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The Nathan Barry Show
050: Dave Pell - Lessons From Two Decades of Publishing Online

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 62:22


Dave Pell has been writing online for almost as long as the internet has existed. His popular newsletter, NextDraft, has over 140,000 subscribers. NextDraft covers the day's ten most fascinating news stories, delivered with a fast and pithy wit.Dave has been a syndicated writer on NPR, Gizmodo, Forbes, and Huffington Post. He earned his bachelor's degree in English from U.C. Berkeley, and his master's in education from Harvard.Besides being a prolific writer, Dave is also the Managing Partner at Arba, LLC. For more than a decade, Arba has been angel investing in companies like Open Table, GrubHub, Marin Software, Hotel Tonight, Joyus, and Liftopia.In this episode, you'll learn: How Dave merged his two writing passions into a successful product The key to building a strong relationship with your audience How Dave dramatically increased signups to NextDraft Links & Resources Flicker Unsplash Fareed Zakaria Jim Rome The Skimm Morning Brew The Hustle Spark Loop Sam Spratt Dave Pell's Links Dave Pell on Twitter NextDraft newsletter Dave's new book: Please Scream Inside Your Heart NextDraft app PleaseScream.com Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Dave:If you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it. So, that's pretty powerful and still excites me. I still press publish with the same enthusiasm now than I did when the internet first launched.[00:00:23] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Dave Pell, who has been writing for basically as long as the internet has been around. He's been an investor since the early days. He's been writing since the.com bust, and even before then. He writes his popular newsletter with 140,000 subscribers called Next Draft.We have this really fun conversation about writing. His writing process. How he grew the newsletter. Bunch of other things that he cares about. Even a few things that I was interested in, like he doesn't have his face in photos on the internet very much. He has his avatar instead. So, just getting into why that is.He also has a book coming out soon. It's called Scream Inside Your Heart, which is a fun reference to some memes from 2020. So, enjoy the episode. There's a lot in there.Dave. Welcome to the show.[00:01:12] Dave:Thanks a lot for having me on.[00:01:14] Nathan:Okay. So you've been doing this for a long time. You've been writing on the internet since the .com era. So, I'm curious maybe just to kick things off, what have you seen—I realize this is a giant question.What have you seen change? What are some of those trends that you've seen, that you either really miss from the early days, or some of those things that you've held onto from the early days of the internet, that you're really still enjoying?[00:01:46] Dave:Yeah, that is a pretty huge question, but I'll give it a shot. The thing I miss from the early days of the internet is that our democracy was not being destroyed by the internet in the early days of the internet. So, everything we thought we were building, basically it turned out to be the opposite of what actually happened.The part about the internet that I still feel is there, although a little bit less so because of the big companies have sort of taken over all the platforms and stuff, is just the idea that someone can have a passion or a creative output that they want to share with the world, and they can mold internet tools to fit their skills, and then use the internet to broadcast that out, and still become sort of pretty popular withour the “OK” of some gatekeeper at a publication, or at a television studio, or whatever.The indie spirit of the internet still lives on. It ebbs and flows, and has a lot of different iterations. But that was the thing that excited me the most when I first played with the internet. And that's the thing that continues to excite me the most now.[00:02:57] Nathan:I always think of the newsletter, and your newsletter in particular, is that indie spirit. Is that what you see most commonly in newsletters? Or are you seeing it in other places as well?[00:03:10] Dave:I see it in podcasts. I see it in newsletters. I see it in people sharing their art, sharing their photography on Flicker, and up through the more modern tools. I go to a site called Unsplash all the time to look at images, and it's just basically regular people sharing their images.Some of them are professional photographers, some aren't, and they're getting their work out there, and then some of them probably get jobs out of it and stuff like that. So, just the idea that you can have some kind of creative output and have a place to share it. And try to get an audience for that is really inspiring.It's a lot harder than it used to be because there's a few billion more people trying to get attention also, and because there are more gatekeepers now. So, you have to, hope that your app meets Apple's guidelines, or that different products you might want to share on the internet have to meet certain classifications now, whereas they might not have in the very early days of the internet. But in general, if you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it.So, that's pretty powerful, and, still excites me. I still press published with the same enthusiasm now that I did when the internet first launched.[00:04:32] Nathan:Yeah. So let's talk about the main project that you have right now, which is Next Draft. Give listeners the 30-second pitch on Next Draft, of what it is.[00:04:46] Dave:Sure. Basically I call myself the managing editor of the internet. What I basically do is a personality-driven news newsletter where I cover the day's most fascinating news. I cover 10 stories. A lot of times in each section there's more than one link. I give my take on the day's news, each individual story, and then I link off to the source for the full story.When I first launched it, I called it Dinner Party Prep. I provided enough information for you to sort of get the gist of the story. And if there's topics you want to dig deeper, you just click and, you know, go get the story yourself. So that's sort of the overview of it.