Podcast appearances and mentions of Henry Kissinger

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56th United States Secretary of State

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  • Oct 22, 2021LATEST
Henry Kissinger

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Best podcasts about Henry Kissinger

Latest podcast episodes about Henry Kissinger

Tangentially Speaking with Christopher Ryan
499 - ROMA 48 (From Chappelle to Kissinger)

Tangentially Speaking with Christopher Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 48:45


Coming to you from Antigua, Guatemala (the original "banana republic"), in this one, I get a few things off my chest, including American foreign policy, why Henry Kissinger is not welcome on my podcast, how group identity becomes desperately attractive in a time of crisis, and how that plays out in the LGBTQ anger-fest at Dave Chappelle. The essay I read from by Molly Frances is here. Join us Sunday (10/24) at 2:30pm (EST) for the festive live-stream of episode 500 on my YouTube channel, hosted by Anya Kaats and Mike Maher. Find me on Instagram or Twitter. Please consider supporting this podcast. This Amazon affiliate link kicks a few bucks back my way. Intro music: “Brightside of the Sun,” by Basin and Range; "You Haven't Done Nothin," by Stevie Wonder.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.22.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:47


"The war for our minds (con'd)." The colonization of independent media.    Patrick Lawrence THE SCRUM  Oct 21       21 OCTOBER—Watch and listen, O you with open eyes and ears. The national security state's long, very long campaign to control our press and broadcasters has taken a new turn of late. If independent media are what keep alive hope for a vigorous, authentic Fourth Estate, as argued severally in this space, independent media are now subject to an insidious, profoundly anti-democratic effort to undermine them. The Independent Consortium of Investigative Journalists, Frances Haugen, Maria Ressa: Let us consider this institution and these people. They are all frauds, if by fraudulent we mean they are not what and who they tell us they are and their claim to independence from power is bogus. The Deep State—and at this point it is mere pretense to object to this term—long ago made it a priority to turn the mainstream press and broadcasters to its purposes—to make a free press unfree. This has gone on since the earliest Cold War decades and is well and responsibly documented. (Alas, if more Americans read the many excellent books and exposés on this topic, assertions such as the one just made would not arrive as in the slightest outré.)    But several new realities are now very evident. Chief among them, the Deep State's colonization of corporate media is now more or less complete. CNN, filling its airtime with spooks, generals, and a variety of official and formerly official liars, can be counted a total takeover. The New York Times is prima facie government-supervised, as it confesses in its pages from time to time. The Washington Post, owned by a man with multimillion-dollar CIA contracts, has turned itself into a comic book. For reasons I will never entirely fathom, corporate media have not merely surrendered their legitimacy, such as it may have been: They have actively, enthusiastically abandoned what frayed claim they may have had to credibility. The national-security state incorporates mainstream media into its apparatus, and then people stop believing mainstream media: The thrill is gone, let's say.  In consequence of these two factors, independent media have begun to rise as … independent media. They accumulate audiences. A little at a time, they acquire the very habits of professionalism the mainstream press and broadcasters have let decay. Gradually, they assume the credibility the mainstream has lost. The media ecosystem—horrible phrase but there it is—begins to take on a new shape.  Certain phenomena engendered by independent media prove popular. There are whistleblowers. People inside Deep State institutions start to leak, and they turn to independent media, most famously WikiLeaks, to get information out. While the Deep State's clerks in mainstream media keep their heads down and their mouths shut as they cash their checks, independent media take principled stands in favor of free expression, and people admire these stands. They are, after all admirable. Those populating the national-security state's sprawling apparatus are not stupid. They can figure out the logical response to these developments as well as anyone else. The new imperative is now before us: It is to colonize independent media just as they had the mainstream in previous decades. There are some hopelessly clumsy cases. I urge all colleagues to stop bothering with The Young Turks in any capacity. Those running it, creatures of those who generously fund it, are simply infra-dig. As Matt Taibbi pointed out over the weekend in a piece wonderfully headed, “Yes, Virginia, There Is a Deep State,” they've now got some clod named Ben Carollo proclaiming the CIA as an accountable force for good, savior of democracy—this in a video appearing under the rubric “Rebel HQ.” As an East European émigré friend used to say, “Gimme break.” Democracy Now! is a subtler instance of colonization. The once-admirable Amy Goodman drank the Russiagate Kool-Aid, which I counted the first indication of covert intervention of one or another kind. Then she caved to the orthodoxy on the chemical-weapons scam during the Syrian crisis, and lately—you have to watch to believe—Goodman has begun broadcasting CNN “investigative” reports with unalloyed approval. The debate in this household is whether Ms. Goodman had a long lunch in Langley or her donors started threatening to delay their checks. I have no evidence of either but tend to the latter explanation. The three recent phenomena suggested at the top of this piece are indications of the Deep State's latest tactics in its assault on independent media and the culture that arises among them. It behooves us to understand this.  Two weeks ago, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published “The Pandora Papers,” a “leak” of 12 million electronic documents revealing the tax-fiddling, money-hiding doings of 300–odd political figures around the world. “The Pandora Papers” followed publication of “The Panama Papers” in 2016 and “The Paradise Papers” a year later. There are many useful revelations in these various releases, but we ought not be fooled as to the nature of the project. Where did the ICIJ get the documents in “The Pandora Papers,” and how?  Are they complete? Were names redacted out? They have been verified? Explaining provenance, authenticity, and so forth is essential to any investigative undertaking, but ICIJ has nothing to say on this point. Why, of all the people “The Pandora Papers” exposes, is there not one American on its list? As Moon of Alabama notes in an analysis of this release, it amounts to a list of “people the U.S. doesn't like.” The ICIJ vigorously insists on its independence. But on close inspection this turns out not to be so by any serious understanding of the term. Among its donors are the Ford Foundation, whose longtime ties to the CIA are well-documented, and the Open Societies Foundation, the (in)famous George Soros operation dedicated to cultivating coups in nations that fall outside the fence posts of neoliberalism.  The group was founded in 1997 as a project of the Center for Public Integrity, another institution dedicated to “inspiring change using investigative reporting,” as the center describes itself. Among its sponsors are Ford, once again, and the Democracy Fund, which was founded by Pierre Omidyar, bankroller of The Intercept (another compromised “independent” medium). Omidyar is, like Soros, a sponsor of subversion ops in other countries masquerading as “civil society” projects. ICIJ's other sponsors (and for that matter the Democracy Fund's) are comprised of the sorts of foundations that support NPR, PBS, and other such media. Let us be crystal clear on this point. Anyone who assumes media institutions taking money from such sponsors are authentically independent does not understand philanthropy as a well-established, highly effective conduit through which orthodoxies are enforced and public discourse circumscribed.  What are we looking at here? Not what we are supposed to think we are looking at, certainly. I will return to this question. There is the case of Maria Ressa, which I considered briefly in a previous commentary. Ressa is the supposedly courageous, speak-truth-to-power co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize this year, a Filipina journalist who co-founded The Rappler, a web publication in Manila. The Nobel committee cited Ressa for her “fight for freedom of expression.” Who is Maria Ressa, then, and what is The Rappler? I grow weary of writing this sentence: She and her publication are not what we are supposed to think they are. Ressa and The Rappler, each insisting on independence just as the ICIJ does, are straight-out lying on this point. The Rappler recently received a grant of $180,000 from the National Endowment for Democracy, a CIA front—this according to an NED financial report issued earlier this year. None other than Pierre Omidyar and a group called North Base Media own nonvoting shares in the publication. Among North Base's partners is the Media Development Investment Fund, which was founded by George Soros to do what George Soros likes to do in other countries. Does a picture begin to emerge? Read the names together and one will. You have to figure they all party together. Nobel in hand, Maria Ressa has already declared that Julian Assange is not a journalist and that independent media need new regulations, as in censorship. Henry Kissinger got a Nobel as a peacemaker: Ressa gets one as a defender of free expression. It's a fit. This brings us to the case of Frances Haugen, the former Facebook exec who recently appeared before Congress waving lots of documents she seems to have secreted (supposedly) out of Facebook's offices to argue for—what else at this point?—increased government regulation of social media, as in censorship. Frances Haugen, you see, is a courageous, speak-truth-to-power whistleblower. Never mind that her appearance on Capitol Hill was carefully choreographed by Democratic Party operatives whose party simply cannot wait to censor our First Amendment rights out of existence.  It is hard to say who is more courageous, I find—the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, or Frances Haugen. Where would we be without them? The culture of independent media as it has germinated and developed over the past decade or so gave us WikiLeaks, and its effectiveness cannot be overstated. It gave us all manner of gutsy journalists standing for the principles of a genuinely free press, and people listened. It gave us whistleblowers who are admired even as the Deep State condemns them.     And now the national-security state gives us none other than a secret-disclosing crew of mainstream hacks, a faux-independent journalist elevated to the highest honors, and a whistleblower who was handed her whistle and taught how to toot it—three crowd-pleasers, three simulacra. These are three frauds. They are to independent journalism what McDonald's is to food.  There is only one defense against this assault on truth and integrity, but it is a very good one. It is awareness. CNN, Democracy Now!, the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, Frances Haugen—none of these and many other media and people are properly labeled. But the labels can be written with modest efforts. Awareness and scrutiny, watching and listening, will prove enough.

Conversations with Tyler
Stanley McChrystal on the Military, Leadership, and Risk

Conversations with Tyler

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 53:57


Stan McChrystal has spent a long career considering questions of risk, leadership, and the role of America's military, having risen through the Army's ranks ultimately to take command of all US and NATO forces in Afghanistan, a force representing 150,000 troops from 45 countries. Retiring as a four-star general in 2010, he has gone on to lecture at Yale and launched the McChrystal Group, where he taps that experience to help organizations build stronger teams and devise winning strategies. His latest book, which he tells Tyler will be his last, is called Risk: A User's Guide. He joined Tyler to discuss whether we've gotten better or worse at analyzing risk, the dangerous urge among policymakers to oversimplify the past, why being a good military commander is about more than winning battlefield victories, why we're underestimating the risk that China will invade Taiwan, how to maintain a long view of history, what set Henry Kissinger apart, the usefulness of war games, how well we understand China and Russia, why there haven't been any major attacks on US soil since 9/11, the danger of a “soldier class” in America, his take on wokeness and the military, what's needed to have women as truly senior commanders in the armed forces, why officers with bad experiences should still be considered for promotion, how to address extremists in the military, why he supports a draft, the most interesting class he took at West Point, how to care for disabled veterans, his advice to enlisted soldiers on writing a will, the most emotionally difficult part and greatest joys of his military career, the prospect of drone assassinations, what he eats for his only meal of the day, why he's done writing books, and more. Visit our website: https://conversationswithtyler.com Email: cowenconvos@mercatus.gmu.edu Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cowenconvos Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/cowenconvos/ Follow Tyler on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tylercowen Follow Stanley on Twitter: https://twitter.com/StanMcChrystal Like us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/cowenconvos Subscribe to our Newsletter: https://go.mercatus.org/l/278272/2017-09-19/g4ms Thumbnail photo credit: Leading Authorities, Inc.

In House Warrior
Vampirette - A Journalist's View of Theranos' Elizabeth Holmes With Vivia Chen, Columnist With Bloomberg Legal and Host Richard Levick of LEVICK

In House Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 35:46


Vampirette - A Journalist's View of Theranos' Elizabeth Holmes: Vivia Chen, a legal columnist with Bloomberg Legal, speaks with host Richard Levick of LEVICK and discusses Ms. Holmes chameleons-like ability to go from Silicon Valley can-do wunderkind to victim of the patriarchy, just in time for trial. How did she entice Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, Sam Nunn, James Mattis, David Boise, Rupert Murdoch and other powerful white men to empower her and her fantastic yet unproven technology? In a flash, she plays her privileged white female card, employing the “Svengali defense” – my ex-boyfriend of color made me do it.

