Podcasts about Comparative

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Syntactic construction that serves to express a comparison

  • 647PODCASTS
  • 1,334EPISODES
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  • Jan 9, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Comparative

Latest podcast episodes about Comparative

FreshEd
FreshEd #193 – Occupying Schools in Brazil (Rebecca Tarlau)

FreshEd

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 39:51


FreshEd is taking a break for the next few weeks. While we are away, we'll re-play some of our favourite episodes. Special Note: We need your support to keep us ad-free in 2022. If you have the means to do so, please consider donating to FreshEd by visiting freshedpodcast.com/donate. Today I talk with Rebecca Tarlau about her new book, Occupying Schools, Occupying Land, which was published last year. The book details the way in which the Landless Workers Movement transformed Brazilian Education. Rebecca Tarlau is an Assistant Professor of Education and Labor and Employment Relations at the Pennsylvania State University. She is affiliated with the Lifelong Learning and Adult Education Program, the Comparative and International Education program, and the Center for Global Workers' Rights. Occupying Schools, Occupying Land won the 2020 book award from the Globalization and Education Special Interest Group of the Comparative and International Education Society. www.freshedpodcast.com/tarlau/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/support/

Unbreak My Heart
Living with a Whole Heart Part 2 | Brené Brown | Oprah Super Soul

Unbreak My Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 33:25


Doesn't heartache feel unfair and like unwanted suffering? When we are rejected, we can feel disoriented. It's hard to know we're loved, that we belong and we are valued. This is the danger of a rough breakup! No matter what you go through, it is never true that you aren't worthy of love. This is when we suffer. We had our partner and we belonged together. When we are no more, there is suffering. How do you shift out of this suffering? Is the answer to be vulnerable? Even when you've put your armor of protection up? Listen to Brene and Oprah share about this idea. I hope you feel inspired and encouraged. Thank you for listening. You're invited! Let me know if you'd  like to participate in collaborating with me in building connection, community, and sharing input to make the show the best it can be. Send me a message to learn more at: https://www.facebook.com/cheriunbreakmyheart

Dragons in Genesis
067_2 Chronicles

Dragons in Genesis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 40:57


The wild inventions of the Chronicler continue in this episode as we cover the entirety of the First Temple Period beginning with King Solomon and ending with the Temple's destruction at the hands of the Babylonians, ushering in the influence of Persian rule and religion which is evident in the text. See how the Chronicler changes events from the record of the Books of Kings in order to satisfy his own theological views.

Oncotarget
New Study: Biomarkers Linked to the Progression of Endometrial Cancer

Oncotarget

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 6:02


Statistics from the American Cancer Society indicate that endometrial cancer (EC) is on the rise among women in the United States. While it more commonly affects older women, researchers are finding that EC is the only gynecological cancer today increasing in incidence and mortality among younger women. Not to be confused with the benign condition of endometriosis, EC tumors are highly heterogeneous and are a challenge to diagnose and treat. Since these heterogeneous tumors also develop in differential growing environments, most studies that use EC cell lines to diagnose patients or develop treatments do not translate to efficacy in vivo. “Current methodologies for diagnosis and treatment rely on the use of cell lines as models for tumor biology. However, due to inherent heterogeneity and differential growing environments between cell lines and tumors, these comparative studies have found little parallels in molecular signatures.” In a new study, researchers from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and the National Institutes of Health compared signaling pathways and genes among EC cell lines and tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Their goal was to identify parallels between cell lines and tumors that may be associated with regulating EC transformation and progression. In December 2021, their research paper was published as the cover of Oncotarget's Volume 12, Issue 26, and entitled, “Comparative transcriptome analysis between patient and endometrial cancer cell lines to determine common signaling pathways and markers linked to cancer progression”. “Identifying mutually dysregulated biomarkers and signaling pathways in cell lines and tumors can advantageously provide a more expedient method for studying mechanisms in cancer biology.” Full blog - https://www.impactjournals.com/journals/blog/oncotarget/new-study-biomarkers-linked-to-the-progression-of-endometrial-cancer/ Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article - https://oncotarget.altmetric.com/details/email_updates?id=10.18632%2Foncotarget.28161 DOI - https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.28161 Full text - https://www.oncotarget.com/article/28161/text/ Correspondence to - T. John Wu - twu@usuhs.edu Keywords - endometrial cancer, cancer stage, comparative transcriptome analysis, signaling pathways, normalization About Oncotarget Oncotarget is a bi-weekly, peer-reviewed, open access biomedical journal covering research on all aspects of oncology. To learn more about Oncotarget, please visit https://www.oncotarget.com or connect with: SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/oncotarget Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Oncotarget/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/oncotarget Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/oncotargetjrnl/ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/OncotargetYouTube/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/oncotarget Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/oncotarget/ Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/user/Oncotarget/ Oncotarget is published by Impact Journals, LLC please visit https://www.ImpactJournals.com or connect with @ImpactJrnls Media Contact MEDIA@IMPACTJOURNALS.COM 18009220957

New Books in Hindu Studies
Gloria Maité Hernández, "Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Hindu Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:11


Gloria Maité Hernández's Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics (Oxford UP, 2021) compares two mystical works central to the Christian Discalced Carmelite and the Hindu Bhakti traditions: the sixteenth-century Spanish Cántico espiritual (Spiritual Canticle), by John of the Cross, and the Sanskrit Rāsa Līlā, originated in the oral tradition. These texts are examined alongside theological commentaries: for the Cántico, the Comentarios written by John of the Cross on his own poem; for Rāsa Līlā, the foundational commentary by Srīdhara Swāmi along with commentaries by the sixteenth-century theologian Jīva Goswāmī, from the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava school, and other Gauḍīya theologians.  Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/indian-religions

New Books in Christian Studies
Gloria Maité Hernández, "Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:11


Gloria Maité Hernández's Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics (Oxford UP, 2021) compares two mystical works central to the Christian Discalced Carmelite and the Hindu Bhakti traditions: the sixteenth-century Spanish Cántico espiritual (Spiritual Canticle), by John of the Cross, and the Sanskrit Rāsa Līlā, originated in the oral tradition. These texts are examined alongside theological commentaries: for the Cántico, the Comentarios written by John of the Cross on his own poem; for Rāsa Līlā, the foundational commentary by Srīdhara Swāmi along with commentaries by the sixteenth-century theologian Jīva Goswāmī, from the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava school, and other Gauḍīya theologians.  Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

New Books Network
Gloria Maité Hernández, "Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:11


Gloria Maité Hernández's Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics (Oxford UP, 2021) compares two mystical works central to the Christian Discalced Carmelite and the Hindu Bhakti traditions: the sixteenth-century Spanish Cántico espiritual (Spiritual Canticle), by John of the Cross, and the Sanskrit Rāsa Līlā, originated in the oral tradition. These texts are examined alongside theological commentaries: for the Cántico, the Comentarios written by John of the Cross on his own poem; for Rāsa Līlā, the foundational commentary by Srīdhara Swāmi along with commentaries by the sixteenth-century theologian Jīva Goswāmī, from the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava school, and other Gauḍīya theologians.  Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Religion
Gloria Maité Hernández, "Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:11


Gloria Maité Hernández's Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics (Oxford UP, 2021) compares two mystical works central to the Christian Discalced Carmelite and the Hindu Bhakti traditions: the sixteenth-century Spanish Cántico espiritual (Spiritual Canticle), by John of the Cross, and the Sanskrit Rāsa Līlā, originated in the oral tradition. These texts are examined alongside theological commentaries: for the Cántico, the Comentarios written by John of the Cross on his own poem; for Rāsa Līlā, the foundational commentary by Srīdhara Swāmi along with commentaries by the sixteenth-century theologian Jīva Goswāmī, from the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava school, and other Gauḍīya theologians.  Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in Intellectual History
Gloria Maité Hernández, "Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:11


