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The Wellness Revolution Podcast with Amber Shaw
TWR 123: Don't Treat Symptoms, Treat the Cause with Michelle Shapiro

The Wellness Revolution Podcast with Amber Shaw

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 58:06


Everywhere you look, there is information about what kind of diet works best. Although restrictive diets can produce results for you, they will not necessarily be sustainable, so your weight loss will not be long-term. You can begin to see real progress on your journey when you address the core issues rather than just the symptoms you are trying to stop. Historically, dietitians have followed the Food Pyramid, but now Doctors view dietitians as abandoning nutritional science in favor of HAES/Intuitive Eating. Michelle Shapiro RD, our podcast guest today, calls herself the "Queen of the Middle Ground" because she strives to bridge the differences between dietitians. It is very divisive in the nutrition world now, with different RDs adhering to different approaches. Consequently, Michelle believes that the patient is left out of the equation. Using a holistic approach, Michelle empowers each client to become their own expert on their own body. In this episode, Michelle shares her journey to becoming an integrative/functional dietitian, describes functional medicine, and discusses the importance of language and mindset in healing. Key Highlights: What does it look like to bridge the gap with dietitians? Michelle shares her story Deficiencies in chronic illness treatment within our highly specialized medical system What is functional medicine? What is the difference between an integrated, functional, and alternative/holistic practitioner? Do functional doctors have the same training as conventional doctors? Michelle explains Wellness Map, which she created to improve access and affordability of integrative care Is integrative/functional medicine covered by insurance? Options for accessing care The importance of self-talk and intentional language Body positivity's flaws and how nutrition science can help Rather than treating symptoms, target the underlying cause Episode resources Amber's Little Black Dress Bootcamp: ambershaw.com/little-black-dress-bootcamp Get your Liposomal Glutathione from Cymbiotika and use code AMBER15 for 15% off About Michelle Shapiro Michelle Shapiro is an Integrative/Functional Registered Dietitian from NYC with 8+ years of experience serving over 1000 clients to reverse their anxiety, heal longstanding gut issues and approach weight loss lovingly and in a body-neutral way. Michelle is also the founder of Wellness Map, a functional medicine advocacy membership to help clients get connected with holistic healthcare providers. Connect with Michelle Website: www.wellnessmap.co| michelleshapirord.com Instagram: @michelleshapirord About Amber Shaw Amber is a Body Transformation Expert, Founder of The Wellness Revolution, motivational speaker, and NBC Health and Wellness Coach. Having built a lifestyle that allowed her to embrace work, children, exercise, and well-balanced eating habits, Amber now works with helping and coaching women to achieve the same level of serenity and empowerment through a sustainable way of living. Connect with Amber Instagram: @msambershaw TikTok: @msambershaw Website: ambershaw.com

Screaming in the Cloud
Crafting a Modern Data Protection Strategy with Sam Nicholls

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:26


About SamSam Nicholls: Veeam's Director of Public Cloud Product Marketing, with 10+ years of sales, alliance management and product marketing experience in IT. Sam has evolved from his on-premises storage days and is now laser-focused on spreading the word about cloud-native backup and recovery, packing in thousands of viewers on his webinars, blogs and webpages.Links Referenced: Veeam AWS Backup: https://www.veeam.com/aws-backup.html Veeam: https://veeam.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Chronosphere. Tired of observability costs going up every year without getting additional value? Or being locked in to a vendor due to proprietary data collection, querying and visualization? Modern day, containerized environments require a new kind of observability technology that accounts for the massive increase in scale and attendant cost of data. With Chronosphere, choose where and how your data is routed and stored, query it easily, and get better context and control. 100% open source compatibility means that no matter what your setup is, they can help. Learn how Chronosphere provides complete and real-time insight into ECS, EKS, and your microservices, whereever they may be at snark.cloud/chronosphere That's snark.cloud/chronosphere Corey: This episode is brought to us by our friends at Pinecone. They believe that all anyone really wants is to be understood, and that includes your users. AI models combined with the Pinecone vector database let your applications understand and act on what your users want… without making them spell it out. Make your search application find results by meaning instead of just keywords, your personalization system make picks based on relevance instead of just tags, and your security applications match threats by resemblance instead of just regular expressions. Pinecone provides the cloud infrastructure that makes this easy, fast, and scalable. Thanks to my friends at Pinecone for sponsoring this episode. Visit Pinecone.io to understand more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by and sponsored by our friends over at Veeam. And as a part of that, they have thrown one of their own to the proverbial lion. My guest today is Sam Nicholls, Director of Public Cloud over at Veeam. Sam, thank you for joining me.Sam: Hey. Thanks for having me, Corey, and thanks for everyone joining and listening in. I do know that I've been thrown into the lion's den, and I am [laugh] hopefully well-prepared to answer anything and everything that Corey throws my way. Fingers crossed. [laugh].Corey: I don't think there's too much room for criticizing here, to be direct. I mean, Veeam is a company that is solidly and thoroughly built around a problem that absolutely no one cares about. I mean, what could possibly be wrong with that? You do backups; which no one ever cares about. Restores, on the other hand, people care very much about restores. And that's when they learn, “Oh, I really should have cared about backups at any point prior to 20 minutes ago.”Sam: Yeah, it's a great point. It's kind of like taxes and insurance. It's almost like, you know, something that you have to do that you don't necessarily want to do, but when push comes to shove, and something's burning down, a file has been deleted, someone's made their way into your account and, you know, running a right mess within there, that's when you really, kind of, care about what you mentioned, which is the recovery piece, the speed of recovery, the reliability of recovery.Corey: It's been over a decade, and I'm still sore about losing my email archives from 2006 to 2009. There's no way to get it back. I ran my own mail server; it was an iPhone setting that said, “Oh, yeah, automatically delete everything in your trash folder—or archive folder—after 30 days.” It was just a weird default setting back in that era. I didn't realize it was doing that. Yeah, painful stuff.And we learned the hard way in some of these cases. Not that I really have much need for email from that era of my life, but every once in a while it still bugs me. Which gets speaks to the point that the people who are the most fanatical about backing things up are the people who have been burned by not having a backup. And I'm fortunate in that it wasn't someone else's data with which I had been entrusted that really cemented that lesson for me.Sam: Yeah, yeah. It's a good point. I could remember a few years ago, my wife migrated a very aging, polycarbonate white Mac to one of the shiny new aluminum ones and thought everything was good—Corey: As the white polycarbonate Mac becomes yellow, then yeah, all right, you know, it's time to replace it. Yeah. So yeah, so she wiped the drive, and what happened?Sam: That was her moment where she learned the value and importance of backup unless she backs everything up now. I fortunately have never gone through it. But I'm employed by a backup vendor and that's why I care about it. But it's incredibly important to have, of course.Corey: Oh, yes. My spouse has many wonderful qualities, but one that drives me slightly nuts is she's something of a digital packrat where her hard drives on her laptop will periodically fill up. And I used to take the approach of oh, you can be more efficient and do the rest. And I realized no, telling other people they're doing it wrong is generally poor practice, whereas just buying bigger drives is way easier. Let's go ahead and do that. It's small price to pay for domestic tranquility.And there's a lesson in that. We can map that almost perfectly to the corporate world where you folks tend to operate in. You're not doing home backup, last time I checked; you are doing public cloud backup. Actually, I should ask that. Where do you folks start and where do you stop?Sam: Yeah, no, it's a great question. You know, we started over 15 years ago when virtualization, specifically VMware vSphere, was really the up-and-coming thing, and, you know, a lot of folks were there trying to utilize agents to protect their vSphere instances, just like they were doing with physical Windows and Linux boxes. And, you know, it kind of got the job done, but was it the best way of doing it? No. And that's kind of why Veeam was pioneered; it was this agentless backup, image-based backup for vSphere.And, of course, you know, in the last 15 years, we've seen lots of transitions, of course, we're here at Screaming in the Cloud, with you, Corey, so AWS, as well as a number of other public cloud vendors we can help protect as well, as a number of SaaS applications like Microsoft 365, metadata and data within Salesforce. So, Veeam's really kind of come a long way from just virtual machines to really taking a global look at the entirety of modern environments, and how can we best protect each and every single one of those without trying to take a square peg and fit it in a round hole?Corey: It's a good question and a common one. We wind up with an awful lot of folks who are confused by the proliferation of data. And I'm one of them, let's be very clear here. It comes down to a problem where backups are a multifaceted, deep problem, and I don't think that people necessarily think of it that way. But I take a look at all of the different, even AWS services that I use for my various nonsense, and which ones can be used to store data?Well, all of them. Some of them, you have to hold it in a particularly wrong sort of way, but they all store data. And in various contexts, a lot of that data becomes very important. So, what service am I using, in which account am I using, and in what region am I using it, and you wind up with data sprawl, where it's a tremendous amount of data that you can generally only track down by looking at your bills at the end of the month. Okay, so what am I being charged, and for what service?That seems like a good place to start, but where is it getting backed up? How do you think about that? So, some people, I think, tend to ignore the problem, which we're seeing less and less, but other folks tend to go to the opposite extreme and we're just going to backup absolutely everything, and we're going to keep that data for the rest of our natural lives. It feels to me that there's probably an answer that is more appropriate somewhere nestled between those two extremes.Sam: Yeah, snapshot sprawl is a real thing, and it gets very, very expensive very, very quickly. You know, your snapshots of EC2 instances are stored on those attached EBS volumes. Five cents per gig per month doesn't sound like a lot, but when you're dealing with thousands of snapshots for thousands machines, it gets out of hand very, very quickly. And you don't know when to delete them. Like you say, folks are just retaining them forever and dealing with this unfortunate bill shock.So, you know, where to start is automating the lifecycle of a snapshot, right, from its creation—how often do we want to be creating them—from the retention—how long do we want to keep these for—and where do we want to keep them because there are other storage services outside of just EBS volumes. And then, of course, the ultimate: deletion. And that's important even from a compliance perspective as well, right? You've got to retain data for a specific number of years, I think healthcare is like seven years, but then you've—Corey: And then not a day more.Sam: Yeah, and then not a day more because that puts you out of compliance, too. So, policy-based automation is your friend and we see a number of folks building these policies out: gold, silver, bronze tiers based on criticality of data compliance and really just kind of letting the machine do the rest. And you can focus on not babysitting backup.Corey: What was it that led to the rise of snapshots? Because back in my very early days, there was no such thing. We wound up using a bunch of servers stuffed in a rack somewhere and virtualization was not really in play, so we had file systems on physical disks. And how do you back that up? Well, you have an agent of some sort that basically looks at all the files and according to some ruleset that it has, it copies them off somewhere else.It was slow, it was fraught, it had a whole bunch of logic that was pushed out to the very edge, and forget about restoring that data in a timely fashion or even validating a lot of those backups worked other than via checksum. And God help you if you had data that was constantly in the state of flux, where anything changing during the backup run would leave your backups in an inconsistent state. That on some level seems to have largely been solved by snapshots. But what's your take on it? You're a lot closer to this part of the world than I am.Sam: Yeah, snapshots, I think folks have turned to snapshots for the speed, the lack of impact that they have on production performance, and again, just the ease of accessibility. We have access to all different kinds of snapshots for EC2, RDS, EFS throughout the entirety of our AWS environment. So, I think the snapshots are kind of like the default go-to for folks. They can help deliver those very, very quick RPOs, especially in, for example, databases, like you were saying, that change very, very quickly and we all of a sudden are stranded with a crash-consistent backup or snapshot versus an application-consistent snapshot. And then they're also very, very quick to recover from.So, snapshots are very, very appealing, but they absolutely do have their limitations. And I think, you know, it's not a one or the other; it's that they've got to go hand-in-hand with something else. And typically, that is an image-based backup that is stored in a separate location to the snapshot because that snapshot is not independent of the disk that it is protecting.Corey: One of the challenges with snapshots is most of them are created in a copy-on-write sense. It takes basically an instant frozen point in time back—once upon a time when we ran MySQL databases on top of the NetApp Filer—which works surprisingly well—we would have a script that would automatically quiesce the database so that it would be in a consistent state, snapshot the file and then un-quiesce it, which took less than a second, start to finish. And that was awesome, but then you had this snapshot type of thing. It wasn't super portable, it needed to reference a previous snapshot in some cases, and AWS takes the same approach where the first snapshot it captures every block, then subsequent snapshots wind up only taking up as much size as there have been changes since the first snapshots. So, large quantities of data that generally don't get access to a whole lot have remarkably small, subsequent snapshot sizes.But that's not at all obvious from the outside, and looking at these things. They're not the most portable thing in the world. But it's definitely the direction that the industry has trended in. So, rather than having a cron job fire off an AWS API call to take snapshots of my volumes as a sort of the baseline approach that we all started with, what is the value proposition that you folks bring? And please don't say it's, “Well, cron jobs are hard and we have a friendlier interface for that.”Sam: [laugh]. I think it's really starting to look at the proliferation of those snapshots, understanding what they're good at, and what they are good for within your environment—as previously mentioned, low RPOs, low RTOs, how quickly can I take a backup, how frequently can I take a backup, and more importantly, how quickly can I restore—but then looking at their limitations. So, I mentioned that they were not independent of that disk, so that certainly does introduce a single point of failure as well as being not so secure. We've kind of touched on the cost component of that as well. So, what Veeam can come in and do is then take an image-based backup of those snapshots, right—so you've got your initial snapshot and then your incremental ones—we'll take the backup from that snapshot, and then we'll start to store that elsewhere.And that is likely going to be in a different account. We can look at the Well-Architected Framework, AWS deeming accounts as a security boundary, so having that cross-account function is critically important so you don't have that single point of failure. Locking down with IAM roles is also incredibly important so we haven't just got a big wide open door between the two. But that data is then stored in a separate account—potentially in a separate region, maybe in the same region—Amazon S3 storage. And S3 has the wonderful benefit of being still relatively performant, so we can have quick recoveries, but it is much, much cheaper. You're dealing with 2.3 cents per gig per month, instead of—Corey: To start, and it goes down from there with sizeable volumes.Sam: Absolutely, yeah. You can go down to S3 Glacier, where you're looking at, I forget how many points and zeros and nines it is, but it's fractions of a cent per gig per month, but it's going to take you a couple of days to recover that da—Corey: Even infrequent access cuts that in half.Sam: Oh yeah.Corey: And let's be clear, these are snapshot backups; you probably should not be accessing them on a consistent, sustained basis.Sam: Well, exactly. And this is where it's kind of almost like having your cake and eating it as well. Compliance or regulatory mandates or corporate mandates are saying you must keep this data for this length of time. Keeping that—you know, let's just say it's three years' worth of snapshots in an EBS volume is going to be incredibly expensive. What's the likelihood of you needing to recover something from two years—actually, even two months ago? It's very, very small.So, the performance part of S3 is, you don't need to take it as much into consideration. Can you recover? Yes. Is it going to take a little bit longer? Absolutely. But it's going to help you meet those retention requirements while keeping your backup bill low, avoiding that bill shock, right, spending tens and tens of thousands every single month on snapshots. This is what I mean by kind of having your cake and eating it.Corey: I somewhat recently have had a client where EBS snapshots are one of the driving costs behind their bill. It is one of their largest single line items. And I want to be very clear here because if one of those people who listen to this and thinking, “Well, hang on. Wait, they're telling stories about us, even though they're not naming us by name?” Yeah, there were three of you in the last quarter.So, at that point, it becomes clear it is not about something that one individual company has done and more about an overall driving trend. I am personalizing it a little bit by referring to as one company when there were three of you. This is a narrative device, not me breaking confidentiality. Disclaimer over. Now, when you talk to people about, “So, tell me why you've got 80 times more snapshots than you do EBS volumes?” The answer is as, “Well, we wanted to back things up and we needed to get hourly backups to a point, then daily backups, then monthly, and so on and so forth. And when this was set up, there wasn't a great way to do this natively and we don't always necessarily know what we need versus what we don't. And the cost of us backing this up, well, you can see it on the bill. The cost of us deleting too much and needing it as soon as we do? Well, that cost is almost incalculable. So, this is the safe way to go.” And they're not wrong in anything that they're saying. But the world has definitely evolved since then.Sam: Yeah, yeah. It's a really great point. Again, it just folds back into my whole having your cake and eating it conversation. Yes, you need to retain data; it gives you that kind of nice, warm, cozy feeling, it's a nice blanket on a winter's day that that data, irrespective of what happens, you're going to have something to recover from. But the question is does that need to be living on an EBS volume as a snapshot? Why can't it be living on much, much more cost-effective storage that's going to give you the warm and fuzzies, but is going to make your finance team much, much happier [laugh].Corey: One of the inherent challenges I think people have is that snapshots by themselves are almost worthless, in that I have an EBS snapshot, it is sitting there now, it's costing me an undetermined amount of money because it's not exactly clear on a per snapshot basis exactly how large it is, and okay, great. Well, I'm looking for a file that was not modified since X date, as it was on this time. Well, great, you're going to have to take that snapshot, restore it to a volume and then go exploring by hand. Oh, it was the wrong one. Great. Try it again, with a different one.And after, like, the fifth or six in a row, you start doing a binary search approach on this thing. But it's expensive, it's time-consuming, it takes forever, and it's not a fun user experience at all. Part of the problem is it seems that historically, backup systems have no context or no contextual awareness whatsoever around what is actually contained within that backup.Sam: Yeah, yeah. I mean, you kind of highlighted two of the steps. It's more like a ten-step process to do, you know, granular file or folder-level recovery from a snapshot, right? You've got to, like you say, you've got to determine the point in time when that, you know, you knew the last time that it was around, then you're going to have to determine the volume size, the region, the OS, you're going to have to create an EBS volume of the same size, region, from that snapshot, create the EC2 instance with the same OS, connect the two together, boot the EC2 instance, mount the volume search for the files to restore, download them manually, at which point you have your file back. It's not back in the machine where it was, it's now been downloaded locally to whatever machine you're accessing that from. And then you got to tear it all down.And that is again, like you say, predicated on the fact that you knew exactly that that was the right time. It might not be and then you have to start from scratch from a different point in time. So, backup tooling from backup vendors that have been doing this for many, many years, knew about this problem long, long ago, and really seek to not only automate the entirety of that process but make the whole e-discovery, the search, the location of those files, much, much easier. I don't necessarily want to do a vendor pitch, but I will say with Veeam, we have explorer-like functionality, whereby it's just a simple web browser. Once that machine is all spun up again, automatic process, you can just search for your individual file, folder, locate it, you can download it locally, you can inject it back into the instance where it was through Amazon Kinesis or AWS Kinesis—I forget the right terminology for it; some of its AWS, some of its Amazon.But by-the-by, the whole recovery process, especially from a file or folder level, is much more pain-free, but also much faster. And that's ultimately what people care about how reliable is my backup? How quickly can I get stuff online? Because the time that I'm down is costing me an indescribable amount of time or money.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or if you are looking to go beyond just caching and unlocking your data's full potential, these folks have you covered. Redis Enterprise is the go-to managed Redis service that allows you to reimagine how your geo-distributed applications process, deliver, and store data. To learn more from the experts in Redis how to be real-time, right now, from anywhere, visit redis.com/duckbill. That's R - E - D - I - S dot com slash duckbill.Corey: Right, the idea of RPO versus RTO: recovery point objective and recovery time objective. With an RPO, it's great, disaster strikes right now, how long is acceptable to it have been since the last time we backed up data to a restorable point? Sometimes it's measured in minutes, sometimes it's measured in fractions of a second. It really depends on what we're talking about. Payments databases, that needs to be—the RPO is basically an asymptotically approaches zero.The RTO is okay, how long is acceptable before we have that data restored and are back up and running? And that is almost always a longer time, but not always. And there's a different series of trade-offs that go into that. But both of those also presuppose that you've already dealt with the existential question of is it possible for us to recover this data. And that's where I know that you are obviously—you have a position on this that is informed by where you work, but I don't, and I will call this out as what I see in the industry: AWS backup is compelling to me except for one fatal flaw that it has, and that is it starts and stops with AWS.I am not a proponent of multi-cloud. Lord knows I've gotten flack for that position a bunch of times, but the one area where it makes absolute sense to me is backups. Have your data in a rehydrate-the-business level state backed up somewhere that is not your primary cloud provider because you're otherwise single point of failure-ing through a company, through the payment instrument you have on file with that company, in the blast radius of someone who can successfully impersonate you to that vendor. There has to be a gap of some sort for the truly business-critical data. Yes, egress to other providers is expensive, but you know what also is expensive? Irrevocably losing the data that powers your business. Is it likely? No, but I would much rather do it than have to justify why I'm not doing it.Sam: Yeah. Wasn't likely that I was going to win that 2 billion or 2.1 billion on the Powerball, but [laugh] I still play [laugh]. But I understand your standpoint on multi-cloud and I read your newsletters and understand where you're coming from, but I think the reality is that we do live in at least a hybrid cloud world, if not multi-cloud. The number of organizations that are sole-sourced on a single cloud and nothing else is relatively small, single-digit percentage. It's around 80-some percent that are hybrid, and the remainder of them are your favorite: multi-cloud.But again, having something that is one hundred percent sole-source on a single platform or a single vendor does expose you to a certain degree of risk. So, having the ability to do cross-platform backups, recoveries, migrations, for whatever reason, right, because it might not just be a disaster like you'd mentioned, it might also just be… I don't know, the company has been taken over and all of a sudden, the preference is now towards another cloud provider and I want you to refactor and re-architect everything for this other cloud provider. If all that data is locked into one platform, that's going to make your job very, very difficult. So, we mentioned at the beginning of the call, Veeam is capable of protecting a vast number of heterogeneous workloads on different platforms, in different environments, on-premises, in multiple different clouds, but the other key piece is that we always use the same backup file format. And why that's key is because it enables portability.If I have backups of EC2 instances that are stored in S3, I could copy those onto on-premises disk, I could copy those into Azure, I could do the same with my Azure VMs and store those on S3, or again, on-premises disk, and any other endless combination that goes with that. And it's really kind of centered around, like control and ownership of your data. We are not prescriptive by any means. Like, you do what is best for your organization. We just want to provide you with the toolset that enables you to do that without steering you one direction or the other with fee structures, disparate feature sets, whatever it might be.Corey: One of the big challenges that I keep seeing across the board is just a lack of awareness of what the data that matters is, where you see people backing up endless fleets of web server instances that are auto-scaled into existence and then removed, but you can create those things at will; why do you care about the actual data that's on these things? It winds up almost at the library management problem, on some level. And in that scenario, snapshots are almost certainly the wrong answer. One thing that I saw previously that really changed my way of thinking about this was back many years ago when I was working at a startup that had just started using GitHub and they were paying for a third-party service that wound up backing up Git repos. Today, that makes a lot more sense because you have a bunch of other stuff on GitHub that goes well beyond the stuff contained within Git, but at the time, it was silly. It was, why do that? Every Git clone is a full copy of the entire repository history. Just grab it off some developer's laptop somewhere.It's like, “Really? You want to bet the company, slash your job, slash everyone else's job on that being feasible and doable or do you want to spend the 39 bucks a month or whatever it was to wind up getting that out the door now so we don't have to think about it, and they validate that it works?” And that was really a shift in my way of thinking because, yeah, backing up things can get expensive when you have multiple copies of the data living in different places, but what's really expensive is not having a company anymore.Sam: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. We can tie it back to my insurance dynamic earlier where, you know, it's something that you know that you have to have, but you don't necessarily want to pay for it. Well, you know, just like with insurances, there's multiple different ways to go about recovering your data and it's only in crunch time, do you really care about what it is that you've been paying for, right, when it comes to backup?Could you get your backup through a git clone? Absolutely. Could you get your data back—how long is that going to take you? How painful is that going to be? What's going to be the impact to the business where you're trying to figure that out versus, like you say, the 39 bucks a month, a year, or whatever it might be to have something purpose-built for that, that is going to make the recovery process as quick and painless as possible and just get things back up online.Corey: I am not a big fan of the fear, uncertainty, and doubt approach, but I do practice what I preach here in that yeah, there is a real fear against data loss. It's not, “People are coming to get you, so you absolutely have to buy whatever it is I'm selling,” but it is something you absolutely have to think about. My core consulting proposition is that I optimize the AWS bill. And sometimes that means spending more. Okay, that one S3 bucket is extremely important to you and you say you can't sustain the loss of it ever so one zone is not an option. Where is it being backed up? Oh, it's not? Yeah, I suggest you spend more money and back that thing up if it's as irreplaceable as you say. It's about doing the right thing.Sam: Yeah, yeah, it's interesting, and it's going to be hard for you to prove the value of doing that when you are driving their bill up when you're trying to bring it down. But again, you have to look at something that's not itemized on that bill, which is going to be the impact of downtime. I'm not going to pretend to try and recall the exact figures because it also varies depending on your business, your industry, the size, but the impact of downtime is massive financially. Tens of thousands of dollars for small organizations per hour, millions and millions of dollars per hour for much larger organizations. The backup component of that is relatively small in comparison, so having something that is purpose-built, and is going to protect your data and help mitigate that impact of downtime.Because that's ultimately what you're trying to protect against. It is the recovery piece that you're buying is the most important piece. And like you, I would say, at least be cognizant of it and evaluate your options and what can you live with and what can you live without.Corey: That's the big burning question that I think a lot of people do not have a good answer to. And when you don't have an answer, you either backup everything or nothing. And I'm not a big fan of doing either of those things blindly.Sam: Yeah, absolutely. And I think this is why we see varying different backup options as well, you know? You're not going to try and apply the same data protection policies each and every single workload within your environment because they've all got different types of workload criticality. And like you say, some of them might not even need to be backed up at all, just because they don't have data that needs to be protected. So, you need something that is going to be able to be flexible enough to apply across the entirety of your environment, protect it with the right policy, in terms of how frequently do you protect it, where do you store it, how often, or when are you eventually going to delete that and apply that on a workload by workload basis. And this is where the joy of things like tags come into play as well.Corey: One last thing I want to bring up is that I'm a big fan of watching for companies saying the quiet part out loud. And one area in which they do this—because they're forced to by brevity—is in the title tag of their website. I pull up veeam.com and I hover over the tab in my browser, and it says, “Veeam Software: Modern Data Protection.”And I want to call that out because you're not framing it as explicitly backup. So, the last topic I want to get into is the idea of security. Because I think it is not fully appreciated on a lived-experience basis—although people will of course agree to this when they're having ivory tower whiteboard discussions—that every place your data lives is a potential for a security breach to happen. So, you want to have your data living in a bunch of places ideally, for backup and resiliency purposes. But you also want it to be completely unworkable or illegible to anyone who is not authorized to have access to it.How do you balance those trade-offs yourself given that what you're fundamentally saying is, “Trust us with your Holy of Holies when it comes to things that power your entire business?” I mean, I can barely get some companies to agree to show me their AWS bill, let alone this is the data that contains all of this stuff to destroy our company.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, it's a great question. Before I explicitly answer that piece, I will just go to say that modern data protection does absolutely have a security component to it, and I think that backup absolutely needs to be a—I'm going to say this an air quotes—a “first class citizen” of any security strategy. I think when people think about security, their mind goes to the preventative, like how do we keep these bad people out?This is going to be a bit of the FUD that you love, but ultimately, the bad guys on the outside have an infinite number of attempts to get into your environment and only have to be right once to get in and start wreaking havoc. You on the other hand, as the good guy with your cape and whatnot, you have got to be right each and every single one of those times. And we as humans are fallible, right? None of us are perfect, and it's incredibly difficult to defend against these ever-evolving, more complex attacks. So backup, if someone does get in, having a clean, verifiable, recoverable backup, is really going to be the only thing that is going to save your organization, should that actually happen.And what's key to a secure backup? I would say separation, isolation of backup data from the production data, I would say utilizing things like immutability, so in AWS, we've got Amazon S3 object lock, so it's that write once, read many state for whatever retention period that you put on it. So, the data that they're seeking to encrypt, whether it's in production or in their backup, they cannot encrypt it. And then the other piece that I think is becoming more and more into play, and it's almost table stakes is encryption, right? And we can utilize things like AWS KMS for that encryption.But that's there to help defend against the exfiltration attempts. Because these bad guys are realizing, “Hey, people aren't paying me my ransom because they're just recovering from a clean backup, so now I'm going to take that backup data, I'm going to leak the personally identifiable information, trade secrets, or whatever on the internet, and that's going to put them in breach compliance and give them a hefty fine that way unless they pay me my ransom.” So encryption, so they can't read that data. So, not only can they not change it, but they can't read it is equally important. So, I would say those are the three big things for me on what's needed for backup to make sure it is clean and recoverable.Corey: I think that is one of those areas where people need to put additional levels of thought in. I think that if you have access to the production environment and have full administrative rights throughout it, you should definitionally not—at least with that account and ideally not you at all personally—have access to alter the backups. Full stop. I would say, on some level, there should not be the ability to alter backups for some particular workloads, the idea being that if you get hit with a ransomware infection, it's pretty bad, let's be clear, but if you can get all of your data back, it's more of an annoyance than it is, again, the existential business crisis that becomes something that redefines you as a company if you still are a company.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, I mean, we can turn to a number of organizations. Code Spaces always springs to mind for me, I love Code Spaces. It was kind of one of those precursors to—Corey: It's amazing.Sam: Yeah, but they were running on AWS and they had everything, production and backups, all stored in one account. Got into the account. “We're going to delete your data if you don't pay us this ransom.” They were like, “Well, we're not paying you the ransoms. We got backups.” Well, they deleted those, too. And, you know, unfortunately, Code Spaces isn't around anymore. But it really kind of goes to show just the importance of at least logically separating your data across different accounts and not having that god-like access to absolutely everything.Corey: Yeah, when you talked about Code Spaces, I was in [unintelligible 00:32:29] talking about GitHub Codespaces specifically, where they have their developer workstations in the cloud. They're still very much around, at least last time I saw unless you know something I don't.Sam: Precursor to that. I can send you the link—Corey: Oh oh—Sam: You can share it with the listeners.Corey: Oh, yes, please do. I'd love to see that.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, absolutely.Corey: And it's been a long and strange time in this industry. Speaking of links for the show notes, I appreciate you're spending so much time with me. Where can people go to learn more?Sam: Yeah, absolutely. I think veeam.com is kind of the first place that people gravitate towards. Me personally, I'm kind of like a hands-on learning kind of guy, so we always make free product available.And then you can find that on the AWS Marketplace. Simply search ‘Veeam' through there. A number of free products; we don't put time limits on it, we don't put feature limitations. You can backup ten instances, including your VPCs, which we actually didn't talk about today, but I do think is important. But I won't waste any more time on that.Corey: Oh, configuration of these things is critically important. If you don't know how everything was structured and built out, you're basically trying to re-architect from first principles based upon archaeology.Sam: Yeah [laugh], that's a real pain. So, we can help protect those VPCs and we actually don't put any limitations on the number of VPCs that you can protect; it's always free. So, if you're going to use it for anything, use it for that. But hands-on, marketplace, if you want more documentation, want to learn more, want to speak to someone veeam.com is the place to go.Corey: And we will, of course, include that in the show notes. Thank you so much for taking so much time to speak with me today. It's appreciated.Sam: Thank you, Corey, and thanks for all the listeners tuning in today.Corey: Sam Nicholls, Director of Public Cloud at Veeam. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insulting comment that takes you two hours to type out but then you lose it because you forgot to back it up.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Freelance Dietitian Podcast
049: Poems and Haikus with the Listeners!