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
S4 E50: Australia: Lockdowns and Location Apps | John Anderson

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 82:01


This episode was recorded on September 9th. Dr. Jordan Peterson and John Anderson exchange ideas about the freedom of conscience, policies, and mandatory vaccines. Dr. Jordan shares his experience with policies while Anderson shares tips on conducting proper debates while commenting on the governmental debates. See how Australia connects to their discussion and how social media came into play. John Anderson is a sixth-generation farmer and grazier from New South Wales, who spent 19 years in the Australian Parliament. After serving in politics, Anderson launched a web-based interview program, Conversations with John Anderson, featuring interviews with public intellectuals. He continues to serve the interests of Australia's rural and regional communities. Find more John Anderson on his website https://johnanderson.net.au/ Check out his YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnAndersonConversations Check out his Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnandersonao Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnAndersonAO/ ———————————— Shownotes ———————————— ● [00:00] Dr. Peterson introduces this week's guest, John Anderson. ● [03:32] "The problem with fighting fire with fire is that you end up burning." Dr. Peterson ● [03:54] What's happening in Australia and the west? ● [04:26] John's tips for proper debates. ● [06:17] How Anderson views Australia's regime. ● [06:40] China's imposed threat on Australia. ● [09:09] John quoting Henry Kissinger on freedom. ● [09:47] The legality of mandatory vaccines in western culture and the blitz story during WWII in Britain. ● [11:48] Anderson's analogy of democracy. ● [14:31] Dr. Peterson's advice on policies. ● [16:05] The lockdowns in Australia. ● [22:07] Dr. Peterson's perspective towards proper political force on vaccinations. ● [21:26] The cost of safety. ● [25:29] John's opinion on debates. ● [26:56] Breaking down trust in the government. ● [31:53] How governmental debates should be conducted. ● [37:21] Freedom of Conscious. ● [43:10] The best rationale for mandatory vaccines. ● [53:01] Lockdowns and the dangers of mandating medical procedures. ● [59:46] The power of social media and John's thoughts on moving forward. ● [01:02:19] Social media and John's podcast. ● [01:06:47] Anderson's thoughts on freedom and governments. ● [01:10:15] Australian politicians' understanding of social media. __________ Visit www.jordanbpeterson.com to view more information about Jordan, his books, lectures, social media, blog posts, and more. Jordan B. Peterson is a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, a clinical psychologist, and the author of the multi-million copy bestseller 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, #1 for nonfiction in 2018 in the US, Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, the Netherlands, Brazil and Norway, and slated for translation into 50 languages. Dr. Peterson has appeared on many popular podcasts and shows, including the Joe Rogan Experience, The Rubin Report, H3H3, and many more. Dr. Peterson's own podcast has focused mainly on his lecture series, covering a great deal of psychology and historical content. Jordan is expanding his current podcast from lectures to interviews with influential people around the world. We hope you enjoy this episode and more to come from Dr. Peterson in the future. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Revelations Radio Network
RESET RUMORS OF WARS

Revelations Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


Canary Cry News Talk #399 - 10.08.2021 RESET, RUMORS OF WARS: Battle of Sci, Tech, Social, Pol, Econ, Militia, Edu, Spiritual - CCNT 399 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com EVERYTHING ELSE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel: Ravel Podcast Facelikethesun Resurrection YouTube channel Truther Dating experiment INTRO 1:15 Episode 400 prep Candace Owens says we are in WW3 [New Arms Race] Clip: Another Biden speech went really well FLIPPY 9:34 Robot arm that finds lost items, fuses data from cameras and antennae (MIT Edu)   CHINA 19:30 11 injured, US Nuke Submarine collides with “unknown object” South China Sea (DailyMail)   SPACE POPE REPTILIAN 25:37 Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race]   MONEY 35:01 NatWest, a bank in Britain, pleads guilty for money laundering (Reuters) Leak reveals Twitch Streamer earnings, millions (Fortune) Amazon secured $670 million in tax breaks, says watchdog (CBS NEWS) Note: Official, George Soros is trading Bitcoin (Yahoo) Note: Senator Cynthia Lummis reveals $100K purchase of Bitcoin (NBC) Moderna founders debut on Forbes' top 400 richest Americans (NY Post) Clip: Implications of “Little Guy” who front ran Institutions, Alex Machinsky Celsius Network CEO   I AM WACCINE 55:08 WHO backs first malaria waccine for children (CNN) Not mention on CNN: Gavi, leading the way (Global Fund) Sanofi says positive results from first high dose flu + C19 booster shot (Sanofi Press)   BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons 1:06:28 Clip: How surveillance advertising is tracking you   COVID 19/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 1:43:52 Clip: Dr. Leanna Wen, US should be more like Canada Clip: Trudeau introduces mandate, no more testing? Clip: Newfoundland presser for mandate…squirt squirt Clips: Alex Jones exposes video from 2019, Fauci planning pandemic marketing (New Rescue) Clip: Fauci, 1 and 2 Clip: LA passes mandate, people push back BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups 2:22:24   POLITICS 2:54:05 Abortion law on hold, Basil was right (CNN) Biden to sign bill to raise debt ceiling (The Hill) Kamala Harris to “Stop the Steal” (The Atlantic)   ADDITIONAL STORIES San Fransisco to list mask mandates on Oct. 15 (SF Chron) Elon Musk to move Tesla HQ to Texas (AP) 18 former NBA players arrested for defrauding health care system (NBC) Chimeric injections in CRISPR reduces tumors (BioRxiv) Facebook renews ambitions to connect world (Wired) What Biden needs to say about Surveillance Tech and Foreign Policy (Just Security) Clip: Ethics professor pushes back on mandates, get's fired Note: Study finds waccinated people more susceptible to variant than unwaxxed (MedRxiv) Clip: Klaus says Henry Kissinger influence, Rockefeller admits recruiting Kissinger Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race] Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Fact Check: Sweden “bans”…halts all Moderna SpikeVax (Newsweek) Man who killed pharmacist brother was enraged about waccine (USA Today) European Parliament opposes AI mass surveillance (PC Mag)   PRODUCERS ep. 399: Derek R**, Rachelle, Aaron J, Arnold W, Liz D, Veronica D, Juan A, Ethan N, Sean D, HeatheRuss, Morv, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Mark D, Dominick R, JC, Child of God, Sir Sammons the Knight of the Fishes, Malik, Scott K, Gail M, DrWhoDunDat, Brandt W, Runksmash, Ciara, Douglas P   TIMESTAMPS: Rachel C JINGLES: LearBag3000 ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N LivingTeaBill

Canary Cry News Talk
RESET RUMORS OF WARS

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 201:44


Canary Cry News Talk #399 - 10.08.2021 RESET, RUMORS OF WARS: Battle of Sci, Tech, Social, Pol, Econ, Militia, Edu, Spiritual - CCNT 399 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com EVERYTHING ELSE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel: Ravel Podcast Facelikethesun Resurrection YouTube channel Truther Dating experiment INTRO 1:15 Episode 400 prep Candace Owens says we are in WW3 [New Arms Race] Clip: Another Biden speech went really well FLIPPY 9:34 Robot arm that finds lost items, fuses data from cameras and antennae (MIT Edu)   CHINA 19:30 11 injured, US Nuke Submarine collides with “unknown object” South China Sea (DailyMail)   SPACE POPE REPTILIAN 25:37 Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race]   MONEY 35:01 NatWest, a bank in Britain, pleads guilty for money laundering (Reuters) Leak reveals Twitch Streamer earnings, millions (Fortune) Amazon secured $670 million in tax breaks, says watchdog (CBS NEWS) Note: Official, George Soros is trading Bitcoin (Yahoo) Note: Senator Cynthia Lummis reveals $100K purchase of Bitcoin (NBC) Moderna founders debut on Forbes' top 400 richest Americans (NY Post) Clip: Implications of “Little Guy” who front ran Institutions, Alex Machinsky Celsius Network CEO   I AM WACCINE 55:08 WHO backs first malaria waccine for children (CNN) Not mention on CNN: Gavi, leading the way (Global Fund) Sanofi says positive results from first high dose flu + C19 booster shot (Sanofi Press)   BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons 1:06:28 Clip: How surveillance advertising is tracking you   COVID 19/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 1:43:52 Clip: Dr. Leanna Wen, US should be more like Canada Clip: Trudeau introduces mandate, no more testing? Clip: Newfoundland presser for mandate…squirt squirt Clips: Alex Jones exposes video from 2019, Fauci planning pandemic marketing (New Rescue) Clip: Fauci, 1 and 2 Clip: LA passes mandate, people push back BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups 2:22:24   POLITICS 2:54:05 Abortion law on hold, Basil was right (CNN) Biden to sign bill to raise debt ceiling (The Hill) Kamala Harris to “Stop the Steal” (The Atlantic)   ADDITIONAL STORIES San Fransisco to list mask mandates on Oct. 15 (SF Chron) Elon Musk to move Tesla HQ to Texas (AP) 18 former NBA players arrested for defrauding health care system (NBC) Chimeric injections in CRISPR reduces tumors (BioRxiv) Facebook renews ambitions to connect world (Wired) What Biden needs to say about Surveillance Tech and Foreign Policy (Just Security) Clip: Ethics professor pushes back on mandates, get's fired Note: Study finds waccinated people more susceptible to variant than unwaxxed (MedRxiv) Clip: Klaus says Henry Kissinger influence, Rockefeller admits recruiting Kissinger Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race] Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Fact Check: Sweden “bans”…halts all Moderna SpikeVax (Newsweek) Man who killed pharmacist brother was enraged about waccine (USA Today) European Parliament opposes AI mass surveillance (PC Mag)   PRODUCERS ep. 399: Derek R**, Rachelle, Aaron J, Arnold W, Liz D, Veronica D, Juan A, Ethan N, Sean D, HeatheRuss, Morv, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Mark D, Dominick R, JC, Child of God, Sir Sammons the Knight of the Fishes, Malik, Scott K, Gail M, DrWhoDunDat, Brandt W, Runksmash, Ciara, Douglas P   TIMESTAMPS: Rachel C JINGLES: LearBag3000 ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N LivingTeaBill

Wisdom of Crowds
Episode 72: Fighting China For All The Right Reasons

Wisdom of Crowds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 55:25


Elbridge Colby joins Shadi and Damir to talk about his challenging new book The Strategy of Denial, an unflinchingly clinical argument for confronting China. Does China's authoritarianism make it our enemy, or is confrontation inevitable regardless? Will our allies stick by our side just because China is a bully? And what does Henry Kissinger get wrong about power politics?        

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
James Woolsey‘s Operation Dragon & the Triumph of ”Crackpot Realism” in U.S. Foreign Policy w/ Jim DiEugenio

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 95:47


On this edition of Parallax Views, earlier this year a curious new book was published dealing with the assassination of John F. Kennedy.  Co-written by R. James Woolsey, former Director of the CIA under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1995, and Ion Mihai Pacepa, a former Romanian spy and a noted, high-ranking Eastern Bloc defect during the Cold War, Operation Dragon: Inside the Kremlin's Secret War Against America argues that the JFK assassination was the result of a plot involving the Soviet Union's Nikita Khrushchev and Cuba's Fidel Castro. Lee Harvey Oswald, the book claims, was instructed by Khrushchev to kill President Kennedy. According to Woolsey and Pacepa, Khrushchev actually called off the plot for fear that it might be discovered and lead right back to him as one of the perpetrators.  What Khrushchev did not count on, say Woolsey and Pacepa, is that Oswald would go rogue and carry out the assassination plot in spite of orders to the contrary. In other words, Operation Dragon alleges that President Kennedy's assassination was the result of nefarious Soviet treachery. Is Operation Dragon just another entry in dizzying array of theories positing an alternative to the Warren Commission Report's oft-contested findings concerning the fatal shooting of a sitting President of the United States in Dallas, TX on November 22nd, 1963? Perhaps. Then again, most books that challenge, in varying degrees, the official line on the Kennedy assassination aren't written by ex-CIA Directors. But the curiosity of the book's co-author, the aforementioned James Woolsey, penning a book dealing with the Kennedy assassination doesn't end with his status as the former highest-ranking official in the CIA. In addition to his tenure as DCIA, Woolsey served as U.S. Under Secretary of the Navy in the late 1970s and was involved in negotiations with the Soviet Union in the 1980s. In other words, he was in the thick of it, so to speak, during the Cold War. Most curiously of all, however, when it comes to Woolsey is his connections to the neoconservative foreign policy movement and his penchant for promoting various conspiratorial fears about foreign countries even prior to the publication of Operation Dragon. A member of the notoriously hawkish neocon think tank The Project for a New American Century (PNAC) before its dissolution in 2006, Woolsey has stoked fears that North Korea could use electromagnetic pulse (EMP) weapons against the United States and was also a notable proponent of the theory that al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein's Iraq were involved in the Oklahoma City Bombing. Since the publication of Operation Dragon, Woolsey has appeared on the right-wing outlet Newsmax to promote his theory about the Kennedy assassination. This, combined with his neoconservative inclinations and conspiratorial musings that align quite well with the bolstering of a hawkish, pro-war agenda, raises the question of Woolsey's political motivations in promoting what The Daily Beast has referred to as a "QAnon-style spin" on the Kennedy assassination. Joining us to pushback against Woolsey's JFK assassination theory and place it within the context of his hawkish neocon history is returning guest James DiEugenio, the leading figure behind the website Kennedys and King, writer for the upcoming Oliver Stone documentary JFK Revisited: Through the Looking Glass, and author of such books as Destiny Betrayed: JFK, Cuba, and the Garrison Case, Reclaiming Parkland: Tom Hanks, Vincent Bugliosi, and the JFK Assassination in the New Hollywood, and The JFK Assassination. DiEugenio argues that not only is Woolsey's Kennedy assassination theory wrong, but that it is representative of a certain brand of foreign policy thinking in Washington, D.C. that sociologist C. Wright Mills would refer to as "crackpot realism". Before delving into Operation Dragon, however, Jim fills us in on the latest news concerning the fight to declassify and release the last of the JFK records. We discuss how President Trump, despite at times signaling to the contrary, helped keep the records declassified during his Presidency. Now said records and their review for declassification lay in the hands of President Joe Biden. Then we shift our attention to Operation Dragon and discuss the problems with the book's claims that theoretical physicist and "Father of the Atomic Bomb" J. Robert Oppenheimer and British Prime Minister Clement Attlee were secretly Soviet spies, the relationship between Woolsey's theories on the Kremlin and the paranoid "Monster Plot" of the CIA's James Jesus Angleton, a brief history of neoconservatism, Woolsey's neocon credentials, the relationship between the narrative of the Cold War promoted by Woolsey and the ideas of the far right-wing John Birch Society, James Angleton and the origins of the idea that Lee Harvey Oswald was a KGB agent or asset,, Operation Dragon as a retread of the narrative put forth in Edward Jay Epstein's 1992 book Legend: The Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald, Norman Cousins and the quest for détente with Khrushchev's Soviet Union, French journalist Jean Daniel's meeting with Fidel Castro in Havana on the day of Kennedy's assassination , Kennedy and rapprochement negotiations with Cuba, Khrushchev and Castro's reactions to the assassination, why neither the Soviet Union or Cuba benefitted from Kennedy's assassination, former Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Nitze's Cold War ideology and the rise of neoconservatism, neoconservatism as an ideology that has now slipped into both the Republican and Democratic Parties, "crackpot realism" in the killing of Gaddafi in Libya and the U.S. intervention in Assad's Syria, Barack Obama and the CIA's classified weapons supply and training program in Syria known as "Timber Sycamore", the Project for American Century's agenda, George HW Bush's comments calling the neocons "the crazies in the basement" of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, the notion that Henry Kissinger and Henry Kissinger were "soft" on Communism during the Cold War, neocons as constantly seeking pretexts for war, the late Russian studies scholar Stephen F. Cohen vs. Richard Pipes on the Soviet Union, Nixon and Kissinger as being to the right of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher on Mikhail Gorbachev, neocons and the Australia nuclear submarines deal as part of a geopolitical strategy against China, "Noble Lies" and the selling of wars, NATO's expansion and the lack of historical context provided by crackpot realism in foreign policy, Woolsey's book as a psyop, PNAC member Robert Kagan and his wife Victoria Nuland's involvement in U.S. foreign policy related to Ukraine, the neocon agenda as bankrupting the U.S. and destroying social programs vis-à-vis war spending, and, much, much more.

