Podcasts about Hardin

  • 738PODCASTS
  • 2,265EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 10, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Hardin

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Latest podcast episodes about Hardin

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
The Greatest Lesson From A 100-Year-Old Boss

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 40:00


In this episode, Hardin pays tribute to godmother and honorary Centenarian, Luverta "Mama Lu" Smith. #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene
2202: Drew Hardin

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:37


Drew Hardin started working in automotive journalism while in college and he joined Petersen Publishing in 1986 as a staff editor for 4-Wheel & Off-Road magazine. His latest book is titled HOT ROD Magazine: The Definitive & Official 75 Years History published by Motorbooks. It is the officially licensed anniversary celebration of the world's longest continuously published and best-known automotive magazine ever.

Who Would Watch This?
Who Would Watch 'After Ever Happy'?

Who Would Watch This?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 72:27


It's time for the fourth film of the After series, listen as Oscar and Carl realise they are now some of the most knowledgeable people on the planet when it comes to this film series, they discuss what type of food should be at a funeral and if it's ok for Hardin to read his book in group therapy, as well as the ultimate question; Who would watch this?

HERBS (Herbs with Erin - Remedies for Body and Spirit)
Episode 53: Rewilding plant connection with guest Jesse Wolf Hardin

HERBS (Herbs with Erin - Remedies for Body and Spirit)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 50:37


This episode is with guest Jesse Wolf Hardin who shares with us the importance of being embodied in herbal wisdom; what rewilding is and the process for practicing it. Jesse also shares a bad habit that herbal healers and plants people tend to carry and a way through this challenge.

The God Culture
Nasaan Ang Hardin Ng Eden? Pilipinas? Solomon's Gold Series 12A sa Tagalog

The God Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 98:02


Nasaan Ang Hardin Ng Eden? Pilipinas? Solomon's Gold Series 12A sa Tagalog. The journey begins... More to come... Yah Bless. English Version: https://youtu.be/o9YiijJZiUI Now Available in Podcast Audio Format Internationally: https://www.thegodculture.com/podcast (Includes Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and many more platforms. Free on our website.) Alternative Video Platforms Now Available: Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/TheGodCulture Utreon: https://utreon.com/c/TheGodCulture Odessey: https://odysee.com/@TheGodCulture:c For Our Books in eBook (Free) or Print: The Search For King Solomon's Treasure, Ophir Philippines Coffee Table Book, The Book of Jubilees: The Torah Calendar, 2nd Esdras: The Hidden Book of Prophecy, REST: The Case For Sabbath, The First Book of Enoch: The Oldest Book In History: OphirInstitute.com (All Books. Links to Amazon and Shopee PH for your area.) 2Esdras.org BookOfJubilees.org RestSabbath.org LeviteBible.org FirstEnoch.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-God-Culture-Original-376627072897316 FB Alternatives: https://parler.com/user/TheGodCulture https://gab.com/TheGodCulture Website: thegodculture.com For the many that are having difficulty with YouTube working properly, here are Series' Playlists: Solomon's Gold Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4PhVocfJEi1oZRRj0AWnzx Answers In Jubilees Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi7bU2SrP84nw1EyRAqpQqsP Answers In 2nd Esdras Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6ULjeic8lJP63WRyOiW9yp Flood Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi7FQ7HiGJcODyJEoBP7-0Md Lost Tribes Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi7nzrJvNB4pKWG8gFOe9xDA Original Canon Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi5IdRs0Efb9L0oyVL3E9r1f Sabbath Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6Fd6BamniTVm5SsNi2mZPy RESOLVED: Doctrines of Men Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi49L5WkYemQh72yDwV0Ye7Y Feasts of YHWH Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4YXMnaHTYiJw-mDuBqvNtP The Name of God Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4xaPtUfKykVU0HbOZK-LeJ 100 Clues The Philippines Is Ophir: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi5gq1FV4RlgEAKP7WRCLca9 Find The Garden of Eden Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4KPuAcFq4Bx4A2l8dmcfxP Rivers from Eden Theory Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6Xt-ts2C1QVz-ZnAZxicWJ Revelation Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6WYQajRSk9iP5tc_Oi5k1j Prophetic Warning Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4jpVYhQ8s5Ad_bZN69nVVh When Was Jesus Born Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6nC0qdzNGBvSt8jK3xmIU5 Commandments of the New Testament Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi5jcicc67_G3Tc-C0pN0WJv All Tagalog Videos Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi7uDwFBB6Qn_DEl4FRu_Nwk All Spanish Narrated Videos Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi5EtdquviZxBfc8R-Chw3ijSupport the show

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
Were All About Self-Improvement

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 20:01 Transcription Available


In this episode, Hardin reinforces the importance of self-improvement. #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

The Oklahoma Breakdown with Ikard and Lehman
OU-Baylor Preview with David Smoak, Week 10 CFB Preview + Ws/Ls: NFL Trade Deadline, CFP Committee, Bryan Hardin & Brooklyn Nets

The Oklahoma Breakdown with Ikard and Lehman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 109:09


Gabe Ikard and Teddy Lehman bring you the latest news with OU football by giving some thoughts heading into OU vs. Baylor (2:32). They preview OU-Baylor with David Smoak (40:03).  In the “National College Football Roundup,” they preview Tennesse vs. Georgia, Alabama vs. LSU & Texas vs. Kansas State (59:10). Teddy and Gabe give their “Winners/Losers of the Week:” NFL trade deadline, CFP committee, OKC Thunder, Bryan Harsin, Steve Nash & the Brooklyn Nets (1:22:09).  ·Use promo code ‘ted' for 10% off at https://opolisclothing.com/ ·Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OK_Breakdown?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor ·Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ok_breakdown/?hl=en Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
Mind Your Conduct

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 28:03 Transcription Available


In this episode, Hardin explains the impact of self-conduct on your quality of life. #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Cleveland at Hardin Valley - Week 11 (10.28.22)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 135:11


Full Game Replay: Cleveland At Hardin Valley Academy - Week 11 (10.28.22) Tommy Sweat & Brian Rice had the call for this week's HVA Game. Cleveland defeated Hardin Valley 35-7. Aired on WOKI 98.7.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

DishWithDina
044. Dishing with Dasha Hardin, Business Owner, Air Force Veteran & Registered Dietitian

DishWithDina

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 51:09


TRIGGER/CONTENT WARNING: eating disorders, weight Dina and Dasha compare stories about growing up in different immigrant households, discuss venturing private practice, and their thresholds for spicy foods. At the time of this recording, Dasha Hardin was a dietetic intern with Keith & Associates Distance Dietetic Internship who wrapping up the last week of her internship, but she's since passed her national exam and is officially a Registered Dietitian! Dasha lives in Augusta, GA and works at a local hospital. She recently launched Broad Wellness, where she provides virtual and in-person nutrition counseling with an anti-diet, weight inclusive approach to help her clients peel back the layers of what nourishment means to them and re-navigate their relationship with food. Born in Ukraine, Dasha came to the United States at 7 years old and grew up exposed to a mix of different cuisines as a child. She can be found across most social media platforms as @wellnessisbroad. You can also check out Dasha's website at https://broadwellnessgroup.com/. Mentioned in this episode: Learn more about Intuitive Eating here. If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, leave a review, and share it with others! You can also submit listener feedback or request to be a guest on a future episode by completing this form: https://forms.gle/7UZ2kEPDHjBgLhRU9. Help support this podcast for as little as $0.99/month: https://anchor.fm/dishwithdina/support --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dishwithdina/support

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
The Only Toxic Person Love Can Fix Is You

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 16:23


In this episode, Hardin shares why your love is only responsible for healing you. #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

Monsters Who Murder: Serial Killer Confessions
S14E05 GRANT HARDIN PART 2

Monsters Who Murder: Serial Killer Confessions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 40:38


Part 2 of our profile on Grant Hardin as he undergoes police interrogation over an alleged shootingSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/monsters-who-murder-serial-killer-confessions. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Hardin Valley Academy At William Blount (10.21.22)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 147:41


Full Game Replay: Hardin Valley Academy At William Blount - Week 10 (10.21.22) Tommy Sweat & Brian Tatum had the call for this week's HVA Game. Hardin Valley defeated William Blount 42-25. Aired on WOKI 98.7.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Business Innovators Radio
Interview with James “Scott” Hardin President of Able Financial

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 22:33


James “Scott” Hardin owns Able Financial, Inc. (AFI) d/b/a It's A Better Way Mortgage.He has been in Colorado since 1985 attending Cherry Creek High School and UNC. He opened Able Financial, Inc as a mortgage brokerage in 1997. In 2003 AFI opened a second division that would grow lending institutions (Correspondent Branching Companies) throughout the US. They decided to expand AFI's reach in 2018 and have since entered 16 other states (AL,AZ,CA,CO,FL,GA,ID,MN,MS, NC, NM,OH, OR,SC,TN,TX,WA).Learn More: https://www.ablefinancialinc.com/Colorado Real Estate Leaders https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/colorado-real-estate-leaders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-james-scott-hardin-president-of-able-financial

How'd it Happen?
Tom Hardin - Right & Wrong (Episode 318)

How'd it Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 72:03


Tom Hardin previously spent much of his career as a financial analyst in the U.S. In 2008, as part of a cooperation agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice, Tom assisted the U.S. government in understanding how insider trading occurred in the financial services industry.Known as “Tipper X,” Tom became one of the most prolific informants in securities fraud history, helping to build over 20 of the 80+ individual criminal cases in “Operation Perfect Hedge,” a Wall Street house cleaning campaign that morphed into the largest insider trading investigation of a generation. As the youngest professional implicated in the sting, Tom was tasked with wearing a covert body wire on over 40 occasions to help the FBI bring down some of its biggest targets in the industry.In a reunion of sorts, Tom was invited by the FBI-NYC's office to speak to their rookie agents in 2016 and is now a global keynote speaker, corporate trainer and board advisor on behavioral ethics, compliance and organizational conduct and culture risk. Through rigorous self-examination, Tom took responsibility for his actions as a young professional, used the experience to transform his life and is now on an on-going journey into human behavior and why we sometimes make the wrong decision.Tom holds a B.S. in Economics from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Tom's riveting life story is the subject of his forthcoming book, The Inside Story of Tipper X.You won't want to miss this fascinating episode!To Learn More about Tom Hardin, please see the links below:Website: https://tipperx.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/iamtipperxLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tom-hardin-0952324/Twitter: https://twitter.com/iamtipperx Business email: tom@tipperx.comTo Connect with Mike:Website: https://mikemalatesta.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikemalatesta/Please LIKE

Monsters Who Murder: Serial Killer Confessions

An Ex-Police Chief is suspected of murder in cold blood. Can he beat the Detective trying to force out a confession?Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/monsters-who-murder-serial-killer-confessions. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

How'd It Happen Podcast
Tom Hardin - Right & Wrong (Episode 318)

How'd It Happen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 72:03


Connect With Me:Website: https://mikemalatesta.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikemalatesta/Instagram: @malatesta.mikeTwitter: @MikeMalatestaYou Tube: How'd it Happen PodcastCoaching: https://mikemalatesta.com/ownershift-coaching/...

