Podcasts about Measurement

Process of assigning numbers to objects or events

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Best podcasts about Measurement

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Latest podcast episodes about Measurement

Bless Their Hearts
Measurement Pt. 1

Bless Their Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 52:07


If you think measuring horses in hands is weird, wait til you hear the guys argue about pecks, bushels, and the metric system. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

You Know What I Would Do
Episode 15: Imperial Measurement VS Metric, Emmys, Colonial Americans, Recycling, Partners Not Putting Keys Away

You Know What I Would Do

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 58:42


Magness & Marcus on Coaching
Episode 184: Fitness Measurement Fallacy

Magness & Marcus on Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 63:09


Does your belief in your fitness feel like a ping pong ball, bouncing back and forth wildly, dependent on whether your latest workout went well or not? In this episode we cover the fallacy of equating a single workout or measure as the be all end all marker of whether we are ready to go…

Astro arXiv | all categories
Measurement of AGN dust extinction based on the near-infrared flux variability of WISE data

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 0:26


Measurement of AGN dust extinction based on the near-infrared flux variability of WISE data by Shoichiro Mizukoshi et al. on Sunday 18 September We present the measurement of the line-of-sight extinction of the dusty torus for a large number of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) based on the reddening of the colour of the variable flux component in near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. We collected long-term monitoring data by $textit{Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)}$ for 513 local AGNs catalogued by the $mathit{Swift/}$BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS) and found that the multi-epoch NIR flux data in two different bands (WISE $W1$ and $W2$) are tightly correlated for more than 90% of the targets. The flux variation gradient (FVG) in the $W1$ and $W2$ bands was derived by applying linear regression analysis, and we reported that those for unobscured AGNs fall in a relatively narrow range, whereas those for obscured AGNs are distributed in a redder and broader range. The AGN's line-of-sight dust extinction ($A_V$) is calculated using the amount of the reddening in the FVG and is compared with the neutral hydrogen column density ($N_{rm{}H}$) of the BASS catalogue. We found that the $N_{rm{}H}/A_V$ ratios of obscured AGNs are greater than those of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and are distributed with a large scatter by at most two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we found that the lower envelope of the $N_{rm{}H}/A_V$ of obscured AGNs is comparable to the Galactic diffuse ISM. These properties of the $N_{rm{}H}/A_V$ can be explained by increase in the $N_{rm{}H}$ attributed to the dust-free gas clouds covering the line of sight in the broad-line region. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.07933v1

Astro arXiv | all categories
Spin it as you like: the lack of a measurement of the spin tilt distribution with LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA binary black holes

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 1:13


Spin it as you like: the lack of a measurement of the spin tilt distribution with LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA binary black holes by Salvatore Vitale et al. on Sunday 18 September The growing set of gravitational-wave sources is being used to measure the properties of the underlying astrophysical populations of compact objects, black holes and neutron stars. Most of the detected systems are black hole binaries. While much has been learned about black holes by analyzing the latest LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA (LVK) catalog, GWTC-3, a measurement of the astrophysical distribution of the black hole spin orientations remains elusive. This is usually probed by measuring the cosine of the tilt angle ($costau$) between each black hole spin and the orbital angular momentum, $costau=+1$ being perfect alignment. Abbott et al. (2021e) has modeled the $costau$ distribution as a mixture of an isotropic component and a Gaussian component with mean fixed at $+1$ and width measured from the data. In this paper, we want to verify if the data require the existence of such a peak at $costau=+1$. We use various models for the astrophysical tilt distribution and find that a) Augmenting the LVK model such that the mean of the Gaussian is not fixed at $+1$ returns results that strongly depend on priors. If we allow $mu>+1$ then the resulting astrophysical $costau$ distribution peaks at $+1$ and looks linear, rather than Gaussian. If we constrain $-1leq muleq+1$ the Gaussian component peaks at $mu=0.47^{+0.47}_{-1.04}$ (median and 90% symmetric credible interval). Two other 2-component mixture models yield $costau$ distributions that either have a broad peak centered at $0.20^{+0.21}_{-0.18}$ or a plateau that spans the range $[-0.5, +1]$, without a clear peak at $+1$. b) All of the models we considered agree on the fact that there is textit{no} excess of black hole tilts at around $-1$. c) While yielding quite different posteriors, the models considered in this work have Bayesian evidences that are the same within error bars. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.06978v2

5 Minute Chinese
我买了新苹果手表 I bought the new Apple Watch

5 Minute Chinese

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 5:32 Transcription Available


Hello everyone! In today's episode I talk about the new Apple Watch Series 8 I just got and its new functions. Hope you enjoy. Script and useful vocabulary below by paragraph.1:01 hand-washing1:42 heart health2:13 Medication App2:28 crash detection (&fall detection)3:56 Workout App0:00大家好! 欢迎收听新一期的《5分钟中文》。我上个星期买了新出的苹果手表Apple Watch,昨天送到了。还挺快的。我已经用了一天,今天就想跟大家聊聊苹果手表的新功能和我的用户体验。功能 | Gōngnéng | Function用户体验 | yònghù tǐyàn | user experience0:29我的上一个苹果手表是2017年出的第三代的苹果手表,我戴了差不多四年才换新的。很多新功能其实前两年的苹果手表就都已经有了,不是今年才有的。但是因为我很久都没有换手表,所以很多功能对我来说是新的。戴 | dài | wear代 | dài | generation1:01我想跟大家介绍的第一个苹果手表新功能就是洗手时间。苹果手表会检测到你在洗手,然后帮你倒计时洗手的时间。提醒你要好好、仔细地洗手不能洗得太快,导致洗得不干净。我通过这个功能发现我每次洗手的时间都不够。洗手洗够时间还是很有必要的。检测 | jiǎncè | detect | 倒计时 | dàojìshí | countdown | 提醒 | tíxǐng | remind | 仔细 | zǐxì | thoroghly, with attention to detail | 导致 | dǎozhì | lead to | 1:42苹果手表第二个有新功能就是帮助你监测心脏健康。苹果手表可以检测房颤。它也可以检测你的心跳是否正常。如果你在没有运动的情况下,心跳却超出正常范围,它就会提醒你这个异常情况。监测 | jiāncè | monitor心脏 | xīnzàng | heart房颤 | fáng chàn | atrial fibrillation心跳 | xīntiào | heartbeat超出...范围 | chāochū... Fànwéi | Out of ...range异常 | yìcháng | abnormal情况 | qíngkuàng | situation, scenario2:13第三个功能就提醒你吃药。有时候我们工作、学习很忙,就不记得按时吃药和保健品。新的苹果手表可以在应该吃药的时候提醒你。这样你就不会忘了。按时 | ànshí | on time保健品 | Bǎojiàn pǐn | health products2:38第四个功能是车祸检测。苹果手表在检测到严重车祸时会显示提醒,并在20秒后自动报警。如果你没有反应的话,他会自动播放语音告诉警察你出了车祸和你的大致位置,为救援提供便利。在这之前苹果也有摔倒检测的功能。如果它检测到你摔倒了,而且一分钟内都没有动作,它就会认定你摔得很厉害。这时候苹果手表也会自动为你报警,通知你的紧急联系人。我希望我们都不会用到这两个功能。但是如果真的出现了这样的紧急的情况,而我们没有办法动弹、求救,这个功能可能就是救命的功能。车祸 | chēhuò | car accident检测 | jiǎncè | detect显示 | xiǎnshì | show, display自动 | zìdòng | automatic报警 | bàojǐng | Call the police反应 | fǎnyìng | response, reaction播放 | bòfàng | play语音 | yǔyīn | voice大致 | dàzhì | approximate位置 | wèizhì | Location救援 | jiùyuán | rescue提供 | tígōng | provide便利 | biànlì | convenient摔倒 | shuāi dǎo | fall动作 | dòngzuò | action认定 | rèndìng | identify通知 | tōngzhī | Notice紧急 | jǐnjí | emergency联系人 | liánxì rén | contact动弹 | dòngtán | move求救 | qiújiù | ask for help救命 | jiùmìng | Help3:56最后,我要说一下苹果手表对我最重要的功能:增强的运动记录功能。如果你用苹果手表运动,你对健身圆环可能并不陌生。健身环对我每天坚持健身非常有帮助。新的苹果手表不但可以帮你记录活动时间,不同运动类型,心率,和卡路里消耗,还可以记录你的心率区间,跑步功率,制定自己的体能训练等等。新的体能训练视图测量你的跑步姿势。我觉得还挺酷的。这些测量指标可以帮助我们更安全高效的运动。记录 | jìlù | Record坚持 | jiānchí | persist in类型 | lèixíng | type心率 | xīnlǜ | heart rate卡路里 | kǎlùlǐ | Calories消耗 | xiāohào | consume区间 | qūjiān | interval, zone功率 | gōnglǜ | power制定 | zhìdìng | formulate体能 | tǐnéng | physical fitness视图 | shìtú | view, infochart测量 | cèliáng | Measurement知识 | zhīshì | Knowledge高效 | gāoxiào | efficient5:00那今天关于新苹果手表和它的新功能就跟大家聊到这里。你戴苹果手表吗?你觉得苹果手表的这些新功能对你的生活有帮助吗?感谢您收听五分钟中文。如果你喜欢,请帮我订阅、点赞、分享。感谢收听。我们下期再见!

HVAC School - For Techs, By Techs
HVAC Measurement Types and Benefits

HVAC School - For Techs, By Techs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 43:04 Very Popular


Eric Kaiser joins the HVAC School podcast to talk about HVAC measurement types and the benefits of taking each one. He also talks about point measurements and data trends. Point measurements include static pressure, voltage readings, and readings provided by gauges. We only take those measurements once. However, when you track those on several occasions over time, you can build data trends. Single-point measurements give us information about what is happening at the moment, but they don't give us a long-term view of the system's health. Absolute and differential measurements also have different purposes entirely. Absolute measurements require us to compare a reading to a specific, unchanging reference point, but differentials compare one measurement to another. When we turn point measurements into trend measurements, we can see some degree of causation. Changes in data trends indicate that a problem occurred at a certain point in time and could be due to changes that coincided with the deviation from the norm. However, that's intermittent trending that relies on us to take point measurements at spaced-out points in time. Continuous trending allows us to use sensors and test instruments that map changes constantly. At the end of the day, point measurements are like snapshots, and continuous data trends are like videos; the former only shows part of the picture, and the latter can help us solve more difficult problems by giving us a more complete idea of what's happening. Eric and Bryan also discuss: Qualitative vs. quantitative measurements Filter restrictions and static pressure Gauge vs. atmospheric pressure Combined trend measurements How tool usage and calibration impact measurements Non-invasive testing Recorded data and sample frequency Comparative troubleshooting in spaces with similar equipment Resolution vs. accuracy vs. precision   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.