New Books in Intellectual History
Elizabeth Borgwardt et al., "Rethinking American Grand Strategy" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 70:43


What is grand strategy? What does it aim to achieve? And what differentiates it from normal strategic thought--what, in other words, makes it "grand"? In answering these questions, most scholars have focused on diplomacy and warfare, so much so that "grand strategy" has become almost an equivalent of "military history." The traditional attention paid to military affairs is understandable, but in today's world it leaves out much else that could be considered political, and therefore strategic. It is in fact possible to consider, and even reach, a more capacious understanding of grand strategy, one that still includes the battlefield and the negotiating table while expanding beyond them. Just as contemporary world politics is driven by a wide range of non-military issues, the most thorough considerations of grand strategy must consider the bases of peace and security--including gender, race, the environment, and a wide range of cultural, social, political, and economic issues. Rethinking American Grand Strategy (Oxford UP, 2021) assembles a roster of leading historians to examine America's place in the world. Its innovative chapters re-examine familiar figures, such as John Quincy Adams, George Kennan, and Henry Kissinger, while also revealing the forgotten episodes and hidden voices of American grand strategy. They expand the scope of diplomatic and military history by placing the grand strategies of public health, race, gender, humanitarianism, and the law alongside military and diplomatic affairs to reveal hidden strategists as well as strategies. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Elizabeth Borgwardt et al., "Rethinking American Grand Strategy" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 70:43


What is grand strategy? What does it aim to achieve? And what differentiates it from normal strategic thought--what, in other words, makes it "grand"? In answering these questions, most scholars have focused on diplomacy and warfare, so much so that "grand strategy" has become almost an equivalent of "military history." The traditional attention paid to military affairs is understandable, but in today's world it leaves out much else that could be considered political, and therefore strategic. It is in fact possible to consider, and even reach, a more capacious understanding of grand strategy, one that still includes the battlefield and the negotiating table while expanding beyond them. Just as contemporary world politics is driven by a wide range of non-military issues, the most thorough considerations of grand strategy must consider the bases of peace and security--including gender, race, the environment, and a wide range of cultural, social, political, and economic issues. Rethinking American Grand Strategy (Oxford UP, 2021) assembles a roster of leading historians to examine America's place in the world. Its innovative chapters re-examine familiar figures, such as John Quincy Adams, George Kennan, and Henry Kissinger, while also revealing the forgotten episodes and hidden voices of American grand strategy. They expand the scope of diplomatic and military history by placing the grand strategies of public health, race, gender, humanitarianism, and the law alongside military and diplomatic affairs to reveal hidden strategists as well as strategies. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Elizabeth Borgwardt et al., "Rethinking American Grand Strategy" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 70:43


What is grand strategy? What does it aim to achieve? And what differentiates it from normal strategic thought--what, in other words, makes it "grand"? In answering these questions, most scholars have focused on diplomacy and warfare, so much so that "grand strategy" has become almost an equivalent of "military history." The traditional attention paid to military affairs is understandable, but in today's world it leaves out much else that could be considered political, and therefore strategic. It is in fact possible to consider, and even reach, a more capacious understanding of grand strategy, one that still includes the battlefield and the negotiating table while expanding beyond them. Just as contemporary world politics is driven by a wide range of non-military issues, the most thorough considerations of grand strategy must consider the bases of peace and security--including gender, race, the environment, and a wide range of cultural, social, political, and economic issues. Rethinking American Grand Strategy (Oxford UP, 2021) assembles a roster of leading historians to examine America's place in the world. Its innovative chapters re-examine familiar figures, such as John Quincy Adams, George Kennan, and Henry Kissinger, while also revealing the forgotten episodes and hidden voices of American grand strategy. They expand the scope of diplomatic and military history by placing the grand strategies of public health, race, gender, humanitarianism, and the law alongside military and diplomatic affairs to reveal hidden strategists as well as strategies. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

Forward GC

The App Store is about to change because of a new legal settlement.The settlement dates back to a 2019 lawsuit: App developers sued because they believed Apple held too much power in deciding how they could charge for payments and in taking commission. The settlement changes Apple policy by allowing developers to communicate directly with customers regarding payments outside of the App Store, according to CNN.Apple also agreed to fork over $100 million: The companies in the lawsuit will receive anywhere from $250 to $30,000 each. But this still isn't much of a win for app developersAs the WSJ points out, they still cannot advertise their alternative payment methods within the app (they'll have to rely on data collection to get users' email addresses and communicate the payment methods that way). Plus Apple will still take a hefty cut -- up to 30% -- on all in-app purchases.The VerdictBigger changes may come from the Epic trial because Epic wants its own payment system inside the app. It remains to be seen if this settlement has any impact on the pending decision in the Epic case.   One of the most anticipated trials in tech history started Tuesday with jury selection for the case against Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes. Here's an update on what the trial is about and what's likely ahead.Holmes, who has pleaded not guilty, faces 12 charges for allegedly defrauding investors and patients about revolutionary blood-testing technology that basically didn't work at all. If convicted, the punishment could be as much as 20 years in prison. Holmes's defense is likely to center on blaming Sunny Balwani, a former business partner and romantic partner who also faces fraud charges. Documents from her lawyers suggest they will accuse Balwani of inflicting emotional abuse on Holmes that led her to believe his representations of the company were true. This defense would suggest Holmes was more of the company's public face who shared messages based on what she heard from insiders like Balwani.Holmes will likely testify at some point, based on the recent filings regarding Balwani. Other potential witnesses include Rupert Murdoch, a Theranos investor, and Henry Kissinger, who was on the board. Just like Epic and many small developers, South Korea has a problem with Apple's App Store and Google Play. And the results of its legal fight in Asia could indicate how friendly the Biden administration will be to Big Tech during the next few years. South Korea has proposed a law that allows for alternative payment systems outside app stores: As you know from reading the story above, plenty of developers in America want to do the same thing. The U.S. government has also been skeptical of the power of Google and Apple. The difference is that this proposal is coming from the South Korean government: Apple believes South Korea is targeting American companies, and the U.S. has traditionally worked to counter foreign laws it believes hurt domestic companies. Apple has asked the Biden administration for help. Given the US antitrust fervor, this is an odd request: As the NYT put it, “Will (the Biden administration) defend tech companies facing antitrust scrutiny abroad while it applies that same scrutiny to the companies at home?” Siding with Apple and Google could come at a priceAntitrust cases -- which are already going to be challenging for the government -- don't come across with as much power if the Biden administration says it's wrong for another country to take a similar regulation strategy.Wendy Cutler, vice president at the Asia Society Policy Institute told the NYT, “You don't want to be calling out a country for potentially violating an obligation when at the same time your own government is questioning the practice.”The VerdictMany other countries could propose similar legislation, putting the United States into an even bigger bind.

Today In Jewish History
25 Elul – Henry Kissinger – 1973

Today In Jewish History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021


Fearless - The Art of Creative Leadership with Charles Day
Ep 324: Michael Korda - 'The Historian'

Fearless - The Art of Creative Leadership with Charles Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 47:06


This week's guest is Michael Korda, the Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of Simon & Schuster. We could spend the episode talking only about the highlights of Michael's life. He grew up in 1930s London in a family of movie industry icons. As you'll hear, he became close friends with Graham Greene, traveled to Budapest to attend the Hungarian revolution, and joined the RAF. He did all this before he turned 25. At Simon and Schuster he published books by Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Henry Kissinger, Harold Robbins and Jacqueline Susann. He edited and published all 43 of Mary Higgins Clark's books, and most if not all of Larry McMurtry's books, including Lonesome Dove. As a writer, he published over two dozen books of his own, from the autobiographical to the definitive historical accounts of Robert E. Lee and TE Lawrence, better known as Lawrence of Arabia. He has lived several lives in this one, and helped countless others tell the story of theirs. He has survived wars, the London Blitz and cancer. And at the end of our conversation, I asked him about the role that fear has played in his extraordinary life. In a world growing more uncertain by the day, living a full and rich life is increasingly challenging. The media fills us with reasons to be afraid. And the debate between trying to stay informed, and trying to get on and live life can fill the mind with a Rubik's cube of choices. When you add on top of that, the challenges and risks that come with the responsibility of leading others, then the potential for fear to take over from rational thinking becomes a serious threat. Fear is a powerful force. In daylight we are embarrassed by it. At night, we are scarred by it. Rarely do we choose to shine a light on it. But it is only when we do, only when we admit to ourselves that we are afraid, can we hope to move beyond it. And only then can we help others to join us on the other side. And then, you can have a life so rich with possibility that it is unimaginable that everything you have experienced could belong to one person.

Fearless - The Art of Creative Leadership with Charles Day

Edited highlights of our full conversation. This week's guest is Michael Korda, the Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of Simon & Schuster. We could spend the episode talking only about the highlights of Michael's life. He grew up in 1930s London in a family of movie industry icons. As you'll hear, he became close friends with Graham Greene, traveled to Budapest to attend the Hungarian revolution, and joined the RAF. He did all this before he turned 25. At Simon and Schuster he published books by Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Henry Kissinger, Harold Robbins and Jacqueline Susann. He edited and published all 43 of Mary Higgins Clark's books, and most if not all of Larry McMurtry's books, including Lonesome Dove. As a writer, he published over two dozen books of his own, from the autobiographical to the definitive historical accounts of Robert E. Lee and TE Lawrence, better known as Lawrence of Arabia. He has lived several lives in this one, and helped countless others tell the story of theirs. He has survived wars, the London Blitz and cancer. And at the end of our conversation, I asked him about the role that fear has played in his extraordinary life. In a world growing more uncertain by the day, living a full and rich life is increasingly challenging. The media fills us with reasons to be afraid. And the debate between trying to stay informed, and trying to get on and live life can fill the mind with a Rubik's cube of choices. When you add on top of that, the challenges and risks that come with the responsibility of leading others, then the potential for fear to take over from rational thinking becomes a serious threat. Fear is a powerful force. In daylight we are embarrassed by it. At night, we are scarred by it. Rarely do we choose to shine a light on it. But it is only when we do, only when we admit to ourselves that we are afraid, can we hope to move beyond it. And only then can we help others to join us on the other side. And then, you can have a life so rich with possibility that it is unimaginable that everything you have experienced could belong to one person.