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
My Evolution As A Businessman

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 21:50


In this episode, Hardin answers a question from the audience about how he has evolved as a businessman. #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

KLRNRadio
Richrd Hardin's GPWF: Prayer Can Really Cause God To Change! So Pray!

KLRNRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 125:42


Richard Hardin's: Prayer Can Change God Sometimes! So Pray! Amazon.com/Richard-A-Hardin/e/B09J2YHCVB, RAHardin, POBox 45684, OKC, OK 73145. **I will be sharing today about one of the confused topics that is being taught on false beliefs and misuse of the Scriptures, for God will actually change many times as a result of our prayers(talking to God). I will read many Scriptures that show God changed because of someone's prayers, and He even sometimes changed just in His Mercy. Our image of God is very serious because it determines how we choose to relate to God. The only way we can relate to God and be pleasing to Him is through His perfect Word to faith, Heb11:6---Faith only comes by hearing God's perfect Word without any changes by us in any way. We must hear, accept, and obey whatever is God's Pure Word for us to receive faith. Any change to God's Word and He will not back up what we are claiming, or speaking. We are ambassadors and must not change His message, His Word, in any way when we teach or confess His message, Proverbs 30:5-6, “Every Word of God is Pure: He is a shield unto them that put their trust in Him. (6) Add thou not unto His Words, lest He reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.” We are found to be liars if we add to or take away from His Pure Living Word, Christ, because God will not back up our word, only His Pure Word, Christ. ****Today, I am going to share with you that God will sometimes actually change things if you will only talk to Him with an honest, open mind and heart. I will share two areas in our lives that God has limited Himself to not know about us. If you listen in you will see that both areas are a very special blessing to us. I am going to give you the Scriptures and the only way to be pleasing to God is to accept the Scriptures by being open like Saul (who became the Apostle Paul) was when Jesus told him that he was wrong and was persecuting Jesus. Paul accepted and the first thing he said was, “Lord what would you have me to do.” Just because you have never heard of two areas in our lives that God doesn't know, if it is in the Scripture, you need to be open to believe and receive them into your heart to faith. I'm not telling you the Scriptures here because I want you to take the time to hear the Scriptures! Sat on @KLRNRadio.com or anytime on rahardin.com.

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Hardin Valley Academy at Maryville (10.14.22)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 108:27


Full Game Replay: Hardin Valley Academy At Maryville - Week 9 (10.14.22) Joel Silverburg & Tommy Sweat had the call for this week's HVA Game. Maryville defeated Hardin Valley 42-6. Aired on WOKI 98.7. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pump Fakes and Bad Takes Podcast
Hardin Valley Academy at Maryville (10.14.22)

Pump Fakes and Bad Takes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 108:27


Full Game Replay: Hardin Valley Academy At Maryville - Week 9 (10.14.22) Joel Silverburg & Tommy Sweat had the call for this week's HVA Game. Maryville defeated Hardin Valley 42-6. Aired on WOKI 98.7. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Hardin Valley Academy at Maryville (10.14.22)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 108:27


Full Game Replay: Hardin Valley Academy At Maryville - Week 9 (10.14.22) Joel Silverburg & Tommy Sweat had the call for this week's HVA Game. Maryville defeated Hardin Valley 42-6. Aired on WOKI 98.7. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Darren, Daunic and Chase
Hour 4: Elliotte Friedman, Matt Hardin (10-13-22)

Darren, Daunic and Chase

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 44:18


allmomdoes Podcast with Julie Lyles Carr
SEASONS: Career Seasons with Melinda Hardin

allmomdoes Podcast with Julie Lyles Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 33:32


She's a mom who's had a big corporate career, left to follow the dream of helping people with their fitness and wellness, and somehow ended up catching the eye of HGTV for an Airbnb she and her husband designed. Through it all, she's held onto God as she's navigated multiple careers and the road to sobriety.Melinda Hardin joins Julie Lyles Carr on the AllMomDoes podcast for a conversation about how we navigate seasons of success and learning how to be satisfied with right where we are as we wrap up our latest series on seasons.Show Notes: https://bit.ly/3MmwlxG

Stolen Sisters
Case 18: Michelle Driggers, Lisa Hardin, Megan Oxenidine, Rhonda Jones, Christina Bennett and Abby Patterson

Stolen Sisters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 11:29


The town of Lumberton, North Carolina, holds a dark secret involving the unsolved murders of five Indigenous women. All were brutally killed and discarded by their phantom killer, who has never been apprehended nor punished for their crimes. Those with any information regarding the murder of Michelle Driggers or Lisa Hardin are urged to contact either the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation on 910-486-1262 or the Lumberton Police Department on 910-671-3846. Those with any information regarding the murders of Megan Oxenidine, Rhonda Jones or Christina Bennett, or the disappearance of Abby Patterson, should contact the Charlotte Office of the FBI at 704-672-6100. If you feel that you need support regarding any of the issues presented in this episode, please contact your local crisis centre. CREDITS: Narration and Production - Kirsty Skye Research and Writing - Kirsty Skye Scoring - S. D. D. C. LISTEN: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4VihnSDeXi8kvoZhdDUdvJ?si=mT3zc7gdQJisHibBr4ImIA Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/stolen-sisters/id1517420487 AnchorFM: anchor.fm/stolensisters SOCIALS: Website - https://anchor.fm/stolensisters Twitter - @Stolen_Sisters Instagram - @stolensisterspod Email - stolensisterspodcast@yahoo.com SOURCES: https://www.robesonian.com/archive/38400/view-full_story-1634106-article-father_offers_reward_in_death_of_daughter http://www.justicefornativewomen.com/2021/09/michelle-driggers-unsolved-north.html https://www.justicefornativewomen.com/2022/07/lisa-hardin-unsolved-murder-from-north.html http://memorial.obittree.com/book-of-memories/550644/driggers-michelle/obituary.php https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/woman-disappears-bodies-lumberton-north-carolina_n_59df5717e4b0fdad73b25e18 https://www.insideedition.com/lumberton-north-carolina-where-3-women-mysteriously-died-last-year-has-sordid-history-violence https://m.facebook.com/NorthCarolinaColdCases/posts/143997140396516 https://www.justicefornativewomen.com/2019/11/rhonda-jones-1-of-3-women-murdered-in.html?q=Oxenidine http://www.justicefornativewomen.com/2019/08/christina-bennett-unsolved-murder-in.html?q=rhonda+jones http://www.justicefornativewomen.com/2019/08/megan-oxenidine-unsolved-murder-in.html?q=rhonda+jones https://borderbelt.org/an-attack-on-our-people-north-carolinas-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women/ https://wpde.com/news/local/5-years-later-still-no-answers-in-deaths-of-three-lumberton-women-kristin-bennett-rhonda-jones-megan-oxendine-robeson-county https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/kidnap/abby-lynn-patterson https://charleyproject.org/case/abby-lynn-patterson WOLFSBANE STUDIOS LTD©

State of Injustice
Hardin Counties Finest

State of Injustice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 53:28


A quick recap on the Toni Schoor case and how, it appears, the HCSO dropped the ball. And an extremely alarming case concerning sexual abuse against a minor and how justice was not pursued. The Baroo: A podcast for dogs and their peopleDogs make the best companions for humans. The Baroo aims to help make humans better...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Messages from Oxon Hill Church of Christ

The Call of God (Part 2) (Luke 5:4-11)

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Jefferson County At Hardin Valley Academy - Week 8 (10.7.22)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 125:25


Full Game Replay: Jefferson County At Hardin Valley Academy - Week 8 (10.7.22) Joel Silverburg & Tommy Sweat had the call for this week's HVA Game. Jefferson County defeated Hardin Valley 17-7. Aired on WOKI 98.7. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pump Fakes and Bad Takes Podcast
Jefferson County At Hardin Valley Academy - Week 8 (10.7.22)

Pump Fakes and Bad Takes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 125:25


Full Game Replay: Jefferson County At Hardin Valley Academy - Week 8 (10.7.22) Joel Silverburg & Tommy Sweat had the call for this week's HVA Game. Jefferson County defeated Hardin Valley 17-7. Aired on WOKI 98.7. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Jefferson County At Hardin Valley Academy - Week 8 (10.7.22)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 125:25


Full Game Replay: Jefferson County At Hardin Valley Academy - Week 8 (10.7.22) Joel Silverburg & Tommy Sweat had the call for this week's HVA Game. Jefferson County defeated Hardin Valley 17-7. Aired on WOKI 98.7. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Detroit Stories
Let's Talk About Foster Care

Detroit Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 33:29


*Pulling back the curtain on the foster system, a foster family and case workers explain the joys and challenges of fostering * (0:06) Tom and Anne Marie Malysz of St. John Fisher Chapel University Parish in Auburn Hills discuss how becoming foster parents has changed them, relying on the Lord's help. (2:09) In Part 1, the Malysz family talks about how they became involved in fostering, the expectations they had going in, and how divine providence played a role in helping the couple agree to take on the responsibility. (6:11) The couple takes an orientation class, undergoes an arduous licensing process, and is paired with a case worker. Despite stereotypes to the contrary, the couple says they were pleasantly surprised by the painlessness of the process. (7:02) The Malysz family welcomes their first foster children, an infant boy and his two-year-old sister. They discuss how their biological children reacted and what it was like. Since then, they've fostered a total of five children. (8:20) The couple discusses the challenges and joys of fostering, including the knowledge they are helping a family in need. For the Malyszes, their Catholic faith is a big component of it all. (11:28) The couple admits it's bittersweet when a child leaves their home, because they don't often get further contact with the child. But they hope that somehow, the child's future was changed for the better as a result of their stay. (13:30) In Part 2, Kristie Harden, director of child welfare for Catholic Charities of Southeast Michigan, and her staff explain the ins and outs of the foster care process. Hardin discusses the paperwork, training and background checks involved. (16:15) Hardin discusses how a child becomes removed from his or her birth family and is placed in the foster system. The goal isn't to place a child with a foster family, however. The goal is always reunification with the child's birth family. (17:25) Lyda McRoberts, one of CCSEM's case workers, talks about how the system encourages reunification by working with parents and children on treatment plans and services. She is in constant communication with a child's birth parents, and supervises planned visits. She also conducts regular checks with the foster family to ensure the child's wellbeing. (20:07) McRoberts talks about what a supervised visit looks like. It's awkward at first, she admits, but important to see how birth parents interact with and care for their children. (24:07) While reunification is the ultimate goal, it's not one that's often met. That makes case workers' jobs seem exhausting and thankless, but the interest of children and the cooperation of foster families makes the sacrifice worth it, McRoberts says. (24:49) Ross Henson, a licensing specialist with CCSEM, discusses the process of ensuring a foster family is ready to take on a child, including home visits. Henson discusses the shortage of foster families willing to take on children, making his job even more important. (29:48) Hardin offers an appeal to those considering becoming foster parents: Educate yourself, but don't be afraid of the process. It's not scary, and for those who are called, it can be one of the most rewarding experiences in the world. Reporting by Dan Meloy; narration by Leah Butalid; script by Casey McCorry; production by Ron Pangborn This episode is sponsored by Catholic Charities of Southeast Michigan. Being a mom is the most challenging and rewarding job in the world! At Catholic Charities of Southeast Michigan, they make it a bit easier for moms who are feeling alone, struggling financially, or who need an extra hand to help them establish a secure and happy family. To learn more about the ways you can help moms in need visit ccsem.org/respectlife. Listen to ‘Detroit Stories' on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or Fireside. Podcasts also will be posted biweekly on DetroitCatholic.com.

