set of remarks)- Dr. John Patrick Whelan, Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Rheumatology at University of California, Los Angeles- Dr. Aditi Bhargava, Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Center for Reproductive Sciences at University of California, San Francisco- Dr. Retsef Levi, J. Spencer Standish (1945) Professor of Operations Management at MIT- Dr. David Healy, Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Ontario (2nd set of remarks)- Dr. Peter Doshi, Associate Professor of pharmaceutical health services research at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (2nd set of remarks)- Aaron Siri, Attorney, is the Managing Partner of Siri & Glimstad LLP- Kim Witczak, international drug safety advocate and speaker, serves as Consumer Representative on the FDA Psychopharmacologic Drug Advisory Committee, &- Dr. Iona Heath, retired general practitioner from Kentish Town in London and Past President, Royal College of general Practitioners

Creating a Family: Talk about Infertility, Adoption & Foster Care

We talk with Corey Burke, an embryologist and Tissue Bank Director at Cryos International-USA and Dr. Mark Trolice, Reproductive Endocrinologist and Director of The IVF Center in Orlando and Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine, and author of The Fertility Doctor's Guide to Overcoming Infertility about decisions doctors and patient have to make concerning eggs or embryos after retrieval.In this episode, we cover:Overview of the IVF Process.What determines how many eggs will be produced?What number of eggs is ideal for an egg retrieval as part of IVF? Are more eggs always better?Once eggs are retrieved, one of the choices a patient and doctor have to make is whether to freeze eggs vs. embryos.Compare the challenges between freezing eggs vs freezing embryos.How does vitrification differ from other methods of freezing?What is the thaw rate success for frozen eggs compared to frozen embryos?Why are eggs more difficult to vitrify than embryos?Does the quality of the eggs retrieved factor into the decision?What are the advantages to the patient of freezing eggs rather than embryos? What are the advantages to the patient of freezing embryos rather than eggs?How many eggs is usually recommended for a woman to freeze to have a good chance of being able to create a viable embryo?Can genetic testing be done on eggs?How long can human eggs remain viable if frozen vs. the viability of frozen embryos?If embryos are created, one of the choices a patient and doctor have to make is whether to transfer fresh or frozen embryos. How does genetic testing impact fresh vs frozen?What are the advantages to the patient of transferring fresh embryos?What are the advantages to the patient of transferring frozen embryos?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire infertility patients and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

The Quicky
The Mental Load Of IVF

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 18:51


Anyone who's been through In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) will tell you about the huge costs, extensive medical intervention, and if they are lucky enough to be successful, how happy they are, but what if you go through all that and still come out the other side without a baby? Talking about the toll on your mental health as a result of IVF is much more difficult for many people than discussing the physical or financial impacts, so what do those women who have tried desperately to conceive wish they'd known beforehand? The Quicky speaks to a woman who went through years of IVF and a medical specialist to find out what prospective parents should know before they embark on this journey, and how to care for their mental wellbeing before, during and after, no matter what the outcome. CREDITS  Host/Producer: Gemma Bath Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri Guests: Alice Almeida - Founder and Managing Director The Amber Network who spent three years trying to conceive her first child through IVF which took a huge toll on her mental health, marriage and self-esteem, and then suffered from secondary infertility as well. You can read more about Alice's story here Dr Karin Hammarberg - Senior Research Fellow in Global and Women's Health at Monash University, and a Registered Nurse with 20 years experience as clinical co-ordinator of IVF programs Subscribe to The Quicky at... https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Portable Practical Pediatrics
Dr. M's Women and Children First Podcast #8 – Dr. Kjersti Aagaard, A Womb With a View

Portable Practical Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 59:44


Dr. Kjersti Aaagard, is an expert in maternal-fetal medicine holding the distinction as the Henry and Emma Meyer Professor and Chair in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital. She serves as vice chair of research for obstetrics and gynecology and is a professor in the Departments of Molecular and Human Genetics, Molecular and Cellular Biology, and Molecular Physiology and Biophysics. She is an expert in the study of the maternal microbiome and metagenomics Research. She is a tour de force of knowledge in the evolutionary understanding of the maternal-fetal communications throughout pregnancy and post delivery. We share a fascinating hour discussing the maternal microbiome, breastmilk, diet and much more as they relate to mom and her babe. I hope that you enjoy this stimulating conversation with Dr. Aagaard, Dr. M

IJGC Podcast
Racial Inequities in Immunotherapy Trials with Katherine Grette and Nathaniel Jones

IJGC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 30:22


In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Katherina Grette and Nathaniel Jones to discuss racial inequities in immunotherapy trials and their article, “Not immune to inequity: minority under-representation in immunotherapy trials for breast and gynecologic cancers,” which is the Lead Article in IJGC's November 2021 issue. (https://ijgc.bmj.com/content/early/2021/09/21/ijgc-2021-002557) Dr. Katherine Grette attended medical school at the University of Washington, then completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of South Alabama prior to joining faculty. She currently practices as a generalist and serves as the Assistant Director of Resident Research for the department. Dr. Nate Jones completed residency at Mountain Area Health Education Center in Asheville, NC followed by fellowship in Gynecologic Oncology at New York Presbyterian Hospitals: Columbia and Cornell. He currently serves as Assistant Professor in Gynecologic Oncology at the University of South Alabama Mitchell Cancer Institute. His research interests center on targeted cancer therapies, molecular and genomic characteristics of gynecologic malignancies, and addressing racial disparities in gynecologic cancer care. Highlights •Minority women are poorly represented in immunotherapy clinical trials for breast and gynecologic cancers •Enrollment of black women is especially low, accounting for only 5% of participants •Minority participation in clinical trials must increase to improve equity in health outcomes @natejones333 / @katgrette / @usamci

Advances in Women's Health
Osteoporosis: The Pivotal Role That Orthopedic Surgeons Can Play in Optimizing the Bone Health of Their Postmenopausal Post-Fracture Patients

Advances in Women's Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


Host: Andrea Singer, MD, FACP, CCD Guest: Paul A. Anderson, MD Guest: Susan V. Bukata, MD, FAOA, FAAOS While there's growing awareness among orthopedic surgeons that osteoporosis is the underlying cause of fractures, there is often a disconnect between this recognition and action in the form of treatment to prevent subsequent fractures. In this discussion, Drs. Andrea Singer, Paul Anderson, and Susan Bukata address the pathophysiology of osteoporosis and the need to identify patients at risk for additional fractures. Osteoporosis treatment (including pharmacotherapy) can play a critical role in preventing future fractures, but physicians must first recognize that fracture is a sentinel event and treat it as a call to action.

ReachMD CME
Osteoporosis: The Pivotal Role That Orthopedic Surgeons Can Play in Optimizing the Bone Health of Their Postmenopausal Post-Fracture Patients

ReachMD CME

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


CME credits: 0.25 Valid until: 29-10-2022 Claim your CME credit at https://reachmd.com/programs/cme/osteoporosis-pivotal-role-orthopedic-surgeons-can-play-optimizing-bone-health-their-postmenopausal-post-fracture-patients/12949/ While there's growing awareness among orthopedic surgeons that osteoporosis is the underlying cause of fractures, there is often a disconnect between this recognition and action in the form of treatment to prevent subsequent fractures. In this discussion, Drs. Andrea Singer, Paul Anderson, and Susan Bukata address the pathophysiology of osteoporosis and the need to identify patients at risk for additional fractures. Osteoporosis treatment (including pharmacotherapy) can play a critical role in preventing future fractures, but physicians must first recognize that fracture is a sentinel event and treat it as a call to action.

Doulas of the Roundtable
Episode 69: Sliding Scales

Doulas of the Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 52:31


A question we see often in doula forums is about sliding scales. How do you determine the low & high end of the scale? How do you make sure that those who can afford to pay, are honest about their ability to pay? Many doulas underestimate the amount of time involved in setting up a sliding scale. Then there is the maintenance & moving prospective clients through the application & verification process. There is much more than this to consider. Come join us as we discuss the ins & outs of sliding scales.

