Podcasts about Psi

  • 768PODCASTS
  • 2,014EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 27, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Psi

Show all podcasts related to psi

Latest podcast episodes about Psi

Row by Row Garden Show
Row by Row Episode 234: New Irrigation Kits for 2023

Row by Row Garden Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 35:34


Join Us! Tonight, we're discussing our new irrigation kits for the new year of 2023! Let's Grow Together!Raised Bed Irrigation Kit: Our Raised Bed Irrigation Kit contains everything you need to water your raised bed gardens in the most effective and environmentally friendly way. Drip irrigation allows you to use less water while watering more effectively. This is because you are only placing water directly where your plants need it - at the roots. Because you're not watering the leaves, disease pressure and pest pressure will be greatly reduced. This kit will support 8 (4 ft. by 8 ft.) raised beds with 4 feet between them.Raised Bed Irrigation Kit Includes:2- 100 ft. roll 1/4 tubing with emitters1 – 20 PSI Filter Regulator Combo1 – Figure 8 End Clamp1 – Green Hole Punch20 – Goof Plugs10-transfer barbs2 – 50 ft. 1/4″ tubing40 – 1/4″ elbows10 – 1/4″ flow valve10 – 1/4″ tees1 -30ft mainline tubing100 – Tubing Stakes10 – Garden Wire PinsRaised Bed Irrigation Kit Requirements:Water hose – connects to a 3/4″ water hose or 3/4″ spigot.Pressure – PSI should be below 50 psi and 8 gallons per minute. Requires a flow rate between 0.4 to 8 gallons per minute. To calculate your flow rate, simply record the time (in minutes that it takes to fill a 5-gallon bucket with water. Then divide 5 by the time above to obtain your gallon-per-minute rate. For example, if it takes 30 seconds (0.5 minutes) to fill a 5-gallon bucket, your flow rate is 10 gallons per minute because:5 gal / 0.5 min = 10 gal/minRow length – Our tubing can be used on a maximum row length of 30 ft. at 20 psi. We don't recommend using rows longer than 30 feet. If rows are too long, water will not be equally distributed throughout the tubing along the row.Row number – With a flow rate of 5 gallons per minute, our tubing can support 300 feet of tubing. That's the equivalent of 30 rows that are 10 feet long. To calculate how much tubing your system can support, first calculate your flow rate based on the example above. For example, if your flow rate is 8 gallons per minute, the maximum length of tape your system can support is 480 feet. The flow rate on the tubing is 0.5 gallons per emitter per hour. The emitter spacing is 6″. Flow rate per foot/1 gallon per hour. Small Drip Irrigation Kit: Our Small Drip Irrigation Kit contains everything your need to water your vegetable garden in the most effective and environmentally friendly way. Drip irrigation allows you to use less water while watering more effectively. This is because you are only placing water directly where your plants need it – at the roots. Because you're not watering the leaves, disease pressure and pest pressure will be greatly reduced.Small Drip Irrigation Kit Includes:1 – 30 ft. roll of mainline tubing1 – 100 ft. roll 1/4 tubing with emitters1 – 20 PSI Filter Regulator Combo1 – Figure 8 End Clamp1 – Green Hole Punch10 – Transfer Barbs10 – Goof Plugs32 – garden pinsSmall Drip Kit Irrigation Kit Requirements:Water hose – connects to a 3/4″ water hose or 3/4″ spigot.Pressure – PSI should be below 50 psi and 8 gallons per minute. Requires a flow rate between 0.4 to 8 gallons per minute. To calculate your flow rate, simply record the time (in minutes that it takes to fill a 5-gallon bucket with water. Then divide 5 by the time above to obtain your gallon-per-minute rate. For example, if it takes 30 seconds (0.5 minutes) to fill a 5-gallon bucket, your flow rate is 10 gallons per minute because:5 gal / 0.5 min = 10 gal/minRow length – Our tubing can be used on a maximum row length of 30 ft. at 20 psi. We don't recommend using rows longer than 30 feet. If rows are too long, water will not be equally distributed throughout the tubing along the row.Row number – With a flow rate of 5 gallons per minute, our tubing can support 300 feet of tubing. That's the equivalent of 30 rows that are 10 feet long. To calculate how much tubing your system can support, first calculate your flow rate based on the example above.

POP! Culture Corner
CIA Secret Project Stargate: Remote Viewing, UFOs/UAPs: A Growing Phenomenon Feat. Astral

POP! Culture Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 136:43


The UAP Topic is Not slowing down, The Conversation continues w/ Our Special Guest Astral as we discuss Current events, obscure UFO news that are making headlines, and More! Astral Focuses on and Is a Futurist, researcher, musician, & developer. PSI, UFO/UAP, & Astral Projection enthusiast | Featured on VICE

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)
AFR Nº 359: Tráfico de restos humanos y macabros rituales de poder - Acceso anticipado

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 83:10


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! El esoterismo y la magia. Prejuicios y ciencia. ¿Hay víctimas de estafa o no? ¿Hay un fascismo intelectual? Un aumento exponencial de robo de restos humanos de cementerios (en Argentina). Una cabeza de niño momificada enviada por correo. Más robo de cadáveres de niños. La momificación. Amputación de manos y pies. ¿Por qué se hace todo esto? Distintos tipos de magia. ¿Para qué se usan las magias marrón y negra? Una advertencia a los escépticos. Creer o no creer, nos afecta igual. El crecimiento del narco-satanismo en México. La sangre que se derrama es un pago. ¿Cuántos hemos explorado nuestra relación con nuestra propia muerte? La Ley de Atracción. Los sacrificios de sangre. Los cultos Umbanda, Quimbanda y Candomblé. Un secreto sobre la sangre y la energía astral. Relacionados: AFR Nº 358: Familia desaparece sin dejar rastros – GF es entrevistado por Carlos Iurchuk https://alfilodelarealidad.com/podcast-afr-no-358-familia-desaparece-sin-dejar-rastros-gf-es-entrevistado-por-carlos-iurchuk/ Más sobre la Ley de Atracción https://alfilodelarealidad.com/?s=ley+de+atracci%C3%B3n Más sobre Umbanda, Quimbanda y Candomblé https://alfilodelarealidad.com/?s=umbanda Más sobre egrégoros https://alfilodelarealidad.com/?s=egr%C3%A9goro Nueva plataforma de cursos (https://miscursosvirtuales.net). * * * Programa de Afiliados * * * iVoox comparte con AFR un pequeño porcentaje si usas uno de estos enlaces: * Disfruta de la experiencia iVoox sin publicidad, con toda la potencia de volumen, sincronización de dispositivos y listas inteligentes ilimitadas: Premium anual https://www.ivoox.vip/premium?affiliate-code=68e3ae6b7ef213805d8afeeea434a491 Premium mensual https://www.ivoox.vip/premium?affiliate-code=7b7cf4c4707a5032e0c9cd0040e23919 * La mejor selección de podcasts en exclusiva con iVoox Plus Más de 50.000 episodios exclusivos y nuevos contenidos cada día. ¡Suscríbete y apoya a tus podcasters favoritos! Plus https://www.ivoox.vip/plus?affiliate-code=258b8436556f5fabae31df4e91558f48 Más del mundo del misterio en nuestro portal: alfilodelarealidad.comEscucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de Al Filo de la Realidad. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/3844

Mysterious Universe
29.02 - MU Podcast - The Enchanted Zone

Mysterious Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 70:41


We enter the "enchanted zone" of reincarnation for this episode and discuss some of the most unusual cases of past life memories. We consider the role of Psi, telepathy, synchronicity and cosmic order in relation to death survival and dive into stories of transplant memories, the Jungle men and the importance of the 700 year cycle. We'll also take a look at "Spyfail" and hear how a deadly mixture of arrogance and ill preparedness has left the world vulnerable to a potentially catastrophic cyber disaster. Links Reincarnation: True Stories of Past Lives Bigelow Institute for Consciousness Studies Essay Contest A Rational Guide to the Best Evidence of Postmortem Survival Beyond Death: The Best Evidence for the Survival of Human Consciousness A Change of Heart Plus+ Extension The extension of the show is EXCLUSIVE to Plus+ Members. To join, click HERE. Spyfail: Foreign Spies, Moles, Saboteurs, and the Collapse of America's Counterintelligence Who Are the Shadow Brokers? Former NSA TAO hacker sentenced to 66 months in prison over Kaspersky Leak Former NSA contractor sentenced to 9 years for theft of government info Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Soul Horizon
Telepathy, Clairvoyance, and Precognition (ESP): Languages of the Heart

The Soul Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 64:00


There are many, many forms of psi phenomena but the main forms of psi, referred to as the 'Big Five," are:TelepathyClairvoyancePrecognitionTelekinesisHealingThe first three pertain to the transference of information and fall within the subcategory of ESP. The last two pertain to the transference of energy and fall within the subcategory of PK or psychokinesis. In today's conversation, we explore phenomena in the ESP category. In the episode, we examine laboratory evidence, consider how discoveries in the field of quantum physics might be able to explain the existence of psi phenomena, and discuss ways to open to or enhance your own ESP abilities.Sources and all mentioned links, documents, and websites  (it was too long to include).Disclaimer: This podcast is intended for entertainment and informational purposes only and does not substitute individual psychological advice.

P.E.E.P. Podcast
Episode 56: Generational Trauma in Our DNA

P.E.E.P. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 17:19


In this brief episode, Nicolle looks at the recent scientific evidence that generational trauma – something considered a new age idea for years – is in fact, a real thing called epigenetics. CDC article: https://www.cdc.gov/genomics/disease/epigenetics.htmYehuda and Lehrner article : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6127768/Youssef, et al: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5977074/ https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20190326-what-is-epigenetics https://psychcentral.com/health/genetic-traumaRegister for the Great Is the Spirit Grand Opening virtual (Zoom) event: greatisthespirit.comSubscribe to Nicolle's newsletter at https://www.nicollemorock.com/Find Nicolle's books: https://www.amazon.com/Nicolle-Morock/e/B07Q8BQLP2?ref_=pe_1724030_132998060Theme music is provided by the talented Mr. Jeremy Moss http://jeremymosscomposer.com/ (Listen through the end of the podcast to hear the whole theme song.)Connect with Nicolle at www.peeppodcast.com and https://www.facebook.com/P.E.E.P.PodcastGet merchandise at https://www.teepublic.com/user/peep-podcast

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)
AFR Nº 358: Familia desaparece sin dejar rastros – GF es entrevistado por Carlos Iurchuk

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 70:02


Caso Gill: ¿abducción, teleportación o masacre colectiva? Acerca de los prejuicios y las hipótesis. A 21 años de la desaparición de una familia de Nogoyá en Entre Ríos (en el paraje Crucesita Séptima) y sin ninguna pista. Rubén (56), Norma, (26), María Ofelia (12), Osvaldo (9), Carlos (6) y Sofía (4) viajan a Viale, regresan en bus y no se los ve más. Las hipótesis que se analizan son las siguientes: (1) La hipótesis paranormal. (2) La hipótesis pasional (¿una hija extra-marital?). Inspección ocular y con perros. ¿Un molino tritura los cuerpos y alimenta a los chanchos? Un agasajo para la comisión policial. (3) ¿Tráfico de estupefacientes? ¿Ajuste de cuentas entre narcotraficantes? (4) Operaciones militares ilegales. Oleada de mutilaciones de ganado en la zona. Helicópteros negros de EEUU en Islas del Ibicuy. La paranoia mundial por el Ántrax. ¿Un experimento biológico militar? ¿Vieron los Gill algo que no debían? Una zona caliente de avistamientos OVNI (encuentros cercanos de tipo 1, 2 y 3. Nuevas investigaciones e inspecciones. La pista del mecánico: ¿un testimonio "plantado" o patológico? Dinero en la cuenta bancaria no retirado. Otros muchos casos de desapariciones. Sumate a nuestras actividades en Capilla del Monte en febrero 2023. Relacionados: El video de este episodio en vivo se encuentra en: https://www.youtube.com/live/aiainOzVSw0?feature=share Más sobre el Caso Gill: https://alfilodelarealidad.com/?s=caso+gill Nueva plataforma de cursos (https://miscursosvirtuales.net). * * * Programa de Afiliados * * * iVoox comparte con AFR un pequeño porcentaje si usas uno de estos enlaces: * Disfruta de la experiencia iVoox sin publicidad, con toda la potencia de volumen, sincronización de dispositivos y listas inteligentes ilimitadas: Premium anual https://www.ivoox.vip/premium?affiliate-code=68e3ae6b7ef213805d8afeeea434a491 Premium mensual https://www.ivoox.vip/premium?affiliate-code=7b7cf4c4707a5032e0c9cd0040e23919 * La mejor selección de podcasts en exclusiva con iVoox Plus Más de 50.000 episodios exclusivos y nuevos contenidos cada día. ¡Suscríbete y apoya a tus podcasters favoritos! Plus https://www.ivoox.vip/plus?affiliate-code=258b8436556f5fabae31df4e91558f48 Más del mundo del misterio en nuestro portal: alfilodelarealidad.com

Rare Candy
Space Mushrooms w/ Rehmannia Dean Thomas

Rare Candy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 84:55


Glen and Psi are joined by Taoist Tonic Herbalist, Rehmannia Dean Thomas to talk about the healing properties of Reishi mushrooms, the connection between mushrooms and outer space, dieting, and Rehmannia answers questions from twitter. Rehmannia Dean Thomas Super Tonic Herbs Site https://rdeanthomas.com/superior-tonic-herbs-shop/ For Rare Candy Premium Episodes, subscribe to the substack https://rarecandy.substack.com/ Follow all things Rare Candy including merch, social media, and more https://linktr.ee/RareCandy

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
District Council: Bree Latimer

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 12:51


Welcome to this episode! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Bree Latimer, Western District Member at Large, about her journey in Kappa Kappa Psi and goals for her District. Transcription coming soon. Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits
370. Leveraging a Venture Mindset in Philanthropy: Investing in Bold, Unproven Ideas - Rena Greifinger

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 51:40


Meet Rena. She's an award-winning social entrepreneur, philanthropy leader, and advocate for women and girls. She's the Director of Individual Philanthropy at Population Services International (PSI) and the Managing Director of Maverick Collective by PSI, a community of bold philanthropists advancing health and gender equity. We're chatting through taking a business approach to saving lives and providing real solutions to complex health problems. Tune in to hear her incredible wisdom on how we can reimagine philanthropic models to create sustainable and scalable solutions. 

Mindalia.com-Salud,Espiritualidad,Conocimiento
Los 10 pasos para que emerja el Perdón. Entrevista a Emil Pacheco

Mindalia.com-Salud,Espiritualidad,Conocimiento

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 37:06


Entrevista realizada en diciembre de 2022. Emil, te invita a dar al perdón una mirada distinta, a verlo como un acto de rebeldía o de inteligencia. Un perdón que no proviene de la debida gratitud a los padres, sino que emerge de un proceso de 10 pasos, que empieza por sentir hastío emocional y mental. Y los beneficios que te traerá a nivel físico y de autoestima. EMIL PACHECO Ing. Industrial, Sanadora UCDM, Trainer y terapeuta PNL, Eneagrama, Coach ICC, Dip. Psi. Positiva, asesora Crianza Consciente, autora de libro. Brinda charlas y asesorías a mujeres en autoestima y maternidad. https://emilpacheco.com/ https://www.instagram.com/emilpachecosandrea/?hl=es https://www.facebook.com/autoestimaparamamas/ https://mobile.twitter.com/emilpsandrea #EmilPacheco #Perdón #CrecimientoPersonal -----------INFORMACIÓN SOBRE MINDALIA---------- Mindalia.com es una ONG internacional sin ánimo de lucro. Nuestra misión es la difusión universal de contenidos para la mejora de la consciencia espiritual, mental y física. -Apóyanos con tu donación en este enlace: https://streamelements.com/mindaliaplus/tip -Colabora con el mundo suscribiéndote a este canal, dejándonos un comentario de energía positiva en nuestros vídeos y compartiéndolos. De esta forma, este conocimiento llegará a mucha más gente. - Sitio web: https://www.mindalia.com - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindalia.ayuda/ - Twitter: http://twitter.com/mindaliacom - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mindalia_com/ - Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/mindaliacom - Vaughn: https://vaughn.live/mindalia - Odysee: https://odysee.com/@Mindalia.com *Mindalia.com no se hace responsable de las opiniones vertidas en este vídeo, ni necesariamente participa de ellas. *Mindalia.com no se responsabiliza de la fiabilidad de las informaciones de este vídeo, cualquiera sea su origen. *Este vídeo es exclusivamente informativo.

Marisa心之回音
無特定目標的嘗試,碰撞意想不到的可能性|Kin237 電力紅地球 1/10

Marisa心之回音

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 7:03


{新年定錨十三天:Day 10 無特定目標的嘗試,碰撞意想不到的可能性} 無特定目標的嘗試,碰撞意想不到的可能性。 丟掉目標和計劃表,簡單地去做一些非常單純、毫無意義,甚至天馬行空的事情。 走過的每一步,即便看起來毫不相干,堆疊堆疊著,有一天突然迸發出不可思議的爆發力。 / 今起三天強大的能量,適合為2023上半年做定頻。 共振之月的前三天,集體心智庫PSI和銀河中心的對等印記,都共時共振調性。建議大家多靜心、多喝水,保持平穩的身心狀態,減少不必要的訊息轟炸,同時避免過度忙碌。 不要急著增添什麼,只要好好運用手邊資源,你的未來從此時此刻啟動。 — 時間座標: 0'00” 銀河三角靜心:頂輪-右髖-左腳中趾 2'37” 這三天很適合為2023定頻 6'00” 新年定錨十三天:Day 10 無特定目標的嘗試,碰撞意想不到的可能性 — 歡迎加入Marisa心之回音粉專 / IG,瞭解更多Marisa分享的內容與服務,期望與你交流!