Wire-to-Wire with Nolin RECC
Episode 20 - Interview with Larry Phillips

Wire-to-Wire with Nolin RECC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 14:10


Nolin member Larry Phillips is a resident of District 1 and a long time businessman and developer in Hardin and surrounding counties. He talks about his work as the local area experiences record growth.

The Bourbon Daily
The Bourbon Daily: Show #2,187 – Tasting of Hardin's Creek by Jim Beam at the ABV Barrel Shop

The Bourbon Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 26:20


Steve, Jim and Kyle try Hardin's Creek from Jim Beam for the first time at the ABV Barrel Shop and share their thoughts on this new product. TBD music is by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Important Links: ABV Barrel Shop: abvbarrelshop.com ABV Network Shop: https://shop.abvnetwork.com/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theabvnetwork Check us out at: abvnetwork.com. Join the revolution by adding #ABVNetworkCrew to your profile on social media.

Messages from Oxon Hill Church of Christ

The Call of God (Luke 5:4-11)

Bourbon Matters
Unicorn Series - Hardin's Creek

Bourbon Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 38:02


The guys try the two new Hardin's Creek releases from Jim Beam: Colonel James B. Beam 2 year Bourbon and Jacob's Well 15 year Bourdon --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Herbal Radio
Interviews on Herbal Radio | Featuring Jesse Wolf Hardin

Herbal Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 53:00


Welcome to this week's conversational interview with Earth poet, author, artist, and herbalist, Jesse Wolf Hardin. Thomas and Wolf reminisce on Wolf's activist past, his work as an author, his advice for newcomers wanting to learn about plants, the beauty and excitement of herbalism, and much more. We hope you enjoy this truly special and inspiring talk. Jesse Wolf Hardin is an impactful author, ecosopher, ecological and societal activist, personal counsel, graphic artist, musician, and historian – a champion of both human and bio diversity, as well as of nature's medicines. Wolf was a leading organizer of and presenter for Earth First!, becoming a featured presenter at hundreds of conferences and universities, and was the creator of cross cultural ecospiritual collaborations appropriately called “Medicine Shows” that melded his powerful spoken word with live music, indigenous presenters, and focused activism. With his wife Kiva Rose, he founded the international Good Medicine Confluence gathering in 2008, along with the in-depth digital magazine for herbalists, healers and folklorists Plant Healer Quarterly.  He is the author of over 800 published articles in over 200 different publications, as well as of over 25 books, his work earning the praises of luminaries such as Gary Snyder, Joanna Macy, Ralph Metzner, Starhawk, and Rosemary Gladstar. He has been featured in The Encyclopedia of Nature & Religion (Continuum 2005) and many other compilations. His published works include early titles Full Circle , Kindred Spirit and Gaia Eros, along with The Practice of Herbalism and http://www.planthealer.org/bookstore.html covering the core whys and hows of an herbal practice, The Healing Terrain on sense of place, cultivation, and the healing power of nature... as well as an inspiring historical novel  The Medicine Bear, a book of herbs and empowerment for kids I'm a Medicine Woman Too! (Hops Press 2009), and The Traveling Medicine Show: Pitchmen & Plant Healers of Early America. His inspiring book The Enchanted Healer also comes in a version for an audience beyond herbalists titled Wonderments, with both being focused on heightened awareness, the senses, plant spirit and the spiritual heart of healing.  His most recent creation is the Hedge Guild Oracle deck and book, iconic art and text bringing clarity to our self exploration and daily options and choices.  The Oracle and most of his Ebooks and softbound books are available through PlantHealerBookstore.com.  Wolf's work is also featured in the lauded Plant Healer Quarterly as well as the free Herbaria Monthly which you can subscribe to on the Plant Healer website.  As Terry Tempest Williams opined, “Wolf's voice inspires our passion to take us further —seeing the world whole — even holy.” Visit Wolf at PlantHealer.org  Register for the virtual Fall Free Herbalism Project here: https://info.mountainroseherbs.com/free-herbalism-project Join our community! Subscribe to the Mountain Rose Herbs newsletter Subscribe to Mountain Rose Herbs on YouTube Follow on Instagram Like on Facebook Follow on Pinterest Follow on Twitter Read the Mountain Rose Herbs blog Follow on TikTok Strengthening the bonds between people and plants for a healthier world. Mountain Rose Herbs www.mountainroseherbs.com  

THE TRUTH IS BARREL PROOF
Hardin's Creek - Colonel James B Beam

THE TRUTH IS BARREL PROOF

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:53


On this episode Ian help us with the taste notes of the new release of HARDING'S CREEK. This Colonel James Beam 2 years expression has interesting and complex notes that has you coming back to it. To know more about HARDIN'S CREEK and other products visit https://www.hardinscreek.com/. Be sure to follow Ian on all social media as FB, IG and TIKTOK @barrelproofnerd #whiskey #bourbon #barrelproof --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hoodsom/support

Representing Rural
Rural Candidates: Mayor Talitha Hardin

Representing Rural

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 39:20


Since 2011, Mayor Talitha Hardin has secured over $1.5 million for infrastructure improvement projects in Leslie. Hardin is currently running for the Mayor of Leslie seat once again to continue building on all she's been able to accomplish for the town that she loves and calls home. Hardin credits the help of former RCA staff and board members, Renee Carr and Lavina Grandon, with helping kickstart the town's revitalization.

THE TRUTH IS BARREL PROOF
HARDIN'S CREEK: JACOB'S WELL

THE TRUTH IS BARREL PROOF

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 8:57


Wendy run us through the taste notes of Jim Beam family distillery . This HARDIN'S CREEK expression with the name JACOB'S WELL is a 15year 4 months whiskey packs layers of flavors and has some interesting notes. To more about the expressions of this brand visit Hardin's Creek (https://www.hardinscreek.com/) Be sure to follow Wendy on IG (https://www.instagram.com/tathelanaest83/)or read her blog on 51ANDPROOF (https://www.fiftyoneandproof.com/). Looking for a new glass to try your whiskey? Check out WHISDOM GLASS (https://whiskeywhisdom.com?via=hoodsommelier) Use code TTIBP to get 10% of your first purchase. #whiskey #bourbon #IOWA --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hoodsom/support

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
How Personal Development Creates A Boss Life

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 55:09


In this very special 100th episode, Hardin and the "Squad" share how personal development has helped them "Boss Up" over the last year.This episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

Mark Groves Podcast
Overcoming Perfectionism with Vitale Buford Hardin

Mark Groves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 39:49 Very Popular


Themes: Perfectionism, Excellence, Career, Authenticity, Self-Compassion, Self-Worth Summary: This week I'm pumped to be joined by my good friend, Vitale Buford Hardin who is a top leadership consultant, driver of leadership excellence, and CEO of The Hardin Group, a leadership consulting firm. Tune in as we unpack perfectionism, why it manifests, how it affects us in the workplace and within our relationships, and ultimately how to actually heal from it. Vitale believes that “who we are is how we lead,” so the real leadership work begins with ourselves. Vitale brings her training and concepts to life in a fun and relatable way, empowering teams and companies to transform the way they work, produce, and relate. She is an iPEC-certified executive coach, trainer, award-winning speaker, and author. Featured in The New York Times, she is the author of the book, Addicted to Perfect, detailing her struggle with perfectionism and how she overcame it.  Discover: What perfectionism is and the different ways in which it can manifest The root cause of perfectionism The first step in detaching from the need to be perfect How companies and leaders can actually benefit from addressing and healing perfectionism in the workplace 00:00 Intro 00:46 What is perfectionism? 02:55 Why we chase perfection 05:30 Detaching from perfectionism 07:37 Perfectionism in the workplace 12:06 How it affects innovation 17:47 Are men or women more prone to perfectionism? 21:27 Perfectionism in relationships 28:00 Compassion and perfectionism can't coexist 30:34 Excellence instead of perfectionism 32:23 Vitale's struggle with perfectionism Links: Book | Addicted to Perfect: A Journey Out of the Grips of Adderall Website | The Hardin Group LinkedIn | Vitale Buford Hardin Sponsors: Cured Nutrition | Use code CREATETHELOVE for 20% all products at curednutrition.com/createthelove Organifi | Use code CREATETHELOVE for 20% off all products at organifi.com/createthelove Create the Love Cards | Use code CTLCARDS15 for 15% off at createthelove.com/cards See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
Appreciation Is Power

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 29:19


In this episode, Hardin explains the power of appreciation. #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
Gaining Major Confidence

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 34:41


In this episode, Hardin shares how simply creating your own definition of success leads to massive confidence. #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Ohio Outdoors - OHLAP and Timber Ninja

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 100:50


We are officially into the 2022-2023 hunting season! Last week we welcomed some small game seasons, doves, and some early waterfowl. This upcoming weekend is the opening of archery deer in the Disease surveillance areas of Hardin, Marion, and Wyandot counties. Paul was able to get out and knock down a couple doves this past week, but had little luck in the waterfowl blind. Andrew's still prepping for the upcoming season and rehabbing his knee.  The show this week has 2 parts. To start we talk with Dave Kohler of the ODNR Division of Wildlife. Dave has been with the Department for many years and has a lot of knowledge. He shares with us the recap of the 2022 OHLAP program, as well as looking forward to the upcoming season.   After Dave, we have the chance to talk to Jason Redd of Timber Ninja. Timber Ninja is a company that specializes in high quality mobile hunting gear, but the show is more directed at Jason's love of the outdoors, and some of the adventures he's been on. Enjoy! www.theo2podcast.com  GoWild Profile  Tethrd First Lite Instagram: @the.o2.podcast Twitter: @Ohiohunt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ohio Huntsman Podcast
OHLAP and Timber Ninja

