Podcasts about Multicloud

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Best podcasts about Multicloud

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Latest podcast episodes about Multicloud

alphalist.CTO Podcast - For CTOs and Technical Leaders
#69 - David Linthicum // Chief Cloud Strategy Office @ Deloitte Consulting

alphalist.CTO Podcast - For CTOs and Technical Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 56:20


Find out how to optimize your cloud ☁️costs in this CTO podcast featuring David Linthicum (Chief Cloud Strategy Officer at Deloitte, Author of Insider's Guide to Cloud Computing, and #1 Cloud Influencer). This is your opportunity to hear about the efficient use of cloud computing from someone whose 35-year

DataCentric Podcast
Taming the MultiCloud Problem, with Nutanix's Lee Caswell

DataCentric Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 31:50


There aren't many solutions that can tame the multi-cloud management problem, but Nutanix is one of them. In this episode, hosts Matt Kimball and Steve McDowell have a wide-ranging conversation with Nutanix's Lee Caswell about the challenges that face IT administrators and architects in 2023. Special Guest: Lee Caswell .

Gestalt IT
Hybrid Cloud is Evolving Into the Multicloud with NetApp

Gestalt IT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 30:50


This episode of On-Premise IT, sponsored by NetApp, features Arjan Timmerman, Vuong Pham, Stephen Foskett, and Phoebe Goh discussing the evolved cloud. © Gestalt IT, LLC for Gestalt IT: Hybrid Cloud is Evolving Into the Multicloud with NetApp

Embracing Digital Transformation
#117 2022 in Review

Embracing Digital Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 21:19


In this episode, Darren reviews 2022. He identifies the most talked about topics on the podcast in 2022, including Data Management, Artificial Intelligence, Cyber Security, Edge Computing, Multi-Cloud, and Hybrid Workspaces Blog: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/government/podcasts/embracing-digital-transformation-episode117.html Video:

Microsoft Mechanics Podcast
Manage your multi-cloud identity infrastructure with Microsoft Entra

Microsoft Mechanics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 8:54


A single solution to centrally manage your entire identity infrastructure with Microsoft Entra. Whether hybrid across your on-premises systems and the Microsoft Cloud, or across services spanning multiple clouds, like AWS, Google Cloud Platform and your favorite SaaS apps. Joey Cruz, from the identity team at Microsoft, highlights the comprehensive capabilities of Microsoft Entra, including unified identity management, that spans beyond your Microsoft estate and beyond Azure Active Directory. He demonstrates new and unique capabilities for the day-to-day management of your users and workloads. ► ► QUICK LINKS: 00:00 - Introduction 00:25 - Microsoft Entra admin center 01:07 - Secure access to Google services with passwordless authentication using Microsoft Entra 02:20 - Access all of your cloud and on-prem apps from myapps.microsoft.com 03:13 - Supported authentication methods 04:24 - Verified IDs to automate new user verification and access provisioning 05:40 - Workload Identity management for secure app to app communication 06:56 - Privileged Identity Management to protect admin accounts and more 07:41 - Permissions Management to monitor and protect Azure, AWS and GCP in one place 08:20 - Wrap up ► Link References: Try Microsoft Entra at https://entra.microsoft.com Check out our docs at https://aka.ms/EntraDocs ► Unfamiliar with Microsoft Mechanics? As Microsoft's official video series for IT, you can watch and share valuable content and demos of current and upcoming tech from the people who build it at Microsoft. • Subscribe to our YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/MicrosoftMechanicsSeries • Talk with other IT Pros, join us on the Microsoft Tech Community: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/microsoft-mechanics-blog/bg-p/MicrosoftMechanicsBlog • Watch or listen from anywhere, subscribe to our podcast: https://microsoftmechanics.libsyn.com/website • To get the newest tech for IT in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/msftmechanics ► Keep getting this insider knowledge, join us on social: • Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MSFTMechanics • Share knowledge on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/microsoft-mechanics/ • Enjoy us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/msftmechanics/ • Loosen up with us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@msftmechanics  

Cloud Security Reinvented
Jay Thoden van Velzen (SAP) – How a Multi-Cloud Strategy Drives More Options for Organizations

Cloud Security Reinvented

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 37:51


Cloud Security Reinvented
Jay Thoden van Velzen (SAP) – How a Multi-Cloud Strategy Drives More Options for Organizations

Cloud Security Reinvented

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 37:39


Cloud Do You Do?
SPCSS: Public cloud and cybersecurity at state institutions

Cloud Do You Do?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 49:15


We dived deep into cloud technology and cybersecurity topics with the team from our Czech public sector customer The State Treasury Shared Services Center (or hereinafter the SPCSS). SPCSS provides information technology services and specialises in the operation of the state's critical infrastructure. We talked with Jiří Krula (CTO) and Tomáš Šimeček (Head of UNIX/LINUX Technology) about the multi-cloud strategy, tech-trends they see and leverage, cloud and application operations and their security. SPCSS is a state-owned company which operates a national data centre, ensures the operation of state management applications and provides various ICT services that are intended solely for state administration entities with a high emphasis on cyber security.

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast
EP083- PowerProtect Cyber Recovery for Google Cloud

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 23:38


Tune in to this episode as Brian White, Data Protection and Cyber Recovery Product Marketing Consultant for Dell Technologies, and Vijay Tewari, Head of Product Management for Google Cloud Platforms, discuss the recent product launch of Dell Technologies PowerProtect Cyber Recovery for the Google Cloud Marketplace.

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro
Leveling Up Multi-cloud Management with VMware Aria

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 21:05


VMware Aria lessens the finger-pointing in IT and provides a clear-cut solution to common IT plights. Multi-cloud management is critical within most organizations today and shouldn't be left to chance.Shelby Skrhak speaks with David Eaton, technology consultant II at Ingram Micro, about:Uses for VMware AriaReal-world impacts of VMware AriaHow VMware became an essential asset for enterprise organizationsTo join the discussion, follow us on Twitter @IngramTechSol #B2BTechTalkListen to this episode and more like it by subscribing to B2B Tech Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. Or, tune in on our website.

The Daily Scoop Podcast
Security in a multi-cloud world; The Army's cyber landscape.

The Daily Scoop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 33:18


As organizations across government continue to leverage multi-cloud computing, they are tasked with ensuring the entire enterprise remains secure. At the Security Transformation Summit produced by FedScoop, hear how these three government cybersecurity leaders are handling that transformation: Dave Lago, IT cybersecurity specialist in DISA's Cloud Computing Program Office Vu Nguyen, chief information security officer at the Department of Justice Tate Jerussi, associate deputy chief information officer at the Department of Energy Department of Defense Chief Information Officer John Sherman says a new cybersecurity workforce strategy is on the way in 2023. That cyber workforce will be key in implementing the Pentagon's new zero trust strategy. At the Security Transformation Summit, Army Director of Cybersecurity and CISO Major General Jan Norris explains the cyber landscape his organization is managing. The Daily Scoop Podcast is available every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon. If you want to hear more of the latest from Washington, subscribe to The Daily Scoop Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify and Stitcher. And if you like what you hear, please let us know in the comments.

dot tech Podcast by Form3
Ep 38 .tech - Building multi-cloud at Form3

dot tech Podcast by Form3

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 29:05


Kevin Holditch is Head of Platform Engineering at Form3. Kevin leads and looks after the Platform Engineering teams, who have been working on the Form3 multi-cloud platform.Our  .tech series invites guests inside and outside of Form3, discussing current trends in the engineering world alongside shedding light into some of the engineering practices here at Form3. Get in touch with us via this short form if you'd like to be  a podcast guest. 

AWS Morning Brief
A Multi-Cloud Rant (Holiday Replay)

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 7:16


This episode was originally released on August 20, 2021.Want to give your ears a break and read this as an article? You're looking for this link.https://www.lastweekinaws.com/blog/a_multicloud_rant/Want to watch a rant about Multi-Cloud? Watch our Multi-Cloud is a Terrible Idea YouTube Video here: https://youtu.be/Mlr7vioQqwgNever miss an episode Join the Last Week in AWS newsletter Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts Help the show Leave a review Share your feedback Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts Buy our merch https://store.lastweekinaws.comWhat's Corey up to? Follow Corey on Twitter (@quinnypig) See our recent work at the Duckbill Group Apply to work with Corey and the Duckbill Group to help lower your AWS bill

CIO Exchange Podcast
Supercloud 22 – The multi-cloud roadmap and the gateway to “supercloud” - Speakers: theCUBE hosts Dave Vellante and John Furrier, with Kit Colbert, CTO of VMware.