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)
AFR Nº 357: El Instituto Tavistock y la Nueva Edad Media (parte 2)

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 104:35


¿Quién era Rudolf von Laban? ¿Qué hacía? ¿Por qué se lo eligió también para la "Operación Paperclip"? Prescott Bush. MAJESTIC-12. Disforia de edad. ¿Qué ideas manejaba el Instituto Tavistock? El estado permanente de ansiedad. La Agenda 2030. La inseguridad controlada es terrorismo de baja intensidad. Tabaco, alcohol, danza y enteógenos. La evocación de la emocionalidad. La práctica de la magia ceremonial y el pensamiento crítico. ¿Qué es el pensamiento científico? ¿Cómo se hace para deteriorar el pensamiento crítico? El falso humanismo. La importancia del raiting. El proyecto MK-ULTRA. El candidato manchuriano. Comunidad Hippie y las drogas. La TV, el primitivismo sensorial y la manipulación. La Conspiración de Acuario. La táctica de la turbulencia social. Las producciones de Disney. El pensamiento único. El relato importa más que la verdad. El romanticismo no científico. El control de los estilos artísticos. El uso de las culturas primigenias. La Clínica Tavistock. Respondiendo a los podescuchas. Reacciones al podcast AFR Nº 351 (https://www.ivoox.com/afr-n-351-ummo-entrevista-a-jose-luis-audios-mp3_rf_95754619_1.html) sobre el tema UMMO. Relacionados: Podcast AFR Nº 356: El Instituto Tavistock y la Nueva Edad Media (parte 1) https://alfilodelarealidad.com/podcast-afr-no-356-el-instituto-tavistock-y-la-nueva-edad-media-parte-1/ The Manchurian Candidate (película de 2004) https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Manchurian_Candidate_(pel%C3%ADcula_de_2004) Genesis - Jesus He Knows Me (Jesús me conoce) - Video Oficial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35K6vQRt67g Genesis - Jesus He Knows Me (Jesús me conoce) - En vivo. Subtitulado. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbcYjqIF3XA Más sobre los Illuminati https://alfilodelarealidad.com/?s=illuminati Nueva plataforma de cursos (https://miscursosvirtuales.net). * * * Programa de Afiliados * * * iVoox comparte con AFR un pequeño porcentaje si usas uno de estos enlaces: * Disfruta de la experiencia iVoox sin publicidad, con toda la potencia de volumen, sincronización de dispositivos y listas inteligentes ilimitadas: Premium anual https://www.ivoox.vip/premium?affiliate-code=68e3ae6b7ef213805d8afeeea434a491 Premium mensual https://www.ivoox.vip/premium?affiliate-code=7b7cf4c4707a5032e0c9cd0040e23919 * La mejor selección de podcasts en exclusiva con iVoox Plus Más de 50.000 episodios exclusivos y nuevos contenidos cada día. ¡Suscríbete y apoya a tus podcasters favoritos! Plus https://www.ivoox.vip/plus?affiliate-code=258b8436556f5fabae31df4e91558f48 Más del mundo del misterio en nuestro portal: alfilodelarealidad.com

Get Real Estate Podcast
The REAPS program at Coppin State University, Investing in Underserved Communities, and Missing Middle Housing with Hope Mims

Get Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 39:15 Transcription Available


In this episode, Maryland REALTORS® CEO, Chuck Kasky and CEO and Principal Broker of Mims Realty Group, Hope L. Mims, discuss creating real estate career opportunities for college students, the process of generational wealth, pre and post licensing requirements for new agents, and using education as a vehicle to drive change in Maryland to address missing middle housing.Hope L. Mims opened the doors of her boutique Real Estate company in February 2018.  A lifelong Baltimore resident, she is passionate about giving back to her community as she provides scholarships and mentoring to Baltimore youth as well as helping families in need.  Hope is a member and President Elect of the National Association of REALTORS® – Greater Baltimore. She earned her Bachelors Degree in Business Management from Coppin State University and an MBA from University of Phoenix. She is also an Alumni of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program and currently serves as the Chairperson for the Alumni Advisory Board for Coppin State University's Center for Strategic Entrepreneurship. She is also currently enrolled in the Maryland REALTORS® Leadership Academy. Hope gives an inside look at the the Real Estate Acquisitions Program for students (REAPS) offered at Coppin State University to create pathways for students into real estate careers and to provide opportunities to tackle any student debt before graduation. The program specializes in the recruitment of passionate, diverse, and driven students from the Baltimore community and develops their business and financial acumen so they are equipped to thrive in their first year as a licensee. In addition to training for the students, upon passing their PSI exam, all of their first year fees, which can also pose as a significant financial challenge for most new REALTORS®, are paid for by the program.To learn more about the Real Estate Acquisition Program for students (REAPS) email Hope Mims at hope@mimsrealtygroup.com

Rare Candy
Iceberg

Rare Candy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 75:02


Glen and Psi talk about Lupe Fiasco becoming Bill Gates' number one fan, Damar Hamlin, player safety enthusiasts, hip hop, synchronicity, and more For all premium episodes subscribe to the Rare Candy Substack https://rarecandy.substack.com/ Follow all things Rare Candy including merch, social media, and more https://linktr.ee/RareCandy

Airplane News Update
Airplane News: PSI Changing $$ Cut, BEA Joins NTSB on Report, 11 Bladed Propeller

Airplane News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 3:24


Welcome to your weekly Airplane News update, we have three stories for you, PSI is reducing payouts to testing providers and AOPA is worried, French investigators join the NTSB in criticizing the Ethiopian 737 Max report, and a test flight with an 11-bladed propeller.

Drone News Update
Drone News: Autel EVO Max, PSI Changes, FCC NPRM, Ford Patent for Moving Vehicles

Drone News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 5:00


This week in drone news we have four stories for you; the new Autel Evo Max, PSI changing the cut for testing centers, FCC announces NPRM for UAS, and a Ford Patent for operations over moving vehicles.

A-Ha! Real Estate Exam Prep Podcast
Episode 074 - Exam Questions 28

A-Ha! Real Estate Exam Prep Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 44:40


Episode 074 - Exam Questions 28 Going through state exam questions to help real estate students pass their state exam.   01:20 – Never a bad time to get into the real estate industry. 03:45 – One year anniversary of the A-Ha! Podcast. Thank you!! 06:10 – Email from Lauren. Email brian@ahareep.com for the PSI exam outline. 08:55 – Messenger message: what can a student do if they don't pass the exam in time and have to retake the real estate class? 14:50 – Difference between net and gross leases. 18:05 – What is the right of first refusal? Is the seller required to sell their property? 20:00 – Calculating closing costs and how it works with down payment, appraised value, and discount points. The lender bases their lending criteria on the lower of the purchase price or appraised value. 22:37 – Cost of discount points: $325,000 purchase price, $340,000 appraised value, 20% down payment, and 1.5 discount points paid. $325,000 x 80% = $260,000 x 1.5% = $3,900. 27:22 – What should an agent do if they notice the water heater is not operable? 31:18 – What rule is broken when a lender changes the loan terms at the closing table and pressures the borrower to sign the loan documents? Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA), TRID, and RESPA. 37:00 – How to remember blockbusting, steering, and redlining. Blockbusting: busting up (breaking up) the neighborhood; Steering: steering (guiding) clients to or away from certain areas based upon protected class; Redling: illegal lending practice where lenders draw a “red line” around areas they do not want to lend in based upon a protected class   A-Ha LINKS   Email info@ahareep.com   Web www.ahareep.com   Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AHA.REEP   YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrxAjI5Li4Ll3Epwcyc0i6A

P.E.E.P. Podcast
Episode 55: Science, Psi, and Placebos

P.E.E.P. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 13:47


In this brief episode, Nicolle considers the idea that the placebo effect isn't a bad thing, and shares information from two long-time researchers who have come to that conclusion.Read the articles quoted in this episode: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/placebo-can-work-even-know-placebo-201607079926and https://www.health.harvard.edu/mental-health/the-power-of-the-placebo-effect?and https://labblog.uofmhealth.org/rounds/studies-and-real-life-placebos-have-a-powerful-healing-effect-on-body-and-mindSubscribe to Nicolle's newsletter at https://www.nicollemorock.com/Find Nicolle's books: https://www.amazon.com/Nicolle-Morock/e/B07Q8BQLP2?ref_=pe_1724030_132998060Theme music is provided by the talented Mr. Jeremy Moss http://jeremymosscomposer.com/ (Listen through the end of the podcast to hear the whole theme song.)Connect with Nicolle at www.peeppodcast.com and https://www.facebook.com/P.E.E.P.PodcastGet merchandise at https://www.teepublic.com/user/peep-podcast

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)
AFR Nº 356: El Instituto Tavistock y la Nueva Edad Media (parte 1)

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 101:02


¿Quiénes son los Illuminati? ¿Qué es el Instituto Tavistock? La ventana de Overton. La nueva Edad Media. Las ideas emocionalmente atractivas. La pauperización cultural. Manipulación de izquierdas y derechas. Los lavados de cerebros colectivos. Instituto Tavistock desarrolla el proyecto gubernamental especial. Tavistock en Argentina. La Agenda 2030: Serás pobre y feliz. La inviabilidad del ecologismo tonto. El personal esencial. Estados de angustia persistente. Tres condiciones que el Tavistock le sugiere al FMI y BM. Relacionados: Más sobre los Illuminati https://alfilodelarealidad.com/?s=illuminati Nueva plataforma de cursos (https://miscursosvirtuales.net). * * * Programa de Afiliados * * * iVoox comparte con AFR un pequeño porcentaje si usas uno de estos enlaces: * Disfruta de la experiencia iVoox sin publicidad, con toda la potencia de volumen, sincronización de dispositivos y listas inteligentes ilimitadas: Premium anual https://www.ivoox.vip/premium?affiliate-code=68e3ae6b7ef213805d8afeeea434a491 Premium mensual https://www.ivoox.vip/premium?affiliate-code=7b7cf4c4707a5032e0c9cd0040e23919 * La mejor selección de podcasts en exclusiva con iVoox Plus Más de 50.000 episodios exclusivos y nuevos contenidos cada día. ¡Suscríbete y apoya a tus podcasters favoritos! Plus https://www.ivoox.vip/plus?affiliate-code=258b8436556f5fabae31df4e91558f48 Más del mundo del misterio en nuestro portal: alfilodelarealidad.com

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
District Council: Lukas Stelzle

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 12:41


Welcome to this episode! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Lukas Stelzle, Midwest District Secretary/Treasurer, about his journey in Kappa Kappa Psi and goals for his District. Transcription coming soon. Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Rare Candy
Massagetism

Rare Candy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 93:46


Happy New Year, RC Heads. Glen and Psi talk about CTE, Boomers and technology, autism, MMR, and more Del Bigtree's Vaxed Documentary https://odysee.com/@VaccineDocumentaries:6/VAXXED--FROM-COVER-UP-TO-CATASTROPHE--FULL-2016-FILM-:9 New Premium RC Gain of Fiction: Jurassic Park episode on Substack https://rarecandy.substack.com/p/gain-of-fiction-vol-1-jurassic-park#details Follow All Things Rare Candy https://linktr.ee/RareCandy

The Robin Smith Show
#099 Kim Schneiderman

The Robin Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 99:40


Kim Schneiderman, MSW, LCSW, is a Certified Internal Family System's (IFS) psychotherapist with the Psychotherapy and Spirituality Institute (PSI) in Manhattan. She is also the author of Step Out of Your Story: Writing Exercises to Reframe and Transform Your Life (New World Library, 2015) and the Novel Perspective blog on Psychology Today. She has taught self-discovery writing workshops at the New York Open Center, the 92nd Street Y, the JCC of Manhattan, Vassar College, Sivananda Yoga Ashram in the Bahamas, among other venues, and has lectured on the spirituality of crisis and conflict at NYU's Post-Graduate certificate program in Social Work and Spiritual Care and PSI's Summer Certificate Program in Spiritually Informed Psychotherapies. Her self-paced online DailyOm course, Reframing Your Narrative About Challenging Relationships offers perspective-bending writing exercises including IFS-inspired dialogues with triggered parts. You can read more about Kim on her website stepoutofyourstory.comLinksStepoutofyourstory.comReframing Your Narrative About Challenging RelationshipsStep Out of Your Story: Writing Exercises to Reframe and Transform Your LifeNovel Perspective on Psychology Todayhttps://www.facebook.com/stepoutofyourstoryArticlesYour Anger Knows Your WorthYour Anxiety Loves YouThe Self Lost and FoundHow to Reframe Your Narrative About Challenging RelationshipsWelcome to Spiritual Boot CampSitting On My Couch I Find My Ruby Slippers--Jerome C. Glenn Lifeboat Foundation Guardian Awardpress release--Listeners of The Robin Smith Show can now join our Kiva Lending Team and help us in our effort to bring more good into being.Join Team Robley on Kiva!

A Tale of Two Hygienists Podcast
Probing Implants and Disease Prevalence Revisted with Katrina Sanders, RDH Fast Facts: Perio Edition

A Tale of Two Hygienists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 11:34


This week we bring back two great episodes that Katrina did for us in 2022. One is about probing implants and the other is about the disease rates we are seeing, but not treating! Please go back and see what other episodes you could have missed by using the link below for all of our Fast Facts! Quotes:  “Help me out, Dad. What is the percentage of individuals who have moderate to severe gingivitis? And that number is 27.6% of our patient population. That is according to my Midwest dad by the way.” “And to clarify even more, the population of true individuals, of individuals who are adults, who do not have irreversible bone loss at this point, that percentage is 3.2%. So 3.2% of our patients are considered truly healthy patients.” “For the first time, dental implants have been located in the mouth long enough to actually develop disease around them.” “The vast majority of us were taught in dental and dental hygiene school to be very careful around dental implants.” “When probing a dental implant, about 50% of the PSI or pressure that is typically used around a tooth structure should be applied to identify the base around a pocket affiliated with a dental implant.” Links: More Fast Facts: https://www.ataleoftwohygienists.com/fast-facts/  Katrina Sanders Website: https://www.katrinasanders.com  Katrina Sanders Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedentalwinegenist/  Sources: Eke, P. I., Zhang, X., Lu, H., Wei, L., Thornton-Evans, G., Greenlund, K. J., … Croft, J. B. (2016). Predicting Periodontitis at State and Local Levels in the United States. Journal of Dental Research, 95(5), 515–522. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022034516629112 Li, Y., Lee, S., Hujoel, P., Su, M., Zhang, W., Kim, J., ... & De Vizio, W. (2010). Prevalence and severity of gingivitis in American adults. American journal of dentistry, 23(1), 9. Renvert, Stefan, G. Rutger Persson, Flavia Q. Pirih, and Paulo M. Camargo. "Peri‐implant health, peri‐implant mucositis, and peri‐implantitis: Case definitions and diagnostic considerations." Journal of clinical periodontology 45 (2018): S278-S285.

Mindalia.com-Salud,Espiritualidad,Conocimiento
Tantra y su Poder: 5 claves para despertar tu cuerpo, por Valeria Collado

Mindalia.com-Salud,Espiritualidad,Conocimiento

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 43:20


En Ivoox puedes encontrar sólo algunos de los audios de Mindalia. Para escuchar las 4 grabaciones diarias que publicamos entra en https://www.mindaliatelevision.com. Si deseas ver el vídeo perteneciente a este audio, pincha aquí: https://youtu.be/hhnpP9pBdO8 “Con S de Exo” es un programa que invita a la expansión del placer y la consciencia. Los especialistas brindarán distintas prácticas, ejercicios y reflexiones que le darán a tus encuentros íntimos un toque diferente. Un espacio para la deconstrucción de las normas y el incentivo del placer. Se compartirán las claves de esta vía milenaria para despertar el cuerpo cerrado, traumatizado, anestesiado y transformar la vida en un estado orgásmico, fluyendo a cada momento en abundancia, creatividad, energía, pasión y conexión. Valeria Collado Mujer caminante, buscadora, terapeuta y profesora de Respiración Ovárica, alquimia femenina, Tantra Shivaista Cachemir, Sexualidad Sagrada, respiración holotrópica, Psi transpersonal y fonoaudióloga. Infórmate de todo el programa en: http://television.mindalia.com/catego... **CON PREGUNTAS AL FINAL DE LA CONFERENCIA PARA RESOLVER TUS DUDAS *** Si te parece interesante.... ¡COMPÁRTELO!! :-) DURACIÓN: 45m Aproximadamente ------------INFORMACIÓN SOBRE MINDALIA---------- Mindalia.com es una ONG internacional sin ánimo de lucro. Nuestra misión es la difusión universal de contenidos para la mejora de la consciencia espiritual, mental y física. -Apóyanos con tu donación en este enlace: https://streamelements.com/mindaliapl... -Colabora con el mundo suscribiéndote a este canal, dejándonos un comentario de energía positiva en nuestros vídeos y compartiéndolos. De esta forma, este conocimiento llegará a mucha más gente. - Sitio web: https://www.mindalia.com - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindalia.ayuda/ - Twitter: http://twitter.com/mindaliacom - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mindalia_com/ - Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/mindaliacom - Vaughn: https://vaughn.live/mindalia - VK: https://vk.com/mindaliacom - Odysee: https://odysee.com/@Mindalia.com *Mindalia.com no se hace responsable de las opiniones vertidas en este vídeo, ni necesariamente participa de ellas. *Mindalia.com no se responsabiliza de la fiabilidad de las informaciones de este vídeo, cualquiera sea su origen. *Este vídeo es exclusivamente informativo.

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
Happy Holidays 2022!

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 2:20


We, members of the National Communications Committee, want to wish each and every Brother a happy, joyous, and pleasant holiday season!