Gloria Maité Hernández's Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics (Oxford UP, 2021) compares two mystical works central to the Christian Discalced Carmelite and the Hindu Bhakti traditions: the sixteenth-century Spanish Cántico espiritual (Spiritual Canticle), by John of the Cross, and the Sanskrit Rāsa Līlā, originated in the oral tradition. These texts are examined alongside theological commentaries: for the Cántico, the Comentarios written by John of the Cross on his own poem; for Rāsa Līlā, the foundational commentary by Srīdhara Swāmi along with commentaries by the sixteenth-century theologian Jīva Goswāmī, from the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava school, and other Gauḍīya theologians.  Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Poetry
Gloria Maité Hernández, "Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:11


Gloria Maité Hernández's Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics (Oxford UP, 2021) compares two mystical works central to the Christian Discalced Carmelite and the Hindu Bhakti traditions: the sixteenth-century Spanish Cántico espiritual (Spiritual Canticle), by John of the Cross, and the Sanskrit Rāsa Līlā, originated in the oral tradition. These texts are examined alongside theological commentaries: for the Cántico, the Comentarios written by John of the Cross on his own poem; for Rāsa Līlā, the foundational commentary by Srīdhara Swāmi along with commentaries by the sixteenth-century theologian Jīva Goswāmī, from the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava school, and other Gauḍīya theologians.  Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

New Books in Literary Studies
Gloria Maité Hernández, "Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:11


Gloria Maité Hernández's Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics (Oxford UP, 2021) compares two mystical works central to the Christian Discalced Carmelite and the Hindu Bhakti traditions: the sixteenth-century Spanish Cántico espiritual (Spiritual Canticle), by John of the Cross, and the Sanskrit Rāsa Līlā, originated in the oral tradition. These texts are examined alongside theological commentaries: for the Cántico, the Comentarios written by John of the Cross on his own poem; for Rāsa Līlā, the foundational commentary by Srīdhara Swāmi along with commentaries by the sixteenth-century theologian Jīva Goswāmī, from the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava school, and other Gauḍīya theologians.  Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in South Asian Studies
Gloria Maité Hernández, "Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:11


Gloria Maité Hernández's Savoring God: Comparative Theopoetics (Oxford UP, 2021) compares two mystical works central to the Christian Discalced Carmelite and the Hindu Bhakti traditions: the sixteenth-century Spanish Cántico espiritual (Spiritual Canticle), by John of the Cross, and the Sanskrit Rāsa Līlā, originated in the oral tradition. These texts are examined alongside theological commentaries: for the Cántico, the Comentarios written by John of the Cross on his own poem; for Rāsa Līlā, the foundational commentary by Srīdhara Swāmi along with commentaries by the sixteenth-century theologian Jīva Goswāmī, from the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava school, and other Gauḍīya theologians.  Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

RT
Worlds Apart: At the lights? Werner Patzelt, Emeritus Professor of Comparative Government

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 29:27


Like her trademark jackets, Angela Merkel's political style came in one shape and size but all colors of the rainbow. Measured and at times even dull, she nonetheless managed to steer Germany and Europe through many upheavals. Can the traffic-light coalition now poised to replace her do the same without running into red at every corner? To discuss this, Oksana is joined by Werner Patzelt, Emeritus Professor of Comparative Government at Dresden Technical University.

Questioning Medicine
Episode 186: 186. ACE vs ARB, Blood Clots, and Mifepristone

Questioning Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 17:38


Contraception 2021 Sep 20;[EPub Ahead of Print], D Grossman, S Raifman, N Morris, A Arena, L Bachrach, J Beaman, MA Biggs, C Hannum, S Ho, EB Schwarz, M GoldSTUDY DESIGNThis is an interim analysis of an ongoing prospective cohort study conducted at five sites. Clinicians assessed patients in clinic and, if they were eligible for medication abortion and ≤63 days' gestation, electronically sent prescriptions for mifepristone 200 mg orally and misoprostol 800 mcg buccally to a mail-order pharmacy, which shipped medications for next-day delivery. Participants completed surveys three and 14 days after enrollment, and we abstracted medical chart data for this interim analysis.  In this prospective cohort study, researchers estimated the effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of medication abortion with mifepristone dispensed by a mail-order pharmacy with next-day delivery after in-person clinical assessment. The researchers found that complete medication abortion occurred for 96.9% of participants; 88.4% reported being very satisfied receiving medications by mail, and 89.6% said they would use the mail-order service again if needed. Of the 4.9% who experienced adverse events, none were related to mail-order dispensing. This research suggests that mail-order pharmacy dispensing of mifepristone is effective and acceptable to patients, providing further evidence that the in-person dispensing requirement for this medication should be removed.  IMPLICATIONSThe in-person dispensing requirement for mifepristone, codified in the drug's Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy, should be removed.      Stevens SM et al. Antithrombotic therapy for VTE disease: Second update of the CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report. Chest 2021 Aug 2; [e-pub]. (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2021.07.055)  The ninth edition of the CHEST Clinical Practice Guidelines for managing venous thromboembolism (VTE) — published in 2012 and updated in 2016 — now has a second update, which addresses 14 clinical questions and offers 32 guidance statements for clinicians who manage patients with VTE. The 2012 guideline (Chest 2012; 141:Suppl:e419S and the 2016 update (NEJM JW Emerg Med Feb 2016 and Chest 2016; 149:315) both are publicly available.Key Recommendations Patients with isolated subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE): Rule out proximal deep venous thrombosis (e.g., with ultrasonography). If risk for recurrent VTE is low, surveillance is recommended over anticoagulation. If risk for recurrent VTE is high, anticoagulation is recommended. (Weak recommendation, low-certainty evidence) Patients with incidentally discovered asymptomatic PE (other than isolated subsegmental PE): Same initial and long-term anticoagulation that patients with symptomatic PE receive should be used. (Weak recommendation, moderate-certainty evidence) Patients with cancer-associated VTE: Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs; i.e., apixaban, edoxaban, or rivaroxaban) should be used for the treatment phase of therapy (strong recommendation, moderate-certainty evidence). Caveat: for patients with luminal gastrointestinal malignancies, apixaban or low-molecular-weight heparin is preferred to reduce bleeding risk. Patients with antiphospholipid syndrome: Warfarin (target international normalized ratio, 2.5) is recommended over DOAC therapy during the treatment phase for VTE. (Weak recommendation, low-certainty evidence) Catheter-assisted mechanical thrombectomy: Recommended for patients with PE and hypotension who also have high bleeding risk, failed systemic thrombolysis, or shock that is likely to lead to death before systemic thrombolysis can take effect. (Weak recommendation, low-certainty evidence) Initial anticoagulation setting: Outpatient treatment is recommended over hospitalization in patients with low-risk PE, if access to medications and outpatient care is available. (Strong recommendation, low-certainty evidence) Treatment-phase anticoagulants: DOACs are recommended over warfarin. (Strong recommendation, moderate-certainty evidence) Extended-phase therapy (beyond 3 months) for VTE: Extended anticoagulation should be offered to patients with unprovoked VTE — i.e., with no major or minor transient risk factors. Risk for recurrent VTE, risk for bleeding, and patients' values and preferences should be considered in decisions about extended anticoagulation therapy. (Strong recommendation, moderate-certainty evidence) Low-dose apixaban or rivaroxaban is recommended over full doses of these agents. (Weak recommendation, very low-certainty evidence) Aspirin is recommended for patients who are stopping anticoagulation. (Weak recommendation, low-certainty evidence) Ingason AB et al. Rivaroxaban is associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal bleeding than other direct oral anticoagulants: A nationwide propensity score–weighted study. Ann Intern Med 2021 Oct 12; [e-pub]. (https://doi.org/10.7326/M21-1474) The study used icelands National databank to compare GI bleeding among almost 6000 patients receiving  apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban for the first time.  Patients were followed for 1-1/2 years and GI bleeding was verified by review of the medical records.  Once there was a propensity score analysis it was deemed that rivaroxaban had significantly high rates of minor and major gastrointestinal bleeding compared to apixaban with a number needed to treat of around 40 or 50.  However there was no difference between rivaroxaban and dabigatran.  I think this goes to what we have all seen and that the bleeding risk among most anticoagulate medications is not equal but unfortunately which medication the insurance companies will pay for it is also not equal.  However if your patient is at large risk for GI bleed likely should consider not using rivaroxaban                     Chen R et al. Comparative first-line effectiveness and safety of ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers: A multinational cohort study. Hypertension 2021 Sep; 78:591. (https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.120.16667) In this retrospective study of patients who initiated monotherapy for hypertension, researchers used eight large observational databases to compare outcomes for 2.3 million new users of ACE inhibitors and nearly 700,000 new users of ARBs.  Myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure occurred with similar frequency in the two groups, after extensive adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. However, cough, angioedema, pancreatitis, and gastrointestinal bleeding occurred significantly more often in ACE-inhibitor users than in ARB users.            Long-Term Risk for Major Bleeding During Extended Oral Anticoagulant Therapy for First Unprovoked Venous Thromboembolism: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis: Annals of Internal Medicine: Vol 174, No 10 (acpjournals.org) What happens if you extend anticoagulation past the 3 to 6 months for an individual who has a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism.  Often this is a debate in the clinical practice of while you seem low risk so maybe we should discontinue this anticoagulation or well you had his lab value is off to me we should continue anticoagulation.  The scary thing is you do not want to discontinue the anticoagulation and the may have a massive saddle embolism and die!  It is easy to start a medication but it is always so hard to stop the medication.  this study looked at that exact question --it looked at 14 randomized control trials and 13 cohort studies with just over 17,000 patients taking either vitamin K antagonist or DOACs.  The patient had to have received a minimum of at least 9 months of anticoagulation in order to be enrolled in the final analysis and they looked at patients who had had extended anticoagulation up to 5 years.In the end the incidence of major bleeding with warfarin was 1.7 events per year per 100 patients and much lower with the DOACs at 1.12 events per year per 100 people.  While that does not sound like a lot with the newer agents he has remember that is only after 1 year if he looked at the 5-year cumulative incidence of major bleeding for those individuals on either warfarin or a DOAC it was 6.3% which is certainly at significant risk of bleeding especially when you consider that the case fatality rate was 8.3% expirationThat was a whole bunch of numbers but basically I guess with this meta-analysis is really saying is that the current recommendations for anticoagulation after a unprovoked venous thromboembolism are 3 to 6 months and if you are going to extend that out to 9 months or a year or even up to 5 years he better have a darn good reason given that the eventual rates of bleeding are so high and the mortality rate from those bleeds are also so high.  