Ohio Huntsman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 99:50


We are officially into the 2022-2023 hunting season!  Last week we welcomed some small game seasons, doves, and some early waterfowl.  This upcoming weekend is the opening of archery deer in the Disease surveillance areas of Hardin, Marion, and Wyandot counties.  Paul was able to get out and knock down a couple doves this past week, but had little luck in the waterfowl blind. Andrew's still prepping for the upcoming season and rehabbing his knee. The show this week has 2 parts.  To start we talk with Dave Kohler of the ODNR Division of Wildlife.  Dave has been with the Department for many years and has a lot of knowledge.  He shares with us the recap of the 2022 OHLAP program, as well as looking forward to the upcoming season.  After Dave, we have the chance to talk to Jason Redd of Timber Ninja.  Timber Ninja is a company that specializes in high quality mobile hunting gear, but the show is more directed at Jason's love of the outdoors, and some of the adventures he's been on.  Enjoy!www.theo2podcast.comGoWild ProfileTethrdFirst LiteInstagram: @the.o2.podcastTwitter: @Ohiohunt

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
The Next Chapter

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 9:12


In this episode, Hardin shares the significance of reaching new milestones. #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

Bourbon Pursuit
Whiskey Quickie: Hardin's Creek Colonel James B. Beam Whiskey Review

Bourbon Pursuit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 5:55 Very Popular


On this Whiskey Quickie by Bourbon Pursuit, we review Hardin's Creek Colonel James B. Beam Whiskey. This 2 year old bourbon is 108 proof and $80 MSRP. Let us know what you think. Cheers!DISCLAIMER: The whiskey in this review was provided to us at no cost courtesy of the spirit producer. We were not compensated by the spirit producer for this review. This is our honest opinion based on what we tasted. Please drink responsibly.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 152: “For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