Astro arXiv | all categories
On the Measurement of Vorticity in Astrophysical Fluids

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 0:52


On the Measurement of Vorticity in Astrophysical Fluids by Steven R. Spangler. on Thursday 15 September Vorticity is central to the nature of, and dynamical processes in turbulence, including turbulence in astrophysical fluids. The results of cite{Raymond20a,Raymond20b} on vorticity in the post-shock fluid of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant are therefore of great interest. We consider the degree to which spectroscopic measurements of an optically-thin line, the most common type of astronomical velocimetry, can yield unambiguous measurements of the vorticity in a fluid. We consider an ideal case of observations in the plane of a flow which may or may not contain vorticity. In one case, the flow possesses vorticity in a direction perpendicular to the plane of observations. In the other case, the flow is irrotational (zero vorticity) by construction. The observationally-deduced vorticity (referred to as the {em pseudovorticity}) is inferred from spatial differences in the line-of-sight component of velocity, and assumptions of symmetry. My principal result is that in the case of the vortical flow, the pseudovorticity is a reasonable match for the true vorticity. However, and importantly, the pseudovorticity in the case of the irrotational flow field is also nonzero, and comparable in magnitude to that for a vortical flow. The conclusion of this paper is that while astronomical spectroscopic observations may yield a good estimate of the vorticity in a remote fluid, the robustness of such an inference cannot be insured. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.06707v1

Astro arXiv | all categories
On the Measurement of Vorticity in Astrophysical Fluids

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 0:50


On the Measurement of Vorticity in Astrophysical Fluids by Steven R. Spangler. on Thursday 15 September Vorticity is central to the nature of, and dynamical processes in turbulence, including turbulence in astrophysical fluids. The results of cite{Raymond20a,Raymond20b} on vorticity in the post-shock fluid of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant are therefore of great interest. We consider the degree to which spectroscopic measurements of an optically-thin line, the most common type of astronomical velocimetry, can yield unambiguous measurements of the vorticity in a fluid. We consider an ideal case of observations in the plane of a flow which may or may not contain vorticity. In one case, the flow possesses vorticity in a direction perpendicular to the plane of observations. In the other case, the flow is irrotational (zero vorticity) by construction. The observationally-deduced vorticity (referred to as the {em pseudovorticity}) is inferred from spatial differences in the line-of-sight component of velocity, and assumptions of symmetry. My principal result is that in the case of the vortical flow, the pseudovorticity is a reasonable match for the true vorticity. However, and importantly, the pseudovorticity in the case of the irrotational flow field is also nonzero, and comparable in magnitude to that for a vortical flow. The conclusion of this paper is that while astronomical spectroscopic observations may yield a good estimate of the vorticity in a remote fluid, the robustness of such an inference cannot be insured. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.06707v1

Astro arXiv | all categories
Spin it as you like: the lack of a measurement of the spin tilt distribution with LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA binary black holes

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 1:04


Spin it as you like: the lack of a measurement of the spin tilt distribution with LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA binary black holes by Salvatore Vitale et al. on Thursday 15 September The growing set of gravitational-wave sources is being used to measure the properties of the underlying astrophysical populations of compact objects, black holes and neutron stars. Most of the detected systems are black hole binaries. While much has been learned about black holes by analyzing the latest LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA (LVK) catalog, GWTC-3, a measurement of the astrophysical distribution of the black hole spin orientations remains elusive. This is usually probed by measuring the cosine of the tilt angle ($costau$) between each black hole spin and the orbital angular momentum, $costau=+1$ being perfect alignment. Abbott et al. (2021e) has modeled the $costau$ distribution as a mixture of an isotropic component and a Gaussian component with mean fixed at $+1$ and width measured from the data. In this paper, we want to verify if the data require the existence of such a peak at $costau=+1$. We use various models for the astrophysical tilt distribution and find that a) Augmenting the LVK model such that the mean of the Gaussian is not fixed at $+1$ returns results that strongly depend on priors. If we allow $mu>+1$ then the resulting astrophysical $costau$ distribution peaks at $+1$ and looks linear, rather than Gaussian. If we constrain $-1leq muleq+1$ the Gaussian component peaks at $mu=0.47^{+0.47}_{-1.04}$ (median and 90% symmetric credible interval). Two other 2-component mixture models yield $costau$ distributions that either have a broad peak centered at $0.20^{+0.21}_{-0.18}$ or a plateau that spans the range $[-0.5, +1]$, without a clear peak at $+1$. b) All of the models we considered agree on the fact that there is textit{no} excess of black hole tilts at around $-1$. c) While yielding quite different posteriors, the models considered in this work have Bayesian evidences that are the same within error bars. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.06978v1

Cadence Conversations
Healthcare quality measurement with the NCQA

Cadence Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 19:59


This episode is hosted by Chris Altchek, Founder & CEO of Cadence in conversation with Peggy O'Kane, NCQA Founder & President.Their conversation focuses on:The history and origins of the NCQAThe need for independent measurement of healthcare qualityThe difficulties in healthcare data collection and usageThe future of quality care outside the four walls of the hospitalFor more information on Cadence, visit https://www.cadence.care/

Astro arXiv | all categories
Tracing Interstellar Heating: An ALCHEMI Measurement of the HCN Isomers in NGC 253

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 1:08


Tracing Interstellar Heating: An ALCHEMI Measurement of the HCN Isomers in NGC 253 by Erica Behrens et al. on Wednesday 14 September We analyze HCN and HNC emission in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 to investigate its effectiveness in tracing heating processes associated with star formation. This study uses multiple HCN and HNC rotational transitions observed using ALMA via the ALCHEMI Large Program. To understand the conditions and associated heating mechanisms within NGC 253's dense gas, we employ Bayesian nested sampling techniques applied to chemical and radiative transfer models which are constrained using our HCN and HNC measurements. We find that the volume density $n_{text{H}_{2}}$ and cosmic ray ionization rate (CRIR) $zeta$ are enhanced by about an order of magnitude in the galaxy's central regions as compared to those further from the nucleus. In NGC 253's central GMCs, where observed HCN/HNC abundance ratios are lowest, $n sim 10^{5.5}$ cm$^{-3}$ and $zeta sim 10^{-12}$ s$^{-1}$ (greater than $10^4$ times the average Galactic rate). We find a positive correlation in the association of both density and CRIR with the number of star formation-related heating sources (supernova remnants, HII regions, and super hot cores) located in each GMC, as well as a correlation between CRIRs and supernova rates. Additionally, we see an anticorrelation between the HCN/HNC ratio and CRIR, indicating that this ratio will be lower in regions where $zeta$ is higher. Though previous studies suggested HCN and HNC may reveal strong mechanical heating processes in NGC 253's CMZ, we find cosmic ray heating dominates the heating budget, and mechanical heating does not play a significant role in the HCN and HNC chemistry. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.06244v1

Product Chats
Exploring Product Momentum With Erik Dawson of LeafLink

Product Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 26:25


How does momentum factor into product management? In this episode of Product Chats, Erik Dawson, Senior Director of Product Management at LeafLink, answers that question. We dive into how product teams can build internal momentum to support product growth, as well as external momentum, which helps customers move through the customer journey. Time Stamped Show NotesGetting into product [01:19]Building products for enterprise vs startups [02:59]How to structure product teams [06:58]Building customer experience focused products [08:44]Product momentum [11:24]Getting quick wins and setting OKRs [13:41]Product strategy and the three Cs [14:37]Leading gracefully at a product led organization [16:41]Measurement and attribution [18:52]Advice for aspiring product leaders [23:14]  Product Chats is brought to you by Canny. Over 1,000 teams trust Canny to help them build better products. Capture, organize, and analyze product feedback in one place to inform your product decisions.Get your free Canny account today. Stay Connected!TwitterFacebookLinkedIn

Growth Masterminds Podcast
Beyond the install: Redefining mobile growth measurement with Apptopia & Digital Turbine

Growth Masterminds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 28:36


In the mobile app world … how do you know who's winning? It is number of installs? We know that can be a faulty measurement: one that's easy to game, and easily misleading. Apptopia knows this. Their job is providing competitive intelligence across the digital ecosystem, and isolated install counts won't cut it. So they've teamed up with Digital Turbine to do something different They've just released v2 of that “something different," the BRAG index. In this episode of Growth Masterminds, we chat with 2 experts about what that is ... and what they've learned: - Tara Kirkpatrick, analyst for Apptopia - Gregory Wester, SVP and CMO for Digital Turbine

Marketing With Empathy® Podcast
80. Content Measurement: How Brand Storytelling Saves Money

Marketing With Empathy® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 14:26


Episode 80- How to measure your brand content. You think about how to show the impact your brand storytelling content is having on the business. How much is it generating? BUT—what about how much money your content is SAVING your company? Sarah shares how to think about this in your next monthly metrics dashboard report at work.    (free) 3 WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR CONTENT STRATEGY THIS YEAR: https://view.flodesk.com/pages/6161f93cc71e8685f183c63e     VIEW SHOW NOTES: https://blog.kindredspeak.com/one-way-to-monetize-brand-podcast-ep-80    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #90: Texting for Success in Aphasia Rehabilitation - A Conversation with Jaime Lee