[00:05:27] Nathan:Nice. And you said that you're obsessed with the news maybe in a somewhat, even unhealthy way. why, where did that come from?[00:05:36] Dave:Yeah. Well, nothing, nothing about my relationship with the internet is only somewhat unhealthy. it's all extremely unhealthy, but, both my parents are Holocaust survivors and, when I was growing up, news was just a very big part of our daily lives, especially when my three older sisters moved out and it was just the three of us, that was sort of our mode of communication.We talked about the news. We watched the news together. Fareed Zakaria is basically the sun my parents always wanted. but so I got really into the news and being able to connect the news to, our everyday lives, which of course my parents had experienced as children and teens and Europe during world war II.And also reading between the lines about why certain politicians might be saying something, why stories are getting published a certain way. So I just got really into that and I've always been into a and college, you know, I, I majored in English, but if we had minors at Berkeley, I would have minored in journalism.I took a bunch of journalism courses. I've always been really into the media, but not so much as quite an insider where I go to work for a newspaper, but more observing, the news and providing sort of a lit review of what's happening and what has momentum in the news. So I sorta got addicted to it and, Also as a writer.My favorite thing to do is counter punch. I like to have somebody give me a topic and then I like to be able to quickly share my take, or make a joke or create a funny headline about that content. So I sorta took those two passions of the way I like to write. I like to write on deadline. I like to write fast and I like to counter punch and the content that I like, which is news, and I sort of merged those two things and created a product, and a pretty cool suite of internet tools to support that.[00:07:35] Nathan:Yeah. So that makes sense that you've identified the constraints that match your style and made something exactly that fits it. the deadline, like having, he, you know, coming out with something on a daily basis, is more than a lot of creators want to do. so what's your process there?[00:07:55] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I should emphasize that I do it every day. Not because I think it's some incredible draw for readers to get Daily Content. I do it every day because I'm addicted to it. If my newsletter had five stories in it, instead of 10, it would do better. If my newsletter came out three days a week instead of five days a week, I'm sure it would do better.If it came out once a week, it would do even better then you know, also if I had a more marketable or not marketable, but a more, business-oriented topic that was more narrow, it would do better. I used to write a newsletter that was just on tech and it was. Really popular in the internet professional community back in the first boom, I had about 50,000 subscribers and there were probably about 52,000 internet professionals.So I just like writing about what I want to write about and I'm addicted to pressing the publish button and I'm just addicted to the process. So I do it because of that. I'm not sure that would be my general advice to somebody trying to market or promote a newsletter.[00:09:01] Nathan:Yep. Are there other iterations, either ever before or things that you tried that you realized like, oh, that's not a fit for your personality, your writing style?[00:09:09] Dave:Yeah. When I first started it, I actually, I'm an angel investor also and have been since, probably right after Google and Yahoo launched. so a while, and I used to, my passion has always been writing, so I wanted to mix writing into that, process. So I would send out 10. Daily stories, but they were all tech news related to the CEOs of the companies I worked with and a few of their employees, so that they wouldn't have to spend their time reading the news or worrying about competitors or worry about what the latest trends in tech, where I would give it to them.And they could focus on doing their jobs and that sorta got shared and got out. so I did that for a few years. really, that was my iteration. I should've kept the brand. It was called David Netflix. not that it was a great name, but I've shifted brands about 40 times in my life. Cause I love branding and naming.I that's another, maybe this is more of a cautionary tale than a lesson and newsletter marketing. I would stick with a brand if anybody has the possibility of doing that, that was a big mistake I've made over the years is having multiple brands. But when the bus came, the first internet bust, I basically was writing an obituary column every day and about companies that had failed.So I just decided, I wanted to expand it and I knew I was interested in much broader topics than just tech news. So I expanded it to all news, a critical point that, really changed Next Draft and got it to catch on and become more popular was when I decided to focus on making it more personality driven and less, less overwhelmingly, providing an overwhelming level of coverage.I used to think that I had to provide all the news in the day because people would sort of, depend on me to provide their news. I was sort of selling myself as your trusted news source. So I would include a lot of stories that I didn't have anything to say about because they were huge news, you know, an embassy closed in Iran or whatever.That was huge international news, but I didn't necessarily have anything to say about that that day. So after a while I decided, no, I'm not going to do that. I'm just going to limit it to 10 items. And I'm going to focus that on what I think is the most fascinating and think of it less like a curation tool and more like, a, modern day column.I think if the column newspaper column were invented today, it would look a lot like Next Draft people would sort of share their takes and then provide links off for more information. once I did that, it was a big change. People started signing up much more readily and, once I stopped trying to be exhaustive.