Podcasts about Oops

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  • 3,837PODCASTS
  • 4,970EPISODES
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  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Oops

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Latest podcast episodes about Oops

Titan Up The Defense
Episode 329: Titan Up the Defense 256- New Titans #52

Titan Up The Defense

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 108:00


Oops 2, Still Oopsing! So remember how last week's episode got goofed up? Well, it happened again. I know! So instead of doing a Defenders episode this week, we read New Titans 52. It's a complicated mess, but oddly compelling. Enjoy? Enjoy?If you enjoy the show and would like access to bonus materials, please consider donating at patreon.com/ttwastelandYou can get into touch with us at ttwasteland@gmail.com or Titan Up the Defense PO Box 20311 Portland, OR 97294

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: Oops I Ate It

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:50


CLIP: What did you eat that you weren't supposed to? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
FULL SHOW: Oops I Ate It, 10 Second Talent Show, Jews For Foos and more​

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 89:23


FULL EPISODE 12/1/21: Open. Casino Side Hustle. Klein's Dog's Birthday. Ally Knows the News. Is Deleting Messages In Front of Significant Other Shady? A.D.D. News. Jews For Foos. Oops I Ate It. A.D.D. News. 109 Second Talent Show. How To Cut Someone Off From Receiving Your Gifts. A.D.D. News. 5 10 20. Company XMAS Party is Cancelled.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Toys Reluctant Adult Podcast
The Family That Podcasts Together

Toys Reluctant Adult Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 61:55


Breaking news! But enough about NECA's quality control. At last, the Channel 6 News team is assembled! But why do some collectors still feel like they can't get “a head.” Also, Hasbro throws a bone to Star Wars fans, but is there enough meat on there to finally fund the Rancor? Plus, Target says, “Oops, was that a spoiler?” with a set that will have you rethinking the next family game night. Don't ship your drawers, it's The Reluctant Adult Podcast! YouTube The Reluctant Adult Podcast Instagram @TheReluctantAdultPodcast Twitter @Reluctant_Pod Pre-order the Hasbro Ghostbusters Plasma Series Spengler Neutrona Wand from Entertainment Earth Buy something for Paul from his Amazon Wishlist Buy something for Bill from his Amazon Wishlist

Are you Afraid of Are you Afraid of the Dark
Oops All Funnies: Season Seven

Are you Afraid of Are you Afraid of the Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:33


Now that we have passed Thanksgiving, you all are just one week away from new episodes. But for this week, we invite you to sit at our table for a mouthful of chuckles and guffaws. Thanks for listening.

早安英文-最调皮的英语电台
Excuse my French跟「法语」没啥关系!居然还跟脏话有关?

早安英文-最调皮的英语电台

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 9:01


「微信」或者「微博」搜索关注[早安英文],查看更多有趣实用的中英双语节目。�笔记:听前想一下:不告而别一时之勇AA制pardon/ excuse my French (说了粗话或脏话后表示歉意的感叹语)对不起这个表达最开始的时候就是表达“原谅我说的法语”的意思,因为有些美国人喜欢在说话的时候加几个法语词,如果对方听不懂,你表示歉意就会说“pardon/ excuse my French"后来衍生为在说了脏话之后的一种道歉回答:Oh i've hadsuch a sh*t day.我今天可过的太糟了.Oops,pardon my French.不好意思,我说了脏话。有些情况下,会在骂人之前,使用 Pardon/ Excuse my French, 可以表示强调:Pardon myFrench, you are a ** idiot.不好意思我忍不住了,你真是**笨蛋。French leave 不辞而别,不告而别法国人浪漫随性,在社交宴会上可能会不向主人告别就擅自离去,但是英国人非常讨厌这种行为,于是就用“French leave ”表示“不辞而别,擅离职守”。Taking French leave is not my style. 不辞而别不是我的风格。Why did you take French leave yesterday? 昨天怎么没打招呼就离开办公室啊?Spanish athlete 胡说八道的人;吹牛者相传在16世纪,英国人和西班牙人的一场比赛,西班牙人未赢得比赛,却在赛前吹响了胜利的号角。因此,英国人称Spanish athlete为“爱吹牛的人”,或“胡说八道的人”。Don't be a Spanish athlete. Nobody will like you.不要胡说八道,到处吹牛。没有人会喜欢这样的人。获取节目完整音频、笔记和片尾的歌曲名,请关注威信公众号「早安英文」,回复“加油”即可。更多有意思的英语干货等着你!

Glitter and Garbage
Oops, We Did it Again ft. Mikey Pesante

Glitter and Garbage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:37


Justin and Justine sit down with dancer/choreographer/singer Mikey Pesante, who has danced with Rihanna, Camila Cabello, and yes, Britney Bitch. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Judgies
Ep 77: Oops All Grinch (ft. Abelina Sabrina)

The Judgies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 66:33


Please check out Abelina Sabrina on YouTube and Twitchhttps://www.youtube.com/c/abelinasabrina https://www.twitch.tv/abelinasabrina In this Episode: We talk about a girlfriend's eventful night at a bachelor party, a guy committing stolen valor on a date, woman's creepy encounter with a possible employer, a girlfriend having to explain why they aren't invited to a wedding, a woman gets teacher's mad at educating her brother, and a listener writes to us about almost losing a friendship for 'Chup shaming. We also play a few rounds of Billionaire or Villianaire!!! New Judgies Merch available now atbonfire.com/welikebeans Our Patreon is officially open, if you want to see extra content go check it out! https://www.patreon.com/JudgiesPod Send us mail! (Addressed However You'd Like) P.O. Box 58 Ottawa, IL 61350 Leave a Review! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-judgies/id1519741238 Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/judgiespod Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/judgiespod Intro Music by: Iván https://open.spotify.com/artist/5gB2VvyqfnOlNv37PHKRNJ?si=f6TIYrLITkG2NZXGLm_Y-Q&dl_branch=1 Story Links: AITA: For getting wild at bachelor party? DELTED AITA: For committing Stolen Valor? DELTED TwoXChromosome: Creepy dude shared my location https://www.reddit.com/r/TwoXChromosomes/comments/p74j1n/he_shared_my_location_to_himself_without_my/ AITA: For telling Fiance that his mom is engaged? https://www.reddit.com/r/AmItheAsshole/comments/pnhrhp/aita_for_telling_my_fianc%C3%A9_that_his_mom_got/ Advice: Teacher wants me to stop teaching my brother https://www.reddit.com/r/Advice/comments/pd99wa/teacher_wants_me_to_stop_teaching_my_brother/ 0:00 Intro 0:42 Sabrina's Intro rhyme 1:26 Grinch Talk 4:19 Girlfriend's brothers bachelor party 14:35 Committing Stolen Valor to get laid 23:08 Creepy guy shares my location to himself 32:46 Break 33:20 Circle Jurge: Billionaire or Villianaire 43:37 Have to tell my BF that his mom is engaged 49:15 LS: Almost lost a friend over 'Chup Shaming 56:57 Teacher wants me to stop teaching my brother things 1:05:35 Plugs and Outro #judgies #abelinasabrina #grinch

That Video Game Podcast
TVGP Episode 736: Oops, All Accidents

That Video Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 48:51


Featuring: Michael "Boston" Hannon, Paul “Moonpir” Carver-Smith, and Alexander “TheNimp” Jolly Running Time: 48:50 Music by MusiM: Homepage | Bandcamp Livestream Archive: YouTube This week we chat about Cats & Soup, Mario Party Superstars, Halo Infinite, Destiny 2, Forza Horizon 5, Kill It With Fire, Into the Pit, I Am Fish. Become a patron of TVGP for just a few dollars a month at E1M1's Patreon Page! Get two month early access to Critical Misses, uncensored outtakes, and much more for just $5/month!

Kyle X Why?
S4E2 – Kyle Chop!

Kyle X Why?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 71:49


Last week ended with a promise that Jessi would get drunk, and the fanfic did not disappoint! Jessi is at a party drinking an entire Kyle's bed's worth of beer, and Kyle has to fight off some goons. As if that wasn't exciting enough, the episode ends with a bunch of hooded snipers preparing to kill them both. Wow! Fortunately, Tom Foss is here to help. Oops, wait, he just left for Minsk. Ever heard of it? Sam | Jordan Twitter | Patreon | Discord | YouTube

None Taken
E 107 Oops All Prisons

None Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 78:47


Headlines show topics include: OSHA, European Protests, and NYE. The Peng Shuai mystery. The Waukesha tragedy. Commuted prison sentences, and opioid deaths. The Social Spending Bill, oil supply issues, and gas price investigations, oh, nbd but NASA is "testing" an asteroid deflection technique. All this and like 7 more other topics, I just hate listing all these subjects down. PUT THIS ON AND FIGHT WITH YOUR FAMILY --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/None_Taken /support

Technado from ITProTV
Technado, Ep. 231: Reflectiz's Idan Cohen

Technado from ITProTV

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 51:54


Idan Cohen, Co-founder and CEO of Reflectiz, joined the crew to share how they detect website vulnerabilities and threats. He also discussed the risks of third and fourth-party code. In the news, the guys covered the Windows 10 21H2 release, Apple's move to let you fix your own devices, and Twitter stopping AMP support. Then two groups were pwned last week, with GoDaddy exposing WordPress data and Firefox users sharing login cookies on GitHub. Oops.

Technado from ITProTV (Audio)
Technado, Ep. 231: Reflectiz's Idan Cohen

Technado from ITProTV (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 51:50


Idan Cohen, Co-founder and CEO of Reflectiz, joined the crew to share how they detect website vulnerabilities and threats. He also discussed the risks of third and fourth-party code. In the news, the guys covered the Windows 10 21H2 release, Apple's move to let you fix your own devices, and Twitter stopping AMP support. Then two groups were pwned last week, with GoDaddy exposing WordPress data and Firefox users sharing login cookies on GitHub. Oops.

Chapel Bell Curve
5.20 - Oops, All Segments - GT Preview

Chapel Bell Curve

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 82:42


Oops. We combined 'em all. Didn't have much to talk about between the two games we're currently sandwiched between so we did all the things. You get some Yara, you get some #askcbc, you some stats, and a guest in the ever talented Ross Rutledge here to talk to you about CBCR2 and how we're a real stats-pod now. It's the everything episode.Enjoy Yara's Rage Against the MachineIf you like what we do, consider throwing a dollar our way through our Patreon! A $1 monthly contribution gives you access to our Discord server and burgeoning community of goobers ready to talk about football and all things enthusiastically.Send us your questions using the hashtag #askcbc or use good ole fashioned email - ChapelBellCurve@gmail.com Yell at us on TwitterChapel Bell Curve Twitter - @ChapelBellCurveNathan Lawrence on Twitter - @NathanJlawrenceJustin Bray on Twitter - @TheJustinBray

Are you Afraid of Are you Afraid of the Dark
Oops All Funnies Season Six

Are you Afraid of Are you Afraid of the Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:05


Thank you for sticking with us while we are on  brief hiatus from new episodes. We promise there will be new episodes in December. For now, we reminisce on some old stuff that made us laugh and hopefully you too. Thanks for listening!

Textual Deviants
Adventures In Babysitting

Textual Deviants

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 70:28


On this Thanksgiving Eve we are thankful for you listeners who embrace our chaotic content and nature! And we are also thankful for Brittney Spears because Oops we did it again! We watched two different movies, but we did not let it derail our release this week and for that, we are truly thankful!Tiffany Paulsen (Writer of Holidate) makes her second appearance on the podcast with our next DCOM, Adventures in Babysitting, the 2016 remake of the 1987 classic! And she is truly a giver when it comes to giving us content that we could talk about for HOURS!The spirit of Home Alone was with this one, but the execution, was, shall we say.....lacking? With Disney Channel heavy hitters Sofia Carson and Sabrina Carpenter at the helmet, anything could happen, and everything did! Join us as we feast on this weeks DCOM, Adventures in Babysitting!

Night Attack Video Feed
Great Night #22: These Old Gizzards (w/ Trivia Stream Game Show)

Night Attack Video Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Brian, Bryce, and Brett Weaver are holding down the fort as they normally do! Oops, we forgot to come up with topics, so we open up the phone lines to one confused, disgruntling Floridian who can't seem to navigate Disney's Epcot. Our friend Gus takes over the show to hold his Trivia Stream Game Show online pub quiz. The game's not live, but you can still play along at home! I heard that in stereo! Check out more Trivia Stream Game Show at https://www.twitch.tv/triviastreamgameshow Email us! GreatNightPod@gmail.com is the place to send in games, punishments, stories, or kind words :) Get an extra episode every week only at https://www.patreon.com/greatnight and enjoy the preshow and postshow in all the public feeds!

Night Attack Audio Feed
Great Night #22: These Old Gizzards (w/ Trivia Stream Game Show)

Night Attack Audio Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Brian, Bryce, and Brett Weaver are holding down the fort as they normally do! Oops, we forgot to come up with topics, so we open up the phone lines to one confused, disgruntling Floridian who can't seem to navigate Disney's Epcot. Our friend Gus takes over the show to hold his Trivia Stream Game Show online pub quiz. The game's not live, but you can still play along at home! I heard that in stereo! Check out more Trivia Stream Game Show at https://www.twitch.tv/triviastreamgameshow Email us! GreatNightPod@gmail.com is the place to send in games, punishments, stories, or kind words :) Get an extra episode every week only at https://www.patreon.com/greatnight and enjoy the preshow and postshow in all the public feeds!

