Podcasts about AMM

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Latest podcast episodes about AMM

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Love Austin Music Month: Half Dream

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 2:12


Love Austin Music Month may be wrapping up this week, but KUTX shows the love for Austin artists all year round. And today, AMM kudos go to dream folk outfit Half Dream. Recently announced as an official SXSW artist for 2023, Half Dream also has a new album on the way, with a new music […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Love Austin Music Month: The Well

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 2:00


Time for the shreds. Turn it up. Doom it up. Sludge it up. Make it heavy. KUTX Artist of the Month alum, longtime AMM fave and embodiment of heaviosity (that should be a word) The Well is today’s featured badass band, as we cruise into the remaining days of Love Austin Music Month. The trio […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Love Austin Music Month: Pleasure Venom

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 2:12


For the AMM, it started with the self-titled 2018 release by Pleasure Venom. Kick it off with opener “Hive” at earsplitting volume (though “I Can’t Find My Black Lipstick” is essential GRWM music). It’s a peek into the beginnings of a garage band too big for the damn garage. They were bursting at the seams. […]

True Love Knots
American Marriage Ministries With Lewis King

True Love Knots

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 29:27


In this episode of True love Knots, our guest is Lewis King, the executive director of AMM (American Marriage Ministries). AMM is a church and, at the same time, a technology and publishing company, brought Lewis along because of his various experiences that suit their needs, even though he doesn't have experience in the wedding industry. Lewis began to have an interest in pursuing the wedding industry, and when the opportunity came, he became the organization's executive director. Today, Lewis shares the mission of the AMM and the wonderful benefits it brings to the people. Standout Quotes: “ Everybody has the right to be married regardless of who they are and to be married by whomever they want.” [Lewis] “The reality is that the world's changing. And for many people, their financial concerns are changing as well. So we need to meet people where they're at.” [Lewis] “Words matter, but it's also your relationship with the couple. You're becoming a platform or a megaphone for their emotions, commitments, and aspirations.” [lewis] Key Takeaways: American Marriage Ministries is a non-denominational church. They empower their officiants to do powerful communal moments in modern. AMM is a church, and they are not a business organization specifically. AMM sees it as a chance to assist people in spending time doing what they enjoy while meeting their financial obligations. AMM brings something special to the experience that no one else does. 2023 will be a big year for wedding ceremonies. Episode Timeline: [00:31] Meet today's guest “Lewis King,” Executive Director of the American Marriage Ministries [2:42] Lewis's journey to AMM [4:54] What are the Benefits of joining this church? [8:46] Does becoming ordained through AMM automatically check with their county or state? [11:51] The current generation's marriages [13:12] Great trainers for the business aspect of officiating [14:43] Where can you get simple resources for people who want to officiate? [19:42] The beauty of ceremonies [24:26] AMM as a unique industry [26:45] 2023 wedding industry Learn more about Lewis King and the American Marriage Ministries at: Website: https://theamm.org/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lewis-king-859444116

Neustreet X
John Patten, TreasureDAO - How Treasure is Becoming A Decentralized Nintendo of the Metaverse

Neustreet X

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 43:53


Time Stamps(0:23) - Introduction to John and the story of Treasure's founding (9:04) - The Evolution of Treasure - Smol Brains, building developer tools, creating  an AMM, and launching a games studio(18:55) - The state of Web3 gaming and providing the right incentives to attract game developers(24:10) - How to get more Web2 developers into Web3 and some of the games currently on Treasure(29:45) - What's the role of traditional gaming studios and what Treasure can offer differently(33:43) - The economic and social incentives for game developers and how the DAO works(37:56) - John's take on the state of the NFT market(39:40) - What other topics John is interested in(42:20) - Closing thoughts from John and where to find himFind John and Treasure:On Twitter = https://twitter.com/jpatten__On Twitter = https://twitter.com/Treasure_DAO Find Neustreet:On our website = https://neustreet.com/On Twitter = https://twitter.com/realneustreetOn Instagram = https://www.instagram.com/realneustreetOn TikTok = https://www.tiktok.com/@neustreet 

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Love Austin Music Month: Russel Taine Jr.

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 2:24


“Once upon a time I played a guitar in my bedroom. Now I play in the living room, too.” In our continued celebrations of Love Austin Music Month, the AMM points a glaring spotlight at ATX-based songwriter/vocalist/guitarist Aaron Winston‘s pop-powered anti-folk project Russel Taine Jr. Not a person, but a band, though it did start as […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Love Austin Music Month: Saturday Shows

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 2:10


It’s another action-packed weekend, and one of many reasons why it’s important to support Austin music artists. Even when it’s not Free Week or Love Austin Music Month, these awesome shows are happening all year round. Today’s AMM gives you a little slice of a typical Saturday musical adventure in the ATX. Decisions, decisions…!

A Sneaker Podcast: Half Size Up
A Sneaker Podcast: Half Size Up S3 E2 - "...Watched The Movie, But Didn't Finish It o_0..."

A Sneaker Podcast: Half Size Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 70:41


Welcome to Season 3 Episode 02 of the Half Size Up Podcast. We're a Weekly podcast for Sneaker News, UK releases, global sneaker trends & all things in between. In this weeks Episode we discuss the Air Jordan "Cherry 12"... and speculate on the potential AMM 12's, we talk about a new "Beef & Broccoli" sneaker and we each pick a particular designer and sneaker to carry out collaboration on... Catch us on Social Media: Instagram: @HalfSizeUpPod @MerkleMoeMan_ @AshBashSneakers @DeanSt1ll YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCO7nHBaaFje7Jpd_YPgjgng youtube.com/AshBashSneakers youtube.com/merklemoeman In association with:- THE DROP CLUB @The.Drop.Club THE GO-TO DISCORD SNEAKER GROUP FOR ALL THINGS RELEASES, MONITORS & LATEST KICKS USE OUR CODE "HSU" for a 1 MONTH FREE TRIAL - - - - - - - The Pink Miracle Cleaner www.ThePinkMiracle.com Use our Code "HalfSizeUp15" for 15% off your next online Order. Audio: Epidemic Sounds: https://www.epidemicsound.com/referral/wa9wfe/

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Love Austin Music Month: Black Books

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 2:08


So much to love when it comes to Love Austin Music Month that one month is scarcely enough! But January has been designated by the City of Austin Music and Entertainment Division as a reminder to support Austin music artists all year round. And today the AMM spotlights an Austin five-piece making mesmerizing stadium-sized pop, […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Love Austin Music Month: Monsees & Buck

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 2:06


KUTX 98.9 has teamed up once again with the City of Austin Music and Entertainment Division to present Love Austin Music Month,. a celebration reminding all music lovers to support Austin musicians all year round. And you’ve got the AMM here to provide you with details about upcoming shows with local artists, of course! This […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Love Austin Music Month Picks