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)
AFR Nº EXTRA 53: Virgen de la Candelaria: ¿Secreto Templario o Encuentro Cercano de Tercer Tipo? - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 35:45


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! ¿Cuándo y cómo aparece la Virgen? ¿Hubo una aparición previa, en 1310? ¿Cómo aparece la hipótesis OVNI? Relacionados: La Virgen de la Candelaria: ¿secreto templario o encuentro cercano de tercer tipo? https://alfilodelarealidad.com/virgen-candelaria-secreto-templario-encuentro-de-tercer-tipo/ Podcast AFR Nº 256: El enigma de las Vírgenes Negras https://alfilodelarealidad.com/podcast-afr-no-256-el-enigma-de-las-virgenes-negras/ Podcast AFR Nº EXTRA 08: La manipulación de la Historia: la mentira de la Virgen de Guadalupe https://alfilodelarealidad.com/podcast-afr-no-extra-08-la-manipulacion-de-la-historia-la-mentira-de-la-virgen-de-guadalupe/ Más sobre el mundo del Misterio en alfilodelarealidad.comEscucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de Al Filo de la Realidad. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/3844

The Blue Planet Show
Ken Winner on the Blue Planet Show- Wing Foil Interview

The Blue Planet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 92:17


Ken Winner, wing foil designer extraordinaire talks about his background as a pro windsurfer and how he became a designer at Duotone and developed the first inflatable handheld wing for foiling.  At first there was little interest in his invention but once a few people tried it, the sport of wing foiling really took off. Transcript of the interview:  Aloha friends. It's Robert Stehlik. Thank you for tuning into another episode of the Blue Planet Show, where I interview foil athletes, designers, and thought leaders.  You can watch this show right here on YouTube or listen to it on your favorite podcast app. Today's interview is with Ken Winter, the designer at Duotone wing designer extraordinaire. And as always, I ask questions, not just about equipment and technique, but also try to find out more about his background, what inspires him and how he got into water sports. So Ken was really open in this interview, shared a lot of information about wing design, even showed his computer screen where he designs wings. So that's  at the very end of the interview. So you don't want to miss that part. It's really cool if you're into Wing design and wanna know more about the materials and the construction, the design and Ken's philosophy. This is a really good show for all that kind of information. During this interview, I'm gonna play a little bit of footage of Alan Cadiz Wing foiling in Kailua. I got some drone footage of him, which was after this interview, but he's using the 2023 Duotone unit Wing 4.5 meter wing. I'll play some of that in the background. Thank you so much for your time, Ken, and for sharing all the detailed information. So without further ado, here is Ken Winner. Okay. Good morning, Ken. How are you doing today? Good morning. I'm pretty good. All right. It's a little bit of a rainy and windy day here on Oahu. How's the weather on Maui? Same. Same. Yeah. Yep. So have you had super stormy winds the last few days? It's been crazy windy here. Yeah, it's been gusting 45 at times. Do you actually go out in those kind of conditions or do you wait? Yeah. Windy days. Yeah. It's pretty fun. Yeah. So you've been doing what you, what do you do on days like that? You go on a down window or you just go go off? I only do down windows with my wife nowadays. That's her favorite thing. Otherwise I from a friend's house over on Stable Road and Peter actually lives on Stable Road and so we launched there, go out race around a bit, test different wings, hydrofoils. Nice. What kind of equipment were you on in, on those super windy days? Anything from a two to a four. Sometimes we go out pretty overpowered just cause we have something we wanna try and we don't have many choices. Some days we just have to go and do what we can with what we have. We do a lot of prototyping in the four and five meter size. We do a fair amount in the three meter size and then smaller and bigger. We also prototype and test quite a bit, but maybe not as intensely. Nice. Okay. But before we get more into all the equipment and stuff like that, I wanted to get talk a little bit about your background. So tell us a little bit about start in the beginning, like wh how, where you grew up and how you got into water sports and all that kind of stuff. was born a long time ago, 1955, so there's a lot of history there. You don't wanna hear it all. Grew up near Annapolis, Maryland. Did a fair amount of recreational cruising type sailing. My dad owned boats. Built a lot of stuff when I was a kid. Owned a couple boats when I was a teenager. Started windsurfing in 75. How extensive do you want this to be? Started windsurfing in 75, won the world championship in 77. We won again, 80 in 81. We had the right there on Oahu, where you are. We had the World Cup, the PanAm World Cup, which I. Actually, yeah don't worry about making it short. Like we, we got time. So just actually like how did you get into windsurfing? What was your first experience with that? Or what were you doing? Anything other like surfing or water sports before windsurfing? Yeah. No, I've never actually surfed. As I said, I grew up sailing I, when I was a teenager, maybe 17 or 16, I bought a old wooden boat, a little wooden boat, a Bahamas fixed it sailed around, kept it house else. I also bought a shark catamaran sail out bit. So I was into sailing and I, I saw an ad for a windsurfer and thought that would be a good thing for me to try. So wind, Also about the same time bought a hang glider. So I taught myself to hang glide and but I really enjoyed the windsurfing more so sold everything else and just focused on windsurfing. So that you were around 20 years old? Yeah. About 20. Yeah. Did you you have any like formal education or did you go like straight into wind surfing? Yeah, it's funny, I was gonna University of Maryland when I started windsurf, and I might have stuck with that, but I started windsurf and thinking, oh, I can go to college little, a little time windsurfing. And and then when I'm ready to quit, I can go back to school. But I never did actually go back to school, kept wind surfing. For the next forever , 23 years, but ba So basically you're self-taught, like all the knowledge you have on with computers and aerodynamics or, all that is basically from experience and self-taught kind of thing or? Yeah, I do a lot of reading. I remember in, sometime in the early eighties Barry Spanner, I think got a book. The title was The Aerodynamics of Sailing. And I, I heard him make a comment about it, so I got it and I read from cover to cover several times and really absorbed, I think the lessons of that. And did a lot of other reading after that. But that was sort my foundation for learning about the technical side of sailing. , nowadays, of course, it's super easy to get a lot of information online, really good information. So unless you're pursuing a career like attorney or doctor or degreed engineer or PhD scientist, you don't need formal education as much as you used to. If you need it at all, I don't know. But yeah, I think as long as you're a lifelong learner, you can pretty much teach yourself almost anything. . Yeah. Okay. Yeah, a lot of things, for sure. Yeah. So I'm gonna, I'm gonna do some screen sharing here from the windsurfing Hall of Fame. There's little bit of information about you online here. So in the, so you started windsurfing in 1975. That's, this was the day, days when they, the booms were still made out of wood and so on, right? Talk a little bit about your first first wind windsurfing set up bought a used board for 300 bucks and went out, taught myself to use it, and just became hooked like most people. Did it every chance I had. And at first all I focused on was trying to improve my skills. That was hundred percent of my effort. But then gradually over time, I got more interested in improving the equipment. So over time I did some things like. Built my own boards and built my own rigs, masks spoons. Yeah. And you start, you started winning a lot of races, so you were very focused on the com racing side of windsurfing or also I guess freestyle as well, right? Yeah. So I won the freestyle world two or three times, and that was back, it was a much simpler affair than it's now. Of course, the guys who do freestyle nowadays circles around all of us who did freestyle back then. yeah. Around. But you gotta start somewhere in every sport. And so that, that's a picture of Robbie and Jurgen in me at the pan, the Panta actually which was right there on Wahoo. Over in Kai. Yeah. And you were able to beat Robbie, I guess at that point. Still, and you have several world world titles right? In Windsurf racing. Yeah. Robbie and I were rivals to some extent, but he was younger and when he got to be when he achieved his full adult strength, he was extremely hard. I started when I was 20. He started when he was nine. And it's surprise that he dominated the sport so much for so many years. He's a amazing athlete and really great guy. Good entrepreneurs, got a great business. And and we're still rivals. , it's been a good, it's been a good 40 some years. . And then you started build, you said you started building your own boards and making smaller and smaller boards, right? Yeah. So I, excuse me. Yeah I built a a nine foot board. Actually prior to that I had a board shaped for me and glass, and that was a board I would say. I basically invented carving, jives, cause everybody had boards back then. I had a round tail board, which carve through my, instead of skid through them. And basically from that point on, I focused a lot on trying to improve my equipment. I  you're showing a picture of the Transatlantic Windsurf race, which was a pretty funny. That was in about 98, I think. But this has gotta be pretty boring for anybody watching. People are interested in what's happening now. Yeah. No, I don't think so. I don't think so at all. I don't think any, what he's gonna find is boring at all, but, , yeah, just yeah. And then I guess you yeah, I tell us a little bit about how you got into the Wing, wing des, or were you designing w windsurfing sales for duo to before kites, or like how, or, and then, yeah. Just tell us a little bit about how you got Yeah. So I went surfed intensely for three years. I guess in 97, I think I won the US Racing Championships. And then just shortly after that I tried kiting for the first time. And basically after I tried kiting for the first time, I I sold on my windsurfing gear and got straight into kiting. My, my first kite experience was with Don Monague right off Stable Road on Maui. He was out kiting. I was out windsurfing and I told him I wanted to try that, so he handed me his control bar and the leashed, his board to my ankle, and he told me how to secure the kite. And I, so I kited back and forth down to Kaha for the next half hour. And so that was my, that's how I got hooked on kiting. And so from the very first session, you were able to stay upwind and everything and no, I didn't stay upwind. I ended up down at Kaha, so starting at camp one, ending up at Kaha. Oh, okay. And yeah and when, not long after that, I spent a week on Maui hiding every day. And and then a few months after that I did some, I did a how kite video. Cause there were no schools, hardly anybody knew how to learn. So I did some videos. Robbie was saying needed somehow to kite videos. So took the opportunity to do that. We sold about 30,000 videos and then of course, schools came along and the internet came along. So that was, there's, you don't need that kinda stuff anymore. It's all online. Yeah. Oh, so you had a, like a VHS tape on how to kite and sold it like through magazines and stuff like that. But I actually, I used the Nash distributor network to the dealer network to sell boxes of videos to dealers who would then them, to 'em, to customers. And I had a website so I could retail videos directly to the customers. And we actually did a total of three howto videos over a couple years time. And then I helped convince boards and more, which is the parent company of Duotone and fanatic to get into kite boarding kit, making kites. . And so that was about the year 2000. And we tried to hire people to do the job of designing kites, but there were so few kit designers at the time that I ended up taking it on. So I had learning design kit weeks and in China working 16 hours a day learning how to use computer aid design software, CAD software, and then pumping up existing kites and trying to figure out the geometry and trying to figure out how to do that on the Ultimately it worked, so we ended up with a decent and started growing the company from that point. Okay. So boards and more at that time, they had Brand was fanatic and or what were their brands that they were run? It, I'm just gonna say Boards and More is the parent company of the, the parent company that I work for now. , which is we produce Duotone kites and Fanatic windsurfing gear and kites surfing and surfing gear and, sub foiling gear. Boards and More is the company I've been working for the last 22 years. And right now what is your official role at Duotone? I know, I just wanted to say I've been waiting such a long time to get you on the show because you're always so busy. You said you have to, come up with a whole new line of wings and kites and everything, so you were too busy to meet with me. But Yeah, tell me a little bit about like your job, like your role and how you were able to make time today to come here, . Yeah. Yeah, great question. I I tend to overcom commit and try to do more things than I can reasonably do. So years I was designing kites, but I also decided to start designing hydrofoils and that turned into a lot of work. And then I started designing wings and that turned into more work. So I was to foil design work off on some very capable guys that we in Mauritius and Germany. And then more recently I've been able to push the kite design work off on Sky now. Sky's been working with me for 18 years. We've both been learning a lot about kite design and in the last year, so I've been helping him master the software that we use for kit design. And so now he's doing the kite design. And I would say that he's for sure one of the most experienced and capable designers in the world, even though he hasn't been the lead on kite design until recently, but he's now and he's doing a great job. He's making some really great improvements. So having a good teacher, right? Hope . So having so now I'm just focused on maintenance, so that, like your job basically at duo tone right now is wing designer? Yeah. I'm focused on wing design now, and we have two main wing models the unit has handled, boom. And. The unit is more focused on wave riding and down winding. The slick is more free ride and freestyle. Unit has a little bit more Wingspan Slick has a little less the okay. So before we go into the current gear let's go back to when you first started winging and like how you came up with The Wing. I interviewed mark Rappa Horse and Alan Ez as well on the show. And they both talked about how, you guys used to go out downwind together with the standup paddle foil boards and and then, when one day you showed up with the wing. So can you talk a little bit about. Like how you first came up with the wing and the inflatable wing design and so on. Yeah, I was trying to downwind hydrofoil with these guys, and I wasn't doing it that well, was having great success and I was getting a sore shoulder. So I was trying to figure out how could I do downwind hydrofoiling and not get a shoulder? And I, by chance, I saw a video of Flash Austin with his homemade handheld wing that he was using on a hydrofoil at Kaha. And I thought eight years before I had designed some inflatable handheld wings for suffering. Not with a hydro, but just for, and so I thought I wonder if something like that would work. It fits my skillset because I do inflatable adult toys. And so I, I went home, got on the computer, designed crude. Another crude, handheld, inflatable wing. So those designs are you sent me an email with some pictures. Is that from that time when you designed your first wings? Yeah. That, that blue and black wing was my first effort to do a handheld inflatable wing. My idea was to use it on aboard, and that was back in two 10 Sky and I tried it. So this one was the one the original one that you made for for basically wind windsurfing on or on a regular windsurf board? Well, a sub board, yeah. Board. Ok. Yeah. And so it was very similar to what we have today, actually, you yeah. It has some similarities. Yeah. And then you would, hold one hand would go here on one hand here. Yeah, that's how it was at first. Okay. And I tried another one a month or two later and Sky and I didn't, we tried and we didn't really think it was that much fun. Another guy who designs for us took the idea and made a inflatable rig. We call it the I rig, which was pretty nice for kids, very low impact. So I remember that. So in that picture of six wings, you can see the first two in two 10, 2011. And then in 2018, I tried something. I just yeah, just very quickly threw something together. I modified an existing neo design and like a Neo's, one of our kites. And sent that off to the factory. And then when I took it to the beach and stepped on the board and sailed away, it popped up. I popped up on the foil immediately and sailed right out to the reef. Turning around, I fell and I had trouble getting going again. But basically I considered that a success and I figured that would allow me to do down windows without stressing my shoulders. I kept building prototypes after that sky went, this was June of 2018. Sky went to a dealer meeting in there and demonstrated it for everybody. Everybody there and nobody was interested. And then we took it to the SI show in August and nobody was interested. But then finally in November, people started getting interested. I got our ceo Alber. He's a, he used to be a snowboarder on the German national team, so hes really good. And he had thought it looked too complicated and difficult, but then when he tried it, he discovered that it's not too complicated and difficult. Maybe we make some of these and people will buy 'em. So at that point we decided we were gonna go into production with wings, and I think some other brands decided at that point. Interesting concept. Of your of your wife, and then you also sent me this little video. So she was the fir you said probably the first woman to wing Foil. Is that, Yeah. Sky's wife, Christine and Julie both tried it out. I think right around Christmas time of 2018. And then after that Julie got very interested in it. And I took her out at KEG quite a few times, and I think this was her first time on the North Shore , and she was a little excited by the size of the swell . So nowadays she, she really enjoys doing downs from to the harbor and she can do it in about 35 minutes if she's in a hurry. And it's her favorite sport. Cool. Yeah. And then this was your first wing design? The foil wing. And I actually got one of those. I've been, I was waiting for a long time and then finally got the wing and I think it was a three meter, the first one I got. And it was yeah, it was super cool because same as you were, we were trying to do the foil doman runs and Really kind. It's really hard actually. But talk a little bit about this first wing design and because it had a boom and no strut and then it had full battens and so on. So talk a little bit about the swing. Your first Yeah. Starting from scratch, we had no, I had no idea really what to do with it. We, we tried differentl angles and different patterns. I put bats in it because that reduces the fluttering by quite a bit. Nowadays we don't have belong bats because we've found other ways to reduce the flutter. Some of us have a lot of brands go ahead and continue making wing wings with a lot of flutter, but I don't really care for that. The boom I made my first few wings with handles as you saw in the photo, and I really hated the handles. Then I went to a kind of a strap on rigid handle. And then after that I thought why should I have a strut and a boom or strut and a handle and I can just have this one boom or long tube and potentially save money and hassle. So that was the reasoning there, but, It turns out the strut is really nice for stabilizing draft. And so we went back to using a strut sometime later. Yeah. Like I know the, that first wing, it was it did that TikTok thing right? When you held it by the front handle it, it didn't really behave very well. Just lefting behind you. It didn't yeah. So was that, I guess part of the reason for that was because it didn't have that strut to of stabilize it. Yeah. I think the strut kinda acts like a ruter in some respects helped stabilize the it's really hard to know what's gonna be important to people when you're starting with something new. One of the, one of the things I have to do is I have. I can't just pay attention to the things I like to do. I have to pay attention to what other people like to do. At first, to me, the idea of holding the wing by the front handle I just never did it. I would hold it by the boom. So never really noticed that instability when I was using it myself. Yeah, but basically, yeah, that's what, how when I used it on a wave, I would just hold the front of the boom and it worked fine. But but then, yeah, I guess some of the other wings were really stable, just holding it in the front handle and you'd be able to surf with it, just holding the front handle, which, which then I guess so yeah. So another thing that's kinda interesting is if you wanting, that will be pretty stable when you're just on the, we experimented with. And the thing we found is that if I let the air out of my wing and let it get a little bit floppy, take it down to three or four psi, it will fly on the leash. Really stable. But then if I pump it back up to eight psi and I haven't really tight 12 canopy, which is something I like, then it's no longer really stable on the leash. So far we kinda have to make the choice. Do we wanna, do we want our wing more floppy and therefore it'll fly on the, or do we want our wing more stable? Which it's less stable on the leash, but it's more stable otherwise. And so basic, so that's basically why you have those two different wings. One is the unit for more that's more, I guess more stable being on supplying by itself. And then the unit is more, has more of a profile. And is that kind of the thought behind it? We go for a lot of canopy tension on both models of wings. We're not gonna compromise on canopy tension cause it gives, it helps give lift to the, when it's, and it improves power when you're pumping. It improves de power and stability when you're overpowered. So we're not gonna compromise on canopy tension but the difference, one of the differences between the slick and the unit is the unit has more sleep. In the leading edge, and that helps improve the stability. While it's, if you're surfing a wave and holding it by the front handle, the fact that it has more sweep than the slick makes it a little more stable in that respect than the slick. But then the downside is you have more wingspan, so it's easier to catch a wing tip, by sweep. You're saying like the leading edge in the front is a little bit more like this versus that kind of thing? Or, but what do you mean by sweep? Sweep is the you know how some airplanes, like a fighter jet will have wings that are swept back.  And some wings, like a sail plane will have wings that are not swept back. . So sleep is that back angle in the leading edge. Understood. Okay. And DL is the up angle in the leading edge. So we've done quite a bit with different DL patterns and some things I thought would be better weren't. So I thought a progressive DL would be more stable than a linear dl. And a linear DL is actually more stable. So the new unit has a very linear DL shape and uhno. Another thing that's kinda interesting is some wings have very little dl and the advantage of that is when the wing is lying flat on the water, it's less likely to flip over. The disadvantage of that is it's hard to have a, with a deep canopy and with a lot of canopy tension when you have little, so again we're giving up the fact that. . Our wings when they're lying belly down on the water, are more likely to flip over than somebody else's mic. But on the other hand, we have the ability to put in more depth while maintaining really good canopy tension cause we have more behavioral. So would you say there's a downside to having more canopy tension? Like to, to me it seems like the more tension you have, the, the better the profile works, but I guess like sometimes on a wave or whatever, when you're luing it, it has a little bit more drag, right? Is that, or like what's your experience with a tension? The canopy tension gives you less drag if you have, if more canopy tension gives you less drag when you're, but the wing is more stable while if it has A bit less canopy tension. If I let some air pressure out my wing and make it have less canopy tension, it'll flutter more. And that makes it drier and sad to say it makes it more stable. Yeah. Cause it basically when it doesn't have a lot of attention, it can just completely flatten out and just flutter flat. Versus attention has, it still has that profile. Yeah. So thet thing you can have is a wing that flaps and flutters and loves, but that drag impart a certain amount of stability. I see. This is one of those things where you, it's hard. It's hard to get, it's hard to get everything you want. Divorce, trade offs. Okay. So maybe talk a little bit about things you've tried early on that were that ended up on the trash tape and versus, like things that, I guess like the full battens, you said in the beginning you tried them or used them to reduce the flutter, but I remember those battens used to break really easily too in the waves, right? So the, they're thin battens. Yeah. So early on I never really even imagined I would be using a wing in the waves, which is why I didn't mind putting bats in . They don't, they're not really compatible that way. It's, I did make a three strut wing early on. My, my fourth wing in 2005th wing in 2018 was a three stru wing. And it was, perceptively heavier. So I didn't make any more three str wings for a while. So by, sorry, by three struts you mean three inflatable struts? Like this kind of Yeah. So the blue one? Yeah. The 3.0 from July of two 18. Yeah. Yeah. I tried that and it was, not a great wing and a little on the heavy side. So I decided I was gonna try to stick with just one strut, and then actually went to a home after that.  For the simplicity and the low cost and so forth. So the three stru is something I abandoned early on, but it does have potential advantages. So we've been doing more work with that. F1 has a nice three wing. It has its pros and cons, but there are people who like it. And one of the reasons is the fact that you have strut takes away the corner, the the back corner at the tip of a wing, and that's the place people drag most often when they're trying to get going. Getting rid that, I'm sorry, screen. Share that again. So what you're saying, like this corner is what drags in the water when you're to get foiling, right? Yeah. And so a certain arrangement of three strut, I certain three strut geometry will get rid of that corner. . So I think F1 actually has like a patent a patent or a patent pending for that third strut. But it looks like you were the first one to develop that. So how does that work? They They, if they came to contesting it with us, I don't think they could win. But I don't think either of us or them are interested in having a fight. So I don't think it'll be a problem for us. So basically when, I know Duotone is also has a, I think you, I know you have a patent for the hand, the rigid handles on the unit. Are there any other patents that you're, you've gotten or applied for and Yeah, we've, and the question is like, why didn't you apply for a patent for the inflatable wings in the first place? Or did you? Because I think in part you have to do it pretty quickly and it can't really be in the public domain. So these wings that I made in 2000 10, 2 11 From what I understand is they were out there in the public domain and they were, they happened many years before. And so just trying to patent an inflatable wing I don't think that was an option. But we've tried to, we've applied for patents on various aspects of the inflatable wing design as, things related to the DL and boom. And trying to think, what can I mention? What can I not, there's some things we do that we don't even talk about because some people. Aren't aware and we don't wanna give them ideas. Yeah, you don't wanna give away your secret sauce. So I understand. Not too, it's not too soon. Yeah. . Yeah. Okay. So actually I had a question from a friend, my friend Steve. He was asking, have you ch or about basically, on windsurf sales where the can doer and stuff, they have a left tube to improve the laminar flow on the bottom side of the, have you tried that? Have you tried playing with that and or what are your thoughts on that? Yeah, that, that's a popular topic. It came up in in connection with kite design years ago, and I think when I was picking up. The first kite that I actually owned from Don Monague, he was talking about that very idea and doing it in connection with kites. And Don Monague has done amazing amount of work along those lines in connection with kites. And if you were to see PDFs, he put all the things you tried, you would be astonished. Don would be a really interesting guy for you to talk to on this. Don Monague. Okay. Yeah. . Yeah, he was the kit designer for Nash 20 years ago, or 23 years ago. , he's moved on to a lot of really interesting things. But he was talking about it then he worked with it then, and it, it's never really worked for kites for a variety of reasons. There's weight, there's the tendency for. Water to get in and weigh down the kite. Complexity, cost and the actual benefit is hard to find. I've also tried to do elliptical, leading edges in kites and where I have two leading edges side by side. Kinda two bladders next to each other kind of thing. Yeah, exactly. Trying to thin out the shape of the wing and make it stiffer. And that, that's been really hard to make it work. There are people who, tried this stuff and they, know, somebody's probably gonna succeed at some point someday, but so far hasn't One of the problems with double surface on a wing is that the lower surface tends to keep the flow attached, and that attached flow sucks the second surface down. And actually tends to suck the whole wing down. So we spent a lot of time making sure our wings always lift. If you're locking the wing, it lifts if it, if you get hit by a lifts every, all the time, our wings are lifting. If you add that second surface, boom, your lift goes away. The flow remains attached on the bottom of the wing.  As it passes, the leading edge sucks the lower surface down and sucks the whole wing down with it. And this is something I've actually experimented with and tried and observed, so I'm not just speculating here. Interesting. Again, I'm not saying it'll never work, but it's not a slam dunk. It's not an obvious, easy thing to do.  And the benefits aren't obvious either, so Yeah. And it's more weight, it's more cost. So we and with wings in particular, we have to worry about weight. Wind surfers don't worry about weight nearly as much as we do apparently. Tis are, you have to hold it, hold that thing up in, in your hand, and light wind especially then the weight really makes a difference. It does. Yeah, for sure. What about rigid wings? I know people have been making rigid wings for on the ice and stuff like that, but and forever, have you played around with that or have you tested rigid wings? Yeah. Yeah. I saw early on I'd like to have a rigid wing that opened up like an umbrella. . And I actually have tried some rigid and hybrid prototype. But the problem you run into there is you lose one of the greatest attractions of wings, inflatable wings, which is the simplicity in the fact that you just blow 'em up and go and when you have rigid components, elements. You make a more complex, harder to rig up. They're less robust because something like a carbon fiber tube can break pretty easily, especially in the waves.  