Podcasts about gumps

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Best podcasts about gumps

Latest podcast episodes about gumps

That's Hockey Talk
THT - 10/5/22 - 22-23 SEASON PREVIEW

That's Hockey Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 83:14


The boys are BACK... Nick, Gumps, & Rupper get back in the saddle and chat about the offseason with their biggest surprises and get right into predicting playoff teams. They each put together their playoff parlays via FanDuel Sportsbook for the upcoming season and make their picks for the Hart, Vezina, Norris, Calder, & Rocket Richard trophies & of course give out their way too early Stanley Cup picks.

Down the Yellow Brick Pod
Disney's "Return to Oz" (1985 film) - Scene #7 (The Escape - Part 1) with Henry Wilkinson

Down the Yellow Brick Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 56:08


Friend of the pod Henry Wilkinson joins the pod to dive into part 1 of the seventh scene of Disney's 1985 film, “Return to Oz”! Tara, EmKay and Henry create their own personal Gumps with objects in their respective rooms, discuss a lost General Jinjur plot line and appreciate the technical marvel that is the Gump.Part 2 dropping this Wednesday!Show Notes:Down the YBP Etsy ShopPatreon - DTYBPHenry on InstagramHome From OzKenya Barris to Reimagine ‘The Wizard of Oz' for Warner Bros.  Return to Oz: The Gump (Blogspot)Episode 31 - Return to Oz with Walter MurchInstagram: @downtheyellowbrickpod#DownTheYBPTara: @taratagticklesEmKay: @emshray

Locked On Bama
Practice is underway in Tuscaloosa, Kelby Collins announcement is upcoming and no more Running of the Gumps!

Locked On Bama

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 25:21


The Alabama football team has hit the practice field and coaches Nick Saban, Pete Golding and Bill O'Brien held press conferences Sunday to discuss. Meanwhile, Kelby Collins is one of the biggest recruiting prizes left on the Crimson Tide's board and now he will announce August 13th. Will it be the Tide or Gators? Finally, the Gumps--- they run no more. Do you miss them? LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Did you know every week, nearly 40 million job seekers visit LinkedIn? Post your job for free at LinkedIn Dot Com slash lockedoncollege. That's LinkedIn Dot Com slash lockedoncollege to post your job for free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Free Agent Lifestyle
Why GUMPS Will Always Struggle With Modern Women | Dan Bilzerian Married Or Trolling?

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 163:43


Why GUMPS Will Always Struggle With Modern Women | Dan Bilzerian Married Or Trolling? Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel

That's Hockey Talk
THT - 1/26/22 - Mikey Anderson

That's Hockey Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 113:20


Mikey Anderson of the LA Kings joins the crew to chat about his young career in the Show, playing with Drew Doughty, rookie dinners, & the Kings resurgence. Some house keeping is in order with the boys and Pat McAfee joins to as Rupper shares some stories about life on the road in the NHL. The Flyers losing streak continues but congratulations are in order for Keith Yandle as he becomes the NHL's new iron man. The boys give their opinions on the Aaron Dell suspension for the hit on Batherson and Gumps is happy as can be about the Dallas Stars climbing back into a playoff spot. They send it home with a trivia question and a giveaway.

Free Agent Lifestyle
She DOES Want To Be Saved: She Just Needs The Gumps To Save Her When It's Too Late

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 199:33


She DOES Want To Be Saved: She Just Needs The Gumps To Save Her When It's Too Late Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel

Free Agent Lifestyle
Young GUMPS Will Ruin Their Lives For The Fast Life, Quick Cash And A Little @ss - Men Age 18 - 28

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 171:50


Young GUMPS Will Ruin Their Lives For The Fast Life, Quick Cash And A Little @ss - Men Age 18 - 28 Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel

Free Agent Lifestyle
Fresh & Fit Challenges THE DEVINE FEMININE & The Gumps Run To Her Rescue

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 155:04


Fresh & Fit Challenges THE DEVINE FEMININE & The Gumps Run To Her Rescue Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel

Free Agent Lifestyle
Rapper J$tash GUMPS OUT And Deletes His GF & Himself In Front Of HER KIDS

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 127:16


Rapper J$tash GUMPS OUT And Deletes His GF & Himself In Front Of HER KIDS (1) Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel

Revenue Engine
Delivering the Ultimate Sales Warrior with Jason Forrest, CEO and Founder of Forrest Performance Group

Revenue Engine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 32:09 Transcription Available


How do you create and deliver the “Ultimate Sales Warrior”? Jason Forrest, the CEO and founder of Forrest Performance Group helps organizations recruit, assess, and train the Ultimate Sales Warriors to drive results. Jason is a well known speaker, the author of several best selling books, and a pioneer in recruiting and training top sales and management talent. In this episode of The Revenue Engine Podcast, Jason shares how to create the ultimate sales warrior, how to create a winning 90 day onboarding plan, why you need to hire “GUMPs”, what are - and how to release - the 4 mental leashes, and so much more. Grab your headphones and a notebook and learn what you can start doing today to optimize your revenue team's performance to exceed your revenue goals. Connect with Jason on https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasonforrest/ (LinkedIn) or visit Forrest Performance Group's https://www.fpg.com/ (website). Connect with Rosalyn on https://www.linkedin.com/in/rosalyn-santa-elena/ (LinkedIn). This episode of the Revenue Engine was powered by http://www.salesiqglobal.com (Sales IQ Global).

That's Hockey Talk
THT - 11/3 - Kevin Weekes & THE Hockey Aficionado Pat McAfee

That's Hockey Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 76:19


ESPN & NHL Network analyst, former goaltender, & insider Kevin Weekes joins Gumps, Nick, & Rupper to chat about the latest news & rumors around the league. Weekesy breaks down the latest information on the Jack Eichel trade situation and where he could potentially end up, plus shares a few hilarious stories. The boys check in on the rebuild in Detroit and what's going on in Pittsburgh. Rupper shares some incredible stories about a feud that lasted 5 years & the rather unique way he acquired his jersey collection. If you enjoy listening to the show try watching along LIVE with us at YouTube.com/ThatsHockeyTalk every Wednesday at 8pm ET.

That's Hockey Talk
THT - 10/13 - The Puck Has Dropped

That's Hockey Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 58:12


The 2021 season has begun & Nick, Gumps, & Mike Rupp share their thoughts on the new broadcast looks from ESPN & TNT. They cover the season opening games as the Penguins took on the Lightning & welcome the Seattle Kraken to the league as they took on the Vegas Golden Knights. Rupper shares some INCREDIBLE stories about almost mangling 3 rather large high profile New York city iconic athletes with his car & a ton of gems from his time in the league. Plus thoughts on the Brady Tkachuk/Ottawa Senators stand off & all the hockey talk you can handle. If you enjoy listening to show try watching LIVE every Wednesday night at 8pm ET or catch the replay at YouTube.com/ThatsHockeyTalk. You're ALIVE but are you LIVING? Go LIVE with SeatGeek and save 15% off ANY NHL tickets purchase through the link in the YouTube description.