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 1:57


As part of KUTX’s celebration of Love Austin Music Month, the AMM rounds up a few show picks for your perusal. It’s damn hard to choose just one, though, especially during Free Week 2023, brought to you by our colleagues at Red River Cultural District: A couple of badass non-Free Week shows of note: Tony […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
More Austin Music Love

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 2:02


Your AMM host gets greedy when things like Free Week and Love Austin Music Month are happening. So many shows to mention that the Music Minute would turn into a Music Hour(s). However, today’s AMM reins it in a bit to offer two picks for tonight, Wednesday Jan. 4:

Plattdeutsches aus MV
De Wiehnachts-Plappermoehl ut Grambow

Plattdeutsches aus MV

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 70:18


Die besten Geschichten zu Weihnachten schreibt dann doch der Alltag... Marzipanschwine, die Eisenbahn fahren, Bienen, die einen Polizisten von der Verkehrskontrolle abhalten, die Pfeffernuss-Jagd von Wittenfördern oder mecklenburger Bärenfang, der trifft auf norwegische Küche. Dazu erfahren wir von einem Baum für die Tiere, von vorher gefundenen Geschenken und dem besten Essen zum Fest. Am Mühlentisch Platz genommen haben in der Alten Schmiede auf Gut Grambow bei Schwerin Adelheid Spörke, Luten Saß, Peter Wendt und Wilfried Röpert. Musik: Das Schweriner Blechbläser-Collegium.

The Freedom Story
When Kids Are Left Alone

The Freedom Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 5:35


December 20th, 2022 - At the age of just 13, Pip and his sister Amm (age 10) are left alone to manage the home, care for themselves and complete all the daily tasks and responsibilities. For weeks at a stretch, they're left to fend for themselves. Listen to learn more. To give to support children at risk like Pip and Amm, head on over to our End Of Year Campaign page. If you give between now and Dec. 31, your gift will be matched for double the impact! Welcome to The Freedom Story podcast where we bring you our weekly updates, in audio version. For more information, please visit www.thefreedomstory.org. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thefreedomstory/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thefreedomstory/support

Cross-Chain Examination
Uniswap Foundation: Behind the Scenes with Devin Walsh

Cross-Chain Examination

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 31:00


On this episode of Cross-Chain Examination, we're joined by Devin Walsh, Executive Director of the Uniswap Foundation. UF was founded this year with the goal of supporting the decentralized growth and sustainability of the Uniswap protocol and its ecosystem. Devin and Ken Ng submitted the initial proposal to found the Uniswap Foundation during the summer of 2022. Uniswap token holders voted overwhelmingly in favor of the proposal with an impressive 95% yes vote - a feat that took Devin months of hard work, collaboration, and implementation of feedback. To lay some groundwork, she begins the episode by sharing her process for creating the proposal and bringing the Uniswap Foundation to fruition.We then get into the importance of foundation structures for crypto protocols, and specifically for Uniswap Protocol. We also dive into the benefits of having a non-profit label for the foundation. Devin shares the three pillars of the Uniswap Foundation (growth and innovation, governance, and advocacy and stewardship) and we discuss how UF is measuring their success and progress in these fields. We close out our conversation with an overview of all the work UF has done so far as well as what is in the works for their short and long term future. Devin leaves us with some advice for starting a foundation and tells you where to go if you'd like to follow along the UF journey!-  Article Mentioned: https://gov.uniswap.org/t/alastor-fee-switch-report/18020/2 

CryptoNews Podcast
#185: Varun Kumar, CEO of Hashflow, on Decentralized Exchanges, AI, and the Future of ETH

CryptoNews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 37:40


Varun Kumar is the Co-Founder and CEO of Hashflow, a decentralized exchange designed for users to trade seamlessly across chains while offering zero slippage, improved pricing, and MEV-protection. Varun Kumar is the brains behind Hashflow, having previously served as an aerospace engineer.Founded in 2019, Hashflow aims to connect institutional market makers to traders using a request-for-quote (RFQ) model as opposed to automated market makers (AMM). In turn, traders and liquidity providers gain enhanced efficiency, security, valuation and products previously impossible in DeFi.In this conversation, we discuss:- AI censorship- Current state of crypto- Bad actors leaving the industry- Making DEXs look like CEXs- User Experience is paramount to success- NO KYC = huge value prop for DEXs- HashFlow - a decentralized exchange with less slippage- Sandwich attacks- Story telling; less is more- Building beautiful websites- ETH - what's next? was the merge successful?HashflowWebsite: hashflow.comTwitter: @hashflowDiscord: discord.gg/hashflowVarun KumarTwitter: @GandalfTheBr0wnLinkedIn: Varun Kumar  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------  This episode is brought to you by PrimeXBT.  PrimeXBT offers a robust trading system for both beginners and professional traders that demand highly reliable market data and performance. Traders of all experience levels can easily design and customize layouts and widgets to best fit their trading style. PrimeXBT is always offering innovative products and professional trading conditions to all customers.  PrimeXBT is running an exclusive promotion for listeners of the podcast. After making your first deposit, 50% of that first deposit will be credited to your account as a bonus that can be used as additional collateral to open positions.  Code: CRYPTONEWS50  This promotion is available for a month after activation. Click the link below:  PrimeXBT x CRYPTONEWS50

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
The Lonesome Crowded West

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 2:00


Hardcore Modest Mouse fans, you might roll your eyes but please bear with your AMM host. It’s the truth: There’s catchy, and then there’s the way Modest Mouse does it. Like those first riffs of “Float On” from Good News for People Who Love Bad News (2004), all the way on up to the banger […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Speaker Bump Special

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 2:27


It’s the Speaker Bump Social, though leave it to your AMM host to keep referring to tonight‘s line-up at Hole In the Wall as the “Speaker Bump Special.” But it is special! Don’t forget to get your hands on Ben Buck’s B Sides remix compilation, put together by the ATX-based rapper/beatbox himself. From traditional to […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

It’s three times as badass. The AMM presents the lowdown for your Wednesday night at C-Boy’s Heart and Soul, 2008 S. Congress Ave. No need to explain ’cause you already know, but… John Doe placed his searing brand on punk with X, but damn well brings next-level renegade as a solo artist with LPs like […]

95.5 Charivari - Das Münchenbriefing - Münchens erster Nachrichtenpodcast

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 15:58:34 +0000 https://muenchenbriefing.podigee.io/721-new-episode db4ffde1fd9c13cbebae8a4211b5b45e full Am Münchner Hauptbahnhof reißt eine Frau einer anderen ein Augenlid ab UND Textilfrei zwischen Güterzügen – kurioser Polizeieinsatz in Moosach no Heiko Seeringer, Alexander Eisenreich, Christoph Kreisz

Polygon Alpha Podcast
Staking Incentives for Uniswap V3 | Revert Finance | Mario Zavala | Polygon Alpha Podcast