The Best Storyteller In Texas Podcast
Dory Funk to Deng Xiaoping

The Best Storyteller In Texas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 24:33


In this episode: From pro wrestler Dory Funk to Chinese President Deng Xiaoping, Kent has rubbed shoulders with many famous people. He met some in places like the Hereford Bull Barn, others in China or at The White House.   Kent recalls what former Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger told him was the toughest, meanest type of politics. When he met Farrah Fawcett, she was years away from achieving television and film fame. And when Kent was kicked off an official trip to China, he still got the last laugh.

Honestly with Bari Weiss
You're Already Living in China's World Pt 1: The Lab Leak Lies

Honestly with Bari Weiss

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 78:22


When the pandemic began eighteen months ago, anyone who dared suggest that the virus came from a lab in Wuhan, China, was dismissed as a crank, or otherwise accused of racism, xenophobia, and refusing to “believe science.” Why was this highly plausible theory unsayable? On today's podcast, Josh Rogin, a foreign policy columnist for the Washington Post and author of “Chaos Under Heaven: Trump, Xi and the Battle for the Twenty-First Century” answers that question. He makes the powerful case that it all comes back to the power of the Chinese Communist Party, which he likens to the Gambino crime family. If the Gambinos, that is, were running one of the richest countries in the world. Josh is a phenomenal guest and we couldn't contain our conversation to just one episode. So today, in Part One, a look into what went down in Wuhan and Washington during the fateful month of January 2020. We show how the “Lab Leak Theory,” due in big part to Josh's reporting, went from a fringe conspiracy theory to a credible explanation for the virus that continues to ravage the planet. Also discussed: Anthony Fauci, Donald Trump, Rand Paul, Peter Daszak, Xi Jinping, Elaine Chao, Henry Kissinger. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Noticias de América
Noticias de América - Operación Cóndor: Los 'Archivos del Terror', clave de los secretos las dictaduras del Cono Sur

Noticias de América

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 12:56


Los "Archivos del Terror", descubiertos en 1992 en Paraguay, son un testimonio único  que retrasan los detalles de la represión durante la larga noche de las dictaduras militares del Cono Sur entre los años 1973-1990, conocida como Plan Cóndor. El libro "Opération Condor, un homme face à la terreur en Amérique Latine" de Pablo Magge, describe la vida del descubridor de esos archivos, el Doctor Martín Almada. RFI: Pablo Magee, eres autor del libro "Opération Condor, un homme face à la terreur en Amérique Latine" publicado por la editora Saint Simon, actualmente en proceso de traducción al español. Vamos a hablar de un hombre que ayudó a cambiar la historia de Paraguay y de América Latina. Se trata de Martín Almada, quien en 1992 descubrió los llamados “Archivos del Terror”, algo que probablemente pocas personas conocen o recuerdan, que trazan la historia de le represión durante las dictaduras que asolaron el Cono Sur de América Latina a partir de la década de 1970. - Estudié en Londres, en la universidad y tenía una profesora de filosofía que había trabajado para Henry Kissinger. Aproximadamente en la época del golpe de Estado en Chile (septiembre 1973) dejó su trabajo, se fue a Londres a enseñar, y fue mi profesora de filosofía. Nos hablaba mucho de estos temas; después de nuestras clases nos íbamos a tomar unas cervezas y nos contaba lo que ella sabía y del Cóndor. Fue allí por primera vez que oí hablar del Cóndor. Cuando viajé a Paraguay conocí a Martín por casualidad, yo trabajaba para una ONG, y él me contó lo del "Archivo del Terror". Yo no sabía que existía. Me contó su papel como el descubridor de dicho Archivo. Hablamos como cinco horas sin parar, y cuando volví a Francia se impuso la idea de escribir un libro sobre su vida, la vida que me contó, una vida llena de aventuras y llena de todo lo que es la época de las dictaduras en América Latina. Su vida es como un camino que permite explicar muchos detalles de esta época de dictaduras. RFI: ¿Qué es lo que le llamó tu atención de Martín Almada como individuo?  - Martín es una persona bastante peculiar, es decir que te sientas con él, te mira en los ojos y parece que lee tu alma. Es una cosa bastante notable, es como un imán. Cuando camina en las calles de Asunción la gente se acerca, le dice doctor Almada tengo un secreto que contarle sobre la dictadura, y él enseguida dice "aahh, cuénteme, adoro los secretos". Y así va acumulando la memoria de lo que fue la dictadura paraguaya. Y cuando viaja al exterior, en los países del cono Sur, la gente hace lo mismo. La gente le va contando cosas. Entonces, es una memoria viva de lo que fue esa época de dictaduras, él lo puede contar con toda la legitimidad de alguien que pasó torturas, que pasó la cárcel, su esposa fue asesinada por la dictadura. Vivió todo eso en carne propia lo cual da más energía a lo que representa, lo que es. Se impone en una pieza cuando entra, la gente le mira y tiene esa energía fantástica que me impactó enormemente y que me dio ganas de escribir sobre él. RFI:Y al mismo tiempo Martín es una persona muy menuda... - Sí, lo cuento en el libro. Lo llamaban el indio cuando llegó del Chaco, del norte de Paraguay a Asunción, a San Lorenzo, un barrio limítrofe de la capital. Era todo chiquitito, descalzo, los niños se reían de él. Sigue así, físicamente muy humilde podemos decir, pero cuando empieza a hablar es otra cosa. RFI: Podría uno confundirlo con un cura. Y sin embargo es una gente que puso el dedo en la llaga de una de las dictaduras más prolongadas de América del Sur, la del general Stroessner. - Sí, nunca dejó su lucha por la libertad, la justicia. Después de la muerte de su esposa salió de la cárcel, viajó a París y siempre se quedó con esa obsesión de justicia, lo cual le llevó a empezar una investigación que duró años, desde París, Francia, sobre Paraguay y el Cóndor; con el apoyo de periodistas franceses y de curas desarrolló varias hipótesis de dónde podían estar esos archivos. Ese grupo de investigadores pensaron si hay una conspiración llamada el Cóndor, entonces hay archivos, tenemos que encontrarlos. Y cuando Martín vuelve al Paraguay después de la caída de la dictadura (1989), es su obsesión -y lo logra muy rápidamente de hecho- encontrar estos "Archivos del Terror" que hoy en día son los únicos archivos de estados, integrales, que tenemos de una dictadura. Detención de Almada y apoyo externo a la dictadura de Stroessner RFI: En 1974 Martín Almada es detenido, en diciembre de ese mismo año es asesinada su esposa. Posteriormente va a ser llevado a un campo de concentración en Paraguay. Hay que recordar -me parece importante para nuestro público- quiénes apoyan esa dictadura dirigida por Stroessner. - En primer lugar, los Estados Unidos, eso es muy directo a través de los famosos dólares del Tío Sam, en el marco de la lucha contra el comunismo. Hoy en día sería la lucha para la democracia que justifica todo tipo de guerras. Pero en aquel entonces era la guerra contra el comunismo y en ese marco los Estados Unidos apoyaban a todos los dictadores de la región y el número uno -"our man en Paraguay"- era Stroesnner. ¿Por qué?, porque Paraguay está en una situación geográficamente estratégica, está en el medio. Se le llama el corazón de América latina, hay la triple frontera, todo queda cerca. Es como un sol que puede irradiar la guerra anticomunista hacia los países del interior. Y después se juntan en el marco de la guerra anticomunista otras democracias que no pensaríamos. Yo descubrí que Francia, por ejemplo, apoyaba la dictadura de Stroessner con el presidente Giscard d'Estaing RFI: A través de su ministro de la Defensa, Michel Poniatowsky... - Exactamente. Para mí como francés fue una gran sorpresa. Y después hay toda esta estrategia militar que difundió Francia. Francia mandó los militares que estuvieron en Argelia a América Latina para que pudieran enseñar técnicas de tortura, técnicas de guerra, de lucha antiguerrilla... RFI: Estuvo a punto de morir por causa de la tortura que se le infringió de manera repetida, pero se logra salvar de milagro gracias al encuentro de personajes que uno no se imagina. Fue el caso de Eduardo Corrales, coronel del ejército paraguayo, responsable de comunicaciones secretas de defensa del ministerio del Interior. -Martín Almada encuentra a ese coronel en "la Técnica", el centro de tortura de Asunción Paraguay abierto por la CIA en los años cincuenta. Allí se encuentran. Martín llega torturado, cansado, sin casi energía, y lo despierta ese coronel RFI: Que también estaba detenido... -Estaba detenido porque su hijo formó parte de una marcha, en Argentina, para defender los derechos humanos. La dictadura se entera y el padre cae preso. Es responsable de las comunicaciones entre los países latinoamericanos en el marco del Cóndor, y justamente le cuenta a Martín Almada lo que fue el nacimiento del Cóndor, cuando el director de la Dina, los servicios secretos chilenos, mandan invitaciones a directores de servicios secretos de varios países de la región, firman el tratado de lo que va a ser el nacimiento del Cóndor, y el encargado de los servicios secretos del Uruguay propone que como el encuentro es en Chile. La idea fue de los servicios chilenos y el símbolo de Chile es el Cóndor, se le llame Cóndor. Entonces Eduardo Corrales le cuenta a Almada cómo fue el nacimiento, cómo se fueron agregando países a lo que es el Cóndor, qué países forman parte - Cóndor 1, Cóndor 2, Cóndor 3, Cóndor 4, Cóndor 5, y de lo que se trata, es decir de intercambiar datos, informaciones, después intercambiar prisioneros, después empezar a matar a opositores políticos en los distintos países de la región. Entonces si un opositor chileno está en Argentina, los países de Chile pueden entrar a Argentina sin ningún problema para matarlo. Sin embargo, también pueden pedir a los servicios de la Argentina que lo maten. Liberación, viaje a Francia  RFI: Martín Almada estuvo detenido desde 1974 y hasta 1977... Viaja a Panamá donde se encontró con el general Omar Torrijos. Llega a Francia como delegado de la Unesco. El período interesa porque también durante el gobierno Mitterrand hubo de una u otra manera apoyo a la dictadura militar -- Martín llega a Francia en 1981, Mitterrand acababa de llegar al poder. Primer país socialista del mundo occidental, con ministros comunistas -hay que acordarse de eso porque inquietaba mucho a los Estados Unidos--. Tiempo después de su llegada él y un grupo de apoyo a los países de América Latina ven que François Mitterrand acordó un préstamo a Stroessner. Se van inmediatamente a ver a Leonel Jospin, que es primer secretario del Partido Socialista y encargado de los asuntos internacionales, y le preguntan por qué el presidente francés, socialista, le manda dinero al represor. Y Lionel Jospin les mira y dice "raison d'Etat" RFI: Pablo, imagino que la elaboración del libro no fue una cosa sencilla... -- No, no fue una cosa sencilla. Hay que decir que la elaboración de este libro fue un proceso largo y que el tema del Cóndor es extremadamente vigente hoy en día. Cuando llegué al Paraguay me di cuenta que alguien, no sé exactamente quién, estaba escuchando mi teléfono; a lo largo de los siete años que duró su elaboración recibí varias amenazas de muerte lo mismo que mi familia. Gente entró en mi computadora y me hackearon los mails. en una ocasión todos los mails que tenía con Martín Almada se borraron, se borró un disco duro de archivos... Bueno, cosas bastante fuertes. Así que fue una epopeya escribir este libro y eso muestra también a lo que estamos expuestos hoy en día los periodistas. RFI: El libro "Opération Condor, un homme face à la terreur en Amérique Latine" está en proceso de traducción al español. Deberá comenzar a circular a partir del 2022 en Buenos Aires.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – August 17, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 159:55