Free Agent Lifestyle
Should We Let GUMPS Learn THE HARD WAY

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 113:45


Should We Let GUMPS Learn THE HARD WAY

Free Agent Lifestyle
GUMPS Will Always Rescue, Fill In The Void & Clean Up When Men Walk Away

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 121:25


GUMPS Will Always Rescue, Fill In The Void & Clean Up When Men Walk Away

From Cubicle 2 The Clouds
# 71 - Power On Stalls

From Cubicle 2 The Clouds

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2021 57:19


Episode #71. This week we dive into power on stalls! Brief discussion about this crazy weather and how it impacted my plans.  World famous Learning From Others goes right along with the main topic and we talk GUMPS check. Then onto our Weekly Weather. Check out the website www.Cubicle2CloudsAviation.com You can still  send any questions you have for to or go to the website and ask it there!  LEARNING FROM OTHERS:   Weekly Wx: METAR KFFZ 161954Z AUTO 23009G24KT 10SM CLR 17/01 A2980 RMK AO2 SLP076 T01670006 Code C2C at check out for 10% off your entire order.  Go see them in Las Vegas 2010 Festival Plaza Dr. Unit 120Las Vegas, NV  89135 United States YouTube Channel:  Josh Delmar YouTube:

GoingFullNerd - Onyxxx Uncensored
Outside the Wire (Netflix Review) – Training Day Meets I-Robot

GoingFullNerd - Onyxxx Uncensored

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 21:00


Anthony Mackie must have some super-secret sci-fi deal with Netflix to be the next action hero. I mean he was the man in Altered Carbon Season 2 and we won’t bring up his Disney ties as the Falcon in the Avengers films. Outside the Wire is his latest venture and here are my thoughts about it. The Plot In 2036AD, a civil war between pro-Russian insurgents and local resistances in Ukraine leads the US to deploy peacekeeping forces. During an operation, a team of United States Marines and "Gumps" (robotic soldiers) are ambushed. Disobeying an order, drone pilot 1st Lt. Harp deploys a Hellfire missile in a drone strike against a suspected enemy launcher, killing 2 Marines but saving 38. As punishment, Harp is sent to Camp Nathaniel, the US base of operations in Ukraine where he is assigned to Captain Leo, a highly advanced and experimental android super-soldier masquerading as a human officer. Outside the Wire was released by Netflix digitally on January 15, 2021. The film was the most-watched on the platform over its debut weekend. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/goingfullnerd/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/goingfullnerd/support

Call It Like I Don't See It
Episode 25: Scream For Me!!!

Call It Like I Don't See It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 56:41


This is what we screaming about in this episode.It starts off very random with GP & AD singing "One Week" by the band BareNakedLadies. (00:35)Then they talk about the movie twister, a actual president and The last of us part 2. (2:40)There's a hotline you can call, called Just scream. Only for a limit of time only, but not if GP & AD had anything to say about it. (7:30)Quick Bits, Real news, Sort of fast! (16:40)Gamers! It's a question we'll have to face sooner or later lol, but when do you think you'll hang up your gaming controller for good?! (23:50)Outside the Wire Review! (Gumps) (37:00)Recap on WandaVision Ep 3 Now In Color. (45:15)Positive Chakra!! (51:25)Yell outs before we head out. (52:45)Rate, Comment, Follow, and Subscribe.For Questions or Feedback Email us at  callitlikeidontseeit@gmail.com

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics
Did Nixon Win the Popular Vote in 1960? And Other Stories

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2020 73:49


In this episode we look at an enduring mystery, one that didn't matter too much in the 1960 election but has since taken on significance. Could it be that Kennedy lost, and Nixon won, the popular vote nationally in 1960. We looked at it a decade ago, and at that time MHCBUYP declared that Richard Nixon may rightly join popular vote winners but election losers: Cleveland, Jackson, Tilden and Gore.   Now, we think it's complicated.  But still possible.  This, plus the "Gumps of History" and other listener questions.  

Is It for Reel
IIFR E27: Return to Oz

Is It for Reel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2020 78:17


Be sure to wind up your crazy crank, because we watched Return to Oz.  Strap on your wheelies, pick out your favorite head to wear, and probably drop some acid because this is going to be a wild ride.  Gumps, knick knack shops, and electroshock therapy. Oh my!!

FOX Sports Knoxville
The Drive Podcast HR3: "Famous Gumps" 10-22-20

FOX Sports Knoxville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2020 47:14


in hour 2 of the drive, Bear gives us the top 5 at 5, Russell gives us the Rickard Ridge BBQ Smokin' Hot Question of the Day, and we talk about the trending Coach O photo.

Hot Topic Sports
Ep. 97 The Last Dance with The Gumps

Hot Topic Sports

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2020 81:24


Im joined by Jenny and Brian Gump to talk about The Last Dance

Saints Happy Hour
How LSU Takes Down Evil Nick Saban & Bama

Saints Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2019 31:37


Seth Galina of SB Nation joins us to clown on the Gumps and figure out how Joe Burrow and the Tigers can beat Nick Saban. Join us for a FREE LIVE Edition of Saints Happy Hour Podcast at Tracey's In New Orleans December 14. RSVP by Thanksgiving and get FREE T-SHIRT. You really need this t-shirt celebrating 28-3 Forever. This episode is free because of My Bookie.ag and Manscaped.com but... If you want full access to Daily Saints Happy Hour, it's just $7 bucks a month!Also every person who is Patreon Member at the $3.28 Tier and above gets FREE BEER KOOZI and cool Saints Schedule wallpaper!Drunk Saints History Archive!GIVE US 5 STARS ON ITUNES!