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 46:32


Interviewer I'm Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, Program Specialist and Clinical Supervisor for the Aphasia Treatment Program at Cal State East Bay and a member of the Aphasia Access Podcast Working Group. AA's strives to provide members with information, inspiration, and ideas that support their aphasia care through a variety of educational materials and resources.  Today, I have the honor of speaking with Dr. Jamie Lee who was selected as a 2022 Tavistock Distinguished Scholar. We'll discuss her research interests and do a deeper dive into her work involving the study of texting behaviors of individuals with aphasia and her efforts to develop an outcome measure that looks at success at the transactional level of message exchange.  As we frame our podcast episodes in terms of the Gap Areas identified in the 2017 Aphasia Access State of Aphasia  Report by Nina Simmons-Mackie, today's episode best addresses Gap areas:  Insufficient attention to life participation across the continuum of care;  Insufficient training and protocols or guidelines to aid implementation of participation-oriented intervention across the continuum of care;  Insufficient or absent communication access for people with aphasia or other communication barriers  For more information about the Gap areas, you can listen to episode #62 with Dr. Liz Hoover or go to the Aphasia Access website.   Guest bio Jaime Lee is an Associate Professor in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at James Madison University. Jaime's clinical experience goes back nearly 20 years when she worked as an inpatient rehab SLP at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (now Shirley Ryan Ability Lab). She later worked for several years as a Research SLP in Leora Cherney's Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment. Jaime earned her PhD at the University of Oregon, where she studied with McKay Sohlberg. Her research interests have included evaluating computer-delivered treatments to improve language skills in aphasia, including script training and ORLA, examining facilitation of aphasia groups, and most recently, exploring text messaging to improve participation, social connection and quality of life in IWA.   Listener Take-aways In today's episode you will: Learn about why texting might be a beneficial communication mode for IwA Explore the reasons it's important to consider the communication partner in the texting dyad Find out more about measures examining texting behaviors, like the Texting Transactional Success (TTS) tool. Consider how Conversational Analysis may be helpful in understanding texting interactions Edited show notes Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Jamie, welcome to the podcast today. I'm so excited that we finally get to talk to you. And I want to offer a shout out because you mentioned two mentors and colleagues who I just value so much, McKay Solberg and Leora Cherney, and I'm so excited that you've also had them as mentors.   Jaime Lee  02:44 Thanks, Ellen. It's really great to talk with you today. And speaking of shout outs, I feel like I have to give you a shout out because I was so excited to meet you earlier this summer at IARC. We met at a breakfast. And it was exciting because I got to tell you that I assigned to my students your efficacy of aphasia group paper, so it was really fun to finally meet you in person.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  03:11 Thank you, that is the paper that Roberta Elman was first author on. I was really proud to be part of that.   I was excited to get to come over and congratulate you at the breakfast on your Tavistock award. I think it's very, very deserving. And I'm excited today that we can explore your work and get to know each other better. And I'm just going to start with this question about the Tavistock. Can you share with our listeners what you think the benefits of the Tavistock Distinguished Scholar Award will be to your work? Jaime Lee  03:43 Sure, I think first off being selected as a Tavistock Distinguished Scholar has been really validating of my work in terms of research and scholarship. It's made me feel like I'm on the right track. And at least maybe I'm asking the right kinds of questions. And it's also really meaningful to receive an award that recognizes my teaching and impact on students. And I was thinking about this and a conversation that I had with my PhD mentor McKay Solberg. And it was early into my PhD when we were talking about the impact of teaching and how important it was, where she had said that when we work as a clinician, we're working directly with clients and patients were hopefully able to have a really positive meaningful impact. But when we teach, and we train the next generation of clinicians, you know, we have this even greater impact on all of the people that our students will eventually work with throughout their career. And so that's just huge.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:51 It really is huge. And I have to say I went to grad school with McKay and that sounds like something she would say, absolutely, her value of teaching.  I just want to do a quick shout out to Aphasia Access, because I think they also recognize and value the importance of teaching. They have shown that commitment by their LPAA curricular modules that they developed and make accessible to Aphasia Access members, so people can bring content right into their coursework, which is helpful because it takes so much time to prepare these materials. So, if you haven't heard of these curricular modules yet, please go to the website and check them out.  So yes, I'm so glad that you feel your work is validated. It's really important to validate our young researchers.  I think there's an opportunity to expand who you meet during this year. Is that true? Jaime Lee  05:40 That is already true. This honor has already led to growing connections with other aphasia scholars and getting more involved with Aphasia Access. I'm excited to share that I'll be chairing next year's 2023 Aphasia Access Leadership Summit together with colleagues Esther Kim and Gretchen Szabo. We're really enthusiastic about putting together a meaningful and inspiring program. I am just really grateful for the opportunity to have a leadership role in the conference. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  06:17 Wow, that's a fantastic team. And I, again, will encourage our listeners, if you've never been to a Aphasia Access  Leadership Summit, it is worth going to and everybody is welcomed. We've had several podcast guests who have said that it has been a game changer for them-- their first attendance at the Leadership Summit. So, we'll be hearing more about that.  Well, I want to start our interview today by laying some foundation for your work with texting and developing some outcome measures for treatment that captures transactional exchange in individuals with aphasia. And let me just ask what piqued your interest in this area? Jaime Lee  06:57 Yeah, thanks. Well, before I got interested specifically, in texting, I had this amazing opportunity to work as a research SLP with Leora Cherney and her Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment. And we all know Leora well for the contributions she's made to our field. At that time, she had developed ORLA, oral reading for language and aphasia, and a computerized version, and also a computerized version of aphasia scripts for script training. And these were treatments that not only improve language abilities in people with aphasia, but I really had this front row seat to seeing how her interventions really made a difference in the lives of people with aphasia, and help them reengage in the activities that they wanted to pursue-- reading for pleasure and being able to converse about topics that they want to do with their script training. So at the same time, I was gaining these really valuable research skills and understanding more about how to evaluate treatment. I was also able to start learning how to facilitate aphasia groups because Leora has this amazing aphasia community that she developed at what was then RIC. I'm just really grateful for the opportunity I had to have Leora as a mentor, and now as a collaborator. And her work really helped orient me to research questions that address the needs of people with aphasia, and to this importance of building aphasia community. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  08:37 Wow, that sounds like a really amazing opportunity. And I think it's wonderful that you've got to have Leora as a mentor and to develop those interests. Then look at where you're taking it now. So that's really exciting to talk about with you today. Jaime Lee  08:54 As for the texting interest that really started after I earned my PhD and was back at the Rehab Institute, now Shirley Ryan Ability Lab, Leora was awarded a NIDILRR field initiated grant and I served as a co-investigator on this grant. It was a randomized, controlled trial, evaluating ORLA, combined with sentence level writing.  The two arms of the trial were looking at ORLA plus writing using a handwriting modality, versus ORLA combined with electronic writing or we kind of thought about this as texting. So we call that arm T-write. And ORLA was originally designed to improve reading comprehension, but we know from some of Leora's work that there were also these nice cross-modal language improvements, including improvements in written expression. This was a study where we really were comparing two different arms, two different writing modalities, with some secondary interest in seeing if the participants who were randomized to practice electronic writing, would those improvements potentially carry over into actual texting, and perhaps even changes in social connectedness? Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  10:15 Those are great questions to look at. Interest in exploring texting's role in communication has just been growing and growing since you initiated this very early study. Jamie, would you like to explain how you actually gathered data on participants texting behaviors? How did that work? Jaime Lee  10:32 Yes. So we were very fortunate that the participants in this trial, in the T-write study, consented to have us extract and take a look at their real texting data from their mobile phones prior to starting the treatment. So, for those who consented, and everyone, I think we had 60 participants in the trial, and every single participant was open to letting us look at their texts and record them.    We recorded a week's worth of text messages between the participant and their contacts at baseline, and then again at a follow up point after the treatment that they were assigned to. And that was so that maybe we could look for some potential changes related to participating in the treatment. So maybe we would see if they were texting more, or if they had more contacts, or maybe they might even be using some of the same sentences that were trained in the ORLA treatment. We haven't quite looked at that, the trial just finished so we haven't looked at those pre/ post data. But when my colleagues at Shirley Ryan and I started collecting these texting data, we realized there were some really interesting things to be learned from these texts.  And there have been a couple of studies, we know Pagie Beeson's work, she did a T-CART study on texting, right? And later with her colleague, Mira Fein. So we had some texting studies, but nothing that really reported on how people with aphasia were texting in their everyday lives.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:08 Well, Jamie, do you want to share what you learned about how individuals with aphasia texts are different from individuals without aphasia? Jaime Lee  12:15 We saw that first, people with aphasia do text, there were messages to be recorded. I think only a couple of participants in the trial didn't have any text messages. But we took a look at the first 20 people to enroll in the trial. We actually have a paper out-- my collaborator, Laura Kinsey is the first author. This is a descriptive paper where we describe the sample, 20 people, both fluent aphasia and nonfluent aphasia, a range of ages from mid 30s up to 72. And one striking finding, but maybe not too surprising for listeners, is that the participants with aphasia in our sample texted much less frequently than neurologically healthy adults, where we compared our findings to Pew Research data on texting. And our sample, if we took an average of our 20 participants and look at their texts sent and received over a week, over the seven days, they exchanged an average of about 40 texts over the week. Adults without aphasia, send and receive 41.5 texts a day. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  13:36 Wow, that's quite a difference. Right?  Jaime Lee  13:39 Yes, even knowing that younger people tend to text more frequently than older adults. Even if we look at our youngest participants in that sample who were in their mid 30s, they were sending and receiving text much less frequently than the age matched Pew data. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  13:56 Okay, now, I want to let our listeners know that we're going to have the citation for the Kinsey et al. article that you just mentioned in our show notes. How can we situate addressing texting as a clinical goal within the life participation approach to aphasia?  Jaime Lee  14:14 I love this question. And it was kind of surprising from the descriptive paper, that texting activity, so how many texts participants were sending and receiving, was not correlated with overall severity of aphasia or severity of writing impairment?  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis I'm surprised by that. Were you?    Jaime Lee Yes, we thought that there would be a relationship. But in other words, having severe aphasia was not associated with texting less. And we recognize, it's dangerous to draw too many conclusions from a such a small sample. But a major takeaway, at least an aha moment for us, was that we can't make assumptions about texting behaviors based on participants' language impairments, also based on their age, their gender. You know, in fact, our oldest participant in the sample, who was 72, was actually most active texter. He sent and received 170 texts over the week period. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  15:22 Wow, that does blow assumptions out of the water there, Jamie. So that's a really good reminder that this to be individualized with that person at the center? Because you don't know.  Jaime Lee  15:32 You don't know. Yeah. And I think it comes down to getting to know our clients and our patients, finding out if texting is important to them. And if it's something they'd like to be doing more of, or doing more effectively, and going from there.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Wow, that makes a lot of sense.    Jaime Lee   Yeah, of course, some people didn't text, before their stroke and don't want to text. But given how popular texting has become as a form of communication, I think there are many, many people with aphasia, who would be interested in pursuing texting as a rehab goal.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  16:08 Right? You really have to ask, right?    Jaime Lee  16:11 Yes, actually, there's a story that comes to mind about a participant who was in the T-write study, who had stopped using her phone after her stroke. Her family had turned off service; she wasn't going to be making calls or texting.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Well, I've seen that happen too many times.  Jaime Lee   And when she enrolled in the study, and she was a participant at Shirley Ryan, because we ran participants here at JMU and they ran participants in Chicago. And she was so excited. I heard from my colleagues that she went out and got a new phone so that she could use her phone to participate in the study. And then her follow up data. When we look at her real texts gathered after the study at the last assessment point, her text consists of her reaching out to all of her contacts with this new number, and saying hello, and getting in touch and in some cases, even explaining that she'd had a stroke and has aphasia.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  17:13 Oh, well, that really reminds me of the value and importance of patient reported outcomes, because that may not be captured by a standardized test, per se, but man, is that impactful. Great story. Thank you for sharing that. So well, you've done a really nice job in your 2021 paper with Cherney that's cited in our show notes of addressing texting's  role in popular culture and the role it's taking in terms of a communication mode. Would you explain some of the ways that conversation and texting are similar and ways that they're different? Jaime Lee  17:45 That is a great question, Ellen and a question I have spent a lot of time reading about and thinking about. And there is a great review of research that used conversation analysis (CA) to study online interactions. This is a review paper by Joanne Meredith from 2019. And what the review tells us is that there are many of the same organizing features of face to face conversation that are also present in our online communications. So we see things like turn taking, and we see conversation and texting or apps unfold in a sequence. So what CA refers to as sequential organization.  We also see, just like in face to face conversation, there are some communication breakdowns or trouble sources in online communication. And sometimes we see the need for repair to resolve that breakdown. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  18:45 Yeah, Absolutely. I'm just thinking about auto corrects there for a moment. Jaime Lee  18:51 And they can cause problems too. When the predictive text or the AutoCorrect is not what we meant to say that can cause a problem.Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  18:59 Absolutely. Those are good similarities, I get that.   Jaime Lee  19:03 I think another big similarity is just about how conversation is co-constructed. It takes place between a person and a conversation partner and in texting, we have that too. We have a texting partner, or in the case of a group text, we have multiple partners. There's definitely similarities. And another big one is that purpose, I think we use conversation ultimately, and just like we're using texting to build connection, and that's really important Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  19:32 Yeah, I can really see all of those parallels. And there are some differences, I'm going to assume. Jaime Lee  19:39 Okay, yes, there are some definite interesting differences in terms of the social aspects of conversation. We do a lot in person, like demonstrating agreement, or giving a compliment, or an apology, or all of these nonverbal things we do like gesture and facial expression and laughter. Those nonverbal things help convey our stance, or affiliation, or connection. But in texting, we can't see each other. Right? So we have some different tools to show our stance, to show affiliation. What we're seeing is people using emojis and Bitmojis, and GIFs, even punctuation, and things like all capitals. We've all seen the all caps and felt like someone is yelling at us over text, that definitely conveys a specific tone, right? Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  20:34 I was just going to say emojis can be a real tool for people with aphasia, right? If the spelling is a barrier, at least they can convey something through an image. That's a real difference.   Jaime Lee  20:45 Absolutely, I think some of the problematic things that can happen and the differences with texting have to do with sequencing and timing. Because people can send multiple texts, they can take multiple turns at once. And so you can respond to multiple texts at once, or that can lead to some confusion, I think we're seeing, but texting can also be asynchronous, so it's not necessarily expected that you would have to respond right away Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  21:16 So maybe giving a person a little more time to collect their thoughts before they feel like they have to respond versus in a person-to-person exchange where the pressure is on?    Jaime Lee   Absolutely, absolutely.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Well, why might texting be a beneficial communication mode for individuals with aphasia, Jamie, because you have spelling challenges and all those other things.   Jaime Lee  21:37 Yeah, I think it comes back to what you just said, Ellen, about having more time to read a message, having more time to be able to generate a response. I know that texting and other forms of electronic communication like email, can give users with memory or language problems a way to track and reread their messages. And in some cases, people might choose to bank responses that they can use later. We know this from actually some of Bonnie Todis and McKay Sohlberg's work looking at making email more accessible for users with cognitive impairment. So I think there are some really great tools available to people with aphasia to feel successful using texting. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  22:30 That's great. I think banking messages is a really important strategy that we've used before, too.  Jaime Lee  22:37 So there's all these other built-in features, that I'm still learning about that are in some mobile phones, that individuals with aphasia can potentially take advantage of. I think some features might be difficult, but there are things like we've just talked about, like the predictive text or the autocorrect. And then again, all these nonlexical tools, like the emojis and the GIFS and being able to link to a website or attach a photograph. I think this is a real advantage to communicating through text. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:10 It lets you tell more of the story, sometimes. One of my members talks about when his spelling becomes a barrier, he just says the word and then that speech-to-text is really helpful. It's just one more support, I guess.   Jaime Lee  23:24 Yes. And we're needing to find out a little bit more about the features that people are already using, and maybe features that people don't know about, but that they would like to use like that speech-to-text. That's a great point.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:37 Well, how did you end up wanting to study texting for more than an amount of use or accuracy? In other words, what led you to studying transaction? Maybe we can start with a definition of transaction for our listeners?  Jaime Lee  23:51 Sure. Transaction in the context of communication is the exchange of information. So it involves understanding and expression of meaningful messages and content. And this is a definition that actually comes from Brown and Yule's concepts of transaction and interaction and communication. So Brown, and Yule tell us that transaction again, is this exchange of content, whereas interaction pertains to the more social aspects of communication. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  24:26 Okay, thank you. I think that's really good place to start. Jaime Lee  24:29 Part of the interest in transaction, first came out of that descriptive paper where we were trying to come up with systems to capture what was going on. So we were counting words that the participants texted and coding whether they were initiated or are they texts that are simple responses. We counted things they were doing, like did they use emojis or other multimedia? But we were missing this idea of how meaningful their text were and kind of what was happening in their texting exchanges. So this kind of combined with another measure we had, it was another measure in T-write really inspired by Pagie Beeson and Mira Fein's paper where they were using some texting scripts in their study.  We also love scripting. We wanted to just have a simple measure, a simple brief texting script that we could go back and look at. We had as part of our protocol a three turn script. And I remember we sat around and said, what would be a really common thing to text about? And we decided to make a script about making dinner plans. And so we're collecting these simple scripts. And as I'm looking at these data coming in, I'm asking myself, what's happening here? How are we going to analyze what's happening? What was important didn't seem to be spelling or grammar. What seemed most important in this texting script was how meaningful the response was. And ultimately, would the person be able to make dinner plans and go plan a dinner date with a friend. So it seemed like we needed a measure of successful transaction within texting. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  26:23 Jamie, I'm just going say that that reminded me of one of my very favorite papers, whereas you started out counting a lot of things that we can count, and it did give you information, like how much less people with aphasia are texting compared to people without aphasia, and I think that data is really essential. But there's a paper by Aura Kagan and colleagues about counting what counts, right, not just what we can count. And we'll put that citation and all the citations in the show notes-- you're  bringing up some wonderful literature. So I think you decided to make sure that you're counting what counts, right? In addition to what we can count.    Jaime Lee  26:59 Yes. And I do love counting. I was trained at the University of Oregon in single case experimental design. So really, behavioral observation and counting. So I am a person who likes to count but that sounds, like counting what counts. I love that. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  27:13 Yeah, absolutely. In that 2021 paper, you look at the way some researchers have approached conversational analysis measures and you acknowledge Ramsberger and Rende's 2002 work that uses sitcom retells in the partner context. And you look at the scale that Leaman and Edmonds developed to measure conversation. And again, I can refer listeners to Marion Leaman's podcast as a 2021 Tavistock distinguished scholar that discusses her work on capturing conversation treatment outcomes, but you particularly referred to Aura Kagan and colleagues' Measurement of Participation in Conversation, the MPC. We'll put the citation in the show notes with all the others, but could you describe how it influenced your work?   Jaime Lee  27:58 Yeah, sure. That's funny that you just brought up a paper by Aura Kagan, because I think I'll just first say how much Aura's work on Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia, SCA, how influential it's been throughout my career. First as a clinician and actually interacting with people with aphasia, and then later in facilitating conversation groups and helping to train other staff on the rehab team, the nursing staff. And now, it's actually a part of my coursework that I have students take the Aphasia Institute's free eLearning module, the introduction to SCA, as part of my graduate course, and aphasia, and all of the new students coming into my lab, do that module. So they're exposed really early on to SCA. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  28:50 I'm just gonna say me too. We also use that as a training tool at the Aphasia Treatment Program, It's really been a cornerstone of how we help students start to learn how to be a skilled communication partner. So I'm glad you brought that up. Jaime Lee  29:03 Absolutely. So yes, Kagan's Measurement of Participation in Conversation (MPC), was really influential in developing our texting transactional success rating scale. And this is a measure that they created to evaluate participation and conversation. And they were looking actually both at transaction and interaction, I needed to start simply and just look at transaction first. They considered various factors. They have a person with aphasia and a partner engage in a five minute conversation. And they looked at factors like how accurately the person with aphasia was responding, whether or not they could indicate yes/no reliably, and could they repair misunderstandings or miscommunications. And then the raters made judgments on how transactional was that conversation? So, we looked at that measure and modeled our anchors for texting transactional success after their anchors. We had a different Likert scale, but we basically took this range from no successful transaction, partial transaction, to fully successful. And that was really modeled after their MPC.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  30:17 Wow. Thank you for describing all of that. Jaime Lee  30:20 Yeah. Another big takeaway I'll add is that, and this really resonated with what we were hoping to capture, the scores on the MPC weren't necessarily related to traditional levels of severity. So Kagan and colleagues write that someone even with very severe aphasia, could score at the top of the range on the MPC. And I think similarly, what we feel about texting is even someone with severe writing impairments could be very successful, communicating via text message, really, depending on the tools they used, and perhaps, depending on the support they received from their texting partner.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  31:02 You and your colleagues develop this Texting Transaction Success tool, the TTS, right? What is the goal of this measure?    Jaime Lee  31:13 The goal of the TTS is to measure communicative success via texting. We wanted this functional measure of texting, not limited to accuracy, not looking specifically at spelling, or syntax, or morphology, but something that reflected the person with aphasia-- his ability to exchange meaningful information. I think the measure is really grounded in the idea that people with aphasia are competent and able to understand and convey meaningful information even despite any errors or incorrect output. So this is really relevant to texting because lots of us are using texting without correct spelling or without any punctuation or grammar. Yet lots and lots of people are texting and conveying information and feeling that benefit of connecting and exchanging information. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  32:08 It sounds like a really helpful tool that you're developing. Could you please explain how it's used and how it's scored? Jaime Lee  32:16 Sure. So the TTS is a three-point rating scale that ranges from zero, which would be no successful transaction, no meaningful information exchanged, one, which is partial transaction, to two, which is successful transaction. And we apply the rating scale to responses from an individual with aphasia on the short texting script that I was talking about earlier. So this is a three-turn script that is delivered to a person with aphasia where the first line there, we ask them to use their mobile phone or give them a device, and the prompt is: “What are you doing this weekend?” We tell the person to respond any way they want, without any further cues. And then the script goes on, we deliver another prompt, “What about dinner?” And then another prompt, “Great, when should we go?” Each of those responses, we score on the TTS rating scale. We give either a zero, a one or a two. We have lots of examples in the paper of scores that should elicit a zero, a one or a two.We feel like it should be pretty easy for readers to use.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  33:33 Wow, that's going to be really important. I always appreciate when I can see examples of how to do things. Jaime Lee  33:40 We did some really initial interrater reliability on it. The tools are pretty easy to score. We're able to recognize when something is fully transactional, even if it has a spelling error or lexical error, we can understand what they're saying. And a zero is pretty easy to score, if there are graphemes letters that don't convey any meaning, there's no transaction. Where things are a little more interesting, are the partial transaction. I think about an example to “What about dinner” and the participant responded, “Subway, Mexico.” So that's a one because the conversation, the texting partner, would really need to come back and clarify like, “Do you want to get a Subway sandwich?”  Or “Do you want to go eat Mexican?” It could still be really transactional, and they could resolve that breakdown, but the partner would have a little bit more of a role in clarifying the information. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  34:36 When you were actually trying to validate the TTS and establish its interrater reliability in your 2021 article with Cherney you mentioned using the Technology Confidence Survey from the 2021 Kinsey et al. article. Having tools that allow us to understand our clients' technology user profile is really informative in terms of understanding what modes of communication might be important to them. We talked earlier about not assuming, right, not assuming what people want to do or have done. Can you describe the survey? And is it available? Jaime Lee  35:13 Sure, yes. This is a survey we developed for the T-write study, the ORLA Plus Electronic Writing study. It's a simple aphasia friendly survey with yes/no questions and pictures that you can ask participants or clients about their technology usage. from “Are you using a computer? Yes or No” or  “Are using a tablet?”, “Are you using a smartphone?”  We ask what kinds of technology they're using and then what are they using it for? Are they doing email? Are they texting? Are they looking up information? Are they taking photos?  It also has some prompts to ask specifically about some of the technology features like “You're texting? Are you using voice to text?” or “Are you using text to speech to help you with reading comprehension of your text?”  At the very end, we added some confidence questions. We modeled this after Leora Cherney and Ed Babbitt's Communication Confidence Rating scale. So we added some questions like, “I am confident in my ability to use my smartphone” or “I am confident in my ability to text” and participants can read that on a rating scale. We use this in the context of the research study to have some background information on our participants. I think it could be a really great tool for starting a conversation about technology usage and goals, with people who are interested in using more technology, or are using it in different ways. This (survey) is in the Kinsey et al. article. It's a supplement that you can download. It's just a really good conversation starter, that when I was giving the technology survey to participants, many times they would take out their phone or take out their iPad and say, “No, I do it. I use it just like this”. It was really hands on and we got to learn about how they're using technology. And I definitely learned some new things that are available. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  37:20 I think many of us use kind of informal technology surveys.  I'm really excited to see the very thoughtful process you went through to develop and frame that (technology use). That's wonderful to share. Jamie, can you speak to the role of the TTS in terms of developing and implementing intervention approaches for texting? You just mentioned goals a moment ago? Jaime Lee  37:42 Sure. I think we have some more work to do in terms of validating the TTS and that's a goal moving forward. But it's a great starting place. If you have a client who wants to work on texting, it only takes a few minutes to give the script and then score their responses and gives us a snapshot of how effectively they're able to communicate through text. But in terms of developing intervention, to support texting, that's really where we're headed with this. I mean, the big drive is to not just study how people are texting, but really to help support them and texting more effectively and using texting to connect socially and improve their quality of life. But with any kind of intervention, we need a really good outcome measure to capture potential changes. Another reason I'm motivated to continue to work on the TTS, if people with aphasia are going to benefit from a treatment, we need rigorous tools to capture that change and document that potential change. 38:50 Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Absolutely. Absolutely. Jaime Lee  38:53 At the same time, I'd say the TTS isn't the only method we are focused on, we're really interested in understanding what unfolds during texting interactions. What's happening in these interactions. So, most recently, I've been working with my amazing collaborator, Jamie Azios, who is an expert in Conversation Analysis. I've been working with Jamie to say, “Hey, what's happening here? Can we use CA to explore what's going on?”  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  39:25 Well, Jamie, you probably heard this before, but Conversation Analysis can sometimes feel daunting for clinicians to use within their daily treatment settings. In fact, we've had several podcasts that have addressed this and have asked this question. What are you finding? Jaime Lee  39:40 I can definitely relate because I am still very new to CA and learning all the terminology. But Jamie and Laura and I are actually working on paper right now, a CAC special issue, because we presented some data at the Clinical Aphasiology Conference and then will have this paper. We'll be submitting to a JSHL on how we're applying CA to texting interactions. That goal is really based around understanding how people with aphasia and their partners are communicating via texting and looking at these naturalistic conversations to see what barriers they're coming across, and what strategies they are using to communicate in this modality. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  40:27 That makes a lot of sense. And it really circles back again to communication partner training. That does not surprise me. Jaime Lee  40:33 We're seeing some really interesting, creative, and strategic behaviors used both by people with aphasia and their partners. We're seeing people link to a website, or instead of writing out the name of a restaurant, you know, “meet me here” with a link, or using an emoji to help convey their stance when they can't meet up with a friend. They might have more of an agrammatic production. But that emoji helps show the emotion and we're seeing a lot of people with more severe aphasia using photographs really strategically. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  41:09 So those are the strategies are helping and I'm sure that CA also looks at some of the barriers or breakdowns, right?  Jaime Lee  41:15 Yes, we're seeing some breakdowns, trouble sources in the CA lingo. In some instances, we see the partner clarify, send a question mark, like, “I don't know what you're saying”. And that allows the person with aphasia, a chance to self-repair, like, “Oops, here, this is what I meant.” And that's really useful. We also have seen some examples of breakdowns that may not get repaired. And we don't know exactly what was happening. In those instances, I suspect there were some cases where maybe the partner picked up the phone and called the person with aphasia, or they had a conversation to work out the breakdown. But we really don't know because we're using these data that were previously collected. So a lot of this does seem to be pointing towards training the partners to provide supports, and also helping people with aphasia be more aware of some of the nonlinguistic tools, and some of the shortcuts that are available, but there's still a lot to learn. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  42:22 Well, Jamie, as you continue to explore this work, I know you're involved in a special project that you do with your senior undergrads at your university program at James Madison. Do you want to describe the student text buddy program? It sounds really engaging. Jaime Lee  42:38 Sure. This is a program I started here at JMU. JMU has a really big focus on engaging undergrads and research experiences. And we have students who are always asking for opportunities to engage with people with aphasia. Particularly during COVID, there weren't these opportunities. It just wasn't safe. But I know some of the participants from the T-write study and some people with aphasia in our community here in Harrisonburg, were looking for ways to be involved and continue to maybe practice their texting in a non-threatening situation. So this was a project and I was actually inspired by one of the students in my lab, Lindsay LeTellier. She's getting her master's degree now at the University of New Hampshire. But Lindsay had listened to an interview with one of our participants where she said she wanted a pen pal. And Lindsay said, “Oh, this participant says she wants a pen pal, I'd love to volunteer, I'll be her pen pal.” And I said, “Lindsay, that's great. I love the idea of a pen, pal. But if we're going to do it, let's make it a research project. And let's open it up and go bigger with this.” So Lindsey helped spearhead this program where we paired students with people with aphasia to have a texting pen pal relationship for four weeks. And in order to be able to kind of watch their texts unfold, we gave them a Google Voice number, so that we can watch the texts.  We've really seen some really interesting things. We've only run about 10 pairs, but all of the feedback has been really positive from the people with aphasia, they felt like it was a good experience. And the students said it was a tremendous learning experience.  We're seeing some interesting things. Using CA, Jamie and I presented this at IARC, sharing what the students/person with aphasia pairs are doing that's resulting in some really natural topic developments and really natural relationship development. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  44:39 Nice! What a great experience, and we'll look forward to hearing more about that. Jamie, I can't believe how this episode has flown by. But I'm going to ask you a last question. What are you excited about in terms of your next steps for studying texting? Jaime Lee  44:57 I think we definitely want to continue the Text Buddy project because it's such a great learning experience for students, so we'll be continuing to do that. Jamie and I have applied for funding to continue to study texting interactions and use mixed methods, which is a pairing of both of our areas of expertise. I think there's just more to learn, and we're excited to eventually be able to identify some texting supports to help people with aphasia use texting to connect and be more effective in their communication.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  45:35 Well, Jamie, this work is going to be really impactful on the daily lives and the daily ability for people with aphasia to have another mode of support for communicating. So thank you for this exciting work. And congratulations again on your Tavistock award, and I just am grateful that you are our guest for this podcast today. Thank you. Jaime Lee  45:58 Thank you so much, Ellen. This has been great, thanks. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  46:01 It's been it's been a pleasure and an honor.  So for our listeners, for more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing body of materials, go to www.aphasiaaccess.org. And if you have an idea for a future podcast series topic, just email us at info@aphasia access.org. And thanks again for your ongoing support of aphasia access. References and Resources  Babbitt, E. M., Heinemann, A. W., Semik, P., & Cherney, L. R. (2011). Psychometric properties of the communication confidence rating scale for aphasia (CCRSA): Phase 2. Aphasiology, 25(6-7), 727-735. Babbitt, E. M., & Cherney, L. R. (2010). Communication confidence in persons with aphasia. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 17(3), 214-223. Bernstein-Ellis, E. (Host). (2021, July 29). Promoting Conversation and Positive Communication Culture: In conversation with Marion Leaman (No. 73) [Audio podcast episode] In Aphasia Access Aphasia Conversations. Resonate. https://aphasiaaccess.libsyn.com/episode-73-conversation-and-promoting-positive-communication-culture-in-conversation-with-marion-leaman Brown, G., & Yule, G. (1983). Discourse analysis. Cambridge. University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511805226 Fein, M., Bayley, C., Rising, K., & Beeson, P. M. (2020). A structured approach to train text messaging in an individual with aphasia. Aphasiology, 34(1), 102-118. Kagan, A., Simmons‐Mackie, N., Rowland, A., Huijbregts, M., Shumway, E., McEwen, S., ... & Sharp, S. (2008). Counting what counts: A framework for capturing real‐life outcomes of aphasia intervention. Aphasiology, 22(3), 258-280. Kagan, A., Winckel, J., Black, S., Felson Duchan, J., Simmons-Mackie, N., & Square, P. (2004). A set of observational measures for rating support and participation in conversation between adults with aphasia and their conversation partners. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 11(1), 67-83. Kinsey, L. E., Lee, J. B., Larkin, E. M., & Cherney, L. R. (2022). Texting behaviors of individuals with chronic aphasia: A descriptive study. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 31(1), 99-112. Leaman, M. C., & Edmonds, L. A. (2021). Assessing language in unstructured conversation in people with aphasia: Methods, psychometric integrity, normative data, and comparison to a structured narrative task. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 64(11), 4344-4365. Lee, J. B., & Cherney, L. R. (2022). Transactional Success in the Texting of Individuals With Aphasia. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 1-18. Meredith, J. (2019). Conversation analysis and online interaction. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 52(3), 241-256. Ramsberger, G., & Rende, B. (2002). Measuring transactional success in the conversation of people with aphasia. Aphasiology, 16(3), 337–353. https://doi.org/10.1080/02687040143000636 Todis, B., Sohlberg, M. M., Hood, D., & Fickas, S. (2005). Making electronic mail accessible: Perspectives of people with acquired cognitive impairments, caregivers and professionals. Brain Injury, 19(6), 389-401. Link to Jaime Lee's University Profile: https://csd.jmu.edu/people/lee.html  mu.edu/people/lee.html 

