Podcasts about r d

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Latest podcast episodes about r d

On the Horizon RC Podcast
S2 Episode 9: John Adams - Spektrum R&D

On the Horizon RC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 80:44


In this episode with sit down with the legendary John Adams. With an entire career at Horizon, John has been around for the development of 2.4, SAFE, AS3X, AVC and many more innovations. We get a glimpse inside of the R&D lab and how John has become a legend in the RC industry. Enjoy! Products Discussed in the intro:   https://www.horizonhobby.com/product/beechcraft-d18-1.5m-bnf-basic/EFL106250.html https://www.horizonhobby.com/product/1-6-scx6-trail-honcho-4wd-rtr/AXI05001.html https://www.horizonhobby.com/product/fun-scale-pt-19-pnp-56.5/HAN3180.html https://www.horizonhobby.com/product/f-16-thunderbirds-80mm-edf-bnf-basic-with-as3x-and-safe-select/EFL87950.html https://www.horizonhobby.com/search?q=Arrma+Boost&search-button=&lang=default          

Business Standard Podcast
How disruptive will the draft telecommunication bill be?

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 7:00


Telecom spectrum is similar to atma.  It's ajar. It's amar, as the Bhagwad Gita describes. It has no physical form, yet it is omnipresent. That's how the government imagines spectrum, in the Explanatory Note to the draft Indian Telecommunication Bill, 2022.   The Bill, which will regulate the sector once it becomes an Act, seeks to replace the existing legal framework governing telecommunication in India, comprising the Indian Telegraph Act, 1885, the Wireless Telegraphy Act, 1933 and the Telegraph Wires (Unlawful Possession) Act, 1950.  The draft Indian Telecommunication Bill, 2022 has, for the first time, laid down a clear statutory framework and regulations on assigning spectrum. It says, spectrum should primarily be given through auction. For specific functions related to the government and public interest, like defence, transportation and research, the Bill proposes assignment through the administrative process.  To enable efficient use of spectrum, the Centre may also ‘re-farm' or ‘harmonise' any frequency range assigned by auction, or administrative process. The Bill enables sharing, trading, leasing, surrender of spectrum assigned, and a process to return unutilised spectrum. To address the demand of telecom companies for a level playing field, the telecom department aims to bring in a landmark change by extending the definition of ‘telecommunication services'.  It proposes to bring over-the-top (or OTT) communications services such as WhatsApp, Telegram, satellite-based communication services and internet under the ambit of the Bill. So, OTT communication services have to take a licence now and be subjected to the same conditions governing telecom players in India, like quality of service and security rules, etc.  Shiv Putcha, Founder and Principal Analyst, Mandala Insights says, including OTT under telecom is contentious. May create a level-playing field between telcos and OTT. Language suggests greater centralisation of powers.  The government will also have the power to terminate spectrum allocations partly or in full, if it determines that assigned spectrum has remained unutilised for insufficient reasons over a period of time. Likewise, the spectrum allocated to telecom companies that are undergoing insolvency and are unable to offer services, pay dues or comply with license conditions, will be taken back by the government.  The Bill also seeks to simplify the framework for mergers, demergers, acquisitions or other forms of restructuring, by only requiring intimation to the licensing authority, while relief, write-off or deferment of dues may be allowed in cases of payment default in extraordinary circumstances. Next, the draft bill tries to achieve through law a ‘right of way' (ROW) enforceable at the state- and at the municipal-corporation level. This legal framework is key to the rollout of 5G services. It lays down a framework in which a public entity that owns the land has to grant ‘right of way' permission expeditiously, unless it gives a substantive ground for refusal.  The existing regulatory framework, based on Right of Way Rules, 2016, has had a limited impact in addressing bottlenecks in the rapid expansion of telecom infrastructure. The Rs 60,000 crore Universal Service Obligation Fund will be expanded into the Telecommunication Development Fund by adding further objectives of underserved urban areas, R&D, skill development etc. To prevent cyber fraud, the Bill provides that the identity of the person sending a message through telecom services shall be available to a user receiving it. Peeyush Vaish, Partner & Telecom Sector Leader, Deloitte India says, govt will not change rules with retrospective effect. OTT services may have to verify their users. Bill says grant of RoW should be non-discriminatory.  DoT has also heeded the unanimous call from companies that the USO Fund levy should be discontinued or suspended for a few y

Relentless Health Value
EP380: 7 Big Reasons Medicare Drug Price Negotiation Actually Happened This Time Around—What Changed? With Mark Miller, PhD

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 33:18 Very Popular


It's been said that healthcare in this country will not be transformed because of some incremental government policy, nor will this industry transform because of some tech company who techs the crap out of healthcare. It's been said that the only way the healthcare industry in this country is going to fundamentally change is vis-à-vis a seismic shift in the way Americans view the healthcare industry in their understanding of what is going on and the extent to which it directly impacts lives. You and I, all of us, have heard pundits say every year for a decade (at least) that this revolution is a-comin' and that this year … no más. Americans cannot afford to pay any more in premiums or out of pocket. We have reached the brink. And year after year, we've discovered that, in fact, Americans as patients, members, and taxpayers can pay more and are willing to do so. Well, maybe right now we are actually cresting the chop. Medicare can now negotiate drug prices legislation. Maybe it's a bit of a watershed moment here. In this healthcare podcast, I'm talking with Mark Miller, PhD, EVP of healthcare at Arnold Ventures; and this is what we talk about today: the why now—the why, all of a sudden, after years of talking and griping and nothing happening, how right now, what constellation of factors transpired that enabled Medicare drug price negotiation to become law. You need to listen to the show to get the context, but here's the seven main reasons by my counting that Mark Miller talks about in this episode: The sensitivity of the public to just healthcare costs in general, Pharma being an easy-to-spot component of those healthcare costs Sensitivity of policy makers to Pharma's R&D claims, and non-industry-sponsored information coming out that tempers some of those research and development claims that Pharma has been making Sensitivity that innovation isn't a homogenous broad stroke when it comes to new drugs. There's a difference between breakthrough innovations versus me-too-type drugs. Consider some new combination drug that's, I don't know, two generics and costs $2000 a month. There's eyes on that kind of stuff, and if Pharma's reputation travels in an industry-wide block, this compounds our #3 point here. Sensitivity of innovation in the future versus people getting access right now to today's innovations. If too many people (ie, voters) can't get access to today's meds, it's a reach to expect them to worry too much about their future selves where, in all likelihood, they are thinking that they still wouldn't have access to the drugs. The landscape shifted, but pharma talking points did not—and the result was labeled “tone deaf” by some. Voters wanted aggressive actions as a result of the aforementioned constellation of factors, and a majority of Congress people responded and either voted yes or didn't protest overly hard, even if they didn't. Patient voices became more sophisticated. While they still might have issues with PBMs (pharmacy benefit managers) and/or insurance carriers, there's a growing perception that the story here is more nuanced and Pharma is in that mix. This is what we talk about in this episode: the why now, exactly and specifically. So thrilled to have had this conversation with Mark Miller, who has had, and continues to have, such a storied career. In brief, Mark Miller ran MedPAC (Medicare Payment Advisory Commission) for 15 years. That's a big deal. He also has held other roles at CMS and the Urban Institute. Now, Mark is at Arnold Ventures, as aforementioned, which is a philanthropic organization. He oversees Arnold's work in healthcare. One last thing: The legislation that just passed also includes a few other parts that impacts drugs. A big one is limiting the catastrophic Medicare Part D out-of-pockets to beneficiaries to $2000. And then there's also an inflation rebate. So, there's a rebate back to Medicare if Pharma raises its prices faster than the inflation rate. You can learn more at arnoldventures.org.  Mark E. Miller, PhD, leads Arnold Ventures' work to lower the cost and improve the value of healthcare. He has more than 30 years of experience developing and implementing health policy, including prior positions as the executive director of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, assistant director of Health and Human Resources at the Congressional Budget Office, deputy director of health plans at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, health financing branch chief at the Office of Management and Budget, and senior research associate at the Urban Institute. 04:45 Why did Medicare's ability to negotiate on drug pricing happen now? 06:35 What's different about the drug market today that allowed Medicare to gain the ability to negotiate drug pricing? 12:08 How has innovation played into drug price negotiations? 12:40 “If you limit profits, you can end up limiting innovation.” 14:03 Why was the distinction between more drugs and innovative drugs important to changing the landscape of the drug market? 15:49 More versus new and future versus now in the drug market. 19:59 “As the landscape was shifting, Pharma didn't shift with it.” 23:00 How did voters change the landscape in drug pricing? 24:39 “Pharma did not have exclusive control over the patients' voice.” 29:59 “The industry would largely like to just stick with the patents that they have.” 30:16 “Of course, it's competition that ultimately drives innovation.” 31:30 “This is an exquisitely complicated market.” You can learn more at arnoldventures.org.   @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Why did Medicare's ability to negotiate on drug pricing happen now? @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What's different about the drug market today that allowed Medicare to gain the ability to negotiate drug pricing? @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast How has innovation played into drug price negotiations? @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “If you limit profits, you can end up limiting innovation.” @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Why was the distinction between more drugs and innovative drugs important to changing the landscape of the drug market? @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast More versus new and future versus now in the drug market. @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “As the landscape was shifting, Pharma didn't shift with it.” @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast How did voters change the landscape in drug pricing? @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “Pharma did not have exclusive control over the patients' voice.” @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “The industry would largely like to just stick with the patents that they have.” @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “Of course, it's competition that ultimately drives innovation.” @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “This is an exquisitely complicated market.” @MarkMiller_DC discusses #medicare #drugprices on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast   Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! AJ Loiacono, Josh LaRosa, Stacey Richter (INBW35), Rebecca Etz (Encore! EP295), Olivia Webb (Encore! EP337), Mike Baldzicki, Lisa Bari, Betsy Seals (EP375), Dave Chase, Cora Opsahl (EP373), Cora Opsahl (EP372), Dr Mark Fendrick (Encore! EP308), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP371), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP370), Keith Hartman, Dr Aaron Mitchell (Encore! EP282), Stacey Richter (INBW34), Ashleigh Gunter, Doug Hetherington, Dr Kevin Schulman, Scott Haas, David Muhlestein, David Scheinker, Ali Ucar, Dr Carly Eckert, Jeb Dunkelberger (EP360), Dan O'Neill, Dr Wayne Jenkins  

Brothers War Podcast
Warhammer 40k Chat - Ep153

Brothers War Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 52:31


https://store.commandersocial.com   You can find us on Twitter Ryan - @greenegeek Zack - @z4ck38 Together - @commandersocial   Our LGS has setup an online store! https://store.mothershipatx.com  SOCIALSHIP - free shipping on orders of $50 or more SOCIAL10 - 10% off in stock MTG singles Thursday nights come play at mothership! https://discord.gg/MMXQJqf Ep 153 Community Spotlight: @MothershipGames - 12:15 @Cathaoir1 - 47:52 The Command Zone Discussion on new cards we got and spec ideas Main Topic - Dominaria United - Commander Decks Warhammer 40k Commander Decks https://mtg.fandom.com/wiki/Warhammer_40,000_Commander_Decks Release Oct 7th 2022 42 new Warhammer 40K-themed cards in each deck. There are no current plans to make in-universe Magic versions of the new cards in the Warhammer 40K Commander decks. R&D said it is possible if needed on a card by card basis The four commander decks are also available in a Collector's Edition with a unique "Universes Beyond" card frame. The Collector's Edition comes fully foiled with the never-before-seen special surge foil and has the same card content. Warhammer's world isn't evenly colored balanced as it wasn't created with the color pie in mind. R&D solved this problem by making Commander decks instead of a full set. Three Secret Lairs dropping on October 17, 2022 Secret Lair Drop Series: Warhammer 40,000: Orks Secret Lair Drop Series: Warhammer Age of Sigmar Secret Lair Drop Series: Blood Bowl Summary What do you think about Warhammer 40kld? Are you picking up any/all of these precons? Let us know on Twitter! Wrap it up   Keep it Social! Zack Gets it Together Theme Komiku - Battle of Pogs https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Commander Social Theme Title - Trap Sport By - jorikbasov https://pixabay.com/music/future-bass-trap-sport-4348/ Contact Info Consider becoming a Patron: https://www.patreon.com/commandersocial You can check us out at commandersocial.com YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/CommanderSocial You can email us directly at cast@commandersocial.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/commandersocial On twitter @commandersocial Ryan individually @greenegeek twitch.tv/greenegeek Zack individually @z4ck38 © Copyright 2022 Leaky Dinghy, LLC

The Genius Life
252: Leveraging Your Microbiome for Better Skin, Mood, and Brain Health, Plus Why Most Probiotics Suck | Kiran Krishnan, PhD and Tina Anderson

The Genius Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 104:45 Very Popular


Kiran Krishnan is the chief microbiologist at Just Thrive with 17 years of experience in the dietary supplement and nutrition market. He comes from a strict research background, having spent several years with hands-on R&D in the fields of molecular medicine and microbiology at the University of Iowa. Full show notes: https://maxlugavere.com/podcast/252

She Thinks Big - Women Entrepreneurs Doing Good in the World
208 Minting New Niches for CPAs: Inside the CHIPS and IRA Bills

She Thinks Big - Women Entrepreneurs Doing Good in the World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 31:50


***Want one piece of business strategy delivered daily to your inbox?*** Subscribe here: https://www.geraldinecarter.com/subscribe-main-list   There's a giant new bill that just came out that we're trying to get on top of and underneath to understand where the business opportunities are. Here today to talk with me about this is my guest, Randy Crabtree, co-founder and owner of Tri-merit Specialty Tax Professionals, and the host of the Unique CPA podcast.   Highlights: — “Probably the major winner from somebody who's looking to build out a niche is something to do with the construction industry.”  — “There is a new rule regarding R&D, which probably tech startups are going to benefit.” — “Anybody that is helping manufacture equipment, potentially that's going to support the manufacturing of semiconductors can benefit from the CHIPS Act.” — “There are two different investment tax credits under the Inflation Reduction Act. One is tied to semiconductor manufacturing, and the other one is tied to green and energy-efficient manufacturing of equipment or recycling of equipment or renewable energies.”  — “There's an incentive for companies that deal with tech startups doing Research and Development. Startup companies can take the R&D tax credit, and at least a portion of it and offset payroll taxes.”  Connect with Randy: Website: https://tri-merit.com/ Webinar mention: Pricing for Improved Profitability: Practice Management Webinar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EkcAAQQlOA  

Disrupting Distribution by MDM
S7E9: Here's How Bluon is Changing the HVAC Game

Disrupting Distribution by MDM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 36:25


MDM's Mike Hockett chats with Bluon CEO Peter Capuciati about the company's formation and transformation from a refrigerant R&D company to providing a new database and app to remove friction between HVAC distributors, technicians and contractors.

MiningWeekly.com Audio Articles
World's largest battery-electric mine truck heading for commercial availability in 2024

MiningWeekly.com Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 9:18


The world's largest battery-electric truck for underground mining is on its way to becoming commercially available in 2024. Sandvik's 65 t TH665B machine removes between 1 t and 2 t of carbon dioxide (CO2) a day, along with heat and noise. “When we talk about sustainability and electrifying mining, we focus a lot on what we can reduce, such as CO2 emissions, heat and noise. That's one side of the coin, and that's great. “But what's important to emphasise, too, is that you can also increase a lot of things. Battery-electric machines have more power, which provides the potential to improve performance, speed and tons moved,” Sandvik VP strategy and commercial for the battery and hybrid/electric-vehicles business unit of Sandvik Mining & Rock Solutions Jakob Rutqvist highlighted to Mining Weekly in a Zoom interview. (Also watch attached Creamer Media video.) By the end of this year, Sandvik will have three proven battery-electric production units to help satisfy the rapidly increasing demand for decarbonisation – a 4 t loader, 18 t loader and 50 t truck. The 65 t truck will be the next big product launch, amid the company's overall commitment to provide – by the end of 2025 – an offering covering all the major size classes, with the exception of low-profile machines. “Low profile is one of the potential next steps beyond 2025,” said Rutqvist. The official unveiling of the 65 t battery-electric truck was one of the attractions of this month's Electra Mining Africa exhibition in Johannesburg, which was attended by more than 30 000 people at a time when major mining companies the world over are going all out to meet their net-zero decarbonisation commitments. The deployment of a full renewables-powered Sandvik loader and truck fleet underground is calculated to cut total mine emissions by around 35%. When engaged in heavy load work on a steep ramp, the 65 t battery-electric truck has a runtime of roughly one-and-a-half hours to two hours. When on level terrain, that runtime can extend to three hours before requiring the battery to be swopped, which takes about five minutes. While one battery is in operation, the other is charging. The low-noise TH665B, which also has collision avoidance and digital prompt systems, is to undergo site acceptance testing at Western Australia's Sunrise Dam gold mine, beginning early next year. “We're going to put it to very hard use with Barminco and AngloGold Ashanti for the first half of next year. I'm sure we'll learn a lot, and then we'll implement some improvements, and maybe some product upgrades, based on what we learn,” said Rutqvist. Sandvik's first battery-electric entry into Africa will be with the 18 t battery-electric LH518B underground loader at South Africa's South Deep gold mine, a mechanised operation 50 km southwest of Johannesburg, where a 60 MW solar power development is under way. On the development of the solar farm, Rutqvist said: “I was very impressed when I saw that last week.” The commissioning of the battery-electric loader, already a commercial product, will begin early next year. “We're well prepared, both on the customer side and on Sandvik's side, for a successful introduction of this technology in South Africa,” said Rutqvist. Canada is currently the leading battery-electric market, with Australia, northern Europe and Africa rapidly picking up pace. Mining Weekly: What milestones has Sandvik already achieved when it comes to electrification? Rutqvist: We started a very long time ago. The first electric loader came out the same year I was born, so that's 1982, and the first electric truck came in the late 80s. These were cable electric, connected to the mine grid with a cable. We launched our first automated electric loader in 2009 and then acquired Artisan Vehicle Systems in 2019, which is where I sit right now. This is our R&D hub, battery- and prototype factory for battery-electric vehicles, the big new thing. This year is a milestone because we've secured some very ...