Server Nightmares
1-Heather Rose- Server Nightmares with Salvador de Santos

Server Nightmares

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2019 50:14


Heather is a Bartender at bubba Gumps but worked for Joe's Crab shack for many years and has encounter a lot of very interesting clients. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

2Bobs - with David C. Baker and Blair Enns
Debriefing After a New Business Call

2Bobs - with David C. Baker and Blair Enns

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2019 30:29


David asks Blair about using "after action reviews" following sales calls, and the two key questions that should be asked as a part of that debriefing process.   LINKS Episode #15 - The Best Learning Method Ever Devised: After Action Reviews, from The Soul of Enterprise Podcast with Ron Baker and Ed Kless   TRANSCRIPT DAVID C. BAKER: Blair, today we are going to talk about debriefing after a new business call. Not after just a business call, but a new business call, right? So how did this topic come to your mind? What got you thinking about this? BLAIR ENNS: I'm a fan of Ron Baker and Ed Kless' podcast, The Soul of Enterprise. They had a podcast way back when and they made the comment that they see the after action review as the most powerful ... I'm gonna get this wrong, but is the most powerful knowledge tool ever invented. DAVID: Wow. BLAIR: That's a big statement. But we were using after action reviews in our business. And we still use them. There's various forms of them. Their origin actually came out of the US Military in the Vietnam War as a way of looking at campaigns. It's a way of essentially reviewing what happened without being critical of any individual and keeping the whole thing positive so that you can figure out what you would do next time. In fact, an after action review is really just okay what was the goal of the thing that we did, whatever the thing we did is, what went well, and then what would we do differently next time? And then there's some protocols around who speaks first and who speaks last, and how a rank is supposed to be unimportant. But I'm listening to their podcast, I realize, oh, yeah we do this all the time in our business. And it is really valuable. And I'd never thought of it as maybe the most valuable knowledge tool ever. But it occurred to me that I've never really advocated for after action reviews in sales. But I think it's probably a pretty good idea especially if you or employee who's on the front lines doing sales or doing new business development, if they're new or they've just come out of some training. Or you're stuck and things aren't going your way. BLAIR: But it's probably a good idea to review all of the key opportunities. The ones that you win and the ones that you lose. But even in the early days, I think just a new business meeting like a phone call. A kind of a lengthier phone call. Something lengthier than no we're not interested, thanks, goodbye. Or a face to face meeting I think is probably a really good idea to review. Let's just review what happened, and decide what went well, and decide what we would do differently next time. DAVID: So just a couple of housekeeping things here, if it's a meeting where you and somebody that works with you and you're gonna do the review, how soon do you do this? Is it important to do it right away after the meeting ends? Even before you get back to the office? I've got several housekeeping questions, but that's the first one. BLAIR: Generally speaking, the sooner the better. We were recording this on a Friday at the end of the week, we had two after action reviews this week of bigger things that happened. One was quite big. The sales period that just passed. That's about two months long. So what happened there. And another one's kind of a smaller thing that we're working on that's quite detailed. And sometimes it makes sense for a little bit of time to go by so that you can process what actually happened. BLAIR: But I think in the early days, if this is new for you, then the sooner the better. And then the times when you are allowing a little bit of processing time or gestation time, you know enough to make notes as things occur to you. Because the danger is if you leave it too long, you're going to forget a lot of the valuable points. Or you're going to forget the specifics of what happened or how you felt in certain situations. And those can be really valuable. DAVID: It seems like if it's you and let's say you're training somebody that's newer to your firm, sometimes it might make sense to have that person give their perspective before you give yours so that you get some independence, I would guess too. So that's interesting. And I could see this happening then after a meeting that both of you attended or maybe after a phone call where you're on speakerphone. How do you handle it when you're not on speakerphone? I presume half of the states in the US allow you to record a call without the other person's consent. But I presume you're not necessarily recording the calls. How do you handle that? How do you get feedback from somebody else if they weren't actually on the call? BLAIR: Yeah. Let me just speak to that issue of kind of rank or who goes first that you touched on. Coming out of the US Military, the idea is when they walk into an after action review, everybody basically takes a hat off and puts their insignias face down on the table. So the idea is that rank goes away. And I think a further idea is that you generally encourage the lower rank people to speak first. So the last thing I know when we're doing an after action review, I make sure that I'm not the first one to contribute. I don't want people saying, "Yeah, I agree with what you said." You really want to hear what others have to say. So that's kind of the housekeeping point. BLAIR: And then your question around- DAVID: Recording. BLAIR: Recording. In some ways, we don't actually do this in our training program. We think about it and talk about it quite a bit. The idea of we should have our clients record some of these calls and bring them to class or to interact with their coach to get some feedback on that. And I haven't closed the door on it, but there is something that I find a little bit troubling about recording a phone call when the other party doesn't know it's happening. But I don't think it's necessary to record it. To me, there's really two key review questions that you want to think about in your after action review or debriefing meeting when you're debriefing on a new business interaction. BLAIR: And the first one is what assumptions did I make in the sale? We can break that down into different categories where you would ask that question. And then the second one would simply, where did I feel uncomfortable? DAVID: Ah, so keeping it very simple there, right? BLAIR: Yeah. DAVID: Because that's gonna surface some things for you to talk about. BLAIR: Yeah. DAVID: You mentioned that you use a checklist for this. I find checklists really interesting. Have you read the book A Checklist Manifesto, by the way? BLAIR: No, I've heard of it. Haven't read it though. DAVID: Ah, it's a really interesting ... So pilots use checklists just to make sure they don't do something stupid like GUMPS. Gas, undercarriage, mixture, pump, seat belt. So you don't land without the- BLAIR: Forrest Gumps? DAVID: No, it's spelled differently. BLAIR: I would be thinking GUMPS, Forrest Gumps. That was a pretty good movie. Why was he jogging ... Crash. DAVID: And then you'd land on your belly of the plane because you didn't put the gear down. BLAIR: Yeah. DAVID: So you have a checklist of four things and it's NATB. So let's break that down. Need, authority, time frame, budget. Let's go down one by one. DAVID: So there's two questions. What assumptions did I make during the call and then where did I feel uncomfortable? So under the first question, what assumptions did I make? There's four things. The first one is need. So talk about that. BLAIR: Yeah. And so the first assumption we're making here is this is what I would call a qualifying call. So a qualifying call or a qualifying conversation is when where you are assessing the lead. A lead is a clue to a possible sale. So you've got a lead represented by an individual. You're getting that person on the phone or you're having a face to face conversation. And then you're vetting that lead to determine if the opportunity exists. Some sales people just work through that conversation subjectively. They feel their way through it. But it's really good to have a framework. And the most common framework is as you call it, NATB. Or sometimes referred to as BANT. We don't use