Dragons in Genesis
066_1 Chronicles

Dragons in Genesis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 37:10


The two books of Chroniclers are yet another attempt by biblical authors to rewrite their national history and create new scripture which contradicts the older versions. What makes Chroniclers stand out is the fact that the older version of history, the books of Samuel and Kings, were too prolific to erase. So we're able to see how they attempted to rewrite history yet again and compare and contrast Chronicles with its source material. And in this episode that's exactly what we're going to do.

Otherworldly Oracle Official
Mythology Across Cultures (Comparative Mythology)

Otherworldly Oracle Official

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 45:50


A wide variety of cultures have experienced the same mythologies with different names and faces across the vastness of space and time. No idea what I mean? Take a seat around our campfire while we retell some of the most prolific stories known to man and explore their similarities and differences from culture to culture (also called comparative mythology). Including the Hero's Journey, Miraculous Virgin Births, and the Great Flood myths.

Fringe Radio Network
Where Did the Road Go -HUNT MANUAL WITH ANTHONY TYLER

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 86:06


Seriah and Taylor Bell (of The Green Lio Podcast) interview journalist and author Anthony Tyler. Topics include esoterica, comparative religion, Forteana, Jungian philosophy, horror as an artistic genre, alternative storytelling, living in Alaska, true crime, Jacque Vallee, John Keel, Charles Fort, Manly P. Hall, empiricism vs. scientificism, Colin Wilson, Carl Jung's personal experiences with the paranormal, Jungian archetypes, the concept of shadow, Masonic allegory, memetics, flaws of New Age thinking, interaction between the objective and subjective, sleep paralysis, encountering entities in dreams, the nature of dreaming, releasing and purging tension, phantom-limb syndrome, Sandra Blakeslee and V. S. Ramachandran, balancing light and dark, shadow work, the necessity of challenges in life, poltergeist phenomenon, UFOs, the intersection of various paranormal phenomena, Dr. Richard Gallagher, exorcism and mental illness, aliens without the ETH, difficulties in present-day journalism, human vulnerabilities in space travel and exploration, break-away civilization hypothesis, astrology as a philosophy, the Great Platonic Year/Equinox Precession, the UFO as archetype, Erich von Däniken, hypnosis, cults, epilepsy and spiritual visions, serial killers, memes as metaphorical viruses, demonology as a metaphor for psychological/psychiatric issues, heuristic techniques, well-targeted skepticism, and much more! This is a wide-ranging, fascinating discussion that leaves the listener hungry for more!- Recap by Vincent TreewellOutro Music by Mothers of Jupiter with Drop the Needle.

PT Inquest
222 Comparative Effectiveness of Treatments for PFP

PT Inquest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:09


Brought to you by CSMi – https://www.humacnorm.com/ptinquest Learn more about/Buy Erik's courses – The Science PT Support us on the Patreons! Comparative effectiveness of treatments for patellofemoral pain: a living systematic review with network meta-analysis. Winters M, Holden S, Lura CB, et al. Br J Sports Med. 2021;55:369-377. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2020-102819 Due to copyright laws, unless the article is open source we cannot legally post the PDF on the website for the world to download at will. That said, if you are having difficulty obtaining an article, contact us. Music for PT Inquest: “The Science of Selling Yourself Short” by Less Than Jake Used by Permission Other Music by Kevin MacLeod – incompetech.com: MidRoll Promo – Mining by Moonlight

Radio Free Hillsdale 101.7 FM
Grammar Minute: Comparative Adjectives

Radio Free Hillsdale 101.7 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 1:00


How do you know whether to make an adjective comparative by adding "more" at the beginning or "er" at the end? Are you sleepier or more sleepy than you were yesterday? Find out on this episode of Grammar Minute!

SSEAC Stories
The Politics of Public Prosecution in Malaysia and the Problem of Corruption

SSEAC Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:15


On 16 August 2021, Muhyiddin Yaseen resigned as Prime Minister of Malaysia, with Ismail Sabri Yaakub sworn in as the new Prime Minister a week later, making him Malaysia's third Prime Minister in two years. This marked the return to power of UMNO, or the United Malays National Organisation, and the graft-tainted coalition that had been ousted from power in 2018. Meanwhile, another former Prime Minister, Najib Razak, is eyeing a return to Parliament, notwithstanding a conviction and 12-year prison sentence for abuse of power and ongoing trials for corruption. His wife Rosmah Mansur is also now facing three corruption charges. Associate Professor Salim Farrar joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to talk about corruption and the politics of public prosecution in Malaysia, surveying the landscape of law and justice in Malaysia now and beyond, through a re-evaluation of Vision 2020. About Salim Farrar: Salim Farrar is Director of Islamic Law, an Associate Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney and an Associate Professor in the Sydney Law School. He researches in Comparative and Islamic Laws, with focuses on law and development in predominantly Muslim states, the legal accommodation of Muslim minorities and the Malaysian legal system (especially in criminal justice). His most recent published research explores law and justice in Malaysia post the 2018 GE14. He is the joint editor (with Paul Subramaniam) of ‘Law and Justice in Malaysia: 2020 and Beyond' (2021, Thomson Reuters), editor of ‘Law and Development in the Islamic World' Law and Development Review (Special Edition), Vol 13 (2) (2020) and joint author (with Ghena Krayem) of ‘Accommodating Muslims under Common Law' (2017, 2018, Routledge). For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
The Politics of Public Prosecution in Malaysia and the Problem of Corruption