Actually, You Are a Real Runner
Ep 365: Marathon Training 19 Weeks Till- Drinking on Saturday and missing your long run on Sunday, oops

Actually, You Are a Real Runner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 7:56


Work with me: https://www.systemsforselfcare.com/ Support the podcast: https://www.ko-fi.com/jaclynricchiostover  

Be Createfull
46. Attitude of Gratitude (and How Creativity Helps)

Be Createfull

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 66:21


Oops! The audio file didn't upload all the way the first time around. Let's try this again... It's Thanksgiving week! Which means it's the perfect time to talk about how creativity helps us find gratitude and contentment. Thank you to Craig Hutson for our createfull theme music! Listen to more of Craig's music on Spotify. Connect with Make.Do. on Instagram (@makedocreate), Facebook (Make.Do.Searcy), and YouTube (Make.Do. Creative Studio)

The Best Little Horror House in Philly
Sunshine with Alex Schmidt

The Best Little Horror House in Philly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:19


Manfred Mann's Earth Band once said, "Mama always told me not to look into the eyes of the sun,  but Mama, that's where the Best Horror Movie Ever Made is!"  He was talking about Sunshine, the 2007 heater from Alex Garland & Danny Boyle - and so is today's guest, Alex Schmidt (Secretly Incredibly Fascinating, Cracked). We're dispensing business tips, admiring the emotional moments around falling into the fickle sun, and much much more!  I also play fast and loose with the name Pinbacker, calling him Pinbaker a bunch. Oops. Listen to this episode and return to the dust! Check out the BLHHiP Patreon to get all kinds of bonus episodes PLUS A 15% OFF COUPON for the BLHHiP poster!  Speaking of which - The BLHHiP poster! It's rad as heck. Check them out here but please note this is a limited run, especially for the Intermediate and Reds variants. 

El Club de las 4AM
110. “El Oops perfecto.”

El Club de las 4AM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 63:34


Hablemos con @ambarmoon sobre su nuevo embarazo. Un oops que con el trajo shock, incertidumbre, miedo, y al mismo tiempo felicidad absoluta. Conversamos honestamente sobre todos los sentimientos que arropan a las mujeres cuando llega un embarazo no planificado y como te sacude el pánico de pensar aún sea por un segundo, que tu bebe esta en riesgo.Este bebé llegó tal vez en un momento no indicado pero si en el momento perfecto. ¡Quédate y escucha!

Land Academy Show
Jill Friday – How to Sound Like a Professional Investor (LA 1637)

Land Academy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 13:05


Jill Friday - How to Sound Like a Professional Investor (LA 1637) Transcript: Steven Butala: Steven and Jill here. Jill DeWit: Hello. Steven Butala: Welcome to the Land Academy Show, entertaining land investment talk. I'm Steven Jack Butala. Jill DeWit: And I'm Jill DeWit, broadcasting from the valley of the sun. Steven Butala: Today Jill and I talk... Well, it's Jill Friday, and she's going to tell us how to sound like a professional investor. I'm as excited and interested as this as you are. Jill DeWit: Thanks. Steven Butala: Before we get into it. Let's take a question posted by one of our members on the LandInvestors.com online community, is free, and don't forget to subscribe on the Land Academy YouTube channel and comment on the shows you like. Jill DeWit: Okay. Erin wrote, "What are some good ways to recover from a mailer that was priced too high?" Steven Butala: I figure this is right up your alley. Jill DeWit: Totally. This is hard. I know it, it's hard to get used to. It's so much easier to come in low and add money than it is to come in high and take away money. But I've done it. And so I was just taught. This is part... I believe is into the topic today. This is all because of the intensive training that I'm doing. We're week two of three right now. By the time this airs it will be over. And it's just how I get deals done. Whether it's the buy side, the sell side, all of that. And what do you do with you come too high with these people. First of all, I want you to take a step back and, and double check your math because maybe there's something to it that you're missing because it could be zone something special. Jill DeWit: It could be in a very unique area. There could be some special attribute. So I never assume when people call in and say, "I like everything, but the price." When they say exactly like that. I will never assume that I'm wrong. I got to get some more information first. So I nicely say, "I may have goofed. Tell me what's going on." And then I ask a lot of questions. So say you've done that they came in... This is the opposite though. You price it too high. They love you by the way. Re roll back again. What's the exact question? Steven Butala: How do you recover from a mailer that's priced too high? Jill DeWit: Priced too high. Okay. So, and by the way, this is the funniest situation, because... Can you do that for me for a second? It's funny for me because everybody calls you back and they love you. That's usually how you know you did it. Like, "Oh no, I sent out a thousand offers and I got a thousand phone calls. Oops. I may have offered too much." All right. So, but anyway, you need to take all the information in and do it just like you would normally take all the calls down, take all the inbound information, go back, do your due diligence, pick the 10 best ones. Right? And then you got to re figure, what is the right price. And then you need to go back to them and tell them, "I goofed and here's why." Jill DeWit: And it's not hard to come up... I mean, I will point out something that would make the property worth more and say, "I thought it was closer to town." I give them some reasons why not that I meant to buy it cheaper. I will never say that, but I will give them some reasons that shocks. "I hate to say this. I know I priced it at 10,000. I meant two. Here's the reason why I did not realize this was this far from X. I did not realize that the access needed a Y. I did not realize that you owed that much on back taxes." So you can come up with other things to do that... Don't do it on all of them. Still pick your best ones and then go back in and give them some reasons. And then let them respond. Steven Butala: Every property's got flaws. Every property's got attributes. Great stuff about it. No two properties are exactly the same. Jill DeWit: Exactly. Steven Butala: Point out the flaws, whatever they are and say, "Yeah, I offer you 10,000 bucks, but here's the deal,

What's in the news Robin
VAPE VLOG! OOPS! All Liquid Tastings! Beer Guest! KARMA MECH from Argentina!!

What's in the news Robin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 144:16


Apart from the ungodly amount of dangle clacks, I've decided that tonight is going to be another "OOPS ALL LIQUID TASTINGS" kind of night. The weekly cleanings of my office have unearthed many many many bottles of liquid, both old and new, commercial and DIY and dammit I just love trying liquids to that's what I want to do.

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #46 Amy Tran: It's the little "t" trauma.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 34:53