either of those acronyms. But they're helpful here. So it's need, authority or decision makers, time frame, and budget. BLAIR: So assuming we're in a qualifying conversation, that's the framework we're using. So the first thing we're doing is we're essentially uncovering need. And the question is what assumptions did you make around need? And the first big mistake around need is the client says we need a new website. And then you just take that. Okay, new website. And you move onto authority or decision makers to talk about who are the decision makers, what's the decision making process. DAVID: So what should they do differently rather than just the website? You're suggesting they dig deeper than just the website when they're uncovering that need? BLAIR: Yeah. So there's an understanding in sales that the first stated need that you get from the client is usually some sort of tactical need or at the very least, it's what I would call self-diagnosed. So I understand my problem, I understand the solution that I need, and here's the solution that I need. But you as the practitioner, you need to understand for yourself. And you need to validate the client's self-diagnosis. And you might not fully validate in the sale. You might have to sell a diagnostic. So you might have to do some further validation in the engagement. But in the sale, you do have some obligation to do some initial assessment. So beyond just taking the client's word for it, yeah, we need a website, there's a school of thought. It's called the Five Why's School of Thought that says you ask five why's. Okay, well, why do you need a new website? DAVID: Yeah. BLAIR: We need a new website because online sales are dropping. Well, why are online sales dropping? And then you kind of continue to peel the onion in this five why's way. One day I woke up and I realized it's one of these things that just repeated a lot. This idea of five why's, I heard it before and I thought it made a lot of sense. And I woke up and I realized, man, if you have to ask five why's, your first question is a pretty shitty one. DAVID: I love that. So the idea is you're getting to the most powerful underlying need. The one that they're gonna be willing to pay you the most money to fix, right? Because if they land on the tactical, that's part of how they're framing this relationship with you is that maybe they want to pay you as a tactician rather than as a strategist. BLAIR: Yeah, I mean, I'll ask my clients, how often have you been hired? Clients said, "We need X," you said, "Okay." You were hired to do X, you started delivering on X, and you realized, "Oh my god, they don't need X, they need Y." And everybody nods knowingly. It happens all the time, doesn't it? And that's because you made assumptions in that qualifying conversation around the topic of need. And essentially you took the client at face value for is this what they really needed? And you didn't either peel the onion or come at it another way. And I don't want to go too deep down that rabbit hole, but you can look at need as expressed tactical need and then you can get to the underlying business need. And the underlying business need is we're no longer relevant. Clients are buying from somebody else. DAVID: That's much deeper, yeah. BLAIR: Right? So that's a deeper need than ... Well, you don't need a new website, you might need to be repositioned. You might need to rethink what business you're in. You might need to launch new product offerings, et cetera. You might need to think of new service lines. Whatever it is. And then there's ... We can talk about needs versus wants. And maybe that's a subject of another webcast because you've got the corporate needs that the person might be expressing. But really, if you want to win the sale, you're gonna have a significant advantage if you can get to what it is that that personal individual human being wants. BLAIR: Again, that's a deeper topic. But the question is what assumptions did it make under the area of need? DAVID: Right. And that's the first one. BLAIR: Yeah. So it's great if you have somebody asking these questions of you. Okay, what assumptions did we make around the area of need? What did the client need? Could that have been misinterpreted? Is it possible that they need something else? Did you explore? Did you ask five why's? Did you get to the individual wants? Et cetera. So that's the first one. DAVID: Okay. The second one is around authority or decision makers. And I'll tell you, this one perplexes me because if I could do this like on the forms of my website for instance, I would say are you a decision maker or you aren't? And the problem I have is that people won't be honest about that because they can't tell me that they're not a decision maker because they want to be a decision maker even though they know they aren't, right? You can't say, "Are you a decision maker? Are you a loser? Check the box." Nobody's filling out my form. This explains it. So how do you get to authority? I'm really interested in how you probe around this to surface the right answer. BLAIR: Yeah. So this is the most common area where people make the most assumptions and they're most likely to be tripped up later on in the sale because they made an assumption about decision makers and decision making process. And the problem as you pointed out is people are not immediately forthcoming about authority that they do not have. So if you were to ask the closed ended question, are you the decision maker on this project? Is it your responsibility to hire a firm like ours? You're almost always going to get, yes. DAVID: Yeah, of course. Right. Why else would I be talking to you? BLAIR: So a great opening question would be, in addition to yourself, who else needs to be involved in this process to hire a firm like ours? Right? So open with that question. And then you want to rely on your kind of hunch and start probing in specific areas. So you might say if you think this person's needs to be involved you would say, "Does your boss, the CEO, does she need to be involved in the decision?" And you might hear, no, no, no, no. DAVID: I just tell them, after I make the decision, I'll disinform them. BLAIR: Yeah. And then so a great follow up question to that would be does anybody need to approve your decision once you've made it? DAVID: That's a nonsense question, right? On the face of it. BLAIR: But it's a fantastic question. Does anybody need to approve your decision once you've made it? Yeah. The CEO needs ... It's a rubber stamp. Okay, the CEO is the decision maker. And you'll find, especially with new salespeople, if you're the coach and you're facilitating this after action review, you're going to find that repeatedly, the big assumptions are made here. And later on, they'll be the expensive ones. DAVID: Okay. So first one is need. Second one is authority or decision making. The third is time frame. This one stumps me a little because I don't even know why it's important. Why do we even ask time frame questions? Why is this even on here? I get the previous one. I don't get this one. BLAIR: There's really two different reasons we ask time frame questions. And I think most people are oblivious to the most powerful reason. And the most powerful reason is time frame is the surrogate for intent. And the obvious reason is we want to know when they want to get this done. So can we start planning resources, et cetera. So when would we need to start, et cetera. So you start thinking about how and when would we tackle the job. But really, the primary importance of your time frame question is you want to discern through your time frame questions. Whether this is on the wish list or the to do list. And my favorite time frame question is just that. Which has nothing to do with time frame. It's all about intent. You're trying to discern whether or not somebody's just kicking ideas around, they're still contemplating, or they've decided no, we're going to do this project and we're going to hire a firm like yours to help us. BLAIR: The usual time frame questions are when do you need to get started? When do you need to have a solution in the marketplace? Looking forward, is there a milestone or an event that you need to hit? Do you need to be in the marketplace or have this change or this project launched by a certain date? Et cetera. And if you don't get the answers you're looking for ... And what you're really looking for is somebody who's anchored their change in behavior to a future date.   