Build With Rob
Measurement Builds Motivation

Build With Rob

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 24:49 Very Popular


Measurement is a crucial tool on your way to success in any aspect of your life or business. But it's equally important to measure what is important, not simply what is easiest to measure. Choosing the right aspects of something to measure and track provides a pathway to improving those aspects. Without proper measurement, it's far more difficult to understand what needs improvement in order to help you reach your goal. Measurement is also a way to see clear progress over time, and progress is the basis for sustained and even increased motivation. You will be far more motivated to keep pushing toward a goal as you watch yourself move ever closer to achieving it than you will if you lack the clarity of how your actions directly impact your pursuit of said goal. Learn more about this episode. Subscribe to Dyrdek Machine Join our Machinist Community Want to be on the show? Sign up here!

Mind Dive
Episode 14: The Measurement of Wisdom with Dr. Dilip Jeste

Mind Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 42:27


The concept of wisdom may be younger than you think, dating only back to the 1970s. Join hosts Dr. Bob Boland and Dr. Kerry Horrell on this episode of Mind Dive podcast as they speak with Dr. Dilip Jeste. Dive into this conversation with one of the most prolific researchers on the topic as the great questions of wisdom are explored, including “Can you measure it?” and “Do we become wiser with age?” Dr. Jeste previously served as the Senior Associate Dean for Healthy Aging and Senior Care, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Estelle and Edgar Levi Memorial Chair in Aging, Director of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, and Co-Director of the UC San Diego Center on Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living. He is a geriatric neuropsychiatrist specializing in successful psychosocial aging and the neurobiology of wisdom. “We teach the facets of reading, writing and arithmetic, but not how someone can fully understand another's emotions through empathy, compassion, self-compassion, self-reflection and emotional regulation,” said Dr. Jeste. “These factors make us happy and contented—the most important thing in our lives. If we make it a habit to work on this, I do believe in society's capacity to change for the better.” Follow The Menninger Clinic on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn to never miss an episode of Mind Dive.Visit www.menningerclinic.org to learn more about The Menninger Clinic's research and leadership roles in mental health.Listen to Episode 13: The Psychiatry of Youth Gang Violence with Dr. Christopher Thomas Resources mentioned in this episode: “Wiser: The Scientific Roots of Wisdom, Compassion, and What Makes Us Good”

CHEST Journal Podcasts
Impact of Esophageal Pressure Measurement on Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosis in Obese Patients

CHEST Journal Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 28:58


Moderator Viren Kaul, MD, FCCP, and journal CHEST® authors Ghaleb Khirfan, MD, and Adriano R. Tonelli, MD, MSc, discuss the article, "Impact of Esophageal Pressure Measurement on Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosis in Obese Patients" which was published in the September issue. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2022.04.002

No Longer Novice! Now What? A Fitness Podcast.
082: Why Your Body Fat Measurement Doesn't Matter

No Longer Novice! Now What? A Fitness Podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 39:40


On this week's episode, Gaspare, Mike and Pat talk about a newly released article diving in deep about body fat measurements. Gaspare helps break down all the terms and explains the ways one could determine one's body fat measurements. Ultimately, the guys talk about how much it actually matters to have this information or if you should base your progress on this information. Body Fat Measurement Article Instagram The Show - @NoLongerNovice Pat - @Patrickfitzpatrickpfp Mike - @thestokedbrogi Gaspare - @gaspare_ferrantelli The Gym - @stokedathletics

Next in Marketing
"Let's all push ourselves here" - OpenAP is only trying to bring together media companies, agencies, brands, measurement and data providers to advance data-driven TV advertising in a way that satisfies all parties - including consumers.

Next in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 38:24


Next in Marketing spoke with Ed Davis President, Product & Operations at OpenAP about how the media venture - jointly owned by NBCUniversal, Paramount, Warner Discovery and others - has rolled out a series of news products, including a centralized data hub, an identity framework and a measurement tool - all aimed at helping marketers better target consumers, while reducing waste in their media spending (so people stop seeing the same ads again and again). Guest: Ed DavisHost: Mike Shields

The Michael Berry Show
Michael Berry Loves The Museum Of Measurement And Time

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 18:30


The Czar loves this kind of thing. He was so excited to talk to the founder of The Museum of Measurement and Time.