CIO Exchange Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 21:26


CIO Exchange on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vmwcioexchangeYadin Porter de León on Twitter: https://twitter.com/porterdeleon [Subscribe to the Podcast]On Apple Podcast: https://podcastsconnect.apple.com/my-podcastsFor more podcasts, video and in-depth research go to https://www.vmware.com/cio

Google Cloud Platform Podcast
Active Assist and Resource Lifecycle Management with Sharon Fang and Michael Sudakovitch

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 28:31


Guests Sharon Fang and Michael Sudakovitch are here this week to talk with Max Saltonstall and Daryl Ducharme about Google's Active Assist optimization portfolio and managing cloud projects efficiently. Michael, tech lead at Uber, first employed Active Assist for the company in their security department, but they have since realized how useful Active Assist is in many areas of the resource management space. Responsible architects, Michael points out, continually evaluate their resources and patch, update, or remove as necessary to ensure proper security and optimize spending. Sharon helps us understand resource management further and how Active Assist helps teams find resources that can be changed or even removed for better spending, tighter security, and smaller carbon footprint. Active Assist will even recommend the removal of entire projects that have become dormant. Michael talks in detail about Uber's use of Active Assist and how it helped them find vulnerable projects that could be removed for better security. Sharon highlights the effects of Active Assist on reducing CO2 emissions as well, as discontinued projects keep hardware running needlessly. As Michael and his team at Uber began taking advantage of all Active Assist had to offer, Google worked with him to answer questions, tailor resources, and take feedback to improve offerings. The future includes a portfolio expansion of resource life cycle management tools to identify more idol systems like GKE clusters and helping larger customers take advantage of Active Assist at scale automatically. Together, Sharon and Michael tell us stories about the partnership and interesting findings and results of Uber's carbon footprint reduction journey. Sharon Fang Sharon Fang is a Product Manager for Google Cloud's Active Assist, which aims to help users optimize their cloud operations with recommendations. Michael Sudakovitch Michael is a Tech Lead at Uber's Engineering Security organization, focusing on securing and optimizing Uber's Multi-Cloud infrastructure. Cool things of the week Solving internal search problems with Dialogflow blog Automating self-service tech support with Tensorflow blog Introducing IAM Deny, a simple way to harden your security posture at scale blog Supporting healthcare delivery with cloud-native medical imaging blog Interview Active Assist site Uber site Uber Engineering Blog site How ML-fueled recommendations help developers optimize security, price-performance, and carbon reduction blog Introducing Unattended Project Recommender: discover, reclaim, or deprecate abandoned projects under your organization blog Reduce your cloud carbon footprint with new Active Assist recommendations blog What's something cool you're working on? Max is sorting out the final blog posts of the year, planning some secret Santa holiday festivities for the team, and prepping cranberry sauces. Daryl is planning videos for the new year, including a video to help celebrate our 1 millionth subscriber on the Google Cloud Tech YouTube channel and several videos to help people get the most out of Google Cloud IAM features. Hosts Max Saltonstall and Daryl Ducharme

Studio 2G Podcasts
Protecting Student Data in a Multicloud World

Studio 2G Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 19:15


Malicious threat actors often view schools as easy and profitable targets due to their use of legacy technology and willingness to pay ransoms. This school year, it's time to send hackers back to the drawing board. On this episode of “Security Stories,” a podcast from NetApp, Troy Schneider, President of GovExec 360, sits down with Allen Magsipoc, principal systems architect at HighPoint, and Bob Burwell, chief technology officer for State, Local Government and Education at NetApp, to discuss defense-in-depth techniques for the hybrid multi-cloud environment.