Traction
3 Rules for Building a Multi-Product Company with Shadi Rostami, Amplitude

Traction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 18:30


On this episode, Shadi Rostami, Senior/Executive VP of Engineering at Amplitude discusses the tell-tale signs companies should look for before expanding their product suite and three major considerations before doing so.   Expanding beyond your first-ever product offering is a huge moment for any company. Unfortunately, it is also a moment that is very difficult to get right.   Specifically, Shadi covers: The right time to go multi-product. How to set your organization up to go multi-product. Horror stories. Managing new and existing customers with new products. This episode is moderated by Frederic Lardinois, Senior Enterprise Editor at TechCrunch.   Learn more at https://tractionconf.io   Connect with Shadi Rostami: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shadi-rostami-b6a636/   Learn more about Amplitude at https://amplitude.com/   This episode is brought to you by:   Zendesk makes it easier to support your customers with customer service, engagement, and sales CRM solutions. Qualifying early-stage startups can get 6 months free of Zendesk Suite and Zendesk Sales CRM. Go to zendesk.com/startups to apply now.   Each year the U.S. and Canadian governments provide more than $20 billion in R&D tax credits and innovation incentives to fund businesses. But the application process is cumbersome, prone to costly audits, and receiving the money can take as long as 16 months. Boast automates this process, enabling companies to get more money faster without the paperwork and audit risk. We don't get paid until you do! Find out if you qualify today at https://Boast.AI.   Launch Academy is one of the top global tech hubs for international entrepreneurs and a designated organization for Canada's Startup Visa. Since 2012, Launch has worked with more than 6,000 entrepreneurs from over 100 countries, of which 300 have grown their startups to seed and Series A stage and raised over $2 billion in funding. To learn more about Launch's programs or the Canadian Startup Visa, visit https://LaunchAcademy.ca    Content Allies helps B2B companies build revenue-generating podcasts. We recommend them to any B2B company that is looking to launch or streamline its podcast production. Learn more at https://contentallies.com   #product #startup #innovation 

TNT Radio
Professor Ted Steele on Locked & Loaded with Rick Munn - 19 September 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 55:51


GUEST OVERVIEW: Professor Edward J (Ted) Steele is a molecular and cellular immunologist, geneticist and microbiologist and the author of six books and over 100 scientific research papers. He conducted research and taught at the Australian National University's John Curtin School of Medical Research and worked at The University of Toronto's Ontario Cancer Institute, The Welcome Trust in the UK and The University of Wollongong. Professor Steele is a C.Y. O'Connor Foundation Life Fellow and currently lives and works in Melbourne consulting in cancer research and other areas of biomedical biotech R&D. Since 2015, Professor Steele has been publishing on Cosmic Biology data, combining his biomedical genetic experience.

Knowledge on the Go
New multi-cancer early detection test

Knowledge on the Go

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 14:53


Early detection of cancer can dramatically increase the efficacy of curative treatment. Unfortunately, early screening tests exist for only a small number of cancers, meaning most are not diagnosed until symptoms arise in the later stages of the disease.   Better cancer screening is, therefore, a major focus area for clinical performance improvement. Marilyn Sherrill talks with Dr. Joe Cummings about a new genomic test that can theoretically screen for more than 50 different types of cancer using a small blood sample, and what the future may hold for this technology.   Guest speaker: Joe Cummings, PhD  Technology Program Director  Vizient    Moderator: Marilyn Sherrill, RN, MBA Performance Improvement Program Director Vizient   Show Notes: [01:28] The Grail Galleri liquid biopsy test. [02:18] Sampling methodology. [02:55] The analytic process of the Grail Galleri test, and some developmental history. [04:01] Testing methodology is based on methylation patterns. [05:36] Results of the clinical studies to-date, and status of ongoing studies. [08:13] Early adopters include some larger healthcare systems and, potentially, anyone willing to self-pay. [09:04] Test costs and preliminary cost/benefit anaylsis. [11:02] Considerations re: payers' willingness to cover test costs. [12:09] Looking forward to trial results and potential FDA approval. [13:05] With many companies doing R&D in the liquid biospy field, the development of competing and complementary tests is to be expected.   Subscribe Today! Apple Podcasts Amazon Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Android Stitcher RSS Feed

Digitalia
Digitalia #641 - Il Social Robespierre

Digitalia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 94:01


Un artista pubblica The Follower. Il web3 sta andando benissimo. Google cancella il Pixelbook e già ci si chiede se abbia ancora capacità di innovare. Adobe compra Figma per 20 miliardi di dollari. Queste e molte altre le notizie tech commentate nella puntata di questa settimana. Dallo studio distribuito di digitalia: Giulio Cupini, Michele Di Maio, Francesco Facconi Produttori esecutivi: Vincenzo Ingenito, Saverio Gravagnola, Andrea Guido, Alessio Ferrara, Marco Grechi, Michele Francesco Falzarano, Enrico Carangi, Fulvio Barizzone, Antonio Taurisano, Alessandro Morgantini, Simone Podico, Michelangelo Rocchetti, Mario Giammona, Calogero Augusta, Denis Grosso, Iacopo Edoardo Federici, Umberto Marcello, Giuseppe Brusadelli, Giorgio Puglisi, Giacomo Cipriani, Andrea Malesani, Fabio Brunelli, Emanuele Zdunich, Alessandro Grossi, Fabrizio Reina, Antonio Passarelli, Mauro Tommasi, Donato Gravino, Letizia Calcinai, Emanuele Libori, Michele Olivieri, Edoardo Volpi Kellerman, Paolo Tegoni, Fabrizio Bianchi, Davide Tinti, Manuel Zavatta, Nicola Gabriele D., Dario G., Nicola Fort, Alessandro Varesi, Nicola Gabriele D., Alessandro Varesi, daxda, Marco Iannaccone, carnevale bonino paolo Sponsor: Squarespace.com - utilizzate il codice coupon "DIGITALIA" per avere il 10% di sconto sul costo dell'abbonamento. Links: The Follower Artist Reveals Instagrammers Real Stories With Video Surveillance OptiFi developer accidentally closes the project contract irretrievably locking $661000 Google canceled its next Pixelbook and shut down the team building it Google cancels half the projects at its internal R&D group Area 120 It sure seems like Google is struggling to invent the future The $300bn Google-Meta advertising duopoly is under attack Is Silicon Valleys golden era coming to an end? Adobes Figma acquisition is a $20 billion bet to control the entire creative market BeReal is hotter than TikTok. So TikTok is copying it. The End of Real Social Networks Uber was breached to its core, purportedly by an 18-year-old. Here's what's known Qualcuno ha pubblicato dozzine di video di GTA 6. Take-Two rimedia ma è tardi: tantissimi li hanno visti $23 million YouTube music royalties heist is a reminder online copyright is deeply flawed Lo svarione di Torino ma non solo: sta cambiando il modo di arbitrare Thousands of AI-Generated Images are For Sale on Stock Photo Websites Tesla avrebbe installato versioni software custom ottimizzate sui veicoli per i test di sicurezza stradale The Man From Rivian Who Want to Change How We Buy Cars Gingilli del giorno: Bring Gran Turismo 7 thumbsup - Static gallery generator Supporta Digitalia, diventa produttore esecutivo.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
2110: Benchling and the Tech Cloud-based platform for Biotech R&D

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 20:40


Biotechnology is leading the most important scientific revolution since computing. R&D is the key to unleashing biotechnology's potential to transform our world radically, but software hasn't kept up with science. Scientists deserve and urgently need technology that's designed for what they do. But I invited Paul Robson to join me on the podcast to discuss how Benchling R&D Cloud is built for scientific work. We talk about the shortcomings currently present within life sciences R&D that inspired its creation and the role of the cloud, and how its transforming R&D in life sciences to speed up scientific discoveries, including Covid-19 research. About Paul Paul Robson is Head of Field Operations at Benchling, overseeing all aspects of global sales, from deployment and customer success to strategic partnerships and regional expansion. Paul brings more than 25 years of experience scaling high-performing field organizations. Most recently, as President of International at Adobe, he led global business across 160 countries. He joined Adobe in 2011 and played a key role in the company's transformation from packaged desktop software to a cloud subscription model. Prior to Adobe, Paul held leadership roles at Hewlett-Packard and Compaq. Paul is an advisory member on Telecoms and Technology for UK Trade & Investment and board member of techUK. Originally from Australia, Paul graduated from Western Sydney University and holds graduate degrees from INSEAD and University of Helsinki.

Lunatic Fringe - Into the Void
Lunatic Fringe With Chris J. Stewart

Lunatic Fringe - Into the Void

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 61:39


Back in the can to bring us up to speed with life after Covid, Chris Stewart, test jumper and all-around bad ass for NZ Aerosports sits down once again to talk about getting back into the competition saddle, exciting times on the job and potentially exciting news coming out of the R&D department of NZ that may lead to some awesome new releases. You won't want to miss a moment of time with this Kiwi-convert member of the Lunatic Fringe.

The TechCrunch Podcast
Stranded on Apple's new iPhone island and other TC news

The TechCrunch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 37:07


This week Matthew Panzarino tells us about his week on the dynamic island with the new iPhone 14 and iPhone 14 Pro. We're also joined by Becca Szkutak talking about the unpredictable state of VC as we enter the fall. And as always, Darrell will catch you up on the tech news you may have missed this week.Articles from the episode:Review of Apple's iPhone 14 and iPhone 14 Pro: They're leaning into itVC fundraising gets weird as autumn nearsOther news from the week: Adobe snaps up Figma for $20B, taking out one of its biggest rivals in digital designEthereum switches to proof-of-stake consensus after completing The MergeGoogle cancels half the projects at its internal R&D group Area 120Uber investigating cybersecurity incident after hacker breaches its internal networkNow that the Ethereum Merge is behind us, what's next?

TNT Radio
Richard Moore on The No Fly Zone with Greg Maybury - 17 September 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 54:17


On today's show we discuss developments in the Russia/Ukraine conflict and European energy issues. GUEST OVERVIEW: For the past ten years Richard Moore has been focusing his research on how it might be possible for humanity to escape from elite domination. He has also covered the amazing breakthroughs that have been happening in science, usually by groups of independent researchers who are being ignored by mainstream scientists. Richard Moore focused on math and computer science at Stanford, and upon graduation jumped whole-heartedly into the emerging Silicon Valley scene doing software R&D. He worked at many of the leading-edge companies of their day, including Tymshare, Xerox PARC, Apple Computer, and Oracle. After thirty years in the software industry, Richard decided that there had to be more to life than commuting and trading days for dollars and moved to Ireland.

HVAC R&D
Kickstart My Heart

HVAC R&D

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 99:10


Dennis and Rhydon catch up with the Commercial Kitchen master himself as thoughts of well cooked meals and fine spirits permeate the ambiance of this episode. Leading the way in Commercial Kitchen Service content on Instagram, Pat, AKA, Commercial Kitchen Chronicles, and the R&D boys get into a little bit of everything during this round and round discussion.

Traction
How Calendly Scaled Into the Enterprise with Kate Ahlering, Calendly

Traction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 20:19


On this episode, Kate Ahlering, Chief Revenue Officer at Calendly shares best practices for implementing a highly effective revenue strategy to improve the funnel and accelerate bottom-line growth across your organization, as well as insights into how her team is applying a combined PLG-SLG strategy to acquire more customers upmarket.   Specifically, Kate covers:   Why joining Calendly was the right opportunity. The first 30 days at Calendly as the first CRO. Tactics to accelerate revenue growth and scale faster. How do you prioritize accounts? The most common failure points to be mindful of. Tracked metrics that are leading indicators of success. Tips for people thinking about how to pair sales with PLG.   This episode is moderated by Kyle Poyar, Partner at OpenView.   Learn more at https://tractionconf.io   Connect with Kate Ahlering: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kate-ahlering/   Learn more about Calendly at https://calendly.com/   This episode is brought to you by:   Loom is the video messaging platform for work. Teams use Loom to reduce meetings, share institutional knowledge, and get work done faster — because “quick syncs” are never that quick. Complete projects 53% faster with 29% fewer meetings—even across multiple teams and timezones. So cancel that meeting. Record a Loom instead. Head to loom.com/traction for a 14 day free trial.   Each year the U.S. and Canadian governments provide more than $20 billion in R&D tax credits and innovation incentives to fund businesses. But the application process is cumbersome, prone to costly audits, and receiving the money can take as long as 16 months. Boast automates this process, enabling companies to get more money faster without the paperwork and audit risk. We don't get paid until you do! Find out if you qualify today at https://Boast.AI.   Launch Academy is one of the top global tech hubs for international entrepreneurs and a designated organization for Canada's Startup Visa. Since 2012, Launch has worked with more than 6,000 entrepreneurs from over 100 countries, of which 300 have grown their startups to seed and Series A stage and raised over $2 billion in funding. To learn more about Launch's programs or the Canadian Startup Visa, visit https://LaunchAcademy.ca    Content Allies helps B2B companies build revenue-generating podcasts. We recommend them to any B2B company that is looking to launch or streamline its podcast production. Learn more at https://contentallies.com   #plg #sales #startup #growth  

The Come Up
Camila Victoriano — Founder of Sonoro on Building LA Times Studios, Latinx Podcast Innovation, and Following the Story VS the Medium