Polygon Alpha Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 50:34


Polygon Alpha Podcast - Episode 0023 - November 10th, 2022Mario Zavala - Revert FinanceLinkTree - https://linktr.ee/polygonalphapodcastYouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/PolygonTVApple - Follow the show on Apple Podcast!Spotify - Follow the show on Spotify!RSS feed - https://api.substack.com/feed/podcast/863588.rssRevert Finance - Time-vested incentives programs for Uniswap v3 - While Uniswap v2 was prime farming land in the summer of 2020, incentivizing liquidity on Uniswap v3 has not yet taken off. - Revert develops analytics and management tools for liquidity providers in AMM protocols. - Incentivizing liquidity in Uniswap v3 has not really worked out as well as a lot of us expected. - The v3staker is a brilliant mechanism, and security-wise it also leaps ahead of what we had in the Uni v2 days. - Instead of a thousand different forks, one for each farm, we have a canonical contract where any project can create an incentive program and any LP can stake. - This contract can (and has been) audited, and there is no need to verify each new reward contract individually. - The problem is that by deploying liquidity in a very narrow price range, a proportionally small amount of capital can capture most of the rewards - The dominating strategy, as seen in the Ribbon liquidity mining program, is to automate the creation of very narrow positions to maximize rewards capture. - This leads to mercenary liquidity instead of rewarding long term holders and LPs. - We think there's a simple solution to this problem: having a reward vest over a certain period. - This prevents the ultra-concentrated strategy from being successful as it would quickly go out-of-range and without having vested their rewards - Revert is going to test this out by incentivizing 8 Uniswap V3 pools on Polygon with 150k MATIC over 28 days, ending on December 21.~~~~Thank you so much for watching the video, if you've not subscribed to the channel please do! We'll continue to bring new videos to you!Polygon offers scalable, affordable, secure and carbon-neutral web3 infrastructure built on Ethereum. Our products offer developers to create user-friendly applications #onPolygon with low transaction fees and without ever sacrificing securityPolygon official channel: Website: polygon.technologyTwitter: twitter.com/0xPolygon Telegram Community: t.me/polygonofficial Telegram announcement: t.me/PolygonAnnouncements Reddit: www.reddit.com/r/0xPolygon/ Discord: discord.com/invite/polygonFacebook: www.facebook.com/0xPolygon.Technology/ This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit polygonalpha.substack.com

NFTs Are 4 Ever
Episode 70 - GammaSwap

NFTs Are 4 Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 33:20


@kmens5 and @daochemist review GammaSwap, a novel AMM (Automated Market Maker) creating two-sided option market for trading volatility, turning impermanent loss into impermanent gain for liquidity providers of DEX like Uniswap and Sushiswap.