The Skinny Confidential Him & Her Podcast
Dr. Shahin Ghadir Pt. 2 On How To Increase Fertility, When To Freeze Eggs & Sperm, & How To Explore Options For Family Planning

The Skinny Confidential Him & Her Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 56:02


#404: On today's episode we are joined by Dr. Shanin Ghadir of Southern California Reproductive Center, Dr. Ghadir is board-certified in both Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. He is currently an assistant clinical professor in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and at the Keck School of Medicine at USC. Today Dr. Ghadir joins the show to discuss how and when to freeze your eggs or sperm, how to increase fertility, and how to seek out the proper advice for family planning.  To connect with Lauryn Evarts click HERE To connect with Michael Bosstick click HERE Read More on The Skinny Confidential HERE For Detailed Show Notes visit TSCPODCAST.COM To Call the Him & Her Hotline call: 1-833-SKINNYS (754-6697) This episode is brought to you by The Skinny Confidential  The Hot Mess Ice Roller is here to help you contour, tighten, and de-puff your facial skin and It's paired alongside the Ice Queen Facial Oil which is packed with anti-oxidants that penetrates quickly to help hydrate, firm, and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, leaving skin soft and supple. To check them out visit www.shopskinnyconfidential.com now.  This episode is brought to you by Nutrafol Nutrafol's goal is to empower women to embrace the beauty of their hair growth recovery with Nutrafol Postpartum by targeting the root causes of postpartum thinning hair-like the physical stress of childbirth and emotional stress of parenting, as well nutrient depletion. Visit www.nutrafol.com and use promo code SKINNY to save $15 off your first month's subscription and free shipping.  This episode is brought to you by Bliss Bliss is a clean, cruelty-free, planet-friendly skincare brand on a mission to empower everyone to achieve a higher state of happy, one self-care moment at a time. They started in a spa, and now use that skincare expertise to make transformative–and affordable–products so everyone can experience the confidence that comes from healthy, glowing skin. Shop Bliss Youth Got This Retinol Serum & Moisturizer at Amazon This episode is brought to you by Reliefband  Reliefband is the #1 FDA-Cleared anti-nausea wristband that has been CLINICALLY PROVEN to quickly relieve and effectively prevent nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, anxiety, migraines, hangovers, morning sickness, chemotherapy and so much more. Visit www.reliefband.com and use promo code SKINNY for 20% off plush free shipping and a no questions asked 30-day money back guarantee.  This episode is brought to you by Manscaped This holiday season I'm giving thanks to my friends at MANSCAPED™. Do I tell my extended family that I bought my man the Performance Package 4.0. from the global leaders in below-the-waist grooming? I am in love with their products and his confidence has shot up since he started using them for all of his grooming needs. Gift your man MANSCAPED™ this holiday season so his tree stands taller if you know what I mean. Help him join the 2 million men worldwide who trust MANSCAPED™ with 20% off + free shipping with the code SKINNY by going to www.manscaped.com Produced by Dear Media 

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast
COVID in Pregnancy Talking Points

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 18:31


In this episode Dr Stephanie Martin highlights Talking Points about COVID in Pregnancy. By the end of the podcast, we hope each of you listening will have some take away information that you can share with patients, colleagues, family members, really anyone who asks you - what does it mean to be pregnant and have COVID19?The experts at Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics pool their decades of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women to discuss the challenges encountered in caring for these vulnerable women.Dr Stephanie Martin is the Medical Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist with expertise in critical care obstetrics.Suzanne McMurtry Baird, DNP, RN is the Nursing Director for  Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics with many years of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women.Julie Arafeh, RN, MS is the Simulation Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a leading expert in simulation.

Dear NICU Mama
Say Hello to Dr. Michelle Wyatt with Essentia Health!

Dear NICU Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 17:41


On this week's episode, join Martha and Ashley in welcoming Dr. Michelle Wyatt for a special mini-interview! Dr. Wyatt is a Maternal Fetal Medicine physician at Essentia Health, our presenting sponsor for the Dear NICU Mama Event: Be Proud of Who You've Become. In anticipation of this incredible event, we chat about Maternal Fetal Medicine practice, what Essentia Health is doing to support NICU families, and words of wisdom for Dr. Wyatt herself!Registration is still available for Be Proud of Who You've Become Presented by Essentia Health, hosted virtually on November 13th, 2021. For more information visit, www.dearnicumama.com/events !To get connected with Essentia Health: https://www.essentiahealth.orgMichelle Wyatt is a Maternal Fetal Medicine Specialist at Essentia Health in Fargo, ND. She is a Minnesota native growing up in a suburb of Minneapolis and completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities. She graduated Sum Cum laude and Phi beta Kappa with a B.S in biochemistry and B.A. in Physiology. She attended Medical School at Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine where she met her husband. She completed her residency in Obstetrics & Gynecology and fellowship in Maternal Fetal Medicine also at Mayo Clinic. She is the mother to two handsome boys. Their family enjoys being out on the water in the summer and watching football in the fall. During her free time, she enjoys baking and crafting. She has a passion for working with families experiencing high risk pregnancies and an interest in researching and improving the quality of care in obstetrics.To get connected with DNM: Website | Private Facebook Group | InstagramThis podcast episode is not an attempt to practice medicine or provide medical advice. All information, content, and material on this website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical or mental health advice, diagnosis or treatment.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/dearnicumama)

The Thyroid Fix
Estrogen: The Good, the Bad and How It Relates to the Thyroid with Dr. Felice Gersh

The Thyroid Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:30


My guest in this special episode is Dr. Felice Gersh. She  received her medical degree from the USC School of Medicine, and studied Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Kaiser Hospital in Los Angeles. Dr. Gersh is a globally-recognized expert on women's hormones, gut microbiome, and circadian rhythm. She frequently collaborates with numerous research organizations and lectures internationally on women's health topics.As Medical Director of the Integrative Medical Group of Irvine, she focuses on understanding women's innate physical and emotional make-up. Through her research and practical experience, she has come to understand that women have internal, natural rhythms that are absolutely essential to female health. These rhythms are controlled by hormones, particularly estrogen, and may be kept in balance through both conventional and holistic treatments.We deep dive into ESTROGEN: the good, the bad and the ugly side!Practice Webpage:https://integrativemgi.com/Social Media:Instagram @dr.felicegersh https://www.instagram.com/dr.felicegersh/Twitter @DrFeliceGersh https://twitter.com/DrFeliceGershFacebook @felicegershmd https://www.facebook.com/felicegershmd/Youtube Channel:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrbn9RUdGuc6Wq-FT7V4u3gBooks:PCOS SOS https://integrativemgi.com/about-dr-felice-gersh/pcos-sos/PCOS SOS Fertility Fast Track https://integrativemgi.com/about-dr-felice-gersh/pcos-sos-fertility-fast-track/Dr. Gersh's latest book release: Menopause: 50 Things You Need to Knowhttps://amzn.to/3tH2A1dLET'S GET YOUR LIFE BACK...Connect with Dr. Amie HornamanBook a free discovery call: https://dramiehornaman.com/book-a-callYour are worth the effort it will take and I will get your there. Trust the process!CONNECT WITH ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA:Like me on Facebook: Amie Hornaman Nutrition and Functional MedicineSubscribe on Youtube: Dr. Amie HornamanFollow me on Instagram: @dramiehornaman

TopMedTalk
Perioperative obstetric care | EBPOM 2021

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 48:28


With a global focus this piece moves into obstetric anesthesia, perioperative medicine and anemia management. Covering iron deficiency, hemoglobin, post-partum management and how to improve outcomes for all. For more on this go now to www.ebpom.org where you will find the pre-recorded video contributions made by our speakers in anticipation of this discussion. Presented by Sam Bampoe, Tripom Co-Founder, Consultant in Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine at University College London NHS Foundation Trust and Denny Levett, Professor in Perioperative Medicine and Critical Care at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation trust and Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Southampton with their guests; Anita Sugavaganam, Consultant Anaesthetist and Lead for adult general anaesthesia and patient blood management at University Hospitals Sussex, Honorary Senior Clinical lecturer at the University of Sussex, Pervez Sultan, Associate Professor of Obstetric Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, Honorary Faculty position as Associate Professor at University College London and Charlotte Holm, Obstetrics and Gynecology, resident at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark.