Freelance Dietitian Podcast

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 17:38


Ready to have some fun? A few weeks ago I asked listeners to submit poems and haikus related to dietetics. I got 10+ submissions. Who knew RDs loved to write poetry?! Tune into this laid back episode and get ready to smile and laugh.  Make sure you check out my Instagram to see video clips of the submissions. @Freelance.DietitianThank you to everyone who contributed to this episode. I am only sharing social media handles for people who gave me permission: Iris, Olivia, Sarah K, Sandra. Love the show? Consider donating, leaving a 5 star review, or sharing this episode with your friends! Your support keeps the show afloat so new content can be released every week. Thank you very much!

Healthcare Business Radio
Secrets to A $5,000 Month as a Registered Dietitian

Healthcare Business Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 51:07


Have you been struggling to make your business profitable?Maybe you're seeing other RDs who are gaining clients left and right….making $3K, 5K, $10K+ per month and wondering to yourself: how is that even possible?Kim was there just a few months ago….and in May she hit her first $5K month!She has been working hard behind the scenes to grow her business by following our roadmap and trusting the process.Want to hear more of Kim's journey and dive deeper into how she hit her first 5K month as a dietitian? 6;53 — How did she do it?6:08 — The birth of her business9:37 —  Steal her marketing strategy11:17 — Mindset + a Little Secret12:57 — Her advice to fellow RDs This episode is a live recording of a training in our FREE Facebook group “Business Growth Secrets for Dietitians and Nutrition Coaches.” If you are an RD, RD2B or nutrition coach interested in learning more about how you can start and grow your nutrition business, we'd like to invite you to join us in our Facebook group where you can receive additional resources and trainings to help you on your journey. Click the link to join: https://urlgeni.us/facebook/healthcarebusinessuniversityAdditional information:If you are tired of trying to figure out this game of business, marketing, and sales, all on your own, and  you are ready to just implement what's already proven to work, rather than reinventing the wheel, schedule a COMPLIMENTARY game plan call with us by heading over to the link below right now and there you will find over $7,000 worth of trainings, resources, and coaching available only for our followers of this show.https://thepracticerevolution.co/gameplanpStay up to date with The Practice Revolution for upcoming events by following us on Instagram @thepracticerevolutionhttps://www.instagram.com/thepracticerevolution/

Les Cast Codeurs Podcast
LCC 288 - L'épisode marathon mastodonien

Les Cast Codeurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 101:47


Dans ce long épisode, retrouvez Emmanuel, Guillaume, Antonio et Arnaud qui reviennent sur les dernières sorties de GraalVM, GoLang, JBanking, Spring, Spring Modulith, Quarkus, Apache Maven. Vous retrouverez aussi de nombreux sujets infrastructure, cloud, méthodologie le tout accompagné d’un pachyderme très à la mode en ce moment: Mastodon. Enregistré le 18 novembre 2022 Téléchargement de l'épisode LesCastCodeurs-Episode–288.mp3 News Langages Alina Yurenko annonce la sortie de GraalVM 22.3 https://medium.com/graalvm/graalvm–22–3-is-here-jdk–19-builds-jlink-support-new-monitoring-features-and-more-f6e2b2eeff95 l'article mentionne l'annonce faite à JavaOne qu'Oracle contribue GraalVM CE à la communauté Open JDK https://www.graalvm.org/2022/openjdk-announcement/ support du JDK 19 possibilité de télécharger facilement (dans un script) la distribution avec un one-line (bash/curl) possibilité de compiler jWebserver en un exécutable natif diverses améliorations sur le monitoring et l'expérience développeur de native image (JFR, jvmstat, head dump…) nouvelles versions des reachability metadata nouvelle API native image et diverses autres updates sur le support de Python, de Ruby, des contributions de la communauté Go fête ses 13 ans https://go.dev/blog/13years avec la grosse release de 1.18, avec le support des workspaces, du fuzzing, mais surtout des generics aussi une commande govuln qui fait analyse statique - intéressant la notion d'outil dans le langage les build go sont vérouillés vu qu'ils reconstruisent tout et qu'ils dépendent d'un sha1 pour les dependences git et beaucoup plus de choses ici https://go.dev/blog/supply-chain workspace qui permet de travailler sur plusieurs modules en parallèle sans avoir a changer tous les go.mod à la main Librairies Sortie de JBanking 4 par Marc Wrobel https://www.marcwrobel.fr/sortie-de-jbanking–4–0–0 Une librairie utilitaire pour assister dans le développement d'applications bancaires Support des codes ISO des pays, des monnaies, des codes BIC, des IBAN, et aussi du calendrier des jours fériés des banques internationales Spring Modulith, un projet expérimental d'Oliver Drotbohm, qui permet de s'assurer de la structure et architecture de ses projets Spring, par exemple pour vérifier les dépendances propres entre modules, pour bien structurer ses applications Spring Boot https://spring.io/blog/2022/10/21/introducing-spring-modulith Une version alpha de Quarkus 3 arrive ! https://quarkus.io/blog/road-to-quarkus–3/ Plein d'upgrades : Hibernate ORM 6, Jakarta EE 10, Eclipse MicroProfile 6, HTTP/3, io_uring, Virtual Threads de Loom et Structured Concurrency, java.util.concurrent.Flow pour s'affranchir de Reactive Streams Version cible Java 11, mais recommendation d'utiliser Java 17 les versions 3 seront en parallèle des versions 2 le temps que l’écosystème passe à la 3, notamment les dependences jakartaee peut essayer facilement depuis la CLI quarkus create app --stream=3.0 quelques casse de compatibilités attendues mais minimisées, spécialement dans le core garde java 11 car demande de la communauté Spring 6.0 est sorti https://spring.io/blog/2022/11/16/spring-framework–6–0-goes-ga Java 17+ de base Jakarta EE 9+ Hibernate 6+ foundations pour Ahead of Time transformations pour GraalVM Exploration des threads virtuels https://spring.io/blog/2022/10/11/embracing-virtual-threads tester sur les threads servlets et autre SpringBoot arrive plus tard Détail des changements https://github.com/spring-projects/spring-framework/wiki/What%27s-New-in-Spring-Framework–6.x/ Infrastructure Stop using CPU limits on Kubernetes https://home.robusta.dev/blog/stop-using-cpu-limits L'auteur fait une comparaison amusante avec le besoin de boire de l'eau ! Il vaut mieux définir des requêtes (des besoins en eau / CPU), plutôt que des limites (pas le droit de boire plus / d'utiliser plus de CPU) c'est plus nuancé que ca, parce que aux cas limites des choses peuvent mal se passer cas 1: on atteind 100% d'usage. Le process avait définit un request mais en fait a besoin de plus en pratique, et là paf il se met à mal fonctionner, donc dès que votre systeme stresse, vous avez des erreurs en cascade cas 2: un ou plusieurs noeuds sont recyclés, ce qui veut dire que vous avez beaucoup de redémarrages de pods et du coup ca met la pression sur le CPU, tester ces cas là, certaines applis qui démarrent trop lentement ont tendance à tomber en cascade Comment faire des attaques d'injection sur les intelligences artificielles qui recoivent du contenu utilisateur https://hackaday.com/2022/09/16/whats-old-is-new-again-gpt–3-prompt-injection-attack-affects-ai/ le jeu est de donner des phrases ambigues qui font faire à l'IA des choses qu'elle n'est pas sensé faire un des outils c'est ignore les instructions au dessus et fait un truc que je veux que tu fasses et qui n'est pas dans ta programmation initiale Voir toucher l'intention initiale de l'AI (lui faire dire) et donc d'atteindre des sphères non publiques du service Mastodon et la scalabilité https://framablog.org/2022/11/13/de-la-friture-sur-le-fediverse/ la decentralisatione et le protocole Mastodon est couteux en job donc une personne moderement populaire 27k personnes, devrait bouger vers son instance dédiée ce qui amènerait à couter assez cher par mois (en tous cas plus que 8$/mois) L’auteur explique que les devs devraient favorier un protocol fortement decentraliser plutot qu’optimiser pour les grosses instances un article qui couvre la configuration aux petits oignons de Sidekiq, qui traite les queues de tâches, pour scaler une instance Mastodon https://nora.codes/post/scaling-mastodon-in-the-face-of-an-exodus/ Rollouts de release a l’échelle avec Argo (rollback options) https://monzo.com/blog/2022/11/02/argo-rollouts-at-scale/ gros investissement sur ArgoCD Mais encore release à la main par les ingenieurs et tout ou rien pour une application idealement: push dans git et oublie, prometheus metriques dirigent le rollout basé sur des alertes génériques, garder le sisteme ouvert pour des stratégies de rollout alternatives dans le futur basé sur Argo Rollouts et sur des erreurs generiques (20% de calls en erreur, beaucoup d’erreurs de base de donnees, crashs notifie dans slack en async du success ou de l’echec interessant de voir qu’ils s’appuient sur des metriques simples Lessons apprises migration est un gros job automatiser la migration au maximum meme si c’est un one shot change le moteurt avant de changer l’UX (progressive rollout) ca simplifie les chosez Cloud Google adopte progressivement Adoptium Temurin comme version officielle de JDK dans ses produits https://glaforge.appspot.com/article/building-and-deploying-java–17-apps-on-cloud-run-with-cloud-native-buildpacks-on-temurin nous avions mentionné l'annonce de ce support dans l'épisode précédent https://blog.adoptium.net/2022/10/adoptium-welcomes-google/ dans l'article de Guillaume, il utilise les Cloud Native Buildpacks, configuré pour utiliser Java 17, et par défaut, c'est bien Temurin qui est utilisé quand on build à partir des sources dans l'exemple, une application Micronaut, développée avec Java 17, est déployée sur Google Cloud Run Pourquoi on quitte le Cloud https://world.hey.com/dhh/why-we-re-leaving-the-cloud–654b47e0 témoignage de DHH de 37Signal (basecamp et hey) Les 30% de marges d'Amazon viennent de quelque part. On dépense 500k en RDS et ES. On peut acheter beaucoup de machines pour ce prix La réduction des ops est un mythe. On a autant de personnes gérant les services AWS ou Google Cloud Le gain pourrait être la micro startup qui ne sait pas si elle aura des clients ou les volumes de demandes très variables et imprédictibles Mais on a une croissance planifiée Donc on rapatrie Présentation de Mickaël Roger de Thales, enregistrée à Cloud Nord, qui explique le fonctionnement de l'offre S3NS de Thales et Google Cloud pour le “cloud de confiance” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBwBeqd-YFs Web Est-ce que le Web3 peut battre le cloud ? https://blog.scottlogic.com/2022/10/31/can-web3-beat-the-cloud.html Le Web3 est une autre approche pour des applications décentralisées, ce n'est pas un successeur du Web 2.0 classique, et il a généralement besoin du Web 2.0 pour offrir une interface à ses utilisateurs Ce n'est pas que pour faire des cryptomonnaies qui gâchent de l'électricité, ou des NFTs qui ne donnent pas vraiment de titre de propriété d'une oeuvre d'art Dans cet article, l'auteur essaie d'implémenter une fonctionnalité (le fait de pouvoir rajouter des “applaudissements” à un article, un peu comme sur Medium), en implémentant un smart contract en Web3. Mais il se heurte à plein d'écueils le long de sa route, à la dépendance à plein d'autres services, au fait que ce n'est pas la personne qui “vote” qui devrait payer l'action mais celui qui héberge. Au final, il est obligé d'ajouter plein d'adhérences qui font qu'au lieu d'être décentralisée, l'application dépends de trop d'autres services, et a finalement besoin du Web 2.0 pour fonctionner, et du Cloud L'autre déconvenue est sur le prix de chacune des transactions, qui est finalement exorbitant par rapport à une approche Web 2.0 classique Décentralisation amène de la lenteur (latence) Objectifs du Web3 c'est d'etre le propriétaire de ses processes et ses data et de mettre des agents qui interagissent avec des données Outillage Comment debugguer les images Docker slim ou distroless https://iximiuz.com/en/posts/docker-debug-slim-containers/ Les images slim / distroless sont sympas car elles permettent d'avoir des petits conteneurs qui ne prennent pas trop de place, qui parfois sont plus rapides à charger, mais également qui exposent une surface d'attaque beaucoup plus faible Par contre, comme il n'y a pas tous les outils (parfois pas de shell, par exemple), c'est plus compliqué de comprendre ce qu'il se passe à l'intérieur quand quelque chose ne fonctionne pas L'article propose quelques approches pour pallier à cela : Installer des outils à la demande dans un conteneur qui tourne (à coup de apt-get) Passer temporairement à une image plus grosse et plus complète (par ex, distroless a des images avec un tag debug) Utiliser docker run avec un shared namespace Utiliser docker exec et un mount Podman Desktop, une alternative à Docker Desktop, mais utilisant podman https://podman-desktop.io/ Docker annonce une technical preview de conteneurs WASM https://www.docker.com/blog/docker-wasm-technical-preview/ nouveau packaging qui wrap un exécutable WASM et le fait tourner avec le runtime wasmEdge c'est un nouveau type de conteneur il y a beaucoup d'activité autour de WASM, et il y a eu de nombreuses annonces et démonstration lors de la conférence CloudNativeCon et le jour spécial sur WASM, lors de KubeCon https://www.infoq.com/news/2022/11/cloud-native-wasm-day/ docker utilise Docker Desktop et docker engine pour demarrer des “shim" Ses shim (processeS) lancent soit runc (donc pour faire tourner un containeur) soit wasmedge pour faire tourner des modules wasm Donc docker s'éloigne des container et essaie de toucher l'orchestration Un petit tutoriel utilisant Docker et YouTube-dl pour récupérer / consulter les stats (views, likes) de vos vidéos (ou d'autres) sur YouTube https://glaforge.appspot.com/article/retrieve-youtube-views-count-with-youtube-dl-jq-and-a-docker-container Apache Maven propose une extension de “build cache” (qui devrait accélérer les builds, sans tout tout le temps recompiler) https://maven.apache.org/extensions/maven-build-cache-extension/ basé sur une clé construite des sources, des plugins etc par module permet paralelisation et de deploiement sur des agents genre dans le cloud on controle les regles de contournement des invarients (genre changement de compile, timestamp dans les manifests etc) Le guide complet pour publier une librairie Java sur Maven Central https://maciejwalkowiak.com/blog/guide-java-publish-to-maven-central/ Y compris l'intégration avec Github Actions et l'utilisation de Github Secrets pour les clés PGP Et enfin la configuration de JReleaser pour encore faciliter la tâche lorsque l'on pousse une nouvelle version Apache Maven 4.0.0-alpha–2 is out https://maven.apache.org/docs/4.0.0-alpha–2/release-notes.html améliorations cli: --also-make , --resume (plus besoin de pré ciser d'où le build doit recommencer), --non-recursive, --fail-on-severity Utilisation du même timestamps dans tous les modules build/consumer POMs (versioning automatique du parent, versioning automatique des dépendances dans le réacteur, détection automatique des sous modules) new maven 4 api et beaucoup d'autres choses: https://issues.apache.org/jira/secure/ReleaseNote.jspa?version=12351403&projectId=12316922 Data Faker le nouveau générateur de données de test https://github.com/datafaker-net/datafaker C'est un fork de Java Faker https://github.com/DiUS/java-faker Tout ça inspiré de Ruby Faker https://github.com/faker-ruby/faker La boite australienne qui l'avait créé ne maintenait plus le projet, ne le publiait plus dans Maven Central et il y avait des centaines de PRs Vous pouvez générer des données de centaines de provider (ex. adresse, compte bancaire, livres, films, etc) https://github.com/datafaker-net/datafaker#providers en plusieurs langues Exécuter facilement des programmes Java avec dépendances, sans build, avec JBang https://maciejwalkowiak.com/blog/single-file-java-with-jbang/ Dans la même veine que ce que Groovy propose depuis de nombreuses années avec sons système @Grapes qui récupère les dépendances nécessaires L'article montre un exemple simple, puis avec Spring Boot, comment faire un JAR aussi, voire comment conteneurisé sa petite appli Architecture Amélie Benoit continue ses fabuleux sketchnotes sur le thème des design patterns https://twitter.com/AmelieBenoit33/status/1587397290251149312 celui ci est sur le pattern Adapter il y a eu aussi le pattern Builder https://twitter.com/AmelieBenoit33/status/1584778615610228737 l'Observer https://twitter.com/AmelieBenoit33/status/1579706242318360576 ou le Singleton https://twitter.com/AmelieBenoit33/status/1570313646605234177 https://twitter.com/AmelieBenoit33/status/1589869904404316162 Un petit coup de décorateur https://twitter.com/AmelieBenoit33/status/1592468635599372289 35 misconceptions sur les dates et les heures https://www.meziantou.net/misconceptions-about-date-and-time.htm y a t'il toujours 24 heures par jour, 60 secondes dans une minute? ou 365 jours par an ? est-ce que les jours sont toujours consécutifs ? tout le monde a t'il le même calendrier ? lundi est il le premier jour de la semaine ? Méthodologies Interview d'un designer sur comment enlever la friction https://review.firstround.com/amazons-friction-killing-tactics-to-make-products-more-seamless?ct=t designer a Amazon (Music, Alexa), IMDB, Skype for Business types de fictions (choses non familières, friction inhérente - produit avancé - et chemin de friction important, friction par desalignement avec le comportement humain) la troisième catégorie difficile à anticiper en construisant des produits: on ajoute, enlève ou marque des frictions C'est sur le chemin du client Avant le premier contact Signature et premiere tâche transactionnelle (bien choisir la tache pour etre assez simple et ce que l'utilisateur répète) Premier moment de plaisir (regarder les points contre intuitifs dans les données, ou les cas d'utilisation en echec) l'indifférence genre la friction la plus importante pour les nouveaux produits Comment écouter son utilisateur? habitat naturel: sondes dans l'appli, tests chez l'utilisateur en milieu reel en utilisation du produit mentions et revues: aussi métriques d'usage (choses inhabituelles ou inattendues) standard de l'industrie: attentes des clients façonné par ça (barre de recherche en haut) Toujours migrer son audience vers le chemin de moindre resistance Comment éliminer la friction? réduire l'anxiété: décision et perte amènent de l'anxiété. supprimer les étapes non nécessaires: définir la liste des decisions du client et les questionner. (Heuristiques par defaut?) mitiger le changement de contexte: naviguer hors de l'appli pour faire quelque chose, risque d'abandon. Arrêter un livre pour lire un mot dans le dictionnaire, faciliter le retour et le rappel du contexte quand ils reviennent. Comment masquer la friction? temps d'attente: trouver de la valeur (message d'information) bouger la friction au début dans les services (carte credit tout de suite) s’ils investissent dans leur experience (vote), ils sont plus engagés et loyaux: friction positive : sense d'appartenance Glossaire et aide-mémoire sur l'approche de l'Event Storming https://github.com/ddd-crew/eventstorming-glossary-cheat-sheet Si vous ne connaissez pas event storming, ça ne va pas vous éclairer assez plutôt un outil pour rafraichir votre mémoire voir aussi episode sur event storming https://lescastcodeurs.com/2020/06/05/lcc–233-interview-sur-l-event-storming-avec-thomas-pierrain-et-bruno-boucard/ Sécurité Sigstore passe en General Availability, en version 1 https://opensource.googleblog.com/2022/10/sigstore-project-announces-general-availability-and-v1-releases.html Sujet également couvert par InfoQ https://www.infoq.com/news/2022/11/sigstore-stability-ga/ Sigstore est la pour aider au niveau de la sécurisation de la supply chain de code Notamment au niveau des signatures Ca addresse ce que fait PGP amis le rend plus utilisable et permet un usage supplémentaire par un log lisible par tous Plus d'infos dans une interview on espère Loi, société et organisation La proposition de loi sur la sécurisation de l'open source aux Etats-Unis https://blog.tidelift.com/tidelift-advisory-us-senators-introduce-the-securing-open-source-software-act-of–2022 (edited) Holly Cummins sur le sujet du code vestimentaire des femmes dans la tech https://hollycummins.com/fashion-and-programming-ii/ Pourquoi en 2023 on a encore autant d'abrutis qui font des remarques sur les vêtements que portent les femmes qui font des présentations à des conférences, et pire, sur le fait de savoir si elles sont à leur goût ou pas La tenue vestimentaire n'a rien à voir avec le talent, les connaissances, le professionnalisme, l'expertise des personnes Les femmes ont le droit de porter les vêtements qu'elles veulent sans être jugées par des idiots qui feraient mieux de retourner dans leur caverne Avec le rachat de Twitter par Elon Musk, beaucoup de gens commencent à s'intéresser de plus près à Mastodon. On trouve de nombreux articles sur Mastodon ces jours ci https://gorillasun.de/blog/getting-started-with-mastodon et vous, avez vous un compte sur Mastodon ? quelle instance avez-vous choisie ? quels outils (client, mobile, web, etc) utilisez vous ? Pour ma part je n’ai pas de compte Mastodon (je n’utilise pas twitter non plus). J’ai rapidement regardé ce matin ça n’est pas facile de trouver une instance : celles que j’ai regardé ont fermé les inscriptions (d’après ce que j’ai pu lire à cause de problèmes pour gérer l’afflux de nouveaux utilisateurs, à cause de l’augmentation de la création de comptes spam, ou dans l’objectif de répartir les utilisateurs sur d’autres instances moins connues). Du coup j’ai pour le moment abandonné l’idée de me créer un compte. Le site JavaBubble liste plein de développeurs Java qui ont maintenant un compte sur Mastodon https://javabubble.org/ Les Cast Codeurs sur Mastodon : @agoncal@fosstodon.org @aheritier@mastodon.social @glaforge@uwyn.net @emmanuelbernard@mamot.fr Conférences La liste des conférences provenant de Developers Conferences Agenda/List par Aurélie Vache et contributeurs : 23–25 novembre 2022 : Agile Grenoble 2022 - Grenoble (France) 25 novembre 2022 : HACK-IT-N 2022 - Bordeaux (France) 1 décembre 2022 : Devops DDay #7 - Marseille (France) 2 décembre 2022 : BDX I/O - Bordeaux (France) 2 décembre 2022 : DevFest Dijon 2022 - Dijon (France) 14–16 décembre 2022 : API Days Paris - Paris (France) & Online 15–16 décembre 2022 : Agile Tour Rennes - Rennes (France) 19–20 janvier 2023 : Touraine Tech - Tours (France) 25–28 janvier 2023 : SnowCamp - Grenoble (France) 2 février 2023 : Very Tech Trip - Paris (France) 2 février 2023 : AgiLeMans - Le Mans (France) 9–11 février 2023 : World AI Cannes - Cannes (France) 16–19 février 2023 : PyConFR - Bordeaux (France) 7 mars 2023 : Kubernetes Community Days France - Paris (France) 23–24 mars 2023 : SymfonyLive Paris - Paris (France) 5–7 avril 2023 : FIC - Lille Grand Palais (France) 12–14 avril 2023 : Devoxx France - Paris (France) 10–12 mai 2023 : Devoxx UK - London (UK) 12 mai 2023 : AFUP Day Lille & Lyon (France) 12–13 octobre 2023 : Volcamp 2023 - Clermont Ferrand (France) Nous contacter Pour réagir à cet épisode, venez discuter sur le groupe Google https://groups.google.com/group/lescastcodeurs Contactez-nous via twitter https://twitter.com/lescastcodeurs Faire un crowdcast ou une crowdquestion Soutenez Les Cast Codeurs sur Patreon https://www.patreon.com/LesCastCodeurs Tous les épisodes et toutes les infos sur https://lescastcodeurs.com/