The Zeitgeist
Albert Chen - Genopets Co-Founder and CEO, EP 13

The Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 22:35


As the world's first move-to-earn NFT game, Genopets is making it fun and rewarding to live an active lifestyle.Co-founder and CEO Albert Chen joins Brian Friel to discuss Genopets' unique approach to web3 gaming. Show Notes: 00:56 - What is GenoPets?01:33 - Tracked by Mobile03:00 - Geopets similar to Tamagotchi03:44 - Background / Why build on Solana06:56 - User demographics08:33 - Thinking about an in-game economy10:57 - How to use GenoPets14:00 - SFTs and Crossovers with other games15:14 - Sustainability for in-game economy18:35  - What's next on the Roadmap     19:38 - Turn-based battles                20:21 - A builder he admires             22:02 - Contact info       Full Transcript: Brian (00:05):Hey everyone and welcome to the Zeitgeist, the show where we highlight the founders, developers, and designers who are pushing the web 3.0 space forward. I'm Brian Friel, developer relations at Phantom, and I'm super excited to introduce our guests today, Albert Chen. Albert is the co-founder, CEO and CTO of Genopets, a revolutionary note, free-to-play NFT game that's on mobile and is already at 300,000 plus users. Albert, welcome to the show.Albert (00:34):Hey, thanks Brian. Great to be here. Huge fan of Phantom as well.Brian (00:38):Excited to be talking with you as well, big fans of what you guys have been up to. I think there's a lot of folks listening to this podcast who may have heard what Genopets is. They made a scene, a few Genopets flying around on Twitter. But for the uninitiated, can you give us a little overview of who you are and then also what is Genopets?Albert (00:56):Yeah, so Genopets is a free-to-play move-to-earn NFT mobile game that makes it fun and rewarding to live an active lifestyle. A Genopet is a digital pet that you own and it evolves and grows as you become more active in life. The steps that you take every day powers your journey through the Genoverse as you explore battle and evolve, and you have the ability to earn and create NFTs while you play it.Brian (01:22):That's super cool. And so this is all tied to mobile, is that correct? Essentially you're able to track steps, an end user, how active they are throughout the day and have that influence the actual NFT?Albert (01:34):Yeah, exactly. So we are a native mobile app that you can now download from the app store for iOS and the Google Play store for Androids. We have a clear separation of concern in terms of our mobile app and our web app. So we also have a web app, and that's our web 3.0 platform that you can access through the Phantom browser actually. We made it mobile first so it's compatible on mobile devices as well as your desktop. These two experiences are separated for good reason. The mobile game experience is targeted towards any gamers and/or any fitness fanatic because it's very easy to download and just get started.(02:12):Once you download the app, you can summon a Genopet by answering a survey. Then once you get your Genopet, you can start leveling up and evolving it and caring for it. It's not until you want to really explore the other side, the NFT side of the game that you have to create a wallet, connect your account on our web app, and you can buy a Habitat and do crafting. We consider web 3.0 an expansion pack to the mobile game experience.Brian (02:37):I love the phrasing of that. It reminds me a lot of something like a Tamagotchi if you were around in the '90s like that long ago, or Pokemon kind of being tied in with this pet that can do battles, but you have to care for it and it's reflective of you and you kind of develop your own personal relationship and. I think that makes a lot of sense to kind of tie on the web 3.0 NFT component as an added on bonus to that.Albert (03:01):Yeah, absolutely. It's funny that you mentioned Tamagotchi because the first phase of our game loop, we literally internally call it the Tamagotchi loop because it's about growing your pet, caring for it, and then when we come out with Augmentation, you can customize your pet to look however you want. So that completes a whole game loop of what we call the Tamagotchi loop.Brian (03:20):That's super cool. You mentioned kind of the early days there, you guys calling it the Tamagotchi loop early on. I'm curious to hear maybe a little more before we dive into Genopets about your background specifically. You have a really unique framing of, you have this web 2.0-like game with a web 3.0 expansion pack. What is your background specifically and what led you to want to build a game in this way? And then why also did you choose Solana?Albert (03:44):Me personally, I've been a web developer since, I mean as early as 1999. Back then I was just building fun web experiences. I guess back then you could call it web 1.0. We wrote Perl scripts and that ran on websites that allowed us to build discussion boards and guess books and such. That's where I really came from. And then I started doing consumer products such as houseware goods. There was a brand that my co-founder, Ben and I, created called Unbrands. It was a line of products that allow you to hang anything on the wall anywhere without the damaging your wall. So we did that and we had a whole eCommerce layer to it, and this was in the early 2010s. And because of that, we've been working together for over a decade now and got into blockchain together in 2017.(04:32):One of our dreams was to solve this crisis that we see in the next 50 years of humanity, which is a lot of jobs that used to have value are slowly taken over by Ai and we want to be able to allow people to earn passive income through one way or another.(04:50):When we discovered blockchain, we thought it was a really good way of unlocking that. So in 2018 we had a project on the EOS blockchain called GeneOs. GeneOS was a decentralized health data marketplace. Essentially we wanted to create this rental marketplace for health data that allows people to monetize it and rent it to pharmaceutical companies or researchers that needed. We won the EOS Global Hackathon in 2018.(05:16):What ended up happening was we realized that that model was too top down instead of bottom up. There wasn't a lot of demand for this kind of data, at least not now in the technology for it. It doesn't exist yet, it requires a lot of progress and zero knowledge, machine learning and stuff. So we closed that down in 2020. And Ben, my co-founder, had the idea that the health data doesn't have to be boring, it can be something fun. What if it was represented as a pet? And back then we originally, our idea was that your health data would be an NFT and your NFT, it was a more boring version of NFT where your NFT would just be metadata on what your health records look like. But it was his idea that we can make that health record look like an actual pet that evolves as you become healthier.(06:06):So that was a breakthrough. And in 2021 we decided to relaunch the project, and this time on Solana because when we were evaluating different blockchains in the spring and summer of 2021, Solana was just coming up and I was very impressed with the TPS and the community that was growing behind it at the time. And to this day, I still think it's one of the biggest successes in Layer 1 history.Brian (06:28):That's so cool. That framing too of using health data and making it actually fun and something that turning it from this kind of dull dead thing that you don't care about to now it's represented as this ever evolving pet that you have an emotional attachment to, you care about, you want to continue to nurture that. That's a really cool framing. I love that.(06:47):I guess turning back to Genopets now, can you give us a sense of who your users are, maybe where they're distributed in the world?Albert (06:55):Yeah, we have a pretty global audience. Everyone around the world, pretty much every country you can think of. But our largest communities are in Japan, US, France, Russia, and India actually. This is just by the amount of activity that happens in our Discord. We have a fairly large Discord community by our players. The demographics is interesting. When we did a survey a few months ago, 70% of our players did not have any prior crypto experience before coming onto our platform. So we really think that web 3.0 gaming is going to be the springboard to get people onboarded into web 3.0.Brian (07:32):Oh, wow.Albert (07:33):We call it a Trojan horse of web 3.0.Brian (07:35):Yeah, I've definitely heard that Trojan Horse analogy before. That's pretty wild. 72%?Albert (07:41):70%. Every time that we measure this metric, it's actually going up. So there's a metric that we measure internally, which is what percentage of our players have never touched the blockchain while playing Genopets. And right now it's 80% as of last week.Brian (07:55):Wow, that's wild. I'm curious. You have this global audience across a number of different countries. I'd say we see as well in Phantom, like the US, certain parts of EU and certain parts of Asia as well are like there's some fairly crypto native communities there. But then as you're expanding that global reach, it doesn't surprise me that you're saying almost 70 to 80% of folks aren't touching blockchains. How do you think about that when you're designing a game that has these economic components as well? I mean, I know that you guys are free-to-play. Is that a big factor into that decision making and how do you kind of think high level about creating an in-game economy?Albert (08:33):From the very beginning, free-to-play has been one of the key pillars of how we wanted to build this economy. The thinking is that there's a whole other meta game inside of Genopets that's optional for the player, and that's the ability to become a merchant in this world. What that means is when you're playing the mobile Genopets' game, you don't have to think about how your items are received. If you want to level up your pet a little faster or you want that really cool weapon or really cool body part that we call Augment, you can just buy it directly on the mobile app. And on the other side of that transaction will be the merchant class player that cares a little bit more about the earning aspect of the game that are a little more crypto savvy. They can then log into our web 3.0 portal, connect their phantom wallet, buy a Habitat, and start crafting all kinds of items that people can use in the game.(09:30):So we like to call this the seller central, as an Amazon, the seller central of our game experience. So you have the demand side of the economy, which is made up of all players in the world, the same as any free-to-play game. And then you have the supply side, which in traditional gaming would be the game publisher, but here it's a little different, right? So we have the players create items for other players to consume and we take a fee in that.(10:00):The idea is that when you start enabling that, then you kind of get into a flywheel where if more people play, then more people will want to craft items and then there will be more content for people to consume and drives the other side of economy and you have this network effect that happens. Now, the end goal here is that through the governance of the actual game itself, the community can create new items themselves with stats that people vote on and move them into the game and complete this entire loop and allow this ecosystem to grow by itself.Brian (10:31):That's super cool. You mentioned a couple terms in there, I just want to hit on real quick. You mentioned crafting, which I feel like is this whole extra element to the game. There's Habitats as well. Habitats though being distinct NFTs separate from your actual Genopets for myself and also for folks listening as an end user, if I wanted to come and check out Genopets today, what should I be going to first? How do I kind of orient myself in this world where there's all these different components?Albert (10:57):Your Genopet is the main character that you use to play this game. It does not have to be an NFT. If you want, you can just download the app and you can create a Genopet. Later on, we will enable the ability to mint these Genopets as NFTs on chain after it reaches a certain level.