The Come Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 67:01


This interview features Camila Victoriano, Co-Founder and Head of Partnerships at Sonoro.  We discuss how fan fiction taught her to see nerds as heroes, being in the room when Dirty John was pitched to become a podcast, her crash course to figure out the business of podcasting, becoming a first time founder during COVID, why the Mexico audio market is like the US four years ago, Sonoro's growth to a global entertainment company, and why there are no limits to Latino stories.Subscribe to our newsletter. We explore the intersection of media, technology, and commerce: sign-up linkLearn more about our market research and executive advisory: RockWater websiteFollow us on LinkedIn: RockWater LinkedInEmail us: tcupod@wearerockwater.comInterview TranscriptThe interview was lightly edited for clarity.Chris Erwin:Hi, I'm Chris Erwin. Welcome to The Come Up, a podcast that interviews entrepreneurs and leaders.Camila Victoriano:So in 2017, we had a meeting with the editor in chief at the time, and he was like, let me sit you guys down and read you this out loud. And it was what would become Dirty John. That's when we realized there's something here that I think could be our first big swing in audio and in podcasting. And we got to talking and at that point we were like, I think we can do something here. And I think there's a story here to be told in audio. When it launched, it took us all by surprise with how well it did. Obviously we knew it was a good story, but I think you never know when something's going to be that much of a hit. Today, it probably has over 80 million downloads.Chris Erwin:This week's episode features Camila Victoriano, co-founder and head of partnerships at Sonoro. So Camila grew up in Miami as a self-described nerd with a passion for books and fan fiction. She then went to Harvard to study English, literature and history, which led to her early career, starting at the LA Times. While there, she became a founding member of their studios division and a “audio champion”. Then in 2020, she went on to co-found Sonoro, a global entertainment company focused on creating premium, culturally relevant content that starts in audio and comes alive in TV, film and beyond.Sonoro collaborates with leading and emerging Latinx storytellers from over a dozen countries to develop original franchises in English, Spanish, and Spanglish. Some highlights of our chat include how fan fiction taught her to see nerds as heroes being in the room when Dirty John was pitched to become a podcast, her crash course to figure out the business of podcasting, becoming a first time founder during COVID, why the Mexico audio market is like the US four years ago and why there are no limits to Latino stories. All right, let's get to it. Camila, thanks for being on the podcast.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here.Chris Erwin:For sure. So let's rewind a bit and I think it'd be helpful to hear about where you grew up in Miami and what your household was like. Tell us about that.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. So I grew up in Miami, Florida, very proud and loud Latino community, which I was very lucky to be a part of, in the Coral Gables Pinecrest area for those that know Miami and my household was great. My dad, he worked in shipping with South America. My mom was a stay at home mom. And so really as most kids of immigrants, I had obviously parents I loved and looked up to, but it was very different than folks that maybe have parents that grew up in America and knew the ins and outs of the job market and schools and things like that. But really great household, really always pushing me to be ambitious and to reach for the stars. So I was, yeah, just lucky to have parents always that were super supportive. Questioned a little bit, the English major, that path that I chose to go on, but we're generally really happy and really supportive with everything that I pursued.Chris Erwin:Yeah. And where did your parents immigrate from?Camila Victoriano:My mom is Peruvian and my dad was Chilean.Chris Erwin:I have been to both countries to surf. I was in Lobitos in I think Northern Peru and I was also in Pichilemu in Chile and yeah, just absolutely beautiful countries. Great food, great culture. So do you visit those countries often?Camila Victoriano:I visited Chile once, much to the chagrin of my father, but Peru, I visited so many times and yeah, they both have incredible food, incredible wine. So you can't really go wrong. I did Machu Picchu and Cusco, and that sort of trip with my mom once I graduated college, which is really great just to go back and be a tourist in our country, but they're both beautiful and yeah, I love going back.Chris Erwin:Oh, that's awesome. All right. So growing up in your household, what were some of your early passions and interests? I know yesterday we talked about that you had an early interest in storytelling, but in some more traditional forms dating back to the ‘90s, but yeah. Tell us about that. What were you into?Camila Victoriano:I was always a huge reader. It's funny because my parents read, but not super frequently. My grandparents were big readers, but I always, always gravitated towards books. I remember, like many people of my generation when I was six, I read the first Harry Potter book and that was just mind blowing for me and I think...Chris Erwin:At six years old? Because I think I learned to read at like five.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. I had help with my mom a little bit but I remember we read it together and we would just mark with a crayon every time where we ended on the page. But I remember that book was like, I think when I first really understood how detailed and how enveloping worlds could be. And I think starting from that point, I just went full on into fantasy, YA, all sorts of books. I was just reading obsessively. It also helped that I was a classic nerd in middle school and high school and all throughout childhood, really. So I think for me, books, literature stories were just a way to see the world, see people like me, a lot of times in fantasy books or in sci-fi books in particular, you have the nerds as heroes.And so I think for me, that was a big part of why I gravitated to those genres in particular. But yeah, I just read all the time and then I did light gaming. So I played the Sims, again, similar idea though. You're world building. You're living vicariously through these avatars, but that was really how I spent most of my time, I obviously played outside a little bit too, but I was a big indoor reader always.Chris Erwin:Got it. This is interesting because the last interview I just did was with Adam Reimer, the CEO of Optic Gaming, and we talked a lot, he was born in the late ‘70s. So he was like a 1980s self described internet nerd as he says, before being a nerd was cool. So he was going to web meetups at bowling alleys when he was just a young teenager. Over through line with you because he was in Fort Lauderdale and you grew up in Miami. So two Florida nerds.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. Nerds unite. I love it.Chris Erwin:Nerds unite. You also mentioned that you also got into fan fiction. Were you writing fan fiction? Were you consuming it? Was it a mix of both?Camila Victoriano:A mix of both. So that's really in middle school in particular, how I really bonded with my small group of friends. I remember my best friend and I, we connected, we were on the bus reading a Harry Potter fanfiction on at that point it was fanfiction.net. And that is also again, similarly because in person with people, it was just like, we weren't really connecting that much. And so that community online was huge for me and my friend. We read all the time, people had comments, you had editors that you worked with and we wrote them ourselves too. And I think, looking back in the retrospective for me, that's where I think I first started to realize the potential of world building really in storytelling and in media and entertainment. It's like, it didn't stop with the canon text. You could really expand beyond that.We loved telling stories about Harry Potter's parents and how they would go to Hogwarts, like super in the weeds, deep fandom. I don't know. I think for me that was just a real eye opener too, of like, oh, there's a whole online community. And I don't think at that point I was really thinking business. But I think for me, that's where I started to redirect my focus much more seriously too of, oh, this isn't just like, oh, I like books for fun. There's people all around the world that are incredibly passionate and spending hours upon hours of time, oftentimes after hours of school to just write and to really immerse themselves in these universes. And I remember writing them and reading them, just realizing how badly I wanted to be a part of creating things that caused the same feeling. And so for me, that was huge in that respect too.Chris Erwin:Well, thinking about fanfiction, literally there are now companies and platforms that are worth hundreds of millions of dollars that foster fanfiction, the communities around them. I think of Wattpad where you have film studios and TV studios, and a lot of the streamers that are now optioning IP from these fanfiction communities to make into long form premium content. Pretty incredible to see. So you go to high school and then you end up going to Harvard. I think you end up becoming an English major at Harvard. Was that always the intent from when you were in high school, it's like, yes, I'm going to go and get an English degree? What were you thinking? How did you want to spend your time in college? And then how did that evolve after you went?Camila Victoriano:I was typical good student in high school, right, but I think the older I got, the more I realized, oh no, my passion really lies in my English classes, my history classes. Obviously, I think math, once I got to calculus, I was like, all right, this might not be for me. And then science never really gravitated towards, so for me, it was always very clear that even though I tended to be a generalist in many things, my passion and my heart really was in writing and reading and stories and in history too, in the real world and how they intersected and how they affected each other. And so I remember when I was applying to schools again, my parents were like, are you sure you want to do English?Because for them, it was in Latin America, many of the schools don't have that many practical degrees like that. You pick something a bit more technical. So I remember I would tell them, oh yeah, don't worry. I'm going to do English, but I'm going to minor in economics, which never happened. Once I got there, I was like, absolutely not, but that's what I would tell them because I was like, oh no, I'm going to be an English major, but I'm going to have some business acumen to go with it. And I think at that point when I was going into college and applying to schools, what I wanted to do was go into book publishing. And I really wanted to, I remember I had seen that Sandra Bullock movie, the proposal where she's an editor and I was like, that's what I want to do. And so at that point I was talking to, we have this really awesome local bookstore in Miami called Books and Books.And I went and met with the owner, Mitchell Kaplan had a conversation with him. And I remember I told him I wanted to get into books. I wanted to get into publishing. And he's like, look, you're young, you're getting into college. I run a bookstore, but I would tell you, don't worry so much about the medium, just follow the content where the content's going. And that was a huge eye opener. Even though it seems now obvious to, sitting here saying that, I think for me at that age where I was, so it's easy to get one track mind of like, this is what I want to do, and there's nothing else, to get that advice from someone who was running a place that I loved and went to so frequently growing up.And I think that for me, gave me a bit more flexibility going into college, just saying, okay, let's see where I gravitate towards. I know I want to do something creative. I know I want to still study English, but maybe he's right and I don't have to just stick to publishing. So when I got into Harvard I still, again, focused my classes, really liberal arts, right, like film classes, history classes. But I was a bit more, when I got there, unclear of what that would actually lead to in an exciting way, I think. But that was probably a really great piece of advice that affected how I thought about what would come next after Harvard.Chris Erwin:Yeah. So following that thread, I really love that advice of, don't worry about the medium, just follow the content. Clearly I think that really influenced a later decision that you made about doubling down on audio. But before we get there, in terms of following the content, at Harvard, it seems like you dabbled in a few different things where you did an internship with the LA Times, which is maybe news and journalistic reporting. You're also a staff writer for the Harvard political review. So what did following the content look like for you when you were at school?Camila Victoriano:So Harvard can be a really overwhelming place. My mom had gone to college, my dad hadn't finished. So it was a semi first gen college experience where I was like, whoa, once I got there. It was incredibly, the first semester and a half were really, really overwhelming. And I had to get my bearings a little bit, but I think once I got there I tried to dabble in a lot of things. And I think there was literary magazine, there was the Crimson, which is a classic. And then there was a few other organizations like the Harvard Political Review at the Institute of politics. And so I sat in a few things and it's crazy. For people that don't know, once you get there, you still have to apply to these things.You haven't gotten there and then you're done and you're good to go and everything's set up. There's a pretty rigorous application process for most of these clubs, which makes it overwhelming. And so for me, what I ended up finding a home in, in terms of just the community and the way they welcomed you in when you came into the club was the Harvard Political Review. And as one does in college, you get a bit more political, you get a bit more aware of what's going on around you, world politics. And so I think I was in that head space already and wanted to flex a little bit of my writing skills outside of class. And so there I was able to really pitch anything. So I would pitch, I remember like culture pieces about the politics of hipsters, of all things, and then would later do a piece on rhinos that are going extinct.So it was really varied and it allowed me to be free with the things I wanted to write about and explore outside of class and in a super non-judgmental space that was like, yeah, pursue it. And we had all these professors that we had access to, to interview and to talk about these things. So it was just a great place to flex the muscles. But I think mainly my focus in college was building relationships with my friends, if I'm totally honest. I think as someone that's super ambitious and super driven, I was very particular and followed step by step exactly what I needed to do in high school to get into the school I wanted to get to. And then once I was there, I was like, let me enjoy this for a second. Let me meet people and have fun and intermurals and just...Chris Erwin:Wander a bit.Camila Victoriano:Wander a bit, 100%. And I think especially freshman year and sophomore year was very much like let me just wander, take random classes. I took a computer science class, which was a horrible mistake, but just giving myself the opportunity to make mistakes. And I think then by junior, senior year is when I realized, okay, no, I still like this path that I'm going on. I like the storytelling. I like literature. I like writing. Maybe I'm leaning a bit more political. Again, that's why I applied junior year for the LA Times internship because was that through line of, I still want to be in storytelling. I still want to be in media, but now in this college experience and getting into young adulthood, I'm becoming much more aware of the political and socioeconomical world around me. Let me go into media, that's maybe pushing that forward a little bit and a bit more public service.Chris Erwin:Clearly it was a positive experience because I believe that after graduation, you decided to commit to the LA Times full time.Camila Victoriano:Yes.Chris Erwin:And just to go back on a couple of points you noted just about wandering. I think, when I review resumes for people that are applying to my firm, RockWater, my first internship was right before my senior year of college. The summer before senior year. I now look at resumes where people start doing internships literally in high school, and they have six years of working experience before they graduate. It's super impressive. My little brother took a gap year before Harvard and I think that wandering around and figuring out what he likes, what he doesn't like is really valuable. And I always tell people, like my own professional career, I did some things early on that I didn't love, but I learned a lot and it helped shape to where I want to point myself later on. So I think that's really good advice for the listeners here.Camila Victoriano:Absolutely.Chris Erwin:I'm curious, so was there any kind of gap period, or did you just get to work at the LA Times right after you graduated?Camila Victoriano:I went straight into it. I took the summer after college to travel a bit. That's when I went to Cusco with my mom, I went to Columbia. So I went a little bit around Latin America, but other than that, that fall went straight into it. But I think to your point, and again, taking a step back a little bit like freshman summer, I went to study abroad in Paris for the summer. So just again, I had traveled outside the country maybe once or twice, but not a lot. And so for me, that was a really, I was like, let me utilize some of these resources that I have. And so it was, again, that wandering and then the sophomore summer I worked at a literary magazine. So again, going more deep into literature. So I did dabble in a couple things here and there before fully committing, but after graduating pretty much went straight into work.Chris Erwin:And so you get there and are you, again, working in the publisher's office?Camila Victoriano:Working more broadly, for the “business side” of the company, right. So I'm working on business development really broadly. What that started as was how do you diversify revenue streams? How do you develop new projects from the journalism? Basically, what are new ways to make money in a digital space? We pursued projects at this time, and I actually got to see through to fruition because I was there full time, an event series within what was called the festival of books. We developed a new zone focused on digital storytelling. So we brought on VR companies, audio storytelling companies, just thinking about how to expand what the company was putting forward as storytelling, which was cool to me.And also an interesting dynamic for me as someone that loved books to be like, let me throw VR into the mix and into the book festival, but it was really fulfilling, and after pursuing a few different things, developing a couple of platform pitches internally, what really stuck with our team and with me was in 2017, a year into that job, audio as a real business opportunity for the newsroom and for the media company. So in 2017, we had a meeting with the editor in chief at the time and he brought us this story and he was like, let me sit you guys down and read this aloud to you. It was very cinematic, but it was what would become Dirty John.Chris Erwin:The editor in chief read this story out loud to your team?Camila Victoriano:Yes. So just literally, it was a team of me and my boss and that was it. And he was like, let me sit you guys down and read you this out loud. And it was what then Christopher Goffard had the journalist had written as what was going to just be maybe a series online for the paper. And I think that's when we realized like, oh wait, there's something here that I think could be our first big swing in audio and in podcasting. And we got to talking and at that point, Wondery had just gotten started to another podcast company that obviously now sold to Amazon music. And so we met with [Hernan 00:17:57] and the early team there and we were like, I think we can do something here. And I think there's a story here to be told in audio.And so again, a year out of college, I'm there helping put together the production team that would create this massive story or what would become a massive story, we didn't know at the time. And what I was able to do was basically help primarily the launch strategy and help the marketing teams and the sales teams put together what's this actually going to look like when we got this out, there was the first time we had done anything like that. And so it was a pretty wild experience. And then of course when it launched, it took us all by surprise with how well it did. Obviously we knew it was a good story, but I think you never know when something's going to be that much of a hit. And I think today it probably has over 80 million downloads and it's been adapted both scripted and unscripted on Bravo and oxygen and had a season two ordered on Bravo.So it was a crazy experience. And I think for me, it was just like the ding ding ding of, oh, hey, remember what Mitchell told you in high school? Which was, follow the content, not necessarily the medium. And for me I had never really explored audio at that time. My parents were not people that listened to public radio in the car. That was not something I grew up with or that environment. So that was really my first entry point into audio and into podcasting. And as I started to dig into it more, I remember I was such a late listener to Serial and to S town. And I was like, oh my God, this is unreal and something that I've never heard of. I've never heard anything like this before. I probably never read anything like this before. And so I remember I asked my boss at the time, I was like, can I do this full time? I was like, can I just work on building out this audio division and this team? And I think at that point, luckily because Dirty John had been such a huge success, everyone was like, yeah, this is worth doing in a more serious way.Chris Erwin:Before we expand on that, this is a pretty incredible story. So you are in the room as your editor in chief is reading you the Dirty John story. So just remind me, with Dirty John, it was initially just a story. It wasn't like, oh, hey, we created this because we want to make this into an audio series or anything else. It was just, hey, Camila, you're looking at different ways to diversify revenue for the company, looking at different mediums for our content. Here seems to be a pretty incredible story. And was your editor in chief recommending that you make it into a podcast or is that something that came up in the room in real time?Camila Victoriano:No, I think he had already been thinking of it and that's to his credit. Right. And he was like, I think this might be it. And how do we get this done? And then I think Chris Goffard in particular is a great journalist. And he writes these amazing, more feature length pieces. And so his style of storytelling really lended itself to that as opposed to a breaking news reporter. And so he had already thought when he got the piece, this might be a good podcast or it might be our good first podcast. And I think he brought us in because we were the R&D crew of two that existed in the organization to really help make it happen. And so again, once we connected with the Wondery team and put the LA Times team together, it was a match made in heaven, I think. And it worked really, really well.Chris Erwin:It seems like you went right to Hernan and the Wondery team, were you like, hey, we should talk to some of the other audio and radio companies that are out there, or did you just go straight to Wondery?Camila Victoriano:We just went straight to them. And to be honest, I think that was something else our editors suggested. And I think to be honest, it did end up working really well because I think, we were coming from a very journalistic perspective and that's where I started to learn a bit more of the different ways to tell stories in audio, right. Start very character driven, really narrative as if you're making a movie. And so I think that it was a great match honestly, and I don't think we may have maybe looked at other things here and there, but it felt like a good fit right off the bat.Chris Erwin:You said you were working on the marketing strategy and the launch, right, of the series. Do you think there was any special things that you guys did? Obviously it's incredible story and it really resonated with audiences at scale, but were there any initial marketing tactics or buzz that really helped tip that into the mainstream?Camila Victoriano:I think what we decided to do, which was perhaps different than how some podcasts had been marketed before, because till then it had really been public radio driven, was I forget who said this, but it was basically like let's market this as if it was a movie or what would we do if we were launching a film? And so we really went all out in splashing our newspaper with these beautiful full page spreads. We were the LA paper, and so we had all this FYC, for your consideration advertising that would, you'd see those spreads for movies all the time. And so we were like, why don't we just make one of our own? And so it was a full team effort with the designers, the marketing team, me and my boss at the time and just putting together this plan where we really went all out.And I think that definitely caught the attention of our subscribers, which obviously were the first touch point to this story. And we did similar things online where we had, what's called a homepage takeover where basically everywhere you look online, you're seeing advertisements for Dirty John for this story. And so we had newsletters and I think a lot of that 360 approach to promoting it online, in print, although that's not as common, but on social newsletters and really just hitting all the touch points is something that definitely I have taken with me in my career. And I think is also just becoming much more common across podcasting as we launch and others launch more narrative nonfiction, fiction series, that sort of thing where they're becoming really entertainment franchises beyond just a really great maybe non-fiction or reported story. But I think absolutely the way we thought about marketing it helped to change the way that our subscribers and then the listeners that came in through more word of mouth, saw the show and understood it for, oh no, this is entertainment. It's journalism driven, but it's entertainment.Chris Erwin:It's a really good note because an increasing challenge for any content creators or content market is how do you stand out through the noise? There is more content across more mediums today than ever before. And so how do you really cut through the noise, drive mass awareness, but also be focused and really go after a niche community as well? It's not an easy formula. Sorry. I wanted to go a little bit back in time, but that was really helpful context. But then to the point where you said, okay, you're talking to your boss, your leadership. And you're like, I think there's something really big here in audio. I want to focus my efforts here full time. I also think this is interesting Camila, because when we were talking yesterday, you said that you took an atypical path in some ways where you followed the content, you followed your passions.It wasn't like, I'm going to go to school. And then I'm also going to get a dual computer science degree or economics or some quantitative math. And then I'm going to go do two years at McKinsey or an investment bank. And I think you following your heart it then puts you into these serendipitous moments, like being in the room when your editor in chief comes with Dirty John, and then you're like, hey, I've been working on these passion projects. I think there's something to do here in audio, let's go forth together. And then you just happen to be in the room at these incredible moments and then you're raising your hand for where your heart is telling you to go. And it's obviously put you on an incredible path, which we're going to talk more about. That's something that I'm just taking away here from hearing your story.Camila Victoriano:Thanks. That's a great way to put it. It's following my gut a little bit, and I think it just goes back to again, how I was raised and I think my parents were always, there's this funny saying in Spanish, [foreign language 00:25:29], which is like, if you don't cry, you don't get fed, basically. And so I took that to heart and like, yeah, I have a passion. And I think that part of me, the inclination is like, oh, if I work really hard, it'll get noticed. But sometimes it is like, no, you have to really actively say it out loud. And I think sometimes for people that are younger, like I was the youngest by like 10 years in a lot of the spaces I've been in, it's hard sometimes to do that and to raise your hand and say, I want this. But I think when I really felt that I did it and I think it's something I've just been working on in general.Chris Erwin:So you raise your hand and you say that you want to focus on what you perceive as a big audio opportunity for the LA Times. What does that look like for next steps?Camila Victoriano:Really, what that meant was I was the only person working full time on the business side, on this project, which was daunting, but also great because I got to have different touchpoints with all the teams. And so for me, it really became, how do I build essentially a mini startup within this legacy organization and how do we make something that moves quickly and can be nimble and can be experimental in an organization that, as I said earlier is nearly 140 years old at this point? So it was really exciting and really daunting. And so what I did first and foremost was figure out a good cadence to meet with my colleagues in the newsroom. And what it allowed me to do was really focus on offering them insight into the content that was really working well in the space that perhaps is maybe a bit more data driven, I would say.I was really looking at what was working well and also working with our data and product teams to see what were the types of stories that listeners or in our case, readers were gravitating towards and offering that insight to the journalist and to the editors and really working hand in hand with them to figure out based on that, what were they excited about turning into audio or what were they excited about putting resources behind? And so I was focusing a lot on content strategy in the very beginning of how do we follow up this phenomenon, which was also, I think for everyone, you have this huge hit, you want the sequel to be just as good.Chris Erwin:And to be clear. So the data that you're looking at is both in terms of the content that the LA Times is putting out. Like your articles, I'm not sure if you were also doing video as well, looking at who's consuming that, how often are they consuming it, is that type of content performing well relative to other content? In addition, looking at metrics for just podcasting overall, what genres are performing well, what do the formats look like? Is it short form or long form audio? So you are taking that for your own understanding and then educating a lot of the writers and the journalists in the newsroom. Because then when you put that information together, better ideas can start to germinate within your business. Is that right?Camila Victoriano:Absolutely. Yeah. And then what they would be able to offer me was insight sometimes into maybe investigations they were conducting, or they would be able to tell me, yeah, that is a great story, but maybe the sources aren't going to speak on audio. So it was a really wonderful collaboration between the business side and the newsroom in a way that was really organic and really respected the work that they were doing, but also offered them a bit of insight into, hey, we're