Amy Tran is wise beyond her years and absolutely CRUSHES this interview!  She covers the "little t" trauma.  Believes in normalizing men asking for help and checking in, …  Helps us sort out our inner core beliefs.  Her steps become aware of what we are thinking, identify the patterns, see our core beliefs…  and change (err... heal!)  "Awareness is the first step towards healing,"Administrative: (See episode transcript below)You can find Amy on Instagram @doodledwellness.Email  Amy here: amy@doodledwellness.comCheck out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript:0:00:05.8 Mischa Z: Welcome back, everybody to the Tools For a Good Life Summit, and I would like to welcome Amy Tran, MA... Welcome, Amy.0:00:16.7 Amy Tran: Thank you, thank you for having me. Hello, everyone.0:00:21.2 Mischa Z: Awesome. And quick I'm gonna read your bio and then we'll get down to the fun. Okay?0:00:28.5 Amy Tran: Mm-hmm.0:00:29.9 Mischa Z: Fantastic. So Amy is a doctoral student studying clinical psychology in Ontario, Canada, she has received intensive training to provide therapy as well as diagnose mental health disorders and autism in children and adolescents, she has trained in community mental health centers, hospitals and private practices across Ontario. You are also involved in research that examines how the use of smartphones and tablets by young children and parents may disrupt the healthy development of children. Before committing to become a psychologist, you studied visual and creative arts and your Instagram account @doodledwellness, @doodlewellness is where your passion for mental health and art come together, and I do wanna say that your Instagram account is freaking awesome, I just... Brings a smile to my face. And I love everything about it, and it was one of the ways I tracked you down. But let me continue before we get to that.0:01:42.1 Amy Tran: Thank you.0:01:44.4 Mischa Z: Indeed. You draw doodles on social media and create workbooks to make mental health resources and information more accessible to everyone. You're very successful at that. Amy's goal is to raise awareness about mental illness, combat stigma, share helpful coping skills, invite you to practice mindfulness and brighten your social media feed with a daily pick me up, and you will be completing your residency in Toronto next year. Correct?0:02:17.7 Amy Tran: Yes. Well, next year academic year, but this year, September 2021, I'll be off the internship. Yay! [chuckle] Gotta check my pulse.[laughter]0:02:30.9 Mischa Z: And then once you graduate, you hope to continue working with youth integrating mindfulness into mental health treatment and advocating for more accessible mental health treatment.0:02:44.8 Amy Tran: Mm-hmm.0:02:45.9 Mischa Z: Alright, again, welcome to the Summit. And when I look over here, everybody, I'm just looking at your Instagram feed again, @doodledwellness, and you have managed to compile 154,000 followers. Does that surprise you?[chuckle]0:03:04.7 Amy Tran: It really does. I mean, even just hearing you say that number out loud, it's like, "What? Really? Like my account?" So it is surprising. Yeah.0:03:14.0 Mischa Z: Yeah, I think what's really cool about it too, is there's a humbleness within it, there's a humbleness within your doodledwellness.com, your main web page, so I love that. I think there's so much stuff to talk about there, I like your most recent post, childhood trauma. Again, I'm just looking over here, so I apologize. Yes, childhood trauma can also be dot dot dot... And being in my young 50s and perhaps earlier in my 40s, being an A-type male, like a hard charger and all this, if I heard the word trauma, my brain would think, I don't have trauma or that's only this over here, but that's not true, it turns out. Maybe you could speak to that for a second.0:04:10.8 Amy Tran: Yeah, No, I'd love to... I agree, I think most people, when they think about trauma, they think about what do we call, big T trauma, right? Catastrophic accident, natural disaster, abuse or neglect, and of course, those things are very, very traumatic, but I think also love is something that all humans want and crave and need, and especially as a child, right? When you're in that vulnerable stage, who do you depend on to receive love and to have your needs met? Well, the answer typically would be your parents, your mom and dad. But you can have an amazing relationship with mom and dad, they can provide you with food, shelter, warmth, but when there are certain dynamics that play out where you feel like you can't express how you're feeling, you can't share your thoughts, you have to be a certain way to gain approval, love or validation, then that's traumatizing because you are betraying who you really are. And when we're younger, we don't have the mature brain to be able to say, "Well, maybe mom and dad are just having a bad day, or maybe mom and dad were never modeled how to cope with my emotional needs."0:05:38.2 Amy Tran: Instead, the small infant brain is like, "There's something wrong with me." And that core belief gets internalized and carries on throughout adulthood and that's traumatizing, right? To feel like we don't deserve love or cannot receive love unless we're certain people.0:06:02.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, it is traumatizing. And yeah, so hiding your true self by fear of disapproval and to carry that habit into adulthood, right? Denying your needs to be strong for your family. When you say that, denying your needs to be strong for your family... Tell me that.0:06:23.7 Amy Tran: Yeah. Yeah, so let me give you an example. So let's say you are the only male in the home and something's going on with your siblings, so maybe they have special needs or maybe they developed a drug habit or a serious mental health condition, and everyone starts to work together to help this person through, or maybe someone gets cancer, let's say.0:06:50.8 Mischa Z: Okay.0:06:52.8 Amy Tran: And as the young man, you're like, "Well, my dad is so occupied, he's not able to provide for the family because he's dealing with this or this, so I'm gonna be strong for the family. I'm not gonna talk about how scared I am, how worried I am, what I need." And you suppress that, "Oh, what? I'm fine, I'm totally fine. Let's talk about you, don't worry about me."0:07:14.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah and then perhaps you develop the habit of... I know I did [chuckle] of not learning how to communicate perhaps, or feeling that it was okay to be stressed out, or I guess to communicate that in a healthy manner, right?0:07:33.8 Amy Tran: Right, totally.0:07:36.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, another post that you have that again, I'm looking at over here is it's normalized men, and I love that, and it again, resonated with me being in my 40s, fortunately, I was like, I need to start figuring out how to express my emotions, how to cry, how to check in with another, how to ask for help. That's so hard. So maybe talk to that for a minute, normalized men...0:08:07.6 Amy Tran: Yeah. The post, it says, Normalize men asking for help, checking in on each other, crying, sharing their feelings, practicing self-care and having fears and doubts. So I think that it again, it comes back to just, who are we? We're just human beings, right? So this concept of men having to hide their emotions, be strong, that vulnerability is a weakness, those are all just societal constructs that we've taken on, but they're really harmful because we're social beings and we need each other, and we ask each other for help. Checking in on each other that makes you feel like you're wanted, like you belong. Crying, this one is a really interesting one because crying is an emotional release, and in fact, when we cry, there is research to suggest that it can actually help your body bounce back into a place of equilibrium, but we suppress that, right? Sharing feelings, same thing.0:09:14.8 Amy Tran: So having fears and doubts, like if you don't talk about that, then nobody really can reach out to you to help, maybe it gets to the point where you're suppressing it so much that you don't even realize it yourself, so it's just... I think that as someone who identifies as female, I'm very grateful that I have the space with other females to talk about feelings and to share insecurities. And with men, a lot of times, I don't see that, and I think it can be be very detrimental for your mental health because you have no one to talk to and emotions needs somewhere to go, but they're all suppressed in, or it comes out in other ways, like working too much, drinking, gambling, shopping, performance, right? Or...0:10:12.0 Mischa Z: Yes, yes, yes, yes. Good. [chuckle] Yes, thank you for that.0:10:13.8 Amy Tran: So you're like, "Oh, I can resonate with that." Is that what you're... Yeah.0:10:18.9 Mischa Z: Yeah, I think and my sort of the arc for me was, I've been lucky to, a good portion of my life to be on a growth trajectory, let's say, but I definitely think at some point as a male, I was taking in more emotions than I was letting out, so I was building for that pop, and then at some point I was... It leveled out, so I was taking in as much as I was letting out, but I still had a whole bunch of pent-up emotions for a lifetime of these seemingly non-traumatic things. And so when I hit my 40s, it was like divorce, both my parents died in rapid succession, career upheaval, and then I had another failed relationship and just... It was like the...[vocalization]0:11:18.6 Mischa Z: Right?0:11:18.9 Amy Tran: Right, right. Yeah.0:11:22.3 Mischa Z: And yeah, and so I spent a lot of time, I would say, I just say by the grace of God, finding healthy ways to cry, finding that safe space to... I found a community where it was okay as a male to cry and cry a lot, and so that really saved me and then started asking for help, and I think that can be hard as an A-type male it can be hard to ask for help so...0:11:49.3 Amy Tran: Yeah, totally.0:11:51.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, I don't mean to take this over, but I think that that leads us to a great point, if you've got a guy like me who's in his 40s, let's say, and I go through a divorce and one of my kids is like not acting like I want, which can be stressor and that can feel traumatic. Both my parents died and the financial stress and more failed relationships and it became evident to me that my... Like work my way through it, find more success, earn more money, whatever it was, was no longer gonna work. I needed different tools. I needed new tools. So given that scenario, my question to you is thinking of technology as a tool, 'cause you're clearly in tune with that. There we go. I know there's an app you recommend called Mooditude, right?0:12:48.2 Amy Tran: Yes, yes.0:12:49.1 Mischa Z: And then, I think you're also proficient in some CBT, some cognitive behavioral therapy?0:12:55.5 Amy Tran: That's right, yeah.0:12:56.7 Mischa Z: So, thinking of those sorts of modalities, what are the exact next steps you would offer someone like me? So I knew... Well, I would be headed in the new right direction that I would have positive momentum towards getting my life back on track.0:13:15.8 Amy Tran: Wow, so, such a great question, but also such a loaded question, 'cause I just have so much to say.0:13:23.9 Mischa Z: [chuckle] Good.0:13:24.6 Amy Tran: So I don't even know where to start. [chuckle] Yeah. So how about we talk about, basically, how our inner core beliefs are created? So we kind of touched on this before, where we were talking about how our relationship with the people that we grow up with, like our parents, they form certain core beliefs that we have. So there are many more than this, but there's three main ones that I see and that are taught in the CBT framework. So the first one is that I'm unlovable. The second one is that I'm worthless. And the third one is that I'm helpless. So this is all operating on a subconscious level. So we all have some of these core beliefs. We have one or multiple, and then there's other one, right?0:14:19.9 Amy Tran: So as a human, you develop compensatory strategy, so for example, one of my core beliefs is that I'm worthless. So I grew up around parents who were quite invalidating, they were Asian immigrants, just cold, never really praised me or told me they loved me. So me as a young girl, I'm like, "I'm unlovable and I'm worthless." So what did I do? I achieved so much, I just tried so hard, because that's how I got approval from my parents, not just, "Good morning, Amy. Love you," just like, "Oh okay, you've got a A plus, good job." And I'm like, "Yeah, this is the love I need." So anyway.0:15:04.7 Mischa Z: Okay.0:15:05.1 Amy Tran: Okay. So that gets ingrained and then I developed a compensatory strategy. So for me, it was working really hard, for some people, it may be the opposite, being really hyper-vigilant of cues that you don't belong, for example, reassurance seeking, whatever it is, there are behaviors that you do to protect yourself from coming face-to-face with that core belief.0:15:31.8 Mischa Z: Okay.0:15:32.6 Amy Tran: So then, that can be destructive, right? So I would say one of the most important tools at first is to become aware of what you're thinking. Because when we become aware of what we're thinking, we can identify the patterns, and when we look at the patterns, we can start to piece together what our core beliefs might be, and then that's when the actual work happens, is we have to heal that core belief because we have thousands of thoughts a day, that's the premise of CBT, and...0:16:11.8 Mischa Z: And so quickly, a cognitive behavioral therapy, that CBT stands for?0:16:17.4 Amy Tran: Yeah.0:16:18.3 Mischa Z: Yes. Cool.0:16:19.4 Amy Tran: Yeah. So let me give you actually the audience a brief overview of what CBT is. Do you think that would be helpful?0:16:26.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, absolutely. Thank you.0:16:28.7 Amy Tran: Okay. So cognitive behavioral therapy, so there's thought and there's behaviors, and then there's feeling and they're all connected. So if I told you right now to picture a purple elephant, would you be able to do that?0:16:43.4 Mischa Z: Yes, ma'am. [laughter]0:16:44.8 Amy Tran: Perfect. And if I asked you to clap twice, would you be able to do that?0:16:49.9 Mischa Z: Yes. Oops, one extra.[laughter]0:16:52.7 Amy Tran: Nice. And if I asked you to stop feeling depressed, anxious and doubtful of yourself right now, would you be able to do that?0:17:01.4 Mischa Z: Probably not, no.0:17:02.6 Amy Tran: Right. Yeah. So our feelings are harder to change, but what we can change is how we act and what we think. So if we can change those two things, because everything else is connected, then it can change our feelings. So with cognitive behavioral therapy, the first step is to become aware of the thoughts we have. So when we are, let's say, walking past a group of people and they are laughing, one of the automatic thoughts you might have is "They're laughing at me." But CBT trains you to be like, "Woah, woah, woah. What? Wait, I remember now, thoughts are not always real. How do I actually know they're laughing at me? Am I reading their mind? Am I making an assumption?" And then you re-phrase that thought, "Well, maybe someone just told a funny joke," and that reframed thought leads to more positive feelings.0:17:57.3 Amy Tran: So do you see how they're all connected? So basically, you just do that over and over again. So I would say, one of the most important things is to begin to actually look within yourself and be aware of your thoughts, and if you have trouble doing that... One of the things that I've been taught is when you notice the sudden shift in mood, immediately ask yourself, "What was I just thinking?" Because our thoughts trigger our emotions most of the time. When you're sitting there and then all of a sudden you just feel like, "Oh, I feel a little anxious or sad," just ask yourself, "What was I just thinking?" And that automatic thought is a clue of what your core belief is, and you just do that over and over again, and look...0:18:41.0 Mischa Z: Can you give me a quick example of that, of inaction, or for you or for me, or...0:18:47.7 Amy Tran: What do you mean inaction?0:18:50.4 Mischa Z: Or like, give me a real life example of that. I know you did with... Of like... Perhaps recently, you've felt... You've noticed that shift in feeling and so...0:19:07.4 Amy Tran: Oh, yes.0:19:08.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah.0:19:09.7 Amy Tran: Yes, yes. Okay. So yeah, so me and my partner, we were just hanging out and he was doing his own thing, I was doing my own thing. And then I noticed that the sense of dread, almost, I was like, "What was I just thinking?" And I thought for a second, and my thought was that he is purposely avoiding me because he doesn't love me anymore.0:19:39.0 Mischa Z: Okay.0:19:39.2 Amy Tran: Right?0:19:39.5 Mischa Z: Yes.0:19:39.6 Amy Tran: So then, instead of picking a fight or trying to act out, I just took a step back and I was like, "Okay, let's challenge this thought. What evidence do I have? What evidence am I missing? What's an alternative explanation? Am I reading his mind?" So I didn't act on that thought, it turns out he was just tired from working, and had a bad day. [chuckle] But it's interesting because I had that automatic thought, and where did that thought come from? My core belief of being unlovable, of being worthless. So if your core belief is always firing off these automatic thoughts, they shape the way you view the world. Right? And if we leave the thoughts unchecked, they will take over your life.0:20:27.0 Mischa Z: Okay, cool. So you're strategically or... I don't know if strategically is the right word. You're training yourself to catch the thoughts and then evaluate the trail of that thought, or am I saying that right?0:20:45.7 Amy Tran: Exactly.0:20:46.1 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:20:46.3 Amy Tran: Exactly. So the Mooditude app, whenever you have a triggering thought, you can open the app and you can check... Rate how you're feeling, you can write what you were thinking about and the specific topic, so was it relationship, work, family that was triggering you, and then it tracks it all for you, so then you can look at it over time and look for those patterns. Yeah.0:21:11.5 Mischa Z: Awesome, awesome. So I'm just looking at notes I was taking. So become aware of what you're thinking was sort of step, step one, shall we say. And it sounds like for me, that's even inventory, that write it down, get used to literally like, "Alright. What was I thinking? What are my thoughts?" Yes. Yeah.0:21:35.1 Amy Tran: Yeah. As most of the time we go through life on autopilot, right. Have you ever... [chuckle] You've walked down a flight of stairs, and you're like, "How did I get here? Why am I here?" [chuckle] It's 'cause your brain is just chattering, it's just... You're in there. You were thinking about the past and future, we're very rarely in the present moment. And actually, looking at your feet going down the steps, right? And you end up on a different flight of your house, you're like, "What the heck, how did I get here?"0:22:02.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, cool. Or not cool, but cool that we can change that. So you have your MA, which is your masters?0:22:13.8 Amy Tran: Yes.0:22:14.4 Mischa Z: Okay, awesome. And working on your doctorate and so, you've been pretty deep in this sort of field for, I don't know what, five, 10 years, something like that?0:22:26.6 Amy Tran: In the graduate program, about five years, yeah, maybe four years for undergrad.0:22:33.3 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. And so, there are studies backing up CBT, I'm assuming, cognitive behavioral therapy, and then a little bit of work can lead to profound shifts? That's my question. Is that... Or that's a statement. Is that true?0:22:52.7 Amy Tran: "A little bit of work can lead to profound shift." I would say that... That's a tricky question. It really depends on the person, right? So for some people, they are more open to exploring the thoughts that they have. But there also are people who are really afraid of their own thoughts, right? Or they are not honest with themselves, which is okay. So for those folks that may be harder to monitor their own thinking and come face-to-face with what they're thinking, that can be hard.0:23:27.9 Mischa Z: Any, any strategies to help with that?0:23:34.6 Amy Tran: I would... To help with being more open to your own thinking, I would say that there would be two, right? So I would say that sometimes people are worried about exploring their own thinking because it's going to trigger an intense emotion. So I think that one helpful thing to think about or prepare is coping tools, right? So find what works for you to bring you from a hot moment to a cooler moment. So if you notice that what you're feeling or what you're thinking is getting you quite upset and you don't wanna do it anymore, I think it's important for people to have a strategy to calm down, that might be like deep breathing or meditation.0:24:24.5 Amy Tran: And then my second thing is to practice self-compassion, right. So yeah, some of the thoughts that we have about ourselves or the world can be upsetting, but our thoughts are not always real, and I think our mindfulness can be really helpful because we can monitor... You can monitor your thinking without really attaching to it, and you can also be compassionate and non-judgmental. So mindfulness is an entire thing that we can probably talk about for like three hours [chuckle] but there's a lot of resources online, and I think that mindfulness will not only help people be more compassionate and non-judgmental, but I think it will also help you notice your thoughts even more because it's the practice of awareness. Yeah.0:25:13.9 Mischa Z: Yeah. And I think the more we confront, and I don't know if confront is the right word, or just bring awareness to our thoughts, the more they hold less weight.0:25:27.4 Amy Tran: Right, totally. Yeah.0:25:29.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, yeah.0:25:31.8 Amy Tran: Our entire identity... I agree totally with multiple identities. Our entire identity is basically just stories and stories are just a string of words and pictures. Right?0:25:42.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah.0:25:43.1 Amy Tran: So we can let go of that.0:25:45.4 Mischa Z: Yes.[laughter]0:25:47.4 Mischa Z: I wanted to ask, I've got two things, and I'm thinking, I had an idea for the advanced bonus session that everybody's doing, and I'm thinking... And maybe you can tell me now if you think this is worth talking about. But I think where as parents, one thing that I noticed... Like when both my parents died, I went through a divorce, financial upheaval, like I was having to move houses, lots of chaos. And I had two young boys and at one point it really hit me, I was like, "Oh my God, they went through that with me." And I think in hindsight, I could have... What I want you to maybe address, and I think we should save it for the bonus session, and you can tell me if you think it's worth talking about. And I wrote it down is, "What's an important for a parent to be cognizant of for their kids, or how do you nurture or hold space or help kids deal with?" I know this is a broad topic and loaded, but it's like, I think as parents when we're going through hard times... I'll speak for me. As a parent when I was going through hard times, how do I hold space for my kids? What do you think about that as kind of a...0:27:11.2 Amy Tran: Yeah, I love that topic so much. My training is in youth, like working with youth, so yeah, I would love to talk about that.0:27:19.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, I think that would be awesome, and I think it would be very useful because I think there's a lot of us men in our 40s or what have you who... We're a little self-centered. [laughter]0:27:32.5 Amy Tran: Right. Yeah. Well, not only self...0:27:35.2 Mischa Z: Said with love.0:27:35.5 Amy Tran: So not only self-centered, but also modeling what they think society wants men to be, so.0:27:44.6 Mischa Z: Yes, yes. Awesome, so before we hit stop and get to that though, I'm curious and go ahead, were you gonna write down a note? It looks like...0:27:52.9 Amy Tran: Well, I was just writing down what I'm gonna talk about in the bonus session. [laughter]0:27:57.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, perfect. So I'm curious what you... What do you think it is that draws your Instagram account or your Doodled Wellness clearly is a powerful, a powerful place for people to go, and it's drawing people in, and it's clearly a catalyst for change and goodness and stuff and... What do you think it is? What... Just like briefly, what do you think it is? What do you think is coming through there? Does that question make sense, or...0:28:31.3 Amy Tran: It definitely makes sense, but it's a hard question because sometimes, to be honest, I'm like, "I don't even know, I'm just putting it together because this is just me." But if I can step outside of myself as the creator and look at it, I would say that it's... The colors and the way that it's presented is bright and friendly and non-intimidating, that it almost lowers like a layer of defensiveness down. And I don't know if that's true. I haven't done a study on it or anything like that. But I try to make content that's affirming and positive and that sets the colors scheme. But then sometimes I talk about some stuff that really does invite people to do some self-reflection and what they may find or what that I'm inviting them... Where I'm inviting them to go may be a hard place to go. But then while they are on the feed and looking at it, I still think that it's bright and just warm and inviting, so I just think it's a happy place. And I think it's because I actually do believe in the potential for people to flourish and to unlearn what they have learned, uncondition the conditioning of their brain. I really do feel like that's possible and I want more and more people to realize that.0:30:11.5 Mischa Z: I love that. That's a beautiful answer. Thank you so much for that. And as I... It's fun to click on a post and sort of look at the... Who's interacting with you, and it seems like, which I think is super cool, as a pretty broad spectrum of people. Would you say that that's true?0:30:33.6 Amy Tran: Yeah, definitely.0:30:35.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, that's awesome.0:30:36.8 Amy Tran: Yeah, and I...0:30:36.9 Mischa Z: Oh, go ahead. Sorry.0:30:37.7 Amy Tran: And I... Oh no, that's okay. And I also think that one thing that I have noticed too is that more and more teens are noticing the feed because it is quite, I don't wanna say childish, but maybe playful. And I think that's like, I'm just so grateful and honored for them to be there because at that point in our lives we're just so malleable and there's just so much proactive work to be done.0:31:04.3 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Well, fantastic. Amy, we're gonna, we're gonna end. I think that's a beautiful place to end round one. So if this interview with Amy Tran was fantastic, and you want to get even more content from Amy, which is gonna be amazing, I already know the bonus session is gonna be beautiful, upgrade to the All Access Pass for that bonus interview. And Amy, any final thoughts to share that we did not get a chance to cover?0:31:39.2 Amy Tran: No, but I'll leave everyone with a quote, which is, "Awareness is the first step towards healing," well.0:31:47.6 Mischa Z: Yeah, beautiful. Thank you so much, Amy. This has been a ton of fun round one, I'm very excited for round two. And a reminder to everybody, you can find Amy@doodledwellness.com and @doodledwellness on Instagram. And we'll see everybody in the VIP section.0:32:10.2 Amy Tran: Ciao![music]