(11:14):But if you want to go one step further into the game economy, the next step is looking at Habitats. So what Habitats are, they are NFTs where your Genopets can live in. But its main ability is the ability to mint SFTs and NFTs. It can convert the energy that you gain by walking in the game into what we call our KI token. The KI token is the main utility token in our ecosystem that drives everything.(11:42):So this mechanic is already out on Mainnet. We have tens of thousands of people using these on chain programs every day. What's coming in the next few weeks is the crafting part of it. So right now your Habitats can refine crystals every day, and these are building blocks of the game. Eventually these crystals can be combined to create Augments for your pet or toys or energy boosts, and these are items that you must have a Habitat in order to create.(12:11):We've created this program, an on chain program, that utilizes randomness to create what we call on chain loot box system. So every time you craft it, we have a bunch of recipes. The discovery of the recipe components is fun in itself, but the main mechanic that we're using here is that every time you craft, there's a different possibility of what item you end up getting. You can get a rare item or a common item or an uncommon item. It's almost like a digital booster pack. So components or ingredients in, item out. That's what crafting is. And then the end item, you can use endgame for energy boosts or you can use it to customize your Genopet, change your color of your Genopet, or add attributes, add attacks or defenses, what we call moves when we eventually launch battle.Brian (12:59):That's super cool. And then all these that you just mentioned, you mentioned the energy boosts, a lot of these are SFTs on Solana today?Albert (13:06):That's correct, yeah. So the only NFTs that we have right now are Genopets and Habitats, and that's because they're all unique. Items are SFTs because they are semi-unique, let's say. So like earth crystals for example, one earth crystal should not be different from another earth crystal. So to save for a variety of reasons, engineering reasons, enforcement of training fees and all of that, we prefer and we decided to build all of these items as SFTs and it's been working very well for us.Brian (13:39):That's super cool. I'm curious, and this might be getting too much into sharing deep roadmap stuff, but given that these things are on chain, they're SFTs, there's a world in which they could compose with other programs outside of Genopets, have you guys thought about that as well? Maybe having crossovers with other games or other DeFi platforms of some kind?Albert (14:00):Oh yeah, absolutely. It's a huge part of why we even built this economy on chain, right? Without the composability aspect of it, there is no point. We could just use a private database. Right now we are in talks with some DeFi protocols. I mean the whole SFT trading platform was built on Serum with the help of Magic Eden. So Magic Eden composes Serum where our SFTs are trading. And because they are SFTs, they can be probably put into an AMM a lot easier and you can probably do some kind of staking with it. So that's all future roadmap stuff and we're going to see where it goes. But yes, absolutely. Composability. I know it's something that everybody says, but it is definitely a huge part of what we do.Brian (14:43):Yeah, that's super cool. Exciting to think that you guys are thinking along those lines as well. I guess switching back, you mentioned KI token as well. We hit on it briefly with the fact that you guys are free-to-play, but do you have any thoughts on maybe more broadly for if there's a game developer listening to this, any sort of principles you're keeping in mind for when you're developing kind of a sustainable in-game economy? We've seen a few examples with Stepn that gain massive adoption quickly and then fizzle out. I'm curious, did you guys have any kind of guiding principles that guide you on this journey?Albert (15:15):So I think sustainable at game economy is something that everyone's trying to figure out and nobody has really been able to get it correct yet. Our high level vision is what I was describing earlier. If you make it so that the economy is based on people trading with one another instead of the money being paid in by newcomers into the ecosystem, then it can be more sustainable. However, it's not as simple as saying just removing growth from the equation and all is good. You still need growth, but it has to be sustainable in a way that growth contributes to the game economy in a slow but steady manner.(15:53):So one of the things that we designed in the very beginning is that if you want to earn KI tokens, you have to pay into the economy somehow. So this whole concept of free-to-play to earn doesn't really exist in the sense that you can earn for free. You can play for free, but if you want to earn, then you have to invest in either a Habitat or someone has to terraform, that's the word we use for create. Someone has to create a Habitat for you to rent and convert your energy into KI tokens. So that's number one, which is you always have to have some kind of pay in.(16:29):The second part is making sure that the growth is sustainable. So we constantly measure our emissions versus burn. We've been doing a decent job at it. I think we are still under, in terms of the net KI emitted in the last two months. So we've been live, our earning part of the game has been live for two months now. We've had some ups and downs. We went through a three week period where it was a very high net emissions. Then we started changing some rules around.(16:57):One of the biggest rule changes that we made was that level 1 pets cannot earn as much energy as let's say a level 22 pet. Before, it was already the case, but the difference wasn't that high. And that meant that you didn't have to put in that much work to start earning the maximum amount, which was not sustainable. Once we've changed that, our emission schedule decreased quite significantly and it's looking fairly healthy. But as I said earlier, you can't just take growth out of the equation. We do have to still grow users. We still have to introduce crafting to make sure that there's demand for the content. And at the end of the day, if you have growing demand for content, then it would be sustainable in the long term.Brian (17:40):It's such a tricky problem that's above my head. It's all the gig of brains are figuring out the engineering, the economy around this. But it's really exciting that you guys are already seeing this kind of organic growth and excitement around this. I think it makes a ton of sense.Albert (17:53):Yeah. And it's super hard. Everything is hard mode right now because we're in deep winter, so no one's really speculating. No one's trying to buy thousands of dollars in NFTs thinking they'll make their money back in a few months. So you really have to get the fundamentals correct. Yeah, it's very different from Axie Infinity or a Stepn, the times have changed.Brian (18:14):Yeah, yeah. You guys get a chance to lay the right foundation though in the bear market. There's been many stories of that, even Solana being one of them, that generational crypto companies are built in the bear market.(18:26):I guess you hit on it a little bit with some experiments you guys are thinking around composability. Is there anything else that you can share with us for what's next on your guys' roadmap?Albert (18:35):Yeah, so like I mentioned earlier, I think on chain crafting is going to be a huge one. Once on chain crafting is out, there's a lot of composability elements that you can create just on chain. We'll leave that up to the creativity of the community. That's the biggest one because we needed to start completing our Tamagotchi loop, which ends with augmentation. Augmentation is when you craft an item that has a body part, you can switch out the body part of your pet and immediately reflect on chain and end game. So that's the biggest thing that's going to happen in the next two, three months. And then after that it's battle. So we're going to allow people to... I mean, once you start customizing your pet and your pet looks super cool, what's next? You obviously want to compete with other people. That will be our battle loop. The battle loop is something that we really look forward to because that will complete the second phase of our game, and that is likely when we will start ungating the game for the rest of the world.Brian (19:32):Is this battle loop that you're foreshadowing here, is this turn-based battle? Or is this more live action pet battles?Albert (19:38):It's turn-based battle. You can think of it as small mini games, reaction games, and then it's partly skilled based and then partly attribute based. So the stronger a pet is, the easier it is for them to win and battle. And there's going to be elemental parts of it as well so there's some strategy involved.Brian (19:57):I love it. Young gamer me right now is itching to get my hands on some Genopets right now, so we'll have to follow after the show on that.Albert (20:05):Yeah, that would be awesome.Brian (20:06):Well, Albert, this has been an awesome discussion. Really appreciate you coming on and sharing the vision of Genopets and what you guys have all been up to. One closing question we always ask all our guests, and I want to know from you as well, is who is a builder that you admire in the Solana ecosystem?Albert (20:21):Yeah, so that's a great question because there's so many great builders in Solana, but there's one guy that I've worked with in the past for our KI token launch actually that I greatly admire, and that's Noah Prince from Strata Protocol. I just think he has a giga brain that's able to figure out one of the hardest things in the token launch ecosystem. And he did it so well and I haven't seen a protocol that's done it better since then. And when we worked together, there were some small bugs that we had when we were using their protocol and he just hopped on it right away and within a few hours fixed everything, submitted a pull request, and then we were able to pull from that and launch our KI token pretty quickly. So I got to say it's him.Brian (21:05):Oh, that's awesome. So you guys used Strata actually to launch KI?Albert (21:08):Yeah. Yeah, we launched KI on Strata. It was an interesting one because you never know what's going to happen. It was a three day sale. And the first two days there were almost no volume and you're like, "Ugh, God, we're not going to sell out. This is bad." And it turns out every, it's like a game of chicken. Everyone's just waiting. And as soon as somebody start buying, we had almost 2 million sold in a few hours. It's a crazy journey.Brian (21:32):Yeah. Market wide incentives like that happening in real time, it's pretty cool to see. And I totally echo the sentiment around him as well. I think he goes by @redacted_noah on Twitter. He was actually paramount to work with me when we were first getting SFT support in Phantom actually earlier this year as well.Albert (21:48):Oh, awesome. I didn't know that. That's fantastic.Brian (21:51):He's everywhere at once. We'll have to tag him on Twitter to let him know that. Shout out.Albert (21:56):Awesome. Yeah.Brian (21:57):Well, Albert, this has been awesome. Really appreciate you coming on. Where can folks go to learn more about Genopets?Albert (22:02):Yeah, they can go on our website, genopets.me or follow our Twitter, @Genopets, and they can get all the information there.Brian (22:10):Awesome. Love it. Albert Chen, founder, CEO, CTO of Genopets, thanks for coming on.Albert (22:15):Thanks Brian. That was fun.