exploring this new thing together. Here's how we might do it in the best way. And so I was doing a lot of that in a lot of that more high level content strategy, basically to guide the editors into figuring out what might come next. And then also just doing everything else, basically that the journalists weren't doing, right, or that they couldn't do because they were busy reporting amazing stories, which was building on an actual business model for what this might look like, which was difficult, because it was very early days and our sales team had never sold a podcast before.They had sold digital, had sold print, had sold events. And also marketing is like, how do we replicate what we did with Dirty John in a way that was sustainable and in a way that, how do we replicate that by tracking what actually worked well from that experience? Right? Because we could always splash all of our pages and flash all of our online presence with images and with links to the show, but figuring out how to basically make a report of what actually worked to drive listeners. And so it was a lot of in the very beginning, trying to digest and figure out what are the things that we could replicate and what is the “formula” that worked in Dirty John and others. Some of the stuff is hard to quantify and you can't measure, but trying to measure as much as I could to be able to build out a plan for, okay, we think we can make this many more shows and they have to hit these particular metrics. And I was doing a little bit of everything. Literally, like I said, my sales team or the sales team at the LA Times, they had never sold podcasts before. So I was literally calling podcast agencies and selling ads.Chris Erwin:You were selling ads yourself?Camila Victoriano:Yeah, I was. I remember I called ad results. We were doing a show about Bill Cosby, which is not an easy subject to pitch to sales, but I was getting on the phone, calling people and selling ads into the show. So it was really scrappy.Chris Erwin:Yeah. So essentially a one person team where you're creating the vision and the business plan and then also executing against it as well. That's a lot. Did you have a mandate from your leadership, which is like, hey Camila, we believe in your vision here, but we want within one year we expect like X amount of revenue or within three months. Come with a clear business plan and how much capital you need to grow it and then we're going to green light it. What were the expectations from your boss?Camila Victoriano:Yeah. It wasn't anything that specific to be honest, I think mainly the main mandate very broadly was like, Hey, this needs to make money after a certain point. Right. And it can't go on for so long of just, because a lot of people while making podcasts is cheaper than making a pilot, it's also very resource intensive. So while maybe it's not a lot of cash out the door, it's a lot of time from a lot of people to make something that is high touch investigative, like a year of reporting sometimes. And so I was asking a lot of the newsroom and the journalists. And so I had to work with our finance team at the time to build out a model that basically showed at least break even for year one and then started to make some profit after that or some revenue.And so it wasn't as super strict thing, but I think obviously they wanted it to be revenue generating and relied on me and my counterparts on finance department to put that model together. And again, I was an English major. I had never made a spreadsheet. I had never made a model V lookup, it was very new to me. All of that was the first time I was doing any of that. So for me, those next three years or so were an incredible crash course into all of the practical skills that perhaps I hadn't learned in the English major was those were all learned in that time period of building a business model, putting together business plans, content strategy, and then executing marketing plans and sales plans at the same time.Chris Erwin:So I have to ask, clearly your love and your passion is for storytelling, right? So now you're figuring out the business plan for how can you actually create a new sustainable business that's going to tell stories in a different way on new mediums. Did you enjoy doing some of that business work or was it more of like, eh, I don't mind doing it because it allows me to execute towards this primary goal or were you starting to see like, oh, I actually like using both sides of my brain, operating on both sides of the house. What did that feel like for you?Camila Victoriano:I think it was definitely the latter. I think I never expected to “business” as I had always thought of it. Right. I think there were certain things that I could really do without, I did not love sales calling and pitching. I was like, I could do without ever doing this again. But I think for me, what I realized during that time period and working with the folks on the finance team, our COO, our sales, I was like, these guys are all really creative and actually figuring out how this is going to work and how this is going to be sustainable is actually weirdly fun and interesting and challenges my brain. And it's funny to put it that way, but again, as an English major, as someone that didn't grow up with parents or in a community where people were doing really traditional jobs or working as high powered business executives, I had never been in that space.And so I think for me, the brainstorming of what are we going to do, what types of shows are we going to make? How is it going to make money? How are we going to make stuff that's meaningful and powerful and makes a difference, but also not go broke? That was actually really fun for me and really creative in a weird way. Business can be creative. And at the same time, I got a lot of joy from just sitting in newsroom meetings and hearing their stories that they wanted to tell and working with, call them creatives, but the journalists really.And I think that's when I realized, oh, I can be in this space. I can be in this creative space as a facilitator of all these people that maybe have the boots on the ground, making the stories. And I actually really enjoy the operational part weirdly. And I think my brain does like being in both sides where I can brainstorm stories and I can be a part of green light meetings and I can have my opinion based on obviously personal taste, but also what I understand about the market and at the same time, really enjoy putting spreadsheets together, which sounds so lame, but it was fun.Chris Erwin:Hey listeners, this is Chris Erwin, your host of The Come Up. I have a quick ask for you. If you dig what we're putting down, if you like the show, if you like our guest, it would really mean a lot if you can give us a rating wherever you listen to our show. It helps other people discover our work. And it also really supports what we do here. All right, that's it, everybody. Let's get back to the interview.I think you're hitting on a couple notes, which are important. So just one, I think I can just sense from our listeners, some tears of joy, we are calling finance professionals and the FP&A teams at these media businesses that they have creative aspects to their work. I think they really appreciate that, but I think it is true. And I think, look, I've seen this because I started after my banking career, I was very early in the YouTube MCN, digital video days. And there's all these incredible visions of how to build these new modern media businesses, but the actual business fundamentals of how do we make money? How do we have sustainable profit where we can keep doing this year over year? I feel like a lot of those big questions were not addressed. Now that's fundamentally changed 10 years later, but I think people with your mindset is there's a chance to bring great content to these new audiences that want to consume content in different ways.But we got to find a way where there's business sense here, right, where there's going to be money pouring in from partnerships and from brands or from investors or from the fans themselves. And that allows you to keep building, to keep iterating, to create something beautiful and great and different. So clearly you have a really sharp mind for this. This is a good transition to talk about how you ended up going over to Sonoro and meeting Josh and being a co-founder of that business. To tie a bow in your LA Times experience, where did you essentially eventually take the business before you decided to do something else?Camila Victoriano:By 2019 or so, we had launched about eight or nine different shows. They were true crime limited series, but also what was important to us was to have some more recurring community driven projects. We did a really wonderful show called Asian Enough with two of our reporters, Jen Yamato and Frank Shyong. And it was just about what it means to be Asian enough and how that question is something that they asked themselves a lot and other people in the community asked themselves a lot. And I think that's an in general question that I, as a Latina can relate to. So there was a lot of also really, I don't want to say public service, but really community driven projects as well that I was really proud of. And then also of course, we had Chasing Cosby men in the window, Detective Trap, all these really awesome, true crime series that were our bread and butter by the end.And luckily all of them did really well. They all would hit the top of their charts. A couple of them I believe are in development for TV. And I was just really excited to see more than anything too, that the process of brainstorming those ideas and of bringing them to life was so much smoother by the end. Our sales team was total pro that's selling podcasts by the end. Now they still have a podcast salesperson. I think what I was most proud of from year one to year three basically, was that it wasn't anymore a struggle to push these things through, it was very much LA Times studios as we called it was really embedded in the organization and podcasts were a real serious part of the business of the LA Times and still are.And we got to make some amazing shows. All of them had advertisers when they launched, which was again for us a huge success metric. We were able to sell things before they even came out because advertisers trusted us to make it successful. And I think that was a huge success point for me having been on those calls in the beginning. I feel like that's a little bit why too, again, making this jump into Sonoro, why after that point I felt good about leaving because I was like, I feel really great about what I've built and what I've helped set up here. And I feel okay that I can step away now.Chris Erwin:Okay. And so were you planning on transitioning out or did this opportunity to work with Sonoro come up and you're like, hey, this is hard to turn down?Camila Victoriano:It was a little bit of both in my head. I was itching for something bigger, a bigger challenge, how I mentioned LA Times studios was really this mini mini startup within a legacy organization. I had gotten the itch of building something from the ground up and feeling really excited about that. And so I think at that point, I had been at the LA Times total, including my internship probably for close to five years. And so it had been a really solid run. And I think I was ready to look for my next challenge and as I was in that head space, just so happens, got introduced to Josh through our mutual friend, Adam Sachs. And when I met him, I think our energies, just to jump right into it, but our energies really, really matched well. We met over zoom a couple times.Chris Erwin:And when was this Camila?Camila Victoriano:This was in early, early, early 2020. So gearing up for what was to come unbeknownst to me.Chris Erwin:It was right before COVID.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. Yeah. And so we had met a couple times and I'm a real detail oriented person. And I think what was exciting to me about working with someone like Josh was he came in and had a really inspirational vision for what he wanted to achieve. And I got very excited and felt very aligned with that vision and what I had been thinking about recently over the last few years, just being in the audio space and in media.And I thought, might as well go for it. I felt like it was the right time for me to do something from scratch, to take honestly a risk. And what seemed like a risk at the time, because I had been working in a very sort of traditional company that probably wasn't going anywhere. And in general, I think in my life had been pretty risk averse. I think I had just done everything the way I was supposed to do it. Right. And so I think that for me this was, okay, I'm going to take a risk. I feel like I've gained a lot of confidence over the last five years and a lot of skill sets and I'm ready for the challenge. So, yeah, chose to jump in it with him.Chris Erwin:Camila, what's the quick elevator pitch or overview of Sonoro?Camila Victoriano:So, Sonoro is a global entertainment company that creates audio content with the goal of developing it into TV, film, books, other audio derivatives, and our community focus is 500 million global Spanish speakers and US Latinos. So our entire shows are made by Latinos and our entire team is a hundred percent bilingual and bicultural.Chris Erwin:In terms of being inspired by the vision, were there things from the outset where you're like, hey, Josh, I love this idea, but here's what I would do a bit differently? Was there any of that in the beginning?Camila Victoriano:What I was able to offer was the experience being in the industry. Right. And so I think my eagerness really came from wanting to try shows that were outside the podcast norm "a little bit". We had done a lot of true crime at the LA Times, but I was really excited to try stuff that would resonate. For Sonoro, it's really our core consumer are the 500 million global Spanish speakers and the US Latinos. Again, I came from Miami. I'm a Latina. What was exciting to me in general about creating stories that were empowering Latino creators was let's not set a boundary about what the narrative that they have to tell is. Let's let them tell sci-fi stories, fantasy stories, horror, thrillers, that maybe don't have anything to do with being Latino, but are just feature Latino characters in it like they would any other sci-fi.And so I think for me, what was really exciting was pushing those boundaries a little bit and leaving that creative flexibility to the creators and trusting them and their experiences, knowing that if we really relied on the specifics of their experience and their story, inherently, that would have a universal impact. What we Josh and I talked a lot about in the beginning was the success of shows like Money Heist, and those that hadn't come out yet reaffirmed our point later in the year, like Squid Game and Lupin, that more and more people were consuming global content.That was, if you're a French person watching Lupin, there's probably so many inside jokes that I totally missed, but I still really enjoyed it. But they're going to enjoy it even more because it's culturally specific to them. And so I think that's what a little bit what I was really trying to push forward in the early shows that we made and still today of we can be really culturally specific, so that if we're making a show set in Mexico, Mexicans, they're like, oh yeah, this is really made for me, and I get this, and this sounds like where I'm from and who I am. But someone that is listening in the Bronx can still really enjoy it and have a sense of cultural community with the story, but it's more universal in that sense.Chris Erwin:Got it. Very well said. So, you align on visions with Josh, but you also have your distinct point of view. And then is it like, hey, within one to two months of meeting, you joined the Sonoro, and you helped co-found the company and build it to what it is today, or was there a longer [courting 00:43:24] period?Camila Victoriano:I think we literally talked on Zoom twice.Chris Erwin:And then it was like, all right, Camila's on board.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. I don't know. We just, we really got along really well and we clicked really easily. And I was like, I think this can work. I think we have a good rapport. We always joke, we're both Capricorns, so I think that that helps.Chris Erwin:What are the attributes of a Capricorn?Camila Victoriano:Very driven, very type A, very low BS. So I was like, okay, I think we can understand each other. So I don't know. It just felt right. It felt like everything was aligning. I was getting that edge to go and build something and start with... In general, I was just saying, I want to start with a really young team. That's what I wanted to do. That's as far as I had gotten in my head space about it, and then to get this connection from Adam, literally as that was happening, it just felt way too serendipitous to pass up.And also then to have honestly such an immediate connection with Josh of like, oh, okay, I think we can work well together, and I think we understand each other and how we like to do things and how we like to work, that still to this day nearly three years in is true. I think it checks so many boxes that I was like, I just have to, again, it was the first big risk I've taken, honestly; career wise or school wise, if I'm looking that far back. But it felt right, and it felt like the right time to do it. So I just went for it.Chris Erwin:Well, so it's funny that you say all this. I've known Josh for a few years now. And in terms of how you describe him of like he's very ambitious, very driven, very direct, no BS. Camila Victoriano:Yeah.Chris Erwin:And as I'm getting to know you, I get that sense as well. And literally just, I think we spoke for the first time yesterday, but I'm also seeing just how complimentary the both of you are in working together. So I think that explains a lot of the recent success that we've seen with Sonoro over the past few years, not surprised. After a couple Zoom meetings, you guys partner up and then what do you first start working on?Camila Victoriano:So the first year that we really started, and we really formally kicked things off, kid you not, March 2020. So it was weird timing. But really what we were first trying to do is test out if we could actually make things that people loved. That is all we cared about. We were like, can we make shows that people love, that people binge into the deeps in the middle of the night? And can we do it well? And can we do it at a high quality? Because I think that was important to both of us is in general when you're seeing, especially in Latin America and the US, content for Latinos, like traditional telenovelas, the production value just isn't there. And so that was really important to us. And so the first year we launched a lot of traditional bread and butter podcast, chat shows that really quickly climbed up the charts.Personal interviews, comedy, wellness, your traditional categories in Mexico specifically, and started to build out our network there really quickly, because I think a lot of the creators that were more independent there saw us as a reliable resource to help them grow their shows and to really be; for us, it was like, we want to be the partner of choice for any creator podcast or media company, executive director that wants to work and make really great content that just so happens to be created by Latinos.And so that along with let's make stuff people love were our two big mandates in the beginning, and it worked really well. Our first original scripted series launch that we did was a show called Crónicas Obscuras. It was a horror franchise that we launched in October. And that came off of a similar premise, which was Latinos over index and horror. We love horror movies, horror shows, anything. But most of the horror shows or movies that do really well are either based on European legends and European horror stories or feature zero to no Latino characters that, and if they're there, do they make it towards the end? Maybe not. And so-Chris Erwin:They get killed off early.Camila Victoriano:Yeah, definitely not the final character left. So for us, it was like, this is one genre that we know already has a huge gap in terms of how Latinos consume it and how it's being made. And so we said, this is going to be our franchise where we're going to tell Latin American legends, set in Latin America with Latin American characters. And so our first season of Crónicas was about these things called Los Nahuales, which are basically werewolves, but they also turn into other characters like snakes and things like that. And the show, we did it super high production value. We recorded with this thing called binaural audio where you literally have a mic that looks like a head and people can walk around it. And so if you're wearing headphones, the show, you can feel things coming up from behind you, but it's just because of the way that we recorded it with this special mic.And we had the voice actor who's done Homer Simpson in Mexico for 20 years. That was our big celebrity for that season star in the show. And the show ricochet up to number one podcast in general in Mexico. And it did really, really well. And that was our first success of this is an original show that Sonoro produced fully in-house, wrote, direct, production, casting, marketing. And we were able to launch it and people really, really loved it. Next few months after that, we launched a few similar series. The big one, of course, is a show called Toxicomanía, which launched in April of '21, which was, again, similarly mission driven, but always entertaining. It was based on a true story. A Mexican doctor in the 1940s that convinced the president of Mexico to legalize all drugs for six months, which no one knows happened.For six months in Mexico, all drugs were legal and you could get them in government mandated dispensaries. And it was this doctor's way of saying, hey, this is how we build a progressive society. This was an obvious one. Again, it's like the combination of our mission, which is, this is a story about Latinos, in particular Mexicans and drugs that you haven't seen before because when you think Mexico or drugs in media, you think Narcos, but this was actually something very different. But then what we did is we turned it into a really entertaining dramatic thriller. We were inspired by movies like The Big Short and things like that, where it was like it was teaching you something about history, but in a way that was really, really entertaining.And then we partnered with the actor, Luis Gerardo Mendez, who's an amazing Mexican star and really starting to come into his own in the US to executive produce and star in the project. And that show did insanely well. We launched it on 4/20. So again, it was the combination of mission, entertainment, production value, the right partner, and also a really strategic marketing launch of this is obviously a story that people are going to love and it's about drugs, so we're going to launch it on 4/20. And it did really, really well. It was number one in Mexico across Latin America. Number two in the United States in fiction, even though it was only in Spanish.And now we just announced earlier this year that it's going to be developed into a film at Paramount+. And so that to me is a perfect case study of what we really tried to do that first year is let's partner with the best creators. Let's make the best content and see if people love it. And I think we proved that to ourselves that first year, year and a half.Chris Erwin:When you entered the, call, the Mexican creator and audio landscape, was it competitive? Were there a lot of other production companies that were either Latin America based, Mexico based, or from the US that were trying to operate in that market? And two, follow up question, was there a sense of with the creators that were there, did a lot of them want to create in audio and to expand their creator ambitions, or was it something like, oh, we didn't even know that we can do this, but then after talking with you Camilla and your team, they're like, oh yeah, typically, I just create a bunch of videos on YouTube or whatever else, but I'd love to do something in a more scripted or [premium 00:50:55] or narrative form in podcasting. Let's figure out what that looks like together?Camila Victoriano:Yeah. I think in terms of the landscape, there were very few to none established. There were a lot of independent creators. So we actually are head of production; Andrés Vargas. He is this great heart of the Mexican podcast creator network. He was really a first mover there for sure. And I think we worked together really to bring on a lot of these early chat show podcasts into our network to kickstart that, but there wasn't a lot of established companies there. There weren't any. And so for us really, it was a mainly an education challenge, not so much the creators. I think there were, like I said, independent comedians or wellness experts that had already started to realize, oh, this podcasting thing is makes a lot of sense for me to expand into. And we focused on working with them, but really more so for the talent.So for our scripted projects is explaining that, hey, you don't have to have hair and makeup. You can just go into the studio for literally four hours and you make a whole series. And I think for us, that was how, especially when we were early on unknown, reaching out to these huge stars like Luis, being able to pitch it as this is still a really... And this is what I love about audio, right? Is like it's still, even though it's been around for a good chunk of time and you could argue all the way back to radio dramas and radio plays, it still feels like such a creative and experimental space. And I think that's what got a lot of the talent in particular that we were speaking to for our scripted projects excited, that they could try something different. This wasn't your traditional production, where you had to go in with a 5:00 AM call time.It was very much, especially in early COVID days. It's like you could do it from your house. We'll send you a kit. No worries. We'll do it over Zoom. But it was a lot of education really for them, for their managers, but people were excited. I think they thought this is a chance for me to play and for me to have fun and for me to do something different and which made the whole experience, especially of those early recordings, just really special.Chris Erwin:So going back to a point that we talked about with your experience at the LA Times, it was follow the content, but then figure out the business model. How do we make this sustainable? So what did that look like for you working with Josh and the team of like, okay, we found this incredible creator community. We have these shows that are becoming number one in their local markets and they're crossing international borders into the US and more. But how do we actually generate sustainable revenue for this? And what are the right revenue streams beyond what everyone just talks about for podcast ad sales, et cetera? So what was some of the initial work? What did that look like for you guys? And where does that look like going forward as you think about the medium and monetization differently?Camila Victoriano:Yeah, absolutely. I think in Mexico, in particular, again, it was all about education, education, education. And I think for us, since we focused that first year really on just launching great shows and making sure that they were hits, then our counterparts in Mexico were able to go to brands and say, hey, look, we already know this works and explain a little bit the medium and how to interact with consumers and how to write an audio ad. So it's still early days in that market, but we've been able to work with really amazing brands like McDonald's, like Netflix. A lot of CPG brands in particular are really excited about this space. And so I think we're really, the more we talk to brands every month, it gets easier. And I think where the podcast market in the US was maybe four years ago is where they're at right now.And I think we're reaching those innovators in the brand space that are excited to try something new and it's working really well for them. And we're getting a lot of people that come back, come back again because the audience for podcasting is the traditional ones that you see here in the US. They are younger, they have more disposable income typically. And so I think a lot of the brands are really excited about that. And then the US, of course, it's a totally different game. You have your direct response advertisers, which are the bread and butter of podcast advertising, but what we're really excited about is bigger brand presenting sponsorships, especially in our fiction series. That is where we're really looking to double down on in this year. For example, we had a show called Princess of South Beach, which was a 36 episode telenovela in English and in Spanish, and [Lincoln 00:55:02] came on as a presenting sponsor. And we produced this really incredible integrated piece into the content itself.So it was a funny telenovela set in Miami, and we created a chat show or a TV show basically like an Enews called Tea with Tatianna, where she was talking to people around the family that the show was about while integrating Lincoln in a really seamless way. So for us, it's always about thinking a few steps ahead of what's the market going to look like in a year or two, and how can we get ahead of that? And how can we be really, really creative about the way that we integrate brands, so that it doesn't disrupt the content; number one, but also it gives them better value and it gives them much more seamless integration with the content that we already know listeners are loving. And so that's really what we're focused on in the US in particular is those bigger integrations into, in particular, our scripted content.Chris Erwin:Camila, as a young rising leader, where you raised your hand and essentially got to be at the helm of what is the new LA Times studio division, where you're helping to tell stories in different ways. And now you're a co-founder at Sonoro. Looking back on your young career, what are some of your leadership learnings to date, upon reflecting of you as a leader earlier on, maybe a few years back to the leader you are today? What have you learned and what do you want to keep working on?Camila Victoriano:The main thing I've learned has probably been more about human interaction, how you work with people and how you build a team. I think at the LA Times in particular, newsrooms are tough, because it's the business side traditionally and over the years has never... hasn't always been super friendly. And so what I learned really well there and also building a team over Zoom these last few years is communication is critical. And over communicating and making sure everyone knows what they're supposed to be doing, why, and just offering up the opportunity to answer questions and to be there as a leader that listens to people and to listens to maybe questions they have about work, about their life. I think for me, that's always really important and something that I've valued from mentors in my life of they're there to listen and they're not going to... I was a very precocious early career person.I was always like, why is this happening, or what's going on? And I wanted to know as much as possible. And so communication, I think, is something that I always valued as a younger employee or as an early career. And so that's always what I'm trying to communicate or to convey to our employees now and to back then the newsroom is like, I want to be someone that they have a lot of FaceTime with and that communicates a lot with them about strategy and about what we're doing, what we're doing and gets them really excited.Chris Erwin:I like that. I run a lean team, but I realize, I can never overcommunicate. So things that I just assume that the team knows, the reality is that they don't. These things are in my head. And so every day it's important to just remind the team, what is our mission? What are we focused on? What were wins from yesterday? What are learnings and what are we maybe changing? That is literally a daily conversation. And I would much rather over-communicate than under-communicate. So I think that's very well said. Another point here is you now have investors. Yo