Episode 152 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “For What It's Worth”, and the short but eventful career of Buffalo Springfield. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" by Glen Campbell. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, there's a Mixcloud mix containing all the songs excerpted in the episode. This four-CD box set is the definitive collection of Buffalo Springfield's work, while if you want the mono version of the second album, the stereo version of the first, and the final album as released, but no demos or outtakes, you want this more recent box set. For What It's Worth: The Story of Buffalo Springfield by Richey Furay and John Einarson is obviously Furay's version of the story, but all the more interesting for that. For information on Steve Stills' early life I used Stephen Stills: Change Partners by David Roberts.  Information on both Stills and Young comes from Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young by David Browne.  Jimmy McDonough's Shakey is the definitive biography of Neil Young, while Young's Waging Heavy Peace is his autobiography. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before we begin -- this episode deals with various disabilities. In particular, there are descriptions of epileptic seizures that come from non-medically-trained witnesses, many of whom took ableist attitudes towards the seizures. I don't know enough about epilepsy to know how accurate their descriptions and perceptions are, and I apologise if that means that by repeating some of their statements, I am inadvertently passing on myths about the condition. When I talk about this, I am talking about the after-the-fact recollections of musicians, none of them medically trained and many of them in altered states of consciousness, about events that had happened decades earlier. Please do not take anything said in a podcast about music history as being the last word on the causes or effects of epileptic seizures, rather than how those musicians remember them. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things you notice if you write about protest songs is that a lot of the time, the songs that people talk about as being important or impactful have aged very poorly. Even great songwriters like Bob Dylan or John Lennon, when writing material about the political events of the time, would write material they would later acknowledge was far from their best. Too often a song will be about a truly important event, and be powered by a real sense of outrage at injustice, but it will be overly specific, and then as soon as the immediate issue is no longer topical, the song is at best a curio. For example, the sentencing of the poet and rock band manager John Sinclair to ten years in prison for giving two joints to an undercover police officer was hugely controversial in the early seventies, but by the time John Lennon's song about it was released, Sinclair had been freed by the Supreme Court, and very, very few people would use the song as an example of why Lennon's songwriting still has lasting value: [Excerpt: John Lennon, "John Sinclair"] But there are exceptions, and those tend to be songs where rather than talking about specific headlines, the song is about the emotion that current events have caused. Ninety years on from its first success, for example, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" still has resonance, because there are still people who are put out of work through no fault of their own, and even those of us who are lucky enough to be financially comfortable have the fear that all too soon it may end, and we may end up like Al begging on the streets: [Excerpt: Rudy Vallee, "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"] And because of that emotional connection, sometimes the very best protest songs can take on new lives and new meanings, and connect with the way people feel about totally unrelated subjects. Take Buffalo Springfield's one hit. The actual subject of the song couldn't be any more trivial in the grand scheme of things -- a change in zoning regulations around the Sunset Strip that meant people under twenty-one couldn't go to the clubs after 10PM, and the subsequent reaction to that -- but because rather than talking about the specific incident, Steve Stills instead talked about the emotions that it called up, and just noted the fleeting images that he was left with, the song became adopted as an anthem by soldiers in Vietnam. Sometimes what a song says is nowhere near as important as how it says it. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth"] Steve Stills seems almost to have been destined to be a musician, although the instrument he started on, the drums, was not the one for which he would become best known. According to Stills, though, he always had an aptitude for rhythm, to the extent that he learned to tapdance almost as soon as he had learned to walk. He started on drums aged eight or nine, after somebody gave him a set of drumsticks. After his parents got sick of him damaging the furniture by playing on every available surface, an actual drum kit followed, and that became his principal instrument, even after he learned to play the guitar at military school, as his roommate owned one. As a teenager, Stills developed an idiosyncratic taste in music, helped by the record collection of his friend Michael Garcia. He didn't particularly like most of the pop music of the time, but he was a big fan of pre-war country music, Motown, girl-group music -- he especially liked the Shirelles -- and Chess blues. He was also especially enamoured of the music of Jimmy Reed, a passion he would later share with his future bandmate Neil Young: [Excerpt: Jimmy Reed, "Baby, What You Want Me To Do?"] In his early teens, he became the drummer for a band called the Radars, and while he was drumming he studied their lead guitarist, Chuck Schwin.  He said later "There was a whole little bunch of us who were into kind of a combination of all the blues guys and others including Chet Atkins, Dick Dale, and Hank Marvin: a very weird cross-section of far-out guitar players." Stills taught himself to play like those guitarists, and in particular he taught himself how to emulate Atkins' Travis-picking style, and became remarkably proficient at it. There exists a recording of him, aged sixteen, singing one of his own songs and playing finger-picked guitar, and while the song is not exactly the strongest thing I've ever heard lyrically, it's clearly the work of someone who is already a confident performer: [Excerpt: Stephen Stills, "Travellin'"] But the main reason he switched to becoming a guitarist wasn't because of his admiration for Chet Atkins or Hank Marvin, but because he started driving and discovered that if you have to load a drum kit into your car and then drive it to rehearsals and gigs you either end up bashing up your car or bashing up the drum kit. As this is not a problem with guitars, Stills decided that he'd move on from the Radars, and join a band named the Continentals as their rhythm guitarist, playing with lead guitarist Don Felder. Stills was only in the Continentals for a few months though, before being replaced by another guitarist, Bernie Leadon, and in general Stills' whole early life is one of being uprooted and moved around. His father had jobs in several different countries, and while for the majority of his time Stills was in the southern US, he also ended up spending time in Costa Rica -- and staying there as a teenager even as the rest of his family moved to El Salvador. Eventually, aged eighteen, he moved to New Orleans, where he formed a folk duo with a friend, Chris Sarns. The two had very different tastes in folk music -- Stills preferred Dylan-style singer-songwriters, while Sarns liked the clean sound of the Kingston Trio -- but they played together for several months before moving to Greenwich Village, where they performed together and separately. They were latecomers to the scene, which had already mostly ended, and many of the folk stars had already gone on to do bigger things. But Stills still saw plenty of great performers there -- Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonius Monk in the jazz clubs, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, and Richard Pryor in the comedy ones, and Simon and Garfunkel, Richie Havens, Fred Neil and Tim Hardin in the folk ones -- Stills said that other than Chet Atkins, Havens, Neil, and Hardin were the people most responsible for his guitar style. Stills was also, at this time, obsessed with Judy Collins' third album -- the album which had featured Roger McGuinn on banjo and arrangements, and which would soon provide several songs for the Byrds to cover: [Excerpt: Judy Collins, "Turn, Turn, Turn"] Judy Collins would soon become a very important figure in Stills' life, but for now she was just the singer on his favourite record. While the Greenwich Village folk scene was no longer quite what it had been a year or two earlier, it was still a great place for a young talented musician to perform. As well as working with Chris Sarns, Stills also formed a trio with his friend John Hopkins and a banjo player called Peter Tork who everyone said looked just like Stills. Tork soon headed out west to seek his fortune, and then Stills got headhunted to join the Au Go Go Singers. This was a group that was being set up in the same style as the New Christy Minstrels -- a nine-piece vocal and instrumental group that would do clean-sounding versions of currently-popular folk songs. The group were signed to Roulette Records, and recorded one album, They Call Us Au-Go-Go Singers, produced by Hugo and Luigi, the production duo we've previously seen working with everyone from the Tokens to the Isley Brothers. Much of the album is exactly the same kind of thing that a million New Christy Minstrels soundalikes were putting out -- and Stills, with his raspy voice, was clearly intended to be the Barry McGuire of this group -- but there was one exception -- a song called "High Flyin' Bird", on which Stills was able to show off the sound that would later make him famous, and which became so associated with him that even though it was written by Billy Edd Wheeler, the writer of "Jackson", even the biography of Stills I used in researching this episode credits "High Flyin' Bird" as being a Stills original: [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "High Flyin' Bird"] One of the other members of the Au-Go-Go Singers, Richie Furay, also got to sing a lead vocal on the album, on the Tom Paxton song "Where I'm Bound": [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "Where I'm Bound"] The Au-Go-Go Singers got a handful of dates around the folk scene, and Stills and Furay became friendly with another singer playing the same circuit, Gram Parsons. Parsons was one of the few people they knew who could see the value in current country music, and convinced both Stills and Furay to start paying more attention to what was coming out of Nashville and Bakersfield. But soon the Au-Go-Go Singers split up. Several venues where they might otherwise have been booked were apparently scared to book an act that was associated with Morris Levy, and also the market for big folk ensembles dried up more or less overnight when the Beatles hit the music scene. But several of the group -- including Stills but not Furay -- decided they were going to continue anyway, and formed a group called The Company, and they went on a tour of Canada. And one of the venues they played was the Fourth Dimension coffee house in Fort William, Ontario, and there their support act was a rock band called The Squires: [Excerpt: The Squires, "(I'm a Man And) I Can't Cry"] The lead guitarist of the Squires, Neil Young, had a lot in common with Stills, and they bonded instantly. Both men had parents who had split up when they were in their teens, and had a successful but rather absent father and an overbearing mother. And both had shown an interest in music even as babies. According to Young's mother, when he was still in nappies, he would pull himself up by the bars  of his playpen and try to dance every time he heard "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie": [Excerpt: Pinetop Smith, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie"] Young, though, had had one crucial experience which Stills had not had. At the age of six, he'd come down with polio, and become partially paralysed. He'd spent months in hospital before he regained his ability to walk, and the experience had also affected him in other ways. While he was recovering, he would draw pictures of trains -- other than music, his big interest, almost an obsession, was with electric train sets, and that obsession would remain with him throughout his life -- but for the first time he was drawing with his right hand rather than his left. He later said "The left-hand side got a little screwed. Feels different from the right. If I close my eyes, my left side, I really don't know where it is—but over the years I've discovered that almost one hundred percent for sure it's gonna be very close to my right side … probably to the left. That's why I started appearing to be ambidextrous, I think. Because polio affected my left side, and I think I was left-handed when I was born. What I have done is use the weak side as the dominant one because the strong side was injured." Both Young's father Scott Young -- a very famous Canadian writer and sports broadcaster, who was by all accounts as well known in Canada during his lifetime as his son -- and Scott's brother played ukulele, and they taught Neil how to play, and his first attempt at forming a group had been to get his friend Comrie Smith to get a pair of bongos and play along with him to Preston Epps' "Bongo Rock": [Excerpt: Preston Epps, "Bongo Rock"] Neil Young had liked all the usual rock and roll stars of the fifties  -- though in his personal rankings, Elvis came a distant third behind Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis -- but his tastes ran more to the more darkly emotional. He loved "Maybe" by the Chantels, saying "Raw soul—you cannot miss it. That's the real thing. She was believin' every word she was singin'." [Excerpt: The Chantels, "Maybe"] What he liked more than anything was music that had a mainstream surface but seemed slightly off-kilter. He was a major fan of Roy Orbison, saying, "it's almost impossible to comprehend the depth of that soul. It's so deep and dark it just keeps on goin' down—but it's not black. It's blue, deep blue. He's just got it. The drama. There's something sad but proud about Roy's music", and he would say similar things about Del Shannon, saying "He struck me as the ultimate dark figure—behind some Bobby Rydell exterior, y'know? “Hats Off to Larry,” “Runaway,” “Swiss Maid”—very, very inventive. The stuff was weird. Totally unaffected." More surprisingly, perhaps, he was a particular fan of Bobby Darin, who he admired so much because Darin could change styles at the drop of a hat, going from novelty rock and roll like "Splish Splash" to crooning "Mack The Knife" to singing Tim Hardin songs like "If I Were a Carpenter", without any of them seeming any less authentic. As he put it later "He just changed. He's completely different. And he's really into it. Doesn't sound like he's not there. “Dream Lover,” “Mack the Knife,” “If I Were a Carpenter,” “Queen of the Hop,” “Splish Splash”—tell me about those records, Mr. Darin. Did you write those all the same day, or what happened? He just changed so much. Just kinda went from one place to another. So it's hard to tell who Bobby Darin really was." And one record which Young was hugely influenced by was Floyd Cramer's country instrumental, "Last Date": [Excerpt: Floyd Cramer, "Last Date"] Now, that was a very important record in country music, and if you want to know more about it I strongly recommend listening to the episode of Cocaine and Rhinestones on the Nashville A-Team, which has a long section on the track, but the crucial thing to know about that track is that it's one of the earliest examples of what is known as slip-note playing, where the piano player, before hitting the correct note, briefly hits the note a tone below it, creating a brief discord. Young absolutely loved that sound, and wanted to make a sound like that on the guitar. And then, when he and his mother moved to Winnipeg after his parents' divorce, he found someone who was