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Saturday Freakout

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 2:05


OH. MY. WORD. This one will stop you in your tracks. But the AMM recommends dancing and flailing wildly about for tonight’s show at Radio Coffee and Beer, 4202 Menchaca Rd. Or consult with your physician to find out if your heart can handle this chaotic musical spree. Did you know??!! Big Bill…is a band. […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Perfect Middle Hall

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 2:04


You might have heard your AMM host exclaim, “Cactus Lee, what witchery is this?!” over this song. From those opening strums, plain and simple, “Slowly By” is exquisite. It’s the third track on Perfect Middle Hall, the sixth album by Cactus Lee and the follow-up to Texas Music Forever. Like its predecessors, there’s a Texan […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

D.C. native/Brooklyn-based rapper and producer Oddisee unleashes To What End early next year, his first LP since 2017's The Iceberg. And as a preview, a couple of tracks are out now – “Hard To Tell,” and “Ghetto To Meadow” (feat. Philly rapper Freeway), the latter of which is blasting today's AMM. Both are a good […]

Dans la cage
Nouveau monarque chez les poids moyens

Dans la cage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 58:49


Cette semaine, Patrick Côté et Benoit Beaudoin reviennent sur la carte de l'UFC 281 et le duel Adesanya-Pereira. Ils parlent ensuite des prochains galas ainsi que de toute l'actualité dans le monde des AMM. 

Ethereum Daily - Crypto News Briefing
CowSwap Proposes MEV Capturing AMMs

Ethereum Daily - Crypto News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 4:00


CowSwap proposes surplus capturing AMMs, OpenSea decides to continue enforcing royalties, Wintermute's Bebop DEX is now live, and OFAC redesignates Tornado Cash sanctions. Newsletter: https://ethdaily.substack.com

Loose Laces
Episode 22: James Whitner Ain't Nothin To Fu*k With

Loose Laces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 62:45


Ayyyyy we back to sing the praises of AMM and James Whitner for this new rage inducing raffle, shame Marcus goofy ass for that botched drop, complain about Nikes stupid ass exclusive access requirements, and laugh at Adidas for being Adidas.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

america tv love american death history black world children english uk space news americans british games young war walk spring secrets european wild heart inspiration stars dna songs african trip hospitals bbc wind sun vietnam wolf joker britain catholic beatles mothers lion tiger greece liverpool stem nurses cambridge birmingham wright iv kent david bowie eleven butterflies waters depending bomb bob dylan victorian newcastle civil rights john lennon invention bach lsd pink floyd apples communists rat chapman boyd bb boogie pops handel controls string heartbeat alice in wonderland kinks adler byrne ban mole greyhound emo sanford climax roald dahl tilt paul simon sigma yoko ono emi eaten camelot gnome james joyce syd pollock jenner abbey road rock music gog cautionary tales brian wilson elektra lewis carroll relics roger waters jeff beck haydn notting hill arthurian groupies marquee sainsbury willows etta james freak out i ching opel dick clark gilmour howlin edwardian coasters walk like john lee hooker gk chesterton bo diddley wish you were here labour mp tennyson sgt pepper richard wright penny lane twink pinups pat boone anjelica huston new left syd barrett john peel allemande manfred mann nick mason free school amm jimi hendrix experience klose sdp johnny b goode pretty things shine on rubber soul girl guides liberal mps chubby checker american bandstand oar notting hill carnival psychedelic experiences ray davies harrod newport folk festival bandstand elektra records bacharach frith roky erickson steptoe tam lin strawberry fields forever spike milligan soft machine andrew king joker's wild mose allison who do you love saucerful shallots joe boyd geoff emerick rick wright rhymer lodgers radio london distributism entranced ewan maccoll fred frith crazy diamond quaalude incredible string band belloc pete anderson partita no rob chapman track records slim harpo ron grainer addenbrooke what would you say mike leonard emily young cloudberry interstellar overdrive dave gilmour grimble nick kent norman smith ufo club skip spence chris dennis pink fairies first girl i loved jac holzman arnold layne malcolm jones dodder smokestack lightnin tilt araiza
Dans la cage
Contre Pereira, Adesanya peut-il se libérer de ses fantômes du passé?

Dans la cage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 58:01


Patrick Côté et Benoit Beaudoin s'entretiennent avec le combattant Jonathan Ramsay, étoile montante des AMM québécois. Ils mettent ensuite la table pour la carte imposante de l'UFC 281 qui a lieu le weekend prochain. 

A Millennial Mind
Dulari On Dealing With Grief

A Millennial Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 49:19


This week I sit down with Dulari who shares how she suddenly lost her husband. This was a very emotional and raw episode where she shares different parts of her grief journey, how she overcame her hardest moments and how she takes each day as it comes. A really heavy watch but one that i think we can learn so much from. A huge thank you to my sponsor Heights. Don't forget to use my code: MILLENNIAL to make sure you get an EXTRA 15% off! Buy your smart supplement here: https://www.yourheights.com/products/the-smart-supplement/?utm_source=partnerships&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=AMM&utm_content=igstoryweek3 Review the podcast here: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/a-millennial-mind/id1517301518 Follow My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shivani.pau/ Join my community: https://shivani-pau.circle.so/join?invitation_token=a6a5fc957c68906e63ce78280f95b12f2554e07c-20f1f292-a601-4f50-bc6d-19f08e1d9d02

Ethereum Daily - Crypto News Briefing
Immutable X Enforceable NFT Royalties

Ethereum Daily - Crypto News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 4:23


Vitalik proposes a trust model framework for rollups, Alchemy introduces a new allowlist platform, Immutable X plans to extend enforceable royalties to Ethereum, and Shell Protocol releases its first AMM Engine pool. Newsletter: https://ethdaily.substack.com

A Millennial Mind
Emily English On Why You Always Have A Choice

A Millennial Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 53:44


Emily is a fully qualified, registered nutritionist with a motto of "Food you want to eat, by a nutritionist". In this podcast we discuss how Emily began her journey with nutrition, the downfalls of the modelling industry and how food and nutrition can manifest in both positive and negative ways. A really powerful and enlightening episode. I hope you all love it! A huge thank you to my sponsor Heights. Don't forget to use my code: MILLENNIAL to make sure you get an EXTRA 15% off! Buy your smart supplement here: https://www.yourheights.com/products/the-smart-supplement/?utm_source=partnerships&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=AMM&utm_content=igstoryweek3 Visit her website: https://www.emilyenglish.com Review the podcast here: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/a-millennial-mind/id1517301518 Follow My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shivani.pau/