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:15


On 16 August 2021, Muhyiddin Yaseen resigned as Prime Minister of Malaysia, with Ismail Sabri Yaakub sworn in as the new Prime Minister a week later, making him Malaysia's third Prime Minister in two years. This marked the return to power of UMNO, or the United Malays National Organisation, and the graft-tainted coalition that had been ousted from power in 2018. Meanwhile, another former Prime Minister, Najib Razak, is eyeing a return to Parliament, notwithstanding a conviction and 12-year prison sentence for abuse of power and ongoing trials for corruption. His wife Rosmah Mansur is also now facing three corruption charges. Associate Professor Salim Farrar joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to talk about corruption and the politics of public prosecution in Malaysia, surveying the landscape of law and justice in Malaysia now and beyond, through a re-evaluation of Vision 2020. About Salim Farrar: Salim Farrar is Director of Islamic Law, an Associate Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney and an Associate Professor in the Sydney Law School. He researches in Comparative and Islamic Laws, with focuses on law and development in predominantly Muslim states, the legal accommodation of Muslim minorities and the Malaysian legal system (especially in criminal justice). His most recent published research explores law and justice in Malaysia post the 2018 GE14. He is the joint editor (with Paul Subramaniam) of ‘Law and Justice in Malaysia: 2020 and Beyond' (2021, Thomson Reuters), editor of ‘Law and Development in the Islamic World' Law and Development Review (Special Edition), Vol 13 (2) (2020) and joint author (with Ghena Krayem) of ‘Accommodating Muslims under Common Law' (2017, 2018, Routledge). For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies

New Books in Political Science
The Politics of Public Prosecution in Malaysia and the Problem of Corruption

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:15


On 16 August 2021, Muhyiddin Yaseen resigned as Prime Minister of Malaysia, with Ismail Sabri Yaakub sworn in as the new Prime Minister a week later, making him Malaysia's third Prime Minister in two years. This marked the return to power of UMNO, or the United Malays National Organisation, and the graft-tainted coalition that had been ousted from power in 2018. Meanwhile, another former Prime Minister, Najib Razak, is eyeing a return to Parliament, notwithstanding a conviction and 12-year prison sentence for abuse of power and ongoing trials for corruption. His wife Rosmah Mansur is also now facing three corruption charges. Associate Professor Salim Farrar joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to talk about corruption and the politics of public prosecution in Malaysia, surveying the landscape of law and justice in Malaysia now and beyond, through a re-evaluation of Vision 2020. About Salim Farrar: Salim Farrar is Director of Islamic Law, an Associate Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney and an Associate Professor in the Sydney Law School. He researches in Comparative and Islamic Laws, with focuses on law and development in predominantly Muslim states, the legal accommodation of Muslim minorities and the Malaysian legal system (especially in criminal justice). His most recent published research explores law and justice in Malaysia post the 2018 GE14. He is the joint editor (with Paul Subramaniam) of ‘Law and Justice in Malaysia: 2020 and Beyond' (2021, Thomson Reuters), editor of ‘Law and Development in the Islamic World' Law and Development Review (Special Edition), Vol 13 (2) (2020) and joint author (with Ghena Krayem) of ‘Accommodating Muslims under Common Law' (2017, 2018, Routledge). For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books Network
The Politics of Public Prosecution in Malaysia and the Problem of Corruption

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:15


On 16 August 2021, Muhyiddin Yaseen resigned as Prime Minister of Malaysia, with Ismail Sabri Yaakub sworn in as the new Prime Minister a week later, making him Malaysia's third Prime Minister in two years. This marked the return to power of UMNO, or the United Malays National Organisation, and the graft-tainted coalition that had been ousted from power in 2018. Meanwhile, another former Prime Minister, Najib Razak, is eyeing a return to Parliament, notwithstanding a conviction and 12-year prison sentence for abuse of power and ongoing trials for corruption. His wife Rosmah Mansur is also now facing three corruption charges. Associate Professor Salim Farrar joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to talk about corruption and the politics of public prosecution in Malaysia, surveying the landscape of law and justice in Malaysia now and beyond, through a re-evaluation of Vision 2020. About Salim Farrar: Salim Farrar is Director of Islamic Law, an Associate Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney and an Associate Professor in the Sydney Law School. He researches in Comparative and Islamic Laws, with focuses on law and development in predominantly Muslim states, the legal accommodation of Muslim minorities and the Malaysian legal system (especially in criminal justice). His most recent published research explores law and justice in Malaysia post the 2018 GE14. He is the joint editor (with Paul Subramaniam) of ‘Law and Justice in Malaysia: 2020 and Beyond' (2021, Thomson Reuters), editor of ‘Law and Development in the Islamic World' Law and Development Review (Special Edition), Vol 13 (2) (2020) and joint author (with Ghena Krayem) of ‘Accommodating Muslims under Common Law' (2017, 2018, Routledge). For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Law
The Politics of Public Prosecution in Malaysia and the Problem of Corruption

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:15


On 16 August 2021, Muhyiddin Yaseen resigned as Prime Minister of Malaysia, with Ismail Sabri Yaakub sworn in as the new Prime Minister a week later, making him Malaysia's third Prime Minister in two years. This marked the return to power of UMNO, or the United Malays National Organisation, and the graft-tainted coalition that had been ousted from power in 2018. Meanwhile, another former Prime Minister, Najib Razak, is eyeing a return to Parliament, notwithstanding a conviction and 12-year prison sentence for abuse of power and ongoing trials for corruption. His wife Rosmah Mansur is also now facing three corruption charges. Associate Professor Salim Farrar joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories to talk about corruption and the politics of public prosecution in Malaysia, surveying the landscape of law and justice in Malaysia now and beyond, through a re-evaluation of Vision 2020. About Salim Farrar: Salim Farrar is Director of Islamic Law, an Associate Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney and an Associate Professor in the Sydney Law School. He researches in Comparative and Islamic Laws, with focuses on law and development in predominantly Muslim states, the legal accommodation of Muslim minorities and the Malaysian legal system (especially in criminal justice). His most recent published research explores law and justice in Malaysia post the 2018 GE14. He is the joint editor (with Paul Subramaniam) of ‘Law and Justice in Malaysia: 2020 and Beyond' (2021, Thomson Reuters), editor of ‘Law and Development in the Islamic World' Law and Development Review (Special Edition), Vol 13 (2) (2020) and joint author (with Ghena Krayem) of ‘Accommodating Muslims under Common Law' (2017, 2018, Routledge). For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Carol Marchetto Joseph Hacia and James Rilling

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:51


UC San Diego professor Carol Marchetto discusses how a comparative gene expression analysis of human and non-human primates revealed differences in the regulation of a class of transposable elements LINE1 retrotransposons between species. University of Southern California professor Joseph Hacia discusses studies profiling phytanic acid levels in red blood cells obtained from humans and captive non-human primates all on low phytanic acid diets. Emory University professor James Rilling discusses the difference of arcuate fasciculus between human and non-human primate brains and how the specialization of speech has helped humans evolve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37527]

Evolution (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Carol Marchetto Joseph Hacia and James Rilling

Evolution (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:51


UC San Diego professor Carol Marchetto discusses how a comparative gene expression analysis of human and non-human primates revealed differences in the regulation of a class of transposable elements LINE1 retrotransposons between species. University of Southern California professor Joseph Hacia discusses studies profiling phytanic acid levels in red blood cells obtained from humans and captive non-human primates all on low phytanic acid diets. Emory University professor James Rilling discusses the difference of arcuate fasciculus between human and non-human primate brains and how the specialization of speech has helped humans evolve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37527]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Carol Marchetto Joseph Hacia and James Rilling

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:51


UC San Diego professor Carol Marchetto discusses how a comparative gene expression analysis of human and non-human primates revealed differences in the regulation of a class of transposable elements LINE1 retrotransposons between species. University of Southern California professor Joseph Hacia discusses studies profiling phytanic acid levels in red blood cells obtained from humans and captive non-human primates all on low phytanic acid diets. Emory University professor James Rilling discusses the difference of arcuate fasciculus between human and non-human primate brains and how the specialization of speech has helped humans evolve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37527]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Questions Answers and Closing Remarks

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 55:27


This symposium addresses several important distinctly human characteristics that range from molecules, to metabolism, anatomy, disease, and behavior. Goals include transdisciplinary interactions, improved self-understanding, promotion of ethically sound studies to explain known differences, and the generation of new, potentially unexplored, insights on uniquely-human specializations. Given the interest in understanding our evolution, this symposium will also help to organize how and in what sequence distinctly human physical, mental, social, and cultural features evolved. Such understanding may help explain the origin of our species and how it came to now directly shape the planet, giving rise to the Anthropocene (a proposed geological epoch distinguished by human influence on climate and the environment). Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37534]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Questions Answers and Closing Remarks