doing just that. It was the guitarist in a group variously known as Chad Allan and the Reflections and Chad Allan and the Expressions. That group had relatives in the UK who would send them records, and so where most Canadian bands would do covers of American hits, Chad Allan and the Reflections would do covers of British hits, like their version of Geoff Goddard's "Tribute to Buddy Holly", a song that had originally been produced by Joe Meek: [Excerpt: Chad Allan and the Reflections, "Tribute to Buddy Holly"] That would later pay off for them in a big way, when they recorded a version of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' "Shakin' All Over", for which their record label tried to create an air of mystery by releasing it with no artist name, just "Guess Who?" on the label. It became a hit, the name stuck, and they became The Guess Who: [Excerpt: The Guess Who, "Shakin' All Over"] But at this point they, and their guitarist Randy Bachman, were just another group playing around Winnipeg. Bachman, though, was hugely impressive to Neil Young for a few reasons. The first was that he really did have a playing style that was a lot like the piano style of Floyd Cramer -- Young would later say "it was Randy Bachman who did it first. Randy was the first one I ever heard do things on the guitar that reminded me of Floyd. He'd do these pulls—“darrr darrrr,” this two-note thing goin' together—harmony, with one note pulling and the other note stayin' the same." Bachman also had built the first echo unit that Young heard a guitarist play in person. He'd discovered that by playing with the recording heads on a tape recorder owned by his mother, he could replicate the tape echo that Sam Phillips had used at Sun Studios -- and once he'd attached that to his amplifier, he realised how much the resulting sound sounded like his favourite guitarist, Hank Marvin of the Shadows, another favourite of Neil Young's: [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Man of Mystery"] Young soon started looking to Bachman as something of a mentor figure, and he would learn a lot of guitar techniques second hand from Bachman -- every time a famous musician came to the area, Bachman would go along and stand right at the front and watch the guitarist, and make note of the positions their fingers were in. Then Bachman would replicate those guitar parts with the Reflections, and Neil Young would stand in front of him and make notes of where *his* fingers were. Young joined a band on the local circuit called the Esquires, but soon either quit or was fired, depending on which version of the story you choose to believe. He then formed his own rival band, the Squires, with no "e", much to the disgust of his ex-bandmates. In July 1963, five months after they formed, the  Squires released their first record, "Aurora" backed with "The Sultan", on a tiny local label. Both tracks were very obviously influenced by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Squires, "Aurora"] The Squires were a mostly-instrumental band for the first year or so they were together, and then the Beatles hit North America, and suddenly people didn't want to hear surf instrumentals and Shadows covers any more, they only wanted to hear songs that sounded a bit like the Beatles. The Squires started to work up the appropriate repertoire -- two songs that have been mentioned as in their set at this point are the Beatles album track "It Won't Be Long", and "Money" which the Beatles had also covered -- but they didn't have a singer, being an instrumental group. They could get in a singer, of course, but that would mean splitting the money with another person. So instead, the guitarist, who had never had any intention of becoming a singer, was more or less volunteered for the role. Over the next eighteen months or so the group's repertoire moved from being largely instrumental to largely vocal, and the group also seem to have shuttled around a bit between two different cities -- Winnipeg and Fort William, staying in one for a while and then moving back to the other. They travelled between the two in Young's car, a Buick Roadmaster hearse. In Winnipeg, Young first met up with a singer named Joni Anderson, who was soon to get married to Chuck Mitchell and would become better known by her married name. The two struck up a friendship, though by all accounts never a particularly close one -- they were too similar in too many ways; as Mitchell later said “Neil and I have a lot in common: Canadian; Scorpios; polio in the same epidemic, struck the same parts of our body; and we both have a black sense of humor". They were both also idiosyncratic artists who never fit very well into boxes. In Fort William the Squires made a few more records, this time vocal tracks like "I'll Love You Forever": [Excerpt: The Squires, "I'll Love You Forever"] It was also in Fort William that Young first encountered two acts that would make a huge impression on him. One was a group called The Thorns, consisting of Tim Rose, Jake Holmes, and Rich Husson. The Thorns showed Young that there was interesting stuff being done on the fringes of the folk music scene. He later said "One of my favourites was “Oh Susannah”—they did this arrangement that was bizarre. It was in a minor key, which completely changed everything—and it was rock and roll. So that idea spawned arrangements of all these other songs for me. I did minor versions of them all. We got into it. That was a certain Squires stage that never got recorded. Wish there were tapes of those shows. We used to do all this stuff, a whole kinda music—folk-rock. We took famous old folk songs like “Clementine,” “She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain,” “Tom Dooley,” and we did them all in minor keys based on the Tim Rose arrangement of “Oh Susannah.” There are no recordings of the Thorns in existence that I know of, but presumably that arrangement that Young is talking about is the version that Rose also later did with the Big 3, which we've heard in a few other episodes: [Excerpt: The Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] The other big influence was, of course, Steve Stills, and the two men quickly found themselves influencing each other deeply. Stills realised that he could bring more rock and roll to his folk-music sound, saying that what amazed him was the way the Squires could go from "Cottonfields" (the Lead Belly song) to "Farmer John", the R&B song by Don and Dewey that was becoming a garage-rock staple. Young in turn was inspired to start thinking about maybe going more in the direction of folk music. The Squires even renamed themselves the High-Flying Birds, after the song that Stills had recorded with the Au Go Go Singers. After The Company's tour of Canada, Stills moved back to New York for a while. He now wanted to move in a folk-rock direction, and for a while he tried to persuade his friend John Sebastian to let him play bass in his new band, but when the Lovin' Spoonful decided against having him in the band, he decided to move West to San Francisco, where he'd heard there was a new music scene forming. He enjoyed a lot of the bands he saw there, and in particular he was impressed by the singer of a band called the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Somebody to Love"] He was much less impressed with the rest of her band, and seriously considered going up to her and asking if she wanted to work with some *real* musicians instead of the unimpressive ones she was working with, but didn't get his nerve up. We will, though, be hearing more about Grace Slick in future episodes. Instead, Stills decided to move south to LA, where many of the people he'd known in Greenwich Village were now based. Soon after he got there, he hooked up with two other musicians, a guitarist named Steve Young and a singer, guitarist, and pianist named Van Dyke Parks. Parks had a record contract at MGM -- he'd been signed by Tom Wilson, the same man who had turned Dylan electric, signed Simon and Garfunkel, and produced the first albums by the Mothers of Invention. With Wilson, Parks put out a couple of singles in 1966, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] And "Number Nine", a reworking of the Ode to Joy from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Number Nine"]Parks, Stills, and Steve Young became The Van Dyke Parks Band, though they didn't play together for very long, with their most successful performance being as the support act for the Lovin' Spoonful for a show in Arizona. But they did have a lasting resonance -- when Van Dyke Parks finally got the chance to record his first solo album, he opened it with Steve Young singing the old folk song "Black Jack Davy", filtered to sound like an old tape: [Excerpt: Steve Young, "Black Jack Davy"] And then it goes into a song written for Parks by Randy Newman, but consisting of Newman's ideas about Parks' life and what he knew about him, including that he had been third guitar in the Van Dyke Parks Band: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Vine Street"] Parks and Stills also wrote a few songs together, with one of their collaborations, "Hello, I've Returned", later being demoed by Stills for Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Steve Stills, "Hello, I've Returned"] After the Van Dyke Parks Band fell apart, Parks went on to many things, including a brief stint on keyboards in the Mothers of Invention, and we'll be talking more about him next episode. Stills formed a duo called the Buffalo Fish, with his friend Ron Long. That soon became an occasional trio when Stills met up again with his old Greenwich Village friend Peter Tork, who joined the group on the piano. But then Stills auditioned for the Monkees and was turned down because he had bad teeth -- or at least that's how most people told the story. Stills has later claimed that while he turned up for the Monkees auditions, it wasn't to audition, it was to try to pitch them songs, which seems implausible on the face of it. According to Stills, he was offered the job and turned it down because he'd never wanted it. But whatever happened, Stills suggested they might want his friend Peter, who looked just like him apart from having better teeth, and Peter Tork got the job. But what Stills really wanted to do was to form a proper band. He'd had the itch to do it ever since seeing the Squires, and he decided he should ask Neil Young to join. There was only one problem -- when he phoned Young, the phone was answered by Young's mother, who told Stills that Neil had moved out to become a folk singer, and she didn't know where he was. But then Stills heard from his old friend Richie Furay. Furay was still in Greenwich Village, and had decided to write to Stills. He didn't know where Stills was, other than that he was in California somewhere, so he'd written to Stills' father in El Salvador. The letter had been returned, because the postage had been short by one cent, so Furay had resent it with the correct postage. Stills' father had then forwarded the letter to the place Stills had been staying in San Francisco, which had in turn forwarded it on to Stills in LA. Furay's letter mentioned this new folk singer who had been on the scene for a while and then disappeared again, Neil Young, who had said he knew Stills, and had been writing some great songs, one of which Furay had added to his own set. Stills got in touch with Furay and told him about this great band he was forming in LA, which he wanted Furay to join. Furay was in, and travelled from New York to LA, only to be told that at this point there were no other members of this great band, but they'd definitely find some soon. They got a publishing deal with Columbia/Screen Gems, which gave them enough money to not starve, but what they really needed was to find some other musicians. They did, when driving down Hollywood Boulevard on April the sixth, 1966. There, stuck in traffic going the other way, they saw a hearse... After Steve Stills had left Fort William, so had Neil Young. He hadn't initially intended to -- the High-Flying Birds still had a regular gig, but Young and some of his friends had gone away for a few days on a road trip in his hearse. But unfortunately the transmission on the hearse had died, and Young and his friends had been stranded. Many years later, he would write a eulogy to the hearse, which he and Stills would record together: [Excerpt: The Stills-Young Band, "Long May You Run"] Young and his friends had all hitch-hiked in different directions -- Young had ended up in Toronto, where his dad lived, and had stayed with his dad for a while. The rest of his band had eventually followed him there, but Young found the Toronto music scene not to his taste -- the folk and rock scenes there were very insular and didn't mingle with each other, and the group eventually split up. Young even took on a day job for a while, for the only time in his life, though he soon quit. Young started basically commuting between Toronto and New York, a distance of several hundred miles, going to Greenwich Village for a while before ending up back in Toronto, and ping-ponging between the two. In New York, he met up with Richie Furay, and also had a disastrous audition for Elektra Records as a solo artist. One of the songs he sang in the audition was "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", the song which Furay liked so much he started performing it himself. Young doesn't normally explain his songs, but as this was one of the first he ever wrote, he talked about it in interviews in the early years, before he decided to be less voluble about his art. The song was apparently about the sense of youthful hope being crushed. The instigation for it was Young seeing his girlfriend with another man, but the central image, of Clancy not singing, came from Young's schooldays. The Clancy in question was someone Young liked as one of the other weird kids at school. He was disabled, like Young, though with MS rather than polio, and he would sing to himself in the hallways at school. Sadly, of course, the other kids would mock and bully him for that, and eventually he ended up stopping. Young said about it "After awhile, he got so self-conscious he couldn't do his thing any more. When someone who is as beautiful as that and as different as that is actually killed by his fellow man—you know what I mean—like taken and sorta chopped down—all the other things are nothing compared to this." [Excerpt: Neil Young, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Elektra demo)"] One thing I should say for anyone who listens to the Mixcloud for this episode, that song, which will be appearing in a couple of different versions, has one use of a term for Romani people that some (though not all) consider a slur. It's not in the excerpts I'll be using in this episode, but will be in the full versions on the Mixcloud. Sadly that word turns up time and again in songs of this era... When he wasn't in New York, Young was living in Toronto in a communal apartment owned by a folk singer named Vicki Taylor, where many of the Toronto folk scene would stay. Young started listening a lot to Taylor's Bert Jansch albums, which were his first real exposure to the British folk-baroque style of guitar fingerpicking, as opposed to the American Travis-picking style, and Young would soon start to incorporate that style into his own playing: [Excerpt: Bert Jansch, "Angie"] Another guitar influence on Young at this point was another of the temporary tenants of Taylor's flat, John Kay, who would later go on to be one of the founding members of Steppenwolf. Young credited Kay with having a funky rhythm guitar style that Young incorporated into his own. While he was in Toronto, he started getting occasional gigs in Detroit, which is "only" a couple of hundred miles away, set up by Joni and Chuck Mitchell, both of whom also sometimes stayed at Taylor's. And it was in Detroit that Neil Young became, albeit very briefly, a Motown artist. The Mynah Birds were a band in Toronto that had at one point included various future members of Steppenwolf, and they were unusual for the time in that they were a white band with a Black lead singer, Ricky Matthews. They also had a rich manager, John Craig Eaton, the heir to the Eaton's department store fortune, who basically gave them whatever money they wanted -- they used to go to his office and tell him they needed seven hundred dollars for lunch, and he'd hand it to