Bruised but whole, ex-Lion Alex Brown's DUI, a call to Henry Kissinger, Hope Solo v. Megan Rapinoe, Jamie Samuelsen night at Comerica, Naomi Osaka cries, Cocaine Cowboys, and BranDon tries to hide Drew's chips.It seems like Spirit Airlines flies to Karzai International Airport now.United Airlines doesn't want their staff to duct taping people anymore.The Afghanistan debacle is connected to Bowe Bergdahl.98-year-old Henry Kissinger has no time for our show despite our "scheduled" interview.Cocaine Cowboys: Kings of Miami is a great 6-part documentary on Netflix.William Kennedy Smith had some great lawyers. His trail also ended the use of the Blue Dot.Alex Brown has been cut from the Detroit Lions after he got BOMBED and crashed going the wrong way on I-75.Tim Tebow was cut for being a bad football player."Life-long-load" Britt Reid goes to court.Hope Solo (and her BH) said Megan Rapinoe is a bully.Naomi Osaka cries during her first press conference since the French Open.Jalen Green is Detroit public enemy #1... on the internet.Former MLB closer, Felipe Vázquez, has been sentenced to prison for being a pedophile.Check out Henry Kissinger's impressive team photo.It's Jamie Samuelsen night at Comerica Park.We take a peek at Deena Centofanti's colon.KISS says David Lee Roth is "past his prime".Eminem to star as White Boy Rick. Drew recalls his unfortunate concert experience at 50 Cent/Eminem years ago.Britney Spears remains a dope and wants you to know that her tubes are real. She somehow doesn't make the highly regarded Sify list of the 10 Dumbest People in Hollywood.JLo is being really mean and deleting history from the internet.50% of US adults have tried marijuana.Lady Gaga's dogwalker really needs you to pay for his vacation.COVID takes a back seat to Kabul. Texas Governor, Greg Abbott, has attained the virus.An alligator ruins a kids birthday party by being an alligator.Not-a-Prince-Harry and that beast Meghan Markle have broken their silence on Afghanistan. They feel sorry for everybody except Thomas Markle. We stand with Thomas Markle.Sandra Lee is engaged to a broke married guy.The Butchery has good chips. They are so good that BranDon knew Drew would eat them, so he tried to hide the bag.Pete and Chasten Buttigieg are finally fathers.The Taliban hates the vaccine.The Las Vegas Raiders players don't need a vaccine, but the fans do.We have some good guests coming up including Alice Cooper, Jim Norton and Dave Attell.Randy vs Lyla in a race... who ya got?Laura Prepon has bailed on Scientology.Facebook is here to save Lizzo.We need to find a new studio. This is Lyla's house.Happy birthday, Shawn Windsor.Get a load of this jerk on the NYC subway.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S. Primacy w/ Prof. Stephen Walt

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 62:04


On this edition of Parallax Views, are we witnessing the decline of U.S. primacy geopolitically? Our guest on this edition of the program, Harvard University's Dr. Stephen Walt, author of The Hell of Good Intetions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S. Primacy, says that that's the case. He joins us to unravel what's been called the D.C. foreign policy blob, give an assessment of the Trump administration and its aftermath, and discuss his latest op-ed in Foreign Policy magazine entitled "Could the United States Still Lead the World If It Wanted To?". Additionally, Dr. Walt will explain for us what the Realist School of Foreign Policy is, his opinion of why Henry Kissinger doesn't fit that well into the Realist school of thought, reasons why other countries may not seek to emulate the U.S. today (QAnon, voter suppression, etc.), the international rules-based order and exceptions made within that order for allies, U.S. foreign policy blunders from the Vietnam War to the War on Terror, atrophied institutions, hawkish foreign policy figures like John Bolton, accountability in the foreign policy establishment, defining the foreign policy establishment/elite, and much, much more!

Stansberry Investor Hour
A Conversation with America's #1 Futurist

Stansberry Investor Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 63:06


On this week's episode of the Stansberry Investor Hour, Dan invites an incredibly special guest onto the show. He studied for years under Henry Kissinger at Harvard University... He later helped pioneer the formulation of supply-side economics as Chairman of the Lehrman Institute's Economic Roundtable... And he's widely regarded as America's #1 futurist... The one and only, George Gilder. George is best known for many of his best-selling books including, Wealth and Poverty, Life After Television, Life After Google, and his latest work, Gaming A.I.: Why A.I. Can't Think but Can Transform Jobs.  And today, Dan brings him onto the show to pick his brain in an exclusive one-on-one interview. During his conversation with Dan, George discusses the real reason gold has stood the test of time as a currency... the one big mistake Satoshi Nakamoto made when he created Bitcoin... and some stunning facts about how leaving the gold standard opened the door for widespread abuse in the currency trading markets. George is truly one of the leading economic and technological thinkers of the past 40 years, and we're incredibly lucky to have him on the show today. If you want a better understanding of what truly goes on behind the scenes with the world's biggest banks and most influential governments, this is an interview you don't want to miss. Listen to Dan's conversation with George and much more on this week's episode.

BestBookBits
World Order | Henry Kissinger | Book Summary | Bestbookbits

BestBookBits

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 17:50


World Order | Henry Kissinger | Book Summary | Bestbookbits --------------------------------------------------