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 55:27


This symposium addresses several important distinctly human characteristics that range from molecules, to metabolism, anatomy, disease, and behavior. Goals include transdisciplinary interactions, improved self-understanding, promotion of ethically sound studies to explain known differences, and the generation of new, potentially unexplored, insights on uniquely-human specializations. Given the interest in understanding our evolution, this symposium will also help to organize how and in what sequence distinctly human physical, mental, social, and cultural features evolved. Such understanding may help explain the origin of our species and how it came to now directly shape the planet, giving rise to the Anthropocene (a proposed geological epoch distinguished by human influence on climate and the environment). Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37534]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - The Impact of Intergroup Social Ties on Coalitionary Aggression - Polly Wiessner

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 22:26


Unlike our closest primate relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, humans form strong intergroup ties which can mitigate coalitionary aggression and make peace possible. However, such bonds can also be used to build larger alliances that take such conflicts to a new level of magnitude, supported by cultural and linguistic proficiencies. Arizona State University and University of Utah professor Polly Wiessner addresses intergroup ties between humans, chimpanzees and bonobos, explores some of the possible evolutionary developments that contributed to the human disposition to form mutually supportive external bonds, and then discusses the impact of social ties on coalitionary action. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37383]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - The Impact of Intergroup Social Ties on Coalitionary Aggression - Polly Wiessner

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 22:26


Unlike our closest primate relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, humans form strong intergroup ties which can mitigate coalitionary aggression and make peace possible. However, such bonds can also be used to build to larger alliances that take such conflicts to a new level of magnitude, supported by cultural and linguistic proficiencies. Arizona State University and University of Utah professor Polly Wiessner will addresses intergroup ties between humans, chimpanzees and bonobos and explore some of the possible evolutionary developments that contributed to the human disposition to form mutually supportive external bonds, and then discuss the impact of social ties on coalitionary action. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37383]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Dietrich Stout Pascal Gagneux and James O'Connell

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 53:19


Emory University professor Dietrich Stout discusses an evolutionarily motivated definition of technology that highlights three key features: material production, social collaboration, and cultural reproduction, UC San Diego professor Pascal Gagneux discusses how recent comparative genome studies have revealed that this polymorphic system is ancient and shared between humans and non-human primates, this despite the fact that none of the great ape species carries all four ABO blood types, and University of Utah professor James O'Connell discusses food sharing, evaluates one hypothesis that focuses on males acquiring big game meat and marrow to provide for mates and offspring. The other hypothesis surrounds how certain kinds of savanna plant food set up the forager interdependence which propelled all aspects of life history change. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37528]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Dietrich Stout Pascal Gagneux and James O'Connell

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 53:19


Emory University professor Dietrich Stout discusses an evolutionarily motivated definition of technology that highlights three key features: material production, social collaboration, and cultural reproduction; UC San Diego professor Pascal Gagneux discusses how recent comparative genome studies have revealed that this polymorphic system is ancient and shared between humans and non-human primates, this despite the fact that none of the great ape species carries all four ABO blood types; and University of Utah professor James O'Connell discusses food sharing, evaluates one hypothesis that focuses on males acquiring big game meat and marrow to provide for mates and offspring. The other hypothesis surrounds how certain kinds of savanna plant food set up the forager interdependence which propelled all aspects of life history change. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37528]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Polly Wiessner Rafael Núñez and Nissi Varki

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 55:03


Arizona State University and University of Utah professor Polly Wiessner will addresses intergroup ties between humans, chimpanzees and bonobos and explore some of the possible evolutionary developments that contributed to the human disposition to form mutually supportive external bonds, and then discuss the impact of social ties on coalitionary action, UC San Diego professor Rafael Nuñez discusses the comparative analysis of “quantity” and “number”, and the implications it has for debates about the origins of other human special capacities such as geometry, music, and art, and UC San Diego School of Medicine professor Nissi Varki discusses the incidence of carcinomas, including the rarity of occurrence of common human carcinomas in captive chimpanzees. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37529]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Polly Wiessner Rafael Núñez and Nissi Varki

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 55:03


Arizona State University and University of Utah professor Polly Wiessner addresses intergroup ties between humans, chimpanzees and bonobos and explores some of the possible evolutionary developments that contributed to the human disposition to form mutually supportive external bonds, and then discusses the impact of social ties on coalitionary action; UC San Diego professor Rafael Nuñez discusses the comparative analysis of “quantity” and “number”, and the implications it has for debates about the origins of other human special capacities such as geometry, music, and art; and UC San Diego School of Medicine professor Nissi Varki discusses the incidence of carcinomas, including the rarity of occurrence of common human carcinomas in captive chimpanzees. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37529]

The Dictionary
#C329 (comparative to compartmentalise)

The Dictionary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 16:44


I read from comparative to compartmentalise.     Steve Martin on Saturday Night Live performing "King Tut" can be watched here: https://youtu.be/FYbavuReVF4     The word of the episode is "compare".     Featured in a Top 10 Dictionary Podcasts list! https://blog.feedspot.com/dictionary_podcasts/     Backwards Talking on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmIujMwEDbgZUexyR90jaTEEVmAYcCzuq     dictionarypod@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/thedictionarypod/ https://twitter.com/dictionarypod https://www.instagram.com/dictionarypod/ https://www.patreon.com/spejampar 917-727-5757

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Technology - Dietrich Stout

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 21:00


Technology is clearly central to human life and evolution but remains hard to define and study. Emory University professor Dietrich Stout discusses an evolutionarily motivated definition of technology that highlights three key features: material production, social collaboration, and cultural reproduction. This perspective has important implications for the way we conceptualize and study the origins and evolution of human technologies. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37385]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Welcome and Opening Remarks

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 4:01


This symposium addresses several important distinctly human characteristics that range from molecules, to metabolism, anatomy, disease, and behavior. Goals include transdisciplinary interactions, improved self-understanding, promotion of ethically sound studies to explain known differences, and the generation of new, potentially unexplored, insights on uniquely-human specializations. Given the interest in understanding our evolution, this symposium will also help to organize how and in what sequence distinctly human physical, mental, social, and cultural features evolved. Such understanding may help explain the origin of our species and how it came to now directly shape the planet, giving rise to the Anthropocene (a proposed geological epoch distinguished by human influence on climate and the environment). Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37447]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Technology - Dietrich Stout

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 21:00


Technology is clearly central to human life and evolution but remains hard to define and study. Emory University professor Dietrich Stout discusses an evolutionarily motivated definition of technology that highlights three key features: material production, social collaboration, and cultural reproduction. This perspective has important implications for the way we conceptualize and study the origins and evolution of human technologies. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37385]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Welcome and Opening Remarks

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 4:01


This symposium addresses several important distinctly human characteristics that range from molecules, to metabolism, anatomy, disease, and behavior. Goals include transdisciplinary interactions, improved self-understanding, promotion of ethically sound studies to explain known differences, and the generation of new, potentially unexplored, insights on uniquely-human specializations. Given the interest in understanding our evolution, this symposium will also help to organize how and in what sequence distinctly human physical, mental, social, and cultural features evolved. Such understanding may help explain the origin of our species and how it came to now directly shape the planet, giving rise to the Anthropocene (a proposed geological epoch distinguished by human influence on climate and the environment). Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37447]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Quantity and Number - Rafael Nuñez

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 17:15


Humans and many other species have biologically endowed abilities for discriminating “quantities” to some degree (e.g., subitizing), but only humans, via the distinct capacity of “symbolic reference” exhibit “number” — i.e., exact symbolic quantification. Language, with its symbolic properties although present in all human cultures, is a necessary condition for “number” but it is not a sufficient condition for it. UC San Diego professor Rafael Nuñez discusses the comparative analysis of “quantity” and “number”, and the implications it has for debates about the origins of other human special capacities such as geometry, music, and art. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37386]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Quantity and Number - Rafael Nuñez