Think Tank with Steve Adubato: The Podcast
Jim Carey; Dr. Leon Smith; Shabnam Salih

Think Tank with Steve Adubato: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 30:00


Steve Adubato speaks with James A. Carey, Jr., Executive Director, New Jersey Lottery, about New Jersey Lottery's record sales during the COVID-19 pandemic, the issues with problem gambling throughout the state and the annual Festival of Ballooning. Leon Smith, Jr., MD, Director of Maternal/Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Saint Barnabas Medical Center, joins […]

ABG - AsianBossGirl
Episode 138: When is the Right Time to Freeze My Eggs and IVF Questions with Dr. Huang

ABG - AsianBossGirl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 87:25


According to UCLA Health, 15% of couples have trouble conceiving. It's really unfortunate and an emotional journey for many. However, thanks to modern assisted reproductive technology, there are different options available to a couple. Today, we will be mainly focusing on in-vitro fertilization (IVF) and egg-freezing. We brought on a special guest & infertility doctor, Dr. Huang. He is Board Certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. He's also a clinical instructor at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine.  Today, he will be walking through the IVF & Egg Freezing process and answering our listener-submitted questions. From how much it cost, the age at which your eggs decrease, to other methods to check your fertility. This was such an informative podcast session for us and we hope you gained more knowledge as well on this one! This episode was edited by Michelle Hsieh. ___ P A R T N E R S mentioned in this episode: - Modern Fertility: Get 30% off your Modern Fertility Prenatal Multivitamin starter kit at modernfertility.com/ABG30  - ISSUU: Get a free account or 50% off your premium account at ISSUU.com/podcast with code ABG - Honey: Get Honey for FREE at JoinHoney.com/ABG - JustWorks: Find out how JustWorks can help your business at justworks.com  - Fast Growing Trees: Get 15% off your order at fastgrowingtrees.com/abg  (valid through 11/30)  - Jinjer Oil: Get 20% off your first order at jinjer.us/abg  - Uncommon Goods: Get 15% at uncommongoods.com/abg   S H O U T O U T ! - Give a shoutout on the podcast here. S U B S C R I B E T O U S ! - @asianbossgirl on Apple Podcasts / Spotify / YouTube / Instagram / Twitter / Facebook - More about us at asianbossgirl.com E – M A I L U S ! - hello@asianbossgirl.com S U P P O R T U S ! - merch: asianbossgirl.myshopify.com - donation: anchor.fm/asianbossgirl/support Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Brian Laundrie Found Dead: Is this REAL???

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 37:38


Human remains have been found in Florida's Carlton Reserve and the Laundrie family attorney says it is likely Brian Laundrie. Steve Bertolino say the area where the remains where found is the same location that Laundrie's parents indicated to police he was headed on the last day they saw him. The FBI confirmed that articles belonging to Brian Laundrie were also found. So far, official identification of the remains has not been made. joining Nancy Grace Today:Dale Carson - Criminal Defense Attorney (Jacksonville), Former FBI Agent, Former Police Officer, Author: "Arrest-Proof Yourself, DaleCarsonLaw.com Dr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Expert in the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial HospitalSheryl McCollum - Forensic Expert & Cold Case Investigative Research Institute Founder, ColdCaseCrimes.org, Twitter: @ColdCaseTips Joe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics: Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Host: "Body Bags with Joseph Scott Morgan"Mike Hadsell - President and Founder, Peace River K9 Search and Rescue, Twitter: @K9River, PRSAR.org Mahsa Saeidi - Investigative Reporter, WFLA-TV (Tampa), Twitter/Instagram: @MahsaWho, Facebook: "WFLAMahsa"See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

IJGC Podcast
Pembrolizumab for Persistent, Recurrent, Metastatic Cervical Cancer:KEYNOTE 826 w/ Nicoletta Colombo

IJGC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 36:16


In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Professor Nicoletta Colombo to discuss pembrolizumab for persistent, recurrent, metastatic cervical cancer: KEYNOTE 826. Professor Nicoletta Colombo graduated in medicine in 1980, completing specialty training in obstetrics and gynaecology in 1984 at the University of Milan, Italy. After a training period at Charing Cross Hospital and Royal Marsden Hospital in London, she became a Clinical Research Associate at the Kaplan Cancer Center, New York University, where she worked from 1984 until 1986. Professor Colombo then worked as a member of the Junior and later the Senior Faculty at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Milan. In 1994 she became Deputy Director and in 2001 Director of the Medical Gynaecologic Oncology Division, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy. Since 2002 she has held the position of Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Milan-Bicocca. In 2008, she became Director of the Ovarian Cancer Centre at IEO and in 2014 Chair of the Program of Gynaecology. Principal investigators of several international clinical trials, Professor Colombo is also author of several publications in the field of gynaecologic oncology, and a member of various professional societies such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the Society of Gynaecologic Oncologists (SGO) and the International Gynaecological Cancer Society (IGCS). She is also Past President of the European Society of Gynaecologic Oncology (ESGO) and was Chair of the first ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference in endometrial cancer ( 2015) and the first ESMO-ESGO Consensus Conference in ovarian Cancer ( 2018). From 2016-2020 she was Subject Editor of ESMO Clinical Guidelines for Gynecological Malignancies and she is currently member of the steering committee of ESMO Clinical guidelines. Highlights 1)adding pembrolizumab to chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab provides statistically significant, clinically meaningful improvements in progression-free and overall survival in patients with persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer 2)The addition of pembrolizumab was also associated with a higher response rate and a longer response duration 3)The safety profile for pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab was manageable 4)data from KEYNOTE-826 suggest that pembrolizumab plus platinum-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab may be a new first-line standard of care for the treatment of persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Manhunt For Brian Laundrie: Take Down on the Appalachian Trail

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 43:45


As the search for Brian Laundrie goes on, sightings continue to be reported. Surveillance footage has surfaced of a man resembling the Florida fugitive, riding a bicycle, about three hours north of North Port where Laundrie's parents live. And on the Appalachian Trail, a Laundrie look-alike, got quite the surprise, when agents stormed into his hotel room. The man provided an ID and showed he didn't have Brian's tattoos. He was soon cut loose.Joining Nancy Grace Today:Michael Griffith - International Criminal Defense Attorney, michaelgriffithlawyer.com Dr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Expert in the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial HospitalSheryl McCollum - Forensic Expert & Cold Case Investigative Research Institute Founder, ColdCaseCrimes.org, Twitter: @ColdCaseTipsJoe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics: Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Host: "Body Bags with Joseph Scott Morgan"Lee Reiber - Mobile Device Forensic Expert, COO: Oxygen Forensics, Inc., Author: "Mobile Forensic Investigations: A Guide to Evidence Collection, Analysis, and Presentation", oxygen-forensic.com, Twitter: @Celldet and @oxygenforensic Mahsa Saeidi - Investigative Reporter, WFLA-TV (Tampa), Twitter/Instagram: @MahsaWho, Facebook: "WFLAMahsa"See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tate Talks
Tate Talks, Season 2 - Episode 4, Guest: Dr. Aimee Chin, Topic: Obstetrics & Gynecology

Tate Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 41:44


The COVID pandemic has brought many health challenges, including those at the beginning of life. Join Jason Tate as he speaks with Dr. Aimee Chin about her fellowship in Obstetrics and Gynecology in Memphis, TN where she shares the current trends and challenges of COVID during and after pregnancy and childbirth. Also in this hour, Jason shares some valuable tips to getting back into life after quarantine as well as how to accept others and their levels of fear and understanding while standing your ground on your beliefs. As always, Jason closes his show with a beautiful meditation; this one focused on kindness and compassion.