Screaming in the Cloud
Multi-Cloud in Sanity with Simen Svale Skogsrud

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 34:34


About SimenEver since he started programming simple games on his 8-bit computer back in the day, Simen has been passionate about how software can deliver powerful experiences. Throughout his career he has been a sought-after creator and collaborator for companies seeking to push the envelope with their digital end-user experiences.He co-founded Sanity because the state of the art content tools were consistently holding him, his team and his customers back in delivering on their vision. He is now serving as the CTO of Sanity.Simen loves mountain biking and rock climbing with child-like passion and unwarranted enthusiasm. Over the years he has gotten remarkably good at going over the bars without taking serious damage.Links Referenced: Sanity: https://www.sanity.io/ Semin's Twitter: https://twitter.com/svale/ Slack community for Sanity: https://slack.sanity.io/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us by our friends at Pinecone. They believe that all anyone really wants is to be understood, and that includes your users. AI models combined with the Pinecone vector database let your applications understand and act on what your users want… without making them spell it out. Make your search application find results by meaning instead of just keywords, your personalization system make picks based on relevance instead of just tags, and your security applications match threats by resemblance instead of just regular expressions. Pinecone provides the cloud infrastructure that makes this easy, fast, and scalable. Thanks to my friends at Pinecone for sponsoring this episode. Visit Pinecone.io to understand more.Corey: This episode is brought to you in part by our friends at Veeam. Do you care about backups? Of course you don't. Nobody cares about backups. Stop lying to yourselves! You care about restores, usually right after you didn't care enough about backups. If you're tired of the vulnerabilities, costs, and slow recoveries when using snapshots to restore your data, assuming you even have them at all living in AWS-land, there is an alternative for you. Check out Veeam, that's V-E-E-A-M for secure, zero-fuss AWS backup that won't leave you high and dry when it's time to restore. Stop taking chances with your data. Talk to Veeam. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's guest is here to tell a story that I have been actively searching for, for years, and I have picked countless fights in pursuit of it. And until I met today's guest, I was unconvinced that it actually exists. Simen Svale is the co-founder and CTO of a company called Sanity. Simen, thank you for joining me, what is Sanity? What do you folks do over there?Simen: Thank you, Corey. Thank you. So, we used to be this creative agency that came in as, kind of—we would, kind of, Black Hawk Down into a company and help them innovate, and that would be our thing. And these were usually content, a project like media companies, corporate communication, these kinds of companies, we would be coming in and we would develop some ideas with them. And they would love those ideas and then invariably, we wouldn't ever be able to do those ideas because we couldn't change the workflows in their CMS, we couldn't extend their content models, we couldn't really do anything meaningful.So, then we would end up setting up separate tools next to those content tools and they would invariably get lost and never be used after a while. So, we were like, we need to solve this problem, we need to solve it at the source. So, we decided we wanted a new kind of content platform. It would be a content platform consisting of two parts. There will be the, kind of, workspace where you create the content and do the workflows and all that, that will be like an open-source project that you can really customize and build the exact workspace that you need for your company.And then on the other side, you would have this, kind of, content cloud, we call it the content lake. And the point with this is to very often you bring in several different sources, you have your content that you create specifically for a project, but very often you have content from an ERP system, availability of products, time schedules. Let's say you're real estate agent; you have data about your properties that come from other systems. So, this is a system to bring all that together. And then there is another thing that kind of really frustrated me was content systems had content APIs, and content APIs are really particularly, and specifically, about a certain way of using content, whereas we thought content is just data.It should be data, and the API should be a database query language. So, these are, kind of, the components of Sanity, it's a very customizable workspace for working with content and running your content workflows. And it's this content lake, which is this, kind of, cloud for your content.Corey: The idea of a content lake is fascinating, on some level, where it goes beyond what the data lake story, which I've always found to be a little of the weird side when cloud companies get up and talk about this. I remember this distinctly a few years ago at a re:Invent keynote, that Andy Jassy, then the CEO of AWS, got up and talked about customer's data lakes, and here's tools for using that. And I mentioned it to one of my clients it's like, and they looked at me like I was a very small, very simple child and said, “Yeah, that would be great, genius, if we had a data lake, but we don't.” It's like, “You… you have many petabytes of data hanging out in S3. What do you think that is?” “Oh, that just the logs and the assets and stuff.” It's… yeah.Simen: [laugh].Corey: So, it turns out that people don't think about what they have in the same terms, and meeting customers with their terms is challenging. Do you find that people have an idea of what a content cloud or a content lake is before you talk to them about it?Simen: I mean, that's why it took us some time to come up with the word content lake. But we realized, like, our thinking was, the content lake is where you bring all your content to make it curiable and to make it deliverable. So that's, like—you should think, like, as long as I need to present this to end-users, I need to bring it into the content lake. And it's kind of analogous to a data lake. Of course, if you can't curate your data in the data lake, it isn't a data lake, even if you have all the data there. You have to be able to analyze it and deliver it in the format you need it.So, it's kind of an analogy for the same kind of thinking. And a crux of a content lake is it gives you one, kind of, single API that works for all of your content sources. It kind of brings them all in together in one umbrella, which is, kind of, the key here, that teams can then leverage that without learning new APIs and without ordering up new APIs from the other teams.Corey: The story that really got me pointed in your direction is when a mutual friend of ours looked at me and said, “Oh, you haven't talked to them yet?” Because it was in response to a story I've told repeatedly, at length, at anyone who will listen, and by that I include happens to be unfortunate enough to share an elevator ride with me. I'll talk to strangers about this, it doesn't matter. And my argument has been for a long time that multi-cloud, in the sense of, “Oh yeah, we have this one workload and we can just seamlessly deploy it anywhere,” is something that is like cow tipping as Ben Kehoe once put it, in that it doesn't exist and you know it doesn't exist because there are no videos of it happening on YouTube. There are no keynote stories where someone walks out on stage and says, “Oh, yeah, thanks for this company's great product, I had my thing that I built entirely on AWS, and I can seamlessly flip a switch, and now it's running on Google Cloud, and flip the switch again, and now it's running on Azure.”And the idea is compelling, and they're very rarely individual workloads that are built from the beginning to be able to run like that, but it takes significant engineering work. And in practice, no one ever takes advantage of that optionality in most cases. It is vanishingly rare. And our mutual friend said, “Oh, yeah. You should talk to Simen. He's done it.”Simen: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: Okay, shenanigans on that, but why not? I'm game. So, let me be very direct. What the hell have you done?Simen: [laugh]. So, we didn't know it was hard until I saw his face when I told him. That helps, right? Like, ignorance is bliss. What we wanted was, we were blessed with getting very, very big enterprise customers very early in our startup journey, which is fantastic, but also very demanding.And one thing we saw was, either for compliance reasons or for, kind of, strategic partnership reasons, there were reasons that big, big companies wanted to be on specific service providers. And in a sense, we don't care. Like, we don't want to care. We want to support whatever makes sense. And we are very, let's call it, principled architects, so actually, like, the lower levels of Sanity doesn't know they are part of Sanity, they don't even know about customers.Like, we had already the, kind of, separation of concerns that makes the lower—the, kind of, workload-specific systems of Sanity not know a lot of what they are doing. They are basically just, kind of, processing content, CDN requests, and just doing that, no idea about billing or anything like that. So, when we saw the need for that, we thought, okay, that means we have the, what we call the color charts, which is, kind of, the light bulbs, the ones we can have—we have hundreds and hundreds of them and we can just switch them off and the service still works. And then there's the control plane that is, kind of, the admin interface that the user is use to administrate the resources. We wanted customers to just be able to then say, “I want this workloads, this kind of content store to run on Azure, and I want this one on Google Cloud.” I wanted that to feel the same way regions do. Like, you just choose that and we'll migrate it to wherever you want it. And of course, charge you for that privilege.Corey: Even that is hard to do because when companies say, “Oh, yeah, we didn't have a multi-cloud strategy here,” it's okay, if you're multi-cloud strategy evolves, we have to have this thing on multiple clouds, okay, first as a step one, if you're on AWS—which is where this conversation usually takes place when I'm having this conversation with people, given the nature of what I do for a living—it's, great, first, deploy it to a second AWS region and go active-active between those two. You should—theoretically—have full-service and API compatibility between them, which removes a whole bunch of problems. Just go ahead and do that and show us how easy it is. And then for step two, then talk about other cloud providers. And spoiler, there's never a step two because that stuff is way more difficult than people who have not done it give it credit for being.How did you build your application in such a way that you aren't taking individual dependencies on things that only exist in one particular cloud, either in terms of the technology itself or the behaviors? For example, load balancers come up with different inrush times, RDS instances provision databases at different speeds with different guarantees around certain areas across different cloud providers. At some point, it feels like you have to go back to the building blocks of just rolling everything yourself in containers and taking only internal dependencies. How do you square that circle?Simen: Yeah, I think it's a good point. Like, I guess we had a fear of—my biggest fear in terms of single cloud was just that leverage you provide your cloud provider if you use too many of those kinds of super-specific services, the ones that only they run. Like, so it was, our initial architecture was based on the fact that we would be able to migrate, like, not necessarily multi-cloud, just, if someone really ups the price or behaves terribly, we can say, “Oh, yeah. Then we'll leave for another cloud provider.” So, we only use super generic services, like queue services, blob services, these are pretty generic across the providers.And then we use generic databases like Postgres or Elastic, and we run them pretty generically. So, anyone who can provide, like, a Postgres-style API, we can run on that. We don't use any exotic features. Let's say, picking boring Technologies was the most, kind of, important choice. And then this also goes into our business model because we are a highly integrated database provider.Like in one sense, Sanity is as a content database with this weird go-to-market. Like, people think of us as a CMS, but it is actually the database we charge for. So also, we can't use these very highly integrated services because that's our margin. Like, we want that money, right [laugh]? So, we create that value and then we build that on very simple, very basic building blocks if that makes sense.So, when we wanted to move to a different cloud, everything we needed access to, we could basically build a platform inside Azure that looks exactly like the one we built inside Google, to the applications.Corey: There is something to be said for the approach of using boring technologies. Of course, there's also the story of, “Yeah, I use boring technologies.” “Like what?” “Oh, like, Kubernetes,” is one of the things that people love to say. It's like, “Oh, yes.”My opinion on Kubernetes historically has not been great. Basically, I look at it as if you want to cosplay working at Google but can't pass their technical screen, then Kubernetes is the answer for you. And that's more than a little unfair. And starting early next year, I'm going to be running a production workload myself in Kubernetes, just so I can make fun of it with greater accuracy, honestly, but I'm going to learn things as I go. It is sort of the exact opposite of boring.Even my early experiments with it so far have been, I guess we'll call it unsettling as far as some of the non-deterministic behaviors that have emerged and the rest. How did you go about deciding to build on top of Kubernetes in your situation? Or was it one of those things that just sort of happened to you?Simen: Well, we had been building microservice-based products for a long time internal to our agency, so we kind of knew about all the pains of coordinating, orchestrating, scaling those—Corey: “We want to go with microservices because we're tired of being able to find the problem. We want this to be much more of an exciting murder mystery when something goes down.”Simen: Oh, I've heard that. But I think if you carve up the services the right way, every service becomes simple. It's just so much easier to develop, to reason about. And I've been involved in so many monoliths before that, and then every refactor is like guts on the table is, like, month, kind of, ordeal, super high risk. With the microservices, everything becomes a simple, manageable affair.And you can basically rebuild your whole stack service by service. And you can do—like, it's a realistic thing. Like, you—because all of them are pretty simple. But it's kind of complicated when they are all running inside instances, there's crosstalk with configuration, like, you change the library, and everything kind of breaks. So, Docker was obvious.Like, Docker, that kind of isolation, being able to have different images but sharing the machine resources was amazing. And then, of course, Kubernetes being about orchestrating that made a lot of sense. But that was also compatible with a few things that we have already discovered. Because workloads in Kubernetes needs to be incredibly boring. We talk about boring stuff, like, if you, for example—in the beginning, we had services that start up, they do some, kind of, sanity check, they validate their environment and then they go into action.That in itself breaks the whole experience because what you want Kubernetes-based service to do is basically just do one thing all the time in the same way, use the same amount of memory, the same amount of resources, and just do that one thing at that rate, always. So, we broke apart those things, even the same service runs in different containers, depending on their state. Like, this is the state for doing the Sanity check, this is the state for [unintelligible 00:13:05], this is the state for doing mutations. Same service. So, there's ways about that.I absolutely adore the whole thing. It saved—like, I haven't heard about those pains we used to have in the past ever again. But also, it wasn't an easy choice for me because my single SRE at the time said, like, he was either Kubernetes or he'd quit. So, it was very simple decision.Corey: Exactly. The resume-driven development is very much a thing. I've not one to turn up my nose at that; that's functionally what I've done my entire career. How long had your product been running in an environment like that before, “Well, we're going multi-cloud,” was on the table?Simen: So, that would be three-and-a-half years, I think, yeah. And then we started building it out in Azure.Corey: That's a sizable period of time in the context of trying to understand how something works. If I built something two months ago, and now I have to pick it up and move it somewhere else, that is generally a much easier task as far as migrations go than if the thing has been sitting there for ten years. Because whenever you leave something in an environment like that, it tends to grow roots and takes a number of dependencies, both explicit and implicit, on the environment in which runs. Like, in the early days of AWS, you sort of knew that local disks on the instances were ephemeral because in the early days, that was the only option you had. So, every application had to be written in such a way that it did not presume that there was going to be local disk persistence forever.Docker containers take that a significant step further. Where when that container is gone, it's gone. There is no persistent disk there without some extra steps. And in the early days of Docker, that wasn't really a thing either. Did you discover that you'd take in a bunch of implicit dependencies like that on the original cloud that you were building on?Simen: I'm old school developer. I would all the way back to C. And in C, you need to be incredibly, incredibly careful with your dependencies because you basically—your whole dependency mapping is happening inside of your mind. The language doesn't help you at all. So, I'm always thinking about my kind of project as, kind of, layers of abstraction.If someone talks to Postgres during a request, requests are supposed to be handled in the index, then I'm [laugh] pretty