them. They were looking for a new guitarist when Bruce Palmer, their bass player, bumped into Neil Young carrying an amp and asked if he was interested in joining. He was. The Mynah Birds quickly became one of the best bands in Toronto, and Young and Matthews became close, both as friends and as a performance team. People who saw them live would talk about things like a song called “Hideaway”, written by Young and Matthews, which had a spot in the middle where Young would start playing a harmonica solo, throw the harmonica up in the air mid-solo, Matthews would catch it, and he would then finish the solo. They got signed to Motown, who were at this point looking to branch out into the white guitar-group market, and they were put through the Motown star-making machine. They recorded an entire album, which remains unreleased, but they did release a single, "It's My Time": [Excerpt: The Mynah Birds, "It's My Time"] Or at least, they released a handful of promo copies. The single was pulled from release after Ricky Matthews got arrested. It turned out his birth name wasn't Ricky Matthews, but James Johnson, and that he wasn't from Toronto as he'd told everyone, but from Buffalo, New York. He'd fled to Canada after going AWOL from the Navy, not wanting to be sent to Vietnam, and he was arrested and jailed for desertion. After getting out of jail, he would start performing under yet another name, and as Rick James would have a string of hits in the seventies and eighties: [Excerpt: Rick James, "Super Freak"] Most of the rest of the group continued gigging as The Mynah Birds, but Young and Palmer had other plans. They sold the expensive equipment Eaton had bought the group, and Young bought a new hearse, which he named Mort 2 – Mort had been his first hearse. And according to one of the band's friends in Toronto, the crucial change in their lives came when Neil Young heard a song on a jukebox: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Young apparently heard "California Dreamin'" and immediately said "Let's go to California and become rock stars". Now, Young later said of this anecdote that "That sounds like a Canadian story to me. That sounds too real to be true", and he may well be right. Certainly the actual wording of the story is likely incorrect -- people weren't talking about "rock stars" in 1966. Google's Ngram viewer has the first use of the phrase in print being in 1969, and the phrase didn't come into widespread usage until surprisingly late -- even granting that phrases enter slang before they make it to print, it still seems implausible. But even though the precise wording might not be correct, something along those lines definitely seems to have happened, albeit possibly less dramatically. Young's friend Comrie Smith independently said that Young told him “Well, Comrie, I can hear the Mamas and the Papas singing ‘All the leaves are brown, and the skies are gray …' I'm gonna go down to the States and really make it. I'm on my way. Today North Toronto, tomorrow the world!” Young and Palmer loaded up Mort 2 with a bunch of their friends and headed towards California. On the way, they fell out with most of the friends, who parted from them, and Young had an episode which in retrospect may have been his first epileptic seizure. They decided when they got to California that they were going to look for Steve Stills, as they'd heard he was in LA and neither of them knew anyone else in the state. But after several days of going round the Sunset Strip clubs asking if anyone knew Steve Stills, and sleeping in the hearse as they couldn't afford anywhere else, they were getting fed up and about to head off to San Francisco, as they'd heard there was a good music scene there, too. They were going to leave that day, and they were stuck in traffic on Sunset Boulevard, about to head off, when Stills and Furay came driving in the other direction. Furay happened to turn his head, to brush away a fly, and saw a hearse with Ontario license plates. He and Stills both remembered that Young drove a hearse, and so they assumed it must be him. They started honking at the hearse, then did a U-turn. They got Young's attention, and they all pulled into the parking lot at Ben Frank's, the Sunset Strip restaurant that attracted such a hip crowd the Monkees' producers had asked for "Ben Frank's types" in their audition advert. Young introduced Stills and Furay to Palmer, and now there *was* a group -- three singing, songwriting, guitarists and a bass player. Now all they needed was a drummer. There were two drummers seriously considered for the role. One of them, Billy Mundi, was technically the better player, but Young didn't like playing with him as much -- and Mundi also had a better offer, to join the Mothers of Invention as their second drummer -- before they'd recorded their first album, they'd had two drummers for a few months, but Denny Bruce, their second drummer, had become ill with glandular fever and they'd reverted to having Jimmy Carl Black play solo. Now they were looking for someone else, and Mundi took that role. The other drummer, who Young preferred anyway, was another Canadian, Dewey Martin. Martin was a couple of years older than the rest of the group, and by far the most experienced. He'd moved from Canada to Nashville in his teens, and according to Martin he had been taken under the wing of Hank Garland, the great session guitarist most famous for "Sugarfoot Rag": [Excerpt: Hank Garland, "Sugarfoot Rag"] We heard Garland playing with Elvis and others in some of the episodes around 1960, and by many reckonings he was the best session guitarist in Nashville, but in 1961 he had a car accident that left him comatose, and even though he recovered from the coma and lived another thirty-three years, he never returned to recording. According to Martin, though, Garland would still sometimes play jazz clubs around Nashville after the accident, and one day Martin walked into a club and saw him playing. The drummer he was playing with got up and took a break, taking his sticks with him, so Martin got up on stage and started playing, using two combs instead of sticks. Garland was impressed, and told Martin that Faron Young needed a drummer, and he could get him the gig. At the time Young was one of the biggest stars in country music. That year, 1961, he had three country top ten hits, including a number one with his version of Willie Nelson's "Hello Walls", produced by Ken Nelson: [Excerpt: Faron Young, "Hello Walls"] Martin joined Faron Young's band for a while, and also ended up playing short stints in the touring bands of various other Nashville-based country and rock stars, including Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, and the Everly Brothers, before heading to LA for a while. Then Mel Taylor of the Ventures hooked him up with some musicians in the Pacific Northwest scene, and Martin started playing there under the name Sir Raleigh and the Coupons with various musicians. After a while he travelled back to LA where he got some members of the LA group Sons of Adam to become a permanent lineup of Coupons, and they recorded several singles with Martin singing lead, including the Tommy Boyce and Steve Venet song "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day", later recorded by the Monkees: [Excerpt: Sir Raleigh and the Coupons, "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day"] He then played with the Standells, before joining the Modern Folk Quartet for a short while, as they were transitioning from their folk sound to a folk-rock style. He was only with them for a short while, and it's difficult to get precise details -- almost everyone involved with Buffalo Springfield has conflicting stories about their own careers with timelines that don't make sense, which is understandable given that people were talking about events decades later and memory plays tricks. "Fast" Eddie Hoh had joined the Modern Folk Quartet on drums in late 1965, at which point they became the Modern Folk Quintet, and nothing I've read about that group talks about Hoh ever actually leaving, but apparently Martin joined them in February 1966, which might mean he's on their single "Night-Time Girl", co-written by Al Kooper and produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: The Modern Folk Quintet, "Night-Time Girl"] After that, Martin was taken on by the Dillards, a bluegrass band who are now possibly most famous for having popularised the Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith song "Duellin' Banjos", which they recorded on their first album and played on the Andy Griffith Show a few years before it was used in Deliverance: [Excerpt: The Dillards, "Duellin' Banjos"] The Dillards had decided to go in a country-rock direction -- and Doug Dillard would later join the Byrds and make records with Gene Clark -- but they were hesitant about it, and after a brief period with Martin in the band they decided to go back to their drummerless lineup. To soften the blow, they told him about another band that was looking for a drummer -- their manager, Jim Dickson, who was also the Byrds' manager, knew Stills and his bandmates. Dewey Martin was in the group. The group still needed a name though. They eventually took their name from a brand of steam roller, after seeing one on the streets when some roadwork was being done. Everyone involved disagrees as to who came up with the name. Steve Stills at one point said it was a group decision after Neil Young and the group's manager Frazier Mohawk stole the nameplate off the steamroller, and later Stills said that Richey Furay had suggested the name while they were walking down the street, Dewey Martin said it was his idea, Neil Young said that he, Steve Sills, and Van Dyke Parks had been walking down the street and either Young or Stills had seen the nameplate and suggested the name, and Van Dyke Parks says that *he* saw the nameplate and suggested it to Dewey Martin: [Excerpt: Steve Stills and Van Dyke Parks on the name] For what it's worth, I tend to believe Van Dyke Parks in most instances -- he's an honest man, and he seems to have a better memory of the sixties than many of his friends who led more chemically interesting lives. Whoever came up with it, the name worked -- as Stills later put it "We thought it was pretty apt, because Neil Young is from Manitoba which is buffalo country, and  Richie Furay was from Springfield, Ohio -- and I'm the field!" It almost certainly also helped that the word "buffalo" had been in the name of Stills' previous group, Buffalo Fish. On the eleventh of April, 1966, Buffalo Springfield played their first gig, at the Troubadour, using equipment borrowed from the Dillards. Chris Hillman of the Byrds was in the audience and was impressed. He got the group a support slot on a show the Byrds and the Dillards were doing a few days later in San Bernardino. That show was compered by a Merseyside-born British DJ, John Ravenscroft, who had managed to become moderately successful in US radio by playing up his regional accent so he sounded more like the Beatles. He would soon return to the UK, and start broadcasting under the name John Peel. Hillman also got them a week-long slot at the Whisky A-Go-Go, and a bidding war started between record labels to sign the band. Dunhill offered five thousand dollars, Warners counted with ten thousand, and then Atlantic offered twelve thousand. Atlantic were *just* starting to get interested in signing white guitar groups -- Jerry Wexler never liked that kind of music, always preferring to stick with soul and R&B, but Ahmet Ertegun could see which way things were going. Atlantic had only ever signed two other white acts before -- Neil Young's old favourite Bobby Darin, who had since left the label, and Sonny and Cher. And Sonny and Cher's management and production team, Brian Stone and Charlie Greene, were also very interested in the group, who even before they had made a record had quickly become the hottest band on the circuit, even playing the Hollywood Bowl as the Rolling Stones' support act. Buffalo Springfield already had managers -- Frazier Mohawk and Richard Davis, the lighting man at the Troubadour (who was sometimes also referred to as Dickie Davis, but I'll use his full name so as not to cause unnecessary confusion in British people who remember the sports TV presenter of the same name), who Mohawk had enlisted to help him. But Stone and Greene weren't going to let a thing like that stop them. According to anonymous reports quoted without attribution in David Roberts' biography of Stills -- so take this with as many grains of salt as you want -- Stone and Greene took Mohawk for a ride around LA in a limo, just the three of them, a gun, and a used hotdog napkin. At the end of the ride, the hotdog napkin had Mohawk's scrawled signature, signing the group over to Stone and Greene. Davis stayed on, but was demoted to just doing their lights. The way things ended up, the group signed to Stone and Greene's production company, who then leased their masters to Atlantic's Atco subsidiary. A publishing company was also set up for the group's songs -- owned thirty-seven point five percent by Atlantic, thirty-seven point five percent by Stone and Greene, and the other twenty-five percent split six ways between the group and Davis, who they considered their sixth member. Almost immediately, Charlie Greene started playing Stills and Young off against each other, trying a divide-and-conquer strategy on the group. This was quite easy, as both men saw themselves as natural leaders, though Stills was regarded by everyone as the senior partner -- the back cover of their first album would contain the line "Steve is the leader but we all are". Stills and Young were the two stars of the group as far as the audience were concerned -- though most musicians who heard them play live say that the band's real strength was in its rhythm section, with people comparing Palmer's playing to that of James Jamerson. But Stills and Young would get into guitar battles on stage, one-upping each other, in ways that turned the tension between them in creative directions. Other clashes, though were more petty -- both men had very domineering mothers, who would actually call the group's management to complain about press coverage if their son was given less space than the other one. The group were also not sure about Young's voice -- to the extent that Stills was known to jokingly apologise to the audience before Young took a lead vocal -- and so while the song chosen as the group's first A-side was Young's "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", Furay was chosen to sing it, rather than Young: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"] On the group's first session, though, both Stills and Young realised that their producers didn't really have a clue -- the group had built up arrangements that had a complex interplay of instruments and vocals, but the producers insisted on cutting things very straightforwardly, with a basic backing track and then the vocals. They also thought that the song was too long so the group should play faster. Stills and Young quickly decided that they were going to have to start producing their own material, though Stone and Greene would remain the producers for the first album. There was another bone of contention though, because in the session the initial plan had been for Stills' song "Go and Say Goodbye" to be the A-side with Young's song as the B-side. It was flipped, and nobody seems quite sure why -- it's certainly the case that, whatever the merits of the two tracks as songs, Stills' song was the one that would have been more likely to become a hit. "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" was a flop, but it did get some local airplay. The next single, "Burned", was a Young song as well, and this time did have Young taking the lead, though in a song dominated by harmonies: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Burned"] Over the summer, though, something had happened that would affect everything for the group -- Neil Young had started to have epileptic seizures. At first these were undiagnosed episodes, but soon they became almost routine events, and they would often happen on stage, particularly at moments of great stress or excitement. Several other members of the group became convinced -- entirely wrongly -- that Young was faking these seizures in order to get women to pay attention to him. They thought