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 17:15


Humans and many other species have biologically endowed abilities for discriminating “quantities” to some degree (e.g., subitizing), but only humans, via the distinct capacity of “symbolic reference” exhibit “number” — i.e., exact symbolic quantification. Language, with its symbolic properties although present in all human cultures, is a necessary condition for “number” but it is not a sufficient condition for it. UC San Diego professor Rafael Nuñez discusses the comparative analysis of “quantity” and “number”, and the implications it has for debates about the origins of other human special capacities such as geometry, music, and art. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37386]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Comparative Anthropogeny: From Molecules to Societies - Siglec-11 Expression in the Brain - Ajit Varki

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 14:22


Sialic acid-recognizing immunoglobulin-type lectins (Siglecs) are a family of cell surface proteins prominently expressed on immune cells in mammals. Siglec-11 is an example of an inhibitory Siglec. It was the first protein in the brain found to be “human-specific”: non-human primates express Siglec-11 in other tissues but not in the central nervous system. UC San Diego School of Medicine professor Ajit Varki discusses the importance of Siglec-11 and the paired receptor Siglec-16, and how they play significant roles in regulating inflammation, and have several uniquely human features including expression in brain. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37380]

New Books in East Asian Studies
Hongjian Wang, "Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation" (Cambria Press, 2020)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 88:52


European Decadence, a controversial artistic movement that flourished mainly in late-nineteenth-century France and Britain, has inspired several generations of Chinese writers and literary scholars since it was introduced to China in the early 1920s. Translated into Chinese as tuifei, which has strong hedonistic and pessimistic connotations, the concept of Decadence has proven instrumental in multiple waves of cultural rebellion, but has also become susceptible to moralistic criticism. Many contemporary scholars have sought to rehabilitate Chinese Decadence but have found it difficult to dissociate it from the negative connotations of tuifei. More importantly, few have reconnected Decadence with its steadfast pursuit of intellectual pleasure and unique paradoxes or explored the specific socio-historical conditions and cultural dynamics that gave rise to Decadence. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation (Cambria Press, 2020) is the first comprehensive study of Decadence in Chinese literature since the early twentieth century. Standing at the intersection of comparative literature and cultural history, it transcends the framework of tuifei by locating European Decadence in its sociocultural context and uses it as a critical lens to examine Chinese Decadent literature and Chinese society. Its in-depth analysis reveals that some Chinese writers and literary scholars creatively appropriated the concept of Decadence for enlightenment purposes or to bid farewell to revolution. Meanwhile, the socialist system, by first fostering strong senses of elitism among certain privileged groups and then rescinding its ideological endorsement and material support, played a crucial role in the emergence of Chinese Decadent literature in the European sense. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture is an important book for scholars and students interested in Decadence, modern Chinese literature and cultural history, Asian studies, and comparative literature. This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania). Victoria Oana Lupașcu is an Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies at University of Montréal. Her areas of interest include medical humanities, visual art, 20th and 21st Chinese, Brazilian and Romanian literature and Global South studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Hongjian Wang, "Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation" (Cambria Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 88:52


European Decadence, a controversial artistic movement that flourished mainly in late-nineteenth-century France and Britain, has inspired several generations of Chinese writers and literary scholars since it was introduced to China in the early 1920s. Translated into Chinese as tuifei, which has strong hedonistic and pessimistic connotations, the concept of Decadence has proven instrumental in multiple waves of cultural rebellion, but has also become susceptible to moralistic criticism. Many contemporary scholars have sought to rehabilitate Chinese Decadence but have found it difficult to dissociate it from the negative connotations of tuifei. More importantly, few have reconnected Decadence with its steadfast pursuit of intellectual pleasure and unique paradoxes or explored the specific socio-historical conditions and cultural dynamics that gave rise to Decadence. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation (Cambria Press, 2020) is the first comprehensive study of Decadence in Chinese literature since the early twentieth century. Standing at the intersection of comparative literature and cultural history, it transcends the framework of tuifei by locating European Decadence in its sociocultural context and uses it as a critical lens to examine Chinese Decadent literature and Chinese society. Its in-depth analysis reveals that some Chinese writers and literary scholars creatively appropriated the concept of Decadence for enlightenment purposes or to bid farewell to revolution. Meanwhile, the socialist system, by first fostering strong senses of elitism among certain privileged groups and then rescinding its ideological endorsement and material support, played a crucial role in the emergence of Chinese Decadent literature in the European sense. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture is an important book for scholars and students interested in Decadence, modern Chinese literature and cultural history, Asian studies, and comparative literature. This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania). Victoria Oana Lupașcu is an Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies at University of Montréal. Her areas of interest include medical humanities, visual art, 20th and 21st Chinese, Brazilian and Romanian literature and Global South studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Law
Hongjian Wang, "Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation" (Cambria Press, 2020)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 88:52


European Decadence, a controversial artistic movement that flourished mainly in late-nineteenth-century France and Britain, has inspired several generations of Chinese writers and literary scholars since it was introduced to China in the early 1920s. Translated into Chinese as tuifei, which has strong hedonistic and pessimistic connotations, the concept of Decadence has proven instrumental in multiple waves of cultural rebellion, but has also become susceptible to moralistic criticism. Many contemporary scholars have sought to rehabilitate Chinese Decadence but have found it difficult to dissociate it from the negative connotations of tuifei. More importantly, few have reconnected Decadence with its steadfast pursuit of intellectual pleasure and unique paradoxes or explored the specific socio-historical conditions and cultural dynamics that gave rise to Decadence. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation (Cambria Press, 2020) is the first comprehensive study of Decadence in Chinese literature since the early twentieth century. Standing at the intersection of comparative literature and cultural history, it transcends the framework of tuifei by locating European Decadence in its sociocultural context and uses it as a critical lens to examine Chinese Decadent literature and Chinese society. Its in-depth analysis reveals that some Chinese writers and literary scholars creatively appropriated the concept of Decadence for enlightenment purposes or to bid farewell to revolution. Meanwhile, the socialist system, by first fostering strong senses of elitism among certain privileged groups and then rescinding its ideological endorsement and material support, played a crucial role in the emergence of Chinese Decadent literature in the European sense. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture is an important book for scholars and students interested in Decadence, modern Chinese literature and cultural history, Asian studies, and comparative literature. This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania). Victoria Oana Lupașcu is an Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies at University of Montréal. Her areas of interest include medical humanities, visual art, 20th and 21st Chinese, Brazilian and Romanian literature and Global South studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in History
Hongjian Wang, "Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation" (Cambria Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 88:52


European Decadence, a controversial artistic movement that flourished mainly in late-nineteenth-century France and Britain, has inspired several generations of Chinese writers and literary scholars since it was introduced to China in the early 1920s. Translated into Chinese as tuifei, which has strong hedonistic and pessimistic connotations, the concept of Decadence has proven instrumental in multiple waves of cultural rebellion, but has also become susceptible to moralistic criticism. Many contemporary scholars have sought to rehabilitate Chinese Decadence but have found it difficult to dissociate it from the negative connotations of tuifei. More importantly, few have reconnected Decadence with its steadfast pursuit of intellectual pleasure and unique paradoxes or explored the specific socio-historical conditions and cultural dynamics that gave rise to Decadence. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: A Comparative and Literary-Historical Reevaluation (Cambria Press, 2020) is the first comprehensive study of Decadence in Chinese literature since the early twentieth century. Standing at the intersection of comparative literature and cultural history, it transcends the framework of tuifei by locating European Decadence in its sociocultural context and uses it as a critical lens to examine Chinese Decadent literature and Chinese society. Its in-depth analysis reveals that some Chinese writers and literary scholars creatively appropriated the concept of Decadence for enlightenment purposes or to bid farewell to revolution. Meanwhile, the socialist system, by first fostering strong senses of elitism among certain privileged groups and then rescinding its ideological endorsement and material support, played a crucial role in the emergence of Chinese Decadent literature in the European sense. Decadence in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture is an important book for scholars and students interested in Decadence, modern Chinese literature and cultural history, Asian studies, and comparative literature. This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania). Victoria Oana Lupașcu is an Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies at University of Montréal. Her areas of interest include medical humanities, visual art, 20th and 21st Chinese, Brazilian and Romanian literature and Global South studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Curiosity Daily
Early Warning Birds, Ancient Fairy Tales, Breaks vs. Sprains