angry. Like, that breaks the whole point. Like, the whole point is that this service doesn't need to know about Postgres. So, we have been pretty hardcore on, like, not having any crosstalk, making sure every service just knows about—like, we had a clear idea which services were allowed to talk to which services. And we were using GVT tokens internally to make sure that authentication and the rights management was just handled on the ingress point and just passed along with records.So, no one was able to talk to user stores or authentication services. That always all happens on the ingress. So, in essence, it was a very pure, kind of, layered platform already. And then, like I said, also then built on super boring technologies. So, it wasn't really a dramatic thing.The drama was more than we didn't maybe, like [laugh] like these sort of cloud services that much. But as you grow older in this industry, you kind of realize that you just hate the technologies differently. And some of the time, you hate a little bit less than others. And that's just how it goes. That's fine. So, that was the pain. We didn't have a lot of pain with our own platform because of these things.Corey: It's so nice watching people who have been around in the ecosystem for long enough to have made all the classic mistakes and realized, oh, that's why common wisdom is what common wisdom is because generally speaking, that shit works, and you learn it yourself from first principles when you decide—poorly, in most cases—to go and reimplement things. Like oh, DNS goes down a lot, so we're just going to rsync around an ETSI hosts file on all of our Linux servers. Yeah, we tried that collectively back in the '70s. It didn't work so well then, either. But every once in a while, some startup founder feels the need to speed-run learning those exact same lessons.What I'm picking up from you is a distinct lack of the traditional startup founder vibe of, “Oh well, the reason that most people don't do things this way is because most people are idiots. I'm smarter than they are. I know best.” I'm getting the exact opposite of that from you where you seemed to wind up wanting to stick to things that are tried and true and, as you said earlier, not exciting.Simen: Yeah, at least for these kinds of [unintelligible 00:17:15]. Like, so we had a similar platform for our customers that we, kind of, used internally before we created Sanity, and when we decided to basically redo the whole thing, but for kind of a self-serve thing and make a product, I went around the developer team and I just asked them, like, “In your experience, what systems that we use are you not thinking about, like, or not having any problems with?” And, like, just make a list of those. And there was a short list that are pretty well known. And some of them has turned out, at the scale we're running now, pretty problematic still.So, it's not like it's all roses. We picked Elasticsearch for some things and that it can be pretty painful. I'm on the market for a better indexing service, for example. And then sometimes you get—let's talk about some mistakes. Like, sometimes you—I still am totally on the microservices train, and if you make sure you design your workloads clearly and have a clear idea about the abstractions and who gets to talk to who, it works.But then if you make a wrong split—so we had a split between a billing service and a, kind of, user and resource management service that now keeps talking back and forth all the time. Like, they have to know about what each other is. And it says, if two services need to know about each other's reciprocally, like, then you're in trouble, then those should be the same service, in my opinion. Or you can split it some other way. So, this is stuff that we've been struggling with.But you're right. My last, kind of, rah-rah thing was Rails and Ruby, and then when I weened off of that, I was like, these technologies work for me. For example, I use Golang a lot. It's a very ugly language. It's very, very useful. You can't argue against the productivity you have in Go, but also the syntax is kind of ugly. And then I realized, like, yeah, I kind of hate everything now, but also, I love the productivity of this.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Uptycs, because they believe that many of you are looking to bolster your security posture with CNAPP and XDR solutions. They offer both cloud and endpoint security in a single UI and data model. Listeners can get Uptycs for up to 1,000 assets through the end of 2023 (that is next year) for $1. But this offer is only available for a limited time on UptycsSecretMenu.com. That's U-P-T-Y-C-S Secret Menu dot com.Corey: There's something to be said for having been in the industry long enough to watch today's exciting new thing becomes tomorrow's legacy garbage that you've got to maintain and support. And I think after a few cycles of that, you wind up becoming almost cynical and burned out on a lot of things that arise that everyone leaves everyone breathless. I am generally one of the last adopters of something. I was very slow to get on virtualization. I was a doomsayer on cloud itself for many years.I turned my nose up at Docker. I mostly skipped the whole Kubernetes thing and decided to be early to serverless, which does not seem to be taking off the way that I wanted it to, so great. It's one of those areas where just having been in the operation side particularly, having to run things and fix them at two in the morning when they inevitably break when some cron job in the middle of the night fires off because no one will be around then to bother. Yeah, great plan. It really, at least in my case, makes me cynical and tired to the point where I got out of running things in anger.You seem to have gone a different direction where oh, you're still going to build and run things. You're just going to do it in a ways that are a lot more well-understood. I think there's a lot of value to that and I don't think that we give enough credit as an industry to people making those decisions.Simen: You know, I was big into Drum and Bass back in the '90s I just love that thing. And then you went away, and then something came was called dubstep. It's the same thing. And it's just better. It's a better Drum and Bass.Corey: Oh yeah, the part where it goes doof, doof, doof, doof, doof, doof, doof—Simen: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: Has always been—it's yeah, we call it different things, but the doof, doof, doof, doof, doof music is always there. Yeah.Simen: Yeah, yeah, yeah. And I think the thing to recognize, you could either be cynical and say, like, you kids, you're just making the same music we did like 20 years ago, or you can recognize that actually it—Corey: Kids love that, being told that. It's their favorite thing, telling them, “Oh yeah, back when I was your age…” that's how you—that's a signifier of a story that they're going to be riveted to and be really interested in hearing.Simen: [laugh]. Exactly. And I don't think like that because I think you need to recognize that this thing came back and it came back better and stronger. And I think Mark Twain probably didn't say that history doesn't repeat itself, it rhymes. And this is similar thing.Right now I have to contend with the fact that server-based rendering is coming back as a completely new thing, which was like, the thing, always, but also it comes back with new abstractions and new ways of thinking about that and comes back better with better tooling. And kind of—I think the one thing if you can take away from that kind of journey, that you can be stronger by not being excited by shiny new things and not being, kind of, a champion for one specific thing over every other thing. You can just, kind of, see the utility of that. And then when they things come back and they pretend to be new, you can see both the, kind of, tradition of it and maybe see it clearer than most of the people, but also, it's like you said, don't bore the kids because also you should see how it is new, how it is solving new things, and how these kids coming back with the same old thing as a new thing, they saw it differently, they framed it slightly differently, and we are better for it.Corey: There's so much in this industry that we take from others. We all stand on the shoulders of giants, and I think that is something that is part of what makes this industry so fantastic in different ways. Some of the original computer scientists who built some of the things that everyone takes for granted these days are still alive. It's not like the world of physics, for example, where some of the greats wound up discovering these things hundreds of years ago. No, it's all evolved within living memory.That means that we can talk to people, we can humanize them, on some level. It's not some lofty great sitting around and who knows what they would have wanted or how they would have intended this. Now, you have people who helped build the TCP stack stand up and say, “Oh yeah, that was a dumb. We did a dumb. We should not have done it that way.” Oh, great.It's a constant humbling experience watching people evolve things. You mentioned that Go was a really neat language. Back when I wound up failing out of school, before I did that, I took a few classes in C and it was challenging and obnoxious. About like you would expect. And at the beginning of this year, I did a deep-dive into learning go over the course of a couple days enough to build a binary that winds up controlling my internet camera in my home office.And I've learned an awful lot and how to do things and got a lot of things wrong, and it was a really fun language. It was harder to do a lot of the ill-considered things that get people into trouble with C.Simen: Hmm.Corey: The idea that people are getting nice things in a way that we didn't have them back when we were building things the first time around is great. If you're listening to this, it is imperative—listen to me—it is imperative. Do not email me about Rust. I don't want to hear it.Simen: [laugh].Corey: But I love the fact that our tools are now stuff that we can use in sensible ways. These days, as you look at using sensible tools—which in this iteration, I will absolutely say that using a hyperscale public cloud provider is the right move; that's the way to go—do you find that, given that you started over hanging out on Google Cloud, and now you're running workloads everywhere, do you have an affinity for one as your primary cloud, or does everything you've built wind up seamlessly flowing back and forth?Simen: So, of course, we have a management interface that our end-users, kind of, use to monitor, and it has to be—at least has to have a home somewhere, even though the data can be replicated everywhere. So, that's in Google Cloud because that's where we started. And also, I think GCP is what our team likes the most. They think it's the most solid platform.Corey: Its developer experience is far and away the best of all the major cloud providers. Bar none. I've been saying that for a while. When I first started using it, I thought I was going to just be making fun of it, but this is actually really good was my initial impression, and that impression has never faded.Simen: Yeah. No, it's like it's terrible, as well, but it's the least terrible platform of them all. But I think we would not make any decisions based on that. As long as it's solid, as long as it's stable, and as long as, kind of, price is reasonable and business practices is, kind of, sound, we would work with any provider. And hopefully, we would also work with less… let's call it less famous, more niche providers in the future to provide, let's say, specific organizations that need very, very specific policies or practices, we will be happy to support. I want to go there in the future. And that might require some exotic integrations and ways of building things.Corey: A multi-cloud story that I used to tell—in the broader sense—used PagerDuty as an example because that is the service that does one thing really well, and that is wake you up when something sends the right kind of alert. And they have multiple cloud providers historically that they use. And the story that came out of it was, yeah, as I did some more digging into what they've done and how they talked about this, it's clear that the thing that wakes you up in the middle of the night absolutely has to work across a whole bunch of different providers because if it's on one, what happens when that's the one that goes down? We learned that when AWS took an outage in 2011 or 2012, and PagerDuty went down as a result of that. So, the thing that wakes you up absolutely lives in a bunch of different places on a bunch of different providers.But their marketing site doesn't have to. Their user control panel doesn't have to. If there's an outage in their primary cloud that is sufficiently gruesome enough, okay, they can have a degraded mode where you're not able to update and set up new alerts and add new users into your account because everything's on fire in those moments anyway, that's an acceptable trade-off. But the thing that wakes you up absolutely must work all the time. So, it's the idea of this workload has got to live in a bunch of places, but not every workload looks like that.As you look across the various services and things you have built that comprise a company, do you find that you're biasing for running most things in a single provider or do you take that default everywhere approach?Simen: No, I think that to us, it is—and we're not—that's something we haven't—work we haven't done yet, but architecturally, it will work fine. Because as long as we serve queries, like, we have to—like components, like, people write stuff, they create new content, and that needs to be up as much as possible. But of course, when that goes down, if we still serve queries, their properties are still up, right? Their websites or whatever is still serving content.So, if we were to make things kind of cross-cloud redundant, it would be the CDN, like, indexes and the varnish caches and have those [unintelligible 00:27:23]. But it is a challenge in terms of how you do routing. And let's say the routing provider is down. How do you deal with that? Like, there's been a number of DNS outages and I would love to figure out how to get around that. We just, right now, people would have to manually, kind of, change their—we have backup ingress points with the—yeah, that's a challenge.Corey: One of the areas where people get into trouble with multi-cloud as well, that I've found, has been that people do it with that idea of getting rid of single points of failure, which makes a lot of sense. But in practice, what so many of them have done is inadvertently added multiple points of failure, all of which are single-tracked. So okay, now we're across to cloud providers, so we get exposure to everyone's outages, is how that winds up looking. I've seen companies that have been intentionally avoiding AWS because great, when they go down and the internet breaks, we still want our store to be up. Great, but they take a dependency on Stripe who is primarily in AWS, so depending on the outage, people may very well not be able to check out of their store, so what did they gain by going to another provider? Because now when that provider goes down, their site is down then too.Simen: Mmm. Yeah. It's interesting that anything works at all, actually, like, seeing how intertwined everything is. But I think that is, to me, the amazing part, like you said, someone's marketing site doesn't have to be moved to the cloud, or maybe some of it does. And I find it interesting that, like, in the serverless space, even if we provide a very—like, we have super advanced engineers and we do complex orchestration over cloud services, we don't run anything else, right?Like, all of our, kind of, web properties is run with highly integrated, basically on Vercel, mostly, right? Like we don't want to know about—like, we don't even know which cloud that's running on, right? And I think that's how it should be because most things, like you said, most things are best outsourced to another company and have them worry, like, have them worry when things are going down. And that's how I feel about these things that, yes, you cannot be totally protected, but at least you can outsource some of that worry to someone who really knows what—like, if Stripe goes down, most people don't have the resources to worry at the level that Stripe would worry, right? So, at least you have that.Corey: Exactly. Yeah, if you ignore the underlying cloud provider stuff, they do a lot of things I don't want to have to become an expert in. Effectively, you wind up getting your payment boundary through them; you don't have to worry about PCI yourself at all; you can hand it off to them. That's value.Simen: Exactly. Yeah.Corey: Like, the infrastructure stuff is just table stakes compared to a lot of the higher up the stack value that companies in that position enjoy. Yeah, I'm not sitting here saying don't use Stripe. I want to be very clear on that.Simen: No, no, no. No, I got you. I got you. I just remember, like, so we talked about maybe you hailing all the way back to Seattle, so hail all the way back to having your own servers in a, kind of, place somewhere that you had to drive to, to replace a security card because when the hard drive was down. Or like, oh, you had to scale up and now you have to buy five servers, you have to set them up and drive them to the—and put them into the slots.Like, yes, you can fix any problem yourself. Perfect. But also, you had to fix every problem yourself. I'm so happy to be able to pay Google or AWS or Azure to have that worry for me, to have that kind of redundancy on hand. And clearly, we are down less time now that we have less control [laugh] if that makes sense.Corey: I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to find you?Simen: So, I'm at @svale—at Svale—on Twitter, and my DMs are open. And also we have a Slack community for Sanity, so if you want to kind of engage with Sanity, you can join our Slack community, and that will be on there as well. And you find it in the footer on all of the sanity.io webpages.Corey: And we will put links to that in the show notes.Simen: Perfect.Corey: Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I really appreciate it.Simen: Thank you. This was fun.Corey: Simen Svale, CTO and co-founder at Sanity. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting comment, and make sure you put that insulting comment on all of the different podcast platforms that are out there because you have to run everything on every cloud provider.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Six Five with Patrick Moorhead and Daniel Newman
The Six Five On the Road at AWS re:Invent 2022 w/ Andrew Davidson, SVP, Product Management, MongoDB