And I question whether a lot of people would want give up the simplicity and the robustness of inflatable in order speed or higher or whatever tructure might give you. That's priority for Right. Would working on that for kids and people who aren't fanatical wingers, people who wanna get into it, but aren't gonna be doing it every day, I would, I'm interested in making it better for families rather than, Better for Kailin . Yeah. But obviously you're also very interested in going fast and testing. I know ANCA has told me that you guys go out and race each other and see what's faster and test equipment and that's, he told me about the Mike's lab foil that he let you know, you let him try your foil and then he got one himself and I just got one recently. So those are, yeah, just having a fast foil makes a big difference that alone, right? I do going fast up to a point about the Mike's slab, what happened was during the pandemic we had a shortage of fanatic hydrofoils. We weren't getting the latest stuff. We weren't even able to get anything out China for a while. My wife is pretty into getting the latest stuff. So she ordered Mike's lab hydrofoil and she got it and she actually had a hard time with it, so I started using it. So I used it a fair amount. But she went to an 1100 Mike's Slab and that worked really well for her. Then she moved to 800, which worked well for her. Then she went to a and that worked well for her, and now she's, now, she now, I dunno she's in the five 40 to 800 range nowadays, depending on what she wants to and so through all that I've been using her hydros as well. But I also use, fanatic has some new stuff that I also use. Peter Slate, who I sail with a lot, is using fanatics and he's going really fast with, he's hard to keep up with. And Alan, of course is very hard to keep up with too. Yeah. And I, sorry, should, when we're talking about fast and I should say don't try to go faster race, because I think that but I'm not sure how to put this. I think that racing with slow equipment is actually more interesting than racing with fast equipment. In the old days of windsurfing, we raced with really slow boards. Didn't matter that we were going slow. Cause the important thing was trying to use the wind and the waves and whatever we found out there to go a little bit faster or to take a slightly shorter course than the next person. So I don't of speed as requisite on the, and. just getting on the water and racing with the stuff you have is pretty interesting. . Yeah, I that's I guess the beauty of one design racing where everybody uses the same equipment and it's not an arms race and it's more about this, your skill and sta strategy and so on, right? Yeah, exactly. And I think of it as the most social form of winging on the water because you're actually doing something with other people. And it's a very sort of a responsive thing where you do one thing and somebody will do another thing in response. So you're, there's interaction that you don't have pretty much any other time, except when you're wanting people to stay outta your way on wave, which is different kinda interaction. But getting back to the winging that Alan or Peter and I do if we're racing around side by side, Trying to go faster. What the main thing I'm doing is I'm trying to assess the performance of the wing. I'm trying to, the power delivery, I'm trying to, is the power consistent hit? Does easy to deal with gust? Is it difficult to deal with the gust when a gust hits, do I accelerate or do I just slow down because there's so much drag? And then, we'll go upwind and we'll go downwind. And if we're going downwind, we can, whether we can deeper with one wing rather than another. This all translate into performance that even someone who's not racing is gonna appreciate. And you can notice subtle differences between wings when you're side by side with somebody of equal ability. But you can't notice if you're just out there cruising by yourself. So that, that, I think that's a real valuable thing for us. But the other thing we do is we've got Finn and Jeffrey Spencer out there on our wings. They test every prototype that comes in. They write our little report and every wing that that comes in, they go out, they loop 'em and spin 'em and race around with them. Do everything that anybody does with them and evaluate them in very thorough, in a very thorough manner, I think. Yeah. I think originally they used to ride for what's it called? They used to write for Slingshot. Slingshot, yeah. So how long have they been writing for Duotone? The last few months. Okay. Yeah, they're amazing wingers. Talk a little bit about the r and d process. I guess it's like you can't really make too many changes at once yet, right? You have to change one, one variable at a time, and then like how many prototypes go into like how many prototypes do you have to make to come up with next year's wing, kind of thing. I'm just curious about that. Yeah, so for the 22 4 meter unit i, I design I name every prototype with a, from the alphabet. So I got down to Q on that one. I'm not sure how many. That's maybe 20 or so. And each one is one that you actually made. Is it just a, do they all make it to the, to be actually samples, or those are all actual samples that you made or that's a good question. I might starting design and try five different variations on my computer. , but they'll all be the same letter. That might be, it might be, okay. Four B dash one or four B dash two and I'll, okay. I'll look at all those and then I'll decide which one I wanna try and in person. And I'll send the, I'll generate patterns. Send the patterns to the factory. The factory, ship it out a week later, or five days later. And then we'll test it. But, I can go through dozens and dozens of prototypes before we finalize a line like, The unit from size two to size 6.5, which is 10 sizes. And we do build and test every size before we put any big into production. Yeah. But I guess on Maui, like basically the four meter is your, like that's the one you start with and then once you have a good four meter, then you start working on the other sizes. Is that kind of how you do it or? Usually I'll do a four or a five in a lot of iterations. I'll also do some sixes. I'll also do threes. I did quite a few threes on the latest slick design because it can be hard to get a three meter working really well. So we , we made six or seven threes before we felt like we were in the right ballpark with with the slick. Yeah, because you can't really use the same design and just make it bigger and smaller because obviously the bigger wings the, one of the issues is that they have too much wingspan, so you have to make 'em kind of lower aspect and then, but the smaller wings, it's not, the wingspan isn't so much of an issue. So can you talk a little bit about that? Like the differences be from your bigger swing to your smallest w in the same lineup, or is that Yeah, that's exactly right. The wingspan, the aspect ratio can be a little bit higher in the smaller wings. With the bigger wings, we haven't really gone over seven and we haven't adjusted the aspect ratio that much up to there. But in the future we'll probably have a seven and an eight with a little bit lower aspect ratio. Another thing you can't scale exactly is. Pretty much everything. You can't scale. Exactly. You have to make adjustments with everything. So if you take a five meter that you like and you wanna go smaller, you actually as a percentage have to go bigger with diameter of the leading edge. And because if you were to scale those down exactly to a, like a three meter, the leading edge wouldn't be big enough in diameter to get the stiffness you want. And then it goes small wing. You really want a stiff leading edge. Cuz otherwise when you're winging and gusty wind, it'll just bend. Yeah. And that, let's talk a little bit about that, the leading edge diameter, like the what you learned about that from all your designing and where, what are your thoughts on that and also the different materials. I know you're doing the unit D-lab with the a Lula fabric and stuff like that, and can you make the diameter thinner with the different fabric if you have more pressure and so on. Just go talk a little bit about that. Yeah. At first of course I was trying a lot of different diameters to see what seemed to work OK at my weight. And one of, one of the issues we have is people of all different weights are doing the sport. And we have to optimize around the average weight of the average writer wrap. So why are you showing that? Oh, I just wanted to bring up some of the wings and the different I was gonna show the aula wings and stuff like that. Okay. Sorry. Sorry. Distract you there. Yeah. So leading edge diameter is a huge topic and most of us who test are in the one 40 to one 90 weight range. So we tend to optimize for that weight range. And a four meter wing has a diameter of about 10 inches at the center. And at eight psi or eight and nine psi, that seems to enough, we've. Tried going smaller diameter. When we go to our ULA wings or glab wings are made outta right now and is great cause it's very light. It's very, and you would think that since it's so you could go smaller in diameter, but after making quite a few prototypes with smaller leading edge we see both advantages and disadvantages. So you can have a little less drag if you're going up wind or if you're in a lot of wind, you get less drag with a smaller leading edge. But if you lose a little bit of air pressure, then you have a softer leading edge. And the smaller, the leading edge, the more sensitive it's to small losses and air pressure. So with our DLA wings, our Lulu wings, we've decided to just keep the diameter about the same. And anybody that wants a little bit softer leading edge can run a little air out. And then bigger riders, the 200 pounders or 210 pound riders will have something that's fully stiff enough to handle their weight. That's one of the tradeoffs we've made with leading edge diameter. Another thing, so basically you found that you can't really even though the all Lula can handle more pressure, you can't really reduce the the leading edge diameter by much? Not yet. We can. It's just when we do it, we find that we're not happy with the tradeoffs. . And so we're leaning toward being conservative. We won't, we don't want. We don't want people to have unreasonable we don't want their expectations to be stymied. Yeah we're getting the best all around performance by keeping the leading edge diameter pretty substantial. Recently, for example, we made two identical slick prototypes. One with standard leading edge diameter. One with maybe a not quite a 2% drop up a about a two centimeter reduction from about 10 inches to a little over nine inches. And the smaller leading edge diameter had advantages as we expected. If we were going up wind and a lot of wind, the guy on the smaller levy edge had a, had an advantage. But overall it had a little less power, little less grunt. And if we lost a little bit of air pressure, it had a little less stiffness. And we felt like those were big enough problems to keep us away from that. Okay. So can you talk a little, sorry, go ahead. Another thing we did related to leading edge stiffness is we put a two 30 gram Dacron in the center. That white panel, those white panels in the center are a heavier, stiffer Dacron. So we put those in a place where there's a lot of stress on the leading edge and both in terms of point loading where the strut attaches and that leading edge handle attaches and the leash touches. And it's also a point where there's a lot of bending load. So that helps make our leading edge differ. I know a lot of brands will double up on their clock there. , which we did at one point, but we really prefer the single layer of two 30 gram Dacron. It's very robust. Interesting. Can you explain like how, why you recommend different pressures for, depending on the size of the wing, like I, I see you're the 2.0, you're recommending 12 psi and then for the 5.5 7.5 and kind of in between. So can you talk a little bit about that? Yeah. The load on the seams, first I should say the closing sea of a leading edge has the most load on it. Of all the seams, it has twice the load on it. Segment, the inter segment seems are the ones between panels of, so we do a lot of testing to try and maximize the strength of our closing. But one thing about closing seams is the load on the closing sea is related to, it's proportional to the pressure times the diameter. So if you have a small diameter, you can have higher pressure without overloading the closing sea. But if you have a big diameter, have to have lower pressure to avoid overloading the closing scene. And think every, everybody understands this in the business. They're all recommending higher pressure for small and lower pressure for big, and it's all related to how much load the closing can handle without breaking. I. I see. Okay. Do you our standard Dacron construction can handle 15 or 18 PSI in a four meter size before it breaks. And I've, I. Done test tubes. I do a lot of test tubes where we test the strength of seam and I've done test tubes where I've taken it up to five psi in the standard diameter for four meter before its, so we do actually quite a bit of lab testing and bench testing on things like strength and cloth strength. So the difference between the unit and the D-lab unit is basically just the material of the leading edge and the str. Is that correct? Otherwise? Yeah, that's correct. Another difference is that the materials stretch a little differently and they require different seam construction. So I can't use the same patterns for the D-lab that I use for the unit. Customize the patterns for the D-lab wings.  To make adjustments to allow for a different, not just different stretch, but also different shrinkage because different scene construction will take up more cloth. know, One scene construction might take up X amount and the other scene construction will take up 1.5 x amount. So I have to make those adjustments in the patterns. And then I've noticed let's talk a little bit about the flutter in, in wings. I noticed looks like the unit has like this little tiny Batten thing versus the D-lab doesn't have that. Is that what's the reason for that? No. The D-lab has it. They just didn't put it in the graphic. Okay. They both have it. But that's one thing I noticed, like the first generation wings, they would get really baggy quickly or after a few months of using them, they would get all bagged out and and you would lose a lot of performance and there would be a lot of flutter in the, in especially in the trailing edge. So how did you, do you eliminate that? Or how are you able to get away without battens in the trailing edge and avoid fluter stuff like that? About a year and a half ago we decided we were gonna attack that problem and we built some wings with different materials stronger rip stop materials for the canopy, and we sent 'em out to team writers in schools around the world and got feedback on how durable the different materials were. And so the material we use in the canopy, the white material in the canopy of the, no, not that one. That, so that one has standard kite rip stop, which is 50 gram rip stop, which is pretty good, especially if you get this panel alignments right. And you get the warp orientation. But then the wing, you're showing now the 2023 D-lab which I think is coming up tomorrow. Oh wow. That has our, what we're calling mod three for modules, three ripstop material in the canopy. So the white material in that canopy has three times the bias stretch resistance of the standard kite style. Rip stop and. That makes it not only more resistant to things like rips when you drop it on your hydrofoil, but really makes it more durable and a higher performance material. It makes our standard unit feel more like a D unit because it's more solid and when you're pumping it, you get better response. It's not a spongy response, it's a, it's more rigid response when you hit a gust. The draft is really super stable. So all around it's a big improvement. There's a small weight penalty of course. But we've, we did some testing where we built three nearly identical six meter wings and we put different amounts of this mod three material in the canopy of each one. So they would in weight by bit. And we founded the canopy with the most, with the largest amount of this material in it was far and away the best performers. So we decided to put in all of our wings for 2020 canopy. So that, so basically that combats that bagginess after, after using it for a while. That doesn't stretch as much, basically. Exactly. Yeah. I just noticed that. Okay. Yeah. So this is the traditional canopy, the mod three. You just have less stretch and especially in the d diagonal direction, right? Yes, exactly. So I just noticed that for the unit. You recommend, the D-lab wings, you recommend a lower pressure than the regular unit wings. Why? Why is that? You get more stiffness for the pressure, know, whatever you're given pressure is. The D-lab gives you more stiffness, but the thing about all is it's incredibly strong and stiff. It's incredibly strong everywhere except where you put a hole in it. So if we have to sew these things together so they have thousands of holes in them, and we do a lot of reinforcement on the seams with materials that are not alu. , but our testing shows us that these are the numbers we should be using for inflation to be safe. And so even though you might pump a five meter to seven instead of eight, it's gonna be stiffer at seven than Aron wing at eight. Okay. So you, you just said, so tomorrow you're gonna release the new the 2023 wings. I think on your website, this is still your 2022 model, right? So what is the no that DLA you're pointing at is the 2020. Oh, I'm wrong. It's the 2022. You're right. It's got the windows for 2022. So what has changed? I think I've seen Alan  with some wings that have two windows here. Is that like one of the ways you can tell, or? Yeah. So the new units. Have windows that are more like the current slick, the 2022 Slick has four windows, not just two of them. Ok. And that improved our, that improves the visibility quite a bit. So talk a little bit about the seam orientation. Because it seems like the seams have a little bit more they don't stretch as much as the fabric, right? So is that, is that you're trying to use the seams to add more basically more tension to the canopy? Is that what your thought is on that or? What I'm doing there is I'm trying with the wing design in general, I'm trying to get more tension from tip to tip across the canopy. And in order to deal with that tension, I'm, or I'm making the thread orientation run tip to tip. So it's more about getting the thread orientation. The aligned with the loads that I'm trying to put in the, and that's actually evolved a bit. Those same angles have changed for 2023. And I surprised there's no photo anywhere of the 2020 threes. They've been out for a while now. . So the Duotone Sports website doesn't have the New Wings. Yeah, I dunno. But yeah, so talk a little bit about the changes that you did make in the wings from 22 to 23 other, I guess the windows, the seams, but what else has changed? Yeah the cloth is a huge thing. It's a really big thing. And up to now, the leading edge materials have lasted longer than the can materials, and you really want everything to break all at once, ideally. So we change the windows, we change the, we increase the depth and the power of the wing a bit. The profile depth is greater. So we are getting more power, but the canopy cloth itself also improves the top end, so we have more wind range overall. We we refined the tip angles, tip angles, tip twist has a lot of influence on wing performance. And so we've been, we've gone through a lot of prototypes trying to find the tip angles that are best. So I'd say we have an improvement in overall power delivery in part cause we've got better control over tip twist. Trying to think what else we've done is I know I'm forgetting something. So the, this wing that Alan Kiddas is using is probably the 23 right? As that's probably A2 three prototype. Correct. That's one of our prototypes where we were trying different canopy materials. Material is one of the materials we tested for use production. And we, we decided not to use it, but it's a very good material. We might use it in the future as possible. Okay. Interesting. Cool. That's cool that , you're able to talk about that it's gonna be released shortly for wing design. What's your philosophy and what are you trying to accomplish when you're designing a wing? I guess for this slick, I really like a wing that delivers power as, very consistently across the wind range. And, I've ridden a lot of wings. I've, I've ridden wings that don't do that. Most wings in the past haven't done that. And we're getting better and better at keeping the power on at all times. I like a, that's always lifting. A lot of people don't have that yet. I like a wing with good canopy tension for low flutter good pumping. Never want, I never really want have to move my hands cause I'm in a, the old days of windsurfing and the old days of winging, you hit a, you have back, wind, move back. You used move handle, or, which is one reasons I liked having a boom at first because I could just slide my hand back. I didn't have to let go and grab another handle. Nowadays the wings, our wings are so stable that I never really have to move my hands back or when lull hits, they're always in the right place. So that's really important to me and I think it's important to everyone when I'm thinking about the sport in general and how to, how to make the sport appealing to more people. I think about the fact that we get families doing winging. We get. No, my, the guy who actually runs our wing brand guy named in Germany, lives just off the Baltic Sea, near Keel. He has a seven year old son who started when he was five. And yeah, I think that's awesome. I love the idea being able to do the sport. So I don't ever wanna lose focus on making it easy, making it accessible, making it affordable. We're a high end brand, so we don't tend to go for the bargain basement type wings. But we do wanna make quality wings at a reasonable price, and I don't wanna lose sight. Yeah. And like in terms of price, like obviously the, a Lula wing is much more expensive, the material like, and like what, how much of a performance advantage do you actually get out of that material and is it, only like someone noticed that, is it just for high performance wing foiling or do you think the average user, it's a big advantage for them to go with a Lula fabric? Yeah, I mean anybody that can afford it will benefit from it. It's just a question of do you wanna spend the money and, know, where are your priorities? You have three kids you have to worry about until spending my wife likes them cause they're light and she doesn't need the stiffness, but she likes the low weight, so she always wants to be on, if possible bigger rider like the. Someone who weighs 200 pounds is gonna really benefit from the stiffness or somebody who likes to jump, who benefit from the stiffness. Most people, it's totally a matter of whether they wanna spend the money or not. You, there's always a benefit and the bigger the wing, the greater the benefit. So a six meter gives you more benefit in aula than a three five in Aula for sure. So let's talk a little bit about the equipment that you use personally. What's your go-to wing like on Maui? I know you have, what, which wing do you use the most, on. We use s scores and fives here a lot. Three. Three fives scores and fives a lot. . On a sea breeze days, sea breeze day when it's blowing six, eight knots, I can be on a seven or eight pretty easily. And. Of course if it's blowing like it has last week, I can easily be on it too. And do you prefer the unit or the the slick wing for your personal use? I really like booms a lot because I can, it's easier to locate my harness lines precisely and I can put my hands anywhere and I can fly one handed. When I say I'm getting from my, from a sitting position to a kneeling position I can one hand the boom and that makes it easier. One hand. But, I used to hate handled wings, but we, our handles are good enough that I like the units also. So what I, it's pretty much whatever I'm working on is what I'm writing. So lately I've been working on slicks mostly and I've been writing slicks mostly. But in the coming few months I'll be working on units entirely and I'll be writing units. So what changes have you made to the slick wing for 2023? What have been? So we did a lot of the things on the new slick that we did on the unit. So we went to the mod canopy, we four windows. We have gone with more canopy depth and more power. We fine tune the tip twist and we had some reflex, quite a bit of reflex in the strut of the 2022 slick. With the new canopy cloth. First I should point out that the thing the reflex did was made it so that the back of the canopy didn't bag out so much when you get gust or if you're out in high wind. So the reflex in the stru improved the top end performance of the slick. By however, with our new canopy, We don't have that bagginess in the cloth. So we were able to tone down the reflex by quite a bit. It's just a maybe three degrees now of reflex in the strut. I should point out also that the wider tips of the flick make it so that the slick benefits more from a little bit of reflex than the unit. The unit has narrower tips and it works different. What else on the slick? We've changed the shape of the strut a little bit. And yeah, o overall it's a lift smoother, lift wing, smoother wing. The power development is actually the smoothest of any I've tried. So when we're sailing along through Guston walls, we feel the gusts less with the slick than we have with any other wing we've ever tried. Okay. And then what about your board and your foils? Like what are your go, what's your go-to equipment on that? Yeah, so I I don't use small boards. I did a little bit a while ago, but I don't jump, so I don't really need a small board. I've been using 75 liter five foot boards quite a bit for the last year or two. And lately I've been on a five four, that's 24 wide and we're trending narrower. Some of us are trending narrower, just cause if you're on a small hydrofoil, if you have a little bit longer narrower board, you can pop up on the foil more easily. But. A longer board isn't necessarily good for waves, so anybody who's on, heavily into waves isn't gonna be on the longer board. I see. There's probably, I'm sorry, go ahead. Oh, sorry. I was just gonna say the ta tail shape, I mean I know it people used to have all the kick tails and all that, but it seems like with the, the smaller, faster foils high aspect foils you need, it's almost like you don't want to pop up at a steep angle. You want to keep that board as flat as possible on the takeoff. So do you still use that kick tail or is it just a flat tail in your Yeah, I haven't used kick tail in quite a while. And I think those were mostly valuable in the bigger boards cause it was hard to some lift. Sinking the tail and getting the nose up is easy. So I think you don't really need any kick for a small board. , the boards I use my mask is about six or seven inches from the tail of the board. So there's just not much back there to keep it from kicking up in the nose. And then how long is your mask? What mass length do you like? I've been using in the 90 to 95 range a lot. And I've used longer, but there's a lot of shallow water around here. Yeah, I was gonna ask what's the disadvantage? So a lot of times it's, it is just like you don't want to hit the reef, right? ? Yeah. The longer, longer mass are either they're, to keep 'em stiff, they have to be a bit heavier and maybe a little thick, which. Not necessarily attractive. And then there's, you always have to look at what the tide's doing. Where I ride I don't like to go out. If there's less than a foot of water a foot above mean water. And if it's two feet, that's better . And sometimes I'll just go to the harbor. If it's a super low tide time of day and I need to test something, I might go to the harbor. Cause at least I know they can get away from the beach without hitting the bottom. I'm curious cuz you've done a lot of testing, like when you get scratches on your foil from the, like hitting the reef a few times all my fos are pretty scratched up. How much does it affect the performance, like in your experience? Hugely. Hugely. Yeah. Yeah. It's terrible. I feel it. I've had, I won't say bad luck, but I have had collisions with things in the water that have destroyed my foils. And you really notice yeah, you notice everything. If you're, if you're sailing with somebody else, you notice because you're going slower all of a sudden, if you're not, yeah. Do you repair it? Scratch, do you try to repair scratches in your foils? Or is there a way to Oh yeah. Fix it. Like how do you repair scratches on the bottom of the foil? I usually try to keep the scratching to a minimum and I'll just use a little tiny bit of two epoxy to fill the scratch. Just, just enough to fill it and then sand it smooth. , I wanna get some epoxy paint so that I can, do a proper paint and sand job on some foils. But I haven't got around to that yet. You can't get a shipp here. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So that would be like a two-part paint epoxy paint kind of thing. Yeah, there's stuff called DPO out Think Australia that America's Cup campaigns use for their hydrofoils and boats. That's supposed to be really good, but you have to ship it by boat probably, or something like that. Yeah. Yeah, I think so. Yeah. Interesting. Yeah, . Okay. And then what we talked a little bit about the Mike's lab foils, but like what foils do you use the most and what sizes and so on? Yeah, so we have a phone has a really nice five 90. It's, I don't think it's in the shop. It's a five 90 front wing that I really like. They, we have a seven, we, we've got an eight 50. We've got sizes, I guess the, I really dunno what's on the website. Okay. You just have a look real quick, but okay. So that's pretty small for you. You have five 90 is pretty small foil size for your you're not, probably not as light as Alan could is or someone like that, right? Yeah, Alan and I use a Mike five 40 sometimes my wife uses it too. And so Alan and I can sail around both being on five 40, but 60 pounds, 50 pounds. So work for most days around here, something like a five 90 is a really nice size for me.  Lighter wind days. The seven five is good. It's a very powerful for size. I was looking at the so are they the duotone foils or the fanatic foils did you say? Use those are Oh, the ones you're showing the, there's those are kite hydrofoils. Oh, duo Kite hydrofoils. Okay. And they're not the, they're not the latest stuff. I don't know if we have the latest stuff on the website. Cause it's been quite the challenge to get the new stuff outta Asia. It's basically not in available yet, basically. Yeah, I think so. Okay. So probably by spring on the mainland. Okay. And that, but the, so the foil that. Five 90 that you're saying using, I assume that's a pretty high aspect pretty thin fast foil. Is that kind of what you, how you would describe it? Yeah. It's, yeah, high. It's probably 10 to one aspect ratio and designed to be fast. We have cfd Computational Fluid dynamic in Germany who does, we work for a lot of projects, likeer America's Cup campaigns, and he's designed some profiles for us, for our mask and for our wings that we think are really very competitive. I, Peter rides his stuff all the time and he's extremely hard to keep up with, so I have no doubt that it's fast. , yeah. It's pretty amazing how much the foils have improved over the last couple, or, last three years or so. Coming from the early goal foils, what foils did you start on? I was designing our kite hydrofoils and our windsurf hydrofoils, and we had some decent trading windsurf, hydrofoils. And then when I started making 'em bigger, they weren't very good at first. So I started on some real crap foils. Very difficult to ride hydrofoils. . Then over time they got better and and became pretty easy to ride over the period of some months and maybe a year. Okay. So I just want some of the, a lot of those hydrofoils you just showed on the website or things that I designed Oh, a couple years ago. . Yeah. So actually, let's talk a little bit about the challenges that, during the pandemic, the whole supply chain issues and logistics, shipping issues and things like that, and delays and the demand, obviously during the pandemic when everybody was like staying, could, couldn't, people couldn't go to work, so they added more free time. It seemed like that's when winging just took off, like I know here on Oahu it was like, you just couldn't, we couldn't get enough stuff, there was like more, way more demand than supply. And then now it seems like where it's almost like the op opposite way where there's everything's back in stock and people are back in at work and not buying as much. I don't know, just can you talk a little bit about that and your experience with that? You pretty much said it all except for the fact that when pandemic was. Paradise. There was no traffic, there was no people on the beaches. It was amazing time in so respects sad in many respects, but not