The History of Computing
How Venture Capital Funded The Computing Industry

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 30:14


Investors have pumped capital into emerging markets since the beginning of civilization. Egyptians explored basic mathematics and used their findings to build larger structures and even granaries to allow merchants to store food and serve larger and larger cities. Greek philosophers expanded on those learnings and applied math to learn the orbits of planets, the size of the moon, and the size of the earth. Their merchants used the astrolabe to expand trade routes. They studied engineering and so learned how to leverage the six simple machines to automate human effort, developing mills and cranes to construct even larger buildings. The Romans developed modern plumbing and aqueducts and gave us concrete and arches and radiant heating and bound books and the postal system.  Some of these discoveries were state sponsored; others from wealthy financiers. Many an early investment was into trade routes, which fueled humanities ability to understand the world beyond their little piece of it and improve the flow of knowledge and mix found knowledge from culture to culture.  As we covered in the episode on clockworks and the series on science through the ages, many a scientific breakthrough was funded by religion as a means of wowing the people. And then autocrats and families who'd made their wealth from those trade routes. Over the centuries of civilizations we got institutions who could help finance industry.  Banks loan money using an interest rate that matches the risk of their investment. It's illegal, going back to the Bible to overcharge on interest. That's called usury, something the Romans realized during their own cycles of too many goods driving down costs and too few fueling inflation. And yet, innovation is an engine of economic growth - and so needs to be nurtured.  The rise of capitalism meant more and more research was done privately and so needed to be funded. And the rise of intellectual property as a good. Yet banks have never embraced startups.  The early days of the British Royal Academy were filled with researchers from the elite. They could self-fund their research and the more doing research, the more discoveries we made as a society. Early American inventors tinkered in their spare time as well. But the pace of innovation has advanced because of financiers as much as the hard work and long hours. Companies like DuPont helped fuel the rise of plastics with dedicated research teams. Railroads were built by raising funds. Trade grew. Markets grew. And people like JP Morgan knew those markets when they invested in new fields and were able to grow wealth and inspire new generations of investors. And emerging industries ended up dominating the places that merchants once held in the public financial markets.  Going back to the Venetians, public markets have required regulation. As banking became more a necessity for scalable societies it too required regulation - especially after the Great Depression. And yet we needed new companies willing to take risks to keep innovation moving ahead., as we do today And so the emergence of the modern venture capital market came in those years with a few people willing to take on the risk of investing in the future. John Hay “Jock” Whitney was an old money type who also started a firm. We might think of it more as a family office these days but he had acquired 15% in Technicolor and then went on to get more professional and invest. Jock's partner in the adventure was fellow Delta Kappa Epsilon from out at the University of Texas chapter, Benno Schmidt. Schmidt coined the term venture capital and they helped pivot Spencer Chemicals from a musicians plant to fertilizer - they're both nitrates, right? They helped bring us Minute Maid. and more recently have been in and out of Herbalife, Joe's Crab Shack, Igloo coolers, and many others. But again it was mostly Whitney money and while we tend to think of venture capital funds as having more than one investor funding new and enterprising companies.  And one of those venture capitalists stands out above the rest. Georges Doriot moved to the United States from France to get his MBA from Harvard. He became a professor at Harvard and a shrewd business mind led to him being tapped as the Director of the Military Planning Division for the Quartermaster General. He would be promoted to brigadier general following a number of massive successes in the research and development as part of the pre-World War II military industrial academic buildup.  After the war Doriot created the American Research and Development Corporation or ARDC with the former president of MIT, Karl Compton, and engineer-turned Senator Ralph Flanders - all of them wrote books about finance, banking, and innovation. They proved that the R&D for innovation could be capitalized to great return. The best example of their success was Digital Equipment Corporation, who they invested $70,000 in in 1957 and turned that into over $350 million in 1968 when DEC went public, netting over 100% a year of return. Unlike Whitney, ARDC took outside money and so Doriot became known as the first true venture capitalist. Those post-war years led to a level of patriotism we arguably haven't seen since. John D. Rockefeller had inherited a fortune from his father, who built Standard Oil. To oversimplify, that company was broken up into a variety of companies including what we now think of as Exxon, Mobil, Amoco, and Chevron. But the family was one of the wealthiest in the world and the five brothers who survived John Jr built an investment firm they called the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. We might think of the fund as a social good investment fund these days. Following the war in 1951, John D Rockefeller Jr endowed the fund with $58 million and in 1956, deep in the Cold War, the fund president Nelson Rockefeller financed a study and hired Henry Kissinger to dig into the challenges of the United States. And then came Sputnik in 1957 and a failed run for the presidency of the United States by Nelson in 1960.  Meanwhile, the fund was helping do a lot of good but also helping to research companies Venrock would capitalize. The family had been investing since the 30s but Laurance Rockefeller had setup Venrock, a mashup of venture and Rockefeller. In Venrock, the five brothers, their sister, MIT's Ted Walkowicz, and Harper Woodward banded together to sprinkle funding into now over 400 companies that include Apple, Intel, PGP, CheckPoint, 3Com, DoubleClick and the list goes on. Over 125 public companies have come out of the fund today with an unimaginable amount of progress pushing the world forward. The government was still doing a lot of basic research in those post-war years that led to standards and patents and pushing innovation forward in private industry. ARDC caught the attention of a number of other people who had money they needed to put to work. Some were family offices increasingly willing to make aggressive investments. Some were started by ARDC alumni such as Charlie Waite and Bill Elfers who with Dan Gregory founded Greylock Partners. Greylock has invested in everyone from Red Hat to Staples to LinkedIn to Workday to Palo Alto Networks to Drobo to Facebook to Zipcar to Nextdoor to OpenDNS to Redfin to ServiceNow to Airbnb to Groupon to Tumblr to Zenprise to Dropbox to IFTTT to Instagram to Firebase to Wandera to Sumo Logic to Okta to Arista to Wealthfront to Domo to Lookout to SmartThings to Docker to Medium to GoFundMe to Discord to Houseparty to Roblox to Figma. Going on 800 investments just since the 90s they are arguably one of the greatest venture capital firms of all time.  Other firms came out of pure security analyst work. Hayden, Stone, & Co was co-founded by another MIT grad, Charles Hayden, who made his name mining copper to help wire up the world in what he expected to be an increasingly electrified world. Stone was a Wall Street tycoon and the two of them founded a firm that employed Joe Kennedy, the family patriarch, Frank Zarb, a Chairman of the NASDAQ and they gave us one of the great venture capitalists to fund technology companies, Arthur Rock.  Rock has often been portrayed as the bad guy in Steve Jobs movies but was the one who helped the “Traitorous 8” leave Shockley Semiconductor and after their dad (who had an account at Hayden Stone) mentioned they needed funding, got serial entrepreneur Sherman Fairchild to fund Fairchild Semiconductor. He developed tech for the Apollo missions, flashes, spy satellite photography - but that semiconductor business grew to 12,000 people and was a bedrock of forming what we now call Silicon Valley. Rock ended up moving to the area and investing. Parlaying success in an investment in Fairchild to invest in Intel when Moore and Noyce left Fairchild to co-found it.  Venture Capital firms raise money from institutional investors that we call limited partners and invest that money. After moving to San Francisco, Rock setup Davis and Rock, got some limited partners, including friends from his time at Harvard and invested in 15 companies, including Teledyne and Scientific Data Systems, which got acquired by Xerox, taking their $257,000 investment to a $4.6 million dollar valuation in 1970 and got him on the board of Xerox. He dialed for dollars for Intel and raised another $2.5 million in a couple of hours, and became the first chair of their board. He made all of his LPs a lot of money. One of those Intel employees who became a millionaire retired young. Mike Markulla invested some of his money and Rock put in $57,000 - growing it to $14 million and went on to launch or invest in companies and make billions of dollars in the process.  Another firm that came out of the Fairchild Semiconductor days was Kleiner Perkins. They started in 1972, by founding partners Eugene Kleiner, Tom Perkins, Frank Caufield, and Brook Byers. Kleiner was the leader of those Traitorous 8 who left William Shockley and founded Fairchild Semiconductor. He later hooked up with former HP head of Research and Development and yet another MIT and Harvard grad, Bill Perkins. Perkins would help Corning, Philips, Compaq, and Genentech - serving on boards and helping them grow.  Caufield came out of West Point and got his MBA from Harvard as well. He'd go on to work with Quantum, AOL, Wyse, Verifone, Time Warner, and others.  Byers came to the firm shortly after getting his MBA from Stanford and started four biotech companies that were incubated at Kleiner Perkins - netting the firm over $8 Billion dollars. And they taught future generations of venture capitalists. People like John Doerr - who was a great seller at Intel but by 1980 graduated into venture capital bringing in deals with Sun, Netscape, Amazon, Intuit, Macromedia, and one of the best gambles of all time - Google. And his reward is a net worth of over $11 billion dollars. But more importantly to help drive innovation and shape the world we live in today.  Kleiner Perkins was the first to move into Sand Hill Road. From there, they've invested in nearly a thousand companies that include pretty much every household name in technology. From there, we got the rise of the dot coms and sky-high rent, on par with Manhattan. Why? Because dozens of venture capital firms opened offices on that road, including Lightspeed, Highland, Blackstone, Accel-KKR, Silver Lake, Redpoint, Sequoia, and Andreesen Horowitz. Sequoia also started in the 70s, by Don Valentine and then acquired by Doug Leone and Michael Moritz in the 90s. Valentine did sales for Raytheon before joining National Semiconductor, which had been founded by a few Sperry Rand traitors and brought in some execs from Fairchild. They were venture backed and his background in sales helped propel some of their earlier investments in Apple, Atari, Electronic Arts, LSI, Cisco, and Oracle to success. And that allowed them to invest in a thousand other companies including Yahoo!, PayPal, GitHub, Nvidia, Instagram, Google, YouTube, Zoom, and many others.  So far, most of the firms have been in the US. But venture capital is a global trend.  Masayoshi Son founded Softbank in 1981 to sell software and then published some magazines and grew the circulation to the point that they were Japan's largest technology publisher by the end of the 80s and then went public in 1994. They bought Ziff Davis publishing, COMDEX, and seeing so much technology and the money in technology, Son inked a deal with Yahoo! to create Yahoo! Japan. They pumped $20 million into Alibaba in 2000 and by 2014 that investment was worth $60 billion. In that time they became more aggressive with where they put their money to work. They bought Vodafone Japan, took over competitors, and then the big one - they bought Sprint, which they merged with T-Mobile and now own a quarter of the combined companies. An important aspect of venture capital and private equity is multiple expansion. The market capitalization of Sprint more than doubled with shares shooting up over 10%. They bought Arm Limited, the semiconductor company that designs the chips in so many a modern phone, IoT device, tablet and even computer now. As with other financial firms, not all investments can go great. SoftBank pumped nearly $5 billion into WeWork. Wag failed. 2020 saw many in staff reductions. They had to sell tens of billions in assets  to weather the pandemic. And yet with some high profile losses, they sold ARM for a huge profit, Coupang went public and investors in their Vision Funds are seeing phenomenal returns across over 200 companies in the portfolios. Most of the venture capitalists we mentioned so far invested as early as possible and stuck with the company until an exit - be it an IPO, acquisition, or even a move into private equity. Most got a seat on the board in exchange for not only their seed capital, or the money to take products to market, but also their advice. In many a company the advice was worth more than the funding. For example, Randy Komisar, now at Kleiner Perkins, famously recommended TiVo sell monthly subscriptions, the growth hack they needed to get profitable. As the venture capital industry grew and more and more money was being pumped into fueling innovation, different accredited and institutional investors emerged to have different tolerances for risk and different skills to bring to the table. Someone who built an enterprise SaaS company and sold within three years might be better served to invest in and advise another company doing the same thing. Just as someone who had spent 20 years running companies that were at later stages and taking them to IPO was better at advising later stage startups who maybe weren't startups any more. Here's a fairly common startup story. After finishing a book on Lisp, Paul Graham decides to found a company with Robert Morris. That was Viaweb in 1995 and one of the earliest SaaS startups that hosted online stores - similar to a Shopify today. Viaweb had an investor named Julian Weber, who invested $10,000 in exchange for 10% of the company. Weber gave them invaluable advice and they were acquired by Yahoo! for about $50 million in stock in 1998, becoming the Yahoo Store.  Here's where the story gets different. 2005 and Graham decides to start doing seed funding for startups, following the model that Weber had established with Viaweb. He and Viaweb co-founders Robert Morris (the guy that wrote the Morris worm) and Trevor Blackwell start Y Combinator, along with Jessica Livingston. They put in $200,000 to invest in companies and with successful investments grew to a few dozen companies a year. They're different because they pick a lot of technical founders (like themselves) and help the founders find product market fit, finish their solutions, and launch. And doing so helped them bring us Airbnb, Doordash, Reddit, Stripe, Dropbox and countless others. Notice that many of these firms have funded the same companies. This is because multiple funds investing in the same company helps distribute risk. But also because in an era where we've put everything from cars to education to healthcare to innovation on an assembly line, we have an assembly line in companies. We have thousands of angel investors, or humans who put capital to work by investing in companies they find through friends, family, and now portals that connect angels with companies.  We also have incubators, a trend that began in the late 50s in New York when Jo Mancuso opened a warehouse up for small tenants after buying a warehouse to help the town of Batavia. The Batavia Industrial Center provided office supplies, equipment, secretaries, a line of credit, and most importantly advice on building a business. They had made plenty of money on chicken coops and though that maybe helping companies start was a lot like incubating chickens and so incubators were born.  Others started incubating. The concept expanded from local entrepreneurs helping other entrepreneurs and now cities, think tanks, companies, and even universities, offer incubation in their walls. Keep in mind many a University owns a lot of patents developed there and plenty of companies have sprung up to commercialize the intellectual property incubated there. Seeing that and how technology companies needed to move faster we got  accelerators like Techstars, founded by David Cohen, Brad Feld, David Brown, and Jared Polis in 2006 out of Boulder, Colorado. They have worked with over 2,500 companies and run a couple of dozen programs. Some of the companies fail by the end of their cohort and yet many like Outreach and Sendgrid grow and become great organizations or get acquired. The line between incubator and accelerator can be pretty slim today. Many of the earlier companies mentioned are now the more mature venture capital firms. Many have moved to a focus on later stage companies with YC and Techstars investing earlier. They attend the demos of companies being accelerated and invest. And the fact that founding companies and innovating is now on an assembly line, the companies that invest in an A round of funding, which might come after an accelerator, will look to exit in a B round, C round, etc. Or may elect to continue their risk all the way to an acquisition or IPO.  And we have a bevy of investing companies focusing on the much later stages. We have private equity firms and family offices that look to outright own, expand, and either harvest dividends from or sell an asset, or company. We have traditional institutional lenders who provide capital but also invest in companies. We have hedge funds who hedge puts and calls or other derivatives on a variety of asset classes. Each has their sweet spot even if most will opportunistically invest in diverse assets. Think of the investments made as horizons. The Angel investor might have their shares acquired in order to clean up the cap table, or who owns which parts of a company, in later rounds. This simplifies the shareholder structure as the company is taking on larger institutional investors to sprint towards and IPO or an acquisition. People like Arthur Rock, Tommy Davis, Tom Perkins, Eugene Kleiner, Doerr, Masayoshi Son, and so many other has proven that they could pick winners. Or did they prove they could help build winners? Let's remember that investing knowledge and operating experience were as valuable as their capital. Especially when the investments were adjacent to other successes they'd found. Venture capitalists invested more than $10 billion in 1997. $600 million of that found its way to early-stage startups. But most went to preparing a startup with a product to take it to mass market. Today we pump more money than ever into R&D - and our tax systems support doing so more than ever. And so more than ever, venture money plays a critical role in the life cycle of innovation. Or does venture money play a critical role in the commercialization of innovation? Seed accelerators, startup studios, venture builders, public incubators, venture capital firms, hedge funds, banks - they'd all have a different answer. And they should. Few would stick with an investment like Digital Equipment for as long as ARDC did. And yet few provide over 100% annualized returns like they did.  As we said in the beginning of this episode, wealthy patrons from Pharaohs to governments to industrialists to now venture capitalists have long helped to propel innovation, technology, trade, and intellectual property. We often focus on the technology itself in computing - but without the money the innovation either wouldn't have been developed or if developed wouldn't have made it to the mass market and so wouldn't have had an impact into our productivity or quality of life.  The knowledge that comes with those who provide the money can be seen with irreverence. Taking an innovation to market means market-ing. And sales. Most generations see the previous generations as almost comedic, as we can see in the HBO show Silicon Valley when the cookie cutter industrialized approach goes too far. We can also end up with founders who learn to sell to investors rather than raising capital in the best way possible, selling to paying customers. But there's wisdom from previous generations when offered and taken appropriately. A coachable founder with a vision that matches the coaching and a great product that can scale is the best investment that can be made. Because that's where innovation can change the world.

new york google japan university steve jobs mba r d wall street amazon apple stone colorado director world war ii mit tumblr texas france greek rock san francisco cold war medium softbank united states hbo manhattan research investors banks development romans sun notice egyptian bible yahoo silicon valley netscape harvard aol david brown oracle cisco airbnb shopify morris xerox reddit technicolor hp arm highland zoom seed jock rockefeller lps west point quantum blackstone dropbox apollo fairchild stanford computing docker venture gofundme outreach philips weber pharaohs sputnik paypal ifttt schmidt wework silver lake raytheon trade intel funded iot discord great depression house party drobo joe kennedy companies staples dupont boulder colorado batavia wag billion markets time warner atari nvidia crab shack figma saas genentech corning github venture capital alibaba ipo brad feld intuit electronic arts firebase chevron amoco stripe nasdaq lightspeed perkins arista railroads byers domo parlaying mobil sprint t mobile groupon sequoia robert morris y combinator david cohen roblox herbalife lsi jp morgan red hat lookout nextdoor lisp macromedia doordash venetians tivo igloo tommy davis checkpoint john d minute maid techstars yc okta exxon nelson rockefeller wealthfront doerr zipcar john doerr workday henry kissinger kleiner perkins kleiner bill perkins andreesen horowitz smartthings dan gregory sumo logic pgp accel kkr digital equipment digital equipment corporation sendgrid verifone greylock servicenow jared polis greylock partners doubleclick redfin palo alto networks paul graham compaq randy komisar venrock standard oil fairchild semiconductor teledyne ziff davis masayoshi son coupang early american comdex tom perkins traitorous john jr noyce charlie waite caufield development corporation jessica livingston michael moritz opendns redpoint wyse quartermaster general wandera
NCUSCR Events
The Trip that Changed the World: Commemorating Kissinger's 1971 Secret Visit to China | Henry Kissinger, Wang Qishan

NCUSCR Events

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 75:02


On July 8, 2021, The Chinese People's Institute of Foreign Affairs (CPIFA), with assistance from the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, organized a multi-part event to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Henry Kissinger's secret trip to China. The event took place at Beijing's Diaoyutai State Guest House and featured live remarks by Dr. Kissinger and Vice President Wang Qishan. This video is an abridged version of the commemorative event, and includes the following components: Keynote | Dr. Kissinger and Vice President Wang Qishan reflect on the significance of the July 1971 visit Panel 1 | Eye Witnesses to History: Participants from the 1971 Kissinger secret trip and 1972 Nixon visit discuss the visit itself and its historical importance - Chinese Panelists: Ambassador Lian Zhengbao and Ms. Nancy Tang - American Panelists: Ambassadors Winston Lord and Chas Freeman - Moderator: Ms. Jan Berris

#Resilience
The Sun Never Sets - London

#Resilience

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 41:03


In honor of the release of “Resilience: How the COVID-19 Pandemic Made Us Wiser and Stronger,” the Resilience Initiative celebrated that the sun never really sets on resilience through three events over the course of one day. The second of these events was held at 7:30pm London time on Tuesday, June 8. In this episode, you'll hear the conversations from that session. Dr. Michael Gordon, Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, reads his essay “Teaching in Times of Covid: From ‘Landing the Plane' to ‘Reaching for the Stars' and Nina Justin, a commercial lawyer and media producer, will read her essay “Surrendering with Gratitude.” Thank you to Diana Wu David, author of Future Proof, for reading the foreword from the book. Grab your copy: “Resilience: How the COVID-19 Pandemic Made Us Wiser and Stronger” Diana Wu David Is a former Financial Times executive, author of Future Proof: Reinventing Work in an Age of Acceleration and an adjunct professor at Columbia Business School's EMBA Global Asia. She began her career working on high level strategy as a management consultant and as an assistant to Dr. Henry Kissinger at Kissinger Associates in New York. She works with global leaders, companies and boards to enhance their ability to adapt, contribute, collaborate and grow. She is privileged to have consulted with or spoken to clients including the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, the World Bank, Expedia, Randstad and Credit Suisse. She writes about the future of work for publications including Fast Company, Inc and Thrive and speaks globally on the future of work, corporate governance and boards and East-West issues. Visit www.dianawudavid.com to learn more about my Future Proof course, speaking and consulting.