The Six Five with Patrick Moorhead and Daniel Newman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 14:42


The Six Five On the Road at AWS reInvent 2022. Patrick Moorhead and Daniel Newman sit down with Andrew Davidson, SVP, Product Management, MongoDB. Their discussion covers: Evolution of the MongoDB & AWS partnership How customers are utilizing MongoDB Atlas on AWS to build cutting-edge applications Data-driven approach to the cloud Cloud strategy in a hybrid world

TechCheck
Salesforce Co-CEO Bret Taylor to Step Down, VMware CEO Raghu Raghuram on Multi-Cloud Strategy & Pure Storage CEO Charles Giancarlo on Earnings Beat 12/01/22

TechCheck

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 43:56


Our anchors begin today's show with CNBC's Frank Holland covering Salesforce's latest earnings as Co-CEO Bret Taylor announces plans to leave the software company. Then, CNBC'S Kate Rooney recaps FTX Founder Sam Bankman-Fried's comments on the crypto exchange's collapse at the New York Times DealBook Summit, and Microsoft Executive Vice President of Cloud & AI Scott Guthrie discuses innovations across the cloud sector. Next, CNBC's Kristina Partsinevelos breaks down the latest wave of cost cuts and layoffs across tech, and VMware CEO Raghu Raghuram explains his multi-cloud strategy. Later, CNBC's Ylan Mui brings us the latest headlines as the Senate Agriculture Committee holds a hearing on FTX, and Pure Storage CEO Charles Giancarlo discusses the data storage firm's latest earnings beat and guidance.

Getup Kubicast
#109 - Cuidando dos seus segredos

Getup Kubicast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 71:13


O Kubicast traz o Gustavo Carvalho e o Lucas Severo Alves para uma conversa sobre Segurança em Cloud e Kubernetes, o que se deve proteger numa empresa, a diferença entre informação sensível e secrets, como funciona o #externalsecretsoperator, projeto Open Source da #CNCF do qual são mantenedores, e muito mais.  As RECOMENDAÇÕES do programa seguem abaixo:Patient Number 9 (novo álbum do Ozzy Osbourne)Desafio aos deuses: a fascinante história do risco (livro do Peter L. Bernstein)Blindspotting (filme) O Kubicast é uma produção da Getup, a única empresa brasileira 100% focada e especializada em Kubernetes. Todos os episódios do podcast estão no site da Getup e nas principais plataformas de áudio digital. Alguns deles estão registrados no YT.

Data Protection Gumbo
170: HYCU at re:Invent - Leveraging Data Protection on AWS - HYCU

Data Protection Gumbo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 38:24


Subbiah Sundaram, Sr. VP of Products at HYCU discusses several key announcements at re:Invent 2022, details about HYCU's free tier which provides zero-impact backups to one-click restores, and easy data mobility.