BLAIR: This might get a little bit deep here, but a great way to think about selling is change management. So a great model for how people buy is how people change. So you can take any model of change management and you can just study that and become a better salesperson. And when you look at how people change, when they make a decision, I'm going to lose weight, or quit smoking, or divorce my spouse, or propose to my girlfriend. What they do is as soon as they make the decision, they look forward in time and then they anchor their change in behavior to a date. You could quit smoking on November 3rd- DAVID: And ask your girlfriend to marry you the same day. BLAIR: Yeah. But when it comes to quitting smoking, or losing weight, or something, you wait until the clean slate of a new ... You wait for January 1st. That's why people make New Year's resolutions. And that's just a sign of somebody who's formed intent. Because they've basically thought, I'm going to do this. They have looked at the calendar. And they've anchored a change in behavior, or the outcome they're looking for to a specific date. That is a sign of intent. That is a late stage opportunity that you should now begin to prepare for to go into closing mode. DAVID: Using this in my own experience, it's resonating some in a new way. I just hired an expert to help me with something. And I was very transparent with them about the timing and the money, which I guess we're gonna talk about next as the fourth one here. Fourth assumption. But when I'm buying something besides expertise. When I'm buying a car or recently I signed up at the airstream traders website. And there's a question in there how soon are you going to buy, right? If I want somebody to treat this seriously, I'll say this week. If I don't want them to bother me, I'll say I'm just curious. But when it comes to hiring an expert, I am very transparent about this. And I'm assuming that that's the case in the scenario that you're describing that if it's a real opportunity for this firm to be hired as an expert, if they ask the right questions, they're going to get the right answers. There may need to be a little bit of probing, but they want to be careful about that. BLAIR: There's an answer to your time frame question that we make assumptions around all the time. And this is something that would need to be probed in your after action review. If I'm the salesperson and I said, "When do you need to get this done?" And the answer is ASAP, right away, you can't proceed on that basis. You need to ask the why question. Okay, why right away? Well, because it's something I've wanted to do for a while. Okay, well, when's right away? Well, next 30 days. What if we don't get it in the next 30 days? Well, 60's fine. I'd prefer 30. This is getting into this murky area here where I start to get suspicious because I think this might be a chronic contemplator. BLAIR: It's great that you have somebody who has some urgency, but you want to look for the reason why there's some urgency. So was there a triggering event in the past? But really, you want somebody who's looked forward into the date and said, "Okay, we're gonna start on this date or we need to be in the marketplace by this date and here are the more valid reasons why." A great one would be we've got a board meeting or a trade show. Those are rock solid events. DAVID: Drop dead dates. If we miss it we're- BLAIR: Yeah. And then you know there's intent around that. So this idea of ASAP, that's the same as never. So if you get ASAP, you need to unpack that, you need to explore it, you can't just assume that ASAP means there's actually intent. DAVID: You know what I love about this is that you're not focusing here on what you say. You're focusing really on the questions you ask so that you can elicit the right information. And as you're going through this debrief, you may pause and say, "You know what? At that point, this is the question you ask. This is the question you could've asked and it might have sorted this out from a real opportunity and not a real opportunity." So it's more about asking questions. That's such an interesting thing to think about. Right? See, I'm asking a question right now. BLAIR: Yeah. I agree. When I think back to my consulting days and how many times I had the ... I'd get a phone call from a client and then I draw this little grid in my call log and start asking questions. Okay, what was the need? Who are the decision makers? I go through all this and just debrief with them. And then your spidey sense, you're not getting all the information. And you're not emotionally involved. But it's amazing what you can pick up. The assumptions just kind of jump out at you. And then the second area we're gonna talk about after budget of where you feel uncomfortable, that's probably even more important. DAVID: Yeah. Okay, so what assumptions did I make? First one was need, the second was authority around decision making, the third, which we just talked about is time frame> and the fourth, the final one of these four, is budget. Let's talk about that and why everyone get's tripped up here. I get a lot of questions from my clients around this and I never really know what to say because I don't do sales training like you do. So why do we get tripped up on budget? BLAIR: Well, first of all, it's the topic of money. And there's a certain amount of stress around the topic of money, as we've talked about before, or the avoiding talking about money. And then there's the negotiating that happens. And clients kinda negotiate on the other stuff too. They won't give you all of the information but it's really on budget where the negotiating starts. I was taught that the first budget question is are funds allocated? Yes or no? I'm not asking for the budget. Have you allocated funds for this project, yes or no? DAVID: Because theoretically, it's easier for them to answer than what's the budget, right? BLAIR: Yeah. And just like the time frame question is about is this person interested or have they formed intent? And then the budget question takes somebody who has formed intent. Because if they're just interested, they almost certainly have not allocated funds. It's not universal, but it almost certainly have not allocated funds. But if somebody has intent, I've decided I'm going to do this, they anchored their change in behavior to an event in the future, the very next thing they do is they start applying resources to their situation. And that's usually in the form of people and budgets. BLAIR: So if somebody says, "Yeah, we need to do it by this event and I have allocated funds," this is a late stage opportunity that's eminently closable. Now it's closable if there's intent but funds haven't been allocated. And where some salespeople mess up is if you ask the question are funds allocated and the client responds with, "No, we don't know what to spend on this. You're the expert. We're hoping you could tell us." I wish I had a dollar for everybody who told me they were frustrated by that. Oh, they're trying to negotiate with me, oh. They shouldn't view it that way. It's a great opportunity. All it really means is yeah they've progressed this far. They formed intent, but they haven't taken the very next step, which is to allocate funds. And they're asking for your help in allocating funds. Why would you be frustrated by that? They're frustrated by it because you want the client to tell you what the budget is. DAVID: So that's not a problem? BLAIR: No, it's not a problem at all. I would actually prefer to be in a situation where there is intent and funds are not allocated. But when funds are allocated, the assumption is that they're not enough funds. You want to sell a solution that costs more. When funds are allocated, that's a sign that these people are ready to go. This is eminently closable. DAVID: Yeah. If funds are allocated, there is a budget, even if they won't tell you what it is. Is that a safe assumption? BLAIR: Yeah, okay. So let's say I'm playing the salesperson. Are funds allocated? Yeah. Yeah. We have allocated funds. Okay, great. Do you mind telling me how much? I'd rather not share that with you. As somebody who loves to role play stuff, I would just love being cheeky. Okay, I'm sorry. We're having a conversation. But you hiring us to potentially help you achieve whatever the benefits are that you uncovered and need. You've allocated funds for this. We're gonna need to work together closely on this if we are in fact the firm that you decide to work with on this. But you won't tell me how much you're going to spend. DAVID: And that's where there's a long pause, right? And you're gonna see who says something first. BLAIR: At some point, we're going to have to trust each other. And we're going to have to have a conversation about money, like adults, right? DAVID: Right. BLAIR: So my suggestion is we just begin