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Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 5:04


Failure to invest in physics Research and Development (R&D) could cost Ireland the opportunity to create over 80,000 jobs over the next ten years, according to the Institute of Physics (IOP), the largest professional body for physics in Ireland and the UK. This warning comes as IOP preliminary research shows companies in Ireland are already facing critical skills shortages, hindering the sector's development and growth. To build on its preliminary research, the IOP today launched a new consultation into its R&D Blueprint, supported by Ibec. The Blueprint provides a platform for stakeholders to highlight barriers to a thriving R&D system in Ireland and actions to overcome these. Findings will enable the IOP to make informed recommendations to Government and policymakers to ensure the policy environment and overall conditions are conducive to a strong R&D system in Ireland. Skills Shortages The IOP's preliminary research, supported by Ibec and titled Paradigm Shift, shows physics-based businesses in Ireland are already facing critical skills shortages, which is preventing investment in research and innovation: 46% of respondents cited skills shortages as a key challenge to undertaking R&D/innovation activity. In addition, 95% said they experienced difficulties recruiting across the board, both for specialist and technical skills, but also for manufacturing and commercial roles. The result of these skills shortages means 61% of respondents said R&D/innovation activity had to be suspended or delayed in the past five years. In order to address the critical skills shortage, many companies looked further afield, with a third (33%) of respondents recruiting from outside the UK or Ireland. Increased public funding required While the IOP commends Government support for research and innovation – evident through Government's recent Impact 2030 report – Paradigm Shift highlights the inherent need for increased public funding to ensure R&D can continue. To put it in context, 70% of respondents said public funding had helped fill financing gaps, without which the activities would not have been undertaken. Looking ahead, 65% of respondents said greater access to direct funding for early-stage R&D could encourage more R&D/innovation activity, while 65% also noted long-term funding schemes could encourage more activity in the next five years. In addition, greater access to finance, such as loans, was highlighted by 65% of respondents as a policy enhancement that would allow them to undertake more R&D/innovation activity. Commenting, Tom Grinyer, Institute of Physics CEO, said: “Today we launch our new consultation with a warning that a failure to invest in physics R&D could cost Ireland the opportunity to create over 80,000 jobs. Our R&D Blueprint, which will gather insights from the wider physics community, will enable us to make key recommendations to Government and policymakers to ensure Ireland does not lose out on essential job opportunities. We are at a crucial point, as our preliminary research shows companies are already experiencing critical skills shortages, which is hampering growth, and are now looking abroad to fill these positions. As a driver of innovation, investment in physics R&D means vital industry will be embedded in Ireland and the resulting benefits will be seen here.” Professor Philip Nolan, Director General, Science Foundation Ireland, said: “The IOP's new consultation is vital for the physics sector and the wider research and innovation community, as gathering views from the community will be key in enabling the IOP to make well-informed recommendations to Government and will help us adapt our strategies better to support physics research and physics-based innovation. The IOP's preliminary research clearly shows there are important opportunities to be grasped if we are to accelerate physics-based innovation, and just how essential the Government's support is in enabling innovation. I encourage those in industry to i...

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Irish Finance Minister speaks at Scale Ireland

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 6:15


Irish Finance Minister Paschal Donoghue indicates continuing support for the startup sector in Ireland My coverage of Scale Ireland's headline event on September 12th began with some networking in a meeting space allocated by Avolon, one of Scale Ireland's longest supporters. I got chatting with Netsso's CEO and Founder Eoin O'Doherty. He explained how his digital product worked allowing those in the legal field to collate and organise their case files. After an interesting walk-through of Netsso's product by Eoin, we were in turn walked into the main auditorium area for the event. Irish Finance Minister speaks at Scale Ireland Martina Fitzgerald, CEO of Scale Ireland kicked off the main attraction at midday making formal introductions. She noted startups as a key element in continuing government policy around economic development. Minister Paschal Donoghue then took the stage with his keynote speech acknowledging the value and importance of the ‘startup sector'. He noted that now is a great time to be thinking about the development of our (environmental) impact and digital industries through our startup sector, which the government sees as key to our economic future. He then mentioned the new schemes for startups like the 90 million euro fund for new ventures in key areas explaining that the government seeks via the budget to maintain ‘balanced economic supports' for a sustainable future in Ireland. The minister stayed on to participate in the panel discussions chaired by Martina Fitzgerald. First up were the entrepreneurs with Jack Pierce, Co-Founder and CFO of Mayflyer, Orlaith Ryan, Co-Founder and CTO of Shorla Oncology and Matthew Coffey, Co-Founder and CEO, Squid. Wayflyer is valued at 1.6 billion euros and is a fintech success example that has 55% of its investment from the US and the balance from the rest of the world. Jack's main ask is the reduction of the administrative burden around raising money and dealing with Enterprise Ireland. His burdens around administration are understandable given he was a 3 person operation 3 years ago and has gone through a monumental growth spurt as a startup. Orlaith's deep R&D involvement with Shorla Oncology has seen her work very closely with a colleague Sharon Cunningham on the development of 3 pharma products in Ireland. Her startup has operations based in Ireland and the USA. She sees her scaling plans as going through a critical phase over the coming year given the developmental stage of her products. Orlaith after raising 10 million euros would like to see fewer administration burdens around raising cash, which would then allow her to strengthen her focus on the business and its technological development. Matthew's company ‘Squid' has done what we all wish someone would do, take our points cards from our favourite retailers and store them in one central app on our phones. Squid started in coffee shops centralising loyalty schemes. Matthew tells us, that the app will soon support points schemes with no need to carry multiple cards. He also shares the pain points shared around raising cash and would like to see government schemes have less bureaucratic process workflows. The next panel was two key investors, Will Prendergast, Partner with Frontline VC and Faye Walsh Drouillard, Founder and General Partner, WakeUp Capital. Will notes the 20% decline in US capital provision and thinks this loss in investor confidence will trickle into Europe later this year. Will finished with some good advice for entrepreneurs around not taking general advice. Startup entrepreneurs should deeply understand their own circumstances and base their spending decisions on them. He noted options are created around good timing for the individual use case, not the industry average. Faye was very focused on investment in the environment, sustainable food and healthy living. She delivered some practical advice noting the implementation of a startup plan is key to success along with confirmation it has ac...