[00:11:56] Nathan:That makes a lot of sense to me. I think that that's something you see from a lot of creators is that they're, they're trying to find some model. That's like, this is my idea of what people should want, you know, rather than what they end up doing, eventually it's coming to, it's like, okay, forget all of that.This is what I want. And I'm going to make that. And then people like me can find and follow it. And people who don't can, you know, do their thing. Can you go find one of the other million sources on the internet?[00:12:21] Dave:Yeah. When I think of the people that I like to follow or have followed forever on the internet, all of them are that ladder. They just do it their way. They have a design, they want, they stick to their guns. They say what they feel like saying. they decide. what the personality of the product is.And, they move within that. I always find that to be the most interesting thing, especially when it comes to something like newsletters. I really think newsletters are more like a radio talk shows than they are like other internet content, podcasts to a certain degree as well. But I always feel like I listened to are used to listen a lot to this radio, sports caster named Jim Rome.And whenever he would have a new city that he was launching and he would always give the same speech on the Monday that they launched saying, just give me a week. You might not.Get the vibe of what we're doing today. You might think it's okay, but not great, but just give it a week and listen, and then decide if you like it or not.And I sort of feel like that's how newsletters are your relationship with your readers sort of creates this, sort of insider-y voice and communication that, you, it takes a little while to get into the rhythm of getting it. But once you do, then it's like this familiar voice or this familiar friend that you feel like, even if you didn't read it for a few weeks, you can start a conversation with that person right away easily.That's how I think the voice of a newsletter is most effective. So that's why I've always thought of it. More of what I do is sort of a textual talk radio, more so than a blog or some other format[00:14:01] Nathan:What do you think, or what would you say to someone who maybe had 10 or 20,000 subscribers and felt like their newsletter had gone a bit stale and maybe their relationship to it had gotten a bit stale or they're in this, this position of writing things that no longer have their voice, how would you coach them through like bringing their voice and personality back into it?[00:14:22] Dave:I mean, it's definitely hard. it's hard doing something that you do alone and, something that is often hard to really get off the ground or get to grow, especially when you're on a platform like the internet, where every day, somebody does something and 10 seconds later, they're like internet famous and you're trying day after day.So, I mean, the first thing. Is that you really have to be interested in what you you're passionate about. and focus in on that, because that will alleviate a lot of that stress. Like, do I feel like sending it today? I'm a too burnt out. What's the point? I mean, not that those feelings don't happen. I had those feelings as recently as an hour ago, when I press publish, I have those feelings and disappointments constantly, you know, that's part of being a creator of any kind.Maybe that word is sort of, sort of goofy, but anybody who's putting themselves out there and putting content out, you know, you have that feeling all the time. If you're an indie, and you're doing it all day in front of the computer by yourself, then that's even more powerful because, you know, if you work at a big company or everybody's working on the same goal, or even in a small group, you can sort of support each other and, maybe even bullshit each other at some cases where, oh, no, this really matters.You know, where, if you're by yourself, that has to be pretty self-sustaining or self-sustaining. I do have a friend or two that I always share blurbs with who, one of my friends Rob's, he proves almost all of my blurbs, so it's nice to have that virtual office mate. He's not really officially part of Next Draft, but you know, I don't think I would do it as easily or as, for as long if it weren't for him because he's like my virtual friend on the internet that says, oh, come on, let's get it out today or whatever.So I think that's helpful to have a support team or a couple people you can count on to sort of give you a boost when you need it. But the key really is, is that it's gotta be something that you are passionate about, both in terms of the product and in terms of what you're focusing on, because if you feel strongly about it, then it really.I don't want to say it doesn't matter if people enjoy it, you should take cues from your readers. What are they clicking on? What are they reading? What are they responding to? But at the core, it's gotta be you because that's what gets you through those down points? you know, I had a weird thing because I write about news.The general news, world basically benefited dramatically from the Trump era because everybody was habitually turning on their news, 24, 7, and refreshing and Whitey and Washington post and checking Twitter every two seconds to see what crazy thing happened next. And we're all poor sorta,[00:17:01] Nathan:Wreck to watch.[00:17:02] Dave:So everybody was really into it and it created.Unbelievable platform for people to become media stars. You know, Trump was bad for democracy, but he was great for media. Great for creating new voices out there. whether we like it or not. for me, it was different because I wrote about all news. I wouldn't say I was apolitical, but I wasn't heavily political.The Next Draft had plenty of readers from both sides of the aisle. when Trump came around, it was like one story every day, basically. So it really limited. I would get emails from longtime readers all the time that said, Hey, can't you cover something other than Trump every day?And I say, Hey, if you can find the story for me, I'll cover it. This is what every journalist is on. Now, the people who used to cover the secret service around Trump, the people who used to cover sports are not talking about Trump because of a pandemic relation ship to it. The people who aren't entertainment are talking about Trump because they can't believe