The OOH Insider Show
Episode 107 - Transparency and Automation in OOH w/ Mehul Mandalia

The OOH Insider Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 32:52


Mehul Mandalia, Co-founder of Moving Walls, discusses measurement, currency, and standardization within the Asian OOH market.Moving Walls is an international media technology group specializing in OOH planning, buying, and measurement technology. Their goal is to bring transparency and automation to out-of-home.Takeaways Measurement is key to scaling out-of-home markets and demonstrating to advertisers why it is worth investing in. Educate brands and agencies on the different measurement systems in ooh.The accuracy of ooh data is often questioned. How sure are you that these were the potential audiences that were exposed to? However, brands invest in this media without knowing data, so any measurement is better than no measurement at all. Associations in the Asian market are looking to build a single currency. Partnering with solution partners, they can create a guide for the industry to follow and be successful in this market.“You are only going to give confidence to clients once they have an idea that whatever they are investing in is actually being delivered on the screens.” ~Mehul MandaliaMehul Mandalia predicts that the focus over the next decade is going to be standardization across new markets, formats, how bookings are made, and how industry is discovered.Pay attention to the Indonesian markets. Despite the amount of digital inventory compared to classic inventory being a lot less than other markets, out-of-home is huge here. The country is challenging because it is fragmented into many islands. Even so, there is a huge opportunity for out-of-home to scale.LinksLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mehul-mandalia/Email: mehul@movingwalls.comMoving Walls: https://www.movingwalls.com/moving-walls-plan-buy-and-measure-outcome-based-outdoor-advertisingPowered by OneScreen.aiOneScreen.ai is the first free, public-access directory for all things Out of Home.Support the show

Best Buy Health Connected Care
Aphasia: Singing to Speak

Best Buy Health Connected Care

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 4:14


We offer a monthly newsletter with new perspectives and useful information on common problems to make your caring practice stronger. Subscribe now to make sure you've got fresh tools for your clients. LINKSources used in this podcast include:National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. (2015). NIDCD fact sheet: Aphasia [PDF] [NIH Pub. No. 97-4257]. Retrieved from https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/sites/default/files/Documents/health/voice/Aphasia6-1-16.pdfNational Aphasia Association. (2022, March 29). Wernicke's (receptive) aphasia. National Aphasia Association. Retrieved June 21, 2022, from https://www.aphasia.org/aphasia-resources/wernickes-aphasia/National Aphasia Association. (2022, March 29). Broca's (expressive) aphasia. National Aphasia Association. Retrieved June 21, 2022, from https://www.aphasia.org/aphasia-resources/brocas-aphasia/#:~:text=This%20type%20of%20aphasia%20is,is%20often%20a%20laborious%20process.Norton, A., Zipse, L., Marchina, S., & Schlaug, G. (2009). Melodic intonation therapy: shared insights on how it is done and why it might help. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1169, 431–436. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.04859.xvan der Meulen I, van de Sandt-Koenderman WM, Heijenbrok-Kal MH, Visch-Brink EG, Ribbers GM. The Efficacy and Timing of Melodic Intonation Therapy in Subacute Aphasia. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2014 Jul;28(6):536-44. doi: 10.1177/1545968313517753. Epub 2014 Jan 20. PMID: 24449708.Breitenstein C, Grewe T, Flöel A, Ziegler W, Springer L, Martus P, Huber W, Willmes K, Ringelstein EB, Haeusler KG, Abel S, Glindemann R, Domahs F, Regenbrecht F, Schlenck KJ, Thomas M, Obrig H, de Langen E, Rocker R, Wigbers F, Rühmkorf C, Hempen I, List J, Baumgaertner A; FCET2EC study group. Intensive speech and language therapy in patients with chronic aphasia after stroke: a randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint, controlled trial in a health-care setting. Lancet. 2017 Apr 15;389(10078):1528-1538. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30067-3. Epub 2017 Mar 1. Erratum in: Lancet. 2017 Apr 15;389(10078):1518. PMID: 28256356.Van Der Meulen I, Van De Sandt-Koenderman MW, Heijenbrok MH, Visch-Brink E, Ribbers GM. Melodic Intonation Therapy in Chronic Aphasia: Evidence from a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial. Front Hum Neurosci. 2016 Nov 1;10:533. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00533. PMID: 27847473; PMCID: PMC5088197.Haro-Martínez AM, Lubrini G, Madero-Jarabo R, Díez-Tejedor E, Fuentes B. Melodic intonation therapy in post-stroke nonfluent aphasia: a randomized pilot trial. Clin Rehabil. 2019 Jan;33(1):44-53. doi: 10.1177/0269215518791004. Epub 2018 Jul 30. PMID: 30056747.Liu Q, Li W, Yin Y, Zhao Z, Yang Y, Zhao Y, Tan Y, Yu J. The effect of music therapy on language recovery in patients with aphasia after stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Neurol Sci. 2022 Feb;43(2):863-872. doi: 10.1007/s10072-021-05743-9. Epub 2021 Nov 24. PMID: 34816318.Hilari K, Northcott S, Roy P, Marshall J, Wiggins RD, Chataway J, Ames D. Psychological distress after stroke and aphasia: the first six months. Clin Rehabil. 2010 Feb;24(2):181-90. doi: 10.1177/0269215509346090. PMID: 20103578.Fogg-Rogers L, Buetow S, Talmage A, McCann CM, Leão SH, Tippett L, Leung J, McPherson KM, Purdy SC. Choral singing therapy following stroke or Parkinson's disease: an exploration of participants' experiences. Disabil Rehabil. 2016;38(10):952-62. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2015.1068875. Epub 2015 Jul 22. PMID: 26200449.Tamplin J, Baker FA, Jones B, Way A, Lee S. 'Stroke a Chord': the effect of singing in a community choir on mood and social engagement for people living with aphasia following a stroke. NeuroRehabilitation. 2013;32(4):929-41. doi: 10.3233/NRE-130916. PMID: 23867418.Tarrant, M., Lamont, R. A., Carter, M., Dean, S. G., Spicer, S., Sanders, A., & Calitri, R. (2021). Measurement of Shared Social Identity in Singing Groups for People With Aphasia. Frontiers in psychology, 12, 669899. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.669899Tarrant, M., Carter, M., Dean, S. G., Taylor, R., Warren, F. C., Spencer, A., Adamson, J., Landa, P., Code, C., Backhouse, A., Lamont, R. A., & Calitri, R. (2021). Singing for people with aphasia (SPA): results of a pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial of a group singing intervention investigating acceptability and feasibility. BMJ open, 11(1), e040544. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040544

Conversations with CommerceNext
A Masterclass in Data, Insights and Media Measurement with Estee Lauder's Doug Jensen

Conversations with CommerceNext

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 29:03


Welcome to the Conversations with CommerceNext podcast, I'm your host Michael LeBlanc, and this podcast is brought to you in conjunction with CommerceNext and presented by CommX.Meet Doug Jensen, SVP Go-to-Market (GTM) Analytics & Activation and Learning Center of Excellence (COE) at The Estée Lauder Companies Inc. Having spent his career in media and measurement, Doug takes us through his rigorous approach from full-funnel marketing measurement to social media sentiment analysis to building an analytics team. All this is in the service of the multiple beauty brands within The Estee Lauder Companies, a tremendous shared resource that powers tremendous results.Corporate web site to explore opportunities at https://www.elcompanies.com/enAbout DougGlobal marketing analytics professional with 30 years' experience in the Beauty & CPG / FMCG industries, leading analytics teams, consulting with marketing and sales leaders and scaling insights through enterprise-wide marketing and analytics training. Superior understanding of technical elements in statistical models and skilled interpreter of client needs, flexibly designing appropriate research designs and delivering solutions to exceed client expectations. Specific expertise in regression-based marketing mix modeling analytic to measure marketing ROI, market share measurement, CRM strategies and analytics (including trial to loyalty analytics), enterprise-wide marketing training (content creation and deployment).ABOUT US: Veronika Sonsev is the Co-Founder of CommerceNext. She also leads the retail practice for Chameleon Collective and is a contributor for Forbes on how to grow retail and ecommerce in the age of Amazon. Having spent the last 10+ years working with some of the largest retailers and direct-to-consumer brands, Veronika has intimate knowledge of the challenges facing retail and ecommerce today. She is also an advocate for women in business and founded the global non-profit mBolden, which is now part of SheRunsit. Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus        Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  and       The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois.  You can learn more about Michael       here  or on       LinkedIn. 

Advertising Is Dead
Blending Fitness & Tech with Ketan Mavinkurve

Advertising Is Dead

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 38:57


In this episode of Advertising Is Dead, Varun is joined by Ketan Mavinkurve, CEO & Founder of Alpha Coach, a fitness app. He talks about the fitness industry in general and how he has been trying to blend fitness with Technology and build a product that can help people with their fitness journeys. Varun & Ketan also discuss the similarities and differences between the terms Health & Fitness; and how rewards are an old but impactful way of honoring and encouraging great results.Take a look at Alpha Coach on their website.Connect with Ketan on his Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedInTalk to Varun Duggirala on Twitter and Instagram: @varunduggiFind full videos on the AiD YouTube ChannelThe show is available across platforms:Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | JioSaavn | Gaana | Amazon MusicYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/androidor iOS: https://ivm.today/iosDo follow IVM Podcasts on social media.We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram.

Whitestone Podcast
Love the People, Fix the Dysfunction

Whitestone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 12:37


OK, so you have worked or are current working at a highly dysfunctional workplace. What's your approach to that dysfunction? Are you just merely a survivor or a true thriver, creating an island of great stewardship in the midst of the craziness?  Join Kevin as we look at establishing a Christian brand in your workplace: “love the people, fix the dysfunction.”  // Download this episode's Application & Action questions and PDF transcript at whitestone.org.

Marketing With Empathy® Podcast
79. Ask Your SEO Agency These Content Questions

Marketing With Empathy® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 21:37


Episode 79- Types of content insights to ask your SEO Agency for. Timing recommendations about how frequently to meet and discuss. Measurement questions to ask for. Quick advice to improve your brand storytelling content plans and strategy with your SEO Agency.     VIEW SHOW NOTES: https://blog.kindredspeak.com/ask-SEO-Agency-these-content-questions-ep-79      LEARN ABOUT BRAND STORYTELLING ACADEMY® group training program: https://sarah-panus.mykajabi.com/brand-storytelling-academy     SUBSCRIBE TO BRAND STORYTELLING NEWSLETTER: https://view.flodesk.com/pages/6161f93cc71e8685f183c63e    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

#TWIMshow - This Week in Marketing
[Ep124] - Google Shares Insights On Factors That Determine Which Content Is Indexed

#TWIMshow - This Week in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 15:30