Cloud Talk
Episode 126: Full-Stack Observability: Bringing Developers and the Business Together

Cloud Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 30:57


Join Joe Byrne, CTO of AppDynamics, as he and Jeff DeVerter discuss the impact of connecting business KPIs to the quality of the developer's code and the operations of the underlying systems. Special Guest: Joe Byrne.

Dell Technologies PowerofStorage Podcast
Unlocking Innovation Anywhere with Software-Defined Solutions

Dell Technologies PowerofStorage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 13:18


Nick and Ryan discuss Dell's recent efforts for delivering software-defined solutions in public clouds. They explore what is possible when your favorite Dell enterprise data services are able to be paired with the unlimited compute and advanced services in the public clouds.

Interviews: Tech and Business
CIO Strategy: Business Transformation with Multicloud

Interviews: Tech and Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 40:15


#cio #cloudcomputing #digitaltransformation This episode of CXOTalk explores business transformation from the perspective of Seagate's Chief Information Officer, Ravi Naik. He has a unique perspective on cloud technology because he is also Executive Vice President of the company's multicloud product offering.The conversation includes these topics:● On the CIO and IT strategy at Seagate● What is multi-cloud?● Why is multicloud important to enterprise cloud adoption?● On cloud vendor lock-in in the public cloud● On managing the dual roles of CIO and EVP of cloud services● How can CIOs overcome challenges to being business leaders?● On customer experience and the Chief Information Officer● How can cloud providers improve customer experience?● How do multicloud environments create business value?● How can CIOs be effective driving digital transformation?In his role as CIO, Ravi Naik is leading large transformative initiatives, leveraging ideas and platforms focused on future growth. With his passion for technology, as EVP of Lyve Cloud, he is pioneering the next chapter of innovation and leadership in Seagate storage services.Prior to joining Seagate in 2017, Ravi was the senior vice president of technology at Katerra, a startup revolutionising the construction industry by transforming the way buildings and spaces come to life. Before Katerra, in 2007 Ravi joined SanDisk to lead an enterprise-wide transformation initiative. Following the success of SanDisk transformation, he was appointed CIO, remaining with the organisation through its sale to Western Digital in 2016. Before that, he held leadership positions in Mercury Interactive, Hewlett Packard, and 3Com Corporation. Naik holds a bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Bombay in India.

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast
EP081 - The Future of Multicloud Data Protection is Here

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 20:52


Today, on November 17th, Dell Technologies announced the expansion of the Data Protection Portfolio as well as new Security Innovations. Listen to Rob Emsley, Director of Product Marketing for Data Protection and Cyber Security at Dell, as well as Alyson Langon, Director of APEX Solutions at Dell discuss the current data protection landscape, the key product announcements, and how Dell is helping to lead organizations into the future with modern, simple, & resilient multicloud dataprotection.

Getup Kubicast
#108 - Cloud ou Multi-Cloud?

Getup Kubicast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 45:32


Camila Alves, também conhecida como @tanacloud, é a convidada especial desse episódio para falar sobre conceito multi-cloud, vantagens de estar em diferentes provedores, disaster recovery, alta disponibilidade em multi-region e gestão de banco de dados e assets em multi-cloud.As RECOMENDAÇÕES do episódio seguem abaixo:O poder da ação (livro de Paulo Vieira) Cada dia uma surpresa: Time Movistar (série na Netfilx)Mergulhar de cilindroCantar e tocar um instrumento O Kubicast é uma produção da Getup, a única empresa brasileira 100% focada e especializada em Kubernetes. Todos os episódios do podcast estão no site da Getup e nas principais plataformas de áudio digital. Alguns deles estão registrados no YT.

Breaking Analysis with Dave Vellante
Cloudflare's Supercloud…What Multi Cloud Could Have Been

Breaking Analysis with Dave Vellante

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 22:58


Over the past decade, Cloudflare has built a global network that has the potential to become the fourth U.S.-based hyperscale-class cloud. In our view, the company is building a durable revenue model with hooks into many important markets. These include the more mature DDoS protection space, but also extend to growth sectors such as zero trust, a serverless platform for application development and an increasing number of services such as database and object storage. In essence, Cloudflare can be thought of as a giant, distributed supercomputer that can connect multiple clouds and act as a highly efficient scheduling engine– allocating and optimizing resources at scale. Its disruptive DNA is increasingly attracting novel startups and established global firms looking for a reliable, secure, high performance, low latency and more cost effective alternative to AWS and legacy infrastructure solutions. In this Breaking Analysis we initiate deeper coverage of Cloudflare. While the stock got hammered this past week on tepid guidance, we are optimistic about the company's future. In this post, we'll briefly explain our take on the company and its unique business model. We'll then share some peer comparisons with both a financial snapshot and some fresh ETR survey data. Finally we'll show some examples of how we think Cloudflare could be a disruptive force with a supercloud-like offering that, in many respects, is what multi-cloud should have been. 

The Hedge
Hedge 153: Security Perceptions and Multicloud Roundtable

The Hedge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 35:44


Tom, Eyvonne, and Russ hang out at the hedge on this episode. The topics of discussion include our perception of security—does the way IT professionals treat security and privacy helpful for those who aren't involved in the IT world? Do we discourage users from taking security seriously by making it so complex and hard to use? Our second topic is whether multicloud is being oversold for the average network operator.

Over The Edge
Everything is About Data with Michael Sherwood, Chief Innovation Officer, City of Las Vegas

Over The Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 51:46


This episode of Over the Edge features an interview between Matt Trifiro and Michael Sherwood, Chief Innovation Officer, City of Las Vegas. Michael has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of process improvement, technology, and innovation. He is extremely passionate about technology and believes that more sustainable communicates can be built through innovation, workforce development, and collaboration.In this episode, Michael explains how the city of Las Vegas is helping the community to be more efficient by providing new opportunities through innovation. The city is using technology to improve public safety, healthcare, transportation, education, and economic development. Michael discusses that by increasing connectivity and access for all communities, setting up innovation centers, and improving the city's technological infrastructure, Las Vegas will continue to be a leader of municipalities as a destination not just for entertainment but also for business and progress. ---------Key Quotes:"One of the great things about doing all these innovation projects is that we get to meet a lot of great companies. They get to come to Las Vegas and see Las Vegas not just as a place for entertainment and hospitality, but they get to see as a great place for possibly relocating and doing business in the city of Las Vegas.""Las Vegas is innovative in nature. We always think of innovative and entertainment, entertainment and hospitality. But, Las Vegas is also becoming very innovative on the technology side and really working towards diversifying its economy and attracting these new types of technologies. And, so from everything from underground to above ground, you know, you're gonna see those things here. And, it really is a testament to the community of people that live here as well as the people that are in charge.""For us it's all about creating those new opportunities, creating those collisions that between our community and business, that hopefully leads to some really great things in the future.""Las Vegas recognizes that education is extremely important and we want to build on that. And so from a technology perspective, obviously while we're not the school district, we support them in their needs. But, if there's things we're doing in the innovation space that can help students, that's what we're doing." "To have intelligence in our roadways and in our communities, the grid really is where it's gonna happen. And, it's going to be game changing for communities." "The cloud is never going anywhere. It's just another puzzle piece that provides more capability than we've had before. The cloud opened the doors several years ago. This next door that's opening is really starting to get us to the point of people starting to think about the Jetsons and start thinking about the Matrix and the technology that you see in those movies, and in some of that you start seeing the underpinnings of some of that now is actually possible." "The capabilities of the future are going to be content or data driven where you're pushing data out into the community itself. Most businesses already have good internet connectivity. So, the next part of it is how do you marry that all together." ---------Show Timestamps:(02:10) History of Las Vegas(05:00) What it's like to be the Chief Innovation Officer and CTO(07:00) Evaluating Technologies for Cities(09:00) Promoting Public Safety(10:00) Health Initiatives in Las Vegas(13:30) Vision for Las Vegas LTE Network(18:15) Transportation Trends(22:00) Making it Easier for Technology in Las Vegas(24:30) Economic Development and Jobs(27:45) Education Initiatives(33:15) Solidifying Sustainability(35:30) Bringing New Grid Technologies(40:30) Enticing People to come to Las Vegas(46:30) Importance of Connectivity--------Sponsor:Over the Edge is brought to you by Dell Technologies to unlock the potential of your infrastructure with edge solutions. From hardware and software to data and operations, across your entire multi-cloud environment, we're here to help you simplify your edge so you can generate more value. Learn more by visiting DellTechnologies.com/SimplifyYourEdge for more information or click on the link in the show notes.--------Links:Follow Matt on TwitterConnect with Michael on LinkedInwww.CaspianStudios.com

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro
Understanding Multi-cloud with VMware and Intel

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 26:07 Transcription Available


Once you get a clear idea of what multi-cloud really is, then the real questions begin. One of the biggest: How do you know which hyper scaler to choose and what happens if you want to switch? Will there be downtime within that transition? Not if you use the right platform. Shelby Skrhak speaks with Annette Miller , Multi-Cloud Partner Development Manager at VMware , and Illyse Sheaffer , Cloud/SDI - Technical Solutions Specialist at Intel , about: Demystifying any confusion around multi-cloud Choosing the right hyper scaler Reasons why companies are moving to VMware      To join the discussion, follow us on Twitter @IngramTechSol #B2BTechTalk Listen to this episode and more like it by subscribing to B2B Tech Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Stitcher. Or, tune in on our website.