now. Is there any reason why you feel like ... Well, I want to hear what your price is. Okay. Well, I can come in with a price, a range of prices, et cetera. And then you could say that's too high. Here's my guarantee. When it comes to giving you prices, I'll give you a range of options. And some of them will be within your budget. And some of them may exceed your budget. But to give me a reference point, please tell me what you've allocated in the way of funds for this. The idea that somebody's allocated funds and won't tell, it's either you're not gonna win this business because they're just kind of going along and you're the third bid, they're trying to protect an advantage for somebody else, or more likely you're just dealing with a junior level decision maker who needs to be schooled on how real business conversations should be had. There should be no animosity or anything. But I'm fond of kind of just stripping away all the pretense and exposing the ridiculousness of the point that yeah we have a budget, but I'm not gonna tell you what it is. That's just absurd. DAVID: Yeah. And you're good at that. You're much better at that than I would be because I wouldn't view it as a game. I would view it as sort of wasting my time. I like how you phrase this. DAVID: Okay. So those are the four assumptions that you need to think about. Let's talk about where you felt uncomfortable. So this is the second big question when you're doing an after action review, to use military phrase. Where did I feel uncomfortable? So talk to me about that. And why are you looking for the ... It's not where did the client feel uncomfortable. It's where you, the salesperson, felt uncomfortable, right? BLAIR: Yeah. If you only had a few minutes to do a debrief on a call, I would actually start with this, where did you feel uncomfortable? DAVID: Yeah. BLAIR: Usually you're uncomfortable because something isn't being said. DAVID: Something isn't being said. Like you're not saying it or- BLAIR: Something isn't being said. Yeah. Oh, okay. There's an elephant in the room and we're not talking about it. DAVID: Yeah. Which we've done a podcast about, right? The say what you think. BLAIR: Say what you're thinking, yeah. DAVID: Yeah, exactly. BLAIR: So the similar principle is to lean into discomfort and light up the dark places. So if you're feeling uncomfortable, you want to train ... This takes a little bit of practice. But you want to train yourself to go to where you're uncomfortable. You start to suspect that the client maybe isn't going to be able to afford you. So you would say, "Hey, before we get too far ..." You might even say, "I'm not sure how to say this. But I'm a little bit concerned that we typically work with companies who spend between X and Y and I'm just a little concerned about whether or not you guys would be in that bandwidth." So that would be a way to kind of bring up price if you're worried about price. Or you might get a sense that this person is really looking for a vendor type provider where it's really about responsiveness and turn around time and you really feel your business is built around the depth of your expertise and maybe customer service. It's there. It's good enough. But it's not your selling point. And this person might value that more. You might just bring that up. BLAIR: One of our key principles is you should view yourself as in a race with the client to object. If there's an objection in the room, like the other metaphor is the elephant in the room. But it's a potential objection. It's a reason why you might not do business together. You want to be the person to put that on the table because the dynamics of objections are such that when one person brings it up, it's incumbant on the other person to address it. And it really doesn't matter which person or which party in the sale. Many salespeople were conditioned to just avoid these things that we see as potential objections. Hope they don't come up. And then when they do come up, the client says, "Oh, we should talk about price. Or we should talk about the fact that you've never done this before." Usually late in the sale, you've allocated all these resources, you've got it to the sunk cost bias is kicking in, you're trying to situate everything that you can to save it. DAVID: And you're on your heels. You're responding defensive. Yeah. BLAIR: Yeah. Now you're on the defensive. So why not just early on as soon as you sense it ... A great example would be okay, I'm really enthusiastic about this based on what you've said about the project so far. It's a little bit different for us. I can see how our experience translates to this. But I want to be completely above board. You need to know, we've never done this type of work before. DAVID: Oh, yeah. BLAIR: And then I just stop and say nothing, right? Just listen to the pause. We've never done this type of work before. And wait for the client to feel that space. DAVID: Even that second and a half right there when you waited, I felt uncomfortable. BLAIR: Right? So the client might say, "Oh, well, that's gonna be a deal killer on our end." Well if it is, you want to find out early, right? You don't want to find out when you're standing there with your 50 page PowerPoint presentation and you get to the last page and oh, yeah, one more question. Thanks for flying out here. We have one more question. Have you ever done this before? No, but excuse, excuse, excuse. It's gonna be okay. DAVID: Yeah. You've wasted all this time. Spent an all nighter. BLAIR: Yeah. And you build all kinds of credibility by leaning into that objection early. You can preface it by saying, "Really excited about it. We've got work that translates. But you need to know we've never done this before." Then pause. Don't say, "But it's gonna be okay." Let the client voice his or her concerns or say, "Well, it looks like you've done this other stuff. I think it translates. I'm okay with it." So you build credibility. You remove this thing that might kill the deal later on. So this idea of where did you feel uncomfortable. Did you address that discomfort or was it still there after the meeting? Right? And what you want to condition yourself and your people to do is when they start to feel uncomfortable about something, lean into this discomfort. Even if it's the way the client is treating it. They're really treating you like a vendor, you want to lean into that sucker. And we could role play that a little bit. DAVID: So this points out the fact that it's not just about what you're saying. But it's your listening skills. Your ability to read between the lines to recognize certain tones of voice and so on. And as you were describing all of this, I as thinking about how this isn't just useful for new business settings, but for account service too. You might even want to include them, right? In some of the conversation ... Some of the debriefing conversations because these account people are having these sorts of conversations all the time. More frequently with somebody that does come aboard as a client. BLAIR: Yeah. That's a really great point. And it makes me think about that in our training program, with every new term that starts and one just started this week, as we're preparing for the term, we're trying to find more and better ways to disseminate the thinking to others in the firm. Because for many years as a consultant, I would advise the salespeople to act a certain way. And then the account people are acting in an entirely different way. DAVID: Right. Yeah. Working against everything that you've built up from a positioning standpoint, right. BLAIR: Yeah. And all of these skills that work in new business development or in sales, they're all applicable in many of the aspects of account service. And some account people are more about server responder types. And the more senior people are really about leading the accounts. And those people in particular, those who are in charged with kind of taking the account into the new direction to the benefit of both the client and the firm, all of these principles would apply to them as well. DAVID: Yeah. Well this has been really, really good. So just finishing up kind of an overview of this again, there's two key review questions you go through. The first is what assumptions did I make? Four that you talk about there. The need, the authority/decision maker element, time frame, and budget. And then the second one is where did I feel uncomfortable? You identify those points and then talk about why you felt uncomfortable and what you might have done to address that issue sooner. This is really interesting, Blair. Thank you very much. BLAIR: Yeah, my pleasure, David. I enjoyed it.  