that anybody voted for him, whatever the issue was, every dinner party was about Trump.So it was really a bummer for my brand and my product. Actually, it became boring in some ways to me to have the same story every day. And it became, I think frustrating to my readers.But during that era, when it was happening, I had to make a decision. Do I become more political and go full on with this?Or do I sort of try to. Do what I would call a falsely unbiased view or a, you know, false equivalence view that we saw in the media where there's both sides to every story. And you have to pretend they're both accurate, including one guy saying to put disinfectant into your veins. And the other person's saying to wear a mask and take a vaccine, but those things get treated as equal somehow because the president said it.And I really decided, you know, more important than keeping readers is that I'm true to my own sort of ethical standards. In a moment that called for it, at least for me. So I became more political. went into it and I said, what I believe and still believe is the truth, you know, about what was happening with Trump and Trumpism and our slide towards authoritarianism.And I know that this is a podcast more about newsletterish than it is about politics or news, but I'm just sharing that because that's the kind of thing that kept me going. and the people who really cared about what I was writing, appreciated it and would email me and say they got something out of that.And most importantly, my mom would say, yeah, you made the right call. Or my dad would say, yeah, you got that. Right. And ultimately, When it became a sort of a bummer period for me, which I would say 2020 was because of all the horrible news. And, I was writing a book about the year. So I was like living, July of 20, 20, well writing about March of 2020, which I don't recommend for anybody's emotional health.And I just had to think like, what's really important to me. Yes. I want to be funny, which I try to be in my newsletter every day. I want to be read my narcissism is as strong as ever, but ultimately I want to be able to look myself in the reflection of the, darken screen on the rare times that it is dark and say like, yeah, you told the truth and that kept me going there.So I think whatever your brand is, you know, it can be a newsletter about guitars, but if you have that sort of passion, And you have something you want to say, and you think is important to say it sort of gets you through those levels and your motivation. And if it's not getting you through the lows and the motivation, there's nothing wrong with saying, Hey man, this is not worth it.I'm going to go try to make something else. You know, it doesn't have to be, you don't have to beat a dead horse.[00:20:51] Nathan:On the political side. Are there specific things that you felt like it costs you opportunities that it lost you? Because I think a lot of creators, whether they talk about, you know, finance or photography or whatever, I'll see these things. And they're like this either directly relates to me and my audience and I feel like I should take a stand on it.Or it's like a broader macro issue that I feel like we should talk about. And when you do, then there's immediately, you know, somewhere between three and 300 responses of like, we didn't follow you for the politics, you know, or like something like that. And your Instagram, DMS, or newsletter replies or whatever.[00:21:24] Dave:Yeah. it costs me a lot. Definitely it costs me readers or subscribers. It costs me, psychic pain because I was locked into a story that was just overwhelmingly, emotionally painful, really, and shocking and difficult to understand all the things that cause you sort of emotional exhaustion. We're in the Trump story, especially in 2020, when it became a story about our own health and our kids' health.And the frustration level just went through the roof. for me, professionalizing that content actually helps create a bit of a barrier to the feelings about it. Some of my good friends were probably more bummed during 2020 than I was because when the latest crazy story or depressing story would happen, I felt I had to. Ingest that content and then come up with, something cogent to say about it. And maybe hopefully funny to make it a little bit of sugar to take the medicine and then get it out to people. So I've always felt that being able to do that, sorta created a barrier between myself and actually feeling something.So that's another thing I like about the newsletter probably at least unconsciously. but yeah, there was a lot of costs in terms of readers, for sure. Hate mail. but there always is, you know, Today. I would say I get much more hate mail from the far left. If that's what you want to call them. People who feel like every joke is like an incredible triggering a front to their existence or any hint that you mentioned somebody as attractive.I've gotten hate mail because I implied that Beyonce is appearance was part of her brand. I mean, it's totally crazy, but, It's those extremes. You have to be able to turn off. You know, a friend of mine used to work at a major, be the editor of a major American newspaper. And he said every Friday they would get together and they would play the craziest, calls to the editor.They had a call line. In addition to, you could send a letter or you could call, leave a voicemail about something you were upset about in the coverage. And they would just gather around and have drinks on Friday. Listen to this because of course the people who are calling this line are almost self-selecting themselves as a little bit wacko and their takes were usually pretty extreme.The internet, Twitter, social media, Provides, greases the wheels for those people to be more prevalent in our lives. But I think it's really important to know that that's a real minority of people, somebody who sent you a hate mail, that your joke was so offensive, or they can't believe you mentioned that people ever watch pornography on the internet or any of these other things, it's this tiny minority of people.And then it's one step crazier that they felt like they had to contact you. So that's a really hard thing. I think about being split, particularly the newsletter game, because anybody can hit reply and you're going to get many more replies from people with crazy complaints, than you are from people with really thoughtful responses.Not that those don't come and those are valuable and I love getting those, but you get many more from people that just have really bizarre. I mean I could list probably for hours to crazy things that people send me that they're mad about, you know,[00:24:50] Nathan:Is there something specific that you do? Like one thing when I get those replies, if they're just like completely off the wall or abusive or something like that, I just scroll down and then click their unsubscribe link because, you know, they're never going to know, and then I just have to show up in their inbox[00:25:07] Dave:Right.