1. Quick Updates - Meta Provides New Insights Into How its Video Distribution Algorithms Work Meta Invites Applications for the Third Phase of its ‘Community Accelerator' Program Instagram Best Practices For Recommended Content Twitter Shares New Insight into the Value of Utilizing Ad Format Combinations in Your Tweet Marketing Google Updates Privacy Threshold For Analytics Search Queries Report Danny Sullivan at Google Tweets That “Helpful Content” Is WIP 2. Twitter ‘Circles' Option Is Available To All Users - Because sometimes your Tweets aren't for everyone add up to 150 people to yours and use it. “Before you post on Twitter, you'll now see an option to share your Tweet with either your circle or your full followers list. Circles can contain up to 150 people, and you can adjust who's in and who's out at any time. Don't worry, no one will be notified of any changes you make to your circle.” Members of Circle will be alerted that their tweets are only viewable by those in the group via a green indicator attached to each Circle tweet.3. Microsoft Ads Re-extends RSA Migration To Feb. 2023 - In April,2022 Microsoft extended the original June 30 deadline to August 29. Now Microsoft has announced that they are extending that deadline to February 1, 2023. Microsoft says the extension is in response to advertisers need for more time. Expanded Text Ads (ETAs) will continue to serve with RSAs but advertisers will no longer be able to create new or edit existing ETAs.You can read the announcement here.4. Google Wants You To Add Product Information To Your Business Profiles! - Google has added a new section for products to the Google Business Profile guidelines. The section says "If you run a retail business, you can show nearby shoppers what you sell by adding your in-store products to your Business Profile at no charge." You can either add products to your Business Profile manually through the Product Editor or with Pointy - a hardware device that is free from Google and sits in the middle of  your barcode scanner and point of sale system so that it can add your products to Google.Products submitted via Product Editor or Pointy must adhere to the Shopping Ads Policy. Google does not allow content related to regulated products and services, including alcohol, tobacco products, gambling, financial services, pharmaceuticals and unapproved supplements, or health/medical devices. Submitting products that violate Google's policy may result in removal of the entire product catalog, including products that aren't in violation.You can read the guidelines over here.5. 4 New Features In Google Shopping Campaign - Google just announced four new features for advertisers to implement in their ad campaigns and merchant feeds.  Conversion value rules for store sales and store visits - Advertisers can now set store visits or sales default values at the campaign level. Before this update, Google Ads applied conversion value rules equally to all conversion actions. In addition to setting specific conversion values for store visits and sales, you can select the values at the campaign level. If you're running multiple campaigns promoting store visits, you can assign a higher value to one than the other. Additionally, you can set rules for store visits or sales on the conditions of geographic location, audiences, or devices. The ability to adjust values by location or device means you can increase the value of store visits for customers in New York versus customers in other areas, for example. You can set conversion value rules by logging in to your Google Ads account and navigating to Measurement > Conversions > Value rules. Then, click create conversion value rule and fill in the required information. Product-specific insights - Product-specific insights are available at the account level and help advertisers spot underperforming offers, identify products with missing feed attributes, and compare bidding with your top competitors. Product insights work on shopping and Performance Max campaigns and are intended to leverage ads performance data to optimize products and provide visibility on what actions to take to fix issues. Deals Content API - The Deals Content API is intended to make uploading and managing deals easier at scale. Merchants and advertisers can now add their sales and promotions to their listings via the Content API, which makes it even easier for merchants to upload and manage their deals at scale. Shipping & Returns Annotations - Merchants will now be able to list the expected delivery date (dynamic) (“Delivery by XX/YY”) and free returns right on their ads. Advertisers can also easily add their return policies. 6. Google Publishes 6 SEO Tips For E-commerce Websites - Alan Kent, a Developer Advocate at Google, shared six SEO tips that combine structured data and Merchant Center to get the most out of your website's presence in search results. Ensure Products Are Indexed - Googlebot can miss pages when crawling a site if they're not linked to other pages. On ecommerce sites, for example, some product pages are only reachable from on-site search results. You can ensure Google crawls all your product pages by utilizing tools such as an XML sitemap and Google Merchant Center. Creating a Merchant Center product feed will help Google discover all the products on your website. The product page URLs are shared with the Googlebot crawler to use as starting points for crawls of additional pages potentially. Check Accuracy Of Product Prices Search Results - If Google incorrectly extracts pricing data from your product pages, it may list your original price in search results, not the discounted price. To accurately provide product information such as list price, discounts, and net price, it's recommended to add structured data to your product pages and provide Google Merchant Center with structured feeds of your product data. This will help Google extract the correct price from product pages. Minimize Price & Availability Lag - Google crawls webpages on your site according to its own schedule. That means Googlebot may not notice changes on your site until the next crawl. These delays can lead to search results lagging behind site changes, such as a product going out of stock. It would be best if you aimed to minimize inconsistencies in pricing and availability data between your website and Google's understanding of your site due to timing lags. Google recommends utilizing Merchant Center product feeds to keep pages updated on a more consistent schedule. Ensure Products Are Eligible For Rich Product Results - Eligibility for rich product results requires the use of product structured data. To get the special rich product presentation format, Google recommends providing structured data on your product pages and a product feed in Merchant Center. This will help ensure that Google understands how to extract product data to display rich results. However, even with the correct structured data in place, rich results are displayed at Google's discretion. Share Local Product Inventory Data - Ensure your in-store products are found by people entering queries with the phrase “near me.” First, register your physical store location in your Google Business Profile, then provide a local inventory feed to Merchant Center. The local inventory feed includes product identifiers and store codes, so Google knows where your inventory is physically located. As an additional step, Google recommends using a tool called Pointy. Pointy is a device from Google that connects to your in-store point-of-sale system and automatically informs Google of inventory data from your physical store. The data is used to keep search results updated. Sign Up For Google Shopping Tab - You may find your products are available in search results but do not appear in the Shopping tab. If you're unsure whether your products are surfacing in the Shopping tab, the easiest way to find out is to search for them. Structured data and product feeds alone aren't sufficient to be included in the Shopping tab. To be eligible for the Shopping tab, provide product data feeds via Merchant Center and opt-in to ‘surfaces across Google.' For more on any of the above tips, see the full video from Google.7. Google Shares Insights On Factors That Determine Which Content Is Indexed - Gary Illyes and Martin Splitt from Google recently published a podcast discussing what's known as a crawl budget and what influences Google to index content. Gary Illyes said that the concept of a crawl budget was something created outside of Google by the search community and most sites don't need to worry about the crawl budget. According to Gary, part of the calculation for a crawl budget is based on practical considerations like how many URLs does the server allow Googlebot to crawl without overloading the server. Another interesting point that was made was how, in relation to crawling, there are different considerations involved. There are limits to what can be stored so, according to Google, that means utilizing Google's resources “where it matters.” It all boils down to the  issue of “spending our resources where it matters.”Because Google can't index everything, it tries to index only the content that matters and how frequently it is updated. "Google can infer from a site overall which areas they might need to crawl more frequently. E.g. if there's a blog subdirectory & there are signals that it's popular/important, then Google might want to crawl there more." " And it's not just update frequency, it's also about quality. E.g. if G sees a certain pattern is popular (folder), & people are talking about it & linking to it, then it's a signal that ppl like that directory,"Listen to the podcast here.

Mid Cities Orthodox Presbyterian Church
The Measurement of Power (2 Samuel 24:1-9)

Mid Cities Orthodox Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 33:16


On Sunday, September 4, 2022, Pastor Joe Troutman preached, "The Measurement of Power" from 2 Samuel 24:1-9. "God is good, God is sovereign, and God can use even the sinful deeds of men to carry out his purposes." 1. Kindled Anger (v. 1) 1 Again the anger of the Lord was kindled against Israel, and he incited David against them, saying, “Go, number Israel and Judah” (cf. 1 Chronicles 21:1). 2. Playing at Power (vs. 2-9) 2 So the king said to Joab, the commander of the army, who was with him, “Go through all the tribes of Israel, from Dan to Beersheba, and number the people, that I may know the number of the people.” 3 But Joab said to the king, “May the Lord your God add to the people a hundred times as many as they are, while the eyes of my lord the king still see it, but why does my lord the king delight in this thing?” 4 But the king's word prevailed against Joab and the commanders of the army. So Joab and the commanders of the army went out from the presence of the king to number the people of Israel. 5 They crossed the Jordan and began from Aroer, and from the city that is in the middle of the valley, toward Gad and on to Jazer. 6 Then they came to Gilead, and to Kadesh in the land of the Hittites; and they came to Dan, and from Dan they went around to Sidon, 7 and came to the fortress of Tyre and to all the cities of the Hivites and Canaanites; and they went out to the Negeb of Judah at Beersheba. 8 So when they had gone through all the land, they came to Jerusalem at the end of nine months and twenty days. 9 And Joab gave the sum of the numbering of the people to the king: in Israel there were 800,000 valiant men who drew the sword, and the men of Judah were 500,000. mcopc.org/podcast

Amobee Out Loud
A New Era in Measurement & Currencies

Amobee Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 37:24


100% new currencies by 2024? To wrap up the first season of Amobee Out Loud, Pam is joined by Kelly Abcarian EVP, Measurement & Impact at NBCUniversal, to discuss the way Covid changed viewers behavior, new currencies that are being unlocked, cross platform measurement and can we get measurement companies to work together to solve the cross screen measurement gap.   For more information visit: www.amobee.com/podcast

In The Know with Axonify
Can Skills Run the World (of Work)? w/ Dani Johnson (RedThread Research)

In The Know with Axonify

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 26:30


Bring your skills strategy to life!The skills conversation is everywhere. Everyone appears to want skills - people's proven ability to do the work - to be the foundation of their workforce strategies. It makes sense - on paper. But there are still plenty of questions left to be answered, including: What is a skill?How do you measure skills?How do you operationalize skill data to improve the employee experience and add value to the business?Dani Johnson, Co-Founder and Principal at RedThread Research, stops by to set the record straight on skills. Dani and JD Dillon explore the potential for skill-based approaches to transform talent development.JD also breaks down his biggest issue with the ongoing remote work debate.Watch the full video of this episode on the Axonify YouTube Channel.Read the RedThread article that inspired this conversation. JD's new book - The Modern Learning Ecosystem - is available for pre-order via Amazon and ATD. Learn more at jdwroteabook.com. In The Know is brought to you by Axonify, the mobile-first training and communication solution that helps make sure your frontline workforce is ready for anything. To learn more about Axonify's digital learning experience and check out success stories from companies like O'Reilly Auto Parts, Longo's, Briscoe Group, Citizen's Bank, MOL Group and Etihad Airways, visit axonify.com.

Your Brain at Work
From Guessing to Gauging: Measuring Change Initiatives

Your Brain at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 50:19


In this episode, experts from across our organization assembled to illustrate how organizations can execute impactful culture change at speed and scale.

Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer
The limits of the market (with Joseph Stiglitz)

Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 41:36 Very Popular


One of the central theories of classical economics is that markets respond quickly and efficiently to changes in demand. But the supply chain disruptions that left store shelves empty for much of the pandemic demonstrate that the markets aren't the efficient adapters that classic economists believe them to be. Nobel laureate economist Joseph Stiglitz explains why the tendency to believe in the market is one of the most deeply rooted trickle-down myths, and why government intervention is the best way to respond to economic downturns. This episode was originally released in May 2020. Joseph Stiglitz is a Nobel laureate economist and a professor at Columbia University. He is also the co-chair of the High-Level Expert Group on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress at the OECD, and the Chief Economist of the Roosevelt Institute. Twitter: @JosephEStiglitz People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781324004219 Four Priorities for Pandemic Relief Efforts: https://rooseveltinstitute.org/four-priorities-for-covid19-pandemic-relief-efforts/ Why Our Affluent Society Is Facing Shortages in the Face of the Coronavirus Pandemic: https://time.com/5811505/affluent-society-shortages-coronavirus-pandemic Deficit Lessons for the Pandemic From the 2008 Crisis: https://prospect.org/economy/deficit-lessons-pandemic-2008-crisis/ How the Economy Will Look After the Coronavirus Pandemic: https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/04/15/how-the-economy-will-look-after-the-coronavirus-pandemic/ Top economist: US coronavirus response is like ‘third world' country: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/apr/22/top-economist-us-coronavirus-response-like-third-world-country-joseph-stiglitz-donald-trump Website: https://pitchforkeconomics.com  Twitter: @PitchforkEcon Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics Nick's twitter: @NickHanauer

Gund Institute Podcasts
Elizabeth Palchak: The Sustainability Imperative at UVM – Research, Partnerships and Measurement

Gund Institute Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 54:38


Elizabeth Palchak leads the Office of Sustainability, connecting academics, research, operations, and engagement to amplify UVM's impact and contributions to sustainable solutions. Elizabeth earned her BA from The College of Wooster and her Ph.D. from the Rubenstein School of Natural Resources, with a focus on social science and the clean energy transition. Prior to her work in the Office of Sustainability, Elizabeth was a Senior Energy Consultant with VEIC, a sustainable energy company based in Vermont. At VEIC, she worked on sustainable energy projects throughout the country for municipalities, utilities, and universities, highlighting the human perspective in program and policy development. She is an active contributor to the Energy Equity Project, a national effort to address energy justice. Palchak spoke at UVM on April 22nd, 2022. Read more about Elizabeth: https://www.uvm.edu/gund/profiles/elizabeth-palchak Learn more about the Gund Institute: www.uvm.edu/gund Explore Gund events: www.uvm.edu/gund/events