ESPN Tallahassee Jeff Cameron Show
JCS 8-14-18 Hour 1

ESPN Tallahassee Jeff Cameron Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2018 42:21


1) Jeff vents about a call he gets everyday / FSU practice talk 2) There is an SI gambling page / Jon Gruden is who we thought he is / Maryland takes full legal and moral responsibility 3) Fan day sucks, but at least it isn't Running of the Gumps

The Reviewniverse with Chris and Steve

In this episode, Chris and Steve check themselves for Gumps. Unfortunately, they found at least three, and they now have Stage 3 Forrest Gump Fever. The cure? To talk about Forrest Gump on a podcast for at least 80 minutes. Easy. Along the way, Chris finds a new way to plug his songs, Steve thinks shrimp is icky, and they both have to decide once and for all if this entire movie is problematic. Reviews This Episode: Forrest Gump (1994) "Gump" by Weird Al Yankovic Bubba Gump Shrimp Co.

The Doug Stanhope Podcast
Ep. #247: I Don't Give A Gump

The Doug Stanhope Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2018 71:50


Doug welcomes the Gumps to Bisbee. Who are they and how did they end up in Bisbee? Recorded Jan 22nd, 2018 at the FunHouse in Bisbee, AZ with Doug Stanhope (@DougStanhope), Gump, & Ggreg Chaille (@gregchaille). Produced and Edited by Chaille. This episode is sponsored by  Brooklinen.com - Get $20 off AND free shipping when you use promo code STANHOPE at [Brooklinen.com](www.Brooklinen.com).  Order a SIGNED copy of Doug's NEW book, "This Is Not Fame: A "From What I Re-Memoir"" at - www.dougstanhope.com/store/this-is-not-fame-signed Closing song “Ain't No Rest For the Wicked”, by Cage The Elephant and performed by UkuleleCheats on Yourtube.com - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRO3zGPV7Qg  LINKS: Chad Shank Voice Over info at www.AudioShank.com Support the Innocence Project - www.innocenceproject.org/

Return to Oz Minute
Episode 68: A song of Gumps and kings

Return to Oz Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2017 27:25


Who’s the Nome King!?!?! Special Guest: Chris O’Connor of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Minute Email us: returntoozminute@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter @ozminute and follow the Facebook page at facebook.com/ozminute Just ask to join our listener group to become part of The Flying Sofa! Visit us at www.returntoozminute.com for more

Saturday Night Freak Show
Legend (1985)

Saturday Night Freak Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2016 71:28


Holly loves unicorns...and Tom Cruise, and Legend (1985), director Ridley Scott's visually arresting fairy tale-fantasy epic, in which a young forest lad (Cruise) must rescue a princess (Mia Sara) and a unicorn from the clutches of the Lord of Darkness (Tim Curry in an awesome Rob Bottin makeup design). Listen in as we detail the differences between the U.S. theatrical version and the international Director's Cut, pontificate about fairies, Gumps, Screwballs, Brown Toms, and more on this week's exciting episode! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pilots Journey Aviation Podcast
PJP #047 – A New Baby

Pilots Journey Aviation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2013 67:11


CFIStew prepares for a new little one in his hangar, while Mike welcomes a mature beauty to his.

In The Pattern Podcast
Episode 20: The Number for the Tower

In The Pattern Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2012 90:09


Brad follows up from the last episode about the CO dectector and how his club feels about installing them on the planes. He also tries to go up with his CFII to shoot some approaches but can’t get the plane to go above 2100 RPM after trying to sort out some engine roughness. Chris makes a mistake with the online scheduler when renting the plane and has a few breakfast flights to make John jealous. Also, who got the number to the tower? Find out this and more in Episode 20 of the In The Pattern Podcast. LINKS Unicom radio procedures AC 90-42F http://www.avweb.com/news/features/183049-1.html Someone forgot their GUMPS check http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hs5ChcYbaNU&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=PL5572E7FC3C86CCDD CG test video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tzs56Xaz3wE www.meetup.com Search for aviation groups :-) $100 user fees will pretty much kill GA http://www.aopa.org/advocacy/articles/2012/120113white-house-aviation-user-fee-response.html Proud Members of the Aviation Media Network Intro and closing music: Deep In Blue by Dan O Songs

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio
The Amos 'n' Andy Show - Radio And TV Delivery Job (04-04-54)

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2010 30:10


Amos 'n' Andy was a situation comedy popular in the United States from the 1920s through the 1950s. The show began as one of the first radio comedy serials, written and voiced by Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll and originating from station WMAQ in Chicago, Illinois. After the series was first broadcast in 1928, it grew in popularity and became a huge influence on the radio serials that followed. Amos 'n' Andy creators Gosden and Correll were white actors familiar with minstrel traditions. They met in Durham, North Carolina in 1920, and by the fall of 1925, they were performing nightly song-and-patter routines on the Chicago Tribune's station WGN. Since the Tribune syndicated Sidney Smith's popular comic strip The Gumps, which had successfully introduced the concept of daily continuity, WGN executive Ben McCanna thought the notion of a serialized drama could also work on radio. He suggested to Gosden and Correll that they adapt The Gumps to radio. They instead proposed a series about "a couple of colored characters" and borrowed certain elements of The Gumps. Their new series, Sam 'n' Henry, began January 12, 1926, fascinating radio listeners throughout the Midwest. That series became popular enough that in late 1927 Gosden and Correll requested that it be distributed to other stations on phonograph records in a "chainless chain" concept that would have been the first use of radio syndication as we know it today. When WGN rejected the idea, Gosden and Correll quit the show and the station that December. Contractually, their characters belonged to WGN, so when Gosden and Correll left WGN, they performed in personal appearances but could not use the character names from the radio show.THIS EPISODE:April 4, 1954. CBS network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. "Radio And TV Delivery Job". The Kingfish gets Andy into the TV repair business. After disaster strikes, Andy tells it to the judge whose nickname is, "Twenty-Year Johnson."  Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, Jeff Alexander (music), Harlow Wilcox (announcer), Joe Connelly (writer), Bob Mosher (writer), Ernestine Wade, Johnny Lee, Amanda Randolph, Cliff Howell (director), Tommy Moore, Jean Vander Pyl, Will Wright, Ken Christy. 25 minutes.

Plane Crazy Down Under
PCDU Episode 29: What’s in a Checklist?

Plane Crazy Down Under

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2010


Some in-cockpit audio provided by a listener triggered a discussion on the differences in pre-landing checklists (GUMPS vs BUMFTH vs BUMFOH vs whatever). All of Grant’s aviation books & manuals are still in boxes after moving house so he had to rely on his memory with predictable results. Talk about incentive to go out and . . . → Read More: PCDU Episode 29: What’s in a Checklist?