Traction
From Bootstrapped to Billions with Edith Harbaugh, LaunchDarkly

Traction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 24:22


On this episode, Edith Harbaugh, CEO at LaunchDarkly and Jonathan Heiliger, Partner at Vertex Ventures discuss the highs and lows of entrepreneurship from bootstrapped to billions.    Taking that first step to being a founder is the first difficult decision for many. After that comes decisions about hiring your teams, picking your partners and investors, and creating a scalable product for a category that doesn't exist yet.   Edith shares how she beat the status quo for founding a company by tackling problems she experienced firsthand and how she is leading an entirely new category for B2B.   Specifically, Edith and Jonathan discuss:   Tangible steps to take to become a founder How to challenge the notion that companies are built from well-known problems Validating the idea, getting to product-market fit, and navigating to hypergrowth and scale The elements of category creation: the challenges, mistakes, and bumps along the way Who to turn to along your founder journey Learn more at https://tractionconf.io   Connect with Edith Harbaugh: https://www.linkedin.com/in/edithharbaugh/   Learn more about LaunchDarkly at https://launchdarkly.com/   This episode is brought to you by:   Extend your company's hiring budget with VanHack's pool of 400,000 remote engineers at a lower cost than local hires. Join companies like Dapper Labs, 1Password, Brex, and Dooly who hired great engineers with VanHack. Mention “Traction Remote” when you sign up today to get 10% off your first hire at https://VanHack.com.Each year the U.S. and Canadian governments provide more than $20 billion in R&D tax credits and innovation incentives to fund businesses. But the application process is cumbersome, prone to costly audits, and receiving the money can take as long as 16 months. Boast automates this process, enabling companies to get more money faster without the paperwork and audit risk. We don't get paid until you do! Find out if you qualify today at https://Boast.AI.   Launch Academy is one of the top global tech hubs for international entrepreneurs and a designated organization for Canada's Startup Visa. Since 2012, Launch has worked with more than 6,000 entrepreneurs from over 100 countries, of which 300 have grown their startups to seed and Series A stage and raised over $2 billion in funding. To learn more about Launch's programs or the Canadian Startup Visa, visit https://LaunchAcademy.ca    Content Allies helps B2B companies build revenue-generating podcasts. We recommend them to any B2B company that is looking to launch or streamline its podcast production. Learn more at https://contentallies.com   #product #marketing #innovation #fundraising #fintech

Sixteen:Nine
Ori Mor, Wi Charge

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 28:38


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT Anyone who has been on the ops or finance side of digital signage and digital out of home knows how complicated and expensive it can be to realize the simple task of getting power to a screen. It's a particular challenge in settlings like retail - because store designers, until recently, didn't think much about the need to get power right in the aisles and in merchandising locations. Battery-powered displays are one answer. Power over ethernet is another. And there's of course the often expensive and possibly unsightly option of running electrical infrastructure - wires and maybe conduit - all the way to the screens and other gear. Wouldn't it be great if wireless power was a reality? Turns out ... it is, and one of the companies leading development already has small displays for retail and hospitality that get their power over the air, using ceiling transmitters and receivers built into the screens. Right now, Wi Charge's screens are just tablet-sized, but that will change. I get the rundown on wireless power from Ori Mor, who founded and runs the Israel company. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Ori, thank you very much for joining me. Can you give me a background on what your company does? Ori Mor: Hi, Dave, happy to be here. We are doing over-the-air wireless power, and over-the-air charging. But when we say over-the-air, we mean a range of 10 meters (30 feet) and not proximity charging, like charging pads. So this is very different from just those close contact charges where you put your phone down and it does it that way?  Ori Mor: Yes, very different. The phone charging is a type of docking station without wires, but a docking station. You still need to do it on your own, knowing that you are now taking care of charging and the docking station, the pad itself is being wired. We are talking about something that is more close to WiFi for power.  Is this a commercial product or something that's still in R&D?  Ori Mor: It's not in large volume yet, but it's a commercial product. It's deployed in Canada, the US, and Israel, and it's going also to a few locations in Europe and actually at the end of this month, also in Brazil. And the company is in Israel, correct?  Ori Mor: Yes, the headquarters and R&D are in Israel. Marketing and Sales are mainly in the US, but also in Korea and Europe.  And how long has the company been around? Ori Mor: 10 years.  Did it start trying to solve this problem or was it something else that found its way into this? Ori Mor: We started by doing over-the-air wireless power. The main application was charging smartphones, but the technology is capable of powering other devices as well.  I was curious about the application for digital signage. I gather that you have a digital display that you could use in a retail setting, but it's a small display. You're not at a point where you could power a very large display?  Ori Mor: Yes, that is correct. We started with the five-inch display based on demand that we got from prominent retailers and CPGs from across the world who were interested in being able to power devices at the edge of the shelf. Obviously, we can't power 16 displays. So we started with a small display. We are now doing seven-inch and nine-inch as well. But the promise is, as you said, being able to power devices at the edge of the shelf without the hassle of running wires or replacing batteries. And is that the problem that's being solved here, just simply the unavailability of power, right at a, like a shelf edge?  Ori Mor: Simply put, yes. People do display, people do CMS, and people do Digital advertising in retail space already, but usually, it's limited to very few locations and we are enabling it to be widely spread relatively easily.  And the problem is, in a lot of older retail and older can be like 10 years old, That there just isn't power on the shelves, right?  Ori Mor: Yes, That is correct. The gondolas are moving, The shelves of Heights are changing And as you said, there are in most of the retail locations, there are no wires. Maybe near the wall, but certainly not in the middle of the store.  There's power over ethernet, but I gather that has its limitations in terms of where you wanna put it and the cost of it. Ori Mor: Power over ethernet is capable of powering displays. The problem is, again, routing it to something that changes with time, usually twice a year or even more, and you need to wire it to every different shelf, which is expensive and cumbersome. So the setup with this is a transmitter and a receiver?  Ori Mor: A transmitter, and a receiver that is embedded within the display device.  Could you do a retrofit, like a bolt-on receiver?  Ori Mor: Actually, no. The displays are designed by us at this stage because we know how to optimize in terms of power consumption. It's a dedicated development optimized for wireless power.  In the future, I believe that we'd be able to support existing displays but we start with something we can control.  Is the power stable, or is it a bit like WiFi where it can kind of drop momentarily here and there? Ori Mor: There is always a rechargeable battery in the device. So we charge the device and the device draws its power from the rechargeable battery. So it gets steady power from the battery even if power drops.  Are you restricted with the displays in terms of what you can show, like is it just static images or to run full 30 frames per second video? Ori Mor: We are doing full videos.  Okay, and was that a mountain you had to climb or was that right out of the gate that would work?  Ori Mor: It was pretty simple. That wasn't the challenge.  With the transmitter, how does that manifest itself? I think it's something that you mount in the ceiling? Ori Mor: Yes, think of it like a router in the ceiling with a range of 5-10 meters, the transmitter locates client devices and beams a directional infrared beam to the device where the device converts the infrared beam back into electricity.  Does it have to be like a line of sight? Ori Mor: Yes. Wireless power with meaningful power is the line of site technology. You can do non line of sight using RF, magnetic and even with infrared, but the amount of power that you can deliver with sight will be very low for reasons that I can explain if you wanna dive into.  I probably wouldn't get most of it. Ori Mor: Oh, you would get it. When you do non line of sight, it means that energy is being spread in the room and you only harvest part of it. It has two drawbacks, a) the amount of power that you draw that you receive is lower because you waste a lot, and b) you fill the environment with unwanted radiation that the regulator and the customer wouldn't want. So if you do choose to do a non line of sight, it's for very low power.  And what are the safety issues?  Ori Mor: We passed all the safety certificates worldwide. FDA in the US, IEC in UL as well. It's approved to be safe under all conditions and that's the claim to fame for the technology we can deliver meaningful power yet it is as safe as your optical mouse.  You're walking around a cafe or something where this is set up and you let's say you work there. Are there any long-term implications of being around this radiation so to speak?  Ori Mor: No. Think of it like it's even safer than your wifi router. The beam is very directional. So outside the beam, there is an absolute zero. It's not a wifi router that sends radiation to every location and only part of it is being harvested or absorbed by your cell phone. The beam that leaves the transmitter, a hundred per cent of it, reaches the receiver, a centimetre away from the beam, and there is an absolute zero, and when you cross the beam, it shuts off automatically,  Hence the need for or the value of having a battery on board? Ori Mor: Yes. So how long would that last if somebody put a large chair or something in the way, and it was blocking, would that mean eight hours later, it stops working?  Ori Mor: Yeah. It's a design criterion. We designed it to be able to last a full day on a battery, but you can design it differently. It's a trade-off between the size of the battery and the thickness of the display.  So if you talk about larger displays, a 30-inch display, a 55-inch display, which is quite common in digital signage, at least. How long off are we from that being a possibility?  Ori Mor: That's too big of a question for me. I'll tell you that we are not even trying to target this at this point in time, but I'll give you an example of how technology develops. You probably know that when we started using the internet, we used 2.4 kilobytes or something like that.  I go back to 256K modems, I'm old.  Ori Mor: Yeah, and we are now doing a podcast where I'm sitting on probably 200 megabytes per second. Whether the technology would take us there, we will have to figure it out by seeing.  So this is a matter of time, more than anything else. Ori Mor: Yes. Time, the economy of scale, components becoming more capable and scaling up performance.  I would assume also that you guys don't wanna be a display manufacturer. You're doing it right now just to demonstrate what's possible, but I'm thinking you'd like to license this to the display guys, as opposed to making your own?  Ori Mor: That is absolutely correct. Wi Charge is a company that knows how to deliver wireless power and we do that for many different applications. We chose a few to show how it works. There's a big opportunity here in terms of market demand. We chose a few applications, one in commercial, one in smart home, and one in consumer, just to see the market and then to license it to the relevant guys that can do it much better than us. When do you see that happening?  Ori Mor: We've already had deals that are licensed-based and it's like a domino effect. It's like how penguins jump to the water. They all stand at the edge of the ocean knowing that the food is in the water, but still hesitating and then one jumps in and immediately after a hundred thousand jump in. So by showing the way, we would unlock this domino effect.  There are some Korean university researchers I wrote a piece about last week that were also doing wireless power. Are there any number of initiatives out there doing this?  Ori Mor: Yes, we have seen more and more companies or universities doing wireless power. What they're doing right now, we did 10 years ago, so it's nice that they're catching up.  We see over-the-air charging happening already and it's happening in different ways with different technologies that allow different value propositions. So you can expect to see more and more of this.  Is your focus right now mostly on B2C (Business to Consumer)?  Ori Mor: No, we are actually doing commercial applications, like the displays. Even the consumer applications that we do, start with commercial settings. It's simply easier for us. Consumer, we are doing very cautiously and very few applications, but actually, before the end of the year, you'd hear announcements about consumer applications from us.  Right, because you've been at CES a number of times and before we turned things on here to record, you mentioned that the company would be back at CES in January. Ori Mor: Yes. There's another reason why we are doing the display. It expedites the go-to-market. When we can actually do the turnkey product, rather than only the wireless power, we can offer solutions to end customers without hesitations.  It's easy to do it in B2B, but we already have a few consumer applications. What's getting traction for the product right now, like a particular use case?  Ori Mor: The displays are seeing tremendous, overwhelming demand. The other products that we do are smart door locks, which you probably are not so smart, not because they can't be smart, it's because people are worried, designers, OEMs are worried that if they would add smart functionalities, batteries would run out way too fast and then the end user would be stuck locked outside over a dead battery. So we are unleashing this as well in parallel.  Yeah, it would be the same with those surveillance cameras that people have at their homes, the Nest cameras and so on. Ori Mor: Exactly. Since they need to go to sleep to preserve their batteries. There's a phrase, I think a professional phrase, which is called the back of the thief. By the time they wake up, the thief is already on the way out.  You mentioned you were seeing tremendous take-up on displays. What's going on there? How are they being used?  Ori Mor: In various ways. Edge shelf displays in retail locations. I'll tell you what I can say and there are a few other things you can publish, we will send you when they go live.  It's the usual thing. The clients don't want you talking about them, right? Ori Mor: So what I'm disclosing right now are things already out there that are available and in a few weeks there will be other use cases as well and I'll be happy to share them with you, both images and videos. So we are doing table-topping restaurants, this is already out there. We are doing edge shelves in grocery locations. And we are doing other devices for grocery locations, which are quite cool, but I'll wait on how they look till we launch them. We are also doing displays in shopping centres like jewellery and other stuff, it's a display it's so generic, you can put it anywhere. You can wrap it and you have advertising at the point of decision.  And this is not just in Israel?  Ori Mor: No, most of it is outside of Israel. Texas, New York, Michigan, Idaho, Toronto, and Sao Paulo. I'm sure one of the determining factors out there is the overall cost. What this does in terms of cost versus what you would pay to run conduit, run power or ethernet cabling to a display that way and people would do a spreadsheet exercise and decide, okay, this is less expensive to do it your way.  Ori Mor: Exactly.  What is the cost of a transmitter?  Ori Mor: Oh, you'd have to ask our partners. They're selling the solutions to the end customers, not us. Okay, but is it hundreds of dollars, thousands of dollars?  Ori Mor: Hundreds, not thousands.  And it would install in the ceiling just like you would put in a ceiling light?  Ori Mor: Yes, it takes a few minutes.  For the display, understanding that these are your proprietary displays and you've tweaked them and everything else, but the hardware cost for a receiver, is that something that's also hundreds of dollars?  Ori Mor: No, much less. It's nominal, so it'd be like another component inside a display?  Ori Mor: Yes.  Does the system also radiate WiFi?  Ori Mor: Yes, the communication with the display is over WiFi, over 3G. So with the end customers, it depends but they can run the content through a CMS on their own, independently. So in theory would a company that makes WiFi equipment, like routers and so on, could they conceivably add your capability into their product line?  So if I'm a company that makes networking equipment, like Cisco or more B2C stuff, could they add Wi charge capability to their WiFi routers? Ori Mor: Yes, but I'll explain how. These companies are used to creating infrastructure and delivering connectivity. They can do the same for power, power as a service, not just data as a service. The only difference is that transmitters should be located most of the time on ceilings rather than hidden in the closet, that's the difference, and now the 5G routers are on ceilings for the exact same reason. They are almost in the line of sight.  You mentioned metering. With the energy issues that Europe's facing right now because of Russia, there's a lot of concern around energy consumption, and I wonder whether we're gonna get to a stage where power would be metered for this sort of thing. Ori Mor: Let me answer this in two ways. Since it's a service, it can be metered. It's an extension of the electricity grid and the same as you paying for watt/hour for electricity, you probably would be paying a watt/hour for wireless electricity, so it's only a natural extension. Regarding power in general and sustainability. What we also discovered is that a single transmitter that we are now shipping saves up to 5000 AA batteries and that's even on our first gen only. So it's probably your and my body weight in batteries saved by each transmitter that we deploy.  Is the transmitter always pushing out energy and therefore the meter's always going or is it more of a demand thing? Ori Mor: No, it's a demand thing. When there's no demand, it goes to sleep.  All right, interesting. That would be a lot more efficient.  What about distance? You mentioned 10 meters right now. Will that improve, just like the other things?  Ori Mor: We did a test for a government agency for 100 meters successfully. But then we decided that as a company we need to focus. It's either we do indoor for consumers or commercial, or we do outdoor for other types of devices and we chose the short-of-range options. So the technology can easily do a hundred meters or probably more, and there's actually a company that does that. This is their forte. We chose to focus on the inside.  Okay, but you could, in theory, have advertising displays on a sidewalk, and the same in drive-throughs, a lot of costs involved in trenching and everything else to get power out to the display? Ori Mor: Oh, there's actually a company that we work with that is considering using our solutions for care pickup and drive tools.  And there would be enough power cuz those are extra bright displays? Ori Mor: So for them, we are considering making animated e-ink displays. As I said the large displays with LCDs or OLEDs are out of our range at the moment. So if people wanna know more about Wi Charge, where do they go?  Ori Mor: Website and LinkedIn.  It's www.wi-charge.com Ori Mor: Yes.  Perfect. All right, Ori, thank you very much for spending some time with me. Ori Mor: Thank you, Dave. I enjoyed it.

Follow the White Rabbit
Open Source Democracy and Building a Decentralized Web with Evan Miyazono

Follow the White Rabbit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 50:07


This week host Derek E. Silva joins Evan Miyazono, Team Lead for Research at Protocol Labs, an open-source R&D lab that builds protocols, tools, and services to radically improve the internet. Dive in as we explore the blockchain dichotomy,, how IPFS powers the distributed web, defending digital democracy, and building the next generation of the Internet.

The Dr. Axe Show
143. How Microbiome Levels Affect Your Overall Health with Kiran Krishman

The Dr. Axe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 46:45 Very Popular


Kiran Krishnan is a Research Microbiologist and has been involved in the dietary supplementand nutrition market for the past 18 years. He comes from a University research backgroundhaving spent several years with hands-on R&D in the fields of molecular medicine andmicrobiology at the University of Iowa. Kiran established a Clinical Research Organization where he designed and conducted dozens of human clinical trials in human nutrition. Kiran is also a co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer at Microbiome Labs. He is currently involved in 16 novel human clinical trials on probiotics and the human microbiome. Kiran is also on the Scientific Advisory Board or a Science Advisor for 7 other companies in the industry.In this episode, we sit down with Dr. Kiran to discuss how nutritional health affect your microbiome and how your microbiome levels affect your overall health.