Doulas of the Roundtable
Episode 68: Understanding SIDS

Doulas of the Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:47


As birth workers, one of the most common concerns families face is the health and well-being of their babies. Understanding SIDS is a topic of great importance to doulas & parents alike. SIDS is the sudden death of an infant under one year of age. The death is unexpected and has no known cause. Come join us as we discuss the difference between SIDS and SUIDS and learn how to discuss how to reduce risk with families via the Safe to Sleep practices.

CCO Oncology Podcast
PARP Inhibitors in Ovarian Cancer: Experts Discuss Patient Cases and the Current Paradigm

CCO Oncology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:53


In this episode, Nicoletta Colombo, MD; Philipp Harter, MD, PhD; and  Alexandra Leary, MD, PhD, discuss patient cases from a live webinar on the current paradigm and long-term benefits of PARPi therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Topics include:Maintenance therapy in ovarian cancerSOLO1, PRIMA, PAOLO-1 clinical dataRole of bevacizumab in treatment of ovarian cancerPresenters:Nicoletta Colombo, MDProfessor of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Milan-BicoccaEuropean Institute of OncologyMilan, ItalyPhilipp Harter, MD, PhDDeputy DirectorDepartment of Gynecology and Gynecologic OncologyEvang. Kliniken Essen-MitteEssen, GermanyAlexandra Leary, MD, PhDMedical Oncologist and Team LeaderGynecology Translational Research LabDepartment of MedicineGustave Roussy Cancer CenterParis, FranceContent based on an online CME program supported by an educational grant from AstraZeneca.New Perspectives in Ovarian Cancer: Current Paradigm and Long-term Benefits of PARPi Therapyhttps://bit.ly/3aF8Lui 

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast
Using Deliberate Practice to Improve Performance During Maternal Cardiac Arrest

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:22


This podcast reviews the technique of deliberate practice that can be used during simulation based training for complex events like maternal cardiac arrest.The experts at Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics pool their decades of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women to discuss the challenges encountered in caring for these vulnerable women.Dr Stephanie Martin is the Medical Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist with expertise in critical care obstetrics.Suzanne McMurtry Baird, DNP, RN is the Nursing Director for  Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics with many years of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women.Julie Arafeh, RN, MS is the Simulation Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a leading expert in simulation.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
BOMBSHELL: GABBY PETITO STRANGLED DEAD!

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:47


After weeks of speculation, we now know how Gabby Petito died. The Teton County, Wyoming, coroner, Dr. Brent Blue, says Petito's death is strangulation. Petito's boyfriend Brian Laundrie is a person of interest in her disappearance but has not yet been named a suspect in her death investigation. Although Blue made reference to domestic violence in his press conference. Brian Laundrie has been missing since September 13, two days after Petito was reported missing. He returned to his Florida home on September 1 without Petito, but with the converted camper van the couple had been traveling in on their cross-country road trip. Laundrie is currently the subject of a federal warrant alleging he accessed funds from another person's bank account, which he was not authorized to use, in late August and early September.Joining Nancy Grace Today:Wendy Patrick - California prosecutor, author “Red Flags” www.wendypatrickphd.com 'Today with Dr. Wendy' on KCBQ in San Diego, Twitter: @WendyPatrickPHDDr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Expert in the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial HospitaSheryl McCollum - Forensic Expert & Cold Case Investigative Research Institute Founder, ColdCaseCrimes.org, Twitter: @ColdCaseTips Joe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics: Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Host: "Body Bags with Joseph Scott Morgan" Mahsa Saeidi - Investigative Reporter, WFLA-TV (Tampa), Twitter/Instagram: @MahsaWho, Facebook: "WFLAMahsa"See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
School Teacher, 11-Year-Old Daughter Found Strangled and Drowned in Their Home

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:58


Allison Abitz, 43, was found strangled to death in her home. Her 11 year old daughter, Jozee, was also found, drowned in the bathtub. A short time later, two other relatives are also found murdered and the hunt is one for a killer. A motorcycle is found behind the home of victims Daniel Stephan, and his wife Pamela. The bike belongs to JT McLean, Abitz's long-time boyfriend. The long haul trucker was found dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound in South Dakota, hundreds of miles from the scene of the crimes.Joining Nancy Grace Today:Wendy Patrick - California prosecutor, author “Red Flags” www.wendypatrickphd.com 'Today with Dr. Wendy' on KCBQ in San Diego, Twitter: @WendyPatrickPHD Dr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Expert in the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial HospitalJoe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics: Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Featured on "The Piketon Massacre: Return to Pike County" on iHeartRadio Angenette Levy - Emmy-nominated Reporter & Anchor, Twitter: @Angenette5See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.11.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 58:37