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1310 - Hundreds Of Amazon RDS Snapshots Found Exposed, How To Avoid This

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 6:03


Mitiga, a cloud incident response company, recently found hundreds of Amazon RDS Snapshots exposed publicly. This led to the leak of users' PII and other information. This episode talks about what RDS and the snapshots are and why you need to understand how the cloud works end to end. Source - https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonRDS/latest/UserGuide/USER_CreateSnapshot.html Be aware, be safe. Support the show and get access to behind the scenes content as a patron - https://www.patreon.com/SecurityInFive *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five Mighty Mackenzie - https://www.facebook.com/mightymackie Where you can find Security In Five - https://linktr.ee/binaryblogger Email - bblogger@protonmail.com

Le sac du quart
La saison morte s'annonce mouvementée

Le sac du quart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 57:22


Cette semaine Didier reçoit le journaliste du RDS.ca Éric Leblanc pour discuter de l'élimination des Alouettes et de la saison morte qui s'annonce mouvementée encore une fois. Didier partage ensuite ce qu'il a retenu de la 10e semaine d'activités dans la NFL et la victoire des Commanders contre les Eagles. Marc-André Chaloux y va ensuite de ses recommandations Fantasy Football pour la semaine 11. 

Freelance Dietitian Podcast
047: 5 Ways To Monetize A Nutrition Blog Ft. Chrissy Carroll, MS, RDN, LDN

Freelance Dietitian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 38:01 Transcription Available


I am absolutely delighted to introduce you all to Chrissy Carroll, an inspiring and upbeat RD that has been successfully navigating the blogging since for 10+ years. Chrissy shares: 5 ways to monetize a blog Why keyword research is a bloggers best friend How to set your blog up for success in a competitive niche Her favourite blogs to follow You can get in touch with Chrissy here: Website - Build A Wellness Blog (For RDs who want to learn how to blog) Recommended post: How to do keyword research with KeySearch Instagram - @ChrissytheRDChrissy's Free Facebook Group - Build Your Blog Today**Something New For You To Checkout*** I (Julia) created a Facebook Group for RDs who want to geek out about podcasting! It is a safe space to ask podcasting questions and learn from other podcasters! You can join the group by clicking here. Love the show? Consider donating, leaving a 5 star review, or sharing this episode with your friends! Your support keeps the show afloat so new content can be released every week. Thank you very much!

The Chip Race
The Lock-In - Matt Savage

The Chip Race

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 42:01


This week, we are locked in and fleshing out all the details of the upcoming WPT Wynn in Las Vegas.WPT executive tour director Matt stops by to help us discuss the week's news gossip and scandal but also to shine a light of the record-breaking festival planned for December. The lads examine the Pokerstars decision to bin podcaster True Geordie after Islamophobic remarks. The conversation is then steered in the direction of the Irish Open which is moving to the RDS and will be sponsored next year by Paddy Power and Pokerstars. Dara discusses the recent hot streak of Irish players in the online realm, Matt talks about enjoying the sweat of the $15,000,000 guarantee at the Wynn and David asks about the signing of Phil Ivey to the WPT roster. The episode rounds out with a mention of Unibet Poker as the new ‘Home Of Overlays' as it's new nightly schedule offers plenty of value for the players.

Down To Business
The Intriguing World of the Modern Artist at Art Source

Down To Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 9:56


Bobby was out & about at Art Source in the RDS, Ireland's premier art fair, featuring hundreds of Irish and International artists and galleries. There he spoke to organisers and artists alike to find out all about it.

The Happy Eating Podcast
6 Foods Dietitians Eat to Boost Their Own Mood

The Happy Eating Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 21:27


We talk a lot on the Happy Eating Podcast about what we eat and drink to support our mental wellness, and what we feed our kids to support theirs. But what do other dietitian nutritionists eat to boost their mood? That's today's episode! We're sharing what 5 other RDs eat, or drink, to boost their mood.   Show Notes: Read the article on EatingWell.com   Thank you for listening to The Happy Eating Podcast. Tune in weekly on Thursdays for new episodes! For even more Happy Eating, head to our website!  https://www.happyeatingpodcast.com Learn More About Our Hosts:  Carolyn Williams PhD, RD: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/realfoodreallife_rd/ Website: https://www.carolynwilliamsrd.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RealFoodRealLifeRD/ Brierley Horton, MS, RD Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brierleyhorton/ Got a question or comment for the pod? Please shoot us a message!  happyeating@gmail.com Produced by Lester Nuby OE Productions

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith
We Can Trust Neurodivergent Children About Their Bodies.

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 44:31


Today Virginia is chatting with Naureen Hunani, the founder of RDs for Neurodiversity, a neurodiversity-informed online continuing education platform for dietitians and helping professionals. Naureen also has her own private practice in Montreal, where she treats children, adults, and families struggling with various feeding and eating challenges through a trauma-informed, weight-inclusive, and anti-oppressive approach. If you want more conversations like this one, please rate and review us in your podcast player! And become a paid Burnt Toast subscriber. It's just $5 per month or $50 for the year. Producing a weekly podcast requires a significant investment of time and resources from several talented people. Paid subscriptions make all of our work possible and enable us to offer an honorarium to expert guests, which is key to centering marginalized voices in this space.And don't forget to preorder Virginia's new book! Fat Talk: Parenting In the Age of Diet Culture comes out April 25, 2023 from Henry Holt. Preorder your signed copy now from Split Rock Books (they ship anywhere in the USA). You can also order it from your independent bookstore, or from Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Target, Kobo or anywhere you like to buy books.Disclaimer: Virginia is a journalist and human with a lot of informed opinions. Virginia is not a nutritionist, therapist, doctor, or any kind of health care provider. The conversation you're about to hear and all of the advice and opinions she gives are just for entertainment, information, and education purposes only. None of this is a substitute for individual medical or mental health advice.BUTTER & OTHER LINKSRDs for NeurodiversityOn the Division of Responsibility and diet cultureMelinda Wenner Moyer on core strength and sitting at the dinner tableFor little ones, Yummy Toddler Food has roundups of good baby and toddler highchairs, booster seats, and toddler tables.For older kiddos, we're hearing good things about this chair and these wobble stoolswhat is misophoniaAgainst ImpulsivityThe Heart Principle by Helen Hoang Want to come on Virginia's Office Hours? Please use this form.CREDITSThe Burnt Toast Podcast is produced and hosted by Virginia Sole-Smith. Follow Virginia on Instagram or Twitter.Burnt Toast transcripts and essays are edited and formatted by Corinne Fay, who runs @SellTradePlus, an Instagram account where you can buy and sell plus size clothing.The Burnt Toast logo is by Deanna Lowe.Our theme music is by Jeff Bailey and Chris Maxwell.Tommy Harron is our audio engineer.Thanks for listening and for supporting independent anti-diet journalism. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit virginiasolesmith.substack.com/subscribe

The Molecast
Molecast #78

The Molecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 62:02


Support the Molecast at https://ko-fi.com/dementedmole Does the World-Cup-Cycle give Ireland's powerhouse win over the Boks more meaning, or was it just a bit of a classic slobberknocker on a Saturday night? Why did Ireland 'A' miss the point so badly at the RDS? Also: Fiji selections, Australian revival and Perilous Pumas!

Freelance Dietitian Podcast
046: - How To Be a Social Media Manager Ft. Diana Garcia

Freelance Dietitian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 27:25 Transcription Available


Prepare to be swept away by the social media master (SMM), Diana Garcia. She has been providing SMM services to RDs and wellness professionals for the past four years and shares her best tips in this episode. Including: Which metrics matter the most Which social media platform sits at the top of the pedestal Why more RDs should get on social media How you can become a social media manager yourself! TW - in this episode Diana briefly shares personal stories about weight loss. If you would prefer not to hear that type of content you may want to skip this episode.You can get in touch with Diana here: Website - www.dyanaracreates.comInstagram - @DyanaracreatesTikTok - DyanaracreatesLove the show? Consider donating, leaving a 5 star review, or sharing this episode with your friends! Your support keeps the show afloat so new content can be released every week. Thank you very much!

Sinn Féin
Is it time for a Citizens' Assembly on Irish Unity?

Sinn Féin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 78:40


Declan Kearney MLA, Tom Arnold and Ailbhe Smyth host a discussion entitled "Why the Irish Government must establish a Citizens' Assembly on Irish Unity" at the Sinn Féin Ard Fheis in the RDS, November 2022

Sinn Féin
Ard Fheis 2022: Mary Lou McDonald's Presidential Address

Sinn Féin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 24:25


Mary Lou McDonald's presidential address to party members and supporters which brought to a close the 2022 Sinn Féin Ard Fheis (Annual Conference) in the RDS, Dublin. 

The Dietitian Collaborative
S2E22 - Creating a Space for Dietitians to Succeed w. Krista Ko RDN

The Dietitian Collaborative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 45:39


Episode Notes Unleash Yo'Genius Masterclass | Free Harness Your Uniqueness | Amplify Your Impact for Growth co'Lab RoundTable Info | Discover your Human Design here Krista Ko RDN, LD | @dietitiansuccesscenter Freesources | https://www.dietitiansuccesscenter.com/freebie If you're feeling certain struggles in the field, you're probably not alone…there are other RDs who can benefit from the knowledge youve gained. Share it! Have a membership? Remember to bring the value, month after month! You dont have to be the jack of all trades, you have your zone of genius & you can collab with other people who have their own zones of genius! The Instagram account, @thedietitiancollaborative. You're more than welcome to stalk...but I like friends too! The Dietitian Collaborative Podcast is brought to you by Wellness Cucina Check out our podcast host, Pinecast. Start your own podcast for free with no credit card required. If you decide to upgrade, use coupon code r-a01769 for 40% off for 4 months, and support The Dietitian Collaborative.

Talkin' Isles
Bruno Gervais

Talkin' Isles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 39:17


Former Islanders defenseman and current RDS analyst Bruno Gervais joins Cory and Greg on episode 33. Gervais talks about: playing junior with Patrice Bergeron (3:55), playing in Bridgeport (9:35), living in the Islanders "Frat House" (14:35), Wadę Dubielewicz (18:15), Al Arbour's 1500th game (20:40), Fight Night (23:00), becoming a broadcaster (28:35), Mike Bossy (32:55), the Spengler Cup (34:35) and more!

Rugby on Off The Ball
Rugby Daily: Rassie on kit clashes, Farrell's A-Team and new All Blacks captain

Rugby on Off The Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 9:11


On today's Rugby Daily, Richie McCormack brings you news of the Ireland A team to face the All Blacks XV at the RDS, and what it could mean for the senior side on Saturday. Rassie Erasmus opens up on Saturday's potential kit clash, his return to the coaches box, and what Ireland means to him. There are some notable absentees from the list of women signing IRFU central contracts today. And there's an update on RG Snyman's potential return.

Freelance Dietitian Podcast
Ep 45 - Food Styling & Photography Ft. Elis Halenko, RD

Freelance Dietitian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 25:51 Transcription Available


Ready to hear from one of the most creative and lovely RDs in the biz?Today Elis shares her tips on how to excel at food styling & photography. She also reminds us why its good to inject FUN into your projects! It helps your work shine, and it will help you catch the attention of your dream clients. You can get in touch with Elis here: Instagram: FoodStylist RD & SnapStudio55 Website: SnapStudio55LinkedIn: Elis HalenkoEsty Shop: ClaybyElisThe Wealthy Coach Podcast Hey Coaches, Practitioners & Healers! Go from 0 clients to a 6-Figure Online Biz!Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifyLove the show? Consider donating, leaving a 5 star review, or sharing this episode with your friends! Your support keeps the show afloat so new content can be released every week. Thank you very much!

Avrora's Podcast
WHATS'S UP with Leucine ???