Keys For Kids Ministries
Sibling Appreciation

Keys For Kids Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021


Bible Reading: Psalm 133Caleb tapped his pencil impatiently on the paper in front of him. "Whoever thought up this assignment for our class at church sure doesn't know you, Janae!" he teased. "I have to write down ten reasons why I like my sister, and I can't even think of one!""Thanks a lot!" Janae picked up a pillow from the couch and threw it at him. "See if I ever bake cookies for you again!""Oops! I forgot about them." Caleb grinned and wrote it down."What about when you were struggling with math last year?" asked Mom. "Your sister spent a lot of time helping you with homework, remember?""Yeah, and how about the umpteen times I helped you practice before a baseball game?" Janae said. "Or last week when I let you ride my bike because yours was broken?" She flung another pillow his way.Caleb ducked. "Sorry! I forgot all those things too--but I appreciate you helping me remember." He grinned and tucked the pillow Janae had thrown at him behind his back. "And thanks for the pillow. You really are a nice sister!""Jokes aside, your church assignment has reminded me that I need to appreciate my brothers and sisters more too," said Mom.The kids gave her puzzled looks. "But, Mom, you don't have any brothers and sisters," Janae said. "You're an only child." "I wasn't thinking of the family I was born into," Mom replied. "I was thinking of God's family." "Oh, you mean like the people at church?" asked Caleb. Mom nodded. "The Bible says that everyone who trusts Jesus as their Savior has been adopted into God's family. That means we're all brothers and sisters in Christ. We've been very blessed by those in our church family lately--Mrs. Blakely brought us meals when I was sick, and Mr. Weiss fixed our car for free. I'm so thankful God brought them into our lives to show us His love.""Me too," Janae said. She stood up and looked at Caleb. "I'm going to make some popcorn. Want some?""Yeah!" said Caleb. He wrote another thing down on his paper: She makes delicious popcorn! He paused and then wrote down one more: She shows me the love of Jesus. -Linda WeddleHow About You?Do you appreciate the brothers and sisters God has given you? Even if you don't have any natural-born siblings, if you trust in Jesus, you have many brothers and sisters in God's family. How have they helped you in difficult times and showed you God's love? Thank God for the brothers and sisters He's given you, and let them know you appreciate them too.Today's Key Verse:A brother [or sister] is born to help in time of need. (NLT) (Proverbs 17:17)Today's Key Thought:Appreciate your brothers and sisters

Evie's Korean Drama Podcast
109: A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT and other Chinese youth dramas

Evie's Korean Drama Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 83:58


This week, Evie is shaking things up and talking about some Chinese drama on her Korean drama podcast show (sorry, haha!) because she recently finished watching the 2021 Chinese youth romance drama A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT and feels obsessed enough to need to unload all her feelings. On you. Oops! Visit Evie's Patreon to support the show and for extra episodes: www.patreon.com/EvieKoreanDramaPodcast

Bad Movies Rock
Bad Movies Rock#117: Safe

Bad Movies Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 63:16


Episode #117: Don't loose sleep, he had it coming. Child women. Spoiler alert: Oops all backstories. 

Hot Property with Dan and Stephen
Hot Property E71 - Oops, All Cream!

Hot Property with Dan and Stephen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 72:47


Oreo is making cookie ratios for everyone. Stephen yells at the parking authority. Busting makes Dan feel good. Do you Live Màs? --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Trylove
Episode 145: COBRA VERDE (1987)

Trylove

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 82:39


Klaus Kinski again appears as That Freaky Guy Who Insists On Going To The Jungle, this time portraying Francisco Manoel da Silva (better known by his outlaw codename, “Cobra Verde”), who's chased there by his plantation owner boss who has no interest in being his father-in-law after Francisco impregnates the baron's three teenage daughters. Oops! Cobra Verde's attempts to kickstart the cold engine of the slave trade on the West African coast, and everything that derail them, make up the rest of an inscrutable plot. In this episode, we discuss our confusion over how the titular character is built, where the movie's satirical lens is pointed, its fairly misguided attempts at ‘authentic' portrayal of African cultures, and how the surly, perfectly pitched magic of AGUIRRE, THE WRATH OF GOD (1972) and NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE (1979) don't seem to have rubbed off on this one. Also check out: - “Picturesque savagery: Primitivism and authenticity in Cobra Verde” by Sam Storey https://www.academia.edu/30156985/Picturesque_savagery_Primitivism_and_authenticity_in_Cobra_Verde Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/trylovepodcast and email us at trylovepodcast@gmail.com to get in touch! Buy tickets and support the Trylon at https://www.trylon.org/. Theme: "Raindrops" by Huma-Huma/"No Smoking" PSA by John Waters. Choir performance from COBRA VERDE. 0:00 - Episode 145: COBRA VERDE (1987) 2:37 - The Patented Aaron Grossman Summary 4:43 - Jason's thoughts 7:57 - Cody's thoughts 12:04 - Harry's thoughts 16:42 - Aaron's thoughts 22:41 - Where the film's sardonic lens is pointed 28:44 - The line between ‘adding authenticity' and ‘exoticizing' 36:06 - Who is Cobra Verde?: A discussion 47:06 - Da animals D: 48:40 - A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (1971) and the systems that grind us all 53:51 - Cody's Noteys: Snakelove (snake-themed trivia)

Ron Paul Liberty Report
Oops...? Did Attorney General Garland Lie To Congress About Parent 'Threat Tag'?

Ron Paul Liberty Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:18


Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee have revealed what appears to be a blockbuster whistleblower document showing how the FBI was instructed to add a "tag" to mark "threats" that parents might pose to school boards, schools, and teachers. Garland vehemently denied such a tag was authorized in testimony before Congress. Also today...as the vax continues to fail in its basic functions, Biden is set to demand boosters for all Americans. What could go wrong? And...big Pharma is making $1K per SECOND profit on the shots - corporatism? Get your copy of Ron Paul's new mini-book, "Making Sense of Current Political Idiocies"!! Make a tax-deductible contribution to the Ron Paul Institute of $50 for a copy of the book and $100 for a Ron Paul HAND-SIGNED copy. This is a LIMITED TIME offer! Make your contribution here: http://ronpaulinstitute.org/support/

Scar Bearers
How to fix an OOPS of a day!

Scar Bearers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 3:32


Have you had one of those days where one little incident can throw the whole day off? I nearly had that, but I was able to steer clear of sabotaging my own day by doing ONE little thing. Watch this video to learn what it was I did so you can avoid the same pitfall! My contact information: chrisdtgordon.com Chris DT Gordon, @chrisdtgordon on the socials Usual technical hijinks: @nateberan

Come With Us Podcast
"Oops! We Broke the Bed” & Other Sexy Bloopers

Come With Us Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 43:57


Before we get started, I wanted to let you know that Aaron was NOT into this topic. So, as you listen, just picture him cringing along on this episode all about Sex Bloopers. Here's just a little taste of what we covered:Learning from sex mistakesNina's trip to the ER story on our pegging episode. Breaking a bed mid-sexBreaking a desk while getting busyBruisesScratchesRun burnGetting bitten by bugsLegless lizards climbing up urethrasWax play & the importance of using the correct candlesBDSM & injuriesGenital piercing accidentsPenis tattoosErections lasting more than 4 hoursAllergic reactionsHomemade glory hole injuriesPassing out from sexual chockingMelted gummi bear playWho signs the cast when you break your cock?Dripping cum on the floorFireSex in the oceanGetting a tampon stuckand so much more. Got a blooper of your own? Share it with us at ComeWithUsConfessions@gmail.com. WANT A GRADUATE DEGREE IN LOVE?Are you looking for some guidance or direction on taking your relationship to the next level? From love, sex, intimacy, and self-love, Beth can help!Love, Sex and Relationship Coaching: https://bethtalks.com/coaching-with-bethFor Romantic concierge booking, or  virtual shopping appointments, email Info@darlingway.comShop online 24/7:  https://darlingway.com/L I N K S  &  S O C I A L   M E D I A - Follow us on social media for updates, Come With Us podcast episodes, Sexy Ed School & more!!Website: https://darlingway.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/comewithuspodcastCoaching: https://bethtalks.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/comewithuspodcastContact Come With Us:comewithusconfessions@gmail.comSupport the show (https://comewithuspodcastmerch.myshopify.com/)

What Up Patna
#88 Say oops Up Fade Ya Head.....Say oops Up Fade Ya Head ***(Part 1)***

What Up Patna

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 19:54


We got ta hittin the record button early while waiting for the Patna to come thru. Allasuden Part 1 and 2 were born. Check out this prequel to the sequel with the Patna Eddie Fades @eddie_fades - SledMan, Big A, and Nick-loc were super duper stoned. Mean while Big A was eager to try his new Kong Beer Bong and that was that. Thanks for a good time at Eddie Fade. Enjoy this Part 1 phukery #88 "in your Charlie Wilson voice" Say oops Up Fade Ya Head Say oops Up Fade Ya Head. Stay pooned for Part Deux Patna.....Episode #88 Part 2 is on thee way.... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whatuppatna/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/whatuppatna/support

Scriptnotes Podcast
525 - The Story This Was Based On

Scriptnotes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 62:53


John and Craig invite investigative reporter Zeke Faux (Bloomberg) for a new round of How Would This Be A Movie. They cover stories ranging from the secret history of sushi to fake Scottish rappers. Zeke shares what it's like to option an article to Hollywood and tricks for getting noticed by producers. In follow-up, we get a romantic update from Oops and answer a listener question on whether it's worth watching prior adaptations of a given work. In our bonus segment for premium members, we ask: what are the remaining distinctions between writing for Hollywood and writing for magazines? Scriptnotes Hoodies order by November 18 in time for the Holidays! Veterans in Media and Entertainment Movie Pass is Back! 339 – Mostly Terrible People sign up for the full episode at Scriptnotes.net Zeke Faux and on Twitter! How Thieves Stole $40 Million of Copper by Spray-Painting Rocks By Andy Hoffman and Benedikt Kammel Secret History of Sushi by Daniel Fromson with illustrations by Igor Bastidas for the NYT The Migrant Laborers Who Clean Up after Disasters by Sarah Stillman for the New Yorker ‘The story of a weird world I was warned never to tell' by Sarah McDermott for the BBC Silibill N' Brains: Meet the Two Scottish Rappers Who Conned the World by Tom Seymour for Vice and Fake It Till You Make It: The Great Hip Hop Hoax by Samuel on DDW Magazine Inevitable Foundation Friendsgiving Miry's List Jasmila Žbanić, Quo Vadis, Aida? and #Craigana Roam Research Get a Scriptnotes T-shirt! Gift a Scriptnotes Subscription or treat yourself to a premium subscription! Craig Mazin on Twitter John August on Twitter John on Instagram Outro by Ryan Gerber (send us yours!) Scriptnotes is produced by Megana Rao and edited by Matthew Chilelli. Email us at ask@johnaugust.com You can download the episode here.