Can low temperature-aged garlic enhance exercise performance? Korea Univesity & National Institute of Agricultural Sciences (South Korea), October 8, 2021 Scientists from South Korea's National Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Korea University looked at aged garlic to see whether it could help reduce fatigue. To do this, they conducted a study on mice fed with a special low-temperature-aged garlic (LTAG). Their findings were published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. Testing the fatigue-fighting effects of low temperature-aged garlic The researchers chose to use LTAG because it lacked the pungent odor and spicy flavor of regular garlic, making it easier to use for animal testing. To create the LTAG, the researchers stored garlic in a sealed container, aging at 60 C for 60 days. The resulting LTAG was then peeled and pulverized, before being added to 200 milliliters of 70 percent ethanol (EtOH), which was then subjected to ultrasonic extraction three times. This 70 percent EtOH and LTAG extract was then concentrated under a vacuum at 45 C and then lyophilized to create a dry LTAG residue. After the creation of the LTAG, the researchers then separated mice into six groups. The first group was given a low dose of LTAG extract; the second was fed a high dose of LTAG extract; the third was given a low dose of garlic extract; and the fourth was given a high dose of garlic extract. The fifth and sixth groups consisted of normal mice that were given phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) instead of garlic. One of these control groups was made to exercise while the other group was not. The mice in the five groups were forced to run on a treadmill for four weeks. With each passing week, the amount of exercise the mice would have to do on the treadmills would increase. This was done by increasing both the speed that the mice had to run, and the amount of time they had to spend running. (Related: How to alleviate fatigue with herbal medicine.) After 28 days of treatment, five mice from each group were subjected to a final, exhaustive treadmill test. This test increased the treadmill speed from 15 meters per minute (m/min) to 40 m/min every 3 minutes. During this test, the running time was monitored until each mouse failed to follow the increase in speed on three consecutive occasions and lag occurred. At this point, the mouse's total running time was recorded. The effect of the LTAG on the levels of glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), free fatty acid (FFA) and lactate in the mice's blood. Following the final exercise, the mice were killed and blood samples were collected from them. In addition, the mice's gastrocnemius muscles were also isolated and frozen in liquid nitrogen for testing. LTAG treated mice demonstrated less fatigue Following the exhaustive running tests, the researchers found that the mice treated with LTAG extract were able to run for much longer than the control mice. Meanwhile, looking at the blood tests, they noted that the mice treated with LTAG extract exhibited lower levels of glucose, LDH, FFA and lactate. More importantly, the LTAG treated mice had increased amounts of glycogen and creatine kinase (CK) in their muscles. Glycogen storage is an important source of energy during exercise. It serves a central role in maintaining the body's glucose homeostasis by supplementing blood glucose. Because of this, glycogen is seen as an accurate marker for fatigue, with increased glycogel levels closely associated with improved endurance and anti-fatigue effects. CK, on the other hand, is known to be an accurate indicator of muscle damage. During muscle degeneration, muscle cells are dissolved and their contents enter the bloodstream. As a result, when muscle damage occurs, muscle CK comes out into the blood. As such, fatigue tends to lead to lower muscle CK levels and higher blood CK levels. Higher levels of glycogen and muscle CK in the LTAG treated mice indicated that they experienced less fatigue than the other groups. Based on these findings, the researchers believe that LTAG has potential for use as an anti-fatigue agent.       Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents University of Geneva (Switzerland), October 7, 2021 Adolescents born prematurely present a high risk of developing executive, behavioral and socio-emotional difficulties. Now, researchers from Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have revealed that practicing mindfulness may help improve these various skills. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests using mindfulness as a means of clinical intervention with adolescents, whether prematurely born or not. Several studies have already shown that very preterm (VPT) children and adolescents are at higher risk of exhibiting cognitive and socio-emotional problems that may persist into adulthood. To help them overcome the difficulties they face, researchers from the HUG and UNIGE have set up an intervention based on mindfulness, a technique known to have beneficial effects in these areas. Mindfulness consists in training the mind to focus on the present moment, concentrating on physical sensations, on breathing, on the weight of one's body, and even on one's feelings and thoughts, completely judgment-free. The mindfulness-based interventions generally take place in a group with an instructor along with invitations to practice individually at home. To accurately assess the effects of mindfulness, a randomized controlled trial was performed with young adolescents aged 10 to 14, born before 32 weeks gestational weeks. Scientists quickly found that mindfulness improves the regulation of cognitive, social and emotional functions, in other worlds, our brain's ability to interact with our environment. Indeed, it increases the ability to focus on the present—on thoughts, emotions and physical sensations, with curiosity and non-judgment. Thanks to this practice, adolescents improve their executive functions, i.e. the mental processes that enable us to control our behavior to successfully achieve a goal. As a result, young people find it easier to focus, manage and regulate their behavior and emotions in everyday life. For eight weeks, the young teens spent an hour and a half each week with two mindfulness instructors. They were further encouraged to practice mindfulness daily at home. Parents were also involved in this study. They were asked to observe their child's executive functions, for example the ability to regulate their emotions and attentional control, their relationships with others and their behavior. The adolescents also underwent a series of computerized tasks to assess their reactions to events. A comparison of their test results with a control group that did not practice mindfulness shows a positive impact of the intervention on the adolescents' everyday life and on their ability to react to new events. "Each teenager is unique, with their own strenghts and difficulties. Through their involvement in this study, our volunteers have contributed to show that mindfulness can help many young people to feel better, to refocus and to face the world, whether they were born preterm born or not," agree Dr. Russia Hà-Vinh Leuchter, a consultant in the Division of Development and Growth, Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at Geneva University Hospitals, and Dr. Vanessa Siffredi, a researcher at the Child Development Laboratory at the Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at the UNIGE Faculty of Medicine, two of the authors of this work. "However, while the practice of meditation can be a useful resource, it is important to be accompanied by well-trained instructors", they specify. The adolescents who took part in the program are now between 14 and 18 years. Scientists are currently evaluating the long-term effects of mindfulness-based intervention on their daily attention and stress. Furthermore, to validate their clinical data with neurobiological measurements, researchers are currently studying the effects of mindfulness on the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).   Iron deficiency in middle age is linked with higher risk of developing heart disease University Heart and Vasculature Centre Hamburg (Germany) 6 October 2021 Approximately 10% of new coronary heart disease cases occurring within a decade of middle age could be avoided by preventing iron deficiency, suggests a study published today in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 “This was an observational study and we cannot conclude that iron deficiency causes heart disease,” said study author Dr. Benedikt Schrage of the University Heart and Vasculature Centre Hamburg, Germany. “However, evidence is growing that there is a link and these findings provide the basis for further research to confirm the results.” Previous studies have shown that in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, iron deficiency was linked to worse outcomes including hospitalisations and death. Treatment with intravenous iron improved symptoms, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with heart failure and iron deficiency enrolled in the FAIR-HF trial.2 Based on these results, the FAIR-HF 2 trial is investigating the impact of intravenous iron supplementation on the risk of death in patients with heart failure. The current study aimed to examine whether the association between iron deficiency and outcomes was also observed in the general population. The study included 12,164 individuals from three European population-based cohorts. The median age was 59 years and 55% were women. During the baseline study visit, cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities such as smoking, obesity, diabetes and cholesterol were assessed via a thorough clinical assessment including blood samples. Participants were classified as iron deficient or not according to two definitions: 1) absolute iron deficiency, which only includes stored iron (ferritin); and 2) functional iron deficiency, which includes iron in storage (ferritin) and iron in circulation for use by the body (transferrin). Dr. Schrage explained: “Absolute iron deficiency is the traditional way of assessing iron status but it misses circulating iron. The functional definition is more accurate as it includes both measures and picks up those with sufficient stores but not enough in circulation for the body to work properly.” Participants were followed up for incident coronary heart disease and stroke, death due to cardiovascular disease, and all-cause death. The researchers analysed the association between iron deficiency and incident coronary heart disease, stroke, cardiovascular mortality, and all-cause mortality after adjustments for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, and inflammation. Participants with a history of coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline were excluded from the incident disease analyses. At baseline, 60% of participants had absolute iron deficiency and 64% had functional iron deficiency. During a median follow-up of 13.3 years there were 2,212 (18.2%) deaths. Of these, a total of 573 individuals (4.7%) died from a cardiovascular cause. Incidence coronary heart disease and stroke were diagnosed in 1,033 (8.5%) and 766 (6.3%) participants, respectively. Functional iron deficiency was associated with a 24% higher risk of coronary heart disease, 26% raised risk of cardiovascular mortality, and 12% increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with no functional iron deficiency. Absolute iron deficiency was associated with a 20% raised risk of coronary heart disease compared with no absolute iron deficiency, but was not linked with mortality. There were no associations between iron status and incident stroke. The researchers calculated the population attributable fraction, which estimates the proportion of events in 10 years that would have been avoided if all individuals had the risk of those without iron deficiency at baseline. The models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, and inflammation. Within a 10-year period, 5.4% of all deaths, 11.7% of cardiovascular deaths, and 10.7% of new coronary heart disease diagnoses were attributable to functional iron deficiency. “This analysis suggests that if iron deficiency had been absent at baseline, about 5% of deaths, 12% of cardiovascular deaths, and 11% of new coronary heart disease diagnoses would not have occurred in the following decade,” said Dr. Schrage. “The study showed that iron deficiency was highly prevalent in this middle-aged population, with nearly two-thirds having functional iron deficiency,” said Dr. Schrage. “These individuals were more likely to develop heart disease and were also more likely to die during the next 13 years.” Dr. Schrage noted that future studies should examine these associations in younger and non-European cohorts. He said: “If the relationships are confirmed, the next step would be a randomised trial investigating the effect of treating iron deficiency in the general population.”     