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
So…Many…Shows

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 2:15


The mind is reeling. The entire weekend is overflowing with all manner of musical badassery. The only problem you’ll have is choosing which show(s) to go to. So, please spread the word – try something new – buy all the band merch. These are but a few AMM selections for your perusal. The AMM is […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Levitation: More AMM Picks

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 2:23


More LEVITATION is coming your way this weekend, and your AMM host has greedily honed in on a handful of favorites you can’t miss. The music fest, originally founded by The Black Angels in 2008, has events curated worldwide, but the hometown celebration continues to be the destination for music fans from all over. Yes, […]

Mission: DeFi
DeFi Lunch (Ep 223) - Oct. 25, 2022 - @polkadot UX is horrendous / @CantoPublic Killing & @Cardano humiliated / @clv_org / $ETH 6% Yield / @Reddit #NFTs / @klaytn_official

Mission: DeFi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 62:48


Join our community on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/MissionDeFi/ @Polkadot - what a train wreck of a user experience - https://twitter.com/b05crypto/status/1584746506221154307?s=20&t=Hfgc1C7fXAtvtJBGw_x3SA CLV - Cross-chain DeFi Interoperability - https://clv.org/ Huckleberry | a community driven AMM crosschain DEX built on Moonriver and Clover-P. - https://clover.huckleberry.finance/#/add/CLV That's embarrassing @IOHK_Charles - https://twitter.com/b05crypto/status/1584881377841119234?s=52&t=WMZC5PeXOwoRJakS2Pg83w CLV | by Clover - https://twitter.com/clv_org Apple Restricts Using NFTs to Unlock Content, Features in Apps - Decrypt - https://decrypt.co/112804/apple-clarifies-app-store-rules-barring-nft-utility-external-purchase-links at current run rate ETH is yielding close to 6% real yield - https://twitter.com/NorthRockLP/status/1584690369060810752?s=20&t=Hfgc1C7fXAtvtJBGw_x3SA Gold vs BTC correlation signals Bitcoin becoming safe haven: BofA - https://cointelegraph.com/news/gold-vs-btc-correlation-signals-bitcoin-becoming-safe-haven-bofa Reddit NFT trading volume hits all-time high as wallet holders near 3 million - https://cointelegraph.com/news/reddit-nft-trading-volume-hits-all-time-high-as-wallet-holders-near-3-million?utm_source=Telegram&utm_medium=social Klaytn Foundation | The metaverse blockchain for all - https://www.klaytn.foundation/ This is not financial advice. Nothing said on the show should be considered financial advice. This is just the opinions of Brad Nickel, Joe Cawley, and our guests. None of us are financial advisors. Trading, participating, yield farming, liquidity pools, and all of DeFi and crypto is high risk and dangerous. If you decide to participate, do your own research. Never count on the research of others. We don't know what we are talking about and you can lose all your money. Never invest more than you can afford to lose, because you probably will lose it all. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/missiondefi/support

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Lonesome Nights

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 2:03


A tip o’ the hat from the AMM goes to the hosts of KOOP Radio‘s The Lonesome Stranger, a badass Thursday morning escapade of traditional and not-so-traditional country sounds for the most discerning aficionado. And they damn well deliver the most authentic tunes – with “no bro bands or lip sync-ers.” Your AMM host recently […]

A Millennial Mind
Niki Mahon On How You Can Always Change

A Millennial Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 61:55


This week I sit down with entrepreneur Niki Mahon who shares her journey starting Nikita by Niki and how and why she recently rebranded to NIKITA. A really powerful episode where we share the power of reflection, the importance of having a supportive circle and the trials and tribulations of being an influencer. I really loved recording this podcast and can't wait for you all to hear it too! A huge thank you to my sponsor Heights. Don't forget to use my code: MILLENNIAL to make sure you get an EXTRA 15% off! Buy your smart supplement here: https://www.yourheights.com/products/the-smart-supplement/?utm_source=partnerships&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=AMM&utm_content=igstoryweek3 Visit her website: https://www.nikitabyniki.com Subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBni3bPrKZOfoB8mYUjrydQ Review the podcast here: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/a-millennial-mind/id1517301518Follow My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shivani.pau/

A Millennial Mind
How Inge Theron Built A Global Empire

A Millennial Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 44:00


This week I sit down with Inge Theron who founded the iconic brand FaceGym; the world's first gym for the face. Inge is incredibly vulnerable throughout this podcast and shares the power of manifestation, how we can learn from failure and the trials and tribulations of founding her own business. This episode inspired me so much and I can't wait to hear what you think! A huge thank you to my sponsor Heights. Don't forget to use MILLENNIAL to make sure you get 15% off! Buy your smart supplement here: https://www.yourheights.com/products/the-smart-supplement/?utm_source=partnerships&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=AMM&utm_content=igstoryweek3 Book a FaceGym workout: https://facegym.com Subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBni3bPrKZOfoB8mYUjrydQ Review the podcast here: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/a-millennial-mind/id1517301518 Follow My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shivani.pau/

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

The sweet, sweet croon of “Ain’t A Day Goes By” is from the forthcoming release Ramblin’ Soul by Melissa Carper, which you’ve probably heard on KUTX recently. The new album is out Nov. 18, and from time to time, your AMM host brings out a few tunes from Carper’s 2021 release Daddy’s Country Gold, like […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
ACL Fest, Weekend 2

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 2:21


Today’s Austin Music Minute features music by Genesis Owusu, who performed this afternoon ACL Fest – round two. And the AMM has added Arlo Parks, Phoenix, Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats, and Omar Apollo to the list of must-sees for the day. ACL Fest Nights shows tonight include Boston dance/funk outfit Ripe at 3Ten […]

A Millennial Mind
Lauren Murrell On How Beating Cancer Created Her Skin Care Company

A Millennial Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 47:14


This week I sit down with Lauren Murrell who shares how she beat leukaemia despite having a 20% chance of survival. Lauren's story brought me to tears. Her resilience, determination and grit to battle cancer and start her skincare company with her sister was truly inspirational. A huge thank you to my sponsor Heights. Don't forget to use MILLENNIAL to make sure you get 15% off! https://www.yourheights.com/products/the-smart-supplement/?utm_source=partnerships&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=AMM&utm_content=igstoryweek2 BySarah London is an organic skincare brand founded by both sisters - Visit their website www.bysarahlondon.com Subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBni3bPrKZOfoB8mYUjrydQ Review the podcast here: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/a-millennial-mind/id1517301518 Follow My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shivani.pau/

Eelke Kleijn | DAYS like NIGHTS Radio
DAYS like NIGHTS 257

Eelke Kleijn | DAYS like NIGHTS Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 60:00