CIO Exchange Podcast
Mindshifts for Modernizing Applications - Guest: Ginna Raahauge, CIO at Zayo

CIO Exchange Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 36:19


This conversation is part of our Lead/Forward series, where we talk with technology leaders about the real stories behind the themes of innovation, talent, and experience. In this episode, we interview Ginna Raahauge, CIO at Zayo to find out more about the current state and future of the expanding definition of DevOps and what application modernization really means within the new environments the applications are being consumed. She explains how Covid has accelerated the diversification of application use in the office and at home. Ginna delves into the need for enhanced internet speed and bandwidth capabilities, as well as new considerations for implementing security measures earlier in the development process. She also talks about pushing further into the edge, scaling in the cloud, and the trials and tribulations of understanding legacy applications while investing in infrastructure and talent to upskill and modernize for the future. ---------Key Quotes“When you think about the infrastructure by which the foundation you are deploying your applications, the developers are really having to think about that differently, have more immersive conversations around what that architecture looks like, what the risks in that architecture are, or the assumptions that have really changed in their development aspects of that.”“Developers are so much more closer to the impact of the experience, whether it's consumer, partner, customer, or even end user inside like an employee experience. And, it just is becoming so much more blended and immersive.”“We are still going through that transformation of really what is DevOps? We've been trained on the traditional or the more longstanding DevOps methods and agile taxonomy. But, I do think that it's still early given the new environmentals of hybrid and just the pure consumption demand over more wavelength and 5G types of experiences, versus hard line experiences or fiber to the house. Not everybody has that.”“I think that the definition of DevOps is expanding and getting bigger and we're seeing where those edges are blending, and we have to think about some of those experiences in that and they have to develop differently.”---------Time stamps:01:15 Shift in Technological Acceleration and Application Performance04:45 Breaking down Bandwidth07:30 Developer Redevelopment of Approach10:15 Evolution and Reskilling of DevOps14:15 DevSecOps Considerations with User Experience10:15 Future Developers Understanding Legacy25:45 Producing New Ideas Without Old Constraints29:15 DevOps and Cloud---------Links:Ginna Raahaug on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ginna-raahauge-9b4275/CIO Exchange on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vmwcioexchangeYadin Porter de León on Twitter: https://twitter.com/porterdeleon [Subscribe to the Podcast] On Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cio-exchange-podcast/id1498290907 For more podcasts, video and in-depth research go to https://www.vmware.com/cio---------Keywords: cio, cio exchange, VMware, innovation, leadership, DevOps, Developer, Developers, ops, operations, IT, information technology, business, technology, cto, devsecops, security, cloud, multi-cloud, hyperscaling, hyperscalers

The New Stack Podcast
Latest Enhancements to HashiCorp Terraform and Terraform Cloud

The New Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 17:52


What is Terraform?Terraform is HashiCorp's flagship software. The open source tool provides a way to define IT resources — such as monitoring software or cloud services — in human-readable configuration files. These files, which serve as blueprints, can then be used to automatically provision the systems themselves. Kubernetes deployments, for instance, can be streamlined through Terraform. "Terraform basically translates what your configuration was codified in by your configuration, and provisions it to that desired end state," explained Meghan Liese, [sponsor_inline_mention slug="hashicorp" ]HashiCorp[/sponsor_inline_mention] vice president of product and partner marketing in this podcast and video recording, recorded at the company's user conference, HashiConf 2022, held this month in Los Angeles. For this interview, Liese discusses the latest enhancements to Terraform, and Terraform Cloud, a managed service offering that is part of the HashiCorp Cloud Platform. [Embed Podcast]Why Should Developers be Interested in Terraform?Typically, the DevOps teams, or system administrators, use Terraform to provision infrastructure, but there is also growing interest to allow developers to do it themselves, in a self-service fashion, Liese explained. Multicloud skills are in short supply, concluded the 2022 HashiCorp State of Cloud Strategy Survey, so making the provision process easier could help more developers, the company reckons. A Terraform self-service model, which was introduced earlier this year, could “cut down on the training an organization would need to do to get developers up to speed on using the infrastructure-as-code software,” Liese said. In this “no code” setup, developers can pick from a catalog of no-code-ready modules, which can be deployed directly to workspaces. No need to learn the HCL configuration language. And the administrators will no longer have to answer the same “how-do-I-do-this-in-HCL?” queries. The new console interface aims to greatly expand the use of Terraform.  The company has been offering self-service options for a while, by way of an architecture that allows for modules to be reused through the private registry for Terraform Cloud and Terraform Enterprise.What is the Make Code Block and Why is it Important?The recent release of Terraform 1.3 came with the promise to greatly reduce the amount of code HCL jockeys must manage, through the improvement of the make code block. Actually, make has been available since Terraform 1.1, but some kinks were worked out for this latest release. What make does is provide the ability to refactor resources within a Terraform configuration file, moving large code blocks off as separate modules, where they can be discovered through a public or private registry.What is Continuous Validation?With the known state of a system captured on Terraform, it is a short step to check to ensure that the actual running system is identical to the desired state captured in HCL. Many times “drift” can occur, as administrators, or even the apps themselves, make changes to the system. Especially in regulated environments, such as hospitals, it is essential that a system is in a correct state. Earlier this year, HashiCorp added Drift Detection to Terraform Cloud to continuously check infrastructure state to detect changes and provide alerts and offer remediation if that option is chosen. Now, another update, Continuous validation expands these checks to include user assertions, or post-conditions, as well. One post-condition may be something like ensuring that certificates haven't expired. If they do, the software can offer an alert to the admin to update the certs. Another condition might be to check for new container images, which may have been updated as a response to a security patch.    

CIO Exchange Podcast
Managing Across Multiple Clouds and Taming the Chaos - Guests: Jeffrey Shaw, CIO and Dale Ramsey, VP of Cloud Infrastructure for Employers

CIO Exchange Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 17:36


What's stopping your business from deploying applications 50% faster to increase market share and boost revenue? For Jeff Shaw, CIO of EMPLOYERS Insurance, it was finding the right place to run the right application with the agility and scalability of the cloud. This meant leveraging not one cloud, but multiple clouds to take advantage of the best tools that each one had to offer while at the same time, managing them as if they were one cloud. In this episode, Jeff is joined by his VP of Cloud Infrastructure Dale Ramsey and together they describe the journey they took to move all their applications off of aging infrastructure, and run them in multiple clouds while ensuring that everything worked together seamlessly. Throughout the conversation, we discuss the real challenges that the business faced when it came to evaluation, training teams, and executing what seemed, at first, to be impossible. During the discussion, Jeff reveals what he considers to be the key elements for successfully taking advantage of all the best tools of each cloud while ensuring that security and customer experience are not compromised. ---------Links:Jeffrey Shaw's Profile: https://www.employers.com/management-team/jeffrey-shawCIO Exchange on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vmwcioexchangeYadin Porter de León on Twitter: https://twitter.com/porterdeleon [Subscribe to the Podcast] On Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cio-exchange-podcast/id1498290907 For more podcasts, video and in-depth research go to https://www.vmware.com/cio---------Keywords: cio, cio exchange, VMware, innovation, leadership, DevOps, Multi-Cloud, Cross-Cloud, Oracle Cloud, IBM Cloud, Microsoft Azure, AWS, VMC, Developers, ops, operations, IT, information technology, business 

Dell Technologies PowerofStorage Podcast
Accelerating Innovation with Dell and VMware

Dell Technologies PowerofStorage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 12:51


Mick talks to Jon Siegel, SVP Product Marketing at Dell Technologies and Dave McGraw, Vice President from the Office of the CTO at VMware to get their perspective on VMware's announcements at VMware Explore including vSAN Express Storage Architecture, vSphere Distributed Services Engine (also known as Project Monterey) and the latest with VMware Tanzu. Jon and Dave also discuss how they're working together to engineer these new VMware technologies into Dell solutions. These 40+ projects span the Dell Technologies portfolio but they have one thing in common – they're all designed with the to simplify the multicloud operational experience with a consistent operational model.