Consumption of a bioactive compound from Neem plant could significantly suppress development of prostate cancer National University of Singapore, September 29, 2021   Oral administration of nimbolide, over 12 weeks shows reduction of prostate tumor size by up to 70 per cent and decrease in tumor metastasis by up to 50 per cent   A team of international researchers led by Associate Professor Gautam Sethi from the Department of Pharmacology at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that nimbolide, a bioactive terpenoid compound derived from Azadirachta indica or more commonly known as the neem plant, could reduce the size of prostate tumor by up to 70 per cent and suppress its spread or metastasis by half.   Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. However, currently available therapies for metastatic prostate cancer are only marginally effective. Hence, there is a need for more novel treatment alternatives and options.   "Although the diverse anti-cancer effects of nimbolide have been reported in different cancer types, its potential effects on prostate cancer initiation and progression have not been demonstrated in scientific studies. In this research, we have demonstrated that nimbolide can inhibit tumor cell viability -- a cellular process that directly affects the ability of a cell to proliferate, grow, divide, or repair damaged cell components -- and induce programmed cell death in prostate cancer cells," said Assoc Prof Sethi.   Nimbolide: promising effects on prostate cancer   Cell invasion and migration are key steps during tumor metastasis. The NUS-led study revealed that nimbolide can significantly suppress cell invasion and migration of prostate cancer cells, suggesting its ability to reduce tumor metastasis. The researchers observed that upon the 12 weeks of administering nimbolide, the size of prostate cancer tumor was reduced by as much as 70 per cent and its metastasis decreased by about 50 per cent, without exhibiting any significant adverse effects.   "This is possible because a direct target of nimbolide in prostate cancer is glutathione reductase, an enzyme which is responsible for maintaining the antioxidant system that regulates the STAT3 gene in the body. The activation of the STAT3 gene has been reported to contribute to prostate tumor growth and metastasis," explained Assoc Prof Sethi. "We have found that nimbolide can substantially inhibit STAT3 activation and thereby abrogating the growth and metastasis of prostate tumor," he added.   The findings of the study were published in the April 2016 issue of the scientific journal Antioxidants & Redox Signaling. This work was carried out in collaboration with Professor Goh Boon Cher of Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at NUS, Professor Hui Kam Man of National Cancer Centre Singapore and Professor Ahn Kwang Seok of Kyung Hee University.   The neem plant belongs to the mahogany tree family that is originally native to India and the Indian sub-continent. It has been part of traditional Asian medicine for centuries and is typically used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Today, neem leaves and bark have been incorporated into many personal care products such as soaps, toothpaste, skincare and even dietary supplements.       Review looks at the efficacy of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine (China), October 8, 2021 In their report, researcherss from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine in China explored the role of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance. The study was published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. Earlier studies have reported the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance and related conditions. The review looked at acupuncture and its effects on clinical outcomes. The researchers searched the following databases for randomized controlled trials involving insulin resistance patients treated with acupuncture: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Embase Medline (via OVID) China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Wan Fang and China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP) The studies show that homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance significantly decreased with acupuncture treatment. Other significant decreases include fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose and fasting insulin. Acupuncture increased insulin sensitivity with very few adverse effects. In sum, acupuncture is a safe and effective alternative treatment for insulin resistance.     Blueberries may improve attention in children following double-blind trial University of Reading (UK), October 10, 2021  Primary school children could show better attention by consuming flavonoid-rich blueberries, following a study conducted by the University of Reading. In a paper published in Food & Function, a group of 7-10 year olds who consumed a drink containing wild blueberries or a matched placebo and were tested on their speed and accuracy in completing an executive task function on a computer. The double blind trial found that the children who consumed the flavonoid-rich blueberry drink had 9% quicker reaction times on the test without any sacrifice of accuracy. In particular, the effect was more noticeable as the tests got harder. Professor Claire Williams, a neuroscience professor at the University of Reading said: "This is the first time that we have seen the positive impact that flavonoids can have on the executive function of children. We designed this double blind trial especially to test how flavonoids would impact on attention in young people as it's an area of cognitive performance that hasn't been measured before. "We used wild blueberries as they are rich in flavonoids, which are compounds found naturally in foods such as fruits and their juices, vegetables and tea. They have been associated with a range of health benefits including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and our latest findings continue to show that there is a beneficial cognitive effect of consuming fruit and vegetables, tea, coffee and even dark chocolate which all contain flavonoids." The children were then asked to pay attention to an array of arrows shown on a PC screen and press a key corresponding to the direction that the central arrow was facing. The task was repeated over a number of trials, where cognitive demand was manipulated by varying how quickly the arrows appeared, whether there were additional arrows appearing either side of the central arrow, and whether the flanking arrows were pointing in the same/different direction as the central arrow. Previous Reading research has shown that consuming wild blueberries can improve mood in children and young people, simple memory recall in primary school children, and that other flavonoid rich drinks such as orange juice, can also improve memory and concentration. The Wild Blueberry Association of North America provided a freeze-dried powder made from wild blueberries which was used in the study but did not provide any additional financial support and did not play a role in the design of the study. Wild blueberries are grown and harvested in North America, and are smaller than regular blueberries, and are higher in flavonoids compared to regular varieties. The double-blind trial used a flavonoid-rich wild blueberry drink, with a matched placebo contained 8.9g of fructose, 7.99g of glucose and 4 mg of vitamin C matching the levels of nutrients found in the blueberry drink. The amount of fructose is akin to levels found in a standard pear. This was an executive function task- requiring participants to pay attention to stimuli appearing on screen and responding correctly. The task was a simple one- responding to the direction of an arrow in the middle of a screen (by pressing left/right arrow key) but we then varied how quickly the stimuli appeared, whether there was additional arrows appearing either side of the stimuli and whether those flanking arrows were pointing in the same/different direction as they direction you had to respond. There are 6 main classes of flavonoids: Anthocyanins – found in berry fruits such as the blueberries used in this study and also in red wine. Flavonols - found in onions, leeks, and broccoli Flavones - found in parsley and celery, Isoflavones - found in soy and soy products, Flavanones - found in citrus fruit and tomatoes Flavanols—found in green tea, red wine, and chocolate     Nocebo effect: Does a drug's high price tag cause its own side effects? University Medical Center Hamburg (Germany), October 5, 2021  Pricey drugs may make people more vulnerable to perceiving side effects, a new study suggests—and the phenomenon is not just "in their heads." The study delved into the so-called "nocebo effect." It's the negative version of the well-known placebo effect, where people feel better after receiving a therapy because they expected good things. With the nocebo effect, patients' worries over treatment side effects make them feel sick. In this study, researchers found that people were more likely to report painful side effects from a fake drug when told it was expensive. But it wasn't just something people were "making up." Using brain imaging, the researchers traced the phenomenon to specific activity patterns in the brain and spine. "These findings are a strong argument against the perception of placebo and nocebo effects as being only 'fake' effects—created purely by imagination or delusions of the patient," said lead researcher Alexandra Tinnermann. She is with the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, in Germany. Dr. Luana Colloca, a researcher at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, agreed. "This is not merely a reflection of people's biases," said Colloca, who wrote an editorial published with the study. "Expectations do modulate symptoms and patients' responses to treatment," she said. For the study, Tinnermann's team recruited 49 healthy volunteers and randomly assigned them to test one of two itch-relieving "medical creams." In reality, both creams were identical and contained no active ingredients. However, people in both groups were told that the products could have the side effect of making the skin more sensitive to pain. There was only one apparent difference between the two phony creams: One came in fancy packing with a high price tag; the other was cheap. After participants applied the creams to their forearms, the researchers had them undergo a standard test that measured their tolerance for heat-induced pain. It turned out that people who'd used the expensive cream were more sensitive to pain during the tests. On average, their pain rating hovered around a 15—within the "mild" pain range—whereas people using the cheap cream barely registered any discomfort. It's likely, Tinnermann said, that people expect a pricey medication to be potent—which could also make them expect more side effects. Colloca agreed. We are all "vulnerable" to such outside influences, she said, be it a drug's price or how it's given (by IV versus mouth, for instance). However, we are not just imagining those placebo or nocebo effects, both researchers noted. Using functional MRI brain scans, Tinnermann's team found specific patterns of nervous system activity in people who had a nocebo response to the pricey cream. That included a change in "communication" between certain brain structures and the spinal cord, Tinnermann said. According to Colloca, research like this can have practical uses. Doctors could, for instance, inform patients that drug prices or other factors can sway their expectations about a treatment's benefits and risks—and that, in turn, can influence whether they feel better or develop side effects. There is, however, no research into whether that kind of knowledge helps prevent patients from the nocebo effect, Tinnermann said. But, she added, health professionals can be aware that patients' expectations "play a huge role in medicine"—and be mindful of how they talk about a medication and its possible side effects. It's an important matter, Colloca said, because the nocebo effect can cause people to stop taking needed medications. Colloca pointed to the example of cholesterol-lowering statins. The potential for those medications to cause muscle pain has been widely reported. And one recent study found evidence that this knowledge can make statin users more likely to report muscle pain side effects. Other research, Colloca said, has shown that when people stop taking their statins, their risk of heart attack and stroke rises.