Avrora's Podcast

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 27:38


ALL THE TRUTH ABOUT VEGAN SUPPLEMENTSLeucine is an essential amino acid that's important for overall healthy muscle tissues, as it stimulates protein synthesis and helps reduce muscle breakdown, especially after strenuous workouts.For athletes who train regularly, leucine is essential to help them build and rebuild muscle. However, leucine isn't commonly found in plant-based foods, and this can pose an intake issue for vegan athletes. However, RDs can counsel athletes who follow this eating pattern to ensure they get enough leucine.In this EPISODE Avrora explain how much Leucine is good to have into your diet, do you need to add more to achieve better performance and all the truth behind sport nutrition in USA. Reference on study and know more about it PRESS HERECONNECT WITH Avrora: avroraprofit.comWORKOUTS and FITNESS PLANT BASED LIFE: @avroraprofit RECIPES: @vegan_curlPRESS HERE: Youtube "AvroraProFit"Register for CONSULTATION WITH AVRORA Press Here AVRORAPROFIT.COM JOIN Magic Mind challenge #14daysofmagic and know more about it PRESS HERE GET Magic Mind Product go to Magicmind.coFollow Magic Mind Community @magicmind USE CODE "AVROFIT' FOR %20 OFF for one time purchases and 40% off a subscriptionThank you for listening! All my favorite things YOU CAN TRY WITH SALE CODE “AVROFIT” @magicmind better than coffee pre workout @the_ambrosia_collective vegan supplements @professornutz_ best peanut butter @squeez_me_skinny belt @golinutrition apple cider gummy's @goodcravings best protein bars @nutilight my favorite vegan HAZELNUT

Bassment Sessions
Bassment Sessions Show 193 (Butch Cassidy sound System, Vars Hillsman, Public Enemy)

Bassment Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 60:00


From the deep oceans of dub, this week's session launches a musical dubmersible to plamb the depths of dub with Artist of the Week Butch Cassidy sound System, RDS, & earlyworm, our IRIE track of the Week with Var Hillsman, dropping beats like it's 1990 with Crooklyn Dodgers and Public Enemy plus our usual X-marks the spot buried treasure with a double shot of Johhny Osbourne. Kick back, crank it up -  this week's show is now in session! PLAYLIST Earlyworm - Alien Pipe Danny Breaks - The Jellyfish Smith & Mighty - Time To Rhyme Butch Cassidy Sound System - Take Me To Your Leader Butch Cassidy Sound System - Burning Sun Dub Butch Cassidy Sound System - Echo Tone Crooklyn Dodgers - Crooklyn Public Enemy - Welcome To The Terrodome Di, Break & MC Fats - Peace & Dub Oakley Grenell, King Ru, Lotek - Hlats - Buss Dance Var Hillsman -  Count Your Blessings Johnny Osbourne - Fally Ranking (VIVEK Remix) Marcus Visionary & Johnny Osbourne - Nightfall RSD - Pretty Bright Light JOIN THE MAILING LIST Join me in the Bassment each week for a session of top vibes.  www.bassmentsessions.com IRIE MAGAZINE for the latest in the world of reggae and beyond, jump on over to the number one online reggae magazine that matters https://www.iriemag.com/

Fearless Practitioners
The Secret Checklist You Need Before You Start a Private Practice | Ep. 176

Fearless Practitioners

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 19:37


Who loves a checklist more than a dietitian? Maybe a CPA, but y'all, we all love to have all the steps written out for us so we can know we are doing the right things in the right order. There are a ton of them out there, and what I want to chat about today is the unspoken checklist. After working with hundreds of RDs over the years, these are the things that should've been on the checklist that never made it. These are the things that I have seen super successful practices owners have. TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE: Develop your skills Study your craft Save some money Build a network before you need it Lay the groundwork Then do the work NOURISH Interested in Joining Nourish? Learn more HERE and make sure you mention you heard it on the show! MORE FROM ADRIEN Instagram Facebook Marketing Wednesdays Action Steps Driven Goal Planner What is my Next Step as a Practitioner - Take the Quiz Foundations of Private Practice Building Your Dream Practice Apply for Business Coaching Resources for Your Practice Schedule Your FREE 15 Min Fearless Steps Call Connect with Adrien on Instagram and Facebook Private Practice Paperwork Templates Subscribe & Review on iTunes Click here to subscribe to iTunes! Subscribe to Fearless Practitioners! Be sure you are subscribed to this podcast to automatically receive your episodes!!! Go to Programs and see what you need to become a Fearless Practitioner TODAY!! Connect with me on your fav social platform: * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adrienpaczosa/ * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/adrien.paczosa/ * YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/Apaczosa Hey! Send me a message and tell me what you think about the show! Use the Hashtag #FearlessPractitioner so I know you're a friend! XOXO Adrien Sign up for my weekly newsletter and you'll get FREE tips on how to live a ridiculously amazing fun-filled life! Get episode show notes here: https://fearlesspractitioners.com/fearless-podcast/

Screaming in the Cloud
The Man Behind the Curtain at Zoph with Victor Grenu

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 28:28


About VictorVictor is an Independent Senior Cloud Infrastructure Architect working mainly on Amazon Web Services (AWS), designing: secure, scalable, reliable, and cost-effective cloud architectures, dealing with large-scale and mission-critical distributed systems. He also has a long experience in Cloud Operations, Security Advisory, Security Hardening (DevSecOps), Modern Applications Design, Micro-services and Serverless, Infrastructure Refactoring, Cost Saving (FinOps).Links Referenced: Zoph: https://zoph.io/ unusd.cloud: https://unusd.cloud Twitter: https://twitter.com/zoph LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/grenuv/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us in part by our friends at Datadog. Datadog's SaaS monitoring and security platform that enables full stack observability for developers, IT operations, security, and business teams in the cloud age. Datadog's platform, along with 500 plus vendor integrations, allows you to correlate metrics, traces, logs, and security signals across your applications, infrastructure, and third party services in a single pane of glass.Combine these with drag and drop dashboards and machine learning based alerts to help teams troubleshoot and collaborate more effectively, prevent downtime, and enhance performance and reliability. Try Datadog in your environment today with a free 14 day trial and get a complimentary T-shirt when you install the agent.To learn more, visit datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloud to get. That's www.datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloudCorey: Managing shards. Maintenance windows. Overprovisioning. ElastiCache bills. I know, I know. It's a spooky season and you're already shaking. It's time for caching to be simpler. Momento Serverless Cache lets you forget the backend to focus on good code and great user experiences. With true autoscaling and a pay-per-use pricing model, it makes caching easy. No matter your cloud provider, get going for free at gomomento.co/screaming That's GO M-O-M-E-N-T-O dot co slash screamingCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the best parts about running a podcast like this and trolling the internet of AWS things is every once in a while, I get to learn something radically different than what I expected. For a long time, there's been this sort of persona or brand in the AWS space, specifically the security side of it, going by Zoph—that's Z-O-P-H—and I just assumed it was a collective or a whole bunch of people working on things, and it turns out that nope, it is just one person. And that one person is my guest today. Victor Grenu is an independent AWS architect. Victor, thank you for joining me.Victor: Hey, Corey, thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to be here.Corey: So, I want to start by diving into the thing that first really put you on my radar, though I didn't realize it was you at the time. You have what can only be described as an army of Twitter bots around the AWS ecosystem. And I don't even know that I'm necessarily following all of them, but what are these bots and what do they do?Victor: Yeah. I have a few bots on Twitter that I push some notification, some tweets, when things happen on AWS security space, especially when the AWS managed policies are updated from AWS. And it comes from an initial project from Scott Piper. He was running a Git command on his own laptop to push the history of AWS managed policy. And it told me that I can automate this thing using a deployment pipeline and so on, and to tweet every time a new change is detected from AWS. So, the idea is to monitor every change on these policies.Corey: It's kind of wild because I built a number of somewhat similar Twitter bots, only instead of trying to make them into something useful, I'd make them into something more than a little bit horrifying and extraordinarily obnoxious. Like there's a Cloud Boomer Twitter account that winds up tweeting every time Azure tweets something only it quote-tweets them in all caps and says something insulting. I have an AWS releases bot called AWS Cwoud—so that's C-W-O-U-D—and that winds up converting it to OwO speak. It's like, “Yay a new auto-scawowing growp.” That sort of thing is obnoxious and offensive, but it makes me laugh.Yours, on the other hand, are things that I have notifications turned on for just because when they announce something, it's generally fairly important. The first one that I discovered was your IAM changes bot. And I found some terrifying things coming out of that from time to time. What's the data source for that? Because I'm just grabbing other people's Twitter feeds or RSS feeds; you're clearly going deeper than that.Victor: Yeah, the data source is the official AWS managed policy. In fact, I run AWS CLI in the background and I'm doing just a list policy, the list policy command, and with this list I'm doing git of each policy that is returned, so I can enter it in a git repository to get the full history of the time. And I also craft a list of deprecated policy, and I also run, like, a dog-food initiative, the policy analysis, validation analysis from AWS tools to validate the consistency and the accuracy of the own policies. So, there is a policy validation with their own tool. [laugh].Corey: You would think that wouldn't turn up anything because their policy validator effectively acts as a linter, so if it throws an error, of course, you wouldn't wind up pushing that. And yet, somehow the fact that you have bothered to hook that up and have findings from it indicates that that's not how the real world works.Victor: Yeah, there is some, let's say, some false positive because we are running the policy validation with their own linter then own policies, but this is something that is documented from AWS. So, there is an official page where you can find why the linter is not working on each policy and why. There is a an explanation for each findings. I thinking of [unintelligible 00:05:05] managed policy, which is too long, and policy analyzer is crashing because the policy is too long.Corey: Excellent. It's odd to me that you have gone down this path because it's easy enough to look at this and assume that, oh, this must just be something you do for fun or as an aspect of your day job. So, I did a little digging into what your day job is, and this rings very familiar to me: you are an independent AWS consultant, only you're based out of Paris, whereas I was doing this from San Francisco, due to an escalatingly poor series of life choices on my part. What do you focus on in the AWS consulting world?Victor: Yeah. I'm running an AWS consulting boutique in Paris and I'm working for a large customer in France. And I'm doing mostly infrastructure stuff, infrastructure design for cloud-native application, and I'm also doing some security audits and [unintelligible 00:06:07] mediation for my customer.Corey: It seems to me that there's a definite divide as far as how people find the AWS consulting experience to be. And I'm not trying to cast judgment here, but the stories that I hear tend to fall into one of two categories. One of them is the story that you have, where you're doing this independently, you've been on your own for a while working specifically on this, and then there's the stories of, “Oh, yeah, I work for a 500 person consultancy and we do everything as long as they'll pay us money. If they've got money, we'll do it. Why not?”And it always seems to me—not to be overly judgy—but the independent consultants just seem happier about it because for better or worse, we get to choose what we focus on in a way that I don't think you do at a larger company.Victor: Yeah. It's the same in France or in Europe; there is a lot of consulting firms. But with the pandemic and with the market where we are working, in the cloud, in the cloud-native solution and so on, that there is a lot of demands. And the natural path is to start by working for a consulting firm and then when you are ready, when you have many AWS certification, when you have the experience of the customer, when you have a network of well-known customer, and you gain trust from your customer, I think it's natural to go by yourself, to be independent and to choose your own project and your own customer.Corey: I'm curious to get your take on what your perception of being an AWS consultant is when you're based in Paris versus, in my case, being based in the West Coast of the United States. And I know that's a bit of a strange question, but even when I travel, for example, over to the East Coast, suddenly, my own newsletter sends out three hours later in the day than I expect it to and that throws me for a loop. The AWS announcements don't come out at two or three in the afternoon; they come out at dinnertime. And for you, it must be in the middle of the night when a lot of those things wind up dropping. The AWS stuff, not my newsletter. I imagine you're not excitedly waiting on tenterhooks to see what this week's issue of Last Week in AWS talks about like I am.But I'm curious is that even beyond that, how do you experience the market? From what you're perceiving people in the United States talking about as AWS consultants versus what you see in Paris?Victor: It's difficult, but in fact, I don't have so much information about the independent in the US. I know that there is a lot, but I think it's more common in Europe. And yeah, it's an advantage to whoever ten-hour time [unintelligible 00:08:56] from the US because a lot of stuff happen on the Pacific time, on the Seattle timezone, on San Francisco timezone. So, for example, for this podcast, my Monday is over right now, so, so yeah, I have some advantage in time, but yeah.Corey: This is potentially an odd question for you. But I find an awful lot of the AWS documentation to be challenging, we'll call it. I don't always understand exactly what it's trying to tell me, and it's not at all clear that the person writing the documentation about a service in some cases has ever used the service. And in everything I just said, there is no language barrier. This documentation was written—theoretically—in English and I, most days, can stumble through a sentence in English and almost no other language. You obviously speak French as a first language. Given that you live in Paris, it seems to be a relatively common affliction. How do you find interacting with AWS in French goes? Or is it just a complete nonstarter, and it all has to happen in English for you?Victor: No, in fact, the consultants in Europe, I think—in fact, in my part, I'm using my laptop in English, I'm using my phone in English, I'm using the AWS console in English, and so on. So, the documentation for me is a switch on English first because for the other language, there is sometimes some automated translation that is very dangerous sometimes, so we all keep the documentation and the materials in English.Corey: It's wild to me just looking at how challenging so much of the stuff is. Having to then work in a second language on top of that, it just seems almost insurmountable to me. It's good they have automated translation for a lot of this stuff, but that falls down in often hilariously disastrous ways, sometimes. It's wild to me that even taking most programming languages that folks have ever heard of, even if you program and speak no English, which happens in a large part of the world, you're still using if statements even if the term ‘if' doesn't mean anything to you localized in your language. It really is, in many respects, an English-centric industry.Victor: Yeah. Completely. Even in French for our large French customer, I'm writing the PowerPoint presentation in English, some emails are in English, even if all the folks in the thread are French. So yeah.Corey: One other area that I wanted to explore with you a bit is that you are very clearly focused on security as a primary area of interest. Does that manifest in the work that you do as well? Do you find that your consulting engagements tend to have a high degree of focus on security?Victor: Yeah. In my design, when I'm doing some AWS architecture, my main objective is to design some security architecture and security patterns that apply best practices and least privilege. But often, I'm working for engagement on security audits, for startups, for internal customer, for diverse company, and then doing some accommodation after all. And to run my audit, I'm using some open-source tooling, some custom scripts, and so on. I have a methodology that I'm running for each customer. And the goal is to sometime to prepare some certification, PCI DSS or so on, or maybe to ensure that the best practice are correctly applied on a workload or before go-live or, yeah.Corey: One of the weird things about this to me is that I've said for a long time that cost and security tend to be inextricably linked, as far as being a sort of trailing reactive afterthought for an awful lot of companies. They care about both of those things right after they failed to adequately care about those things. At least in the cloud economic space, it's only money as opposed to, “Oops, we accidentally lost our customers' data.” So, I always found that I find myself drifting in a security direction if I don't stop myself, just based upon a lot of the cost work I do. Conversely, it seems that you have come from the security side and you find yourself drifting in a costing direction.Your side project is a SaaS offering called unusd.cloud, that's U-N-U-S-D dot cloud. And when you first mentioned this to me, my immediate reaction was, “Oh, great. Another SaaS platform for costing. Let's tear this one apart, too.” Except I actually like what you're building. Tell me about it.Victor: Yeah, and unusd.cloud is a side project for me and I was working since, let's say one year. It was a project that I've deployed for some of my customer on their local account, and it was very useful. And so, I was thinking that it could be a SaaS project. So, I've worked at [unintelligible 00:14:21] so yeah, a few months on shifting the product to assess [unintelligible 00:14:27].The product aim to detect the worst on AWS account on all AWS region, and it scan all your AWS accounts and all your region, and you try to detect and use the EC2, LDS, Glue [unintelligible 00:14:45], SageMaker, and so on, and attach a EBS and so on. I don't craft a new dashboard, a new Cost Explorer, and so on. It's it just cost awareness, it's just a notification on email or Slack or Microsoft Teams. And you just add your AWS account on the project and you schedule, let's say, once a day, and it scan, and it send you a cost of wellness, a [unintelligible 00:15:17] detection, and you can act by turning off what is not used.Corey: What I like about this is it cuts at the number one rule of cloud economics, which is turn that shit off if you're not using it. You wouldn't think that I would need to say that except that everyone seems to be missing that, on some level. And it's easy to do. When you need to spin something up and it's not there, you're very highly incentivized to spin that thing up. When you're not using it, you have to remember that thing exists, otherwise it just sort of sits there forever and doesn't do anything.It just costs money and doesn't generate any value in return for that. What you got right is you've also eviscerated my most common complaint about tools that claim to do this, which is you build in either a explicit rule of ignore this resource or ignore resources with the following tags. The benefit there is that you're not constantly giving me useless advice, like, “Oh, yeah, turn off this idle thing.” It's, yeah, that's there for a reason, maybe it's my dev box, maybe it's my backup site, maybe it's the entire DR environment that I'm going to need at little notice. It solves for that problem beautifully. And though a lot of tools out there claim to do stuff like this, most of them really failed to deliver on that promise.Victor: Yeah, I just want to keep it simple. I don't want to add an additional console and so on. And you are correct. You can apply a simple tag on your asset, let's say an EC2 instances, you apply the tag in use and the value of, and then the alerting is disabled for this asset. And the detection is based on the CPU [unintelligible 00:17:01] and the network health metrics, so when the instances is not used in the last seven days, with a low CPU every [unintelligible 00:17:10] and low network out, it comes as a suspect. [laugh].[midroll 00:17:17]Corey: One thing that I like about what you've done, but also have some reservations about it is that you have not done with so many of these tools do which is, “Oh, just give us all the access in your account. It'll be fine. You can trust us. Don't you want to save money?” And yeah, but I also still want to have a company left when all sudden done.You are very specific on what it is that you're allowed to access, and it's great. I would argue, on some level, it's almost too restrictive. For example, you have the ability to look at EC2, Glue, IAM—just to look at account aliases, great—RDS, Redshift, and SageMaker. And all of these are simply list and describe. There's no gets in there other than in Cost Explorer, which makes sense. You're not able to go rummaging through my data and see what's there. But that also bounds you, on some level, to being able to look only at particular types of resources. Is that accurate or are you using a lot of the CloudWatch stuff and Cost Explorer stuff to see other areas?Victor: In fact, it's the least privilege and read-only permission because I don't want too much question for the security team. So, it's full read-only permission. And I've only added the detection that I'm currently supports. Then if in some weeks, in some months, I'm adding a new detection, let's say for Snapshot, for example, I will need to update, so I will ask my customer to update their template. There is a mechanisms inside the project to tell them that the template is obsolete, but it's not a breaking change.So, the detection will continue, but without the new detection, the new snapshot detection, let's say. So yeah, it's least privilege, and all I need is the get-metric-statistics from CloudWatch to detect unused assets. And also checking [unintelligible 00:19:16] Elastic IP or [unintelligible 00:19:19] EBS volume. So, there is no CloudWatching in this detection.Corey: Also, to be clear, I am not suggesting that what you have done is at all a mistake, even if you bound it to those resources right now. But just because everyone loves to talk about these exciting, amazing, high-level services that AWS has put up there, for example, oh, what about DocumentDB or all these other—you know, Amazon Basics MongoDB; same thing—or all of these other things that they wind up offering, but you take a look at where customers are spending money and where they're surprised to be spending money, it's EC2, it's a bit of RDS, occasionally it's S3, but that's a lot harder to detect automatically whether that data is unused. It's, “You haven't been using this data very much.” It's, “Well, you see how the bucket is labeled ‘Archive Backups' or ‘Regulatory Logs?'” imagine that. What a ridiculous concept.Yeah. Whereas an idle EC2 instance sort of can wind up being useful on this. I am curious whether you encounter in the wild in your customer base, folks who are having idle-looking EC2 instances, but are in fact, for example, using a whole bunch of RAM, which you can't tell from the outside without custom CloudWatch agents.Victor: Yeah, I'm not detecting this behavior for larger usage of RAM, for example, or for maybe there is some custom application that is low in CPU and don't talk to any other services using the network, but with this detection, with the current state of the detection, I'm covering large majority of waste because what I see from my customer is that there is some teams, some data scientists or data teams who are experimenting a lot with SageMaker with Glue, with Endpoint and so on. And this is very expensive at the end of the day because they don't turn off the light at the end of the day, on Friday evening. So, what I'm trying to solve here is to notify the team—so on Slack—when they forgot to turn off the most common waste on AWS, so EC2, LTS, Redshift.Corey: I just now wound up installing it while we've been talking on my dedicated shitposting account, and sure enough, it already spat out a single instance it found, which yeah was running an EC2 instance on the East Coast when I was just there, so that I had a DNS server that was a little bit more local. Okay, great. And it's a T4g.micro, so it's not exactly a whole lot of money, but it does exactly what it says on the tin. It didn't wind up nailing the other instances I have in that account that I'm using for a variety of different things, which is good.And it further didn't wind up falling into the trap that so many things do, which is the, “Oh, it's costing you zero and your spend this month is zero because this account is where I dump all of my AWS credit codes.” So, many things say, “Oh, well, it's not costing you anything, so what's the problem?” And then that's how you accidentally lose $100,000 in activate credits because someone left something running way too long. It does a lot of the right things that I would hope and expect it to do, and the fact that you don't do that is kind of amazing.Victor: Yeah. It was a need from my customer and an opportunity. It's a small bet for me because I'm trying to do some small bets, you know, the small bets approach, so the idea is to try a new thing. It's also an excuse for me to learn something new because building a SaaS is a challenging.Corey: One thing that I am curious about, in this account, I'm also running the controller for my home WiFi environment. And that's not huge. It's T3.small, but it is still something out there that it sits there because I need it to exist. But it's relatively bored.If I go back and look over the last week of CloudWatch metrics, for example, it doesn't look like it's usually busy. I'm sure there's some network traffic in and out as it updates itself and whatnot, but the CPU peeks out at a little under 2% used. It didn't warn on this and it got it right. I'm just curious as to how you did that. What is it looking for to determine whether this instance is unused or not?Victor: It's the magic [laugh]. There is some intelligence artif—no, I'm just kidding. It just statistics. And I'm getting two metrics, the superior average from the last seven days and the network out. And I'm getting the average on those metrics and I'm doing some assumption that this EC2, this specific EC2 is not used because of these metrics, this server average.Corey: Yeah, it is wild to me just that this is working as well as it is. It's just… like, it does exactly what I would expect it to do. It's clear that—and this is going to sound weird, but I'm going to say it anyway—that this was built from someone who was looking to answer the question themselves and not from the perspective of, “Well, we need to build a product and we have access to all of this data from the API. How can we slice and dice it and add some value as we go?” I really liked the approach that you've taken on this. I don't say that often or lightly, particularly when it comes to cloud costing stuff, but this is something I'll be using in some of my own nonsense.Victor: Thanks. I appreciate it.Corey: So, I really want to thank you for taking as much time as you have to talk about who you are and what you're up to. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Victor: Mainly on Twitter, my handle is @zoph [laugh]. And, you know, on LinkedIn or on my company website, as zoph.io.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:25:23]. Thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate it.Victor: Thank you, Corey, for having me. It was a pleasure to chat with you.Corey: Victor Grenu, independent AWS architect. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an insulting comment that is going to cost you an absolute arm and a leg because invariably, you're going to forget to turn it off when you're done.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Highlights from The Pat Kenny Show
Thousands attend GamerFest at the RDS

Highlights from The Pat Kenny Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 9:48


Thousands of gamers packed out the RDS over the weekend to experience the latest technologies and entertainment on the market. Ireland's biggest gaming convention and e-sports festival returned for the first time since the pandemic. Newstalk reporter Josh Crosbie went along to meet with YouTube creators, software designers and of course the players themselves.

Empowering Dietitians
[110] What We Wish We'd Known Earlier in Our Careers with Shani Jordan-Goldman, MS RD CDCES

Empowering Dietitians

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 34:53


Jess Serdikoff Romola, dietitian supervisor and host of The Empowering Dietitians Podcast, is joined in this episode by Shani Jordan-Goldman, a fellow dietitian and the owner of Nutrition Cheat Sheets, a company devoted to supported new RDs in the ways Shani wished she'd had available to her when she was starting out. In this episode, the two dietitians chat about their experiences as students and new dietitians, their genius plan to start their own internship to do things differently (maybe some day!), and the changes they want to see in the profession moving forward. If you liked this episode, you may also like: -Episode 68, Questioning Your Decision to Become a Dietitian? https://empoweringdietitians.com/podcast/068-leaving-dietetics -Episode 98, Let's Change the Process to Become a Dietitian: https://empoweringdietitians.com/podcast/098-becoming-a-dietitian -Episode 101, Not Feeling the Love within the Dietetics Community? https://empoweringdietitians.com/podcast/101-community-support To connect with Shani: www.instagram.com/nutritioncheatsheets www.nutritioncheatsheets.com To connect with Jess and learn more about the support she offers: www.empoweringdietitians.com/free www.instagram.com/empowering.dietitians

Dermot & Dave
Ireland's Biggest Gaming Festival Is On The Way

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 7:11


It's called Gamerfest and it sounds very cool! Did you know that thousands of gamers will ascend upon the RDS in Dublin this weekend for Gamerfest? It's Ireland's largest gaming and Esports festival. Stuart Dempsey the founder and CEO of the festival joined Dermot and Dave to chat all about it.