KeepingItReal
OOPS!

KeepingItReal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 47:59


This episode had to be cut short because of technical difficulties. Though it may be small, IT IS STILL MIGHTY!

The Judgies
Ep 75: Oops All Deleted

The Judgies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 53:34


In this Episode: Josh finds some spicy stories that have all since been deleted. We have a nice guy who missed his shot, a girlfriend belittles her partner but *in a nice way*, a father has a wild request for his son's girlfriend, and a Listener sent us a story about an incident out in a restaurant. And for this weeks CJ Josh has some new Aurora-isms for us to all hear. Our Patreon is officially open, if you want to see extra content go check it out! https://www.patreon.com/JudgiesPod Send us mail! (Addressed However You'd Like) P.O. Box 58 Ottawa, IL 61350 Leave a Review! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-judgies/id1519741238 Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/judgiespod Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/judgiespod Intro Music by: Iván https://open.spotify.com/artist/5gB2VvyqfnOlNv37PHKRNJ?si=f6TIYrLITkG2NZXGLm_Y-Q&dl_branch=1 Story Links: Oops they were all deleted0:00 Intro 3:44 Mail 7:07 Erika's seasonal hot take 9:12 TIFU/NiceGuy: Guy misses his chance 17:24 RelationshipAdvice: My Girlfriend belittled me 23:57 Back from Break 24:05 Aurora-isms 34:56 RelationshipAdvice: Father ask my girlfriend for photos 41:58 LS: AITA For telling on a family trying to steal food 

Talkin My Sh*t
Ep. 123 - Oops, I Did It Again

Talkin My Sh*t

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 68:30


This week on the podcast I sit in with one mic but am accompanied by Tony, Jesus (Audio) & JV (Video). We talk about The Kyle Rittenhouse case, The unfortunate incident at The Town and some upcoming comedy dates!

Oops Caught Me Smoking
Oops Caught Me Smoking with Joe Loeb from the "Hippy Speedball Podcast"

Oops Caught Me Smoking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 49:30


Another great guest this week, we have Joe from the "Hippy Speedball Podcast" coming through to hang with your boy for a bit.  What is a Hippy Speedball? You might be asking yourself.  Well the answer to that question and many more laughs coming your way.  Join us as we chat about podcasting, cannabis, movies and so much more.  Also, all you CBD users head on over to www.chillfrogcbd.com and use PROMO CODE: OOPS30 (ALL CAPS) TO GET 30% OFF YOUR ORDER!! DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS GREAT DEAL!!Follow Joe and the Hippy Speedball Podcast here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hippyspeedballpodcastYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/HippySpeedballPodcastALSO CHECK THE "HIPPY SPEEDBALL PODCAST ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCAST PLATFORMSFor New Episodes and Funny Videos follow "Oops Caught Me Smoking"                       Instagram: www.instagram.com/oopscaughtmesmokingTwitter: www.twitter.com/ocms_podcastFacebook: www.facebook.com/oopscaughtmesmoking YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/oopscaughtmesmokingTikTok: www.tiktok.com/@oopscaughtmesmokingTheWeedTube: www.theweedtube.com/user/oopscaughtmesmokingSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/ocmspodcast)

Chronicles of Devine Destiny
Bad Habits …Oops I did it again

Chronicles of Devine Destiny

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 39:38


Hey Yawl Welcome back this week concludes me talking about my forever love It's best to close this chapter of my life the transition has been tough because it's been a lot of years..if you're new to the podcast make sure you listen to Love like this & Red Flags

Cadaver Gals
E49 Died Twice, Wax Museum Murder

Cadaver Gals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 57:12


Wow, a lady dies twice. Oops! And a socialite in Texas who invested in her local area wax museum is murdered. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Screaming in the Cloud
Building a Partnership with Your Cloud Provider with Micheal Benedict