Politics Weekly
What is the state of US-China relations? Politics Weekly Extra

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 24:12


It's been 50 years this month since Henry Kissinger, the then national security advisor, made a secret trip to the People's Republic of China. Joan E Greve talks to the Guardian's China affairs correspondent, Vincent Ni, to find out how the current diplomatic relationship compares with 1971. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

Palisade Radio
David Kranzler: Are You Ready for the Next Big Move in Metals?

Palisade Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 42:20


Tom welcomes David Kranzler of Investment Research Dynamics back to the show. David discusses what to look for in the coming rally and why it's challenging to pick tops and bottoms. Any experts that claim to be able to do so accurately are questionable. The Comex and banks have been unloading many positions over the last year. As a result, it seems likely that the bottom may be in for gold. They are having trouble pushing gold down under 1800, and this week is a good example. The real physical gold market is primarily driven by buyers in the East, mainly through the Shanghai Gold exchange. India has been dormant for the past three months due to the virus but has begun to reopen. China is also showing more imports, and we are now entering the high season for gold in that region. David questions the overall usefulness of the COT reports. Much of what is reported is questionable, but the prevailing trends and reversals at peak open interest may be a helpful indicator. Dave is also skeptical of the impact of the Basel III regulations. These changes depend heavily on local government enforcement. Moreover, the banks created these regulations, so they are unlikely to have done anything that would damage their business. There are government declassified documents between Henry Kissinger after the closing of the gold window. These discuss finding ways to deflect investor money from gold into paper markets. Arguably, that is why the futures markets were created shortly after that. The best comparisons to today's equity markets are the dot.com bubble and the roaring 1920s. Both ended with massive crashes, and the only difference today is likely in the overall magnitude of the markets. Many investors today are getting maxed out on margins, and some are even taking personal loans. Eventually, something will break that will trigger an avalanche of selling, and the Fed will be unable to stop it. David explains the true definition of inflation as money printing and why that money printing has only begun to affect prices. The Fed funneled much of the money into financial markets, which include the overleveraged housing markets. The Fed's constant rolling forward of the Repo markets is likely an indication that something is very rotten behind the financial curtains. Lastly, he argues that central bank digital currencies will only increase their control over money. There is a growing movement by the BIS to encourage the creation of these new monetary systems. He expects a massive attempt at suppressing cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin at some point. Time Stamp References:0:00 - Introduction0:38 - Silver/Gold Factors8:30 - Gold Chart10:08 - COT Reports Significance14:20 - LBMA Basel Exemption21:30 - Equity Markets24:39 - Deflation?29:09 - Fed & Reverse Repo33:20 - Money Velocity35:29 - CB Digital Currencies38:15 - Concluding Thoughts Talking Points From This Episode Predicting market tops and bottoms and the outlook for gold.Usefulness of COT Reports and the LBMA Basel ExemptionEquity market risks and the inflation/deflation debate.FED Charts, Money Velocity, and Central Bank plans. Twitter: https://twitter.com/InvResDynamicsWebsite: https://investmentresearchdynamics.comNewsletter: https://investmentresearchdynamics.com/mining-stock-journal David Kranzler spent many years working in various analytic jobs and trading on Wall Street. For nine of those years, he traded junk bonds for Bankers Trust. Dave earned a master's degree in business administration from the University of Chicago, concentrating on accounting and finance. He writes a blog to help people understand and analyze what is going on in our financial system and economy.

Repurpose Your Career | Career Pivot | Careers for the 2nd Half of Life | Career Change | Baby Boomer
Future Proof: Reinventing Work in the Age of Acceleration with Diana Wu David #231

Repurpose Your Career | Career Pivot | Careers for the 2nd Half of Life | Career Change | Baby Boomer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 38:20


Description: This week I am speaking with Diana Wu David who is the author of Future Proof: Reinventing Work in an Age of Acceleration. Let me read you her about section on LinkedIn: I am a former Financial Times executive, author of Future Proof: Reinventing Work in an Age of Acceleration, and an adjunct professor at Columbia Business School's EMBA Global Asia. I started out my career working on high-level strategy as a management consultant and as an assistant to Dr. Henry Kissinger at Kissinger Associates in New York. I work with global leaders, companies, and boards to enhance their ability to adapt, contribute, collaborate and grow.  I am privileged to have consulted with or spoken to clients including the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, the World Bank, Expedia, Randstad, and Credit Suisse. I write about the future of work for publications including Fast Company, Inc and Thrive and speak globally on the future of work, corporate governance and boards, and East-West issues. This episode is sponsored by Career Pivot. Check out the Career Pivot Community. Make sure and pick up my latest book, Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for the 2nd Half of Life Third Edition. For the full show notes click here.

The Good Fight
Disaster is Political

The Good Fight

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2021 54:46


Niall Ferguson is a Scottish-American historian whose interests span from WW1 to Henry Kissinger to the history of money. His most recent book, Doom—completed at the height of the COVID crisis—attempts to rethink the distinction between “man-made” and “natural” disasters. Ferguson examines the historical record from Vesuvius to viruses and concludes that societies are guilty of repeated misjudgments and delusions; but he avoids ascribing any immutable pattern to the unpredictable trajectory of disasters. He is the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and a senior faculty fellow of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard. In this week's conversation, Yascha Mounk and Niall Ferguson discuss the dangers of bureaucratization in disaster-management, debate populism and the threat from China, and examine the common threads linking catastrophes throughout history. This transcript has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity. Please do listen and spread the word about The Good Fight. If you have not yet signed up for our podcast, please do so now by following this link on your phone. Email: podcast@persuasion.community  Website: http://www.persuasion.community Podcast production by John T. Williams, Brendan Ruberry and Rebecca Rashid Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Connect with us! Spotify | Apple | Google Twitter: @Yascha_Mounk & @joinpersuasion Youtube: Yascha Mounk LinkedIn: Persuasion Community Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Daily Easy Spanish
El viaje secreto de Henry Kissinger a China que hace medio siglo sentó las bases para cambiar la geopolítica mundial

Daily Easy Spanish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2021 46:24


En julio de 1971 el entonces asesor de seguridad de la Casa Blanca visitó Pekín de incógnito, lo que abrió el camino hacia el restablecimiento de las relaciones diplomáticas entre Estados Unidos y China. BBC Mundo te cuenta cómo fue.

Vastiny News
CX Daily: South Korea Likely to Outpace China in New Shipbuilding Orders in Second Half, Report Says

Vastiny News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021


China is likely to cut banks' required reserve ratio again. Reforms of salary systems in public hospitals will soon be carried out nationwide. Neither China nor the U.S. should seek monopolies in the fields of technology or AI, according to Henry Kissinger. Chinese Tesla rival makes its debut in Hong Kong. Plus, Wuhan reports 52 Covid-19 cases in arrivals from Afghanistan.

Chalke Talk
91. Niall Ferguson (2016)

Chalke Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 30:40


KISSINGER 1923-1966: THE IDEALISTNo American statesman has been as revered and as reviled as Henry Kissinger. Hailed as the ‘indispensable man,' he has also attracted immense hostility. One of our most renowned historians Professor Niall Ferguson reveals an extraordinary panorama of Kissinger the man: from his Jewish upbringing in Germany to his rise as one of America's most influential politicians and grand strategists. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Between The Lines - ABC RN
On the 50th anniversary of Gough Whitlam's delegation to China and Henry Kissinger's secret mission

Between The Lines - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 29:05


50 years ago Gough Whitlam led an opposition Labor Party delegation to China. At the same time, President Nixon announced his own invitation to the Communist country.

LBJ's War
S3 Ep 3 - Sideshow

LBJ's War

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 53:17


In December 1968, only weeks after his election, Nixon names Henry Kissinger as his national security advisor. The appointment will prove to be the most consequential of his presidency. The two men barely know each other, but Kissinger moves swiftly and brilliantly to make himself the linchpin – some would say the architect – of Nixon's enormously ambitious foreign policy agenda. Immediately, and with the new president's blessing, Kissinger marginalizes both State and Defense, concentrating the making of US foreign policy within the White House. The first challenge: how to force the implacable North Vietnamese leadership back to the negotiating table. By late January '69, a plan is in place: Operation Menu, a massive and completely secret bombing assault, not on Vietnam but on North Vietnamese army sanctuaries in neighboring (and neutral) Cambodia. Over the next eight years, the U.S. will drop more bomb tonnage on Cambodia than the combined Allied forces dropped in all of World War II. While the bombing remains largely a secret in the U.S., it fails to move the needle on negotiations with the North.  By the fall of '69, the lack of progress has re-energized the anti-war movement, which mobilizes a wave of demonstrations across the country.  In response, Nixon takes his case to the country, with the Silent Majority speech, which will come to be remembered as perhaps the most effective address of his presidency.

TrineDay: The Journey Podcast
47. Sean Stone: Exposing the New World Order

TrineDay: The Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 37:37


Sean Stone discusses his book, “New World Order: A Strategy of Imperialism,” with publisher Kris Millegan – the Brits behind imperialism, Cecil Rhodes, the British Round Tables, the Council on Foreign Relations, William Yandell Elliott and his influence on thousands like the Rockefellers, Henry Kissinger and Pierre Trudeau, the quest for world governance, and remembering the freedoms and Constitutional principles that we cherish. #newworldorder #seanstone #cecilrhodes #britishroundtables #imperialism

Industry Standard w/ Barry Katz
David Kissinger (Best of, Part 2 of 2)

Industry Standard w/ Barry Katz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 52:29


DAVID KISSINGER is the President of Conaco Productions, (Conan O'Brien'S PRODUCTION COMPANY) and has produced a plethora of shows for them "Andy Barker P.I.," "Outlaw" ON NBC, "Eagleheart" on Adult Swim, "Super Fun Night" for ABC, as well as "the Pete Holmes Show" and “Deon's Black Box” for TBS. Prior to joining Conaco, he was the President of NBC Universal Television/Studio USA where he developed some of the most acclaimed Emmy nominated and winning shows on TV including "House," "the Office," "Monk," "Battlestar Galactica," "Law & Order: Special Victims' Unit," and "Law & Order: Criminal Intent." Previously, Kissinger was a senior VP for Touchstone TV where he oversaw the development and production of "Ellen," “Boy Meets World,” and "Home Improvement." Prior to his TV career, Kissinger worked as a journalist, writing for Rolling Stone, the New York Observer, and Esquire. He is the son of Former Secretary of State and the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, Henry Kissinger.

Industry Standard w/ Barry Katz
David Kissinger (Best of, Part 1 of 2)

Industry Standard w/ Barry Katz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 57:39


DAVID KISSINGER is the President of Conaco Productions, (Conan O'Brien'S PRODUCTION COMPANY) and has produced a plethora of shows for them "Andy Barker P.I.," "Outlaw" ON NBC, "Eagleheart" on Adult Swim, "Super Fun Night" for ABC, as well as "the Pete Holmes Show" and “Deon's Black Box” for TBS. Prior to joining Conaco, he was the President of NBC Universal Television/Studio USA where he developed some of the most acclaimed Emmy nominated and winning shows on TV including "House," "the Office," "Monk," "Battlestar Galactica," "Law & Order: Special Victims' Unit," and "Law & Order: Criminal Intent." Previously, Kissinger was a senior VP for Touchstone TV where he oversaw the development and production of "Ellen," “Boy Meets World,” and "Home Improvement." Prior to his TV career, Kissinger worked as a journalist, writing for Rolling Stone, the New York Observer, and Esquire. He is the son of Former Secretary of State and the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, Henry Kissinger.