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 13:37


Learn about how birds could help us predict natural disasters; fairy tales' old origins; and how breaks and sprains heal. Kivi Kuaka: how birds could be the key to an early warning system for natural disasters by Briana Brownell  Hakai Magazine. (2021). Can Birds Help Us Avoid Natural Disasters? | Hakai Magazine. Hakai Magazine; Hakai Magazine. https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/can-birds-help-us-avoid-natural-disasters/  ‌The project - Kivi Kuaka. (2021, May 3). Kivi Kuaka. https://kivikuaka.fr/theproject/?lang=en  Your Favorite Fairy Tales Are Way Older Than You Think by Ashley Hamer  Folk tales are older than you think - Durham University. (2021). Dur.ac.uk. https://www.dur.ac.uk/news/research/?itemno=27041 ‌ Comparative phylogenetic analyses uncover the ancient roots of Indo-European folktales | Royal Society Open Science. (2016). Royal Society Open Science. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsos.150645 ‌ No fairy tale: Origins of some famous stories go back thousands of years. (2016, January 20). Science News. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/no-fairy-tale-origins-some-famous-stories-go-back-thousands-years  ‌Keats, J. (2017). The Origins of an Ancient Fairy Tale. Discover Magazine; Discover Magazine. https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/the-origins-of-an-ancient-fairy-tale  Fairy Tales: September 2021 podcast playlist | Podcast Brunch Club. (2021, August 31). Podcast Brunch Club. https://podcastbrunchclub.com/fairytales/  Why do breaks heal faster than sprains? by Cameron Duke  Clemence Lim. (2021, June 14). Better to break a bone than to tear a ligament or tendon? Ask your Physio. Core Concepts Physiotherapy; Core Concepts Pte Ltd. https://www.coreconcepts.com.sg/article/better-to-break-a-bone/  Healing Expectations for Different Tissue Types - Symmetry Physical Therapy. (2017, July 25). Symmetry Physical Therapy. https://symmetryptaustin.com/healing-expectations-for-different-tissue-types/  J Gordon Betts, Desaix, P., Johnson, E., Johnson, J. E., Korol, O., Kruse, D., Poe, B., Wise, J., Womble, M. D., Young, K. A., & College, O. (2013). Anatomy & physiology. Openstax College, Rice University. Ligament. (2020). Physiopedia. https://www.physio-pedia.com/Ligament  ligament | Definition, Function, Types, & Facts | Britannica. (2021). In Encyclopædia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/science/ligament  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition
Top 6 Organic Essential Oils and their Do's & Don'ts