Plus
Hovory: Kynologický novinář: Psi nám pomáhají už skoro 20 tisíc let, aniž by z toho měli nějaký svůj profit

Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 23:36


Psi nejsou jen odvěkými souputníky člověka. Dokážou také zachraňovat lidské životy. Například varují před blížícím se tornádem nebo brzkým atakem nemoci. Dokážou najít zbloudilého turistu, ale také vypátrat zraněné.

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)
AFR Nº 355: Uritorco: la conexión islámica

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 50:22


Nueva plataforma de cursos (https://miscursosvirtuales.net). Nuevo proyecto de investigación. ¿Quién era Ángel Acoglanis? La jueza María Servini de Cubría. ¿Por qué Capilla del Monte y sus alrededores es tan especial? ¿Qué fue el nazismo? Relacionados: Una sombra Illuminati sobre Erks https://alfilodelarealidad.com/una-sombra-illuminati-sobre-erks/ Más sobre los Illuminati https://alfilodelarealidad.com/?s=illuminati Más sobre Erks https://alfilodelarealidad.com/?s=Erks Más del mundo del misterio en nuestro portal: alfilodelarealidad.com

P.E.E.P. Podcast
Episode 54: Holiday Greetings and New Year Manifestations

P.E.E.P. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 12:40


In this brief episode, Nicolle discusses combining goal setting with “magic” to make your visions reality and the science that backs the practice. Subscribe to Nicolle's newsletter at https://www.nicollemorock.com/Dr. Dean Radin's book: https://www.amazon.com/Real-Magic-Ancient-Science-Universe/dp/1524758825Find Nicolle's books: https://www.amazon.com/Nicolle-Morock/e/B07Q8BQLP2?ref_=pe_1724030_132998060Theme music is provided by the talented Mr. Jeremy Moss http://jeremymosscomposer.com/ (Listen through the end of the podcast to hear the whole theme song.)Connect with Nicolle at www.peeppodcast.com and https://www.facebook.com/P.E.E.P.PodcastGet merchandise at https://www.teepublic.com/user/peep-podcast

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
District Council: Arden Gunnerson

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 14:51


Welcome to this episode! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Arden Gunnerson, North Central District Secretary/Treasurer, about her journey in Kappa Kappa Psi and goals for her District. Transcription coming soon. Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Caley Fretz - The Challenges (& Opportunities) Facing Cycling Journalism