Subscribe to the podcast RSS: feed: https://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:1525250/sounds.rss . 01. Emanuele Esposito & Darksidevinyl - Your Way (Enoo Napa Afro Mix) [Selador] 02. AMÉMÉ feat. Kosmo Kint - Never Forget [One Tribe] 03. Luuk van Dijk - Hot Stuff [Dark Side of the Sun] 04. Helsloot & Tom Zeta - Bravoure [Poesie] 05. Ewan Rill - Empathy Revolution [Manual] 06. Joris Voorn & Underworld - Too Little Too Late (Little Late Mix) [Spectrum] 07. Rinzen - The Alchemist [Bedrock] 08. Yöurr - Grit and Grind (Thodoris Triantafillou Remix) [Secret Fusion] 09. Kevin de Vries - Dance With Me [Afterlife] 10. Joel Oliver - Cascade (My Friend Remix) [Songspire] 11. Junior Pappa - Medusa [Voyeur] 12. Solee - Growl [Parquet] This show is syndicated & distributed exclusively by Syndicast. If you are a radio station interested in airing the show or would like to distribute your podcast / radio show please register here: https://syndicast.co.uk/distribution/registration

The Crypto Conversation
Beefy Finance - the Multichain Yield Optimizer

The Crypto Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 39:07


Weso is lead developer at Beefy Finance, a Multi-Chain Yield Optimizer that autocompounds crypto assets for the best APYs. Why you should listen Beefy Finance is a decentralized, multi-chain Yield Optimizer platform that allows its users to earn compound interest on their crypto holdings. Beefy Finance automatically maximizes the user rewards from various liquidity pools (LPs),‌ ‌automated market-making (AMM) projects,‌ ‌and‌ ‌other yield‌ farming ‌opportunities in the DeFi ecosystem. The main product offered by Beefy Finance is the 'Vaults' in which you stake your crypto tokens. The investment strategy tied to the specific vault will automatically increase your deposited token amount by compounding arbitrary yield farm reward tokens back into your initially deposited asset.  Supporting links Masterworks Beefy Finance Andy on Twitter  Brave New Coin on Twitter Brave New Coin If you enjoyed the show please subscribe to the Crypto Conversation and give us a 5-star rating and a positive review in whatever podcast app you are using.

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
ACL Fest First Weekend: Saturday & Sunday

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 2:15


All right. Ready for day two? The Austin City Limits Music Festival continues at Zilker Park, and your AMM host presents another quick round of must-see performances. Don’t forget to hydrate: Among the Saturday heavy-hitters, you’ll find duo Sofie Tukker, Atlanta rap artist Big Boi, The War On Drugs, Australian artist Flume, and the incredible […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
ACL Fest Picks, First Weekend

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 2:09


Open the gates, unleash the throngs. ACL Fest 2022 has arrived, and with it comes your AMM host’s humble mini-guide for weekend number 1. But first, shout-outs are in order for KUTX Music Editor Jeff McCord and his essential list of badass local artists playing the fest this year; as well as the Austin Chronicle […]

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
What Time Is It?

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 2:20


Apparently, the answer to the aforementioned question would be 11:11. And it’s all from the mind of KindKeith on his EP Don’t Talk To Me >:(. Songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Keith Galloway takes us on an eclectic and experimental trip riffing on everything from electronic to R&B, jazz, pop and hip-hop. And there’s today’s AMM-featured track, “11:11 (WHAT […]

Birdies & Bourbon
Top 100 PGA Instructor Jon Tattersall Chats BMW PGA Championship, Presidents Cup, Tiger Woods, Scottie Scheffler, Cam Smith, Jordan Spieth, Rory McIlroy, LIV Golf & more

Birdies & Bourbon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 77:01


Top 100 PGA Instructor Jon Tattersall Chats BMW PGA Championship, Presidents Cup, Tiger Woods, Scottie Scheffler, Cam Smith, Jordan Spieth, Rory McIlroy, LIV Golf & more The Birdies & Bourbon team had a blast chatting with PGA Instructor Jon Tattersall about the BMW PGA Championship. We chat through the history of the event, player field and what to expect this week. We also chat through PGA Tour Player of the Year, the FedEx Cup Playoffs and changes to the PGA Tour this coming season. The PGA Tour has made some great changes including money for players missing the cut which will help with travel expenses for up and coming talent on the PGA Tour. Then we get into some golf theory with the state of the game and the swing changes of Rickie Fowler and Jordan Spieth. We discuss Billy Horschel's setup and PGA Tour takes in the recent weeks. Rory McIlroy has become the face of the PGA Tour. Can he keep up his red hot play and continue to be the voice of the players on the tour against LIV Golf? John and Cal discuss Will Zalatoris and what to expect from him given the back injury and several missed events due to the injury. Jon talks the mental game and some training that he incorporates into his teachings. The new offseason will be a good aspect of the tour changes and will allow the players to compete better in the top events. It's always a fascinating conversation with Jon Tattersall on the state of the game and how he is approaching and updating strategies. In 1998 Jon moved to Atlanta, GA to open a learning center with GOLF Magazine Top 100 instructor and ABC commentator Gary Smith. In 2007 Jon co-founded Fusion ATL a sports performance facility designed to capture performance data and develop training protocols for the ardent golfer. In addition, the the certified staff provide services from physical therapy to performance strength training. With a philosophy that says, "Why guess when you can measure", Jon is an early adopter of technology. He is an expert at using tools such as Trackman and Foresight launch monitors, and 3D from AMM, MAT and K-Vest. Be sure to check out Jon Tattersall online at https://www.tattersallgolf.com/ or @tattersallgolf on Instagram. We had a blast chatting through the field and strategies. Cheers. Apparel for the show provided by turtleson. Be sure to check them out online for the new season lineup at https://turtleson.com/ The Neat Glass. Be sure to check out The Neat Glass online at theneatglass.com or on Instagram @theneatglass for an improved experience and use discount code: bb10 to receive your Birdies & Bourbon discount. Thank you for taking the time listen to the Birdies & Bourbon Show for all things PGA Tour, golf, gear, bourbon and mixology. Dan & Cal aim to bring you entertaining and informative episodes weekly. Please help spread the word on the podcast and tell a friend about the show. You can also help by leaving an 5-Star iTunes review. We love to hear the feedback and support! Cheers. Follow on Twitter & Instagram (@birdies_bourbon) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/birdies-bourbon/support

Stuck in Stoneybrook: A Baby-Sitters Club Podcast
Mystery 4-Kristy and the Missing Child: “Jell-O, Jell-O, Jell-O”

Stuck in Stoneybrook: A Baby-Sitters Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 52:51


This one was actually harrowing! Jake Kuhn goes missing and thankfully, Kristy finds him (eventually). We talk about AMM's good work in undermining the moral panic around abducted children, Bart Taylor and gendered toys, and SO MUCH JELL-O (thanks, Mary Anne). Also, two wonderful listener letters! Grab some Jell-O Jigglers (™) and enjoy!