[00:25:08] Nathan:There's something that you do.[00:25:09] Dave:That's not a bad strategy. I like that. I do do that occasionally for sure. occasionally I'll just go to Gmail and just, create a filter for that email to automatically go to my trash. if it's like a hardcore right-winger, that's telling me how stupid I am about ivermectin and that, you know, people should be taking horse dewormer and I'm just not getting the truth.And that Trump is awesome and that, Whatever. I usually just delete, honestly, because I don't see a big benefit to replying to somebody, especially if it's like a rabbit email, you know, they're looking for a reply, they want the conflict. A lot of people sleep easy with conflict. That's one of the lessons of the internet that I learned when I was first starting on the internet, you know, David edix sort sorta became popular because somebody that had a blog with a similar name, that I hadn't heard of, complained that I sort of stole his name because his name was also Dave.And I had got like, probably about three or 400 emails saying, you know, with expletive saying what a horrible person I was. And I also got about 3000 subscribers and at the time I had about 30, so. I didn't know how to respond. I felt like, wow. Number one, I didn't know that guys had the product with the same name.Number two. My name was different enough. Number two or three were both named Dave. I mean, who cares? You know, and plus I don't want to be attacked by anybody. So your first reaction is to respond and a slightly older, although not noticeably these days with my gray beard, slightly older friend of mine who had been in tech a little longer, said, don't respond.This guy lives for conflict. You guys are going to fight. There's going to be this public thing. You're going to be up all night and he's going to never sleep so easy. So, I took that to heart and didn't respond. And I, I think about that a lot when I get rabid emails from people, Mike exception, actually probably my weak point really is from, more my side of the political spectrum, where people who are generally liberal, but are just so extreme for me.In terms of being triggered or having a joke, be every joke, be inappropriate. That those people, I actually do feel like I want to respond to because, I, I don't think I can really motivate or move, somebody who was on the opposite end of the spectrum and is sending me hate aggressive, hate mail, but maybe I can move somebody who's just a little bit different than me, or a little bit more extreme.I will respond to those, although I'm usually sorry. The one other thing I always respond to is if people have been reading, they say, oh, I've been reading you for years. And, I wanted to ask you a couple of questions about this book that you wrote before ordering it. And I'm like, just order the damn book. that's probably my most common email to people these days. It's actually remarkable how many people says, wow, I I've been reading you for years. I share you with all my friends. something, when my sons come home from college where it's always talking about, Dave said this, Dave said that, before I buy your book, I just wanted to ask you a couple of questions to make sure it's going to be for me.I'm like I worked on something for an hour and it's like, your family is talking about it. What, just by the thing I worked on for a year, you know? So those kind of things, personal frustration, I respond.[00:28:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. okay. I'd love to talk about the book some more, but before we get into that, there's two things I want to talk about. The first one is like, how do you measure success for the newsletter? What's the thing that you'd like to, cause I don't think it's, you're pursuing the monetary side for this.It sounds like the monetary side comes from investing and, and then what's success for the newsletter.[00:28:59] Dave:I mean, I have had right now, I I'm just marketing my, my own stuff. And during the pandemic I marketed non-profits, but, that had to do with either the pandemic or, the democracy issues that we were facing. but I have made decent money from selling straight sponsorships. Year-long sponsorships to people, which I highly recommend.I think some of the ads that people put into his letters that go by clicks or whatever, unless you have a massive audience, it's hard to make much money, but if you pitch to some company that is a like-minded brand, Hey, you're going to be my only brand for a year. And anytime you have special events, I'm going to mention it.Then you can say, okay, you have like, you know, 20,000 readers or a hundred thousand readers that can make a difference to a brand to say, yeah, it's like a rounding air show. We'll give you 20 grand or a hundred grand or wherever it comes in there that you can actually make a decent. Living in terms of writing.So that always worked better for me, but no, my, my internet life is really all about narcissism and, clicks, you know, the dopamine, I just want reads. I'd rather you subscribe to my newsletter than pitch me your startup company. I just, that's what I want the most. So more numbers, more opens, more reads, more subscribers.And unfortunately that's probably the hardest thing to get also, especially in a product that is sort of viral. I think newsletters are sort of viral, but it's better if you have a team and some tools to really get it going. That's, you know, sites like the Skimm morning brew and the hustle. They have teams that are really growth hacking and focusing on