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 62:39


In this week's episode, cycling journalist and former CyclingTips Editor-in-Chief Caley Fretz joins Randall to discuss cycling's changing media landscape, the economic headwinds facing professional journalists, emerging models for supporting quality reporting and story-telling, and how the meaning of cycling changes as one pedals through life. Also: press-fit bottom brackets, hookless road rims, and too-stiff components and frames. Episode sponsors: Thesis Bike and Logos Components  Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Links to Caley's work: The Road to Nairo's House: https://cyclingtips.com/2018/01/the-road-to-nairos-house/ The Teaching Toe Strap: https://www.velonews.com/news/road/the-toe-strap/ Tales From The Tour: The Rest Day Pose: https://cyclingtips.com/2018/07/tales-from-the-tour-the-rest-day-pose/ Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to the gravel ride podcast. I'm your host Craig Dalton. This week on the show, I'm handing the microphone off to my co-host Randall Jacobs. Who's got veteran cycling journalists, Kaylee frets on the pod. To discuss some of the challenges and opportunities facing cycling journalism. You may know Kaylee from his work as editor in chief, over at cycling tips. And prior to that over at Velo news, both publications have undergone some downsizing of late. The economic headwinds facing professional journalists. Our strong, particularly in the cycling world. If we want to have quality reporting and storytelling. A new model needs to emerge. I don't know where this is all gonna end up, but I was super excited that Kaylee agreed to join Randall on the podcast. To just get his perspective and to get into some good old fashioned by geekery. Before we jump in we need to thank this week sponsors from thesis and logos components As many of you know, I'm a long time it's thesis. OB one rider for a limited time thesis is offering $500 off a thesis, OB one with access custom wireless shifting, and your choice of high-end carbon wheels. It's a bike that I can personally attest, stands up to every other carbon bike out there on the market at a really great price. One of the things that I've always appreciated about thesis is that they allow. A unique level of customization. So if you want size appropriate cranks down to, I think 160 or 165 millimeters, you can do that. You can get your stem size, you can customize everything. Based on a free one-on-one consult. So go check out thesis.bike, or contact. Hello at thesis stoplight to get started. I also want to give a shout out to logos components. Logos just receive huge recognition from bike packing.com and was awarded the gear of the year award for the wheelset category in 2022. You might recall an episode. We did a while back on how to choose a gravel wheel set, where Randall went through detail by detail on the design considerations When constructing a carbon wheelset I encourage you to listen to that as it provided a lot of riders with reflection on what they were looking for and what all the different things were, all logos wheels are built on proven open standards with non-proprietary components and with a manufacturing precision. That rivals anybody in the industry, the wheels are backed by Logus is five-year warranty, lifetime at-cost incident protection. And a US-based warehouse and support team to keep you rolling for many years to come. So head on over to logos components.com and use the code community free shipping all one word to take advantage of a free shipping offer. With that business behind us I'm going to pass the microphone back over to randall and his conversation with kaylee frets [00:03:06] Randall R. Jacobs: It's been quite a bit. I think I last saw you at Sea Otter. How have you been? What's going on in your world? [00:03:11] Caley Fretz: Well, I'm unemployed as of November 15th. I mean, yeah, let's just, we can get that one right outta the way. Right. I was part of the layoffs at Outside Inc. To be somewhat differentiated from Outside Magazine for anybody out there. I mean, outside Inc. Does own outside magazine, but it also owns lots and lots of other things. Yeah, myself the editor-in-Chief of Venu as well and two of the CT staff, two really core CT staff. Matt, our managing editor, and Dave Rome, one of our tech editors and, and kinda a legend in space. We're all let go on the same day on November 15th. So I am currently super fun employed and I think after we chat today, I'm probably gonna go skiing cuz it's snowing up in the mountains right now. And so I'm, I'm somewhat enjoying myself. But, you know, fun employment brings with it some level of stress as well, . So that's, that's how I'm doing right now. Yeah. [00:03:59] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and I appreciate you sharing. I think last we rode together. You were still living in Boulder and you've since moved to beautiful Durango. When was that move? [00:04:07] Caley Fretz: That was shortly after we had our, our first child. My wife grew up here and, and we have grandparents here to help with childcare and all the rest. And we just wanted to get off the front range. No offense to the front range. There's too many people and there's fewer people here. And I can go skiing 18 minutes from here, from my door, and I can't really complain about that. [00:04:27] Randall R. Jacobs: Housing costs are probably a little bit less bonkers out that way as well. I was in Denver and particularly Boulderer lately, and it is nuts. [00:04:34] Caley Fretz: it's a little bit better here, although not as, Not as good as it was four or five years ago. It, it, it's a zoom town, right? So in the last couple years it has, it's gone up like 28% or something ridiculous in, in 2021. We love it here. It's amazing. Durango, the bike community here is, is unbelievable. The mountain biking is unbelievable. And there's nobody that, you have not as many people to share all the trails with. So I, we like that bit of it as well. [00:04:59] Randall R. Jacobs: Very, very cool. And so let's just dive into, cuz, cuz I've been curious share a bit about your background. So I, I've only known you as, you know, in your role as, as a journalist and editor at Cycling Tips. But how do you end up on this path? [00:05:13] Caley Fretz: Oh I mean, how far back do you want to go? I, I, I started racing mountain bikes at 12 or 13 years old. My dad was a cyclist. My dad was, I think one of the founding members of the Penn State cycling team, collegiate cycling team back in the day. So I grew up around bikes and I grew up around bike racing and watching the tour and all these things. And yeah, started racing when my family moved to Burlington, Vermont back in the day at Catamount Family Centers. Anybody who, yep. Very, very northeast connection. That's where I, that was all my youth. Yeah. Any, any any new [00:05:45] Randall R. Jacobs: and, and your dad is still in Vermont, if I recall [00:05:48] Caley Fretz: Yeah, yeah. He he actually just retired, but he, he used to run a small like sort of children's museum aquarium thing called Echo on the, on the waterfront in Burlington. And yeah so, so grew up, grew up racing, grew up around bikes, and went to school out here in Colorado. Mostly to ride by bike to, to ma major in bike racing, pre primarily . Much to my parents chagrin, I would say. And let's see what it, what would've been like junior year, summer in between junior and senior year of, of college. Shout out to a friend of mine, Brian Holcomb, who's still in, in the bike world basically came to me and was like, Hey, you should, you should be an intern at Be News. And so I did that and I, and I, I became an intern at Bean News and worked the summer there. And Ben Delaney was the editor-in-chief at the time, and Ben was, Ben was kind enough to bring me on in a, in a kind of part-time capacity that fall. and then it kind of just went from there. So, so yeah, a couple folks who were still floating around the bike world, I, I owe a lot to at this point. Ben and, and Brian and Zach Vest, who was sort of one of my first mentors and has been a, a marketing manager at Niner and a other, a Scott and a couple other places recently. Math yeah, and just kinda worked from there. So I was a tech editor at sort of tech writer at Be News for a couple years, tech editor at Be News for a couple years. And then kinda worked my way into bigger and broader beats basically, and, and kind of stepped into the racing space a little bit more. Became, I think it was like think it was senior editor or whatever the title was at the end of my, my Bella News tenure which was 2017 which is when Wade Wallace got in touch from cycling tips and he was actually just looking for a person to fill a somewhat similar role, kind of like a features writer do a bit of everything kind of writer. And I loved the idea. I loved cycling tips. I loved the brand. I loved everything that stood for, I loved the fact that it was kinda an up and comer and I had been at Villa News long enough that I was just was looking for a change basically. And so I, I jumped ship from one to the other, from Helen News to ct. Remained really good friends with lots of folks at, at vn particularly guys like Andrew Hood who had done a bunch of Tour de France with and things like that. It's like no hard feelings in that, in that jump. Just wanted something new. And within about a year of that for a number of different reasons Wade had promoted me to editor-in-chief at ct. So that was around 20, mid middle of 2018. And it was an interesting time kind of from a business perspective cuz it was near the end of a period when, when CT was owned by bike Exchange in Australia and we were about to be purchased by Pink Bike. And with all of that happening and then in particular with the purchase from Pink Bike we got a bunch more resource and really could expand into what I think most people probably know, cycline tips as now or maybe we'll say six months ago what they knew it as up, up until quite recently. And yeah. I'm trying to think this, there's not my time. My my time as EIC of, of CIP is, is obviously I think what most listeners out there would probably know, if not of me, then you at least know CIP and you know what we were trying to do there. [00:08:52] Randall R. Jacobs: I know how much grief there is out there for, that core team having been broken up. A lot of people, myself included, who value the perspective that you bring to the industry. It's not simply you know, flipping press releases which, you know, there's a place for like, there's, you know, some people that's, they wanna see what the press releases are but doing really interesting journalism. One of your colleagues Ian tralo, he's done some interesting pieces on Central Asian despots in their role in cycling and on the Afghan women's cycling team. And the controversy with how the UCI was prioritizing getting certain members of that team and the organization out of Afghanistan when the US was backing out. Like, this is not your standard bike industry journalism. And that's an angle that I think is going to be very much missed in the vacuum that's created by your departure and the departure of others from that team. [00:09:42] Caley Fretz: Yeah. It's a sad thing. I think the overwhelming emotion for a lot of us is, is just sadness because we spend a lot of time building this thing and a lot of time and energy and effort and, and yeah. No blood, but probably some sweat and tears in there. And yeah, and it feels that's just sad. You know, I. I enjoyed my time there tremendously. I enjoyed working with people like Ian, with James Huang, with Dave, who got laid off alongside me. It was just a really, I can't say it was massively surprising giving a number of things that I can't actually talk about. But I I, oh, I am still very saddened by it. Yeah, I mean, it's not gonna be what it was because a bunch of the people are gone like that, that, that I can say . Yeah. [00:10:28] Randall R. Jacobs: Yeah. Now, remind me, when did James join the team? Because he, he's someone I've admired for years [00:10:33] Caley Fretz: yeah. He, he joined a, I think about 18 months before I did. So when, when bike exchange, when, when Wade first sold a, a large portion of cycling tips to bike exchange that was sort of the first. Let's say capital infusion that, that the company got. And a lot of that was used to pick up kind of high profile folks, particularly in the United States which is what's sort of their next, the next market that, that Wade wanted to go after. So that was, they picked up James and they picked up Neil Rogers in the us as well as some other folks like, like Shane Stokes in the uk or Ireland, I believe he is right now. Yeah, so, so that was all a little bit before I got there. And part of my, sort of what they asked me to do, what Wade asked me to do when, when I became editor in chief was to figure out exactly how to best use people like James, who do phenomenal work. I mean, I, I, I maintain to this day that the three-person team, the three-person tech team that, that we had at Zeman Tips over the last year which would be James and Dave Rome and Ronan McLaughlin in Ireland as well. Was the best anywhere in cycling media? There's no, there's no question in my mind about that. And so basically trying to figure out how to steer that talent was one of the big things that I was tasked with doing over the last three, four years. [00:11:44] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and you know, when you read a review from any of those team members that you're, you're getting it straight you know, for better or for worse for the brands that are at the mercy of, of that team. But honestly, it keeps the industry honest. And I recall early in my career in the bike particularly James' writing be being something that I referenced constantly. And in fact, when I was at one of the big players, if I needed to make an argument, I would oftentimes grab an article from someone like him to bring to the argument like, no press fit is not acceptable. And we're gonna spend the extra money and add the weight, and we're gonna tell a story about how a two piece thread together is a better solution. And honestly, it's a solution to fix what was broken when you went, you know, but that's, that's a, that's a, a hobby horse that I think we've all been riding for some time. [00:12:29] Caley Fretz: love hearing that though. I, I genuinely love hearing that because I mean, oh, first of all, James would also love hearing that. He'd be very proud of that fact. I think and yeah, like we, we know that that was the case, right? I mean, we, we the three of us have been making a, a podcast called Nerd Alert for, for, for the last year and a half or two years or whatever. And I got a fair number of, of Less than pleased emails off the back of, of that podcast. Cause we were quite honest in our assessment of what we thought was happening in the industry. And in particular, like I haven't been a tech editor for. Eight, nine years. I'm just a cyclist at this point. But Dave and James are so deep inside it and think they spend so much of their lives thinking about that stuff that yeah. You, you can't ignore their opinions, right? You absolutely can't ignore their opinions. And I think that's, that's a testament to one, the fact that they do their research. And two the fact that they've been right a number of times. And like over the years, I would say that CT is, was known as the anti press fit media outlet, right? Which is like, there are worse things to be associated with, I think, than hating on creaky bottom brackets. Like, who, who wouldn't wanna hate 'em? Creaky bottom brackets. That makes perfect sense to me. [00:13:33] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and it, and it's deeper than just a creaky bottom bracket. It's detracting from this experience that we are all so passionate about. And so, I think that having someone out there who has influence saying no, this is not the way it should be. Hear the arguments and, and, you know, let a case be made. Hey, you know, come on the podcast and talk about why you think press fit is, is the best way to go about it if you really wanna make that case. But yeah, it's an approach that I, you know, I, I'll take you up on it, but I, I'd probably be on the same side with you on more or less every issue with the exception of maybe a few nuances here and there. But yeah, actually let's have some fun with this. Other stuff other than press fit bottom brackets that would be your hill to die on. [00:14:15] Caley Fretz: well. So actually Dave Ro and I so reminder, Dave Ro and I were both just recently laid off. And so our free, we, we are free to do whatever we want. I don't have a non-compete or anything like that. Right. So, we've kicked, we've kicked off a little podcast and. [00:14:28] Randall R. Jacobs: What is it called? [00:14:29] Caley Fretz: It's called, [00:14:29] Randall R. Jacobs: do people find it? [00:14:30] Caley Fretz: well at the moment it's called the redundant placeholders because we have no idea what to call it. So if you search it, I think any of the, any of the podcast platforms, if you search redundant placeholders, able to find it, you can also find it on, on any of my social channels. I'm at K Fretz on everything cause I'm the only person on the planet with my name. So that's very handy. Anyway David and I were talking about like, okay, so if we were actually literally talking about this yesterday, which is why it's funny that you bring up bottom brackets. Like if, if the bottom bracket the anti press fit bandwagon was the one that we were leading before, what's our, what's our new thing that we get to hate on? And we've actually decided that one of the things that we're most interested in pushing, and if you listen to the episode from this week, you would, you would hear this is bikes that are too stiff and just stuff that's too stiff. So specifically Dave, this, this week brought up the topic of of handlebars that are just like, Way too stiff. Right? Just, just ridiculously stiff. We were talking about the, the 35 mill trend on in mountain bikes, which I hate. And like, I've got a, you know, I've got a giant, I've got a giant trail bike with 170 Mill fork, and then I wanna stick like a, just a two by four in my hands. I don't really understand why I want to do that. And I've ended up with like, like more sort of hand cramp and hand pain on this bike than I've ever had previously. And it's got more travel than any bike that I've, I've had previously. So that, those two things don't really line up in, in my head, right? And, and so Dave and I were basically talking about pushing, pushing back on this need for for stiffer and stiffer and stiffer and stiffer all the time. And the fact that a lot of us don't need that, or really don't want it either. Not only do we not need it, we really don't want it because it makes the broad experience worse. I told a little story about how one of the best bikes I've ever ridden was a not particularly expensive mazzi steel frame, steel fork, steel frame. Then I put a pair of zip 3 0 3 carbon wheels on, so nice, nice light stiff wheel set with a somewhat flexi bike, flexi fork, flexi flexi frame. But it rode like an absolute dream, you know, 27 2 post it might have even had, it might have even not had oversized bars. I can't remember. This is, this is like eight, nine years ago now. And I loved it. I absolutely loved this bike. It, it, it got up and went when I asked it to, and I think the wheel set made a huge difference in, in that. But then it, it cornered like an absolute dream and it was comfortable and it was, it was just beautiful. And it was a, a not particularly expensive steel mozzie, right? Like . So that's, that's, that's the that's the high horse upon which we find ourselves now. The fight for less stiff. Bicycles, I think is what we're gonna go after next. [00:17:06] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and you can kind of take that a step further, talking about steel frames, for example. If you get a steel frame, even a, a pretty decent steel frame at say o e m cost is going to be quite a bit less than a monocot carbon frame. And you don't have all the tooling costs and everything else, and you can change the geometry if you need to without having to retool. And those bikes are gonna be inherently more affordable at the same time. And unless you're an elite racer who's having to sprint off the line or so on, you know, you either spend less money for an equivalent bike that suits your needs well and is comfortable, or you spend the same money and you put it into say, better wheels. You don't get the cheap out wheels with the three Paul hubs that fall apart and in a year and what have you. Yeah, that's one I'll join you on. [00:17:46] Caley Fretz: So that, so [00:17:47] Randall R. Jacobs: right. So I'm joining the battalion. What? [00:17:50] Caley Fretz: That's what we're pushing from [00:17:51] Randall R. Jacobs: I've got another one for you. And, and this, this one I don't think you'll disagree with cuz we talked about sea otter hooks, bead hooks. So bead bead hooks on any real wheels that are marketed for use with road tubeless. [00:18:05] Caley Fretz: I, yeah. I, I don't feel like I am, I, I like having this conversation with James or Dave around because they know the actual technical reasons. You, yourself probably in the same boat. You know, the actual tech technical reasons why this is, this is a, a terrible idea or a good idea, I guess if, if you're talking other direction. I just know that as a, essentially, like I am kind of just a consumer these days, right? Like I said, I, I, I have not been a tech editor. It has not been my job to follow. Bicycle technology for close to a decade now. So I'm basically just a, a, a heavily invested consumer who pays, you know, quite close attention, right? And as a heavily invested consumer, I cannot figure out if my wheels and tires are going to kill me at the moment. And I think that that is not really an acceptable way forward. I don't , I don't think that that should be allowed in the cycling space. And I, and I, every single time I say that, I get a bunch of hook list aficionados coming back at me saying that, oh, it's quite easy. This works with this and this. I'm like, yeah, but I, I, as a person who does not want to go through a bunch of like charts to figure out what tire to run, I don't want that. Just put hooks back on my rims. I don't care about the 40 grams or whatever. It's, I just don't care. [00:19:14] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, would you like some more ammo for those arguments when they come up? [00:19:17] Caley Fretz: give me more. Am. [00:19:18] Randall R. Jacobs: All right. So, so first off the, it used to be the case that it was a substantial, you know, a reasonable weight penalty and higher cost that is substantially mitigated by new forming techniques for the bead hooks and mini hooks that you can create that have the same impact resistance as hook list, add about five, maybe 10 grams per rim at the high end. And cost, yeah, the cost is a little bit higher, but, you know, insurance premiums aren't cheap either. And if you have a single incident, that's gonna be a problem. So, you know, it was an obvious investment when we made that choice for any wheel that we're marketing for use with anything, say smaller than a 34. Plus you get the compatibility with non tules as you well know. But the other part is you think about the fact that there are compatibility charts that exist, right? [00:20:05] Caley Fretz: I don't want [00:20:06] Randall R. Jacobs: that [00:20:06] Caley Fretz: in charts. [00:20:08] Randall R. Jacobs: yeah. It, it's like if that is the case, then maybe the tolerances are too tight and it, it's actually, I'll tell you from the inside, it, it's actually worse than that because any good company is going to check every single rim for its bead seat circumference, right? So those are pretty easy to get within spec. And then the tires, the tires are not all checked. To my knowledge. They're kind of randomly checked. So, okay, now you, now you could have a variation. You only need one. That's not to tolerance, but let's say both of those are in are intolerance. Well, now you have the. and if the tape is too thick or too thin, or someone puts two layers on, they replace the tape or whatever. Maybe it was intolerance initially, but, and then you change it and you know, you do two layers. Now the bead is too tight, it wants to drop into the channel and then pop over the edge of the, of the hook. And so it's just not good. It's just all sorts of not good [00:21:03] Caley Fretz: I hate it so much. It's just, yeah. Yeah. I mean, I, I, I always, I was cognizant when, back in, when we were making the Nerd Alert podcast that, you know, we didn't just want to complain about things. Right? Like, we didn't just want to tell the industry that it was, it was doing things wrong. Cuz most of the time this industry does great things and they build lots of amazing bikes that I love to ride. There's just a couple things like this that are like, what, what are we doing? Like, is, is this, is this the beam counters? Is it the gram counters? What counters are, are causing ? This particular, it must be the bean counters at this point. But I hate it either [00:21:42] Randall R. Jacobs: Bean counter. And then, then also the, the marketing hypers. Right? So there's a new thing. Hopeless is a new thing. Car, car wheels don't have hooks. Why do bicycle school wheels have hooks? Well, you know, because it's 110 p s i that people are sometimes putting in there. That's why [00:21:57] Caley Fretz: car wheels have 33 Psi . Yeah. It's like a mountain bike tire. Yes. Well, I, we agree on that point. And I, I think that that is one that we will continue to complain about. And I will just continue to be annoyed that I, that I can't feel confident in what I'm writing without doing a bunch of, of searching and Google searching, and I don't want to have to do that. [00:22:15] Randall R. Jacobs: Nor should your average rider need to rely on that in order to be safe like that. That's the part that I find kind of, kind of bonkers. [00:22:23] Caley Fretz: Average rider doesn't even know to do that. That's the problem. [00:22:26] Randall R. Jacobs: yeah. True. And the la the last part of that is why do the tire pressure recommendation charts kind of go to 70 proportional with the weight and then they just kind of taper off. You know, that that also kind of tells you something about the confidence in this you know, particular combination of tire and rim and, and pressure and so on. But all right. Should we, well, I guess we hop off this high horse then. That was good fun. I could do this all day. So you mentioned Ben Delaney, and he's an interesting person to bring up because he's a, a mutual acquaintance. Also somebody who's writing, I've been reading since my early days in the industry and also somebody who has been trying to figure out how to navigate the changing landscape in cycling media, which the business model for, for media in general has undergone a dramatic shift. And in his case, he's has his new YouTube channel and is doing freelance work for certain publications and is making a go of it that way. But how would you describe the industry dynamics as having changed during your time in the media side? [00:23:29] Caley Fretz: Oh, I mean, I would say I was relatively insulated from it personally for a long time. And until I kind of reached a, a, a level of management, so to speak, that it became my problem , I didn't spend a whole lot of time thinking about it. Yeah, Ben was unfortunately the, the, the, the victim of a, an outside layoff a, a while ago. So he's been making a solo go of it since I think May or June of, of, of last year. Or this year, 2022. And yeah, like his, his he's experimenting and, and it's, it's good to, I like watching him trying to figure this out, right, because I feel like he's kind of doing it for all of us at the moment and, and trying to figure out exactly, you know, various ways to, to make this thing work and. He is, got his, his YouTube channel's. Great. I mean, I watch it all the time. I'm actually gonna be on it sometime soon. I just, just recorded a thing with him picking our favorite products of the year. I think I went in a slight, I think I went in a slightly different direction than, than probably most of his guests. Cause my favorite product was bar Mitz for my cargo bike. So slightly different place than, than probably a lot of folks he's talking to. But the, the media as a whole, I mean, it's rough out there. It's rough out there, right? Like I have spent an inordinate amount of time thinking about this and trying to figure this out over the last couple years as has like weighed my former boss at C T E before he left over the summer. As is everybody, I mean, frankly, like as is Robin Thurston the CEO of outside, right? Like he is genuinely trying to make this thing work. And at the moment as layoffs kind of. It's hard, right? It's really, really hard to, to get people to pay for something that they haven't had to pay for historically, you're, you're trying to put the genie back in the bottle, right? That's what we are trying to do. And it's really, really, really difficult. And then, frankly, it's one of the things we were most proud of at Cycline Tips is that we did have this core, hyper engaged audience that was willing to pay us for, for what we did. And not only just pay us for like, the content that they had access to, but pay us for the whole community that we had built. Right. I mean there, there's a, there's a Velo Club, which is the, the sort of membership program. Atip, there's a Slack group for Velo Club which I, which I'm concerned about right now. But that group of people, couple thousand people not, it's not the entirety of the membership. It's, it's like sort of the most hardcore of the membership, I would say. And it's a couple thousand people. It's sort of like its own little private forum, right? And, and they support each other and they ask each other questions, and they ask us questions asked, past tense, asked us questions. You know, when, when, when they had a tech question, they, they, they ping James and they had a racing question. They, they would, they would ping me or they would ping Matt e or something like that. And they would also just answer each other's questions. And they've built this, this incredible community there. That for me, underpins any successful, particularly sort of niche media or, or, or, or vertical media business. Because those are the people that not only are they giving you money to, to keep lights on, but they're, they're your, they're your biggest advocates, right? They're your, your most important advocates in the space. They're the people that, that tell their friends. They're the people that get other people signed up. They are, they're more important than any marketing spend you could, you could ever possibly utilize. Right? So that, that was one of the things we were really proud of the last couple years. And I think that that is a model in some ways for, for, for going forward. So, you know, like I said, I'm, I don't have a non-compete. I can start anything I want right now and, and I, and to be, to be very blunt, like I fully plan to I think that, [00:26:54] Randall R. Jacobs: think you absolutely should at this. You clearly have an audience that that misses your voice and that values what you brought to the table. [00:27:00] Caley Fretz: Yeah. And, and I would say it like, honestly, it's, it's even, it's less my voice and it's more like Dave Rome and Matt and like the rest of the crew because I, I, I do like to put, you know, put the folks that that were writing day, day in, day out for ct, like, well ahead of anything that I was doing. But I, I did spend more time than they did thinking about how to, how to build a media business. And so, yeah, I, you know, we wanna, we wanna, we wanna do something here. That there's it's only been a couple weeks since we were, we were. Let go. So we're still figuring out what the details are. But like I said, you know, we've already kicked off a little podcast. We know that there's a lot of people out there that are kind of waiting for this. And we will, we will just try to give them what they want, I guess. I mean, my, in my mind, the, ideal sort of media entity of the future and I, I've used this term a couple times with, with Dave in, in