Talking Rounds
Episode 26: C.O.T.Y

Talking Rounds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 60:02


Card of the year material this week. A little breakdown of a mutual golf game leads into some etiquette chatter on our pet peeves of the week. We give shine to Pat Rivera on his LFA 144- first round submission victory. Then we go full prelim preview, wrestle to lock in 4 this week, and touch on dog picks. Tune in and preview a legendary matinee of fights!Locks of the week:Obs (19-20) Aljamain Sterling by Decision (+150), Zubaira Tukhugov (+150), Katlyn Chookagian, under 2.5 Rds in main event, with the bonus 5th pick, Mateusz Gamrot (KO +500)Tucker (16-23)  Mateusz Gamrot, Sean Brady, Charles Olivera (+150), and Under 1.5 in Petr Yan vs Sean O'Malley fight (+240).

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Connections Are Top Priority for Gamers

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 3:48


As Official Broadband Partner of GamerFest 2022, eir commissioned research with gamers in Ireland to look at how, when, where and with whom they are connecting with while gaming. To mark the partnership with Ireland's largest gaming event taking place in the RDS, Dublin on October 22nd and 23rd, eir was keen to understand the role of connection with the gaming community in Ireland. In terms of the top priority, strong and reliable connection is key with 81% of participants stating that having a high-speed broadband connection was the most important factor a seamless and uninterrupted online gaming experience. Strong network connections not only facilitate a seamless gaming experience but also more social connections with 40% making friends through online gaming community. Connectivity is playing an increasingly important role in gaming with online games requiring a reliable, lag-free, low-latency connection with research revealing that 58% play most of their online games through their mobile phones and tablets, meaning gamers can rely on eir's 5G and Fibre to the Home networks for split second accuracy while gaming online and the best overall gaming experience. eir's 5G network is available to more than 70% of the population of Ireland and continues to expand, with ultrafast data speeds in 485 towns and cities across Ireland. Fibre to the Home is a future-proofed network capable of delivering speeds of 2Gbps straight to more than 900,000 homes and businesses, further extending the availability of high-speed broadband connections across Ireland. Speaking at the launch of the partnership Susan Brady, eir's Managing Director of Consumer and Small Business commented: “At eir, we are committed to providing our customers with access to world leading technologies and the highest-quality connectivity. We are delighted to partner with GamerFest 2022 and look forward to meeting all the attendees at the event later this month and showcasing the latest innovation and technology available to our customers to deliver the best gaming experience.” Stuart Dempsey, GamerFest's CEO commented: “We're incredibly excited to welcome visitors back to GamerFest 2022 to experience all the amazing gaming content and technology across the weekend through the support of our exclusive broadband partners, eir. Strong connections are at the heart of our community and we can't wait for them all to meet again in person at GamerFest.” Having already welcomed thousands of visitors to its events across Ireland, GamerFest will see 5,000 gamers descend on the RDS venue for a packed weekend of gaming and entertainment featuring the latest games, esports, VR gaming, special guests, and live stage shows. Visitors to the event can also expect a wide array of gaming entertainment including the latest blockbuster titles, VR gaming and technology, expo hall and marketplace to grab the latest gaming equipment and gear. More about Irish Tech News Irish Tech News are Ireland's No. 1 Online Tech Publication and often Ireland's No.1 Tech Podcast too. You can find hundreds of fantastic previous episodes and subscribe using whatever platform you like via our Anchor.fm page here: If you'd like to be featured in an upcoming Podcast email us at Simon@IrishTechNews.ie now to discuss. Irish Tech News have a range of services available to help promote your business. Why not drop us a line at Info@IrishTechNews.ie now to find out more about how we can help you reach our audience. You can also find and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Snapchat.

The Molecast
Molecast #75

The Molecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 65:48


Support the Molecast at https://ko-fi.com/dementedmole We're doling out high praise for the internationals who brought their A game in the instant classic between Leinster and the Cell C Sharks at the RDS. Who plays what role in Munster's off-field team as they struggle to define short-term and long-term goals? And finally the Emerging Ireland tour that no one can agree about, other than that it's good to win in a big rugby country like South Africa.

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo
Marc Denis on Slafkovsky making his NHL debut & Martin St. Louis' fresh coaching approach

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 12:39


RDS hockey analyst Marc Denis joins First Up to discuss the Canadiens starting the season tonight vs the Leafs, Juraj Slafkovsky making his NHL debut, Martin St.Louis and his fresh approach as a coach, Matt Murray making his debut for the Maple Leafs, Cole Caufield's potential and more!

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo
First Up: October 12, 2022 - Hour 2

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 45:43


In the second hour of the show Aaron Korolnek and Carlo Colaiacovo are joined by Maple Leafs executive Dave Poulin to discuss the Maple Leafs season opener vs the Habs. We are also joined by Marc Denis of RDS to look at the season from the Habs point of view

The Big Five Podcast
The axe falls on Hockey Canada. Plus: Nightmare on Saint-Urbain Street

The Big Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 22:54


Elias Makos welcomes in Bonnie Feigenbaum, Conservative Party of Quebec candidate in last provincial election and a lecturer at Concordia & McGill University, and Meeker Guerrier, Weekend News Anchor at Noovo and a commentator at RDS.  Hockey Canada CEO Scott Smith and the entire board of directors have stepped down, the way this story has played out, was it based on evidence, or satisfying social media thirst for blood? The knives are out in LiberalLand, and the message coming from party diehards now that the election is over is clear: Dominique Anglade needs to go Police showed up to one home on Saint-Urban Street after a number of calls from neighbours regarding Halloween decorations that were a little too lifelike

Screaming in the Cloud
HeatWave and the Latest Evolution of MySQL with Nipun Agarwal

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 38:43


About NipunNipun Agarwal is a Senior Vice President, MySQL HeatWave Development, Oracle. His interests include distributed data processing, machine learning, cloud technologies and security. Nipun was part of the Oracle Database team where he introduced a number of new features. He has been awarded over 170 patents.Links Referenced: Oracle: https://oracle.com MySQL HeatWave info: https://www.oracle.com/mysql/ MySQL Service on AWS and OCI login (Oracle account required): https://cloud.mysql.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us in part by our friends at Datadog. Datadog's SaaS monitoring and security platform that enables full stack observability for developers, IT operations, security, and business teams in the cloud age. Datadog's platform, along with 500 plus vendor integrations, allows you to correlate metrics, traces, logs, and security signals across your applications, infrastructure, and third party services in a single pane of glass.Combine these with drag and drop dashboards and machine learning based alerts to help teams troubleshoot and collaborate more effectively, prevent downtime, and enhance performance and reliability. Try Datadog in your environment today with a free 14 day trial and get a complimentary T-shirt when you install the agent.To learn more, visit datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloud to get. That's www.datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloudCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle, and back for a borderline historic third round going out and telling stories about these things, we have Nipun Agarwal, who is, as opposed to his first appearance on the show, has been promoted to senior vice president of MySQL HeatWave. Nipun, thank you for coming back. Most people are not enamored enough with me to subject themselves to my slings and arrows a second time, let alone a third. So first, thanks. And are you okay, over there?Nipun: Thank you, Corey. Yeah, very happy to be back.Corey: [laugh]. So, since the last time we've spoken, there have been some interesting developments that have happened. It was pre-announced by Larry Ellison on a keynote stage or an earnings call, I don't recall the exact format, that HeatWave was going to be coming to AWS. Now, you've conducted a formal announcement, this usual media press blitz, et cetera, talking about it with an eye toward general availability later this year, if I'm not mistaken, and things seem to be—if you'll forgive the term—heating up a bit.Nipun: That is correct. So, as you know, we have had MySQL HeatWave on OCI for just about two years now. Very good reception, a lot of people who are using MySQL HeatWave, are migrating from other clouds, specifically from AWS, and now we have announced availability of MySQL HeatWave on AWS.Corey: So, for those who have not done the requisite homework of listening to the entire back catalog of nearly 400 episodes of this show, what exactly is MySQL HeatWave, just so we make sure that we set the stage for what we're going to be talking about? Because I sort of get the sense that without a baseline working knowledge of what that is, none of the rest of this is going to make a whole lot of sense.Nipun: MySQL HeatWave is a managed MySQL service provided by Oracle. But it is different from other MySQL-based services in the sense that we have significantly enhanced the service such that it can very efficiently process transactions, analytics, and in-database machine learning. So, what customers get with the service, with MySQL HeatWave, is a single MySQL database which can process OLTP, transaction processing, real-time analytics, and machine learning. And they can do this without having to move the data out of MySQL into some other specialized database services who are running analytics or machine learning. And all existing tools and applications which work with MySQL work as is because this is something that enhances the server. In addition to that, it provides very good performance and very good price performance compared to other similar services out there.Corey: The idea historically that some folks were pushing around the idea of multi-cloud was that you would have workloads that—oh, they live in one cloud, but the database was going to be all the way across the other side of the internet, living in a different provider. And in practice, what we generally tend to see is that where the data lives is where the compute winds up living. By and large, it's easier to bring the compute resources to the data than it is to move the data to the compute, just because data egress in most of the cloud providers—notably exempting yours—is astronomically expensive. You are, if I recall correctly, less than 10% of AWS's data egress charge on just retail pricing alone, which is wild to me. So first, thank you for keeping that up and not raising prices because I would have felt rather annoyed if I'd been saying such good things. And it was, haha, it was a bait and switch. It was not. I'm still a big fan. So, thank you for that, first and foremost.Nipun: Certainly. And what you described is absolutely correct that while we have a lot of customers migrating from AWS to use MySQL HeatWave and OCI, a class of customers are unable to, and the number one reason they're unable to is that AWS charges these customers all very high egress fees to move the data out of AWS into OCI for them to benefit from MySQL HeatWave. And this has definitely been one of the key incentives for us, the key motivation for us, to offer MySQL HeatWave on AWS so that customers don't need to pay this exorbitant data egress fees.Corey: I think it's fair to disclose that I periodically advise a variety of different cloud companies from a perspective of voice-of-the-customer feedback, which essentially distills down to me asking really annoying slash obnoxious questions that I, as a customer, legitimately want to know, but people always frown at me when I asked that in vendor pitches. For some reason, when I'm doing this on an advisory basis, people instead nod thoughtfully and take notes, so that at least feels better from my perspective. Oracle Cloud has been one of those, and I've been kicking the tires on the AWS offering that you folks have built out for a bit of time now. I have to say, it is legitimate. I was able to run a significant series of tests on this, and what I found going through that process was interesting on a bunch of different levels.I'm wondering if it's okay with you, if we go through a few of them, just things that jumped out to me as we went through a series of conversations around, “So, we're going to run a service on AWS.” And my initial answer was, “Is this Oracle? Are you sure?” And here we are today; we are talking about it and press releases.Nipun: Yes, certainly fine with me. Please go ahead.Corey: So, I think one of the first questions I had when you said, “We're going to run a database service on AWS itself,” was, if I'm true to type, is going to be fairly sarcastic, which is, “Oh, thank God. Finally, a way to run a MySQL database on AWS. There's never been one of those before.” Unless you count EC2 or Aurora or Redshift depending upon how you squint at it, or a variety of other increasingly strange things. It feels like that has been a largely saturated market in many respects.I generally don't tend to advise on things that I find patently ridiculous, and your answer was great, but I don't want to put words in your mouth. What was it that you saw that made you say, “Ah, we're going to put a different database offering on AWS, and no, it's not a terrible decision.”Nipun: Got it. Okay, so if you look at it, the value proposition which MySQL HeatWave offers is that customers of MySQL or customers have MySQL compatible databases, whether Aurora, or whether it's RDS MySQL, right, or even, like, you know, customers of Redshift, they have been migrating to MySQL HeatWave on OCI. Like, for the reasons I said: it's a single database, customers don't need to have multiple databases for managing different kinds of workloads, it's much faster, it's a lot less expensive, right? So, there are a lot of value propositions. So, what we found is that if you were to offer MySQL HeatWave on AWS, it will significantly ease the migration of other customers who might be otherwise thinking that it will be difficult for them to migrate, perhaps because of the high egress cost of AWS, or because of the high latency some of the applications in the AWS incur when the database is running somewhere else.Or, if they really have an ecosystem of applications already running on AWS and they just want to replace the database, it'll be much easier for them if MySQL HeatWave was offered on AWS. Those are the reasons why we feel it's a compelling proposition, that if existing customers of AWS are willing to migrate the cloud from AWS to OCI and use MySQL HeatWave, there is clearly a value proposition we are offering. And if we can now offer the same service in AWS, it will hopefully increase the number of customers who can benefit from MySQL HeatWave.Corey: One of the next questions I had going in was, “Okay, so what actually is this under the hood?” Is this you effectively just stuffing some software into a machine image or an AMI—or however they want to mispronounce that word over an AWS-land—and then just making it available to your account and running that, where's the magic or mystery behind this? Like, it feels like the next more modern cloud approach is to stuff the whole thing into a Docker container. But that's not what you wound up doing.Nipun: Correct. So, HeatWave has been designed and architected for scale-out processing, and it's been optimized for the cloud. So, when we decided to offer MySQL HeatWave on AWS, we have actually gone ahead and optimize our server for the AWS architecture. So, the processor we are running on, right, we have optimized our software for that instance types in AWS, right? So, the data plane has been optimized for AWS architecture.The second thing is we have a brand new control plane layer, right? So, it's not the case that we're just taking what we had in OCI and running it on AWS. We have optimized the data plane for AWS, we have a native control plane, which is running on AWS, which is using the respective services on AWS. And third, we have a brand new console which we are offering, which is a very interactive console where customers can run queries from the console. They can do data management from the console, they're able to use Autopilot from the console, and we have performance monitoring from the console, right? So, data plane, control plane, console. They're all running natively in AWS. And this provides for a very seamless integration or seamless experience for the AWS customers.Corey: I think it's also a reality, however much we may want to pretend otherwise, that if there is an opportunity to run something in a different cloud provider that is better than where you're currently running it now, by and large, customers aren't going to do it because it needs to not just be better, but so astronomically better in ways that are foundational to a company's business model in order to justify the tremendous expense of a cloud migration, not just in real, out of pocket, cost in dollars and cents that are easy to measure, but also in terms of engineering effort, in terms of opportunity cost—because while you're doing that you're not doing other things instead—and, on some level, people tend to only do that when there's an overwhelming strategic reason to do it. When folks already have existing workloads on AWS, as many of them do, it stands to reason that they are not going to want to completely deviate from that strategy just because something else offers a better database experience any number of axes. So, meeting customers where they are is one of the, I guess, foundational shifts that we've really seen from the entire IT industry over the last 40 years, rather than you will buy it from us and you will tolerate it. It's, now customers have choice, and meeting them where they are and being much more, I guess, able to impedance-match with them has been critical. And I'm really optimistic about what the launch of this service portends for Oracle.Nipun: Indeed, but let me give you another data point. We find a very large number of Aurora customers migrating to MySQL HeatWave on OCI, right? And this is the same workload they were running on Aurora, but now they want to run the same workload on MySQL HeatWave on OCI. They are willing to undertake this journey of migration because their applications, they get much faster, and for a lot less price, but they get much faster. Then the second aspect is, there's another class of customers who are for instance running, on Aurora or other transactions or workloads, but then they have to keep moving the data, they'll keep performing the ETL process into some other service, whether it's Snowflake, or whether it's Redshift for analytics.Now, with this migration, when they move to MySQL HeatWave, customers don't need to, like, have multiple databases, and they get real-time analytics, meaning that if any data changes inside the server inside the OLTP as a database service, right? If they were to run a query, that query is giving them the latest results, right? It's not stale. Whereas with an ETL process, it gets to be stale. So, given that we already found that there were so many customers migrating to OCI to use MySQL HeatWave, I think there's a clear value proposition of MySQL HeatWave, and there's a lot of demand.But like, as I was mentioning earlier, by having MySQL HeatWave be offered on AWS, it makes the proposition even more compelling because, as you said, yes, there is some engineering work that customers will need to do to migrate between clouds, and if they don't want to, then absolutely now they have MySQL HeatWave which they can now use in AWS itself.Corey: I think that one of the things I continually find myself careening into, perhaps unexpectedly, is a failure to really internalize just how vast this entire industry really is. Every time I think I've seen it all, all I have to do is talk to one more cloud customer and I learn something completely new and different. Sometimes it's an innovative, exciting use of a thing. Other times, it's people holding something fearfully wrong and trying to use it as a hammer instead. And you know, if it's dumb and it works, is it really dumb? There are questions around that.And this in turn gave rise to one of my next obnoxious questions as I was looking at what you were building at the time because a lot of your pricing and discussions and framing of this was targeting very large enterprise-style customers, and the price points reflected that. And then I asked the question that Big E enterprise never quite expects, for whatever reason, it's like, “That looks awesome if I have a budget with many commas in it. What can I get for $4?” And as of this recording, pricing has not been finalized slash published for the service, but everything that you have shown me so far absolutely makes developing on this for a proof of concept or an evening puttering around, completely tenable: it is not bound to a fixed period of licensing; it's, use it when you want to use it, turn it off when you're done; and the hourly pricing is not egregious. I think that is something that historically, Oracle Database offerings have not really aligned with.OCI very much has, particularly with an eye toward its extraordinarily awesome free tier that's always free. But this feels like it's a weird blending of the OCI model versus historical Oracle Database pricing models in a way that, honestly I'm pretty excited about.Nipun: So, we react to what the customer requirements and needs are. So, for this class of customers who are using, say, RDS, MySQL, Aurora, we understand that they are very cost sensitive, right? So, one of the things which we have done in addition to offering MySQL HeatWave on AWS is based on the customer feedback and such. We are now offering a small shape of HeatWave instance in addition to the regular large shape. So, if customers want to just, you know, kick the tires, if developers just want to get started, they can get a MySQL node with HeatWave for less than ten cents an hour. So, for less than ten cents an hour, they get the ability to run transaction processing, analytics, and machine learning.And if you were to compare the corresponding cost of Aurora for the same, like, you know, core count, it's, like, you know, 12-and-a-half cents. And that's just Aurora, without Redshift or without SageMaker. So yes, you're right that based on the feedback and we have found that it would be much more attractive to have this low-end shape for the AWS developers. We are offering this smaller shape. And yeah, it's very, very affordable. It's about just shy of ten cents an hour.Corey: This brings up another question that I raised pretty early on in the process because you folks kept talking about shapes, and it turns out that is the Oracle Cloud term that applies to instance size over an AWS-land. And as we dug into this a bit further, it does make sense for how you think about these things and how you build them to customers. Specifically, if I want to run this, I log into cloud.oracle.com and sign up for it there, and pay you over on that side of the world, this does not show up on my AWS bill. What drove that decision?Nipun: Okay, so a couple of things. One clarification is that the site people log in to is cloud.mysql.com. So, that's where they come to: cloud.mysql.com.Corey: Oh, my apologies. I keep forgetting that you folks have multiple cloud offerings and domains. They're kind of a thing. How do they work? Given I have a bad domain by habit myself, I have no room to judge.Nipun: So, they come to cloud.mysql.com. From there, they can provision an instance. And we, as, like, you know, Oracle or MySQL, go ahead and create an instance in AWS, in the Oracle tenancy. From there, customers can then, you know, access their data on AWS and such. Now, what we want to provide the customers is a very seamless experience, that they just come to cloud.mysql.com, and from there, they can do everything: provisioning an instance, running the queries, payment and such. So, this is one of the reasons that we want customers just to be able to come to the site, cloud.mysql.com, and take care of the billing and such.Now, the other thing is that, okay, why not allow customers to pay from AWS, right? Now, one of the things over there is that if you were to do that and there's a customer, they'll be like, “Hey, I got to pay something to AWS, something to Oracle, so we'd prefer, it'd be better to have a one-stop shop.” And since many of these are already Oracle customers, it's helpful to do it this way.Corey: Another approach you could have taken—and I want to be very clear here that I am not suggesting that this would have been a good idea—but an approach that you could have taken would have been to go down the weird AWS partner rabbit hole, and we're going to provide this to customers on the AWS Marketplace. Because according to AWS, that's where all of their customers go to discover new softwares. Yeah, first, that's a lie. They do not. But aside from that, what was it about that Marketplace model that drove you to a decision point where okay, at launch, we are not going to be offering this on the AWS Marketplace? And to be clear, I'm not suggesting that was the wrong decision.Nipun: Right. The main reason is we want to offer the MySQL HeatWave service at the least expensive cost to the user, right, or like, the least cost. If you were to, like, have MySQL HeatWave in the Marketplace, AWS charges a premium. This the customers would need to pay. So, we just didn't want the customers to have to pay this additional premium just because they can now source this thing from the Marketplace. So, it's really to, like, save costs for the customer.Corey: The value of the Marketplace, from my perspective, has been effectively not having to deal as much with customer procurement departments because well, AWS is already on the procurement approved list, so we're just going to go ahead and take the hit to wind up making it accessible from that perspective and calling it good. The downside to this is that increasingly, as customers are making larger and longer-term commitments that are tied to certain levels of spend on AWS, they're increasingly trying to drag every vendor with whom they do business into the your AWS bill so they can check those boxes off. And the problem that I keep seeing with that is vendors who historically have been doing just fine, have great working relationships with a customer are reporting that suddenly customers are coming back with, “Yeah, so for our contract renewal, we want to go through the AWS Marketplace.” In return, effectively, these companies are then just getting a haircut off whatever it is they're able to charge their customers but receiving no actual value for any of this. It attenuates the relationship by introducing a third party into the process, and it doesn't make anything better from the vendor's point of view because they already had something functional and working; now they just have to pay a commission on it to AWS, who, it seems, is pathologically averse to any transaction happening where they don't get a cut, on some level. But I digress. I just don't like that model very much at all. It feels coercive.Nipun: That's absolutely right. That's absolutely right. And we thought that, yes, there is some value to be going to Marketplace, but it's not worth the additional premium customers would need to pay. Totally agree.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: It's also worth pointing out that in Oracle's historical customer base, by which I mean the last 40 years that you folks have been in business, you do have significant customers with very sizable estates. A lot of your cloud efforts have focused around, I guess, we'll call it an Oracle-specific currency: Oracle Credits. Which is similar to the AWS style of currency just for a different company in different ways. One of the benefits that you articulated to me relatively early on was that by going through cloud.mysql.com, customers with those credits—which can be in sizable amounts based upon various differentiating variables that change from case to case—and apply that to their use of MySQL HeatWave on AWS.Nipun: Right. So, in fact, just for starters, right, what we give to customers is we offer some free credits for customers to try a service on OCI of, you know, $300. And that's the same thing, the same experience you would like customers who are trying HeatWave on AWS to get. Yes, so you're right, this is the kind of consistency we want to have, and yet another reason why cloud.mysql.com makes sense is the entry point for customers to try the service.Corey: There was a time where I would have struggled not to laugh in your face at the idea that we're talking about something in the context of an Oracle database, and well, there's $300 in credit. That's, “What can I get for that? Hung up on?” No. A surprising amount, when it comes to these things.I feel like that opens up an entirely new universe of experimentation. And, “Let's see how this thing actually works with his workload,” and lets people kick the tires on it for themselves in a way that, “Oh, we have this great database. Well, can I try it? Sure, for $8 million, you absolutely can.” “Well, it can stay great and awesome over there because who wants to take that kind of a bet?” It feels like it's a new world and in a bunch of different respects, and I just can't make enough noise about how glad I am to see this transformation happening.Nipun: Yeah. Absolutely, right? So, just think about it. So, you're getting MySQL and HeatWave together for just shy of ten cents an hour, right? So, what you could get for $300 is 3000 hours for MySQL HeatWave instance, which is very good for people to try for free. And then, you know, decide if they want to go ahead with it.Corey: One other, I guess, obnoxious question that I love to ask—it's not really a question so much as a statement; that that's part of the first thing that makes it really obnoxious—but it always distills down to the following that upsets product people left and right, which is, “I don't get it.” And one of the things that I didn't fully understand at the outset of how you were structuring things was the idea of separating out HeatWave from its constituent components. I believe it was Autopilot if I'm not mistaken, and it was effectively different SKUs that you could wind up opting to go for. And okay, if I'm trying to kick the tires on this and contextualize it as someone for whom the world's best database is Route 53, then it really felt like an additional decision point that I wasn't clear on the value of. And I'm still not entirely sure on the differentiation point and the value there, but now you offer it bundled as a default, which I think is so much better, from the user experience perspective.Nipun: Okay, so let me clarify a couple of things.Corey: Please. Databases are not my forte, so expect me to wind up getting most of the details hilariously wrong.Nipun: Sure. So, MySQL Autopilot provides machine-learning-based automation for various aspects of the MySQL service; very popular. There is no charge for it. It is built into MySQL HeatWave; there is no additional charge for it, right, so there never was any SKU for it. What you're referring to is, we have had a SKU for the MySQL node or the MySQL instance, and there's a separate SKU for HeatWave.The reason there is a need to have a different SKU for these two is because you always only have one node of MySQL. It could be, like, you know, running on one core, or like, you know, multiple cores, but it's always, like, you know, one node. But with HeatWave, it's a scale-out architecture, so you can have multiple nodes. So, the users need to be able to express how many nodes of HeatWave are they provisioning, right? So, that's why there is a need to have two SKUs, and we continue to have those two SKUs.What we are doing now differently is that when users instantiate a MySQL instance, by default, they always get the HeatWave node associated with it, right? So, they don't need to, like, you know, make the decision to—okay when to add HeatWave; they always get HeatWave along with the MySQL instance, and that's what I was saying a combination of both of these is, you know, like, just about ten cents an hour. If for whatever reason, they decide that they do not want HeatWave, they can turn it off, and then the price drops to half. But what we're providing is the AWS service that HeatWave is turned on by default.Corey: Which makes an awful lot of sense. It's something that lets people opt out if they decide they don't need this as they continue to scale out, but for the newcomer who does not, in many cases—in my particular case—have a nuanced understanding of where this offering starts and stops, it's clearly the right decision of—rather than, “Oh, yeah. The thing you were trying and it didn't work super well? Well, yeah. If you enable this other thing, it would have been awesome.” “Well, great. Please enable it for me by default and let me opt out later in time as my level of understanding deepens.”Nipun: That's right. And that's exactly what we are doing. Now, this was a feedback we got because many, if not most, of our customers would want to have HeatWave, and we just kind of, you know, mitigating them from going through one more step, it's always enabled by default.Corey: As far as I'm aware, you folks are running this effectively as any other AWS customer might, where you establish a private link connection to your customers, in some cases, or give them a public or private endpoint where they can wind up communicating with this service. It doesn't require any favoritism or special permissions from AWS themselves that they wouldn't give to any other random customer out there, correct?Nipun: Yes, that is correct. So, for now, we are exposing this thing as a public endpoint. In the future, we have plans to support the private endpoint as well, but for now, it's public.Corey: Which means that foundationally what you're building out is something that fits into a model that could work extraordinarily well across a variety of different environments. How purpose-tuned is the HeatWave installation you have running on AWS for the AWS environment, versus something that is relatively agnostic, could be dropped into any random cloud provider, up to and including the terrifyingly obsolete rack I have in the spare room?Nipun: So, as I mentioned, when we decided to offer MySQL HeatWave on AWS, the idea was that okay, for the AWS customers, we now want to have an offering which is completely optimized for AWS, provides the best price-performance on AWS. So, we have determined which instance types underneath will provide the best price performance, and that's what we have optimized for, right? So, I can tell you, like, in terms of many of—for instance, take the case of the cache size of the underlying processor that we're using on AWS is different than what we're using for OCI. So, we have gone ahead, made these optimizations in our code, and we believe that our code is really optimized now for the AWS infrastructure.Corey: I think that makes a fair deal of sense because, again, one of the big problems AWS has had is the proliferation of EC2 instance types to the point now where the answer is super easy, too, “Are you using the correct instance type for your workload?” Because that answer now is, “Of course not. Who could possibly say that they were with any degree of confidence?” But when you take the time to look at a very specific workload that's going to be scaled out, it's worth the time investment to figure out exactly how to optimize things for price and performance, given the constraints. Let's be very clear here, I would argue that the better price performance for HeatWave is almost certainly not going to be on AWS themselves, if for no other reason than the joy that is their data transfer pricing, even for internal things moving around from time to time.Personally, I love getting charged data transfer for taking data from S3, running it through AWS Glue, putting it into a different S3 bucket, accessing it with Athena, then hooking that up to Tableau as we go down and down and down the spiraling rabbit hole that never ends. It's not exactly what I would call well-optimized economically. Their entire system feels almost like it's a rigged game, on some level. But given those constraints, yeah, dialing in it and making it cost-effective is absolutely something that I've watched you folks put significant time and effort into.Nipun: So, I'll make two points, right, to the questions. First is yes, I just want to, like, be clear about it, that when a user provisions MySQL HeatWave via cloud.mysql.com and we create an instance in AWS, we don't give customers a multitude of things to, like, you know, choose from.We have determined which instance type is going to provide the customer the best price performance, and that's what we provision. So, the customer doesn't even need to know or care, is it going to be, like, you know, AMD? Is it going to be Intel? Is it going to be, like, you know, ARM, right? So, it's something which we have predetermined and we have optimized for it. That's first.The second point is in terms of the price performance. So, you're absolutely right, that for the class of customers who cannot migrate away from AWS because of the egress costs or because of the high latency because of AWS, right, sure, MySQL HeatWave on AWS will provide the best price-performance compared to other services out in AWS like Redshift, or Aurora, or Snowflake. But if customers have the flexibility to choose a cloud of their choice, it is indeed the case that customers are going to find that running MySQL HeatWave on OCI is going to provide them, by far, the best price performance, right? So, the price performance of running MySQL HeatWave on OCI is indeed better than MySQL HeatWave on AWS. And just because of the fact that when we are running the service in AWS, we are paying the list price, right, on AWS; that's how we get the gear. Whereas with OCI, like, you know, things are a lot less expensive for us.But even when you're running on AWS, we are very, very price competitive with other services. And you know, as you've probably seen from the performance benchmarks and such, what I'm very intrigued about is that we're able to run a standard workload, like some, like, you know, TPC-H and offer seven times better price-performance while running in AWS compared to Redshift. So, what this goes to show is that we are really passing on the savings to the customers. And clearly, Redshift is not doing a good job of performance or, like, you know, they're charging too much. But the fact that we can offer seven times better price performance than Redshift in AWS speaks volumes, both about architecture and how much of savings we are passing to our customers.Corey: What I love about this story is that it makes testing the waters of what it's like to run MySQL HeatWave a lot easier for customers because the barrier to entry is so much lower. Where everything you just said I agree with it is more cost-effective to run on Oracle Cloud. I think there are a number of workloads that are best placed on Oracle Cloud. But unless you let people kick the tires on those things, where they happen to be already, it's difficult to get them to a point where they're going to be able to experience that themselves. This is a massive step on that path.Nipun: Yep. Right.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking time out of your day to walk us through exactly how this came to be and what the future is going to look like around this. If people want to learn more, where should they go?Nipun: Oh, they can go to oracle.com/mysql, and there they can get a lot more information about the capabilities of MySQL HeatWave, what we are offering in AWS, price-performance. By the way, all the price performance numbers I was talking about, all the scripts are available publicly on GitHub. So, we welcome, we encourage customers to download the scripts from GitHub, try for themselves, and all of this information is available from oracle.com/mysql where they can get this detailed information.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the show notes. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Nipun: Sure thing, Corey. Thank you for the opportunity.Corey: Nipun Agarwal, Senior Vice President of MySQL HeatWave. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry insulting comment. You will then be overcharged for the data transfer to submit that insulting comment, and then AWS will take a percentage of that just because they're obnoxious and can.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Freelance Dietitian Podcast
040: Nutrition Jobs & The Future of Dietetics! Ft. Stacey Dunn-Emke, MS, RDN