that and having rewards programs and ambassador programs.The reason you see that is because.Newsletters themselves are not really inherently that viral. Yes. Somebody can forward it to one person or whatever, but it's not as viral as a lot of other forms of content where you can click a button and share it with all of your followers, like a Facebook post or a tweet.So yeah, the thing that matters to me most is probably the hardest to get in the newsletter game, but that's the truth[00:31:10] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I think the, the point on like newsletters don't have a distribution engine. There's no Facebook newsfeed, YouTube algorithm equivalent for newsletters. And so it really relies on either you posting your content somewhere else, whether it's Twitter or YouTube or medium or something that has an algorithm or your readers saying like, oh, I read Next Draft.You should too. There's not really something else in there. Have you looked at, or I guess if you have thoughts on that, you comments on it, but then also have you looked at launching an ambassador program or, or an actual referral program?[00:31:44] Dave:Yeah, I've thought about him. And now over the last year, there's been a few tools that have come out a few. I think X people from sites like morning view Ru, and some other sites that have sort of perfected some of these marketing programs have, sort of come out with these tools. I've messed around with them a little bit.Some of them still require I find, some technical ones. so I, I have like an engineer who works with me on Next Draft, like as a freelance basis every now and then, but it's not always easy for me to launch stuff that requires a lot of a moment to moment technical support, and management, because it's just me using a lot of, they're customized, but they're over the counter tools.So I've thought about a lot of them, but I really haven't tried it that much.I want to though I do want to do that. I would like to do one of those programs, especially where you get credit for referrals. I think that's the best kind of model. So there's one called spark loop.[00:32:51] Nathan:Yeah, we actually, I invested in spark loops, so we[00:32:54] Dave:Okay.[00:32:55] Nathan:Decent portion of that business, so good.[00:32:58] Dave:Oh, nice. Yeah. That one, if it was just slightly easier, I know that it's probably difficult to make it easier because, there's so many pieces. They have to have your subscribers. I have to have my subscribers, but that is, does seem like a good product. And especially if they can, I think expand into like letting a person sell a product or whatever, get credited for sharing products that can be even bigger.But yeah, that kind of stuff is really powerful for sure. And I, I do want to get into that. it's more just inertia that I it's just a matter of sitting there for the, an amount of hours that it requires to get it going.But I do think that's a great thing for newsletter writers to do, and I'm pretty surprised that more newsletter platforms don't build it right in.I think that'll probably change over time too. Maybe you guys will get acquired by.[00:33:48] Nathan:Yep. No, that makes sense. I know for convert kit, we wanted to build it in, it looks at the amount of time that it would take and then said like let's invest in a , you know, and then roll it into our offering.[00:33:59] Dave:Yeah, it's hard. It's hard not to take that stuff personally, too, you know, for people that do newsletters, you think you're going to put a thing on there and say, Hey, you know, it's just me here and you always read my newsletter and click. I know you love me so much. Can you just do this to get a free whatever?And it's, you know, sometimes not that many people click, you know, or other times like they click just as long as there's the free item. So there's a lot of ways to get depressed. Like I had things where I say, Hey, the first a hundred people who do this, get a free t-shirt or whatever next strap t-shirt.And those hundred people will literally do what I asked them to do in like 34 seconds, you know? And then it like stops after that. The next time you ask them, if there's not a t-shirt. But it's not you, you know, if you go to a baseball game or a lawyer game or whatever, you know, people sit there, they don't even cheer as much for the team as they cheer when the guy comes out with the t-shirt gun.So it's like, people love t-shirts more than they're ever going to love you. And you have to go into these things with that in mind. there's no way, even if it's, even if you're XX large and the t-shirt is, you know, petite, it's still worth more than you are. And the average mind of the average person.So you have to go into all of these things thinking, I hope this works like crazy, but if it doesn't tomorrow, I open up the browser and start writing.[00:35:19] Nathan:Yeah. That's very true. I want to talk about the growth of the newsletter. I was reading something, which I realized later was back in 2014, that you were at around 160,000 subscribers. I imagine it's quite a bit larger than that now. And then I'd love to hear some of the inflection points of growth.[00:35:35] Dave:Yeah, I'm not, I'm not sure. I might've, I don't know if I lied in 2014, but now I have about,[00:35:41] Nathan:Quoted it wrong.[00:35:42] Dave:No, you might've got it right. I might've exaggerated. Maybe that was a including app downloads and a few other things. Yeah. I have about 140,000 or so now, so that would be making that a pretty horrible seven years now.You're depressing me.Your listeners should just stop, stop writing newsletters. It's not worth the depression[00:36:02] Nathan:Just give up now[00:36:03] Dave:Yeah. And by all means if Nathan goals do not pick up. no, yeah, I probably have it 140,000 on newsletter. Made my newsletter. It's hard to believe in this era of newsletters actually, but when I first launched Next Draft, I noticed that even people who would send in testimonials or that I would ask for testimonials would say, basically something to the extent that even though email is horrible, this is the one newsletter I I'd sign up for whatever.And I kept thinking, man, that's a bummer that I'm starting out at this deficit, that people have a negative feeling about the