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 54:44


About Micheal Micheal Benedict leads Engineering Productivity at Pinterest. He and his team focus on developer experience, building tools and platforms for over a thousand engineers to effectively code, build, deploy and operate workloads on the cloud. Mr. Benedict has also built Infrastructure and Cloud Governance programs at Pinterest and previously, at Twitter -- focussed on managing cloud vendor relationships, infrastructure budget management, cloud migration, capacity forecasting and planning and cloud cost attribution (chargeback). Links: Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com Teletraan: https://github.com/pinterest/teletraan Twitter: https://twitter.com/micheal Pinterestcareers.com: https://pinterestcareers.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You know how git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really. Please ask someone else!Corey: Thats all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best way I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's git based workflows mean you don't have to play slap and tickle with integrating arcane non-sense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for pets startup, to global fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them, because you don't have to, they get why self service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y.comCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while, I like to talk to people who work at very large companies that are not in fact themselves a cloud provider. I know it sounds ridiculous. How can you possibly be a big company and not make money by selling managed NAT gateways to an unsuspecting public? But I'm told it can be done here to answer that question. And hopefully at least one other is Pinterest. It's head of engineering productivity, Micheal Benedict. Micheal, thank you for taking the time to join me today.Micheal: Hi, Corey, thank you for inviting me today. I'm really excited to talk to you.Corey: So, exciting times at Pinterest in a bunch of different ways. It was recently reported—which of course, went right to the top of my inbox as 500,000 people on Twitter all said, “Hey, this sounds like a ‘Corey would be interested in it' thing.” It was announced that you folks had signed a $3.2 billion commitment with AWS stretching until 2028. Now, if this is like any other large-scale AWS contract commitment deal that has been made public, you were probably immediately inundated with a whole bunch of people who are very good at arithmetic and not very good at business context saying, “$3.2 billion? You could build massive data centers for that. Why would anyone do this?” And it's tiresome, and that's the world in which we live. But I'm guessing you heard at least a little bit of that from the peanut gallery.Micheal: I did, and I always find it interesting when direct comparisons are made with the total amount that's been committed. And like you said, there's so many nuances that go into how to perceive that amount, and put it in context of, obviously, what Pinterest does. So, I at least want to take this opportunity to share with everyone that Pinterest has been on the cloud since day one. When Ben initially started the company, that product was launched—it was a simple Django app—it was launched on AWS from day one, and since then, it has grown to support 450-plus million MAUs over the course of the decade.And our infrastructure has grown pretty complex. We started with a bunch of EC2 machines and persisting data in S3, and since then we have explored an array of different products, in fact, sometimes working very closely with AWS, as well and helping them put together a product roadmap for some of the items they're working on as well. So, we have an amazing partnership with them, and part of the commitment and how we want to see these numbers is how does it unlock value for Pinterest as a business over time in terms of making us much more agile, without thinking about the nuances of the infrastructure itself. And that's, I think, one of the best ways to really put this into context, that it's not a single number we pay at the end [laugh] of the month, but rather, we are on track to spending a certain amount over a period of time, so this just keeps accruing or adding to that number. And we basically come out with an amazing partnership in AWS, where we have that commitment and we're able to leverage their products and full suite of items without any hiccups.Corey: The most interesting part of what you said is the word partner. And I think that's the piece that gets lost an awful lot when we talk about large-scale cloud negotiations. It's not like buying a car, where you can basically beat the crap out of the salesperson, you can act as if $400 price difference on a car is the difference between storm out of the dealership and sign the contract. Great, you don't really have to deal with that person ever again.In the context of a cloud provider, they run your production infrastructure, and if they have a bad day, I promise you're going to have a bad day, too. You want to handle those negotiations in a way that is respectful of that because they are your partner, whether you want them to be or not. Now, I'm not suggesting that any cloud provider is going to hold an awkward negotiation against the customer, but at the same time, there are going to be scenarios in which you're going to want to have strong relationships, where you're going to need to cash in political capital to some extent, and personally, I've never seen stupendous value in trying to beat the crap out of a company in order to get another tenth of a percent discount on a service you barely use, just because someone decided that well, we didn't do well in the last negotiation so we're going to get them back this time.That's great. What are you actually planning to do as a company? Where are you going? And the fact that you just alluded to, that you're not just a pile of S3 and EC2 instances speaks, in many ways, to that. By moving into the differentiated service world, suddenly you're able to do things that don't look quite as much like building a better database and start looking a lot more like servicing your users more effectively and well.Micheal: And I think, like you said, I feel like there's like a general skepticism in viewing that the cloud providers are usually out there to rip you apart. But in reality, that's not true. To your point, as part of the partnership, especially with AWS and Pinterest, we've got an amazing relationship going on, and behind the scenes, there's a dedicated team at Pinterest, called the Infrastructure Governance Team, a cross-functional team with folks from finance, legal, engineering, product, all sitting together and working with our AWS partners—even the AWS account managers at the times are part of that—to help us make both Pinterest successful, and in turn, AWS gets that amazing customer to work with in helping build some of their newer products as well. And that's one of the most important things we have learned over time is that there's two parts to it; when you want to help improve your business agility, you want to focus not just on the bottom line numbers as they are. It's okay to pay a premium because it offsets the people capital you would have to invest in getting there.And that's a very tricky way to look at math, but that's what these teams do; they sit down and work through those specifics. And for what it's worth, in our conversations, the AWS teams always come back with giving us very insightful data on how we're using their systems to help us better think about how we should be pricing or looking things ahead. And I'm not the expert on this; like I said, there's a dedicated team sitting behind this and looking through and working through these deals, but that's one of the important takeaways I hope the users—or the listeners of this podcast then take away that you want to treat your cloud provider as your partner as much as possible. They're not always there to screw you. That's not their goal. And I apologize for using that term. It is important that you set that expectations that it's in their best interest to actually make you successful because that's how they make money as well.Corey: It's a long-term play. I mean, they could gouge you this quarter, and then you're trying to evacuate as fast as possible. Well, they had a great quarter, but what's their long-term prospect? There are two competing philosophies in the world of business; you can either make a lot of money quickly, or you can make a little bit of money and build it over time in a sustained way. And it's clear the cloud providers are playing the long game on this because they basically have to.Micheal: I mean, it's inevitable at this point. I mean, look at Pinterest. It is one of those success stories. Starting as a Django app on a bunch of EC2 machines to wherever we are right now with having a three-plus billion dollar commitment over a span of couple of years, and we do spend a pretty significant chunk of that on a yearly basis. So, in this case, I'm sure it was a great successful partnership.And I'm hoping some of the newer companies who are building the cloud from the get-go are thinking about it from that perspective. And one of the things I do want to call out, Corey, is that we did initially start with using the primitive services in AWS, but it became clear over time—and I'm sure you heard of the term multi-cloud and many of that—you know, when companies start evaluating how to make the most out of the deals they're negotiating or signing, it is important to acknowledge that the cost of any of those evaluations or even thinking about migrations never tends to get factored in. And we always tend to treat that as being extremely simple or not, but those are engineering resources you want to be spending more building on the product rather than these crazy costly migrations. So, it's in your best interest probably to start using the most from your cloud provider, and also look for opportunities to use other cloud providers—if they provide more value in certain product offerings—rather than thinking about a complete lift-and-shift, and I'm going to make DR as being the primary case on why I want to be moving to multi-cloud.Corey: Yeah. There's a question, too, of the numbers on paper look radically different than the reality of this. You mentioned, Pinterest has been on AWS since the beginning, which means that even if an edict had been passed at the beginning, that, “Thou shalt never build on anything except EC2 and S3. The end. Full stop.”And let's say you went down that rabbit hole of, “Oh, we don't trust their load balancers. We're going to build our own at home. We have load balancers at home. We'll use those.” It's terrible, but even had you done that and restricted yourselves just to those baseline building blocks, and then decide to do a cloud migration, you're still looking back at over a decade of experience where the app has been built unconsciously reflecting the various failure modes that AWS has, the way that it responds to API calls, the latency in how long it takes to request something versus it being available, et cetera, et cetera.So, even moving that baseline thing to another cloud provider is not a trivial undertaking by any stretch of the imagination. But that said—because the topic does always come up, and I don't shy away from it; I think it's something people should go into with an open mind—how has the multi-cloud conversation progressed at Pinterest? Because there's always a multi-cloud conversation.Micheal: We have always approached it with some form of… openness. It's not like we don't want to be open to the ideas, but you really want to be thinking hard on the business case and the business value something provides on why you want to be doing x. In this case, when we think about multi-cloud—and again, Pinterest did start with EC2 and S3, and we did keep it that way for a long time. We built a lot of primitives around it, used it—for example, my team actually runs our bread and butter deployment system on EC2. We help facilitate deployments across a 100,000-plus machines today.And like you said, we have built that system keeping in mind how AWS works, and understanding the nuances of region and AZ failovers and all of that, and help facilitate deployments across 1000-plus microservices in the company. So, thinking about leveraging, say, a Google Cloud instance and how that works, in theory, we can always make a case for engineering to build our deployment system and expand there, but there's really no value. And one of the biggest cases, usually, when multi-cloud comes in is usually either negotiation for price or actually a DR strategy. Like, what if AWS goes down in and us-east-1? Well, let's be honest, they're powering half the internet [laugh] from that one single—Corey: Right.Micheal: Yeah. So, if you think your business is okay running when AWS goes down and half the internet is not going to be working, how do you want to be thinking about that? So, DR is probably not the best reason for you to be even exploring multi-cloud. Rather, you should be thinking about what the cloud providers are offering as a very nuanced offering which your current cloud provider is not offering, and really think about just using those specific items.Corey: So, I agree that multi-cloud for DR purposes is generally not necessarily the best approach with the idea of being able to failover seamlessly, but I like the idea for backups. I mean, Pinterest is a publicly-traded company, which means that among other things, you have to file risk disclosures and be responsive to auditors in a variety of different ways. There are some regulations to start applying to you. And the idea of, well, AWS builds things out in a super effective way, region separation, et cetera, whenever I talk to Amazonians, they are always surprised that anyone wouldn't accept that, “Oh, if you want backups use a different region. Problem solved.”Right, but it is often easier for me to have a rehydrate the business level of backup that would take weeks to redeploy living on another cloud provider than it is for me to explain to all of those auditors and regulators and financial analysts, et cetera why I didn't go ahead and do that path. So, there's always some story for okay, what if AWS decides that they hate us and want to kick us off the platform? Well, that's why legal is involved in those high-level discussions around things like risk, and indemnity, and termination for convenience and for cause clauses, et cetera, et cetera. The idea of making an all-in commitment to a cloud provider goes well beyond things that engineering thinks about. And it's easy for those of us with engineering backgrounds to be incredibly dismissive of that of, “Oh, indemnity? Like, when does AWS ever lose data?” “Yeah, but let's say one day they do. What is your story going to be when asked some very uncomfortable questions by people who wanted you to pay attention to this during the negotiation process?” It's about dotting the i's and crossing the t's, especially with that many commas in the contractual commitments.Micheal: No, it is true. And we did evaluate that as an option, but one of the interesting things about compliance, and especially auditing as well, we generally work with the best in class consultants to help us work through the controls and how we audit, how we look at these controls, how to make sure there's enough accountability going through. The interesting part was in this case, as well, we were able to work with AWS in crafting a lot of those controls and setting up the right expectations as and when we were putting proposals together as well. Now, again, I'm not an expert on this and I know we have a dedicated team from our technical program management organization focused on this, but early on we realized that, to your point, the cost of any form of backups and then being able to audit what's going in, look at all those pipelines, how quickly we can get the data in and out it was proving pretty costly for us. So, we were able to work out some of that within the constructs of what we have with our cloud provider today, and still meet our compliance goals.Corey: That's, on some level, the higher point, too, where everything is everything comes down to context; everything comes down to what the business demands, what the business requires, what the business will accept. And I'm not suggesting that in any case, they're wrong. I'm known for beating the ‘Multi-cloud is a bad default decision' drum, and then people get surprised when they'll have one-on-one conversations, and they say, “Well, we're multi-cloud. Do you think we're foolish?” “No. You're probably doing the right thing, just because you have context that is specific to your business that I, speaking in a general sense, certainly don't have.”People don't generally wake up in the morning and decide they're going to do a terrible job or no job at all at work today, unless they're Facebook's VP of Integrity. So, it's not the sort of thing that lends itself to casual tweet size, pithy analysis very often. There's a strong dive into what is the level of risk a business can accept? And my general belief is that most companies are doing this stuff right. The universal constant in all of my consulting clients that I have spoken to about the in-depth management piece of things is, they've always asked the same question of, “So, this is what we've done, but can you introduce us to the people who are doing it really right, who have absolutely nailed this and gotten it all down?” “It's, yeah, absolutely no one believes that that is them, even the folks who are, from my perspective, pretty close to having achieved it.”But I want to talk a bit more about what you do beyond just the headline-grabbing large dollar figure commitment to a cloud provider story. What does engineering productivity mean at Pinterest? Where do you start? Where do you stop?Micheal: I want to just quickly touch upon that last point about multi-cloud, and like you said, every company works within the context of what they are given and the constraints of their business. It's probably a good time to give a plug to my previous employer, Twitter, who are doing multi-cloud in a reasonably effective way. They are on the data centers, they do have presence on Google Cloud, and AWS, and I know probably things have changed since a couple of years now, but they have embraced that environment pretty effectively to cater to their acquisitions who were on the public cloud, help obviously, with their initial set of investments in the data center, and still continue to scale that out, and explore, in this case, Google Cloud for a variety of other use cases, which sounds like it's been extremely beneficial as well.So, to your point, there is probably no right way to do this. There's always that context, and what you're working with comes into play as part of making these decisions. And it's important to take a lot of these with a grain of salt because you can never understand the decisions, why they were made the way they were made. And for what it's worth, it sort of works out in the end. [laugh]. I've rarely heard a story where it's never worked out, and people are just upset with the deals they've signed. So, hopefully, that helps close that whole conversation about multi-cloud.Corey: I hope so. It's one of those areas where everyone has an opinion and a lot of them do not necessarily apply universally, but it's always fun to take—in that case, great, I'll take the lesser trod path of everyone's saying multi-cloud is great, invariably because they're trying to sell you something. Yeah, I have nothing particularly to sell, folks. My argument has always been, in the absence of a compelling reason not to, pick a provider and go all in. I don't care which provider you pick—which people are sometimes surprised to hear.It's like, “Well, what if they pick a cloud provider that you don't do consulting work for?” Yeah, it turns out, I don't actually need to win every AWS customer over to have a successful working business. Do what makes sense for you, folks. From my perspective, I want this industry to be better. I don't want to sit here and just drum up business for myself and make self-serving comments to empower that. Which apparently is a rare tactic.Micheal: No, that's totally true, Corey. One of the things you do is help people with their bills, so this has come up so many times, and I realize we're sort of going off track a bit from that engineering productivity discussion—Corey: Oh, which is fine. That's this entire show's theme, if it has one.Micheal: [laugh]. So, I want to briefly just talk about the whole billing and how cost management works because I know you spend a lot of time on that and you help a lot of these companies be effective in how they manage their bills. These questions have come up multiple times, even at Pinterest. We actually in the past, when I was leading the infrastructure governance organization, we were working with other companies of our similar size to better understand how they are looking into getting visibility into their cost, setting sort of the right controls and expectations within the engineering organization to plan, and capacity plan, and effectively meet those plans in a certain criteria, and then obviously, if there is any risk to that, actively manage risk. That was like the biggest thing those teams used to do.And we used to talk a lot trade notes, and get a better sense of how a lot of these companies are trying to do—for example, Netflix, or Lyft, or Stripe. I recall Netflix, content was their biggest spender, so cloud spending was like way down in the list of things for them. [laugh]. But regardless, they had an active team looking at this on a day-to-day basis. So, one of the things we learned early on at Pinterest is that start investing in those visibility tools early on.No one can parse the cloud bills. Let's be honest. You're probably the only person who can reverse… [laugh] engineer an architecture diagram from a cloud bill, and I think that's like—definitely you should take a patent for that or something. But in reality, no one has the time to do that. You want to make sure your business leaders, from your finance teams to engineering teams to head of the executives all have a better understanding of how to parse it.So, investing engineering resources, take that data, how do you munch it down to the cost, the utilization across the different vectors of offerings, and have a very insightful discussion. Like, what are certain action items we want to be taking? It's very easy to see, “Oh, we overspent EC2,” and we want to go from there. But in reality, that's not just that thing; you will start finding out that EC2 is being used by your Hadoop infrastructure, which runs hundreds of thousands of jobs. Okay, now who's actually responsible for that cost? You might find that one job which is accruing, sort of, a lot of instance hours over a period of time and a shared multi-tenant environment, how do you attribute that cost to that particular cost center?Corey: And then someone left the company a while back, and that job just kept running in perpetuity. No one's checked the output for four years, I guess it can't be that necessarily important. And digging into it requires context. It turns out, there's no SaaS tool to do this, which is unfortunate for those of us who set out originally to build such a thing. But we discovered pretty early on the context on this stuff is incredibly important.I love the thing you're talking about here, where you're discussing with your peer companies about these things because the advice that I would give to companies with the level of spend that you folks do is worlds apart from what I would advise someone who's building something new and spending maybe 500 bucks a month on their cloud bill. Those folks do not need to hire a dedicated team of people to solve for these problems. At your scale, yeah, you probably should have had some people in [laugh] here looking at this for a while now. And at some point, the guidance changes based upon scale. And if there's one thing that we discover from the horrible pages of Hacker News, it's that people love applying bits of wisdom that they hear in wildly inappropriate situations.How do you think about these things at that scale? Because, a simple example: right now I spend about 1000 bucks a month at The Duckbill Group, on our AWS bill. I know. We have one, too. Imagine that. And if I wind up just committing admin credentials to GitHub, for example, and someone compromises that and start spinning things up to mine all the Bitcoin, yeah, I'm going to notice that by the impact it has on the bill, which will be noticeable from orbit.At the level of spend that you folks are at, at company would be hard-pressed to spin up enough Bitcoin miners to materially move the billing needle on a month-to-month basis, just because of the sheer scope and scale. At small bill volumes, yeah, it's pretty easy to discover the thing that spiking your bill to three times normal. It's usually a managed NAT gateway. At your scale, tripling the bill begins to look suspiciously like the GDP of a small country, so what actually happened here? Invariably, at that scale, with that level of massive multiplier, it's usually the simplest solution, an error somewhere in the AWS billing system. Yes, they exist. Imagine that.Micheal: They do exist, and we've encountered that.Corey: Kind of heartstopping, isn't it?Micheal: [laugh]. I don't know if you remember when we had the big Spectre and the Meltdown, right, and those were interesting scenarios for us because we had identified a lot of those issues early on, given the scale we operate, and we were able to, sort of, obviously it did have an impact on the builds and everything, but that's it; that's why you have these dedicated teams to fix that. But I think one of the points you made, these are large bills and you're never going to have a 3x jump the next day. We're not going to be seeing that. And if that happens, you know, God save us. [laugh].But to your point, one of the things we do still want to be doing is look at trends, literally on a week-over-week basis because even a one percentage move is a pretty significant amount, if you think about it, which could be funding some other aspects of the business, which we would prefer to be investing on. So, we do want to have enough rigor and controls in place in our technical stack to identify and alert when something is off track. And it becomes challenging when you start using those higher-order services from your public cloud provider because there's no clear insights on how do you, kind of, parse that information. One of the biggest challenges we had at Pinterest was tying ownership to all these things.No, using tags is not going to cut it. It was so difficult for us to get to a point where we could put some sense of ownership in all the things and the resources people are using, and then subsequently have the right conversation with our ads infrastructure teams, or our product teams to help drive the cost improvements we want to be seeing. And I wouldn't be surprised if that's not a challenge already, even for the smaller companies who have bills in the tunes of tens and thousands, right?Corey: It is. It's predicting the spend and trying to categorize it appropriately; that's the root of all AWS bill panic on the corporate level. It's not that the bill is 20% higher, so we're going to go broke. Most companies spend far more on payroll than they do on infrastructure—as you mentioned with Netflix, content is a significantly larger [laugh] expense than any of those things; real estate, it's usually right up there too—but instead it's, when you're trying to do business forecasting of, okay, if we're going to have an additional 1000 monthly active users, what will the cost for us be to service those users and, okay, if we're seeing a sudden 20% variance, if that's the new normal, then well, that does change our cost projections for a number of years, what happens? When you're public, there starts to become the question of okay, do we have to restate earnings or what's the deal here?And of course, all this sidesteps past the unfortunate reality that, for many companies, the AWS bill is not a function of how many customers you have; it's how many engineers you hired. And that is always the way it winds up playing out for some reason. “It's why did we see a 10% increase in the bill? Yeah, we hired another data science team. Oops.” It's always seems to be the data science folks; I know I'd beat up on those folks a fair bit, and my apologies. And one day, if they analyze enough of the data, they might figure out why.Micheal: So, this is where I want to give a shout out to our data science team, especially some of the engineers working in the Infrastructure Governance Team putting these charts together, helping us derive insights. So, definitely props to them.I think there's a great segue into the point you made. As you add more engineers, what is the impact on the