Freelance Dietitian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 36:22 Transcription Available


I invited Stacey to come onto the show and talk about dietetics, and I'm talking the BIG PICTURE of the profession. Stacey has been practicing for thirty years and has built her own successful business, NutritionJobs, which is rooted in career coaching for RDS. If anyone has their finger on the pulse when it comes to the future of dietetics ... its Stacey. Here are the blog posts Stacey referred to during our conversation: Alternative Dietitian Job Ideas Dietitian Job TrendsYou can get in touch with Stacey here: Website - NutritionJobsInstagram - NutritionJobs Youtube - NutritionJobsLove the show? Consider donating or leaving a 5 star review! Your support and kind words mean the world to me.  

Food Bullying Podcast
A dietetic legend of learning & laughing

Food Bullying Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 20:16


Leslie Bonci has filled four decades as a dietitians with certifications, Academy of Nutrition & Dietetic offices, and building an amazing practice of serving athletes & real people. Leslie is all about helping  clients discover their best through knowledge, application, and motivation.  Leslie notes "No one knows what RDs do. We have not done a great job of marketing ourselves and our voice is lost in the sea of sinfluencers. We also need to find ways to resonate with relevance leading with emotion and the common ground before facts and evidence. We must find ways to connect before we correct." She also believes that creating a budget, living within one's salary cup, culinary competence, and being able to separate the nonsense from the real are critically important skills that consumers need to master. "The economy, the misinformation, the proliferation of stress on all fronts is making it more difficult for people to thrive." In this episode, Leslie talks about her walk in learning more about agriculture and provides suggestions for other RDNs to learn more about food is grown. She believes in the value of inclusion and has worked hard to not exclude anyone from the food conversation.  Congrats, Leslie, on your remarkable legacy. A must listen for any dietitian. 

Dear Future Dietitian
18. How to Start Working with Brands with The RD Link Founder Jenna Gorham

Dear Future Dietitian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 28:44


In this episode you'll learn:  Why you don't need to be an influence or have a large following to work with brands The value you can bring to brands as a dietetics student Mistakes to avoid when starting to build relationships with brands  The different ways you can work with brands as a dietitian   About Jenna Jenna Gorham is a registered dietitian and the founder of The RD Link. Starting her career in private practice, Jenna quickly had a need for collaborating with brands. She has since spent her career working with brands to help them leverage dietitian expertise to help them become credible, authoritative companies. Jenna built The RD Link so that dietitians and food companies are more accessible to each other for pursuing partnerships. Out of the office you can find her on the trails, exploring the mountains of Montana! About The RD Link  The RD Link is the only one-stop-shop platform to connect RDs and brands. Our mission is to create relationships between health and wellness brands and registered dietitians to foster credibility and the spread of accurate nutrition information while helping brands and dietitians alike grow their businesses in meaningful ways. Resources mentioned:  The RD Link - Sign up for a free membership to make a profile and get found by top health and wellness brands: https://therdlink.com/ Make Money as a VA Training Course - allaccessdietetics.com/make-money-as-a-va Use code AAD20 for 20% off Link Premium Annual Membership: https://www.therdlink.com?fpr=jenny29

Empowering NICU Parents Podcast
The Wolff Family's Post NICU Journey Through Home Trach Care, Decannulation, and Unexpected Surprises Too

Empowering NICU Parents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 36:43


For this podcast, I continued my conversation with Jessica Wolff. We discussed what their life was like once they brought Lily home. She explains how they adjusted to caring for Lily with her tracheostomy along with the necessary life-saving equipment and how all of that completely changed once COVID hit. We discussed how the plan for Lily's decannulation went completely sideways, how they coped with it, and how they learned that Lily actually needed a full laryngotracheal reconstructive surgery. Jessica proudly shares how Lily is doing today, medically, developmentally and emotionally and how they are navigating everything as a family, especially in preparation for sweet Lily to head to Preschool! We conclude the episode speaking about Nolan, Jessica and Pat's son who they welcomed earlier this year who also spent some time in the NICU. Jessica shares some great information and advice pertinent to other families who are either currently in the NICU and weighing the heavy decision of a tracheostomy for their child, or for the families who have a child at home with a tracheostomy, as well as families who have suffered or may suffer a loss. Listeners will be surprised to hear some of the unexpected emotions that Lily and the Wolff family has had to work through once Lily had her trach removed. And again, you will be amazed by how strong and resilient Lily and the entire Wolff family is! I hope you enjoy the episode! Our NICU Roadmap: A Comprehensive NICU Journal: https://empoweringnicuparents.com/nicujournal/NICU Mama Hats: https://empoweringnicuparents.com/hats/NICU Milestone Cards: https://empoweringnicuparents.com/nicuproducts/Finn + Emma: http://shrsl.com/2py7dEmpowering NICU Parents Show Notes: https://empoweringnicuparents.com/episode38Episode 37 Show Notes: https://empoweringnicuparents.com/episode37Empowering NICU Parents Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/empoweringnicuparents/Empowering NICU Parents FB Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/empoweringnicuparentsPinterest Page: https://pin.it/36MJjmH