medium. So I, since then I've always made it my goal to. Have the content available wherever people are. So the newsletter is certainly the main way that people get next job, but there's an app for the iPhone and the iPad there.That's the first thing I launched because I wanted to have an alternative for people who just hate email too much. So now you go to the landing page, it's like, Hey, if you don't like email, here's another version. I have a blog version. I have an apple news version. I have an RSS version. I'm lucky enough to have a really good, WordPress custom WordPress install that I just push one button and it pushes it out to all of those things.But I am, I'm a big proponent of just meeting people where they are. even, as an example, I recently launched a sort of a substance. Version of my newsletter under the radar. but when I redo my site, I'm going to make that more clear because if people already subscribed to like 10 sub stacks and they're using their aggregator and they already have their email saved and they can just click a button, it's like, I don't care.You know, it takes me five extra minutes to paste my content into sub stack. So I just want the reads. I don't really care about how they read it or whether they read it.[00:37:55] Nathan:Yeah. That's fascinating. So then let's shift gears a little bit. I want to hear about the book. first I wanna hear about the title. Would you have it on your shirt?[00:38:03] Dave:Yeah. That's pretty embarrassing. I swear. I didn't know it was video today, but I do have a shirt[00:38:06] Nathan:You're good.[00:38:07] Dave:Otherwise I wouldn't have worn. This would have worn my Nathan Barry's shirt.[00:38:12] Nathan:That's right. It's in the mail actually. It's[00:38:15] Dave:Oh, good, good.[00:38:16] Nathan:Big photo of my face.[00:38:17] Dave:Yeah. Convert kit. My wife converted to Judaism before we got married. So I have my own convert kit.[00:38:23] Nathan:There you go. Exactly. so I want to hear like what the book is about and then particularly where the title came from,[00:38:30] Dave:Sure.[00:38:31] Nathan:It made me laugh a lot when I heard it.[00:38:33] Dave:Oh, cool. That's good. That's a good start then. yeah, the title comes from, in July of the, of 2020 when the pandemic was really setting in and becoming a reality for everybody. this amusement park outside of Tokyo in the shadow of Mount Fuji called the Fuji queue. amusement park reopened.And they found that even though everybody w everybody was wearing masks, people were screaming so much on some of the rides, especially the Fujiyama roller coaster, which was their scariest ride, that they were worried about germs spread. So they sort of put signs around the amusement park saying, no screaming, you can come, you can ride and have fun, but keep your mask on adults scream.And it sort of became a little minor social media thing in Japan, where people were sort of making fun of them like, oh, they're telling us not to scream. How can anybody not scream on the Fujiyama roller coaster? So in response, the, park management had to have their executives with perfectly quaffed hair and tie and colored shirts and masks on ride the roller coaster with a webcam facing them the whole time without moving a muscle.Cracking a smile or grimacing or screaming. And then at the end of the ride, when the rollercoaster stops, it says, please Scream Inside Your Heart.And that was always my favorite meme of, 2020. It went really viral. There was like t-shirts. aside from mine, there were posters memes. It sort of went crazy for about a week or two, which by 2020 standards is a pretty long time for a meme to last.And I just thought that made sense as a title for the book, because that's sort of how we felt, all year that I dunno if we were screaming in our heart, but we were certainly screaming into a void. Like no matter what we sat or yelled on social media or complained to our family members or friends, it just kept getting worse.The year just kept getting worse. And, so the idea is that this book sort of, now you're free to sort of let out the scream. And the book is it's about 2020, certainly, but it's really about the issues that led us to 2020. There's a ton about our relationship to media and including my own relationship to media and how that got us into trouble.Some of the stuff we're talking about today, how, technology has impacted our lives stuff. I've been sort of thinking about it, writing about for the last few decades, and a lot of the political hate that emerged. and, but it's all within this time capsule of the craziest year.[00:41:12] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. And so that's coming out early in November, November 2nd. so you're, it looks like you're just starting the, you know, mentioning the promotion tour and all of that. is there a big, big push that comes with it or are you kind of, I, I'm always curious with people's book launches, what strategy they take.[00:41:30] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I'm a newbie, so it's, the whole process has been interesting to me working with a publisher, working with others, is not my forte. so I got used to that or I'm getting used to that and they're probably getting used to it also because working with grouchy 50 something in these is probably not ideal, but, yeah, I've just been promoting it so far in Next Draft, but I've been doing, I have a PR company that's helping me and I've been doing a ton of podcasts and I'm marketing it to my own readers.And then as it gets a little bit closer to the November 2nd date, I have a lot more stuff planned rut, a lot of influencers have early copies of the book, and hopefully they'll promote it. And, I'll call out a few favors from bloggers and hopefully newsletter writers. I feel like that should be my in theory.That should be my secret weapon because, in addition to being fun and creative, nothing moves traffic, except maybe Facebook, nothing moves traffic more than newsletters. I know a lot of people who run e-commerce companies and newsletters are always second, if not first, in terms of traffic drivers.So, I really think that, if some of my friends out there at morning brew in the hustle and the scam and all these other sites that sort of, have surpassed my size by quite