The New Abnormal
The Man Who Was Trump Before Trump

The New Abnormal

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 56:13


The president's adviser is falling all over himself to kiss his boss' ass. “Mr. President, we're all so proud to work for you. You're saving the world!” It sounds like something you could imagine Jared Kushner would say to Donald Trump. But the groveler in question is none other than Henry Kissinger, and the occupant of the White House is Richard Nixon. Yes, Trump is a descendent of Nixon's, says former Spy magazine editor and Studio 360 host Kurt Andersen, whose new podcast is called Nixon at War. Also on the episode, New Yorker writer Susan Glasser joins Molly and co-host Jesse Cannon to dissect President Biden's trip to Europe and summit with Vladimir Putin, and whether Democrats' hopes for their Senate majority were all foolishness. Finally, on the episode, hilarious viral phenomenon Crackhead Barney and Drew Rosenthal join Jesse and Molly to break down their approach to MAGA rallies, how she was committed to a psych ward in Staten Island, why they think they're going to get beat up one day, why they want to interview Thomas Markle, and how the Proud Boys greeted them.If you haven't heard, every single week The New Abnormal does a special bonus episode for Beast Inside, the Daily Beast's membership program. where Sometimes we interview Senators like Cory Booker or the folks who explain our world in media like Jim Acosta or Soledad O'Brien. Sometimes we just have fun and talk to our favorite comedians and actors like Busy Phillips or Billy Eichner and sometimes its just discussing the fuckery. You can get all of our episodes in your favorite podcast app of choice by becoming a Beast Inside member where you'll support The Beast's fearless journalism. Plus! You'll also get full access to podcasts and articles. To become a member head to newabnormal.thedailybeast.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

LBJ's War
S3 Ep 1 - October Surprise

LBJ's War

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 39:37


Get in and get those files.  Blow the safe and get it. -President Nixon to aide H.R. Haldeman For President Richard Nixon, the publication of the Pentagon Papers, in June 1971, ought not to have mattered. The malfeasance and mendacity revealed in the Times, and soon in papers across the country, had all happened under previous administrations, from Truman to LBJ. In fact, Nixon's national security advisor, Henry Kissinger, tells the president, "I've read this stuff, and we come out pretty well in it."  But Nixon cannot be mollified.  It is not the contents of the Pentagon Papers that he's worried about. It is the leaking of classified information that has stoked his fury, and his fear.  For Richard Nixon has secrets of his own, secrets that if brought to light, could sink his presidency.  What are these secrets?  Here the story flashes back, to the late summer and early fall of 1968, when Richard Nixon secures his party's nomination for the presidency and soon finds himself having to navigate the treacherous politics of the Vietnam War. His principal adversary? Not Hubert Humphrey, the other name on the ballot, but Lyndon Johnson, who has opted not to seek a second term, but remains a formidable player, waging a desperate battle to close out the war and salvage his tattered legacy. Learn more at NixonAtWar.org.

Lifespring! Media: Quality Christian and Family Entertainment Since 2004

Thoughts As we read Revelation and try to understand the prophecies contained in it, like the fall of Babylon and the mark of the beast, it's natural to try to understand them and put them into a familiar frame of reference.  For example, let's consider the number 666. Throughout history believers have thought that it was Nero to Mohammed to Henry Kissinger, to Barak Obama and so many others. If we are in the last days, there is every possibility that he is alive now, but to guess at his identity is just a guess. We can know this, the number does represent a very real person, and when the time comes all will know who he is. These prophecies will come tp pass, just as the prophecies of Jesus' first coming did.  What should we do in the mean time? Should we sell everything and move to the desert or the mountains? No. We should do the work He called us to. Love God with all our heart and soul and mind, love others. and share the Good News until the day of his coming, or until we are called home. Today's Bible Translation Bible translation used in today's episode: Ch. 12-16 WEB, Ch. 17 NLV Support Please remember that this is a listener supported show. Your support of any amount is needed and very much appreciated. Find out how by clicking here. When you buy through links on this site, we may earn an affiliate commission, and you will earn our gratitude. Design: Steve Webb | Photo: Felix Mittermeier on Unsplash Live Not by Lies: A Manual for Christian Dissidents By Rod Dreher / Sentinel Aleksandr Solzhenitzyn once noted that people often assume that their democratic government would never submit to totalitarianism---but Dreher says it's happening. Sounding the alarm about the insidious effects of identity politics, surveillance technology, psychological manipulation, and more, he equips contemporary Christian dissidents to see, judge, and act as they fight to resist the erosion of our freedoms. 304 pages, hardcover from Sentinel.

One Radio Network
05.19.21 Ehret Matthew

One Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 92:32


Matthew Ehret Investigative Journalist, Historian Matthew is a journalist and co-founder of the Rising Tide Foundation and Canadian Patriot Review. He has published scientific articles with 21st Century Science and Technology, and is a regular author on several political/cultural websites including Los Angeles Review of Books: China Channel, Strategic Culture, Off Guardian and The Duran. He has also authored three books from the series the Untold History of Canada. “Freedom? What’s freedom? I’m Canadian,” says investigative journalist Matthew Ehret. Canada is still in lockdown. “Canadians have the freedom to stay home.” How does Justin Trudeau compare to his father, Pierre Trudeau? Matthew Ehret compares a high school economics textbook from 1944 that’s “grounded in the understanding of values” to the economics textbooks of today that are “so detached from common sense and reality.” The market is so volatile that someone only has to say something, and the value of your investment crashes, Case in point, what Elon Musk said that affected Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Do China and Russia want to risk a nuclear war? Is China just playing along with the narrative of global warming? Whatever one thinks about the origin of the coronavirus, it’s for sure “we’re being played.” The official narrative is “bunk;” the reality is there’s “a push for depopulation.” We must get into the mindset of these global engineers who promote oligarchy. What part did Henry Kissinger and the Trilateral Commission play in the politics of China? When did China start pushing back against Kissinger’s opposition to nation-states and support of Malthusianism? What was Kissinger’s Nietzschean perspective? How did his belief in Darwinism affect his foreign policy? How did Kissinger’s 1970 visit to China promote the Gang of Four until Mao Zedong died in 1976? What was behind Pierre Trudeau’s 1973 visit to China? What was China’s Century of Humiliation? What did the British Empire and foreign powers do to “accelerate entropy”? China’s aim is to turn debt into value at home and in Africa with their enormous natural resources, whereas the U.S. emphasis is on installing 200 bioweapons labs around the world. Why does China regard the IMF as a “parasitical system that rejects the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence.” China files more parents than the U.S., and is a world leader in high-speed rail networks. How did Donald Trump initiate the reconstruction of America? Is Biden continuing along the same path or is he following the dictates of the New World Order? How did Aristotle’s 4th Century book, “Politics” influence today’s system of globalism? How does it compare to Platonism’s Mandate of Heaven? Are people born “blank slates” or are they a “reflection of the entire universe”? Sun Yat-sen was a Christian. How were his Three Principles of the People influenced by Abraham Lincoln? What was William Gilpin’s connection to Abraham Lincoln and the creation of greenbacks? What was Gilpin’s futuristic concept of a Cosmopolitan Railway hoping to accomplish for the economic linking of the U.S. with China? How did Gilpin’s vision of a global system of railroads influence the Chinese Revolution of 1911 and the current Belt and Road Initiative? Why did Wall Street want the interrelationship of nation-states to fail? What did the City of London hope to gain from World War I? Why was Ben Franklin considered “The Prometheus of America”? Why was he interested in China and Confucianism? What are the roots of our New Age of War? Why does George Soros want to “chop up China”? How is he a threat to the U.S. and the Belt and Road Initiative? How is China’s Central Bank different from the U.S. Central Bank? How is the Glass–Steagall Act involved? China wants to have a Confucian Revival, and the U.S. wants to know how to kill baby-boomers.

BengalisOfNewYork
Fahim Hamid-"1971" Documentary Filmmaker

BengalisOfNewYork

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2021 35:01


Before the war on terror, America used to support the radicalization of Islam because it used to be seen as "communism taking away your religion." America supported these madrassas, and the Mujahideen because they were seen as anti-communist. Same as what they did in Afghanistan. So for a long time, that was the alignment between the US and Pakistan. So they were friends, naturally. When it came to 1971, and the elections happened, Pakistan rejected it and the genocide broke out. During this time, America had a partnership with Pakistan and the real reason was that at that time, Nixon and Henry Kissinger (who won the Nobel Peace Prize) were trying to create this very famous opening into China. There's a famous photograph of Nixon and Mao, and it was this that won them their legacy, and their Nobel prize. How did one of the greatest achievements in American foreign policy's history happen? It was Pakistan that brokered the backchannel between Kissinger and China. Both Nixon and Kissinger were so desperate to make this happen, and the economic benefits of this happening were huge for Kissinger and Nixon. They wanted this so badly and Pakistan agreed to help the US out. "Yeah, we'll help you out, but we have this insurgency. We have these people in East Pakistan that are winning these elections and, they're taking away our power. We don't want to deal with them, keep giving us money and weapons that you've been continuing to give us. In return, we'll give you your China back-channel" And that's the essential distort. They want their Nobel peace prize, and a bunch of Bangladeshis had to die in order for that to go on and go through. Listen to the entire conversation with Fahim Hamid on the BoNY Podcast. Available on all Podcast platforms and on BengalisofNewyork.com/bony-podcast. Subscribe and share. Link in bio. Also, Amazon Alexa/Echo knows us! Just say, “Alexa, play BoNY Podcast." --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bengalisofnework/support

Checks and Balance
Checks and Balance: Vlad, bad and dangerous

Checks and Balance

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 42:00


Vladimir Putin has responded to a new US administration with typical thuggery. Russia’s main opposition leader is in prison and its military is again threatening Ukraine. Can Joe Biden deal with Russia more effectively than past presidents?The Economist’s James Bennet and Michael McFaul, a former US ambassador who was with Biden when he last met Putin, join the discussion. Plus we hear an excerpt from The Economist Asks with former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Public Intellectual: The Life of a Citizen Pilgrim w/ Richard Falk

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 82:54


On this edition of Parallax Views, international laws scholar and activist Richard Falk joins us once again, this time to discuss his new political memoir Public Intellectual: The Life of a Citizen Pilgrim. Richard has dedicated a lifetime to fighting for peace, justice, and global cooperation as well as challenging the status quo, often from within the very elite institutions that many times uphold that status quo. This has led him to such places as Hanoi during the Vietnam War and South Africa during apartheid. All in the service of being what Richard calls a "Patriot of Humanity". Or a "Citizen Pilgrim". In this conversation we discuss: - Richard's apolitical youth and early adulthood and how he was raised by a conservative anti-communist father. - The unusual conservatism of academia - The experience of being an academic during the Cold War and specifically the era of McCarthyism and the Red Scare - How Richard's views of international relations and international law differs greatly from those of Henry Kissinger, John Mearsheimer, and the RAND Corporation - Taking a dialogic approach to international relations - Experiences in Vietnam and South Africa - The influence of religion and philosophy on Richard's intellectual development - And much, much more!

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg
Joscelyn ‘Round the Middle East

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 99:15


On today’s episode, Vital Interests author and national security extraordinaire Thomas Joscelyn makes his first Remnant appearance. With a healthy supply of Hayek references on hand, Jonah seems determined to outdo the wonkiness of Brian Riedl’s visit earlier this week. Al-Qaeda, Afghanistan, China, and the meaning of necrocracy are all discussed peacefully by the pair, until a certain name is mentioned; If you thought Jonah’s contempt for Woodrow Wilson was unparalleled, just wait until you hear the disdain that overtakes Tom at the mere mention of Henry Kissinger.  Show Notes: -       Tom’s journal, Long War -    Vital Interests at The Dispatch -    Just in case you happen to know Siraj Haqqani -    The history of the institutionalized form of al-Qaeda, the AQAP -    Bin Laden’s files -    Tom: “The Flawed Reasoning Behind Biden’s Afghanistan Withdrawal” -    Jonah: “Biden Citing the Wrong Reasons for Afghanistan Withdrawal” -    The Remnant with Bing West -    Kissinger makes WWI metaphors in regards to China -    Hitchens: “A necrocracy?” -    The Remnant with Oriana Skylar Mastro -    “The Longer Telegram,” by an anonymous official -   Lin Wells’ memo See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Economist Asks
The Economist Asks: Henry Kissinger

The Economist Asks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 42:00


How does the best-known veteran of foreign policy view the great global standoff today? Henry Kissinger is a titan of US politics — as Secretary of State and National Security Advisor in the Nixon and Ford administrations he brokered detente with the Soviet Union and orchestrated a breakthrough presidential visit to China in 1972. Incumbents have sought his insight long after he left the White House. Anne McElvoy asks him about the current threats to world order, how to handle Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping, and what he would have done differently when in office. And, following an Economist advert, are plane companions ever too inhibited to talk to him? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
The Economist Asks: Henry Kissinger

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 42:00


How does the best-known veteran of foreign policy view the great global standoff today? Henry Kissinger is a titan of US politics — as Secretary of State and National Security Advisor in the Nixon and Ford administrations he brokered detente with the Soviet Union and orchestrated a breakthrough presidential visit to China in 1972. Incumbents have sought his insight long after he left the White House. Anne McElvoy asks him about the current threats to world order, how to handle Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping, and what he would have done differently when in office. And, following an Economist advert, are plane companions ever too inhibited to talk to him? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TBTL- Too Beautiful to Live
#3379 If It’s Cello, Let It Mellow

TBTL- Too Beautiful to Live

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 90:00


Luke’s Lyft driver taught him some pretty interesting things about Henry Kissinger’s role in a global plot to reduce the earth’s population. Plus, Yo-Yo Ma gave an impromptu performance at his vaccination clinic, and it turns out Subway is the food of choice on Korean TV.

DarrenDaily On-Demand
Good vs. Great

DarrenDaily On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 2:19


In this episode, Darren shares the former U.S. Secretary of state Henry Kissinger's technique to ensure his staff was doing their very best every time.