talking about these things is, is essentially an aggregation of niches or niches if, depending on which pronunciation you prefer. So rather than try to go really broad and talk about a little bit of everything, which, which tends to be kind of the model across most of cycling media, I prefer a concept where you, you essentially allow editors to. To dive into their, their interests and their strengths. Right? You know, you take, you take Dave Rome and you say, Dave, you love tools. You're real weirdo about it. But we appreciate your weirdness and we, we, we embrace it and, and do it. Like, tell me everything you can possibly tell me about tools, because I'm pretty sure there's an audience there. And even if it's not that big, even if it's a couple thousand people, if they are hyper engaged with you, a couple thousand people in a recurring membership model, recurring revenue model is enough to pay Dave plus some, right? And then you sort of, you take that concept and you, and you expand it out. And yeah, it's, it's, it becomes the basis by which you can build a, a, a media entity. That I think is, is sustainable. Not none, nothing I'm saying here is wholly original, right? Like this is the broadly the direction that a lot of different media entities are going. Anybody sort of follows that world. There's, there's like, there's a new politics site called S four that is essentially the same rough concept, right? You, you dive headlong into, into particular beats. You provide a ton of depth in those beats. You hit the, the audience, people who, who really care about that particular topic, and you pull that group in and then you do the same thing over here and you pull that group in, you do the same thing over here, and you pull that group in. And there's for sure people that care about more than one obviously. But you really, like, you focus really deep on each one of these things. And that's the, that's the, if I could build something and, and I, you know, like I said, I, I intend to try, that's the concept. I think that that makes the most sense to me from a. from a business perspective, from an editorial perspective, from from every perspective I can, I can think of, basically. [00:29:59] Randall R. Jacobs: Yeah, so I've had folks like Russ Roca from PathLessPedaled. On the pod. He has a YouTube channel you may or may not be familiar with, but that's become his livelihood, right. And he has sustainers through Patreon. He doesn't do endorsements and things like that. I don't think he's doing any sort of sponsored episodes or anything of that sort. And he's been able to make a living. And there are obviously plenty of YouTuber influencer types who may have less scruples about promoting things and things of that sort. But who I'm curious, either within bike or, or outside a bike what projects do you see succeeding in the model that you could imagine emulating or building upon? Because I've seen a bunch of attempts at it and it's, it's a really tough nut to [00:30:43] Caley Fretz: it's a tough not to crack. I, I would say that the biggest and most obvious is the athletic, which was just purchased by the New York Times for something like, I think it was 425 million. Now, so the sort of caveat around that is that that's probably less than they were actually hoping for. This is a, a VC funded media entity that, that primarily covers ball sports. And their whole thing was you take, you, you, you essentially apply the beat reporter model of like a local newspaper. You know, you, you, the, the, the Denver Post for example, will have a Broncos beat reporter. Then all they do is talk about the Broncos, right? And, and they're even allowed to kind of be fans of the Broncos a little bit. They take that and they apply it to every single ball sport. So both types of football, you know, baseball, basketball, all the rest. And they apply a beat reporter to every major team. And sometimes more than one beat reporter to, to really big teams. You know, like if we're talking English, English Premier League you know, Manchester United has a couple different writers on it. Aston Villa has probably won, right? So, but, but, but even so, if you're a massive Aston Villa fan and you just want your Aston Villa News, you can go, you know that the athletics gonna have it cuz they have a person who is dedicated to your team and nothing else but your team. So you can also get like, okay, well I want some broader, I want World Cup news, I want, I want the Manchester United news. I want the Ronaldo news, but I really want my Aston Villa guy, right. That is essentially the same model that I'm talking about where like, I believe that people really want Dave Rome's tool. They probably also care about lots of other things that, that we will write about. But they really want Dave room's tool stuff. And that's probably the thing that's actually gonna get them across the line from a, from a membership perspective, right? Is that deep, deep, deep love of this one thing that a content creator they like is talking about. That's the kind of thing that, that, that moves the needle in. So yeah, the athletic is, is kind of the biggest, most obvious example of this kind of working. They made I think some strategic areas early on in the way that they pulled staff together that made it quite an expensive organization to run. And I think that's part, probably part of the reason why they didn't get quite as much cash for it as they thought. But still building a media a media entity from nothing in the last, I think it started five years ago or so. I remember sitting at a Tor de France press buffet with some of the. The British. So at the time it was, you know, sky Era. A lot of big name British sport writers, sports writers were coming over the tour, and a couple of those guys were talking about job offers from the athletic and actually like how insanely well paid they were going to be So I think [00:33:13] Randall R. Jacobs: And the, these are full, full-time positions. We're not [00:33:15] Caley Fretz: oh, yeah, yeah. [00:33:16] Randall R. Jacobs: Just shifting everything to freelance. Like so [00:33:18] Caley Fretz: No, no, no. These are, yeah, [00:33:20] Randall R. Jacobs: models Do. [00:33:21] Caley Fretz: no, I mean, I don't, I mean, perhaps they're contractors or something, but like, you know, the, the, these individuals are writing a, a story a day most of the time about the particular beat that they're talking about. A story every other day, depending on the, on the, on the writer probably. But anyway, yeah, about about five years ago. So you see, you know, you've got a media entity that's only about five years old and just sold to the New York Times for half a million or whatever it was, or sorry, half a billion. [00:33:43] Randall R. Jacobs: Yeah. [00:33:43] Caley Fretz: a pretty, that's a success story in my mind. And shows that the. The model can work, I think. There's no guarantees and that's a scale that I don't really have any need, want, or desire to come anywhere near. But I do think that the core essentially value proposition of membership that they, that they showed worked, can work elsewhere. It can work in cycling, can work across endurance media, I think. [00:34:12] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and again, with my kind of very cursory understanding of the space, they were required by the New York Times, which itself went through its own economic model crisis and had to make the switch to a paywall. And the quality of the content was sufficient that they're, they're making such large acquisitions, so they must be doing something right. They're, they're not the failing New York Times. As some folks called them a few years ago. I think there's also something to be said for consolidating quality and having the interaction of the sort that you did at at cycling tips, not just through Velo Club but also just the comments section. It, it was a very unique space and your team was in there. Interacting and the, the nature of the communication that I saw, the way that your readers were engaging there, it didn't seem hierarchical at all. It was a conversation with, with you and your team and that that was very, very cool to see. And that was something quite special that I think is more a consequence of the people involved than of the particular platform as special as cycling tips was. And I was one of the early readers that was, those are my racing days when it was literally just the blog and it was pointers on how to train. It was the cool thing at the time. And. Actual cycling tips. Yeah. That name was, was a direct, directly correlated with the contents. But I don't know if I've shared this with you, but in addition to the podcast, which is founded by Craig Dalton we also started this Slack community called the Ridership, which also is bit over a couple thousand members, and also has these like healthy dynamics. We call it a, a community of Rogers Helping Riders. And that was directly inspired by what you guys do at Velo. like saw what you were doing over there was just something that wanted to emulate, found inspiring saw a place for. And I'd be curious one of the things that Craig and I have talked about, is some form of shared platform that's somehow democratically governed. Where content creators and those who are engaging with their content who wanna support them and so on, can all meet and having that be something centralized in the sense that it's all meeting in the same place, but decentralized in terms of the governance structure, and then maybe even set up as a non-profit. I'm curious if you've had any thoughts around that sort of thing. [00:36:35] Caley Fretz: Yeah, I've actually sort of played around with similar ideas. We, yeah. In this, well, and again, in the sort of couple weeks that I've been thinking about, really thinking about this now we thought through, so, so ironically, one of the things that. There's been a fair number of complaints around with outside was was essentially like web three and, and NFT stuff. However some of that technology would actually make something like what you're talking about potentially work quite a bit better. Again, I haven't spent, we, we didn't go too far down this, this, this rabbit hole cause we feel like getting something off the ground relatively quickly is, is, is a priority. But I agree that, that something platforms work, right? Like that's essentially, that, that's all YouTube is, is just a platform for other people to, to, to put content on. They monetize it over top. They give you a cut, they take most of it. That's a, it's a pretty good business actually. So like could you do that for endurance sports, perhaps? Probably. Are there enough? Are there enough really high quality individual content creators out there to make that work? Probably, maybe like, are, are there enough Ben Delaney's, who would love to probably work with a platform that, that increased their visibility? But, you know, in, in exchange for a cut of whatever he's making, probably. I mean, that's essentially the, the deal that he's made with YouTube, right? Like we were saying. I think there's something there. I don't, I think it'd, I think it'd be incredibly difficult to, to get off the ground and would almost have to be quite organic and you'd have to be kind of willing to, to sit on it and let it grow for quite some time or, or sit on a bunch of investment money and, and do it that way. Which I don't necessarily have the time for at this point in time, but I like the idea. I really, I like, I genuinely, you know, I've, I've had a lot of conversations with other people in, in bike media over the last couple weeks because for obvious reasons, people giving me a ring. They're saying a lot of 'em are saying basically like, Hey, I'm sorry just checking in on you. Stuff like that. And we, and we get to talking about this sort of thing. And one of the things that keeps coming up is this desire to stop competing so directly with each other as bike media, right? Like the space is too small. We all do our own thing. We talk to maybe the same audience in general, but we talk to them in very different ways. And you know, like I I I, I, I've been on the phone with editor in chiefs of, of, of a couple different major bike outlets in the last week and all have said something along those lines. And I think that some sort of collective would, would hit the same. Yeah, it would hit, it would hit the same. there, right? Of a, of a desire to provide a space for everybody to just create really good work that they actually get paid for. Cuz that's the hard thing again, you're still talking about putting the genie back in the bottle. You're still talking about trying to get people to pay for, for something that they historically haven't paid for, or you're running an advertising based model, which is incredibly difficult. And in part, and this particular moment is very, very difficult. I mean, you know, Robin, the CEO of outside mentioned that specifically in the letter that came along with with these layoffs is like the advertising world out there right now, particularly in endemic media, like cycling is bad. It is bad news. You know, they're, they're looking into 2023 and seeing and seeing steep drop-offs in the amount that that is being spent. So you've run up against kind of similar problems, I think with that model. But it is certainly something that is The incentives to me feel like they're lined up for creators in a, in a model like that, right? Because they, if done right, they would directly benefit from their, their work. Whereas, you know, something that's always kind of frustrated me in this space is like, the value of myself and, and, and editorial teams have increased the value of entities tremendously o over my career. And then they get sold and I see none of it And so like that, that the incentive, [00:40:24] Randall R. Jacobs: and [00:40:25] Caley Fretz: structure is not, is not great within most of bike media [00:40:29] Randall R. Jacobs: Yeah. It's bad enough in the tech space where there are stock options, but generally to the founder goes most of the spoils. Even though and I say this as a founder, I don't create most of the value, right? Nothing that, that I could do would get off the ground without all the other people who make it happen. And so, it's only right that there be a distribution of ownership and a sharing of the rewards if there's success, which in turn incentivizes success. In the case of cycling tips, in reading the comments it's very clear that the readership knows it. They're not there for cycling tips. Cycling tips is the bander under which all the people whose perspectives they valued. It's where those people are. And so, your standalone brand and that of your colleagues, has value and has value in particular, if it's brought in a single place where people can interact with you as, as they had in the past it's a terrible thing to lose. And you know, whatever the reasons for it, obviously there are economic headwinds. But it's, it's unfortunate. But there's a saying that I, I live by that seems to apply, which is change happens when the fear of change is less than the pain of staying the same. [00:41:36] Caley Fretz: Hmm. [00:41:37] Randall R. Jacobs: And there's nothing quite like a radically changing economic model or layoffs or things like that that make staying the same, really painful. And so whether the fear has changed or not, time to take the leap and people like yourself and Ben and others have been making that leap. I wonder you mentioned that some sort of platform would have to. Either be funded by a bunch of VC money, which honestly I don't, if you wanna end up with a small fortune, start with a big one. Throwing VC money at things is a really good way to end up with Juicero. I don't know if you recall that [00:42:10] Caley Fretz: Oh, yes. [00:42:11] Randall R. Jacobs: 130 or 160 million of Sandhill Road money lit on fire for a a glorified electric press for If anyone's curious, look this up. It is. It'll, it'll make you feel that yeah, it, it'll make you question the judgment of, of Silicon Valley in a way that I have learned too from the inside over the years. But the organic piece let's, let's unpack that cuz I, I have a couple of ideas that I'd like to bounce off of you. So platforms like YouTube, I suspect it's gonna be very hard for somebody who has an audience on YouTube or who wants to build an audience to leave YouTube. But having a platform that is essentially an a. So if you're a content creator, wherever your content is, this is the one place where you can find all of it along with, categorized content from other players. So you want to learn about tools you have, Dave Romes YouTube videos about tools. You have his podcast about tools. You have other content creators content there. And then it becomes kind of platform agnostic like you can be anywhere, but this is the place where you go to find it. And this is the place where you go to interact. Cuz the YouTube comments, that's not an interaction space that's largely a trolling space or, or it's a largely one directional sorts of conversation happening. Even, even the healthiest version of it is still not a conversation. But if you have a YouTube video embedded in a a community, [00:43:27] Caley Fretz: Mm-hmm. [00:43:28] Randall R. Jacobs: Now all of a sudden people are in digital community together and not just over say Dave and his tool-based content or his tool focused content. Not to say that's all he does, but using that as an example, but also Dave in community, in his local chapter, right. In his local riding community. And in the context of a place where people are also going for, James' bike reviews and you know, your Twitter de France coverage and, and things like this that's one model that I've wondered, like if there was such a platform. [00:43:59] Caley Fretz: how, how, how do you monetize it? Is it, is it pay? Walled, [00:44:03] Randall R. Jacobs: That's a big question, right? [00:44:04] Caley Fretz: Well, so, so, the reason I ask is because I, I, like, I would see a couple different options, right? And, and we're getting into real sort of media theory here, but , [00:44:11] Randall R. Jacobs: This, this was actually part of the conversation I wanted to have with you long before all these changes. And it's something we've discussed on the pod before as well with other content creators. [00:44:19] Caley Fretz: I, I think So I, I'll say that first and foremost that I'm, I'm not anti paywall. I know some of the, some others are in, in the media space, but I fundamentally believe that if done properly you're essentially only targeting. So, so, so I'm, I'm a big advocate of what, what we call meter paywall, which is basically you get a couple free stories in a given amount of time whatever the number is, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, whatever you want. And then at some point you, you pay right? Now, the nice thing about that is that you know, if we, if we take a, let's take a hypothetical cycling media outlet with somewhere in, you know, we, we'll call it, we'll call it 2 million unique users a month, right? You've got 2 million people showing up at a website every month. The number of people who are actually gonna get to the paywall that are gonna go to enough stories to get to that paywall is probably something in the neighborhood of like, Less than 5% of those people. It's a tiny, tiny, tiny number because a huge number of those people are coming in from Google. They're, they're, they're seo, they're coming into SEO stories, they're coming into, you know, how to bet in my disc brakes. And they're, they're in and they find out how to do that and they're out. Right? And that's the only interaction you have with them. And they're useful from a page view perspective if you're monetizing that. But they're not particularly useful from a membership perspective cuz who's gonna pay to get one story, right. That, that's, that doesn't make any sense. So you're really only trying to monetize your super users. So your super users are that 5%, the people that actually end up hitting paywall. And part of the reason why I'm not anti paywall is because those people that, that, that small group of people that is coming back day after day after day after day, they value you. And if they truly value you, they should pay for you. , like, I don't have any problem with, you know, we put a ton of time and energy and effort into this and it is our jobs. And we need to get paid. And if people, if people appreciate what we're doing enough to come back every single day and they're not willing to pay for that, then as far as I'm concerned, they need to look at themselves and, and, and ask why. Right? Like, all I'm asking for is, is, you know, eight bucks a month or whatever to continue doing so that, so that you can do something that you do every single day that you enjoy, that you, that you gain information and entertainment from inspiration from even. I think that that's a pretty reasonable trade off. I don't really have any problem asking the super user to do that. I think that there are other paywall versions of a paywall that, that I, that I don't agree with, sort of philosophically, I don't agree with paywall in a hundred percent of content. I also think that that just ruins your discoverability and it, it, it doesn't allow anybody [00:46:49] Randall R. Jacobs: was, I was gonna say, is [00:46:50] Caley Fretz: Yeah. Then nobody, [00:46:53] Randall R. Jacobs: thing or is it more just practically like, you're, you're gonna cut off all the channels for discovery? [00:46:58] Caley Fretz: Both. Yeah. I, I, it, it realistically, yeah. Like I said, your discoverability goes to zero. People can't tell that you make good content. I have kind of a similar issue with the, the like premium content model. So you, you know, you give away your, your crappy stuff for free and the really good stuff you gotta pay for, like, I don't like that either. Cause why then anybody's strolling around your website, it's gonna be like, well, it's the only thing is I can read are crap. So why would I pay for the, i, I don't know that [00:47:23] Randall R. Jacobs: poor, it's a poor pitch. [00:47:24] Caley Fretz: It's a bad pitch. So, so I have issues with that. I also just like philosophically, you know, the, the sort of fully hard pay wall that you can't read anything without paying beyond the discovery of discoverability problems. I just kinda have issues with that because like if we do write a, how to bet in your disc brake so they don't make noise story. Like, I want people to be able to access that, right? Like, then I don't have to listen up. people's loud disc breaks. You know, like people, I, I have no problem sort of providing that much content to somebody for free. And I think that the fully pay well in that is, is, is isn't great. But again, I I'm not against paywalls in general. Meter paywalls I think work quite well. They yeah, we know that they're effective. They can be incredibly effective, particularly if you have this sort of requisite essentially story volume to make them work and, and sort of audience size to make them work. So given that like the, the sort of concept that you are talking about, paywall seems like a, like a, a, a good way forward because again, you're sort of avoiding the avoiding the need to, to chase advertising dollars constantly. And this is, this is gonna be somewhat a reflection of what I'm thinking for, for. For myself going forward, obviously you're avoiding, you're, you're avoiding chasing advertising dollars incessantly, which, you know, I'm not against advertising either. I think the right advertising partners can be, can be crucial, right? They provide lots of actually value to an audience at some point, right. You know, the fact that you get bikes to test the fact that you have a good relationship there. Those, those are all valuable things. So not, not anti advertising either. I'm just more anti, constantly chasing every single cent you can possibly get out of advertising. And the, and the sort of the, the, the extra resource that, that very concept requires. And so yeah, some sort of like membership driven thing lines up with the sort of ethos of what you're talking about, which is very community driven. We know communities are willing to invest in their own space where they can be a community. And so that would make sense as well. And if you start to do things like add too much advertising to something like that, then you do the incentives start to shift. Cuz you start working for the advertisers instead of working for the community. And that I think goes against the whole ethos that you're talking about of the sort of communal thing. So that would be my, that would be my 2 cents on, on, on how to build something like that. Like I said, it is a concept that, that we played around with and I've played around with in my head for, for some time actually. I personally, again, it's more of a, more of a time issue for me than anything. Not that I don't think it could be cool and don't think it could work. I just think that the, to build that community would take quite a bit of time. And also figuring out the precise method of paying. So the other roadblock that I, that I came across when I was thinking through this was the precise method of paying content creators in that scenario, it's quite complicated. Cause are you paying them? Are you paying them by page view? Are you paying them? Is there a tip jar? Is there some sort of, of, you know, rank voting system when people sign up, like, I like these three creators and I don't like these three, and so the top three get, get my money. And the, and the other three don't. That starts to create some perverse incentives toward bad content as well, right? And, and essentially that's the, that is the YouTube problem. The YouTube problem is that YouTube is incentivized for clickbait. It's incentivized for garbage content, , because that's, that's the stuff that gets picked up. And think about, think about your average, like YouTube headline or YouTube sort of, title card. Versus what you would find on a, a site like cycling tips these days. Right. It's a dramatic difference. Like we, we would have to change headlines depending on whether it was going on YouTube or going on on the site back in the day. Cuz YouTube is incentivized to be like all caps and exclamation points and somebody crashing in the title card and all these things that we kind of hate because that's what you end [00:51:25] Randall R. Jacobs: Kaylee, Fritz destroys X, Y, [00:51:27] Caley Fretz: Exactly. So after the monetization question, how do you actually split up that money with the content creators? It's a, it's a, again, I like, I love the, the idea, I love the concept, but the sort of those particular decisions. Be crucial to success and crucial to it actually working for the people that, that you, that you know, that you want, want, would want it to work for. And it'd be hard. It'd be really hard. I I don't have the solution to those questions, which is why I, again, thought through a lot of this and, and thought through a similar concept, not, not identical but a similar concept and, and basically came to the conclusion that in the near term, a a slightly more traditional model is not the worst thing in the world, right? Like, build really good content, pay people for it make people pay for it. , that's essentially the, that's the, the, the three part business plan of most membership driven media entities these days. Does that all make sense? I feel like I went in a bit of rant there. [00:52:31] Randall R. Jacobs: Not at all. Not at all. And in fact, it's a conversation I'd like to continue cuz I have a few ideas that probably we, we don't want to dedicate a whole episode to just this conversation. But certainly appreciate you pulling back a curtain on the sorts of questions that you as an editor in the space and an editor for one of the most respected publications in the space and for good reason, providing that perspective in the sorts of things that you are thinking about from this new Vantage point is very much appreciative. So thank you for that. I wanna go in a completely different direction. What are the pieces that you've written that you most enjoyed or found most challenging, or that were most meaningful for you as a writer? [00:53:08] Caley Fretz: Hmm. Internally at cycling tips. We called them riddles. It was a, it was a coin, a term that I intro coined for his little, the little essays. Right. There's a couple of those that I, that I really enjoyed writing and, and liked writing. It's just sort of the pure act of, of, of sort of language, basically like playing with language. Which is still fundamentally like why I started doing this to begin with is cause I really enjoyed doing that. And the last couple years have stepped away from writing almost entirely. Not entirely, but almost entirely. And, and so when I did get a chance to write, it was always, it was always meaningful and I, and I liked it. That tended to be at things like the Tor de Frances where, you know, I would essentially send to myself cuz I, I wanted to go cover the to Frances again. I had plenty, plenty, plenty of, plenty of talented, talented writers that, that reporters that could have gone instead of me. But at some point you pull the boss card and I'm like, I'm gonna the tour So, so yeah, there's a couple pieces on that front. Actually one of the first pieces I ever wrote for segment tips it's, it was called The Road to Niro's House. And it was about a trip that my wife and I and two friends took to Columbia. And it, it, like half the photos are broken on it now. It's, it's, it's from like 2017 like 6,500 words of a trip around Columbia and all the sort of things that, that riding in Columbia. Particularly in 2017 meant sort of keeping in mind that that, you know, a relatively large and disastrous war there only kind of wrapped up around the 2010 mark depending on who you ask . So I, I, I really enjoyed that piece. And then, yeah, like these, these little riddles, you know, there's a couple that I've written over my career that I that you tend to write them in 20 minutes, right? Because something just hits you in the head and, and you just, I mean, you just get it out, but it, because of that, it's, they're very pure. I think. I wrote one about the toe strap that my dad would use to attach a sock full of Tube tire, co2, you know, flat fixing implements underneath his saddle. Right? And he would, he would strap this thing underneath his saddle with a, with a strap, like a tube sock underneath his saddle with a, with a, with a tow strap, like a leather tow strap. And, and I, and I wrote this story about how, like, you know, I just remember when I was 12, 13 years old. And you know, my dad is obviously a much stronger cycl cyclist than me at that point. And just like, you know, trying to stay on his wheel with this like, toe strap dangling in front of me as like the, you know, I'm just, I'm just, I just need to stay on the tow strap. Wrote a piece about that at some point that I, that I ended up, I, I really liked. And it was meaningful to me because of my, my relationship with my dad is like very tied into my relationship with cycling because we grew up doing it together and, and still ride together when we can and things like that. There was one about eating Castle and Carcassone during a rest day, Tor de France that I liked. Again, these, you know, [00:55:59] Randall R. Jacobs: Castle in Per, [00:56:01] Caley Fretz: Castle is is like a, [00:56:03] Randall R. Jacobs: I'm, I'm, I'm not so [00:56:04] Caley Fretz: is like, is like a meat, like a meaty stew thing you know, white beans and, and, and some, some meat. And Carcassone is a town in southern France with a big kind of world heritage site castle over top of it. And it's always hot as hell there. They often have restage there at the torque. It's always hot as hell. And I have yet to find a hotel or an Airbnb there that has air conditioning. So you're always just like baking, you know, second rest day of the Tor De France. You know, I, I think I was sitting in a cafe. And I had a couple roses like you do and, and eating a castle, which is also hot. So I'm like, I'm hot eating a hot castle and just watching the world kind of go by like the sort of Tor de France rest day world go going by and, you know, like Greg Van Ama coming up and, and stopping at a red light. I'm this, I've wrote the story a while ago and I'm trying to remember what I even talked about. You kn