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:23


Join us for a dive into the power of essential oils in our daily lives. The interest in essential oils is rapidly on the rise according to Google Trends. The trend line is fascinating. Why? What makes essential oils so sought after? They work! Organixx carries a line of organic and pure essential oils. Today we will share the top 3 uses of the top single essential oils in our line.   Lavender Lavender oil is believed to have antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties. We've all heard by now that lavender promotes deeper sleep, but did you know…   There's promising research for breast health too. 2014 Iranian research published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer found that lavender oil kills breast cancer cells but leaves healthy cells unharmed. It's important to note that this study was on cells in a petri dish, not on humans. The researchers concluded that: “L. angustifolia has cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines, and apoptosis is proposed as the possible mechanism of action.”1 Stops the itch and burn of insect bites. Even fire ants! Put a drop of lavender oil on a bee sting, mosquito, or other bug bite to stop pain, itching, and reduce swelling. Reapply as necessary. Lavender oil works really well for this, especially if applied immediately. Use it as a flavor booster. Add a drop of high-quality lavender oil suitable for consumption to brownie batter, chocolate icing, cookie dough, dessert recipes, raw chocolate, or even salad dressings. It's absolutely delicious.   Is Lavender Oil Safe? Using diluted lavender oil topically or in aromatherapy is generally considered safe for most adults but may not be recommended for children. Applying pure lavender oil to your skin (especially open wounds) may also cause irritation, so we recommend infusing it with a carrier oil, such as olive oil or coconut oil. Dissolving it in water also works.   Be careful not to rub lavender oil in your eyes and mucous membranes. If this happens, wash it out immediately. Lavender oil may also cause allergic reactions in people with unusually sensitive skin, so do a spot test before using it. Simply apply a drop of lavender oil to your arm and see if any reaction occurs.   The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) also warns against using lavender oil when taking medications like barbiturates, benzodiazepines and chloral hydrate, as it may increase their sedative effects and cause extreme drowsiness and sleepiness.     Tea Tree (Melaleuca) This versatile oil possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antifungal properties.   Due to its potent anti-inflammatory benefits, tea tree oil helps to relieve inflammatory skin conditions, especially eczema and psoriasis. Dilute as necessary and apply to affected area two to three times daily. Tea tree oil has long been used as a natural bug repellent by native Australian aboriginal people. Chinese research in 2016 found tea tree to be effective against the cereal weevil, Sitophilus zeamais.3 The cereal weevil is considered to be an extremely destructive pest to stored cereals all over the world. Tea tree also helps to relieve the pain, itching, and inflammation of insect bites. If it's an extra-hot day and your deodorant has failed, apply again, but this time with a drop or two of tea tree oil to help kill bacteria. Tea tree oil's potent antibacterial properties are well proven with dozens of research studies.   Is Tea Tree Oil Safe? The answer is yes, as long as it is applied topically in appropriate doses and NOT swallowed. This oil may irritate your skin, especially if used for the first time. We recommend starting with low concentrations until you figure out your tolerance. Determine if you have an allergy to tea tree oil before using it by doing a skin test — apply a small amount to your inner arm to see if any reaction such as a rash or hives occurs.   The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) recommends avoiding oxidized oil, which has been exposed to air, because it may help trigger allergies more than fresh tea tree oil.  Avoid using undiluted tea tree oil as well and use tea tree oil-infused products instead to reduce your risk of skin irritation.   Lemon The health benefits of lemon oil can be attributed to its stimulating, calming, astringent, detoxifying, antiseptic, disinfectant and antifungal properties. *Important to note: Lemon essential oil can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Lemon oil has a balancing effect on the oil glands of the scalp. Massage a drop or two of lemon oil into your scalp before you go to bed at night. Wash it out in the morning. Done over a period of weeks, you will notice much less oily hair. It will make your pillow smell nice and fresh too! Diffuse lemon oil to help kill airborne bacteria. Research carried out by Dr. Jean Valnet (co-author of the book The Practice of Aromatherapy: A Classic Compendium of Plant Medicines and Their Healing Properties) shows that diffused lemon oil can rapidly kill off the bacteria that causes meningococcal infections, typhoid fever, staph infections, pneumonia, diphtheria, and tuberculosis. Several essential oils are haemostatic, i.e. they help to stop bleeding by speeding up the coagulation of the blood. The most useful of these is oil of Lemon, though Geranium and Rose have similar, though less powerful, effects.   Is Lemon Oil Safe? It is advisable not to use lemon oil without diluting it first, as it can irritate skin. It must be used with a carrier oil for direct application to the skin. Effective carrier oils include coconut oil, olive oil and jojoba oil.   There are findings showing that lemon oil may promote photosensitivity, which increases your sensitivity to the sun and may lead to sunburn and uneven darkening of the skin. We also recommend you avoid applying lemon oil and other citrus oils to your skin when outdoors, as blistering may occur.   People with sensitivities should use essential oils with caution. Reactions can vary from person to person. Some may experience skin reactions, while some may have respiratory problems. Consult your physician first before use. Pregnant women and children should also see a doctor before applying lemon oil.   Peppermint According to a review conducted by the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, peppermint has significant antimicrobial and antiviral activities. It also works as a strong antioxidant, displays anti-tumor actions in lab studies, shows anti-allergenic potential and pain-killing effects, helps to relax the gastrointestinal tract and may be chemopreventive.4   Note: Chemoprevention is the use of a medication, vitamin or supplement to stop cancer from happening. This is most often used for people who have a high risk of developing cancer. The high menthol content of peppermint makes it great for cooling off during hot flashes. At the first sign of a hot flash developing, place a drop at the back of the neck, at the base of the skull, or on the collarbones. Breathe it in. This has an instant cooling and calming effect. Peppermint oil not only relaxes skeletal muscles, it also helps to relax the muscles of the respiratory system. Inhaling the scent of peppermint helps to relieve congestion due to allergies and counteract the effects of pollen. Especially powerful when combined with lavender and lemon to ease seasonal allergies! Peppermint oil is superb for helping to relieve indigestion and heartburn. Put just one drop of peppermint oil into a glass of water and drink. It works much more quickly than peppermint tea due to the concentrated nature of peppermint oil. If it's too strong for you, just dilute it and rub it across the tummy.   Is Peppermint Oil Safe? Peppermint oil is safe in low amounts in most adults, but it can trigger side effects in people with sensitivities. It is important for the following individuals to either avoid using this essential oil or to use it carefully only with the help of a healthcare professional. Pregnant and nursing women — Peppermint oil or other similar products may have emmenagogue and abortifacient effects, so it would be wise not to use peppermint oil without your physician's approval. Infants and children 7 years old and younger — Peppermint oil must not be used undiluted because there isn't enough information regarding its safety for them. Diabetics — Using peppermint oil may raise your risk of low blood sugar levels or hypoglycemia. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia patients — Peppermint can relax the sphincter between the stomach and esophagus, and cause acid to move up to the esophagus. People with gallbladder problems — Peppermint oil may cause gallbladder inflammation; those diagnosed with gallstones should consult a physician before using peppermint oil. People taking antacids — These drugs can cause peppermint oil capsules to break down easily, increasing the risk of heartburn.   Eucalyptus The healing benefits of Eucalyptus Oil can be attributed to its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, decongestant, deodorant, and antiseptic qualities, among other valuable properties.   Eucalyptus oil is known to be a vasodilator, meaning it dilates, or opens, blood vessels. In 1994, Austrian researchers discovered that eucalyptol, a phytochemical in eucalyptus oil (also known as 1,8-cineol) improved global blood flow to the brain, after only 20 minutes of inhalation.9 A newer study released in 2016 by Korean researchers found that eucalyptol is also able to pass through the blood-brain barrier. This research also found eucalyptol's high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to be helpful in the management of chronic conditions such as respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, and degenerative nerve and brain diseases. Some studies have shown that several different species of eucalyptus may help to reduce blood sugar levels in mice. Also because eucalyptus is such an excellent vasodilator, the entire body benefits from this increase in blood circulation. To help combat poor blood circulation, dilute eucalyptus oil and massage it into the legs, hands, and feet as needed. Eucalyptus oil's anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and anti-phlegm properties work very quickly to open congested airways. Make a steam inhalation by boiling two cups of water, pour it into a large bowl, then let it cool for five minutes. Add a drop or two of eucalyptus oil. Then create a tent from a small towel draped over your head. Place your face over the bowl and carefully breathe in the vapor until you get some relief. This should only take a couple of minutes. This is great for bronchitis, head colds, chest colds, and asthma.   Is Eucalyptus Oil Safe? Essential oils like eucalyptus oil are generally safe to use, but with specific precautions. Before using it, consult a holistic doctor to see if your condition would allow you to do so, and undergo an allergen patch test to check for possible allergic reactions and lower your risk for developing side effects. In general, adults should not take eucalyptus oil orally except under a doctor's supervision, and this oil mustn't be given to children, especially those under 2 years old.   While eucalyptus oil is generally safe when applied to adult skin, refrain from applying the oil, salve or chest rub on the face or nose of baby because of its potential side effects. Lastly, pregnant and breastfeeding women should also avoid using the oil as evidence is lacking regarding its safety for these groups of women.     Frankincense – The KING of essential oils! Frankincense essential oil is distilled from the resin of the Boswellia tree that grows in many regions within northern Africa and the Middle East. Oman, Somalia, and Ethiopia are the most prominent suppliers today.   Research shows that the natural plant chemical constituents in frankincense oil stimulate the immune system.2   But it supports so much more… Frankincense is a powerful health support for respiratory problems such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, and bronchitis. It even helps when suffering from laryngitis. Diffuse it into the room where you intend to spend some time. For best results, use an ultrasonic cool mist diffuser. Never heat essential oils because heating them diminishes their therapeutic effects. Whether your skin is dry and mature or oily and blotched with blemishes, frankincense oil has wonderful balancing qualities. It helps to reduce lines and wrinkles by tightening and toning skin, accelerates the healing of blemishes, skin ulcers and wounds, and stimulates cell regeneration. For anti-aging benefits, put several drops into your favorite night time moisturizer. For acne and blemishes, apply it neat directly on the problem area, unless you have very sensitive skin, then dilute. Use frankincense oil to help calm and center the mind, to promote spiritual awareness, and to cultivate a sense of inner peace while meditating. Frankincense contains compounds known as sesquiterpenes which work directly on the limbic system of the brain, the center of memory and emotions. Frankincense is calming, grounding, and centering to the nervous system. Diffuse it into your room, or just inhale directly from the bottle at the start of your meditation.   Is Frankincense Oil Safe? Yes, frankincense oil is generally safe. Just make sure to undergo an allergen patch test before applying frankincense oil topically to see if you have any sensitivity to this oil.   For some groups of people, frankincense oil isn't recommended, since it may trigger adverse reactions. If you're pregnant or nursing, avoid using frankincense oil because it may trigger contractions, prompt menstruation and lead to a miscarriage. As for children, there is very limited information regarding the potential use of this oil for this age group, so if you're a parent or guardian, do not let them use this oil.   How to Dilute Essential Oils Although essential oils can be used neat (undiluted) in many cases, it is best (and more economical) to dilute essential oils before applying them to the body. Add a drop or two of your chosen oil to one-half to one teaspoonful of an organic carrier oil such as coconut, almond, hemp, or jojoba.   If using with children or pets, use even less essential oil because their smaller bodies cannot tolerate an adult dose. It's best to consult a qualified aromatherapist before using essential oils with pets or children.    A Final Word About Quality Always choose high quality, organic essential oil that has been properly distilled so that its phytochemical content is not compromised. Look for bottles labeled 100% pure oil and beware of cheap oils that may be diluted with potentially toxic chemical ingredients.   In addition to the powerful essential oils we touched on today, Organixx carries 6 more beautiful single oils just as powerful and effective to help you maintain optimal health; Orange, Grapefruit, Oregano, Geranium Rose, Rosemary, and Clove. Resources: Organixx Essential Oils - 100% Pure, Organic, Non-GMO 1 Comparative studies of cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of different extracts and the essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia on malignant and normal cells. 2 Immunomodulatory activity of biopolymeric fraction BOS 2000 from Boswellia serrata. 3 Insecticidal Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil and RNA-Seq Analysis of Sitophilus zeamais Transcriptome in Response to Oil Fumigation. 4 A review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of peppermint tea (Mentha piperita L.). National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy – Safety Information 12 Top Essential Oils & 60+ Uses Non-Toxic DIY Essential Oil Mosquito Repellent Tummy Troubles? The Best Essential Oils for Digestive Problems What Are Essential Oils? 21 Facts About Essential Oils You May Not Know

All The Wiser
A Little Wiser: Comparative Suffering

All The Wiser

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:56


Dr. Edith Eger is one of Kimi and Christy's new heroes, and they talk about their favorite "write it down on a post-it" moments. As a result of Dr. Edie's unimaginable story and circumstances, they explore the idea of comparative suffering and why it is so harmful. Christy explains why people measure and minimize their pain by comparing it to that of others. They talk about Dr. Edie's wisdom about "feeling the feeling" and the "power of and" when it comes to talking about our own struggles. The friends discuss the power of humor when 93-year-old Dr. Edie points out that her boobs and "high kick" are superb.For our sponsor, today is a special day. The All The Happier live course launched this morning with a group of exceptional humans from around the country! All The Happier is an online course rooted in science and human story - to empower you with real tools to find connection, meaning and joy.Sign up for Kimi and Christy's newsletter here for tools to thrive, words of wisdom, and stuff that makes you smile...straight to your inbox. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.