bottom line? And this is one of the things actually as part of engineering productivity, we think about as well on a long-term basis. Pinterest does have over 1000-plus engineers today, and to large degree, many of them actually have their own EC2 instances today. And I wouldn't say it's a significant amount of cost, but it is a large enough number, were shutting down a c5.9xl can actually fund a bunch of conference tickets or something else.And then you can imagine that sort of the scale you start working with at one point. The nuance here is though, you want to make sure there's enough flexibility for these engineers to do their local development in a sustainable way, but when moving to, say production, we really want to tighten the flexibility a bit so they don't end up doing what you just said, spin up a bunch of machines talking to the API directly which no one will be aware of.I want to share a small anecdote because when back in the day, this was probably four years ago, when we were doing some analysis on our bills, we realized that there was a huge jump every—I believe Wednesday—in our EC2 instances by almost a factor of, like, 500 to 600 instances. And we're like, “Why is this happening? What is going on?” And we found out there was an obscure job written by someone who had left the company, calling an EC2 API to spin up a search cluster of 500 machines on-demand, as part of pulling that ETL data together, and then shutting that cluster down. Which at times didn't work as expected because, you know, obviously, your Hadoop jobs are very predictable, right?So, those are the things we were dealing with back in the day, and you want to make sure—since then—this is where engineering productivity as team starts coming in that our job is to enable every engineer to be doing their best work across code building and deploying the services. And we have done this.Corey: Right. You and I can sit here and have an in-depth conversation about the intricacies of AWS billing in a bunch of different ways because in different ways we both specialize in it, in many respects. But let's say that Pinterest theoretically was foolish enough to hire me before I got into this space as an engineer, for terrifying reasons. And great. I start day one as a typical software developer if such a thing could be said to exist. How do you effectively build guardrails in so that I don't inadvertently wind up spinning up all the EC2 instances available to me within an account, which it turns out are more than one might expect sometimes, but still leave me free to do my job without effectively spending a nine-month safari figuring out how AWS bills work?Micheal: And this is why teams like ours exist, to help provide those tools to help you get started. So today, we actually don't let anyone directly use AWS APIs, or even use the UI for that matter. And I think you'll soon realize, the moment you hit, like, probably 30 or 40 people in your organization, you definitely want to lock it down. You don't want that access to be given to anyone or everyone. And then subsequently start building some higher-order tools or abstraction so people can start using that to control effectively.In this case, if you're a new engineer, Corey, which it seems like you were, at some point—Corey: I still write code like I am, don't worry.Micheal: [laugh]. So yes, you would get access to our internal tool to actually help spin up what we call is a dev app, where you get a chance to, obviously, choose the instance size, not the instance type itself, and we have actually constrained the instance types we have approved within Pinterest as well. We don't give you the entire list you get a chance to choose and deploy to. We actually have constraint to based on the workload types, what are the instance types we want to support because in the future, if we ever want to move from c3 to c5—and I've been there, trust me—it is not an easy thing to do, so you want to make sure that you're not letting people just use random instances, and constrain that by building some of these tools. As a new engineer, you would go in, you'd use the tool, and actually have a dev app provisioned for you with our Pinterest image to get you started.And then subsequently, we'll obviously shut it down if we see you not being using it over a certain amount of time, but those are sort of the guardrails we've put in over there so you never get a chance to directly ever use the EC2 APIs, or any of those AWS APIs to do certain things. The similar thing applies for S3 or any of the higher-order tools which AWS will provide, too.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. 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Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: How does that interplay with AWS launches yet another way to run containers, for example, and that becomes a valuable potential avenue to get some business value for a developer, but the platform you built doesn't necessarily embrace that capability? Or they release a feature to an existing tool that you use that could potentially be a just feature capability story, much more so than a cost savings one. How do you keep track of all of that and empower people to use those things so they're not effectively trying to reimplement DynamoDB on top of EC2?Micheal: That's been a challenge, actually, in the past for us because we've always been very flexible where engineers have had an opportunity to write their own solutions many a times rather than leveraging the AWS services, and of late, that's one of the reasons why we have an infrastructure organization—an extremely lean organization for what it's worth—but then still able to achieve outsized outputs. Where we evaluate a lot of these use cases, as they come in and open up different aspects of what we want to provide say directly from AWS, or build certain abstractions on top of it. Every time we talk about containers, obviously, we always associate that with something like Kubernetes and offerings from there on; we realized that our engineers directly never ask for those capabilities. They don't come in and say, “I need a new container orchestration system. Give that to me, and I'm going to be extremely productive.”What people actually realize is that if you can provide them effective tools and that can help them get their job done, they would be happy with it. For example, like I said, our deployment system, which is actually an open-source system called Teletraan. That is the bread and butter at Pinterest at which my team runs. We operate 100,000-plus machines. We have actually looked into container orchestration where we do have a dedicated Kubernetes team looking at it and helping certain use cases moved there, but we realized that the cost of entire migrations need to be evaluated against certain use cases which can benefit from being on Kubernetes from day one. You don't want to force anyone to move there, but give them the right incentives to move there. Case in point, let's upgrade your OS. Because if you're managing machines, obviously everyone loves to upgrade their OSes.Corey: Well, it's one of the things I love savings plans versus RIs; you talk about the c3 to c5 migration and everyone has a story about one of those, but the most foolish or frustrating reason that I ever saw not to do the upgrade was what we bought a bunch of Reserved Instances on the C3s and those have a year-and-a-half left to run. And it's foolish not on the part of customers—it's economically sound—but on the part of AWS where great, you're now forcing me to take a contractual commitment to something that serves me less effectively, rather than getting out of the way and letting me do my job. That's why it's so important to me at least, that savings plans cover Fargate and Lambda, I wish they covered SageMaker instead of SageMaker having its own thing because once again, you're now architecturally constrained based upon some ridiculous economic model that they have imposed on us. But that's a separate rant for another time.Micheal: No, we actually went through that process because we do have a healthy balance of how we do Reserved Instances and how we look at on-demand. We've never been big users have spot in the past because just the spot market itself, we realized that putting that pressure on our customers to figure out how to manage that is way more. When I say customers, in this case, engineers within the organization.Corey: Oh, yes. “I want to post some pictures on Pinterest, so now I have to understand the spot market. What?” Yeah.Micheal: [laugh]. So, in this case, when we even we're moving from C3 to C5—and this is where the partnership really plays out effectively, right, because it's also in the best interest of AWS to deprecate their aging hardware to support some of these new ones where they could also be making good enough premium margins for what it's worth and give the benefit back to the user. So, in this case, we were able to work out an extremely flexible way of moving to a C5 as soon as possible, get help from them, actually, in helping us do that, too, allocating capacity and working with them on capacity management. I believe at one point, we were actually one of the largest companies with a C3 footprint and it took quite a while for us to move to C5. But rest assured, once we moved, the savings was just immense. We were able to offset any of those RI and we were able to work behind the scenes to get that out. But obviously, not a lot of that is considered in a small-scale company just because of, like you said, those constraints which have been placed in a contractual obligation.Corey: Well, this is an area in which I will give the same guidance to companies of your scale as well as small-scale companies. And by small-scale, I mean, people on the free tier account, give or take, so I do mean the smallest of the small. Whenever you wind up in a scenario where you find yourself architecturally constrained by an economic barrier like this, reach out to your account manager. I promise you have one. Every account, even the tiny free tier accounts, have an account manager.I have an account manager, who I have to say has probably one of the most surreal jobs that AWS, just based upon the conversations I throw past him. But it's reaching out to your provider rather than trying to solve a lot of this stuff yourself by constraining how you're building things internally is always the right first move because the worst case is you don't get anywhere in those conversations. Okay, but at least you explored that, as opposed to what often happens is, “Oh, yeah. I have a switch over here I can flip and solve your entire problem. Does that help anything?”Micheal: Yeah.Corey: You feel foolish finding that out only after nine months of dedicated work, it turns out.Micheal: Which makes me wonder, Corey. I mean, do you see a lot of that happening where folks don't tend to reach out to their account managers, or rather treat them as partners in this case, right? Because it sounds like there is this unhealthy tension, I would say, as to what is the best help you could be getting from your account managers in this case.Corey: Constantly. And the challenge comes from a few things, in my experience. The first is that the quality of account managers and the technical account managers—the folks who are embedded many cases with your engineering teams in different ways—does vary. AWS is scaling wildly and bursting at the seams, and people are hard to scale.So, some are fantastic, some are decidedly less so, and most folks fall somewhere in the middle of that bell curve. And it doesn't take too many poor experiences for the default to be, “Oh, those people are useless. They never do anything we want, so why bother asking them?” And that leads to an unhealthy dynamic where a lot of companies will wind up treating their AWS account manager types as a ticket triage system, or the last resort of places that they'll turn when they should be involved in earlier conversations.I mean, take Pinterest as an example of this. I'm not sure how many technical account managers you have assigned to your account, but I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that the ratio of technical account managers to engineers working on the environment is incredibly lopsided. It's got to be a high ratio just because of the nature of how these things work. So, there are a lot of people who are actively working on things that would almost certainly benefit from a more holistic conversation with your AWS account team, but it doesn't occur to them to do it just because of either perceived biases around levels of competence, or poor experiences in the past, or simply not knowing the capabilities that are there. If I could tell one story around the AWS account management story, it would be talk to folks sooner about these things.And to be clear, Pinterest has this less than other folks, but AWS does themselves no favors by having a product strategy of, “Yes,” because very often in service of those conversations with a number of companies, there is the very real concern of are they doing research so that they can launch a service that competes with us? Amazon as a whole launching a social network is admittedly one of the most hilarious ideas I [laugh] can come up with and I hope they take a whack at it just to watch them learn all these lessons themselves, but that is again, neither here nor there.Micheal: That story is very interesting, and I think you mentioned one thing; it's just that lack of trust, or even knowing what the account managers can actually do for you. There seems to be just a lack of education on that. And we also found it the hard way, right? I wouldn't say that Pinterest figured this out on day one. We evolved sort of a relationship over time. Yes, our time… engagements are, sort of, lopsided, but we were able to negotiate that as part of deals as we learned a bit more on what we can and we cannot do, and how these individuals are beneficial for Pinterest as well. And—Corey: Well, here's a question for you, without naming names—and this might illustrate part of the challenge customers have—how long has your account manager—not the technical account managers, but your account manager—been assigned to your account?Micheal: I've been at Pinterest for five years and I've been working with the same person. And he's amazing.Corey: Which is incredibly atypical. At a lot of smaller companies, it feels like, “Oh, I'm your account manager being introduced to you.” And, “Are you the third one this year? Great.” What happens is that if the account manager excels, very often they get promoted and work with a smaller number of accounts at larger spend, and whereas if they don't find that AWS is a great place for them for a variety of reasons, they go somewhere else and need to be backfilled.So, at the smaller account, it's, “Great. I've had more account managers in a year than you've had in five.” And that is often the experience when you start seeing significant levels of rotation, especially on the customer engineering side where you wind up with you have this big kickoff, and everyone's aware of all the capabilities and you look at it three years later, and not a single person who was in that kickoff is still involved with the account on either side, and it's just sort of been evolving evolutionarily from there. One thing that we've done in some of our larger accounts as part of our negotiation process is when we see that the bridges have been so thoroughly burned, we will effectively request a full account team cycle, just because it's time to get new faces in where the customer, in many cases unreasonably, is not going to say, “Yeah but a year-and-a-half ago you did this terrible thing and we're still salty about it.” Fine, whatever. I get it. People relationships are hard. Let's go ahead and swap some folks out so that there are new faces with new perspectives because that helps.Micheal: Well, first off, if you had so many switches in account manager, I think that's something speaks about [laugh] how you've been working, too. I'm just kidding. There are a bu—Corey: Entirely possible. In seriousness, yes. But if you talk to—like, this is not just me because in my case, yeah, I feel like my account manager is whoever drew the short straw that week because frankly, yeah, that does seem like a great punishment to wind up passing out to someone who is underperforming. But for a lot of folks who are in the mid-tier, like, spending $50 to $100,000 a month, this is a very common story.Micheal: Yeah. Actually, we've heard a bit about this, too. And like you said, I think maintaining context is the most thing. You really want your account manager to vouch for you, really be your champion in those meetings because AWS, like you said is so large, getting those exec time, and reviews, and there's so many things that happen, your account manager is the champion for you, or right there. And it's important and in fact in your best interest to have a great relationship with them as well, not treat them as, oh yet another vendor.And I think that's where things start to get a bit messy because when you start treating them as yet another vendor, there is no incentive for them to do the best for you, too. You know, people relationships are hard. But that said though, I think given the amount of customers like these cloud companies are accruing, I wouldn't be surprised; every account manager seems to be extremely burdened. Even in our case, although I've been having a chance to work with this one person for a long time, we've actually expanded. We have now multiple account managers helping us out as we've started scaling to use certain aspects of AWS which we've never explored before.We were a bit constrained and reserved about what service we want to use because there have been instances where we have tried using something and we have hit the wall pretty immediately. API rate limits, or it's not ready for primetime, and we're like, “Oh, my God. Now, what do we do?” So, we have a bit more cautious. But that said, over time, having an account manager who understands how you work, what scale you have, they're able to advocate with the internal engineering teams within the cloud provider to make the best of supporting you as a customer and tell that success story all the way out.So yeah, I can totally understand how this may be hard, especially for those small companies. For what it's worth, I think the best way to really think about it is not treat them as your vendor, but really go out on a limb there. Even though you signed a deal with them, you want to make sure that you have the continuing relationship with them to have—represent your voice better within the company. Which is probably hard. [laugh].Corey: That's always the hard part. Honestly, if this were the sort of thing that were easy to automate, or you could wind up building out something that winds up helping companies figure out how to solve these things programmatically, talk about interesting business problems that are only going to get larger in the fullness of time. This is not going away, even if AWS stopped signing up new customers entirely right now, they would still have years of growth ahead of them just from organic growth. And take a company with the scale of Pinterest and just think of how many years it would take to do a full-on exodus, even if it became priority number one. It's not realistic in many cases, which is why I've never been a big fan of multi-cloud as an approach for negotiation. Yeah, AWS has more data on those points than any of us do; they're not worried about it. It just makes you sound like an unsophisticated negotiator. Pick your poison and lean in.Micheal: That is the truth you just mentioned, and I probably want to give a call out to our head of infrastructure, [Coburn 00:42:13]. He's also my boss, and he had brought this perspective as well. As part of any negotiation discussions, like you just said, AWS has way more data points on this than what we think we can do in terms of talking about, “Oh, we are exploring this other cloud provider.” And it's—they would be like, “Yeah. Do tell me more [laugh] how that's going.”And it's probably in the best interest to never use that as a negotiation tactic because they clearly know the investments that's going to build on what you've done, so you might as well be talking more—again, this is where that relationship really plays together because you want both of them to be successful. And it's in their best interest to still keep you happy because the good thing about at least companies of our size is that we're probably, like, one phone call away from some of their executive team, where we could always talk about what didn't work for us. And I know not everyone has that opportunity, but I'm really hoping and I know at least with some of the interactions we've had with the AWS teams, they're actively working and building that relationship more and more, giving access to those customer advisory boards, and all of them to have those direct calls with the executives. I don't know whether you've seen that in your experience in helping some of these companies?Corey: Have a different approach to it. It turns out when you're super loud and public and noisy about AWS and spend too much time in Seattle, you start to spend time with those people on a social basis. Because, again, I'm obnoxious and annoying to a lot of AWS folks, but I'm also having an obnoxious habit of being right in most of the things I'm pointing out. And that becomes harder and harder to ignore. I mean, part of the value that I found in being able to do this as a consultant is that I begin to compare and contrast different customer environments on a consistent ongoing basis.I mean, the reason that negotiation works well from my perspective is that AWS does a bunch of these every week, and customers do these every few years with AWS. And well, we do an awful lot of them, too, and it's okay, we've seen different ways things can get structured and it doesn't take too long and too many engagements before you start to see the points of commonality in how these things flow together. So, when we wind up seeing things that a customer is planning on architecturally and looking to do in the future, and, “Well, wait a minute. Have you talked to the folks negotiating the contract about this? Because that does potentially have bearing and it provides better data than what AWS is gathering just through looking at overall spend trends. So yeah, bring that up. That is absolutely going to impact the type of offer you get.”It just comes down to understanding the motivators that drive folks and it comes down to, I think understanding the incentives. I will say that across the board, I have never yet seen a deal from AWS come through where it was, “Okay, at this point you're just trying to hoodwink the customer and get them to sign on something that doesn't help them.” I've seen mistakes that can definitely lead to that impression, and I've seen areas where they're doing data is incomplete and they're making assumptions that are not borne out in reality. But it's not one of those bad faith type—Micheal: Yeah.Corey: —of negotiations. If it were, I would be framing a lot of this very differently. It sounds weird to say, “Yeah, your vendor is not trying to screw you over in this sense,” because look at the entire IT industry. How often has that been true about almost any other vendor in the fullness of time? This is something a bit different, and I still think we're trying to grapple with the repercussions of that, from a negotiation standpoint and from a long-term business continuity standpoint, when your faith is linked—in a shared fate context—with your vendor.Micheal: It's in their best interest as well because they're trying to build a diversified portfolio. Like, if they help 100 companies, even if one of them becomes the next Pinterest, that's great, right? And that continued relationship is what they're aiming for. So, assuming any bad faith over there probably is not going to be the best outcome, like you said. And two, it's not a zero-sum game.I always get a sense that when you're doing these negotiations, it's an all-or-nothing deal. It's not. You have to think they're also running a business and it's important that you as your business, how okay are you with some of those premiums? You cannot get a discount on everything, you cannot get the deal or the numbers you probably want almost everything. And to your point, architecturally, if you're moving in a certain direction where you think in the next three years, this is what your usage is going to be or it will come down to that, obviously, you should be investing more and negotiating that out front rather than managed NAT [laugh] gateways, I guess. So, I think that's also an important mindset to take in as part of any of these negotiations. Which I'm assuming—I don't know how you folks have been working in the past, but at least that's one of the key items we have taken in as part of any of these discussions.Corey: I would agree wholeheartedly. I think that it just comes down to understanding where you're going, what's important, and again in some cases knowing around what things AWS will never bend contractually. I've seen companies spend six weeks or more trying to get to negotiate custom SLAs around services. Let me save everyone a bunch of time and money; they will not grant them to you.Micheal: Yeah.Corey: I promise. So, stop asking for them; you're not going to get them. There are other things they will negotiate on that they're going to be highly case-dependent. I'm hesitant to mention any of them just because, “Well, wait a minute, we did that once. Why are you talking about that in public?” I don't want to hear it and confidentiality matters. But yeah, not everything is negotiable, but most things are, so figuring out what levers and knobs and dials you have is important.Micheal: We also found it that way. AWS does cater to their—they are a platform and they are pretty clear in how much engagement—even if we are one of their top customers, there's been many times where I know their product managers have heavily pushed back on some of the requests we have put in. And that makes me wonder, they probably have the same engagement even with the smallest of customers, there's always an implicit assumption that the big fish is trying to get the most out of your public cloud providers. To your point, I don't think that's true. We're rarely able to negotiate anything exclusive in terms of their product offerings just for us, if that makes sense.Case in point, tell us your capacity [laugh] for x instances or type of instances, so we as a company would know how to plan out our scale-ups or scale-downs. That's not going to happen exclusively for you. But those kind of things are just, like, examples we have had a chance to work with their product managers and see if, can we get some flexibility on that? For what it's worth, though, they are willing to find a middle ground with you to make sure that you get your answers and, obviously, you're being successful in your plans to use certain technologies they offer or [unintelligible 00:48:31] how you use their services.Corey: So, I know we've gone significantly over time and we are definitely going to do another episode talking about a lot of the other things that you're involved in because I'm going to assume that your full-time job is not worrying about the AWS bill. In fact, you do a fair number of things beyond that; I just get stuck on that one, given that it is but I eat, sleep, breathe, and dream about.Micheal: Absolutely. I would love to talk more, especially about how we're enabling our engineers to be extremely productive in this new world, and how we want to cater to this whole cloud-native environment which is being created, and make sure people are doing their best work. But regardless, Corey, I mean, this has been an amazing, insightful chat, even for me. And I really appreciate you having me on the show.Corey: No, thank you for joining me. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and how you think about things, where can they find you? Because I'm also going to go out on a limb and assume you're also probably hiring, given that everyone seems to be these days.Micheal: Well, that is true. And I wasn't planning to make a hiring pitch but I'm glad that you leaned into that one. Yes, we are hiring and you can find me on Twitter at twitter dot com slash M-I-C-H-E-A-L. I am spelled a bit differently, so make sure you can hit me up, and my DMs are open. And obviously, we have all our open roles listed on pinterestcareers.com as well.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:49:45]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Micheal: Thank you, Corey. It was really been great on your show.Corey: And I'm sure we'll do it again in the near future. Micheal Benedict, Head of Engineering Productivity at Pinterest. I am Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a long rambling comment about exactly how many data centers Pinterest could build instead.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Stryker & Klein
CLIP: Oops I Cheated