that what he wanted was for women to comfort him and mop his brow, and that collapsing would get him that. The seizures became so common that Richard Davis, the group's lighting tech, learned to recognise the signs of a seizure before it happened. As soon as it looked like Young was about to collapse the lights would turn on, someone would get ready to carry him off stage, and Richie Furay would know to grab Young's guitar before he fell so that the guitar wouldn't get damaged. Because they weren't properly grounded and Furay had an electric guitar of his own, he'd get a shock every time. Young would later claim that during some of the seizures, he would hallucinate that he was another person, in another world, living another life that seemed to have its own continuity -- people in the other world would recognise him and talk to him as if he'd been away for a while -- and then when he recovered he would have to quickly rebuild his identity, as if temporarily amnesiac, and during those times he would find things like the concept of lying painful. The group's first album came out in December, and they were very, very, unhappy with it. They thought the material was great, but they also thought that the production was terrible. Stone and Greene's insistence that they record the backing tracks first and then overdub vocals, rather than singing live with the instruments, meant that the recordings, according to Stills and Young in particular, didn't capture the sound of the group's live performance, and sounded sterile. Stills and Young thought they'd fixed some of that in the mono mix, which they spent ten days on, but then Stone and Greene did the stereo mix without consulting the band, in less than two days, and the album was released at precisely the time that stereo was starting to overtake mono in the album market. I'm using the mono mixes in this podcast, but for decades the only versions available were the stereo ones, which Stills and Young both loathed. Ahmet Ertegun also apparently thought that the demo versions of the songs -- some of which were eventually released on a box set in 2001 -- were much better than the finished studio recordings. The album was not a success on release, but it did contain the first song any of the group had written to chart. Soon after its release, Van Dyke Parks' friend Lenny Waronker was producing a single by a group who had originally been led by Sly Stone and had been called Sly and the Mojo Men. By this time Stone was no longer involved in the group, and they were making music in a very different style from the music their former leader would later become known for. Parks was brought in to arrange a baroque-pop version of Stills' album track "Sit Down I Think I Love You" for the group, and it became their only top forty hit, reaching number thirty-six: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down I Think I Love You"] It was shortly after the first Buffalo Springfield album was released, though, that Steve Stills wrote what would turn out to be *his* group's only top forty single. The song had its roots in both LA and San Francisco. The LA roots were more obvious -- the song was written about a specific experience Stills had had. He had been driving to Sunset Strip from Laurel Canyon on November the twelfth 1966, and he had seen a mass of young people and police in riot gear, and he had immediately turned round, partly because he didn't want to get involved in what looked to be a riot, and partly because he'd been inspired -- he had the idea for a lyric, which he pretty much finished in the car even before he got home: [Excerpt: The Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The riots he saw were what became known later as the Riot on Sunset Strip. This was a minor skirmish between the police and young people of LA -- there had been complaints that young people had been spilling out of the nightclubs on Sunset Strip into the street, causing traffic problems, and as a result the city council had introduced various heavy-handed restrictions, including a ten PM curfew for all young people in the area, removing the permits that many clubs had which allowed people under twenty-one to be present, forcing the Whisky A-Go-Go to change its name just to "the Whisk", and forcing a club named Pandora's Box, which was considered the epicentre of the problem, to close altogether. Flyers had been passed around calling for a "funeral" for Pandora's Box -- a peaceful gathering at which people could say goodbye to a favourite nightspot, and a thousand people had turned up. The police also turned up, and in the heavy-handed way common among law enforcement, they managed to provoke a peaceful party and turn it into a riot. This would not normally be an event that would be remembered even a year later, let alone nearly sixty years later, but Sunset Strip was the centre of the American rock music world in the period, and of the broader youth entertainment field. Among those arrested at the riot, for example, were Jack Nicholson and Peter Fonda, neither of whom were huge stars at the time, but who were making cheap B-movies with Roger Corman for American International Pictures. Among the cheap exploitation films that American International Pictures made around this time was one based on the riots, though neither Nicholson, Fonda, or Corman were involved. Riot on Sunset Strip was released in cinemas only four months after the riots, and it had a theme song by Dewey Martin's old colleagues The Standells, which is now regarded as a classic of garage rock: [Excerpt: The Standells, "Riot on Sunset Strip"] The riots got referenced in a lot of other songs, as well. The Mothers of Invention's second album, Absolutely Free, contains the song "Plastic People" which includes this section: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Plastic People"] And the Monkees track "Daily Nightly", written by Michael Nesmith, was always claimed by Nesmith to be an impressionistic portrait of the riots, though the psychedelic lyrics sound to me more like they're talking about drug use and street-walking sex workers than anything to do with the riots: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] But the song about the riots that would have the most lasting effect on popular culture was the one that Steve Stills wrote that night. Although how much he actually wrote, at least of the music, is somewhat open to question. Earlier that month, Buffalo Springfield had spent some time in San Francisco. They hadn't enjoyed the experience -- as an LA band, they were thought of as a bunch of Hollywood posers by most of the San Francisco scene, with the exception of one band, Moby Grape -- a band who, like them had three guitarist/singer/songwriters, and with whom they got on very well. Indeed, they got on rather better with Moby Grape than they were getting on with each other at this point, because Young and Stills would regularly get into arguments, and every time their argument seemed to be settling down, Dewey Martin would manage to say the wrong thing and get Stills riled up again -- Martin was doing a lot of speed at this point and unable to stop talking, even when it would have been politic to do so. There was even some talk while they were in San Francisco of the bands doing a trade -- Young and Pete Lewis of Moby Grape swapping places -- though that came to nothing. But Stills, according to both Richard Davis and Pete Lewis, had been truly impressed by two Moby Grape songs. One of them was a song called "On the Other Side", which Moby Grape never recorded, but which apparently had a chorus that went "Stop, can't you hear the music ringing in your ear, right before you go, telling you the way is clear," with the group all pausing after the word "Stop". The other was a song called "Murder in my Heart for the Judge": [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Murder in my Heart for the Judge"] The song Stills wrote had a huge amount of melodic influence from that song, and quite a bit from “On the Other Side”, though he apparently didn't notice until after the record came out, at which point he apologised to Moby Grape. Stills wasn't massively impressed with the song he'd written, and went to Stone and Greene's office to play it for them, saying "I'll play it, for what it's worth". They liked the song and booked a studio to get the song recorded and rush-released, though according to Neil Young neither Stone nor Greene were actually present at the session, and the song was recorded on December the fifth, while some outbursts of rioting were still happening, and released on December the twenty-third. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The song didn't have a title when they recorded it, or so Stills thought, but when he mentioned this to Greene and Stone afterwards, they said "Of course it does. You said, 'I'm going to play the song, 'For What It's Worth'" So that became the title, although Ahmet Ertegun didn't like the idea of releasing a single with a title that wasn't in the lyric, so the early pressings of the single had "Stop, Hey, What's That Sound?" in brackets after the title. The song became a big hit, and there's a story told by David Crosby that doesn't line up correctly, but which might shed some light on why. According to Crosby, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" got its first airplay because Crosby had played members of Buffalo Springfield a tape he'd been given of the unreleased Beatles track "A Day in the Life", and they'd told their gangster manager-producers about it. Those manager-producers had then hired a sex worker to have sex with Crosby and steal the tape, which they'd then traded to a radio station in return for airplay. That timeline doesn't work, unless the sex worker involved was also a time traveller,  because "A Day in the Life" wasn't even recorded until January 1967 while "Clancy" came out in August 1966, and there'd been two other singles released between then and January 1967. But it *might* be the case that that's what happened with "For What It's Worth", which was released in the last week of December 1966, and didn't really start to do well on the charts for a couple of months. Right after recording the song, the group went to play a residency in New York, of which Ahmet Ertegun said “When they performed there, man, there was no band I ever heard that had the electricity of that group. That was the most exciting group I've ever seen, bar none. It was just mind-boggling.” During that residency they were joined on stage at various points by Mitch Ryder, Odetta, and Otis Redding. While in New York, the group also recorded "Mr. Soul", a song that Young had originally written as a folk song about his experiences with epilepsy, the nature of the soul, and dealing with fame. However, he'd noticed a similarity to "Satisfaction" and decided to lean into it. The track as finally released was heavily overdubbed by Young a few months later, but after it was released he decided he preferred the original take, which by then only existed as a scratchy acetate, which got released on a box set in 2001: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Mr. Soul (original version)"] Everyone has a different story of how the session for that track went -- at least one version of the story has Otis Redding turning up for the session and saying he wanted to record the song himself, as his follow-up to his version of "Satisfaction", but Young being angry at the idea. According to other versions of the story, Greene and Stills got into a physical fight, with Greene having to be given some of the valium Young was taking for his epilepsy to calm him down. "For What it's Worth" was doing well enough on the charts that the album was recalled, and reissued with "For What It's Worth" replacing Stills' song "Baby Don't Scold", but soon disaster struck the band. Bruce Palmer was arrested on drugs charges, and was deported back to Canada just as the song started to rise through the charts. The group needed a new bass player, fast. For a lipsynch appearance on local TV they got Richard Davis to mime the part, and then they got in Ken Forssi, the bass player from Love, for a couple of gigs. They next brought in Ken Koblun, the bass player from the Squires, but he didn't fit in with the rest of the group. The next replacement was Jim Fielder. Fielder was a friend of the group, and knew the material -- he'd subbed for Palmer a few times in 1966 when Palmer had been locked up after less serious busts. And to give some idea of how small a scene the LA scene was, when Buffalo Springfield asked him to become their bass player, he was playing rhythm guitar for the Mothers of Invention, while Billy Mundi was on drums, and had played on their second, as yet unreleased, album, Absolutely Free: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Call any Vegetable"] And before joining the Mothers, Fielder and Mundi had also played together with Van Dyke Parks, who had served his own short stint as a Mother of Invention already, backing Tim Buckley on Buckley's first album: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And the arrangements on that album were by Jack Nitzsche, who would soon become a very close collaborator with Young. "For What it's Worth" kept rising up the charts. Even though it had been inspired by a very local issue, the lyrics were vague enough that people in other situations could apply it to themselves, and it soon became regarded as an anti-war protest anthem -- something Stills did nothing to discourage, as the band were all opposed to the war. The band were also starting to collaborate with other people. When Stills bought a new house, he couldn't move in to it for a while, and so Peter Tork invited him to stay at his house. The two got on so well that Tork invited Stills to produce the next Monkees album -- only to find that Michael Nesmith had already asked Chip Douglas to do it. The group started work on a new album, provisionally titled "Stampede", but sessions didn't get much further than Stills' song "Bluebird" before trouble arose between Young and Stills. The root of the argument seems to have been around the number of songs each got on the album. With Richie Furay also writing, Young was worried that given the others' attitudes to his songwriting, he might get as few as two songs on the album. And Young and Stills were arguing over which song should be the next single, with Young wanting "Mr. Soul" to be the A-side, while Stills wanted "Bluebird" -- Stills making the reasonable case that they'd released two Neil Young songs as singles and gone nowhere, and then they'd released one of Stills', and it had become a massive hit. "Bluebird" was eventually chosen as the A-side, with "Mr. Soul" as the B-side: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Bluebird"] The "Bluebird" session was another fraught one. Fielder had not yet joined the band, and session player Bobby West subbed on bass. Neil Young had recently started hanging out with Jack Nitzsche, and the two were getting very close and working on music together. Young had impressed Nitzsche not just with his songwriting but with his arrogance -- he'd played Nitzsche his latest song, "Expecting to Fly", and Nitzsche had said halfway through "That's a great song", and Young had shushed him and told him to listen, not interrupt. Nitzsche, who had a monstrous ego himself and was also used to working with people like Phil Spector, the Rolling Stones and Sonny Bono, none of them known for a lack of faith in their own abilities, was impressed. Shortly after that, Stills had asked Nitzsch

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LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
Stop Living In Survival Mode

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 22:00


In this episode, Hardin shares the importance of freeing yourself from living and thinking in "survival mode". #LifeOfABossThis episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

Ask Me Anything with J.D. Greear
AMA Live, Part 3: Should Churches Sacrifice Doctrine to Appeal to More People?

Ask Me Anything with J.D. Greear

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 15:15


Recently, Pastor J.D. got to host a special "Live AMA" with college students from Hardin Baptist Church in Hardin, KY. Listen in as Pastor J.D. answers questions submitted by the audience, including, "Should Churches Sacrifice Doctrine to Appeal to More People?"