Futurized
Deep Tech in Abu Dhabi

Futurized

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 49:38


In this episode of the podcast, the topic is: Deep Tech in Abu Dhabi. Our guest is Ray O. Johnson, CEO of the Technology Innovation Institute. In this conversation, they talk about the transition from a petroleum based economy to a high tech economy. If you're new to the show, seek particular topics, or you are looking for a great way to tell your friends about the show, which we always appreciate, we've got the episode categories. Those are at Futurized.org/episodes. They are collections of your favorite episodes organized by topic, such as Entrepreneurship, Trends, Emerging Tech, or The Future of Work. That'll help new listeners get a taste of everything that we do here, starting with a topic they are familiar with, or want to go deeper in. The host of this podcast, Trond Arne Undheim, Ph.D is the co-author with Natan Linder of Augmented Lean published by Wiley in 2022, author of Health Tech: Rebooting Society's Software, Hardware and Mindset--published by Routledge in 2021, Future Tech: How to Capture Value from Disruptive industry Trends--published by Kogan Page in 2021, Pandemic Aftermath: how Coronavirus changes Global Society and Disruption Games: How to Thrive on Serial Failure (2020)--both published by Atmosphere Press in 2020, Leadership From Below: How the Internet Generation Redefines the Workplace by Lulu Press in 2008. For an overview, go to Trond's Books at Trondundheim.com/books At this stage, Futurized is lucky enough to have several sponsors. To check them out, go to Sponsors | Futurized - thoughts on our emerging future. If you are interested in sponsoring the podcast, or to get an overview of other services provided by the host of this podcast, including how to book him for keynote speeches, please go to Store | Futurized - thoughts on our emerging future. We will consider all brands that have a demonstrably positive contribution to the future. Before you do anything else, make sure you are subscribed to our newsletter on Futurized.org, where you can find hundreds of episodes of conversations that matter to the future. I hope you can also leave a positive review on iTunes or in your favorite podcast player--it really matters to the future of this podcast.   Trond's takeaway Transitioning a state's economy from one paradigm to another is not an easy task, and it always takes years. Investing in R&D is a key part of the transition. The hard part is not just to make the technology breakthroughs, but to create the innovations that must follow in new business models, and complete with upskilling local talent to be employed in the new reality. To be part of such a change is exciting and it is a leap of faith. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 61, The emergent Arabian startup scene. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or other episodes. If so, do let us know by messaging us, we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. Futurized is created in association with Yegii, the insight network. Yegii lets clients create multidisciplinary dream teams consisting of a subject matter experts, academics, consultants, data scientists, and generalists as team leaders. Yegii's services include speeches, briefings, seminars, reports and ongoing monitoring. You can find Yegii at Yegii.org. The Futurized team consists of podcast host and sound technician Trond Arne Undheim, videographer Raul Edward D'Trewethan, and podcast marketer Nahin Israfil Hossain. Please share this show with those you care about. To find us on social media is easy, we are Futurized on LinkedIn and YouTube and Futurized2 on Instagram and Twitter: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/futurized2/ Twitter (@Futurized2): https://twitter.com/Futurized2 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Futurized-102998138625787 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/futurized YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/Futurized Podcast RSS: https://feed.podbean.com/www.futurized.co/feed.xml See you next time. Futurized—conversations that matter.  

The Cryptoshow - blockchain, cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin and decentralization simply explained
#370 CPI Numbers, Ethereum Merge and the new Earn Product

The Cryptoshow - blockchain, cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin and decentralization simply explained

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 53:25


Bitcoin and S&P 500 continue to rise, markets are waiting for Inflation data (CPI) to come in later today. The Ethereum Hardfork is scheduled to take place in two days, the FED is deciding on future guidance the 20th of September and of course a deep-dive into Cake's new Earn Product. This and much more in our weekly episode. Stick around until the end, both Julian and Fabio share a bit of their outlook and thoughts on the market. - Main Updates: Earn: https://app.cakedefi.com/earn Screenshot Earn - Cake Updates: Cointelegraph: https://twitter.com/Cointelegraph/status/1568622853536497664 ETH Staking: https://twitter.com/cakedefi/status/1568950492365045762 0% for borrowing: https://twitter.com/cakedefi/status/1568154758061465600 R&D 50mil USD: https://www.theedgesingapore.com/news/cryptocurrency/cake-defi-launch-crypto-robo-advisory-service-2023-committing-us50-mil-rd Company Growth: https://twitter.com/julianhosp/status/1569613214366990336 Screenshot Holiday Winner Screenshot Push Notification - CPI: Screenshot Inflation Screenshot DXY Screenshot FED Meeting - Market Update: Screenshot Julian Market Overview Markets: https://www.coingecko.com/ Bitcoin: https://www.binance.com/en/trade/BTC_USDT?layout=pro&theme=dark&type=spot Screenshot Market Drawdown Screenshot Bitcoin Cycle Screenshot Bitcoin September Screenshot Mt Gox 1 Screenshot Mt Gox 2 Screenshot Bitcoin Dominance Ethereum Merge: https://www.google.com/search?q=ethereum+merge ---------------  ► Get cash flow on your cryptocurrencies: https://www.cakedefi.com ► Buy Bitcoin & Ethereum here: https://www.cakedefi.com ► Buy DeFiChain here: https://www.coingecko.com/en/coins/defichain#markets ---------------  How to buy Bitcoin in 5 easy steps (safest method!): https://julianhosp.com/bitcoininfivesteps ---------------  QUIZ: What type of crypto investor are you? Take the free quiz and find out! https://julianhosp.com/quiz ---------------  Share this episode and let us make the world more than #cryptofit together :) Feedback to my show:  http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1323952161 Read this book with all the lessons I have ever learned in life: http://geni.us/25stories Wanna get started in crypto? Here are 5 easy steps to get going: https://julianhosp.com/bitcoininfivesteps/ ---------------  #CRYPTO: ► Buy #Bitcoin with best price here: http://bit.ly/exchange_promo * ► Use this Hardwallet: http://www.julianhosp.com/hardwallet  * ► Use this exchange for Altcoins: https://www.binance.com/?ref=11272739  * ► The best book to understand #blockchain, #cryptocurrencies and #Bitcoin: https://geni.us/crypto_simple * ► The best book to understand all the blockchain applications beyond Bitcoin: https://geni.us/blockchain_simple * ► Get cashflow from cryptocurrencies with this platform for free: https://www.cakedefi.com ---------------  ► Join our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/cryptofit ► Podcast I-Tunes: http://bit.ly/cryptoshow-podcast ► Podcast Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3FUQW20dA0ObJ4l9SVEFHP?si=-pDzvYD_RmCnU2-hBpjoXw ► My website: http://www.julianhosp.com ► #cryptofit Shop: https://shop.spreadshirt.de/cryptofit ---------------- ► Follow me here and stay in touch: Twitter: https://twitter.com/julianhosp Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/julianhosp/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/julianhosp/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/julianhosp/ Xing: https://www.xing.com/profile/Julian_Hosp/ ---------------- The links marked with an asterisk (*) are so-called commission links. If you click on such a link and buy via this link, I get a commission from your purchase. The price does not change for you.This is not an investment advice. As with every investment, your capital is at risk and the return is not guaranteed. Before you decide on an investment, please read our risk statement or contact a financial advisor.

KPMG Tax Now
Value of data in Research and Development Tax strategies

KPMG Tax Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 15:05


Georgia King-Siem, Amanda Tirtadinata and Matthew Osborn explore the areas of data that may help you make better decisions when it comes to your research and development (R&D) strategy, and within that more specifically, your R&D Tax claim strategy.

Capstan Live Podcast
R&D Credits Then and Now: What the Inflation Reduction Act Means for You

Capstan Live Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 35:26


The R&D Tax Credit has come a long way, baby! Join Capstan Regional Director Jacob Wood as he traces the evolution of the Credit from its humble origin to the amplified and expansive Credit we enjoy today. Jacob will touch on the implications of all relevant legislation and will share the actionable info you need to take advantage of the Inflation Reduction Act's new R&D provisions.

People Always, Patients Sometimes
Innovate In What You Do!

People Always, Patients Sometimes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 17:31


On this episode of People Always, Patients Sometimes we welcome Michelle Shogren back to the podcast. Hi, I'm Tom Rhoads, CEO of Spencer Health Solutions. We recently spoke to Michelle Shogren, a familiar face in the clinical trials industry, most recently at Bayer Pharmaceuticals. She recently left Bayer to form her own consulting firm called Innovate In What You Do! Michelle is parlaying her 25 years of experience fostering teams and developing an innovation mindset into her consultancy. Michelle and our host, Janet Kennedy, have a lively conversation about innovation, which I know you'll enjoy on this episode of People Always, Patients Sometimes.   Janet Kennedy: (00:47) Hi, I'm Janet Kennedy and I'm a member of the Spencer Health Solutions team. It's always a pleasure to talk to Michelle Shogren on People Always, Patients Sometimes. We spoke to Michelle recently on an episode about innovation in clinical trials and the pharmaceutical industry. Today, we're gonna be talking about Michelle's new company Innovate In What You Do! Welcome back to the podcast, Michelle.   Michelle Shogren: (01:11) Hi, Janet. Thanks for having me back again.   Janet Kennedy: (01:13) I am so excited about your new company, but for those folks who might have jumped into this episode and hadn't heard the previous one, do you mind setting the stage a little bit and telling us a little bit about your background?   Michelle Shogren: (01:25) Sure, happy to do that. So I've been in the clinical trial space now for about 25 years in different roles of patient caregiver study coordinator, site, director, marketing director on that side of the fence. Then I jumped over into the CRO world as a monitor and on to pharma to be a monitor, country lead monitor, study lead monitor, and eventually working in process excellence, and then starting an innovation function. The innovation function I created in 2015 with a team of six people who were working on something called fostering innovation. And we were trying to prove innovation made sense in R&D other than coming up with just the molecule. We were able to successfully launch that and grow it over the seven year period to a point where they said, "You know what, you're doing so much now, and it's so impactful for clinical development and operations; let's move you up to strategy portfolio and operations, and you can support all of pharma R&D," which included 11 functions now, instead of just one. So obviously we were doing something right along the way, and now I've had a chance to leave Bayer and focus on some family and some health needs. And I decided what a better time to start my own company to try to help even more people and stay close to the patients.   Janet Kennedy: (02:44) All right. So I guess we're gonna start with a challenge. It's very comfortable, sometimes working for a very big organization with a lot of structure and benefits and support, and you've gone 180 degrees and you are now a self-employed entrepreneur. I understand that through work in innovation, you have to think like an entrepreneur in a big company. Do you think that that's laid the groundwork for your decision to start your company?   Michelle Shogren: (03:12) I think it definitely made it easier for me. It's also something that I've been considering and thinking about for a few years and had planned as a later in life activity anyways. So when the catalyst of change came, I thought, "You know what? We can just go ahead and advance it and make it faster." But you're right. It's a little scary   Janet Kennedy: (03:31) Well, there are a lot of folks out there to support you. That's the one thing that I would share with you; I did come from an entrepreneurial background, was very involved in startup weekends and innovation programs. And it is the most collegial group I have ever run into. Everybody wants you to succeed and they're all there to support. So I think even though you are pretty fresh on the entrepreneurial track, you will find that the network is there to support you. So there's a little bit of encouragement for you going forward.   Michelle Shogren: (04:03) Thanks, Janet. I needed that today.   Janet Kennedy: (04:06) Well, tell me about the company itself, Innovate In What You Do! Why call it that and what is it all about?   Michelle Shogren: (04:13) Well, you know, it's actually, it was a phrase that our corporate innovation had thrown out one time in a presentation and had used it a couple different times. And I said, "You know what? I love this phrase because of the fact, it doesn't ask you to do innovation." It says, "You know what? You can innovate in the things that you do on a regular basis." And that is my philosophy going forward. Why innovate in some other space? You wanna innovate in what you do. And it was all around the fact that how can we be better at our day to day activities, and how can we make a difference for people out there? I have a near and dear passion of patients. So of course, if I can use these powers for good of helping patients in particular, that would be great, but I really just have a purpose within me to help others. And I think innovating what you do can do that.   Janet Kennedy: (05:04) Now. I sense that this is not a quick decision that you made and that this is something you actually have experience doing. So tell me how the actual services that you would consider providing in your new business relate to the work that you did at Bayer.   Michelle Shogren: (05:21) So I have been consulting in some form or fashion for years and years and years, usually just pro bono, trying to help people out and give them encouragement or some direction when they were misguided. Either startup companies, tech companies, different solution providers would come to us and I would say, "Hey, what do you think about this or that," in order to help them figure out, how do they fit into this world of pharma? How do they communicate better? And how do they think about their users at all the steps of the way? A lot of times when we think end users, we think patients, but there's study teams, there's sites. There's so many different pieces that all have to come together to make it work. So one portion of in innovating, what you do is around innovation consulting and trying to help those same people going forward.   Michelle Shogren: (06:06) So maybe it's a pharma company trying to create an innovation function like I did, or maybe it is somebody who has an innovation function and they're struggling with taking those ideas that they have, and actually getting them to incubate and moving them on to implementation. But it could also be other sectors in the same environment or ecosystem that we sit in. So other solution providers, tech companies, startup companies, things of that nature, but it can also be innovating in your leadership style because that's another big piece that people need help with. And that goes back into innovating what you do.   Janet Kennedy: (06:42) All right. So let's go break this down a little bit and I'm gonna get myself some free consulting here. So here's our scenario A - it is a company that really never had anybody with a title of innovation; they were just a traditional company doing the traditional things, but they recognized that maybe their process was a little stale or that they were doing business as usual so much that business was maybe even declining or productivity was declining. That's a pretty big task to come in as an outsider and try to shift that. So how would you go about it?   Michelle Shogren: (07:15) It depends on what their main problem or what they think their problem is. Sometimes they don't even know. And that's where we have the first stage of Innovate In What You Do! So I call it my 'two eyes wide' approach. Cause if you look at the abbreviation for Innovate In What You Do!, it's I.I. - two eyes - and then W Y D - which also sounds like wide. So with this approach, we always have to make sure we know the problem itself and there's different innovation techniques that we can do to ensure that we are thinking about this all the way around. And we really do understand what the problem is. If they have that figured out, then we look to see, okay, well, what are your ideas that you have to fix it? Sometimes they have ideas and they just don't know what to do with it. And I can help them with that other times, they're like, you know what?   Michelle Shogren: (08:00) We just know the problem. And we've been kind of trying to come up with ideas for a long time and not have a much success. So in those cases, I can help with innovation workshops, design sprints, things like that, using my knowledge of seven different innovation methods, as well as facilitation methods that allow them to focus on the content and not how to get to a solution or a resolution. If they have the ideas and they need to figure out how do I incubate them for success? A lot of people approach things like regular projects, just typical project management. This doesn't work for innovation. You actually need to know how to do innovation project management, which is an advanced form of project management. It allows you to do iterations and pivots where a standard project management doesn't even know what to do in those situations.   Michelle Shogren: (08:46) And it also has a huge focus on the user. And how do you bring their voice in early? And how are you testing along the way to make sure you're on the right path and set up for success and building champions within the people that you're gonna have to end up selling this to later on. And if they have an idea of how to do that, and they've gone through everything, but now they're struggling to actually implement it. They've proven in a proof of concept. It makes sense. It totally has the benefits that are there and it's doable, but they're just failing at how to get that implemented either at their company, or maybe they're trying to sell something to another company. That's another piece that we can help as well to try to figure out, okay, why is this a problem? What do you need for a good pitch? Do you have all the data that's necessary? Are you prepared for the questions they're gonna ask? And then what are the tips and tricks that I can share from all the years of experience of being able to be proactive instead of reactive in this environment.   Janet Kennedy: (09:43) So let's go back to the companies that maybe accept the idea that they need to be innovating or they're attempting innovation, but it really isn't getting off the launchpad. A lot of the problem is most employees feel like I'm already busy. Now I'm already overwhelmed. I can't get my regular work done. And now I need to go into a workshop and we're gonna brainstorm some stuff, but I'm gonna go back to my regular job after that. How do you get people on board and then how do you make them or encourage accountability once you've finished a workshop?   Michelle Shogren: (10:15) Great question Janet. Many times when we find the situation, I can simply ask them, "Oh, well, how long have you been working on this topic?" And most of the time, it's not a brand new topic. It's something they've been struggling with. And they say, "Oh, we've been working on this for months already." I'm like, "Oh, okay. Well, how many ideas did you come up with in those meetings over the last couple of months?" "Oh, well we had a few, but you know, um, nothing really seemed to land well," is usually what they say. And I said, "Oh, well, can you show me the list of ideas?" "Oh, well, we don't really document them. We just talk about them." And that's big problem. Number one is that they've obviously spent a lot of time on it. And if I could have a workshop with them for two to three hours, bring all the right people together, ensure that the process was followed.   Michelle Shogren: (11:03) I provide the time constraints that are necessary to keep from overthinking or chasing rabbits down holes we don't need to do. And I ensure there's documentation of all of the ideas and the concepts that come out of it. Now I've given to them what they've tried to do for the last three to six months, possibly in two to three hours. And if you add an extra hour onto that, I can give you your next step session, where we talk about jobs to be done. What are the first next steps? Because sometimes people think, "Oh gosh, there's so much to be done." And they look at the end, result, that's out there and they get overwhelmed, kind of like me in housework. So this way I can say, "Hey, what's just the first next step to get this moving in the right direction. Who's gonna be responsible for it? And when do you think it's realistic to get this step done?" And I'll help them map that through in order to be able to ensure life after the workshop actually yields results. And you can bolt on a consulting subscription to it afterwards to help make sure they're driving in that direction and see how they're going along the way and where do they need help. And sometimes you just need someone to push you. You just need that meeting on the calendar to make sure stuff's getting done.   Janet Kennedy: (12:09) Even if it is the day before the meeting.   Michelle Shogren: (12:12) Exactly. And many times it is, but Hey, at least it got done.   Janet Kennedy: (12:16) So innovation also sounds hugely expensive. When you talk to companies, are you telling them that there's no reason meeting if you haven't set aside some budget to support the ideas that will come out of this?   Michelle Shogren: (12:30) No, actually I don't because you know, back in my previous life, when I was right out of school and going into college, I sold Kirby vacuum cleaners, and these were vacuum cleaners that cost about $1,400 to purchase. And I was selling them in rural south Texas, where people made that in the entire month of work. And I found a way to be the top salesperson, even though budget constraints were definitely an issue because if there's enough value there, if there's enough shown benefits, if you do your job well enough in researching and testing things, to have data driven decisions, they'll find a way to find the money.   Janet Kennedy: (13:07) Oh, that's an excellent point. So I'm now picturing you going to door selling vacuums, and I love this idea in my head. And that brings me to my next question is: a great percentage of your experience has been in pharmaceutical industries, but everybody needs to innovate. So do you feel like the processes that you've set up, the programs that you're going to be offering, that they are applicable to any industry?   Michelle Shogren: (13:32) Absolutely. I think that the innovation piece of it provides the framework to be able to be applied to any place. And I've actually helped my friends in different industries innovate in what they do just as a friend. So I've helped a day spa figure out how do they retain their people that are working there, their employees, after they get trained, because they were all jumping ship. I've had a funeral home that was trying to figure out how do they have advertising in a situation like that that was quite difficult. So you can, you can apply it in any kind of area. One of the things though that I think sets me apart is the fact that I do have all the experience in all the different roles along the life cycle of a clinical trial. And that's one reason why I'm predominantly positioning myself within this area still, cause that's really where my passion lies. However, my daughter Ren, who is 26, she has come on as a creative director for my company and she has different backgrounds. She has actually worked for bayer as well for a year, as well as other medical companies. And she's also done some really interesting, crazy things with auto dealerships and marketing companies and emergency response companies. So she's seen a lot of other things and she's gonna be able and available to help in some other sectors as well, doing some of the similar things.   Janet Kennedy: (14:58) Well, that was going to be my next question, which is, there is no way you could do this on your own, so how are you building out your community? Do you see this aside from your very talented daughter, do you see this as something that is trainable and replicable so that you could have additional folks leading a workshop for instance?   Michelle Shogren: (15:18) Absolutely. And I already have some people that have reached out to me and were interested in helping and coming to work for me, which is really exciting. I need to have the amount of work first for me to bring them on, but I have several that have experience with innovation, possibly even with me in the past, so that I know their skill sets and their capabilities. Because whenever you do a workshop, especially you need to have two people it's so much better. And I also wanna bring in some diversity and mix because I really believe we need diversity and inclusion in order to have impactful innovation. So that's another big piece. So I'm looking for people that could support also in different places around the world going forward, but I can't get too far ahead of myself. Let's see if this even takes off the ground first.   Janet Kennedy: (16:04) All right. Then one last question, and it's obviously self-serving because I believe the more podcasts the better, but I see on your website, you're thinking about launching a podcast. So what's your plan for that?   Michelle Shogren: (16:17) My thought was I could interview different thought leaders about some of the things that they did as far as innovation, but we could also have some podcasts of talking about what you can do in these situations where it's more of an interview situation. And we talk through what different tools could you do, some easy things you can apply in your day to day work and you can just listen to it and have it to take away with you. Some simple understanding the problem exercises or possibly innovating in under an hour, what you could do with your teams in a regular meeting, some of these key pieces to help them learn and grow and take away some valuable educational information.   Janet Kennedy: (16:56) Oh, I think that's incredibly exciting. Well, I wish you so much luck and success with your new company. I know we'll be talking to you and working with you going forward, but I guess break a leg and I hope it goes very, very well for you.   Michelle Shogren: (17:11) Thank you so much, Janet. I really appreciate you having me here today.   Janet Kennedy: (17:14) You've been listening to the People Always, Patients Sometimes podcast, today with our guest Michelle Shogren of Innovate In What You Do!