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio
The Amos & Andy Show - Raiding The Piggy Bank (09-09-47)

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2009 28:12


The Amos 'n' Andy Show - Amos 'n' Andy was a situation comedy popular in the United States from the 1920s through the 1950s. The show began as one of the first radio comedy serials, written and voiced by Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll and originating from station WMAQ in Chicago, Illinois. After the series was first broadcast in 1928, it grew in popularity and became a huge influence on the radio serials that followed. Amos 'n' Andy creators Gosden and Correll were white actors familiar with minstrel traditions. They met in Durham, North Carolina in 1920, and by the fall of 1925, they were performing nightly song-and-patter routines on the Chicago Tribune's station WGN. Since the Tribune syndicated Sidney Smith's popular comic strip The Gumps, which had successfully introduced the concept of daily continuity, WGN executive Ben McCanna thought the notion of a serialized drama could also work on radio. He suggested to Gosden and Correll that they adapt The Gumps to radio. They instead proposed a series about "a couple of colored characters" and borrowed certain elements of The Gumps. Their new series, Sam 'n' Henry, began January 12, 1926, fascinating radio listeners throughout the Midwest. That series became popular enough that in late 1927 Gosden and Correll requested that it be distributed to other stations on phonograph records in a "chainless chain" concept that would have been the first use of radio syndication as we know it today. When WGN rejected the idea, Gosden and Correll quit the show and the station that December. Contractually, their characters belonged to WGN, so when Gosden and Correll left WGN, they performed in personal appearances but could not use the character names from the radio show.THIS EPISODE:September 30, 1947. Program #72. NBC network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. "Piggy Bank Show". The Stevens' twenty fifth anniversary piggy bank is empty and must be refilled...quickly! Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, Jeff Alexander and His Orchestra, The Jubalaires, James Basquette, Eddie Green, Ernestine Wade, Art Gilmore (nouncer). 30:09.

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio
Amos & Andy - Kingfish Thinks Sapphire Wants To Kill Him (05-11-45)

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2009 29:22


Amos 'n' Andy was a situation comedy popular in the United States from the 1920s through the 1950s. The show began as one of the first radio comedy serials, written and voiced by Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll and originating from station WMAQ in Chicago, Illinois. After the series was first broadcast in 1928, it grew in popularity and became a huge influence on the radio serials that followed. Amos 'n' Andy creators Gosden and Correll were white actors familiar with minstrel traditions. They met in Durham, North Carolina in 1920, and by the fall of 1925, they were performing nightly song-and-patter routines on the Chicago Tribune's station WGN. Since the Tribune syndicated Sidney Smith's popular comic strip The Gumps, which had successfully introduced the concept of daily continuity, WGN executive Ben McCanna thought the notion of a serialized drama could also work on radio. He suggested to Gosden and Correll that they adapt The Gumps to radio. They instead proposed a series about "a couple of colored characters" and borrowed certain elements of The Gumps. Their new series, Sam 'n' Henry, began January 12, 1926, fascinating radio listeners throughout the Midwest. That series became popular enough that in late 1927 Gosden and Correll requested that it be distributed to other stations on phonograph records in a "chainless chain" concept that would have been the first use of radio syndication as we know it today. When WGN rejected the idea, Gosden and Correll quit the show and the station that December. Contractually, their characters belonged to WGN, so when Gosden and Correll left WGN, they performed in personal appearances but could not use the character names from the radio show.THIS EPISODE:May 11, 1945. NBC network. Commercials deleted. The Kingfish is convinced that Sapphire plans to kill him for the insurance money. Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, Ernestine Wade, Lou Lubin, Harlow Wilcox (announcer). 23:05.

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio
Amos & Andy - Sunday Monday Or Always (02-25-44)

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2009 27:15


Amos 'n' Andy was a situation comedy popular in the United States from the 1920s through the 1950s. The show began as one of the first radio comedy serials, written and voiced by Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll and originating from station WMAQ in Chicago, Illinois. After the series was first broadcast in 1928, it grew in popularity and became a huge influence on the radio serials that followed. Amos 'n' Andy creators Gosden and Correll were white actors familiar with minstrel traditions. They met in Durham, North Carolina in 1920, and by the fall of 1925, they were performing nightly song-and-patter routines on the Chicago Tribune's station WGN. Since the Tribune syndicated Sidney Smith's popular comic strip The Gumps, which had successfully introduced the concept of daily continuity, WGN executive Ben McCanna thought the notion of a serialized drama could also work on radio. He suggested to Gosden and Correll that they adapt The Gumps to radio. They instead proposed a series about "a couple of colored characters" and borrowed certain elements of The Gumps. THIS EPISODE: February 25, 1944. NBC network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. Replacing "The Great Gildersleeve." Andy is convinced that he's written the hit tune, "Sunday, Monday, Or Always." He and The Kingfish go into the song writing business! Guests are Kay Kyser, Harry Babbitt. Also Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen (the real composers of the tune). Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, Harlow Wilcox (announcer), Kay Kyser, Harry Babbitt, Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen, Kay Kyser and His Orchestra (music fill), Georgia Carroll (vocal). 29:42.

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio
Amos & Andy - Kingfish's Tourist Service (11-22-53) - Boxcars711 Old Time Radio Pod

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2008 29:09


Amos 'n' Andy was a situation comedy popular in the United States from the 1920s through the 1950s. The show began as one of the first radio comedy serials, written and voiced by Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll and originating from station WMAQ in Chicago, Illinois. After the series was first broadcast in 1928, it grew in popularity and became a huge influence on the radio serials that followed.Amos 'n' Andy creators Gosden and Correll were white actors familiar with minstrel traditions. They met in Durham, North Carolina in 1920, and by the fall of 1925, they were performing nightly song-and-patter routines on the Chicago Tribune's station WGN. Since the Tribune syndicated Sidney Smith's popular comic strip The Gumps, which had successfully introduced the concept of daily continuity, WGN executive Ben McCanna thought the notion of a serialized drama could also work on radio.

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio
Amos & Andy "The Marriage Counselor" (12-17-43) - Boxcars711 Old Time Radio Pod

Boxcars711 Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2008 26:30


Amos 'n' Andy creators Gosden and Correll were white actors familiar with minstrel traditions. They met in Durham, North Carolina in 1920, and by the fall of 1925, they were performing nightly song-and-patter routines on the Chicago Tribune's station WGN. Since the Tribune syndicated Sidney Smith's popular comic strip The Gumps, which had successfully introduced the concept of daily continuity, WGN executive Ben McCanna thought the notion of a serialized drama could also work on radio. He suggested to Gosden and Correll that they adapt The Gumps to radio. They instead proposed a series about "a couple of colored characters" and borrowed certain elements of The Gumps. Their new series, Sam 'n' Henry, began January 12, 1926, fascinating radio listeners throughout the Midwest.