Unstress with Dr Ron Ehrlich
Dr Jim Parker: Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Unstress with Dr Ron Ehrlich

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 61:47


Today, we're going to explore women's health. And women's health, whether you're a woman or not, is important because we all know women and they're an important part of our lives. They're known as the backbones of growth and a progressing nation. My guest today is Dr Jim Parker. Jim has been an obstetrician, gynaecologist, and endoscopic surgeon. He has a wide range of researches with a particular interest in evidence-based medicine and the application of those findings to clinical practise. I always have been blown away by his encyclopaedic knowledge, which I am very keen to share with you today. I hope you enjoy this conversation I had with Dr Jim Parker.   CREDITS:   Host: Dr Ron Ehrlich   Guest: Dr Jim Parker   Producer: Amelia Navascues ----  You can also watch this episode at https://drronehrlich.com/  ----- TIME TO TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR HEALTH? Join me in my online health programs.  ----- CONNECT WITH ME You can ask questions via social media using my Instagram or Facebook or TikTok or YouTube page.

Here & Now
Pregnant doctor receives COVID-19 booster; Colorado's sheepdog competition

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 41:02


A new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology shows that up to 15% of pregnant people who catch the coronavirus ending up hospitalized. Houston Methodist Hospital emergency room doctor Anh Nguyen is pregnant and got the booster shot. She joins us to discuss. And, every September, thousands of people flock to the small town of Meeker, Colorado, to watch sheepdogs compete. CPR's Stina Sieg went to this year's competition.

The Simplicity Sessions
Working Women and Hormone Balance with Dr. Shawn Tassone

The Simplicity Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 64:47


Welcome back to The Simplicity Sessions, I'm delighted that you've joined us today. My name is Jenn Pike, your host, registered holistic nutritionist, medical exercise specialist, the best-selling author of the Simplicity Project and the creator of the women's revolutionary health program, The Hormone Project. I am very happy to welcome Dr. Shawn Tassone to the podcast. Shawn Tassone MD, Ph.D., is known as America's Holistic Gynecologist. He is the first physician in the United States to be double board certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and by the American Board of Integrative Medicine. He holds a medical degree in addition to a Ph.D. in mind-body medicine. He's a practicing OBGYN in Austin, TX, hormone specialist, author, speaker, highly rated patient advocate, and creator of the world's first integrative hormonal mapping system. In his 20+ years of practice, Shawn has seen over 40,000 women and he is determined to remove the myths surrounding women's health. As an integrative health practitioner, he believes that you should have an active role in your care. His work includes studies and publications on hormonal imbalances, spirituality in medical care, whole foods to heal the human body, and integrative medicine. Dr. Tassone is featured in many publications including The New York Times, NBCNews Online, Stanford MedX, and his book (The Hormone Balance Bible, published by HarperCollins), is now available in stores and online! I speak to Shawn about the reasons he has followed a career path in women's health care. We also discuss how women often treat pain and discomfort based on society's rules for women. Shawn discusses the signs and symptoms of hormone imbalances and how women can find solutions for such imbalances. Here are the main topics of today's episode: Why Shawn chose his field Shawn's inspiration Shawn's interests beyond the medical field How the strength of women and their mindset can hurt them Functional health tests are not available in our healthcare system until you search for them The SHINES protocol Solutions to reset your hormones Top 3 signs of hormone imbalances Hormone treatment Signs of too much testosterone Estrogen levels Find the connector in your health care    Connect with us - Thank you for joining us today. If you could do me the honor of hitting the subscribe button, leaving a review, sharing this podcast with a friend, or tagging me on social media when you visit The Simplicity Sessions Community on Facebook or @jennpike on Instagram, I would be forever grateful. You can connect to this episode on iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher by searching The Simplicity Sessions, or visiting www.jennpike.com/podcast. Join our growing community via Facebook The Simplicity Sessions Community.   Connect with Dr. Shawn Tassone - Website: https://tassonemd.com/ Hormone Mapping Quiz - http://www.tassonemd.com/quiz Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shawntassonemd/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tassonedoc   Online work with Jenn - Register for my signature program The Hormone Project and work with my team and me 1:1 to support your health, hormones, and more via the following link www.jennpike.com/thehormoneproject. Sign up for The Synced Program to learn how to tune your body to the lunar cycle and acquire a multidisciplinary approach to balance your body in less than 30 minutes a day!  Interested in registering for the upcoming Audacious Women mentorship? Send us a message via our website at https://jennpike.com/contact/ To learn more about the products mentioned in this episode, visit the link I've shared on my Instagram @jennpike. There you can discover where you can purchase these products and how you can start to make them part of your everyday simplicity approach.   Learn more about the products and supports I recommend from some of our amazing partners - Eaton Hemp is my favourite CBD and hemp company. They are a hundred percent organic, they're unfiltered, and they are third-party tested. To experience Eaton Hemp, use the discount code JENNPIKE20 at eatonhemp.com/jennpike to save 20% off your order. Use organic hemp hearts in smoothies, parfaits, or oats to get great protein, healthy omega-3s, anti-oxidants, and loads of vitamins and minerals. St Francis Herb Farm education includes webinars, blogs and articles on important topics including the plant medicines that they create to promote women's health by targeting digestion, allergies, immune support, heart health, brain health, and sleep. I use and recommend their products and you can use the code JENNPIKE15 at checkout to save 15% off your order. GoodJuju makes all-natural, plastic-free home & body products that are good for you and good for the planet. Use JENNPIKE10 for 10% off your order. Skin Essence is Canadian-founded, organic, non-GMO, and does not test on animals; this company is one that we love and have around the house. You can even talk to the company to get advice on which products may be right to try first. Use code JENNPIKE20 to get 20% off your first order and use JENNPIKE10 to save 10% off every order after that. Mid-Day Squares - Use JENN15 to save 15% off these delicious squares. They get you through the day like a protein and fiber bar but they taste like you decided to treat yourself today.   Quotes - “...what's called the nocebo effect versus placebo where the negativity of what you say can actually change a diagnosis versus the positivity, and just having that open up my brain…” “I'm a robotic surgeon, too. I use the robot for surgery, but then if a woman's having heavy periods, sometimes I'll just recommend yarrow flower instead of birth control pills.” “they're telling me I can't have hormones and I'm just supposed to be miserable for the last five years of my life.” “fatigue, if you're taking a nap at four or five in the afternoon that's probably not normal.” “Testosterone does stimulate hair follicles so it will help with hair growth, but too much can overstimulate it and that is when you get hair on your stomach or your chin” “The reason I think we see a lot of thyroid issues is because the more estrogen that's in the body, the less active your thyroid is going to be. And we have that for one, huge reason: diet. Fat cells make estrogen. So the fatter you are the more fat cells you have, the more your estrogen goes up and your thyroid function goes down.” “ don't put all the pressure also on that practitioner to know everything for you.”

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast
Seven Steps to Highly Reliable Patient Care

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 42:03


Discover seven steps that can help your unit move closer to highly reliable patient care where the patient receives the same care regardless of who is on the unit, the time of day or day of the week.  These seven steps are illustrated in a case study of severe maternal hemorrhage.The experts at Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics pool their decades of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women to discuss the challenges encountered in caring for these vulnerable women.Dr Stephanie Martin is the Medical Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist with expertise in critical care obstetrics.Suzanne McMurtry Baird, DNP, RN is the Nursing Director for  Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics with many years of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women.Julie Arafeh, RN, MS is the Simulation Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a leading expert in simulation.”

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Manhunt for Gabby Petito Boyfriend Brian Laundrie, as His Parents Visit Public Library

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 39:47


Brian Laundrie has been missing since at least September 14. The person of interest in Gabby Petito's death told his parents that he intended to hike in the Carlton Reserve, but he has not returned. Three days before he left, Laundrie's girlfriend Gabby Petito was reported missing by her family. Those knowledgeable with the rough terrain point out it would be difficult to survive in that area, which is now mostly underwater, for an extended period of time. There is no potable water and little dry ground to camp. Meanwhile, Laundrie's parents were followed by federal agents to a public library, where they hung out for a period of time, before heading to a meeting with an attorney.Joining Nancy Grace Today:Wendy Patrick - California prosecutor, author “Red Flags” www.wendypatrickphd.com 'Today with Dr. Wendy' on KCBQ in San Diego, Twitter: @WendyPatrickPHDDr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Expert in the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial HospitalJoe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics: Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Featured on "The Piketon Massacre: Return to Pike County" on iHeartRadioAngenette Levy - Emmy-nominated Reporter & Anchor, Twitter: @Angenette5See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Did Brian Laundrie's Parents Help Son Go On-The-Run With Attached Camper?