Next in Marketing
"Perhaps we've not been vocal enough" - why the TV industry undercounts over the air viewers - and maybe overstates cord-cutting

Next in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 34:22


Next in Marketing spoke with Radha Subramanyam, President and Chief Research and Analytics Officer, CBS about the importance of data fidelity in TV research, and why neither census-based or panel based solutions have all the answers. For example, Subramanyam talked about how existing methodologies may be undercounting HIspanic American audiences and other demographics that still access TV over the air - while overstating just how many households are streaming first. Guest: Radha SubramanyamHost: Mike Shields

Diabetes Core Update
Diabetes Core Update – September 2022

Diabetes Core Update

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 26:54 Very Popular


Diabetes Core Update is a monthly podcast that presents and discusses the latest clinically relevant articles from the American Diabetes Association's four science and medical journals – Diabetes, Diabetes Care, Clinical Diabetes, and Diabetes Spectrum. Each episode is approximately 20 minutes long and presents 5-6 recently published articles from ADA journals. Intended for practicing physicians and health care professionals, Diabetes Core Update discusses how the latest research and information published in journals of the American Diabetes Association are relevant to clinical practice and can be applied in a treatment setting. This issue will review: Optimal Number of Steps per Day to Prevent All-Cause Mortality in People With Prediabetes and Diabetes Undiagnosed Diabetes in U.S. Adults: Prevalence and Trends Twenty-Year Temporal Trends in Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Incident Type 2 Diabetes: A Danish Population-Based Cohort Study The gut microbiome composition is altered in long-standing type 1 diabetes and associates with glycemic control and disease-related complications Association of Metabolic Syndrome With Incident Dementia: Role of Number and Age at Measurement of Components in a 28-Year Follow-up of the Whitehall II Cohort Study Changes in Visual Impairment due to Diabetic Retinopathy During 1980–2019 Based on Nationwide   For more information about each of ADA's science and medical journals, please visit www.diabetesjournals.org. Presented by: Neil Skolnik, M.D., Professor of Family and Community Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University; Associate Director, Family Medicine Residency Program, Abington Jefferson Health John J. Russell, M.D., Professor of Family and Community Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University; Director, Family Medicine Residency Program, Chair-Department of Family Medicine, Abington Jefferson Health

The Community + Purpose Podcast
026 - Austin & Calli "You're human, You're complex, You're not defined by 1 moment, 1 mistake, 1 measurement."

The Community + Purpose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 25:51


On today's episode, Austin and Calli have a very practical conversation about how who we are matters more than a single moment, mistake, or circumstance. Have questions? Send us an email: podcast@apexgathering.com

The Marketing Analytics Show
Future-proofing your marketing measurement with the Plan-Build-Launch framework with Chris Mercer

The Marketing Analytics Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 32:56


In this episode, Chris Mercer shares his Plan-Build-Launch framework to help you future-proof your marketing measurement. You'll learn: What marketers and analysts should be aware of regarding their measurement What the measurement framework is all about, and what steps does it consist of How marketers could increase the ROI of their campaigns

Nightlife
Timekeeping and our dependence on its precise measurement

Nightlife

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 51:08


The evolution of timekeeping and what would happen if time was lost?

Innovation Now
Space Measurements

Innovation Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022


By timing how long it takes individual photons to leave a satellite, reflect off the surface, and return to the receiver telescope on the satellite, NASA can precisely measure surface heights below.

The Nonlinear Library
AF - What Makes A Good Measurement Device? by johnswentworth

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 4:06


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: What Makes A Good Measurement Device?, published by johnswentworth on August 24, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. In some sense, any new measurement device automates a part of research. A thermometer automates the task of sticking one's finger in something to check how hot it is, a scale automates the task of holding something to check how heavy it is, etc. The automated version is not only more convenient, but more precise and reproducible (as is usually the case when automating things). For alignment, one analogue might be interpretability tools which automate the work done when some human looks at a part of a neural net and sees what it's doing. Let's take that last example and dig into it a bit more: interpretability tools which automate the work done when some human looks at a part of a net and sees what it's doing. We want to leverage the analogy to other measurement tools, like a thermometer or a scale, to better understand automation of interpretability. Here's one type of proposal I hear a lot: to automate interpretability, have some human researchers look at parts of a net, poke at them, and write up an explanation of how they're interpreting it. Collect data from many such instances, and train a neural net to take net-parts and produce explanations. We want to leverage the analogy to thermometers or scales, so what would be the analogous strategy for making a thermometer or scale? Well, have a bunch of humans stick their fingers in a bunch of stuff and report how hot the stuff is, then train a neural net to replicate the humans' hotness-reports. Or, have a bunch of humans hold things and report how heavy they are, then train a net to replicate the humans' heaviness-reports. Hopefully it is obvious that the "train a net to replicate human reports" results would not be nearly as useful, for purposes of scientific progress, as actual thermometers or scales. But what's missing? And how can we carry that insight back to the interpretability problem? The thermometer has two great powers: a simple legible data type, and reproducilbility. First, simple legible data type: the thermometer's output is a single number (the temperature), and we can compare that number with other thermometer-outputs. That's a kind-of-thing for which we have very precise mathematical understanding: we know exactly what kinds-of-things we can do with these numbers, we have a nice general representation, we're confident that different people mean the same thing by numbers, etc. This is in contrast to natural language, which is typically ambiguous, doesn't necessarily make it obvious what we can do, leads to frequent miscommunication, etc. Second, reproducibility: if the thermometer says X is hotter than Y, then when I put X and Y in contact, X gets cooler and Y gets hotter (all else equal). I can use the thermometer to rank hotness of a bunch of things, sort them by thermometer reading, and consistently (approximately-deterministically) find that the things on the hotter end feel hotter than the things on the colder end. This is what makes the single-number output (temperature) actually useful: it approximately-deterministically predicts some stuff, across a broad range of contexts, based on just those simple numbers. Exercise for the reader: walk through the same analogy for a scale. What would be the analogy of a thermometer for an interpretability tool? Well, something which we can point at part of a net, and get back a simple legible output, which approximately-deterministically predicts some stuff across a broad range of contexts. When you look at it like that, it's clear that building a measurement tool like a scale or thermometer is itself a task which requires scientific insight. It requires finding some approximately-deterministically-reproducible pattern, which can be predicted by...

Ops Cast
The War Between the Art & Science of Marketing and Measurement with Camela Thompson

Ops Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 50:47 Transcription Available


On this episode, we talk with  Camela Thompson, VP of Marketing at CaliberMind, a B2B Marketing Analytics Platform. Camela has been with CaliberMind for almost three years. Prior to that she spent 15+ years in Revenue Operations in the tech industry in successful startups such as Qumulo, Extrahop, and CDK Global (formerly Cobalt) before proving herself as a customer-first growth marketer. She is deeply familiar with the pain points that Ops teams face and is passionate about helping Ops professionals accelerate their careers.   In addition, she hosts CaliberMinds' podcast, The Revenue Marketing Report. On this episode, we cover: Camela's take on the trend of bringing Marketing Operations under the Revenue Operations umbrella.Is the driver for creating a Rev Ops function is usually driven more for alignment or to manage costs/headcount? If so, what kinds of challenges does this create?What Camela means by the "The War Between the Art & Science of Marketing and Measurement"Link to The Revenue Marketing Report Podcast: https://www.calibermind.com/revenue-marketing-report/podcastsEpisode Brought to You By MO Pros The #1 Community for Marketing Operations Professionals

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
Measurement and verification of carbon sequestration in cattle industry continues to be a challenge

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 6:33


In 2020, the Canadian Beef Advisors (CBA) set industry-wide carbon goals for the next decade, spanning to 2030. Now, two years into the set goals, the CBA made working groups for all of those goals. Brenna Grant, executive director of CanFax Research Services — the secretariat for the CBA — was on hand at the... Read More

The Dan Rayburn Podcast
Episode 32: The Problem With Third-Party Viewer Measurement Platforms; Previewing NFL on Amazon Prime

The Dan Rayburn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 39:38


This week we discuss the recent news of Amazon's plans to use Nielsen for TV measurement of Thursday Night Football on Prime Video and highlight problems the streaming industry faces in defining what success looks like. With no standards or agreed upon methodology, definitions or user metrics, the streaming industry is struggling to measure and define viewership from one service to another. We also recap the Walmart+ and Paramount deal; new sports licensing deals with Big Ten Conference and the UEFA Champions League and discuss more of what Netflix's AVOD offering could look like. Companies, and services mentioned: Amazon Prime Video, NFL, Netflix, Walmart, Nielsen, FOX, CBS, Disney, Peacock, Lionsgate, Big Ten Conference, ESPN, Paramount+, UEFA Champions League, DAZN, fuboTV.Questions or feedback? Contact: dan@danrayburn.com

B2B Growth
Digging Out the Data: A Case for Measurement as a Core Company Value

B2B Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 31:39 Transcription Available


In this cross-over episode we're sharing an episode from When Spreadsheets Hit the Fan . This show is produced by Sweet Fish Media .   In a business culture that demands speed and urgency, is a case to be made for using data to make the right decisions?  In this episode, we speak with Sean Collier, Chief Operating Officer at Etna Interactive.  Join us as we discuss: The Importance of Data Based Decision Making The Shortcomings of Product Based Organizations: Is there really a market for what you're selling? Finding the balance between speed vs data driven decisions The Case for Measurement as a Core Company Value

Secretly Incredibly Fascinating
Imperial Units Of Measurement

Secretly Incredibly Fascinating

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 64:56


Alex Schmidt is joined by comedy writer/podcaster Katie Goldin ('Creature Feature' podcast, @ProBirdRights) for a look at why Imperial units of measurement are secretly incredibly fascinating. Visit http://sifpod.fun/ for research sources, handy links, and this week's bonus episode.

History Extra podcast
Measurement: an unexpected history

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 45:24 Very Popular


From weight and distance, to calorie-counting and calculating the depths of space, throughout history, humans have loved to measure things. Speaking to Elinor Evans, James Vincent – author of Beyond Measure – uncovers some fascinating and unexpected stories from the history of measurement. (Ad) James Vincent is the author of Beyond Measure: The Hidden History of Measurement (Faber & Faber, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Beyond-Measure-Hidden-History-Measurement/dp/0571354211/ref=asc_df_0571354211/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=570229818468&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5898554147373027881&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1601293199965&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A Shark's Perspective
#336 - The Currency of TV Measurement

A Shark's Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 30:40


Conversation with Andre Roux, a data sales executive at Experian with an extensive background in the TV industry working in data, operations, analytics, and sales for companies like Experian, NBCU, DIRECTV, Turner, and ABC/Disney. Episode on Website

The Dental Hacks Podcast
Shorts: The Act of Measurement

The Dental Hacks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:27


What metrics are you measuring? How does measurement affect long term outcomes? Whether it's tracking blood glucose, logging what you eat or checking on your office's production and collections, measurement can help keep you accountable. But how important is this measurement? Can you measure too much? What happens if you get bad data?  Al relates his experiences with a CGM (constant glucose monitor) and how it's helped improve long term outcomes with diabetes and wonders if there is an appropriate analogy with measurement of key performance indicators of your business! Join the Very Dental Facebook group using the password "Timmerman," Hornbrook" or "McWethy." If you'd like to support the Very Dental Podcast Network then you should support our sponsors!  After the course I took at Cosmedent back in May, I realized that polishing restorations, especially composite restorations is an afterthought for most dentists. Getting a beautiful shine with lasting luster is just too much work, so why bother? But what if you could make your patients happier and make your composite restorations last longer? You need to try Enamelize, the aluminum oxide polishing paste from Cosmedent that will change the way you look at