Screaming in the Cloud
The Unseen Impact of Cloud Migration with Donovan Brady

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 35:13


About DonovanDonovan Brady is the Director of Solutions Architecture at Logicworks. He began his career at Logicworks six years ago as a Solutions Architect, fast forward to today, Donovan now manages a team of highly skilled and certified AWS and Azure Solutions Architects. During his time at Logicworks, Donovan has had the opportunity to work with companies in a variety of verticals to solve their most complex IT and business challenges. Donovan is originally from New York and has been a professional musician since the age of six. He is also a self-proclaimed 90's video game nerd.Links Referenced: LogicWorks: https://www.logicworks.com/ Donovan's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/donovan-brady-9403a583/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest on this promoted episode of Screaming in the Cloud is Donovan Brady, director of solutions architecture at Logicworks and something of a kindred spirit in that he tends to also focus on something that I more or less spend my time being obnoxious about on Twitter, which is in many cases going towards cloud for the right reasons with an outcome in mind, which is rarely having the most interesting and clever technical stack imaginable. Donovan, thank you for joining me today.Donovan: Yeah, thanks for having me. Corey, really excited for the conversation and looking forward to getting into it.Corey: Let's start by establishing the bona fides, for lack of a better term here. What does Logicworks do that they require a director of solutions architecture?Donovan: Logicworks is a managed services and professional services cloud provider specializing in hyper-compliant workloads migrating, optimizing, and operating in the cloud, right? That means that we work with primarily Software-as-a-Service companies or HealthTech or FinTech companies with compliances, like PCI, HIPAA, HITRUST, SOC, ISO, GDPR, pretty much you name it and we help customers in their cloud journey operate and optimize in the cloud.Corey: It's weird, when you talk about optimizing in cloud, people always hear that as, “Oh, we're going to fix the bill, we're going to—” because again, that is the context in which I operate where, “Oh, great. We're going to optimize your cloud bill.” Which makes sense, but I think that people have lost sight of the forest for the trees in many respects, where when they hear, “I'm going to optimize your bill,” that often comes across, “Oh, we're going to make it smaller,” because generally, it's not very well optimized, and one of those optimal things you can do is turn something that's unneeded or unnecessary off, and surprise, there's a side effect of saving money. But it often means that in some cases, it's time to start spending more money on things like, oh I don't know, backups, and resiliency, and figure out what it is that the business is aligned around. Because you can always cut the bill to zero by turning everything off. It seems like that's not really the alignment that—or the reason that companies go to cloud in the first place. So, what's your take on that? Why do most companies say, “Ah. We have a problem and we're going to go with cloud,” in the hopes that it fixes that problem?Donovan: Yeah, it's an interesting point. So, a lot of times we hear customers say exactly what you just mentioned: “We want to move to cloud so that we can save costs,” or, “Oh, we're in the cloud and we're primarily concerned about costs.” Unfortunately, that's the wrong motivation. Saving cost is definitely a byproduct of moving to the cloud if you do it the right way, but the primary business reasons why somebody or an organization would want to move to the cloud are slightly different, right? The business objectives that most customers or companies want to increase are their agility, they want to increase their profitability, they want to decrease their time-to-revenue.Let's say—as I mentioned, I work with a lot of Software-as-a-Service companies—they have a monolithic application right now that takes a long time to update, it takes a long time to patch. If you can modernize that application, if you can use some more cutting edge or bleeding edge tools like what's provided in the public cloud, you'd be able to significantly decrease that timetable for deploying new updates, acquiring new companies, decreasing your time to revenue. Those are the primary business drivers that customers should be focused on. And then when you're optimizing in the cloud, you're really looking at the five categories of the Well-Architected Framework, which as you mentioned, isn't just cost. There's security, there's reliability, there's performance, and there's operations, and all of these are kind of intertwined, and can eventually lead to a decrease in [laugh] costs, right, but if you were to just lift-and-shift into the cloud, you're probably not going to save that much money.Corey: Let's not forget the sixth pillar of the Well-Architected Framework, which was recently added which is sustainability. Unfortunately, it does seem a little true to life where it seems like it's been bolted on after the fact. I would have expected that to also be the security pillar, but that's a little sensitive for some folks. It's one of those areas where sustainability and cost optimization tend to go hand-in-glove because turning something off benefits everyone except the cloud providers hoping that you don't turn things off in some cases. I don't necessarily believe that's where the major hyperscalers are sitting today, but there's no denying that they do benefit from things sitting there going unused, as do most companies that charge money for a thing that they provide you.Donovan: Yeah, that's exactly true. There are some other tools that make it easier to save costs and still achieve your expected goals, and that's the more of those more cutting-edge technologies like a serverless deployment, right? A Lambda function is a point-in-time deployment of your code without needing to rely on an ongoing virtual machine, or database, or whatever it is that is running that application, and it runs for just a couple minutes, couple seconds, however long you need it. And I was actually just speaking with a customer recently, we did this CXO dinner, and we were talking about the benefits of the cloud. It was almost as if we planted him there.We didn't; he randomly showed up. But he was also promoting the cloud because he said he runs his entire organization almost in the free tier of AWS because the entire thing is serverless-based, you know? So, there are definitely ways to optimize your costs and therefore sustainability, as you mentioned: turning things off or maybe not have them permanently running in the first place. But you can only achieve that once you've actually done the shift after the lift.Corey: The website that hosts this podcast is lastweekinaws.com. The first version of that that I put up was entirely Lambda and S3-driven. It was traditionally serverless; it cost pennies a month to run.And I've migrated it a few years ago to where it currently is, living on WordPress at WP Engine. Now, a lot of the technology purists will look at that and say that I went in the exact wrong direction. Why would I ever do that? Well, because things like integrating a podcast feed into the website are, grab a plugin; call it good. I can find a universe of people who are better at working with WordPress from a development perspective than I am as opposed to building something myself out of basically popsicle sticks and string and spending all of my time maintaining that.Like, this website does not directly bring in any revenue to the business. It is ancillary. I need to have it in order to empower what the business does, but it is not a core competency of what we do, so outsourcing that to someone who does specialize in this makes an awful lot of business sense. And very often I'll see people who are missing the point in cloud when it comes to losing sight of what the actual business objective is.Donovan: Absolutely. Oftentimes, we hear the primary business goal is, “We want to decrease costs.” They hear for a number of reasons, “We can decrease costs.” “Oh, we can cut some of our operations teams because the cloud just magically runs.” You know, it doesn't exactly work that way. But they're missing sight of the actual business drivers that can help them grow the business, right?What I like to say is that the cloud is not just a data center to host your infrastructure or host your applications; it's actually a platform to grow your business. And because of these more streamlined and automated tools that AWS, Azure, Google, and these other hyperscaler clouds provide you, you can actually hit an immense amount of profitability by just leveraging these tools, but it requires you to transform your business. And that is what cloud adoption really is. Many people think that cloud adoption is a project, “Oh, I migrated to the cloud,” and then you leave it alone. Right?But if you do that you're subject to a lot of issues. Back to that Well-Architected Framework that we said, if you don't have any guardrails in place to make sure that you have the proper security posture or the proper high availability or reliability concerns, right, it leads to cloud sprawl. Now, cloud sprawl is when an environment lacks the necessary guardrails and governance to limit the deployment of resources, right? This has a number of impacts, including a larger attack surface—that's primarily security—there are tons of resources that can get deployed—there's a lot of cost there—and then a lot of management overhead, you know? So, this means that cloud adoption is not a point-in-time project; it's really a process; it's a methodology; it's an ongoing, continuous process, to make sure that you are cost-optimized, to make sure that you're reliable, to make sure that you're secure.And if you can maintain an optimized environment that's well-architected, you will inevitably grow your business because as we mentioned, it's going to lead to better innovation, more agile development teams that can go to market quicker, increasing your overall revenue.Corey: I think that people like to lose sight of the fact that in almost every case, unless you're doing something absolutely bizarre, payroll is going to cost more than your cloud bill. Now, please don't take that as a personal challenge if you're listening to this. The goal is not to run up the score and see how high you can get just for funsies. Although I do admit, I play that game occasionally with, you know, accounts that are not my own. But in practice, for an easy example, on this, people like to turn up their nose at RDS sometimes because well, that charges a lot of money to run MySQL and I can run MySQL on top of EC2 instances.Yes, you can, but what is your time worth comparatively? And at certain points of scale, when you're making extraordinary demands on it, the economics do come back around where yeah, you probably should be running it on EC2 instead of as a managed service, but so much of that is going to be contextual. It's basically impossible to look at an AWS estate—or any cloud estate for that matter—and unequivocally say, “Oh, this is a bad design. This is something that should not be because of X, Y, and Z,” because invariably, there's context that you're missing. I look at cloud accounts all the time where I could, in a vacuum, go ahead and optimize the living hell out of it, except there are reasons that things are the way they are, and the best way to look like a junior consultant is to show up and start throwing shade without understanding why things are the way they are.Donovan: Exactly. And I think the number one issue that people run into, that organizations run into post-migration, is being able to track or tie back their migration and their optimization efforts to the business drivers. Logicworks actually ran an anonymous campaign, it was a survey. We hired some consultants, and some of the information that we found was absolutely shocking. They said that about 63% of organizations that have migrated to the cloud don't actually understand or see the value of the cloud.Now, again, if you're listening to this, that doesn't mean that there isn't the value; it means that these organizations haven't been able to track that, they haven't been able to identify, okay, what are the agility metrics? What is the intended time to market? How long do we want to go with patches? Is this going to be a 24-hour timetable or is it going to be a week-long timetable? How many pushes are we making a day?And then you can actually track that to the revenue that's been generated? And then you can understand. But that's a lot of work, and people are mostly concerned about the hard details of the technical. You know, “Okay, just put me in there. Let's see how it goes. We got to get out of our data center for one reason or another,” but they missed the overall idea of this adoption that we're referencing here.Corey: On some level, it feels like the real business value of a cloud migration has little to do with the cloud itself and everything to do with let's get out of the environment we're currently in and into a new environment because that turns over a whole bunch of rocks and lets you finally sunset some things that really should have been turned off decades ago. I don't know that's too cynical of a take, but I can't shake the feeling there's some validity to it somewhere.Donovan: [laugh]. Yeah, there definitely is some validity to that we've worked with a number of customers that we've migrated, and one perfect example. Last year, we were working with this disaster cleanup organization. They are one of the largest in the country. They have 1700 franchises and they needed to get out of their primary data center because there were a ton of issues.There was actually a case where a squirrel had chewed through one of their power cables to the data center and shut off their air conditioning, so their data center was overheating. We were talking to them about the entire scope that they understood the migration to include, it had about 100 distinct applications and about maybe three to 400 virtual machines. Once we actually got into the assessment, there were over 700 virtual machines and 320 applications; distinct applications. There's a mixture between custom off-the-shelf builds or homegrown applications that they've been making themselves, but they didn't understand that they had over 60% of the IT estate that was just residing in that data center. Because sometimes it's difficult to keep track of all of that.That's one of the things that cloud helps with. Cloud provides a ton of management and visibility and observability and traceability tools, but again, they need to be enabled, you know? And I think when companies are concerned about migrating and they're just concerned about the re-hosting or the re-platforming of their applications, the management of this as an afterthought, and the actual, “How does this change our business,” is kind of a, “Oh man,” question mark in their head because that wasn't something that was considered. And then that's usually when we get the call.Corey: It's always fun when the bat phone goes off because people are generally not calling because, “Hey, things are great here. We just really wanted to boast about it some.” It turns into a, “Oh crap, we have a problem.” That honestly is one of my favorite parts of consulting is when you wind up being able to solve what feels like a monumental problem for someone, and sure, it's relatively easy for you—presumably because when you do the same thing again and again and become a subject matter expert in it, it's just a question of style more than how do I solve this intractable problem. But it's nice to be able to walk away with a client saying, “That was awesome. I wish we could do it again.”Donovan: Yeah.Corey: Helping people is really what the game is about. I think that some folks tend to lose sight of that. And again, consulting doesn't have the best reputation in the world, due to some of the larger shops, in some cases, doing what presents as, “Oh, I don't know how to fix this, but I'm going to show up and prolong the problem forever.” I don't see that that is true consulting in the traditional sense, but maybe I'm just playing games with words.Donovan: No, I agree with that. I think one of my favorite parts of consulting is taking a step back and evaluating the entire landscape of what the problem is that we're trying to solve, right? Oftentimes, as you are aware, somebody comes to you and they say, “This is the problem and this is what I need you to do to fix it.” Eight out of ten times, the solution that they've come up with probably isn't the right solution. That will fix a symptom, right, but it's not going to fix the actual cause or the biggest issue that's plaguing them, right?They have this continuous issue and they know that that's going to cause them heartache and we need somebody to just do this, we don't have time to do this. But if you peel back the onion and understand why you're having that issue, that's where I think a better consulting company would come in and help them discern.Corey: There's value in perspective. Very often, when you are the client organization, you're too close to the problem, and/or you are extraordinarily familiar with your own context, but you're missing some of the larger context in the greater ecosystem. I mean, one of the ways that I tend to look like a wizard from the future when I see something odd on their AWS bill and can just call it out, like, “Oh yeah, that's this weird side effect of when you wind up having additional CloudTrail Management Events, yadda, yadda, yadda, yadda,” and they look at me like I'm a wizard from the future because I can just bust that out off the top of my head. Yeah, but the reason I can do that is because these things repeat themselves, these patterns continue to emerge, and the first time I saw that, it took me two weeks to get to the bottom of it. Now, when I see the symptoms of it, it's oh, yeah, it's that thing again.And I feel like consulting is just a collection of stories like that again, and again, and again. And again, part of the trick is you don't let the client ever see you sweat or do the research. You just, “All right, my next availability is in two weeks. I have a thing coming up.” And that thing, as it turns out, is spending two weeks of deep-dive research. But at least in my case I'd never charge by the hour, so it's all about being mysterious and perceived as being good at these things, at least back in the early days. Then for my sins, I actually became good at it. Oops.Donovan: [laugh]. Doesn't that always seem to happen? It's just like, “Oh, I didn't expect to be an expert in this,” and then I don't know where one day you're like, “Oh, I guess I am the expert.”Corey: Yeah. There's also value in being an outside voice where you're not beholden to individual stakeholders of, “Oh, yeah, we're never allowed to wind up talking about that one system because someone went empire-building and they're powerful here and you can't ever talk about that thing in any way that doesn't lead to more headcount and the rest.” Awesome. I don't have the energy or time for those things, and to be direct, I'm not very good at it, as an employee. I can mind my manners for the duration of a relatively short duration consulting engagement just fine, but I'm also not necessarily there to look at things that are clearly suboptimal and say, “Oh, yeah, this is the way that it should be.”But I'm also not the type to come in and say, “Well, why didn't you build this in Lambda?” “Well, genius because then when this thing was built, Lambda didn't exist, for one,” is a perfectly valid answer to that. And why would you go back and refactor something that's already doing its job, unless your primary business objective is to bolster your own resume? Which I would suggest, it probably shouldn't be?Donovan: Yeah, exactly. And that's where that outside perspective comes in because there are seven Rs of migration, right? Used to be six Rs; now there's seven hours of migration, and you need to continuously reevaluate all of your application portfolio and see which of the seven Rs is most applicable to you, right? This is why that cloud adoption idea is an ongoing process. Maybe you're beholden to some legacy applications that they really did serve their purpose when you were first migrating and there was nothing wrong with them, but now a few years later, it's time to take a deeper look at all of your applications. Maybe we don't need that application anymore. Maybe we can repurchase that. Maybe there's a SaaS version of that, that we can go leverage now.Or maybe it's completely unrelated. You know, I was working with a prospect recently, who came to us—they are currently hosted in AWS—they came to us by way of Microsoft because we're both an AWS and an Azure Partner, and Microsoft said, “Hey, they have some concerns. They wanted us to do a little assessment and see what's going on.” We talked to them, and they said that they were looking to migrate away from AWS and into Azure because they wanted better pricing—Corey: Oh, jeez.Donovan: —and that is—exactly [laugh]. And that is the exact reason why you don't migrate from one to the other because you're setting yourself up for failure, right? It's not about the cost; it's not about the sticker price, the retail price. At the end of the day, all the cloud providers are going to be plus or minus a 2% difference. It's, how did you architect this environment?And when we started peeling back that onion, we started realizing they didn't really have any guardrails or governance, and they started experiencing some of this cloud sprawl. And they expected that by transitioning cloud providers, they would have solved this magic wand solution, and now they're just going to have better costs without putting any processes or frameworks in place to manage the environment to ensure that doesn't happen again.Corey: Let's take it a step further. If you're migrating to cloud to save money, you are probably not going to achieve any cost savings within five years at the soonest. That ignores as well the opportunity cost of all that energy that could be spent on other projects. If you're moving to the cloud, it has to be based on a capability story, not because, “Oh, we're going to save money by moving to the cloud,” in almost every case. I mean, the one time that actually did result in saving money was my own story, where instead of renting a rack in downtown Los Angeles—or part of a rack—for what was it, I think $300 a month or whatnot, suddenly, I wound up just spinning up a couple of Gmail accounts, and oh, this is costing me $10 a month instead, that actually did save some money. On a hobby project where my time was effectively free.That is not usually the case for any functioning business. Don't lose sight of the fact that as technologists, we tend to view our time is free, but to our employer, it's more expensive than the AWS bill. It's spend the money where it makes sense to spend the money.Donovan: Exactly. And that's a great tie-back to those business drivers, right? I think the cloud is a no-brainer for an organization who is looking to expand. “We're right now only in these couple states and we want to be national,” or, “Now, we're going to have a global presence, and it's way easier to leverage the global footprint of the cloud than it is to build your own data centers or whatever your own solution would be.” Right?But those are the primary business drivers that you're looking to achieve. And I think, as a solutions architect, you know, solutions architects are really those consultants that take that higher-level approach and dig deeper to understand okay, but what are we trying to solve here? And this is how we can solve that, right? Not just, oh, I want to save some costs.Corey: I'm taking a look at one of the projects that I'm working on right now and from—this is objectively the wrong direction along almost every axis—I am building something new that I'm not quite ready to talk about yet, but it is going to be revenue-bearing and thus production, and tied to a web app that I'm in the process of constructing. I am intentionally setting out from the beginning to break from my usual serverless pattern and build this to run on top of Kubernetes. I have been, therefore, learning Kubernetes for the last few weeks, and I have many thoughts on it, few of them flattering. And I'm looking at this going, “This seems over-engineered,” and for my use case, it certainly is. However, the reason I'm doing this is because every client I'm dealing with these days runs some Kubernetes stuff themselves, and I should understand it better. It gives me a production workload that I can use for demos for a variety of different things. The staging environment will contain no personally identifiable information, so I can deploy that anywhere that there's a Kubernetes-esque environment or control plane as a dummy workload that I can use to kick the tires on this.And for those reasons, it makes an awful lot of sense. In practice, doing something serverlessly would be the better option. Or the best answer would be to find someone who provides this sort of thing as a white label-able service that I can just pay a few hundred bucks a month to and not think about this thing again. But those are the constraints that make what otherwise looks like a ridiculous idea make sense in this context. But oh God, looking at this for people who run Kubernetes just so they can host their blog, it's, what are you doing over there? Is that just sort of the Hello World-style application? Because not for nothing, the value of a blog is in the content, not in the magic that winds up making that content visible to readers in almost every case.Donovan: Yeah, [laugh] this is one of my favorite topics to talk about, actually, because so many times, we engage these customers, and they're like, “We want to containerize.” And I'm like, “Oh, that's awesome. I love the idea. There's so many benefits to containerization that pretty much checks every box within the Well-Architected Framework.” And then their next sentence is, “And so, we're going to move to Kubernetes.”And I'm like, “Well, why Kubernetes?” Right? Because as you said, this is just a blog, or this is just a static website, or whatever the application they have is. Containers are great, but do you need a full-fledged Kubernetes deployment? Do you need every open-source software possible so that you can integrate?Or would you be just fine with ECS that is pretty streamlined, pretty much out of the box just works from AWS? Sometimes it's necessary. Sometimes EKS or a Kubernetes deployment or maybe your own self-managed Kubernetes deployment is necessary, but it's another one of these misconceptions, I'd say, when people hear the new buzzwords, they're like, “Oh, we need to do that because that's the best thing to do.” And it's often best as you—I loved your word ‘perspective,' the outside perspective—it's usually best to get that outside perspective and understand really how—what specific solution might help you.Corey: From where I sit, I think that people often tend to skip over that. It gets to the idea of resume-driven development. And honestly, it's hard to tell people they're necessarily going in the wrong direction given how fever-pitched the hype around Kubernetes has gotten. Every company is using it for something, and on some level, wanting to get that on your resume is a logical next step. Looking at cloud bills, I would never suggest someone [laugh] wind up doing this on their own dime, so yeah, it does make sense in that context.The goal, I think of being a technology executive is to be able to understand that and, one, provide pathways for your team to develop, but also to make sure that their objectives align with the business's objectives. And often I do not see that leading in the Kubernetes direction, for better or worse. There's a reason that I own the domain kubernetestheeasyway.com and I repoint it to Amazon's ECS.Although to those listening, I am thrilled to repoint that to the highest bidder; my email is open. Jokes and witticisms aside, I am curious based upon your perspective in the market—which is broader than mine because imagine that, you don't focus on one very specific problem—what are most organizations looking at for business drivers that they generally tend to either not realize or not quite achieve, or, “Well, that didn't go quite the way that we wanted to?” Because we see the outcome of people moving to cloud; we don't necessarily see the reasons behind it.Donovan: Yeah, that's a great point. So, the first and foremost concern that I'd say most companies experience is how do we make sure that our website or application is always up and always able to generate revenue, right? Based on the types of customers that we get, they're hyper-compliant, they're mission critical, they're 24x7, they need to always be on, they need to make sure that whatever the platform that they're running their infrastructure on is able to be up 24x7. Much harder to do that in your own world than it is to do that in cloud, right, so that's one large business driver.Another large business driver, again, with hyper-compliance, is security. They've experienced some security incidents and they want to make sure that they have a more scalable, secure platform as they grow because, again, maybe they're becoming national, or they're becoming global, or they need to meet some compliance regulation, right? And then additionally, as I've mentioned a couple times here, they want to increase their overall agility, which will in turn decrease their time to market their time to revenue. That is an often miscalculated correlation, right? People say, “Okay, we'll increase our agility,” but without realizing why they're going to try to increase their agility.They want to move from pushing code 20 times a month to 20 times a day, but why, right? That's the agility piece, but why do you want to do that? Well, because it allows us to more quickly debug our code. It allows us to more quickly identify issues or rollbacks and improve our overall efficiency, increase customer retention, increase customer satisfaction, things like that.Corey: I really wish that people would, I guess, tell those stories more in conference talks, rather than, “We moved to the cloud because of reasons, and it was awesome.” And it's always depressing to me because you hear them tell this beautiful story, and you turn next to the person in the audience often and be like, “Oh, I wish I could work in a place that ran a project like that.” And they say, “Yeah, me too.” And you check their badge and they work at the same company the speaker does. It's the idea of telling this fanciful, imagined versioning rather than addressing the reality that the real world is very messy.Donovan: Exactly. And it's really hard, you know? I'm not going to sit here and say, “Well, you know, everything that we're talking about here and completely transforming your business is simple. And wow, you guys aren't smart for doing it or for not doing it.” You know? It is difficult.But back to that idea of the outside perspective, there are tried and true methods, right? Like we talked about with the Well-Architected Framework, with the Cloud Adoption Methodology, with the Seven Rs of Migration, right? There's a lot of content out there are a lot of people out there that can help you, but it's definitely a journey.Corey: It really is. And I want to thank you for sharing your view of it with us on the show. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Donovan: Visit our website, logicworks.com. You could visit us across all of our social media platforms. You could reach out to me directly; happy to talk to anybody, even if you just wanted to say, “Hey, how's the weather?” Right now, it's raining. But yeah, definitely reach out to us via our website.Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the show notes. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Donovan: Thank you so much, Corey. I had a great time, and looking forward to the next one.Corey: Donovan Brady, director of solutions architecture at Logicworks on this promoted guest episode. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry rant as a negative comment on this, presumably because you are Donovan's antithesis, the director of problems architecture.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Leafs Lunch
Leafs Lunch: September 28, 2022 - Hour 2

Leafs Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 44:22


In the second hour of the show, Julia Tocheri and Mike DiStefano are joined by RDS hockey analyst Bruno Gervais as Leafs Lunch continues its Atlantic Division previews. Then Julia and AB list some of the Most Surprising Duos that have paired up this season.

Screaming in the Cloud
The Controversy of Cloud Repatriation With Amy Tobey of Equinix