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 37:43


A warrant has been issued for Brian Laundrie, the boyfriend of deceased Gabby Petito, but in her death. A grand jury indicted Laundrie for his "use of unauthorized devices" after Petito died. Documents state that Laundrie used a debit card and PIN number for accounts that did not belong to him for charges totaling more than $1,000 between the dates of August 30 and September 1. The indictment does not identify the debit card owner. Meanwhile, the search for Laundrie continues. Joining Nancy Grace Today:Dale Carson - Criminal Defense Attorney (Jacksonville), Former FBI Agent, Former Police Officer, Author: "Arrest-Proof Yourself, DaleCarsonLaw.com Dr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial Hospital Sheryl McCollum - Forensic Expert & Cold Case Investigative Research Institute Founder, ColdCaseCrimes.org, Twitter: @ColdCaseTips Joe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics: Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Featured on "The Piketon Massacre: Return to Pike County" on iHeartRadio Paul Best - Reporter, FOX News & FOX Business See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Evidence Based Birth®
EBB 193 - Evidence on Essential Oils during Pregnancy, Birth, and Postpartum

Evidence Based Birth®

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 43:25


In this episode I am joined by Anna Bertone (she/her), MPH, a research consultant at Evidence Based Birth®, to discuss the evidence on aromatherapy and essential oils for use during pregnancy, labor/birth, and postpartum. In this episode, we cover: What is aromatherapy, where did it come from, and how does it work? What have researchers found on essential oils for nausea and vomiting, stress reduction, and immune function during pregnancy? Which essential oils have been found to be effective for reducing labor pain and anxiety, encouraging labor progress, and treating post-Cesarean symptoms? What does the research say about aromatherapy for use postpartum, including with post-Cesarean symptoms, perineal trauma, sleep, and depression and anxiety? Are there any important safety precautions to be aware of, and what is the bottom line? This episode was inspired by a peer-reviewed article we published in Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, in a special symposium that was edited by Shilpa Babbar, MD, MS, FACOG. Reference: Bertone, A. C., & Dekker, R. L. (September 2021). "Aromatherapy in Obstetrics: A Critical Review of the Literature." Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology 64(3): 572-588. Here are some other resources we mentioned: Access the EBB Pain Management Video Series here https://evidencebasedbirth.com/category-pain-management-series/ You can find the abstract of our research paper, as well as a complete list of references used in this podcast can be found on PubMed here https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33927109/ For more information and news about Evidence Based Birth®, visit www.ebbirth.com. Find us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/EvidenceBasedBirth/), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/ebbirth/), and Pinterest (https://www.pinterest.com/ebbirth/). Ready to get involved? Check out our Professional membership (including scholarship options) (https://evidencebasedbirth.com/become-pro-member/). Find an EBB Instructor here (https://evidencebasedbirth.com/find-an-instructor-parents/), and click here (https://evidencebasedbirth.com/childbirth-class/) to learn more about the Evidence Based Birth® Childbirth Class.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Gabby Petito Boyfriend Brian Laundrie on the Run! FBI Swarms home.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 36:53


A day after finding Gabby Petito's body in a remote Wyoming camping area, the FBI sends agents to Brian Laundrie's home to execute a search warrant. More than 15 FBI agents entered the home shortly after 10 a.m. as police officers roped off the area around it with crime scene tape. Laundrie's parents were escorted out of the home and into a FBI vehicle during the search. After more than an hour, Christopher and Roberta Laundrie were led back into their house. Still no word on where Brian Laundrie is, as the search for him in the Carlton Reserve has ended. Joining Nancy Grace todayDale Carson - Criminal Defense Attorney (Jacksonville), Former FBI Agent, Former Police Officer, Author: "Arrest-Proof Yourself, DaleCarsonLaw.com Dr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial Hospital Sheryl McCollum - Forensic Expert & Cold Case Investigative Research Institute Founder, ColdCaseCrimes.org Joe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Featured on "The Piketon Massacre: Return to Pike County" on iHeartRadio John Elwood - Deputy Chief, Manatee County Search and Rescue, www.manateecountysar.org, Twitter: @KarmatheSARdog, Principal Evaluator for the National Search Dog Alliance and Instructor/Evaluator for the National Association of Search and Rescue, 35 Years Sarasota County Fire DepartmentGarna Mejia [MEH-HEE-UH] - Reporter, KSL-TV in Salt Lake City, Twitter/Instagram/Facebook: @GarnaMejiaKSL, ksltv.com See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
'VAN-LIFE GIRL' GABBY PARENTS SPEAK OUT as Boyfriend Hides Out at Parents' Home

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 37:23


Nichole Schmidt, the mother of missing Gabby Petito, says she feels her daughter is still alive, but she admits that could be hope on her part. In the meantime, boyfriend Brian Laundrie still has not spoken to authorities. Stepfather Joseph Schmidt, who is in Wyoming working with authorities searching for Gabby, calls Laundrie's lack of action, an act of cowardice. Joining Nancy Grace Today:Nichole Schmidt - Victim's Mother Jim Schmidt - Victim's Stepfather Dale Carson - Criminal Defense Attorney (Jacksonville), Former FBI Agent, Former Police Officer, Author: "Arrest-Proof Yourself, DaleCarsonLaw.comDr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Expert in the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial Hospital Joe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Featured on "The Piketon Massacre: Return to Pike County" on iHeartRadio Mike King - Host: "ProfilingEvil" on YouTube, Former Police Officer (Ogden, Utah), Former Chief Investigator: Weber County Attorney's Office, Former Chief of Staff: Utah Attorney General's Office, Author: "Deceived, An Investigative Memoir of the Zion Society Cult", www.ProfilingEvil.com, Instagram/Twitter: @Profiling Evil, Garna Mejia [MEH-HEE-UH] - Reporter, KSL-TV in Salt Lake City (reporting from Jackson Hole, WY), Twitter/Instagram/Facebook: @GarnaMejiaKSL, ksltv.com See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Van-Life Girl's 'Boyfriend' Named Person of Interest in Gabby's Disappearance

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 36:04


Florida police now say Brian Laundrie, the boyfriend of missing Gabby Petito, is a person of interest in her disappearance. The 22-year-old woman mysteriously vanished while the couple was on a road trip. Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito and Laundrie, 23, embarked on a cross-country road trip this summer, but Laundrie returned to Florida. Petito's whereabouts are unknown. Gabby last spoke with her mother via FaceTime on August 23 or 24.Joining Nancy Grace Today:Joseph Petito - Victim's FatherJames Shelnutt - 27 years Atlanta Metro Area Major Case Detective, Former S.W.A.T. officer, Attorney, The Shelnutt Law Firm, P.C., www.ShelnuttLawFirm.com, Twitter: @ShelnuttLawFirmDr. Angela Arnold - Psychiatrist, Atlanta GA www.angelaarnoldmd.com, Expert in the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women, Former Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology: Emory University, Former Medical Director of The Psychiatric Ob-Gyn Clinic at Grady Memorial HospitalJoe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Featured on "The Piketon Massacre: Return to Pike County" on iHeartRadioMike King - Host: "ProfilingEvil" on YouTube, Former Police Officer (Ogden, Utah), Former Chief Investigator: Weber County Attorney's Office, Former Chief of Staff: Utah Attorney General's Office, Author: "Deceived, An Investigative Memoir of the Zion Society Cult", www.ProfilingEvil.com, Instagram/Twitter: @Profiling EvilAndrea Olson - EastIdahoNews.com, Twitter: @NewsWithAndreaTIPLINE: Suffolk County Police Department 1-800-220-8477 GoFundMe: "Help us find Gabby" See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.