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)
AFR 354: Chau, capo. Hasta que nos volvamos a encontrar

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 37:57


A la memoria del ovnílogo brasileño Ademar Gevaerd (1962-2022). Más del mundo del misterio en nuestro portal: alfilodelarealidad.com

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)
AFR Nº EXTRA 52: Las claves iniciáticas de Erks - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Al Filo de la Realidad (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 41:03


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! La ciudad intraterrena de Erks. ¿De dónde salió esta historia? Acoglanis, Terrera y la posesión. ¿Hay alguna alternativa a esta explicación? ¿Desde cuándo vienen las apariciones de OVNIs en la región? ¿Existe una "base extraterrestre" en Capilla del Monte, bajo el cerro Uritorco? ¿Base o ciudad, intraterrena o etérea? ¿Qué evidencias hay? ¿Deberíamos interpretar todo esto en "clave iniciática"? ¿Qué pasa realmente en Capilla del Monte? Algunos casos de ejemplo: 1. La visita de los duendes. 2. Yo quiero un "vigilante" ya. 3. Las primas, la antena de colores y... ¿una abducción? Relacionados: Templarios en América: la mentira filonazi de Terrera https://alfilodelarealidad.com/templarios-en-america-la-mentira-filonazi-de-terrera/ [Texto] Las claves iniciáticas de Erks https://alfilodelarealidad.com/las-claves-iniciaticas-de-erks/ Más sobre el mundo del Misterio en alfilodelarealidad.comEscucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de Al Filo de la Realidad. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/3844

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs
Building A Multi-Million Dollar Real Estate Portfolio Without Bank Financing | Gabriel Hamel

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 63:54


Join Nick Lamagna as he welcomes guest Gabriel Hamel an incredible person and real estate investor who has acquired a portfolio of single family and various classes of commercial real estate worth over $45 Million with little to no traditional bank financing!  Gabriel takes his background and discipline from wrestling and the military and combines It with his passion for real estate and business to make the perfect recipe for success.  Known as the man with the best abs In real estate his discipline carries over to all aspects of his life and Gabriel walks the walk allowing him to achieve physical, financial and mental achievements that most people are searching for.  If you think there's no deals In your market or sellers won't entertain financing you'll love what Gabriel has to say after building most of his portfolio In submarkets of his own backyard.  Surrounding yourself with like minded positive Individuals and building relationships has been a key Ingredient In his success sharing his time and experiences with such amazing people and masterminds as Richard Branson and GoBundance!  Gabriel is a strong advocate of financial literacy through self education and is one of the good guys in the business.  Don't miss this episode with the King of Seller Financing! Topics for this episode include: ✅ What is the BEST strategy to start with in real estate investing? ✅ How to buy properties if you cannot qualify for a traditional bank loan ✅ Lessons from the book Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki ✅ Finding hidden submarkets  ✅ How to talk to a seller about seller financing ✅ What's more important than price in getting great deals ✅ Commercial and Airbnb real estate predictions for 2023 ➡️ More! See the show notes to connect with all things Gabriel Hamel Text Nick today to do some real estate deals together whether you are new or experienced at (516) 540-5733  --- Connect with Gabriel: hamelinvestments.com Gabriel Hamel on Facebook Gabriel Hamel on Instagram Gabriel Hamel on LinkedIn Gabriel Hamel on Twitter Gabriel Hamel on TikTok   --- Connect with Nick Lamagna www.nicknicknick.com Text Nick (516)540-5733 Connect on ALL Social Media and Podcast Platforms Here FREE Checklist on how to bring more value to your buyers