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 38:34


About AmyAmy Tobey has worked in tech for more than 20 years at companies of every size, working with everything from kernel code to user interfaces. These days she spends her time building an innovative Site Reliability Engineering program at Equinix, where she is a principal engineer. When she's not working, she can be found with her nose in a book, watching anime with her son, making noise with electronics, or doing yoga poses in the sun.Links Referenced: Equinix: https://metal.equinix.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/MissAmyTobey TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn, and this episode is another one of those real profiles in shitposting type of episodes. I am joined again from a few months ago by Amy Tobey, who is a Senior Principal Engineer at Equinix, back for more. Amy, thank you so much for joining me.Amy: Welcome. To your show. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. So, one thing that we have been seeing a lot over the past year, and you struck me as one of the best people to talk about what you're seeing in the wilderness perspective, has been the idea of cloud repatriation. It started off with something that came out of Andreessen Horowitz toward the start of the year about the trillion-dollar paradox, how, at a certain point of scale, repatriating to a data center is the smart and right move. And oh, my stars that ruffle some feathers for people?Amy: Well, I spent all this money moving to the cloud. That was just mean.Corey: I know. Why would I want to leave the cloud? I mean, for God's sake, my account manager named his kid after me. Wait a minute, how much am I spending on that? Yeah—Amy: Good question.Corey: —there is that ever-growing problem. And there have been the examples that people have given of Dropbox classically did a cloud repatriation exercise, and a second example that no one can ever name. And it seems like okay, this might not necessarily be the direction that the industry is going. But I also tend to not be completely naive when it comes to these things. And I can see repatriation making sense on a workload-by-workload basis.What that implies is that yeah, but a lot of other workloads are not going to be going to a data center. They're going to stay in a cloud provider, who would like very much if you never read a word of this to anyone in public.Amy: Absolutely, yeah.Corey: So, if there are workloads repatriating, it would occur to me that there's a vested interest on the part of every major cloud provider to do their best to, I don't know if saying suppress the story is too strongly worded, but it is directionally what I mean.Amy: They aren't helping get the story out. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, it's like, “That's a great observation. Could you maybe shut the hell up and never make it ever again in public, or we will end you?” Yeah. Your Amazon. What are you going to do, launch a shitty Amazon Basics version of what my company does? Good luck. Have fun. You're probably doing it already.But the reason I want to talk to you on this is a confluence of a few things. One, as I mentioned back in May when you were on the show, I am incensed and annoyed that we've been talking for as long as we have, and somehow I never had you on the show. So, great. Come back, please. You're always welcome here. Secondly, you work at Equinix, which is, effectively—let's be relatively direct—it is functionally a data center as far as how people wind up contextualizing this. Yes, you have higher level—Amy: Yeah I guess people contextualize it that way. But we'll get into that.Corey: Yeah, from the outside. I don't work there, to be clear. My talking points don't exist for this. But I think of oh, Equinix. Oh, that means you basically have a colo or colo equivalent. The pricing dynamics have radically different; it looks a lot closer to a data center in my imagination than it does a traditional public cloud. I would also argue that if someone migrates from AWS to Equinix, that would be viewed—arguably correctly—as something of a repatriation. Is that directionally correct?Amy: I would argue incorrectly. For Metal, right?Corey: Ah.Amy: So, Equinix is a data center company, right? Like that's why everybody knows us as. Equinix Metal is a bare metal primitive service, right? So, it's a lot more of a cloud workflow, right, except that you're not getting the rich services that you get in a technically full cloud, right? Like, there's no RDS; there's no S3, even. What you get is bare metal primitives, right? With a really fast network that isn't going to—Corey: Are you really a cloud provider without some ridiculous machine-learning-powered service that's going to wind up taking pictures, perform incredibly expensive operations on it, and then return something that's more than a little racist? I mean, come on. That's not—you're not a cloud until you can do that, right?Amy: We can do that. We have customers that do that. Well, not specifically that, but um—Corey: Yeah, but they have to build it themselves. You don't have the high-level managed service that basically serves as, functionally, bias laundering.Amy: Yeah, you don't get it in a box, right? So, a lot of our customers are doing things that are unique, right, that are maybe not exactly fit into the cloud well. And it comes back down to a lot of Equinix's roots, which is—we talk but going into the cloud, and it's this kind of abstract environment we're reaching for, you know, up in the sky. And it's like, we don't know where it is, except we have regions that—okay, so it's in Virginia. But the rule of real estate applies to technology as often as not, which is location, location, location, right?When we're talking about a lot of applications, a challenge that we face, say in gaming, is that the latency from the customer, so that last mile to your data center, can often be extremely important, right, so a few milliseconds even. And a lot of, like, SaaS applications, the typical stuff that really the cloud was built on, 10 milliseconds, 50 milliseconds, nobody's really going to notice that, right? But in a gaming environment or some very low latency application that needs to run extremely close to the customer, it's hard to do that in the cloud. They're building this stuff out, right? Like, I see, you know, different ones [unintelligible 00:05:53] opening new regions but, you know, there's this other side of the cloud, which is, like, the edge computing thing that's coming alive, and that's more where I think about it.And again, location, location, location. The speed of light is really fast, but as most of us in tech know, if you want to go across from the East Coast to the West Coast, you're talking about 80 milliseconds, on average, right? I think that's what it is. I haven't checked in a while. Yeah, that's just basic fundamental speed of light. And so, if everything's in us-east-1—and this is why we do multi-region, sometimes—the latency from the West Coast isn't going to be great. And so, we run the application on both sides.Corey: It has improved though. If you want to talk old school things that are seared into my brain from over 20 years ago, every person who's worked in data centers—or in technology, as a general rule—has a few IP addresses seared. And the one that I've always had on my mind was 130.111.32.11. Kind of arbitrary and ridiculous, but it was one of the two recursive resolvers provided at the University of Maine where I had my first help desk job.And it lives on-prem, in Maine. And generally speaking, I tended to always accept that no matter where I was—unless I was in a data center somewhere—it was about 120 milliseconds. And I just checked now; it is 85 and change from where I am in San Francisco. So, the internet or the speed of light have improved. So, good for whichever one of those it was. But yeah, you've just updated my understanding of these things. All of this is, which is to say, yes, latency is very important.Amy: Right. Let's forget repatriation to really be really honest. Even the Dropbox case or any of them, right? Like, there's an economic story here that I think all of us that have been doing cloud work for a while see pretty clearly that maybe not everybody's seeing that—that's thinking from an on-prem kind of situation, which is that—you know, and I know you do this all the time, right, is, you don't just look at the cost of the data center and the servers and the network, the technical components, the bill of materials—Corey: Oh, lies, damned lies, and TCO analyses. Yeah.Amy: —but there's all these people on top of it, and the organizational complexity, and the contracts that you got to manage. And it's this big, huge operation that is incredibly complex to do well that is almost nobody's business. So the way I look at this, right, and the way I even talk to customers about it is, like, “What is your produ—” And I talk to people internally about this way? It's like, “What are you trying to build?” “Well, I want to build a SaaS.” “Okay. Do you need data center expertise to build a SaaS?” “No.” “Then why the hell are you putting it in a data center?” Like we—you know, and speaking for my employer, right, like, we have Equinix Metal right here. You can build on that and you don't have to do all the most complex part of this, at least in terms of, like, the physical plant, right? Like, right, getting a bare metal server available, we take care of all of that. Even at the primitive level, where we sit, it's higher level than, say, colo.Corey: There's also the question of economics as it ties into it. It's never just a raw cost-of-materials type of approach. Like, my original job in a data center was basically to walk around and replace hard drives, and apparently, to insult people. Now, the cloud has taken one of those two aspects away, and you can follow my Twitter account and figure out which one of those two it is, but what I keep seeing now is there is value to having that task done, but in a cloud environment—and Equinix Metal, let's be clear—that has slipped below the surface level of awareness. And well, what are the economic implications of that?Well, okay, you have a whole team of people at large companies whose job it is to do precisely that. Okay, we're going to upskill them and train them to use cloud. Okay. First, not everyone is going to be capable or willing to make that leap from hard drive replacement to, “Congratulations and welcome to JavaScript. You're about to hate everything that comes next.”And if they do make that leap, their baseline market value—by which I mean what the market is willing to pay for them—approximately will double. And whether they wind up being paid more by their current employer or they take a job somewhere else with those skills and get paid what they are worth, the company still has that economic problem. Like it or not, you will generally get what you pay for whether you want to or not; that is the reality of it. And as companies are thinking about this, well, what gets into the TCO analysis and what doesn't, I have yet to see one where the outcome was not predetermined. They're less, let's figure out in good faith whether it's going to be more expensive to move to the cloud, or move out of the cloud, or just burn the building down for insurance money. The outcome is generally the one that the person who commissioned the TCO analysis wants. So, when a vendor is trying to get you to switch to them, and they do one for you, yeah. And I'm not saying they're lying, but there's so much judgment that goes into this. And what do you include and what do you not include? That's hard.Amy: And there's so many hidden costs. And that's one of the things that I love about working at a cloud provider is that I still get to play with all that stuff, and like, I get to see those hidden costs, right? Like you were talking about the person who goes around and swaps out the hard drives. Or early in my career, right, I worked with someone whose job it was this every day, she would go into data center, she'd swap out the tapes, you know, and do a few things other around and, like, take care of the billing system. And that was a job where it was kind of going around and stewarding a whole bunch of things that kind of kept the whole machine running, but most people outside of being right next to the data center didn't have any idea that stuff even happen, right, that went into it.And so, like you were saying, like, when you go to do the TCO analysis, I mean, I've been through this a couple of times prior in my career, where people will look at it and go like, “Well, of course we're not going to list—we'll put, like, two headcount on there.” And it's always a lie because it's never just to headcount. It's never just the network person, or the SRE, or the person who's racking the servers. It's also, like, finance has to do all this extra work, and there's all the logistic work, and there is just so much stuff that just is really hard to include. Not only do people leave it out, but it's also just really hard for people to grapple with the complexity of all the things it takes to run a data center, which is, like, one of the most complex machines on the planet, any single data center.Corey: I've worked in small-scale environments, maybe a couple of mid-sized ones, but never the type of hyperscale facility that you folks have, which I would say is if it's not hyperscale, it's at least directionally close to it. We're talking thousands of servers, and hundreds of racks.Amy: Right.Corey: I've started getting into that, on some level. Now, I guess when we say ‘hyperscale,' we're talking about AWS-size things where, oh, that's a region and it's going to have three dozen data center facilities in it. Yeah, I don't work in places like that because honestly, have you met me? Would you trust me around something that's that critical infrastructure? No, you would not, unless you have terrible judgment, which means you should not be working in those environments to begin with.Amy: I mean, you're like a walking chaos exercise. Maybe I would let you in.Corey: Oh, I bring my hardware destruction aura near anything expensive and things are terrible. It's awful. But as I looked at the cloud, regardless of cloud, there is another economic element that I think is underappreciated, and to be fair, this does, I believe, apply as much to Equinix Metal as it does to the public hyperscale cloud providers that have problems with naming things well. And that is, when you are provisioning something as a customer of one of these places, you have an unbounded growth problem. When you're in a data center, you are not going to just absentmindedly sign an $8 million purchase order for new servers—you know, a second time—and then that means you're eventually run out of power, space, places to put things, and you have to go find it somewhere.Whereas in cloud, the only limit is basically your budget where there is no forcing function that reminds you to go and clean up that experiment from five years ago. You have people with three petabytes of data they were using for a project, but they haven't worked there in five years and nothing's touched it since. Because the failure mode of deleting things that are important, or disasters—Amy: That's why Glacier exists.Corey: Oh, exactly. But that failure mode of deleting things that should not be deleted are disastrous for a company, whereas if you've leave them there, well, it's only money. And there's no forcing function to do that, which means you have this infinite growth problem with no natural limit slash predator around it. And that is the economic analysis that I do not see playing out basically anywhere. Because oh, by the time that becomes a problem, we'll have good governance in place. Yeah, pull the other one. It has bells on it.Amy: That's the funny thing, right, is a lot of the early drive in the cloud was those of us who wanted to go faster and we were up against the limitations of our data centers. And then we go out and go, like, “Hey, we got this cloud thing. I'll just, you know, put the credit card in there and I'll spin up a few instances, and ‘hey, I delivered your product.'” And everybody goes, “Yeah, hey, happy.” And then like you mentioned, right, and then we get down the road here, and it's like, “Oh, my God, how much are we spending on this?”And then you're in that funny boat where you have both. But yeah, I mean, like, that's just typical engineering problem, where, you know, we have to deal with our constraints. And the cloud has constraints, right? Like when I was at Netflix, one of the things we would do frequently is bump up against instance limits. And then we go talk to our TAM and be like, “Hey, buddy. Can we have some more instance limit?” And then take care of that, right?But there are some bounds on that. Of course, in the cloud providers—you know, if I have my cloud provider shoes on, I don't necessarily want to put those limits to law because it's a business, the business wants to hoover up all the money. That's what businesses do. So, I guess it's just a different constraint that is maybe much too easy to knock down, right? Because as you mentioned, in a data center or in a colo space, I outgrow my cage and I filled up all that space I have, I have to either order more space from my colo provider, I expand to the cloud, right?Corey: The scale I was always at, the limit was not the space because I assure you with enough shoving all things are possible. Don't believe me? Look at what people are putting in the overhead bin on any airline. Enough shoving, you'll get a Volkswagen in there. But it was always power constrained is what I dealt with it. And it's like, “Eh, they're just being conservative.” And the whole building room dies.Amy: You want blade servers because that's how you get blade servers, right? That movement was about bringing the density up and putting more servers in a rack. You know, there were some management stuff and [unintelligible 00:16:08], but a lot of it was just about, like, you know, I remember I'm picturing it, right—Corey: Even without that, I was still power constrained because you have to remember, a lot of my experiences were not in, shall we say, data center facilities that you would call, you know, good.Amy: Well, that brings up a fun thing that's happening, which is that the power envelope of servers is still growing. The newest Intel chips, especially the ones they're shipping for hyperscale and stuff like that, with the really high core counts, and the faster clock speeds, you know, these things are pulling, like, 300 watts. And they also have to egress all that heat. And so, that's one of the places where we're doing some innovations—I think there's a couple of blog posts out about it around—like, liquid cooling or multimode cooling. And what's interesting about this from a cloud or data center perspective, is that the tools and skills and everything has to come together to run a, you know, this year's or next year's servers, where we're pushing thousands of kilowatts into a rack. Thousands; one rack right?The bar to actually bootstrap and run this stuff successfully is rising again, compared to I take my pizza box servers, right—and I worked at a gaming company a long time ago, right, and they would just, like, stack them on the floor. It was just a stack of servers. Like, they were in between the rails, but they weren't screwed down or anything, right? And they would network them all up. Because basically, like, the game would spin up on the servers and if they died, they would just unplug that one and leave it there and spin up another one.It was like you could just stack stuff up and, like, be slinging cables across the data center and stuff back then. I wouldn't do it that way now, but when you add, say liquid cooling and some of these, like, extremely high power situations into the mix, now you need to have, for example, if you're using liquid cooling, you don't want that stuff leaking, right? And so, it's good as the pressure fittings and blind mating and all this stuff that's coming around gets, you still have that element of additional training, and skill, and possibility for mistakes.Corey: The thing that I see as I look at this across the space is that, on some level, it's gotten harder to run a data center than it ever did before. Because again, another reason I wanted to have you on this show is that you do not carry a quota. Although you do often carry the conversation, when you have boring people around you, but quotas, no. You are not here selling things to people. You're not actively incentivized to get people to see things a certain way.You are very clearly an engineer in the right ways. I will further point out though, that you do not sound like an engineer, by which I mean, you're going to basically belittle people, in many cases, in the name of being technically correct. You're a human being with a frickin soul. And believe me, it is noticed.Amy: I really appreciate that. If somebody's just listening to hearing my voice and in my name, right, like, I have a low voice. And in most of my career, I was extremely technical, like, to the point where you know, if something was wrong technically, I would fight to the death to get the right technical solution and maybe not see the complexity around the decisions, and why things were the way they were in the way I can today. And that's changed how I sound. It's changed how I talk. It's changed how I look at and talk about technology as well, right? I'm just not that interested in Kubernetes. Because I've kind of started looking up the stack in this kind of pursuit.Corey: Yeah, when I say you don't sound like an engineer, I am in no way shape or form—Amy: I know.Corey: —alluding in any respect to your technical acumen. I feel the need to clarify that statement for people who might be listening, and say, “Hey, wait a minute. Is he being a shithead?” No.Amy: No, no, no.Corey: Well, not the kind you're worried I'm being anyway; I'm a different breed of shithead and that's fine.Amy: Yeah, I should remember that other people don't know we've had conversations that are deeply technical, that aren't on air, that aren't context anybody else has. And so, like, I bring that deep technical knowledge, you know, the ability to talk about PCI Express, and kilovolts [unintelligible 00:19:58] rack, and top-of-rack switches, and network topologies, all of that together now, but what's really fascinating is where the really big impact is, for reliability, for security, for quality, the things that me as a person, that I'm driven by—products are cool, but, like, I like them to be reliable; that's the part that I like—really come down to more leadership, and business acumen, and understanding the business constraints, and then being able to get heard by an audience that isn't necessarily technical, that doesn't necessarily understand the difference between PCI, PCI-X, and PCI Express. There's a difference between those. It doesn't mean anything to the business, right, so when we want to go and talk about why are we doing, for example, multi-region deployment of our application? If I come in and say, “Well, because we want to use Raft.” That's going to fall flat, right?The business is going to go, “I don't care about Raft. What does that have to do with my customers?” Which is the right question to always ask. Instead, when I show up and say, “Okay, what's going on here is we have this application sits in a single region—or in a single data center or whatever, right? I'm using region because that's probably what most of the people listening understand—you know, so I put my application in a single region and it goes down, our customers are going to be unhappy. We have the alternative to spend, okay, not a little bit more money, probably a lot more money to build a second region, and the benefit we will get is that our customers will be able to access the service 24x7, and it will always work and they'll have a wonderful experience. And maybe they'll keep coming back and buy more stuff from us.”And so, when I talk about it in those terms, right—and it's usually more nuanced than that—then I start to get the movement at the macro level, right, in the systemic level of the business in the direction I want it to go, which is for the product group to understand why reliability matters to the customer, you know? For the individual engineers to understand why it matters that we use secure coding practices.[midroll 00:21:56]Corey: Getting back to the reason I said that you are not quota-carrying and you are not incentivized to push things in a particular way is that often we'll meet zealots, and I've never known you to be one, you have always been a strong advocate for doing the right thing, even if it doesn't directly benefit any given random employer that you might have. And as a result, one of the things that you've said to me repeatedly is if you're building something from scratch, for God's sake, put it in cloud. What is wrong with you? Do that. The idea of building it yourself on low-lying, underlying primitives for almost every modern SaaS style workload, there's no reason to consider doing something else in almost any case. Is that a fair representation of your position on this?Amy: It is. I mean, the simpler version right, “Is why the hell are you doing undifferentiated lifting?” Right? Things that don't differentiate your product, why would you do it?Corey: The thing that this has empowered then is I can build an experiment tonight—I don't have to wait for provisioning and signed contracts and do all the rest. I can spend 25 cents and get the experiment up and running. If it takes off, though, it has changed how I move going forward as well because there's no difference in the way that there was back when we were in data centers. I'm going to try and experiment I'm going to run it in this, I don't know, crappy Raspberry Pi or my desktop or something under my desk somewhere. And if it takes off and I have to scale up, I got to do a giant migration to real enterprise-grade hardware. With cloud, you are getting all of that out of the box, even if all you're doing with it is something ridiculous and nonsensical.Amy: And you're often getting, like, ridiculously better service. So, 20 years ago, if you and I sat down to build a SaaS app, we would have spun up a Linux box somewhere in a colo, and we would have spun up Apache, MySQL, maybe some Perl or PHP if we were feeling frisky. And the availability of that would be one machine could do, what we could handle in terms of one MySQL instance. But today if I'm spinning up a new stack for some the same kind of SaaS, I'm going to probably deploy it into an ASG, I'm probably going to have some kind of high availability database be on it—and I'm going to use Aurora as an example—because, like, the availability of an Aurora instance, in terms of, like, if I'm building myself up with even the very best kit available in databases, it's going to be really hard to hit the same availability that Aurora does because Aurora is not just a software solution, it's also got a team around it that stewards that 24/7. And it continues to evolve on its own.And so, like, the base, when we start that little tiny startup, instead of being that one machine, we're actually starting at a much higher level of quality, and availability, and even security sometimes because of these primitives that were available. And I probably should go on to extend on the thought of undifferentiated lifting, right, and coming back to the colo or the edge story, which is that there are still some little edge cases, right? Like I think for SaaS, duh right? Like, go straight to. But there are still some really interesting things where there's, like, hardware innovations where they're doing things with GPUs and stuff like that.Where the colo experience may be better because you're trying to do, like, custom hardware, in which case you are in a colo. There are businesses doing some really interesting stuff with custom hardware that's behind an application stack. What's really cool about some of that, from my perspective, is that some of that might be sitting on, say, bare metal with us, and maybe the front-end is sitting somewhere else. Because the other thing Equinix does really well is this product we call a Fabric which lets us basically do peering with any of the cloud providers.Corey: Yeah, the reason, I guess I don't consider you as a quote-unquote, “Cloud,” is first and foremost, rooted in the fact that you don't have a bandwidth model that is free and grass and criminally expensive to send it anywhere that isn't to you folks. Like, are you really a cloud if you're not just gouging the living piss out of your customers every time they want to send data somewhere else?Amy: Well, I mean, we like to say we're part of the cloud. And really, that's actually my favorite feature of Metal is that you get, I think—Corey: Yeah, this was a compliment, to be very clear. I'm a big fan of not paying 1998 bandwidth pricing anymore.Amy: Yeah, but this is the part where I get to do a little bit of, like, showing off for Metal a little bit, in that, like, when you buy a Metal server, there's different configurations, right, but, like, I think the lowest one, you have dual 10 Gig ports to the server that you can get either in a bonded mode so that you have a single 20 Gig interface in your operating system, or you can actually do L3 and you can do BGP to your server. And so, this is a capability that you really can't get at all on the other clouds, right? This lets you do things with the network, not only the bandwidth, right, that you have available. Like, you want to stream out 25 gigs of bandwidth out of us, I think that's pretty doable. And the rates—I've only seen a couple of comparisons—are pretty good.So, this is like where some of the business opportunities, right—and I can't get too much into it, but, like, this is all public stuff I've talked about so far—which is, that's part of the opportunity there is sitting at the crossroads of the internet, we can give you a server that has really great networking, and you can do all the cool custom stuff with it, like, BGP, right? Like, so that you can do Anycast, right? You can build Anycast applications.Corey: I miss the days when that was a thing that made sense.Amy: [laugh].Corey: I mean that in the context of, you know, with the internet and networks. These days, it always feels like the network engineering as slipped away within the cloud because you have overlays on top of overlays and it's all abstractions that are living out there right until suddenly you really need to know what's going on. But it has abstracted so much of this away. And that, on some level, is the surprise people are often in for when they wind up outgrowing the cloud for a workload and wanting to move it someplace that doesn't, you know, ride them like naughty ponies for bandwidth. And they have to rediscover things that we've mostly forgotten about.I remember having to architect significantly around the context of hard drive failures. I know we've talked about that a fair bit as a thing, but yeah, it's spinning metal, it throws off heat and if you lose the wrong one, your data is gone and you now have serious business problems. In cloud, at least AWS-land, that's not really a thing anymore. The way EBS is provisioned, there's a slight tick in latency if you're looking at just the right time for what I think is a hard drive failure, but it's there. You don't have to think about this anymore.Migrate that workload to a pile of servers in a colo somewhere, guess what? Suddenly your reliability is going to decrease. Amazon, and the other cloud providers as well, have gotten to a point where they are better at operations than you are at your relatively small company with your nascent sysadmin team. I promise. There is an economy of scale here.Amy: And it doesn't have to be good or better, right? It's just simply better resourced—Corey: Yeah.Amy: Than most anybody else can hope. Amazon can throw a billion dollars at it and never miss it. In most organizations out there, you know, and most of the especially enterprise, people are scratching and trying to get resources wherever they can, right? They're all competing for people, for time, for engineering resources, and that's one of the things that gets freed up when you just basically bang an API and you get the thing you want. You don't have to go through that kind of old world internal process that is usually slow and often painful.Just because they're not resourced as well; they're not automated as well. Maybe they could be. I'm sure most of them could, in theory be, but we come back to undifferentiated lifting. None of this helps, say—let me think of another random business—Claire's, whatever, like, any of the shops in the mall, they all have some kind of enterprise behind them for cash processing and all that stuff, point of sale, none of this stuff is differentiating for them because it doesn't impact anything to do with where the money comes in. So again, we're back at why are you doing this?Corey: I think that's also the big challenge as well, when people start talking about repatriation and talking about this idea that they are going to, oh, that cloud is too expensive; we're going to move out. And they make the economics work. Again, I do firmly believe that, by and large, businesses do not intentionally go out and make poor decisions. I think when we see a company doing something inscrutable, there's always context that we're missing, and I think as a general rule of thumb, that at these companies do not hire people who are fools. And there are always constraints that they cannot talk about in public.My general position as a consultant, and ideally as someone who aspires to be a decent human being, is that when I see something I don't understand, I assume that there's simply a lack of context, not that everyone involved in this has been foolish enough to make giant blunders that I can pick out in the first five seconds of looking at it. I'm not quite that self-confident yet.Amy: I mean, that's a big part of, like, the career progression into above senior engineer, right, is, you don't get to sit in your chair and go, like, “Oh, those dummies,” right? You actually have—I don't know about ‘have to,' but, like, the way I operate now, right, is I remember in my youth, I used to be like, “Oh, those business people. They don't know, nothing. Like, what are they doing?” You know, it's goofy what they're doing.And then now I have a different mode, which is, “Oh, that's interesting. Can you tell me more?” The feeling is still there, right? Like, “Oh, my God, what is going on here?” But then I get curious, and I go, “So, how did we get here?” [laugh]. And you get that story, and the stories are always fascinating, and they always involve, like, constraints, immovable objects, people doing the best they can with what they have available.Corey: Always. And I want to be clear that very rarely is it the right answer to walk into a room and say, look at the architecture and, “All right, what moron built this?” Because always you're going to be asking that question to said moron. And it doesn't matter how right you are, they're never going to listen to another thing out of your mouth again. And have some respect for what came before even if it's potentially wrong answer, well, great. “Why didn't you just use this service to do this instead?” “Yeah, because this thing predates that by five years, jackass.”There are reasons things are the way they are, if you take any architecture in the world and tell people to rebuild it greenfield, almost none of them would look the same as they do today because we learn things by getting it wrong. That's a great teacher, and it hurts. But it's also true.Amy: And we got to build, right? Like, that's what we're here to do. If we just kind of cycle waiting for the perfect technology, the right choices—and again, to come back to the people who built it at the time used—you know, often we can fault people for this—used the things they know or the things that are nearby, and they make it work. And that's kind of amazing sometimes, right?Like, I'm sure you see architectures frequently, and I see them too, probably less frequently, where you just go, how does this even work in the first place? Like how did you get this to work? Because I'm looking at this diagram or whatever, and I don't understand how this works. Maybe that's a thing that's more a me thing, like, because usually, I can look at a—skim over an architecture document and be, like, be able to build the model up into, like, “Okay, I can see how that kind of works and how the data flows through it.” I get that pretty quickly.And comes back to that, like, just, again, asking, “How did we get here?” And then the cool part about asking how did we get here is it sets everybody up in the room, not just you as the person trying to drive change, but the people you're trying to bring along, the original architects, original engineers, when you ask, how did we get here, you've started them on the path to coming along with you in the future, which is kind of cool. But until—that storytelling mode, again, is so powerful at almost every level of the stack, right? And that's why I just, like, when we were talking about how technical I bring things in, again, like, I'm just not that interested in, like, are you Little Endian or Big Endian? How did we get here is kind of cool. You built a Big Endian architecture in 2022? Like, “Ohh. [laugh]. How do we do that?”Corey: Hey, leave me to my own devices, and I need to build something super quickly to get it up and running, well, what I'm going to do, for a lot of answers is going to look an awful lot like the traditional three-tier architecture that I was running back in 2008. Because I know it, it works well, and I can iterate rapidly on it. Is it a best practice? Absolutely not, but given the constraints, sometimes it's the fastest thing to grab? “Well, if you built this in serverless technologies, it would run at a fraction of the cost.” It's, “Yes, but if I run this thing, the way that I'm running it now, it'll be $20 a month, it'll take me two hours instead of 20. And what exactly is your time worth, again?” It comes down to the better economic model of all these things.Amy: Any time you're trying to make a case to the business, the economic model is going to always go further. Just general tip for tech people, right? Like if you can make the better economic case and you go to the business with an economic case that is clear. Businesses listen to that. They're not going to listen to us go on and on about distributed systems.Somebody in finance trying to make a decision about, like, do we go and spend a million bucks on this, that's not really the material thing. It's like, well, how is this going to move the business forward? And how much is it going to cost us to do it? And what other opportunities are we giving up to do that?Corey: I think that's probably a good place to leave it because there's no good answer. We can all think about that until the next episode. I really want to thank you for spending so much time talking to me again. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to find you?Amy: Always Twitter for me, MissAmyTobey, and I'll see you there. Say hi.Corey: Thank you again for being as generous with your time as you are. It's deeply appreciated.Amy: It's always fun.Corey: Amy Tobey, Senior Principal Engineer at Equinix Metal. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment that tells me exactly what we got wrong in this episode in the best dialect you have of condescending engineer with zero people skills. I look forward to reading it.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.