web3 with a16z
Ethereum, Merge and Beyond

web3 with a16z

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 100:08 Very Popular


with @timbeiko @tim_roughgarden @alive_eth @smc90A deep dive on all things Ethereum, which this week makes the big move to Proof of Stake in The Merge. So in this long and wide-ranging conversation with Tim Beiko -- who runs the core devs calls and Protocol Support for Ethereum Foundation -- a16z crypto head of research (Tim Roughgarden), general partner (Ali Yahya), and editor in chief (Sonal Chokshi) cover:how Ethereum got here today -- and the co-evolution of the protocol and the community;what went into The Merge -- both technical and the social processes behind the outcomes;  what changes, what doesn't;top of mind tech trends such as rollups, data availability, EVMs, and more (as well as hot topics including proposer-builder separation and others);views on token governancethe nature of distributed collaboration especially between R&D...but it's really a conversation about how innovation happens, in a decentralized way.  And what does that mean for community involvement, who participates, and how more people can participate in web3? In case you missed it, check out last week's episode for an overview of proof of stake blockchains.As a reminder, none of the following is investment, business, legal, or tax advice; please see a16z.com/disclosures for more important information, including a link to a list of our investments. "web3 with a16z" is a show about building the next generation of the internet from the team at a16z crypto; this show is for anyone seeking to understand, and go deeper, on all things crypto and web3. 

Enchanted Ears Podcast: Anything & Everything Disney
How the World's Fair Changed the Theme Park Industry

Enchanted Ears Podcast: Anything & Everything Disney

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 49:57


Hello and welcome to the Enchanted Ears Podcast, where we discuss anything and everything Disney. Before we jump into the main topic, it's time for a little Disney News! Oogie Boogie Bash does it again. Daisy, Clara Belle and Minnie as the Sanderson sisters is unbelievable. Not to mention Agatha and Ernesto in the parks makes us Disney Worlders (is that a thing?) jealous.  Rumor that Disneyland Paris is scrapping Galaxy's Edge in favor of Pandora or The Lion King.  We've talked about it briefly before, but it's finally time to fully dedicate an episode to the 1964-1965 World's Fair.  Or Not-World Fair as you'll come to find out.  And if you don't really have the world at the “World Fair,” who do you have? Companies.  And if you're a company who needs a creative mind known for great showmanship who do you need? Well if you said anyone other than Walt Disney here, you may be listening to the wrong podcast!  Find out how Walt made the whole showcase a success and got lots of R&D paid for on Pepsi, Ford, and other companies' dime.  As always, thank you so much for listening! Don't forget to check us out on Facebook and Youtube or submit a question/topic for us to discuss on a future episode or support us on Patreon. Have a magical week!

What's Your Forte?
Sarah Hagan on Artist Relations, Networking and Missing Live Music | Episode 33

What's Your Forte?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 20:53


What's Your Forte returns after a one-week break! This week's guest is  Sarah Hagan, a music industry consultant and artists relations expert  with 20 years of experience. She talks about her career, the joy of live  music returning and gives advice on how to break into the industry. Sarah started drumming at ten years old and began teaching drum lessons  at the age of sixteen, continuing over the years as a way to fund her  way through college. She completed a double-major in English and  Criminal Justice, and was on her way to law school for an Entertainment  Law degree when she was offered her first job in the music business.  Sarah spent sixteen years at the Zildjian Company in the Artist  Relations department, and also on the R&D team and product  development teams, ending her time there as Director of Artist Relations  for Zildjian and Vic Firth. Currently, Sarah hosts a music industry podcast called Sarah Hagan  Backstage, holds the position of First Vice President and Treasurer for  the Percussive Arts Society Executive Board, and is on the Board of  Directors for Hit Like A Girl. Through her business, Sarah Hagan Media  and Consulting, she provides marketing and artist relations consulting  for multiple music industry brands including Gruv-X Percussion and  Musora Media, who own Drumeo and Pianote.

Lithium-ion Rocks!
E56: Spodumene Software. Pilbara's Dale Henderson

Lithium-ion Rocks!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 37:27


Pilbara's new Managing Director Dale Henderson discusses record cash generation, path to 1M ton spoduemene production, POSCO hydroxide JV, Calix midstream R&D project as well as broader market (supply, demand and price) and corporate strategy (M&A vs. dividends/buybacks) #Lithium #Tesla #electricvehicles  Video Index 0:00 - 1:25 Introduction 1:26 - 11:15 Q&A with Rodney - There's lots of cash sitting in the treasury, is this earmarked for spending, or will Pilbara become a dividend paying company? Historically selling spodumene to China was the only game in town; in your mind, is that changing? Pilbara is partnering with Calix in the midstream space - is this venture something that could become a meaningful line item for the company? What are the products available from this stream, and what are the benefits of going this route? The current difficulties around securing labour in WA - is that a short-term issue that will resolve itself over time? The BMX auction platform has been a huge success - will Pilbara expand sales volumes using this method? 11:16 - 22:25 Q&A with Howard - How much "free" tonnage does Pilbara have to sell on the BMX auction platform? What strategy maximizes value for shareholders? When you think of your relationship with Posco, do you look at the operating margin in a similar way that Mineral Resources does with its arrangement with Ganfeng?  22:26 - 24:57 Q&A with Rodney - It looks as if spodumene concentrate grades are drifting downwards closer to 5.5%, is that the new 6% or will grades climb upward in the future? The only way RK Equity sees prices falling is if undisciplined tonnage comes online. Do you see any risk of that happening? 24:58 - Q&A with Howard - How does Pilbara view potential M&A? Have you thought about shipping ore from WA to Europe or the USA? Pilbara's thoughts on long-term prices and reflections on the markets. Is there a takeover risk? 37:20 - End Please join us on Patreon at www.patreon.com/lithiumionrocks Please subscribe here on YouTube to Rock Stock Channel to ensure full access to all our free content. And click the 'like' button and comment so we can improve our content going forward. Please register your email at www.rkequity.com  Follow Rodney and Howard on Twitter (@lithiumionbull @lithiumionrocks @RodneyHooper13) and on LinkedIn.  ----- DISCLAIMER NOT INVESTMENT ADVICE. DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH Welcome to Rock Stock Channel. Today we start a new series of individual short videos on raw materials companies that we think should benefit from the rising demand from electric vehicles, energy storage and other clean energy technologies. No payment has been paid in connection with the preparation of  this video and all Rodney's comments and research are his own independent opinions. Rodney and Howard are not financial advisors nor broker dealers, this video is for information purposes only and should not be considered investment or financial advice. Please do your own independent research and read the disclaimer at the end of the video or on RK Equity's website www.rkequity.com Intro and outro audio credit: Jamie Klein

Software Lifecycle Stories
Building respectful relationships with Ramesh Rajagopal

Software Lifecycle Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 29:56


We continue our conversation with Ramesh Rajagopal, a coach at PM Power Consulting. In the first part he shared his origin story and also experiences of his childhood and career. In this episode, he continues to share more details about Leveraging his lean manufacturing experience to get into Agile approaches and becoming an Agile evangelistWorking in a company wide transformation planning processBeing summoned to the office one day,early morning - to be told that his position being made redundant, just a few months before a planned retirementThe support he got from his wifeGetting an opportunity to work in MalaysiaBecoming a trainer and exploring certification opportunities - such as SPC when he was 63The transferable skills from his manufacturing career that he was able to use in IT as wellImportance of communication and the need to relate to the people one interacts with.The importance of respecting dignity of every person and understanding their value systemsTeamwork and giving credit wherever it is dueBeing a continuous learnerBeing a listener 90% of the time while interacting with othersHow to become a better influencer to ensure results, by maintaining a respectful relationship and not limit interactions to only transactionsUnderstanding the aspirations and motivations of individuals first before helpingHis personal practices to develop empathy as a person based onThe Sahaja Marg or heartfulness approachHis career advice and tips for persons who want to get into IT from other domainsHe started my career as an R&D engineer at the Engineering Research Centre at Tata Motors (TELCO) in 1981, then he joined L& T during 1984, initially as a Design Engineer for Earthmoving machines. Later, he moved into Manufacturing Planning. He joined GE India Technology Center during end 2000, as a Project Manager-Delivery and stayed with the organization as it later changed hands to become GXS and OpenText. He also worked as a consultant for the Agile Transformation group for 4 years at Standard Chartered Bank, Kuala Lumpur helping teams and teams of teams to adopt to the new ways of working – from Technology teams, Retail Teams to Data and Privacy teams.With over four decades of experience which includes over 20+ years in software Product development, Delivery, Quality and several years in manufacturing domains of Automobile and Earth moving equipment, mow a Principal consultant at PM Power, part of Agile Transformation and DevOps Service lines.

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Cause Exploration Prizes: Announcing our prizes by ChrisSmith

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 3:56


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Cause Exploration Prizes: Announcing our prizes, published by ChrisSmith on September 9, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. We were gratified to receive over 150 good-faith submissions to Open Philanthropy's Cause Exploration Prizes, where we invited people to suggest a new area for us to support or respond to our suggested questions. We hoped that these submissions would help us find new ways to carry out our mission — helping others as much as possible with the resources available to us. You can read them on the EA Forum. Below, we highlight the submissions to which we are awarding major prizes and honorable mentions. We're awarding these prizes to entries that we thought engaged well with our prompts and helped us to better understand the questions and issues they addressed. We have not investigated each and every claim made in these entries, and the awarding of a prize does not imply that we necessarily endorse their claims or arguments as correct. Our top prize We are awarding our top prize ($25,000) to: Organophosphate pesticides and other neurotoxicants by Ben Stewart. Second prizes We are awarding three second-place prizes ($15,000) for the following submissions. These are listed in no particular order. Violence against women and girls by Akhil Sickle Cell Disease by anonymous Shareholder activism by sbehmer Honorable mentions We are awarding $500 to the authors of the following entries. These are listed in no particular order. Expanding access to infertility services in Low- and Middle-Income Countries by Soleine Scotney Maternal morbidity by alexhill Farmed Animal Welfare in Sub-Saharan Africa by anonymous Indoor Air Quality to Reduce Infectious Respiratory Disease by Gavriel Kleinwaks, Alastair Fraser-Urquhart, and joshcmorrison To WELLBY or not to WELLBY? Measuring non-health, non-pecuniary benefits using subjective wellbeing by JoelMcGuire, Samuel Dupret, and MichaelPlant Tobacco harm reduction by kristof Climate adaptation in low-income countries by Karthik Tadepalli Social and behavioral science R&D by Anna Harvey and Stuart Buck Family Planning: A Significant Opportunity for Impact by Sarah H and Ben Williamson Improving diagnosis and treatment of bipolar spectrum disorders by Karolina Soltys War between the US and China: A case study for epistemic challenges around China-related catastrophic risk by Jordan_Schneider and pradyusp Improved quality control in science by Sophie Schauman More animal advocacy R&D by anonymous Adapting to Extreme Heat Exposure in South Asia by Surbhi B Rich to Poor Country Spillovers by anonymous Large-scale International Educational Migration: A shallow investigation by Jasmin Baier, Johannes Haushofer, and Hannah Lea Shaw Training health workers to prevent newborn deaths by Marshall Developmental Cognitive Neuroepidemiology by Hauke Hillebrandt Differential Neurotechnology Development by mwcvitkovic Short sleeper genes by JohnBoyle We are contacting all prize recipients by email. Good-faith submissions Next week we will begin the process of emailing everyone who submitted a good-faith submission in order to offer them participation awards of $200. Future plans As we stated in our announcement, this was a trial process for us. We're grateful to those who sent us feedback and suggestions for how to improve. At this stage, we don't know if or when we will repeat a process like this. We might write a public update later this year on what we have learned from this exercise and any plans to repeat this or a similar exercise again. Thank you We are grateful to Lizka and the other operators of the EA Forum, and to everyone who engaged with or submitted an entry to the Cause Exploration Prizes for making this possible. Thanks for listening. To help us out with The Nonlinear Library or to learn more, please visit nonlinear.org.