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 8:43


CLIP: It's the newest addition to our "Oops I" segment, it's Oops I cheated! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
FULL SHOW: Rules You Don't Follow, Oops I Cheated, Click Click Bait and more

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 96:53


FULL EPISODE 11/9/21: Open. What Hour Is Best To Start Sleep? Import Export. Best Seat on a Plane. A.D.D. News. Oops I Cheated. TikTok Toe. GOAT Line. A.D.D. News. RUle sYou Don't Follow. Ally Know The News. A.D.D. News. Click Click Bait. Vaccine Cards. Is This a Scam?  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Off Book: The Improvised Musical
226. Soap Opera! (With Kelly Marie Tran)

Off Book: The Improvised Musical

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 56:51


Drama! Intrigue! Bubbles? Zach and Jess are joined by gem of the universe Kelly Marie Tran (Star Wars, Raya and the Last Dragon) for "Soap Opera." When some scrappy civilians figure out that all soap is soap, Big Soap has to fight to keep control. It's a tale of wealth and power but also...Carson Daly? Songs include "Soap is Soap," "Conditioner is Just Hair Lotion" and "Oops, that Snake Gave you Hives." Wanna feel so fresh and so clean? Go to offbookclubhouse.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The David Knight Show
Mon 8Nov21 - Why OSHA Mandate is Illegal / Corruption of INFRASTRUCTURE Bill / Aaron Rodgers Healthy, Gavin Newsom M.I.A.

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 181:39


* “It's the EMERGENCY, stupid” — not the economy. Economic disruption is weaponized but the “emergency” claim is foundational — will GOP ever address it?* The MANY problems of Biden's OSHA injection mandate “rule”. Not a leg to stand on. Remote workers are off the hook — for now* Infrastructure — now we know Joe Manchin's price (over a $1B for his wife). The bill is loaded with trash — here's the ingredients* “Methane” is the rallying cry for COP26 Great Reset — to remove affordable energy* CDC has a “don't ask, don't tell” policy for injections* Child predators, from Sesame Street to Sanjay, target kids with their finely honed propaganda* Aaron Rodgers doesn't play ball with Pharma mob; Terry Bradshaw prostitutes himself* Gavin Newsom M.I.A. — hasn't been seen since he got his injection 11 days ago, missed NWO big eventTOPICS by TIMECODE2:00 “It's the EMERGENCY, Stupid”. It's not just the Biden/OSHA mandates — the false pretense of an emergency remains the basis for a dictatorship. Will the GOP go after the ROOT OF THE PROBLEM?16:20 Remote Workers EXEMPT From OSHA/Biden Mandate. Call the bluff of corporations claiming they must require.35:57 What will the weekly tests cost (if your employer allows it as an option)?52:54 STRONG LEGAL ARGUMENTS that prevailed in 5th Circuit Court on Saturday. Several could be used by individuals challenging any mandates or firing 1:23:42 Listener: That strange fine amount of $13,653 and the Mark of the Beast1:27:50 CDC's Own Jab Policy: “Don't Ask, Don't Tell”. CDC's Walensky pressed in Senate hearings about what percentage of CDC employees have been vaccinated1:39:05 Aaron Rodgers vs Terry Bradshaw (who's gone from quarterback to BigPharma CHEERLEADER) 1:52:05 Infrastructure: What's in the Biden Bill. Disruption & corruption — couldn't have passed w/o Republicans. Here are the disgusting ingredients2:11:24 The absurd bigotry of Microsoft & Wall Street technocrats encapsulated in one brief video intro…2:49:16 Nightmare on Sesame Street: PBS Gives Kids the Bird. BigPharma “puppet” Sanjay Gupta talks to other puppets about the Trump Kool-Aid. And globalist cult is proud of its “redefining humanity”. Transgender gaslighting is perfect preparation for transhumanism.2:56:04 TrumpShot Takes Out Gavin Newsom. Oops - he didn't get the placebo! Newsom missing for 11 days — last seen getting a WarpSpeed injection.Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Split Zone Duo
Week 10: Oops I Purdid it again

Split Zone Duo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 36:34


Godfrey and Richard take a 30ish-minute journey through the college football weekend. The Purdue Boilermakers, destroyer of worlds (but only if you're the No. 2 or No. 3 team in the polls), Ohio elites played with their food to varying degrees, The Old Man Yells At A Cloud, Arizona won!, Washington very much didn't on the field or off!, why did Army and Air Force play in a gas grill?, and a Dakota Marker we'll always remember. Finally, a sincere thank you because this show will push across 1 million downloads all-time!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pat Gray Unleashed
Oops, All Vaccines! | 10/29/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 94:53


Joe Biden has announced a new and improved $1.75 trillion spending plan. The Biden administration now wants to give $450,000 per person to illegal immigrants who have been separated from their families at the U.S. border. The top three songs on iTunes seem to be about a guy named Brandon. The first male wins homecoming queen at a high school in Missouri. The Biden administration is also going to bring Barack Obama to the climate summit. A dinosaur talked to the U.N. recently and warned us about continuing to use fossil fuels. Mark Zuckerberg announces his new name for Facebook, "Meta," as well as his ambitions for virtual and augmented reality. Iowa State's coach might have invented a new word. There is a new cereal box from Kellogg's that caters to the trans community. Geraldo Rivera wants the world to know that inflation is actually a good thing. The number-one seller for Apple right now is an overpriced cloth to clean your iPhone screen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

rSlash
r/TIFU I Accidentally Married My Step-Brother

rSlash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 16:36


r/TIFU In today's story, OP is a young woman who happily married the man of her dreams. During their wedding, OP introduced her single dad to her new husband's single mom. The parents immediately hit it off and started dating. Eventually, they got married too! This means that OP accidentally got married to her own step-brother. Oops! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app