Cloud Wars Live with Bob Evans
Road to Oracle CloudWorld 2022 | CIO Jae Evans Previews Hybrid Cloud & Multi-Cloud Customer Success Stories

Cloud Wars Live with Bob Evans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 12:30


The Big Themes:Customer demand for multi-cloud: Oracle has been focused recently on partnerships with Microsoft and Amazon that allow mutual customers to pick and choose the cloud services they get from each vendor, and Jae says that big-name brands are very hot on this idea.Cloud @ Customer offers even more flexibility: For customers in highly regulated industries or that prefer more control and security, Oracle's Cloud @ Customer offering provides all the benefits of a fully managed cloud region in an on-premise environment.What customers can expect at CloudWorld: Jae says that if customers can come to the event with a clear understanding of their business goals and desired outcomes, they'll find a plethora of information about how Oracle's cloud solutions can help achieve them.The Big Quote: "These are more multi-cloud-type solutions that are making it simpler and advantageous for our customers to use. We have a lot of customers who are excited about it—AT&T, Marriott, and Veritas to name a few—who have really voiced their interest and excitement about what this can do for them... getting that flexibility and optionality so they can get the best cost, best performance for their cloud business."Want to learn more about Oracle CloudWorld 2022?Explore content, speakers, and registration options.This episode is sponsored by Oracle.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:00


Multi-cloud services are an emerging category of software designed to make your Dev and Ops teams' multi-cloud reality easier to cope with. Sponsor VMware stops by the Day Two Cloud podcast to talk about how the operational challenges of running workloads in a mix of public and private clouds and how its multi-cloud services initiative can help. The post Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Day 2 Cloud
Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored)

Day 2 Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:00


Multi-cloud services are an emerging category of software designed to make your Dev and Ops teams' multi-cloud reality easier to cope with. Sponsor VMware stops by the Day Two Cloud podcast to talk about how the operational challenges of running workloads in a mix of public and private clouds and how its multi-cloud services initiative can help. The post Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:00


Multi-cloud services are an emerging category of software designed to make your Dev and Ops teams' multi-cloud reality easier to cope with. Sponsor VMware stops by the Day Two Cloud podcast to talk about how the operational challenges of running workloads in a mix of public and private clouds and how its multi-cloud services initiative can help. The post Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

On Cloud
Reducing the pain of multi-cloud management, now and in the future

On Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 26:39


Multi-cloud is here to stay, but for all its benefits there are hefty challenges too, such as complexity, heterogeneity, and inconsistent operations. In this podcast, David Linthicum talks with VMware's Richard Munro about the many challenges of multi-cloud and how to solve them – now and in the future. Richard's take is that right now, companies need to use cross-cloud services for more consistency. The future will be about edge computing, better data management, and decentralization.

Cloud Wars Live with Bob Evans
Road to Oracle CloudWorld 2022 Databases Preview: Exadata, 23c Release, and More with EVP Juan Loaiza

Cloud Wars Live with Bob Evans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 10:48


The Big Themes:Enhancing the developer experience: This is a major focus for Oracle, and many CloudWorld sessions will focus on work that's been done to help developers use Oracle DBs, including Autonomous Database.Oracle Exadata: Along with database and cloud, Juan says that Exadata is one of three core initiatives for the event.Oracle Database 23c release: CloudWorld will feature the very first preview and discussion of Oracle's next major DB release, called 23c.The Big Quote: "We're also talking about what we're doing for distributed apps, like micro-services and events. We're building a lot of this technology directly into the Oracle database to make it dramatically simpler. We'll be talking about things we're doing with documents and document databases—that's going to be a really big deal."Want to learn more about Oracle CloudWorld 2022?Explore content, speakers, and registration options. This episode is sponsored by Oracle.

Cloud Wars Live with Bob Evans
Road to Oracle CloudWorld 2022: Fusion Analytics, Multi-cloud, and a Keynote Preview from EVP T.K. Anand

Cloud Wars Live with Bob Evans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 10:34


Road to Oracle CloudWorld 2022 Oracle Cloud Analytics EVP T.K. AnandThe Big Themes:Fusion Analytics showcases what makes Oracle Cloud unique: T.K. argues that Oracle stands out among the competition as the only full-stack enterprise cloud vendor, since Oracle is both a cloud platform and application provider.The next wave of analytics transformation: Following the self-service and the SaaS revolutions in analytics, now the industry is moving exploring AI and machine learning and natural language. T.K. will be talking about this in his CloudWorld keynote.Multi-cloud and customer choice: Granting flexibility to customers has been a major theme within Oracle recently, and T.K. says that Oracle Analytics has a strong multi-cloud perspective and can work with data regardless of where it lives.The Big Quote: "The world has changed dramatically, as you know, but Oracle's been executing relentlessly on its cloud strategy. And we're seeing tremendous success in the market. My team has been busy building the next generation analytics platform, and integrating it with all our cloud applications."Want to learn more about Oracle CloudWorld 2022?Explore content, speakers, and registration options.This episode is sponsored by Oracle.

On Cloud
Cracking the multi-cloud security puzzle by shifting security left

On Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 25:41


Multi-cloud security is one of the most difficult pieces of the cloud complexity puzzle to solve for. It's also one of the most critical. In this podcast, David Linthicum talks with Deloitte's Ramesh Menon about how shifting security left—i.e., implementing appropriate security during application development to solve issues before systems go live—can help companies move from a reactive to a more proactive security posture and increase the effectiveness of their security program.

The CTO Advisor
Iztik Moshaof VMware Explore 2022

The CTO Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022


Iztik Moshaof, Sr. Director of Global IT at Cybereason, shares Cybereason's Multi-Cloud journey, including AWS, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, and Microsoft Azure. Keith and Iztik met at VMware 2022 and discuss Oracle Cloud VMware Solution on the set of the CTO Advisor Studio.

Virtually Speaking Podcast
VMware Explore 2022 - VMware CEO Raghu Raghuram

Virtually Speaking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 16:58


On this episode of the Virtually Speaking Podcast Pete and John sit down with VMware CEO Raghu Raghuram to discuss the Multi-Cloud journey, VMware's transition to a SAAS model and much more. Read more

Virtually Speaking Podcast
VMware Explore 2022 Recap with Kit Colbert

Virtually Speaking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 28:26


VMware Explore 2022 is in the books and what a week it was. Pete and John captured dozens of interviews with VMware SMEs, execs, partners and customers and will be releasing them throughout the coming weeks.This week on The Virtually Speaking Podcast we welcome VMware CTO Kit Kolbert to discuss VMware's Multi-Cloud story, the latest innovations, much more. Read more

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Network Break 397: VMware Aria Sings Multicloud Management; NVIDIA Ordered To Stop Selling AI Chips To China

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 51:26


This week's Network Break podcast tackles space weather, new products from VMware, a significant firewall vulnerability, an order barring NVIDIA from selling certain chips to China, and more tech news. The post Network Break 397: VMware Aria Sings Multicloud Management; NVIDIA Ordered To Stop Selling AI Chips To China appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Network Break
Network Break 397: VMware Aria Sings Multicloud Management; NVIDIA Ordered To Stop Selling AI Chips To China

Packet Pushers - Network Break

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 51:26


This week's Network Break podcast tackles space weather, new products from VMware, a significant firewall vulnerability, an order barring NVIDIA from selling certain chips to China, and more tech news. The post Network Break 397: VMware Aria Sings Multicloud Management; NVIDIA Ordered To Stop Selling AI Chips To China appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Network Break 397: VMware Aria Sings Multicloud Management; NVIDIA Ordered To Stop Selling AI Chips To China

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 51:26


This week's Network Break podcast tackles space weather, new products from VMware, a significant firewall vulnerability, an order barring NVIDIA from selling certain chips to China, and more tech news. The post Network Break 397: VMware Aria Sings Multicloud Management; NVIDIA Ordered To Stop Selling AI Chips To China appeared first on Packet Pushers.

The CyberWire
Securing multi-cloud identity with orchestration. [CyberWire-X]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 31:37


While multi-cloud brings significant benefits, it also poses serious security risks. And identity is the reason. Each cloud platform, such as Azure, Google, and AWS, uses proprietary identity systems, and the lack of interoperability makes it unruly to manage. These disparate systems can't talk to each other resulting in a fragmented environment full of identity silos — the perfect way for an attacker to get in and cause destruction. In this episode of CyberWire-X, the CyberWire's CSO, Chief Analyst, and Senior Fellow, Rick Howard, is joined in the first half by Hash Table member Rick Doten, the CISO for Healthcare Enterprises and Centene. In the second half of the show, CyberWire podcast host Dave Bittner talks with our episode sponsor Strata Identity's CEO and Co-founder Eric Olden. Both sets of discussions center around the challenges to identity management caused by the rapid shift to multi-cloud.