a bit, put the word out that, one of their fellow warriors is, has a book out. That'll probably move the needle even more. The media, I'm hoping to get stuff like that, but I really don't know. I'm trying not to get my hopes up too much because, unlike a newsletter, it's not just one day's work, you know, you like worry about one word or one sentence in a book for like three weeks and then you put it out there and people are like, oh yeah, I'll check it out sometime.Thanks. So, you know, that's, you know, whatever that's life as a, you put yourself out there, that's how it goes. So I'm hoping it sells well. And, the more people that get it, I think some people, their first reaction is, oh my God, 2020. I don't want to relive that again. But, hopefully people who know my brand and those that they share it with, know that it's, you know, there's a lot of humor and there's, it's probably 30 pages before we even get into the first event of 2020.So it's, there's a lot more to it and it's sort of fun and crazy and tries to have the pace of a roller coaster. that was the other thing I took from the Fujiyama roller coaster.[00:43:59] Nathan:Yeah. So one thing that I'm always curious about with people who have like a prolific newsletter, you know, in your case of writing every day, and then like, for a lot of people, that would be a lot to handle of staying on top of a daily newsletter. And then you're writing a book on top of that. How did you schedule your time?Were you blocking off like, oh, these afternoons are specifically for book, book writing. Cause you turned it around relatively fast.[00:44:24] Dave:Yeah. the newsletter is sort of like a full-time job. People always ask me, you know, when do you work on, or how many hours do you spend on it? I mean, I'm, I'm always looking for news, whether it's on Twitter or friends, emailing me stuff or texting me stories, or just in conversations with people to see what they're into or what stories are interesting them or what I'm missing.In terms of actual time spent like where I'm dedicating time. I probably do like about an hour every night, because the story has changed so quick. So I'll do an hour of looking for stories every night. And then the next day I sort of lock in from about nine to one, usually, or nine to 12, where I'm finding stories, saving those stories, choosing what stories I want to go with and then actually writing the newsletter.All of that takes about anywhere from like two and a half to four hours, depending on the day I go pretty fast. When it came to the book, that was tricky. It was actually more emotionally tricky because like I said before, I was like, had to go back and write about, you know, Briana Taylor while I'm living another horrible act, you know, or even more so the Trump, you know, one crazy Trump thing and another crazy Trump thing and seeing the pandemic getting worse and worse.So that was stressful. But I found at the beginning I would try to write a lot at night and that was okay. But I found actually if I just kept going, in the day when I was already rolling and had written the newsletter and I was already in the group just to add on an hour or two to that was actually easier and more effective for me than trying to get going.But that's just me. I mean, I just go by my it's almost like my circadian rhythm or something like that, I almost never eat or consume anything before I'm done with next job except for coffee. I would keep that going, you know, once I would like, sort of have a sandwich or whatever, then it's like, oh, let me just take a quick nap and then whatever.So, yeah, I tried to just keep it going. I always find the more consistently busy I am, the less I procrastinate. And if I take a day off or I take a few hours off, even then, between writing, it just, it takes me longer to get going.[00:46:37] Nathan:Yep. That makes sense. The habit that I'm in right now is starting the day with 45 minutes to an hour of writing and that's working much better for me than like slotting it in somewhere else. So I think like w what I hear you saying is like, experiment and find the thing that works well for you.[00:46:54] Dave:Yeah. I mean, if you're going to start experimenting almost every writer, I know not like newsletter writers, but just general writers, all do what you just described. They sort of pick a time in the morning and they get their output done. then the rest of the day, if ideas come to them or whatever, they jot it down, but they're sort of powering in that morning hours.[00:47:13] Nathan:Yeah.[00:47:14] Dave:That's probably a good one to try. Although, you know, some people just do it better at different hours. I'm sure.[00:47:19] Nathan:Yeah. another thing I realized, I've always you for years, and until we got on this video call, I had no idea what you looked like. and which is kind of an interesting,[00:47:28] Dave:Well, I'm sorry.It's by design. I have a face for Panda.[00:47:32] Nathan:Tell me more about, well, I guess two sides, one, has there ever been an interesting interaction? You know, because you're like, Hey, I'm, I'm Dave and people are like, I wouldn't have ever recognized you. Or has there been any other benefits and thought behind, you know, why it have an avatar?[00:47:49] Dave:If by interesting you mean horrible? Yes. There's been many interesting interactions with people. I mean, before, before I had my current, avatar, which is, pretty awesome, actually, a guy named Brian Molko designed it. I had this incredible drawing of a character that looked like me that, had sort of ether net, Machinery and cord going into his head and it was like me, but my head was actually lifted.The top of my head was lifted off and you could see all this machinery and it was an incredible graphic, by this guy named Sam Spratt. Who's now done, album covers and book covers. He's like a super talent. If you want to follow somebody fun on Instagram, he's just incredible. And it was a drawing, even though it looked photo realistic.And I used that for a while and then I would go places and people would be like, you are so much fatter and grayer than I imagined. And so instead of having Sam sort of ruin his artwork, I went back with the more, cartoonish or animated, avatar. So since then I don't get too much of that, but, that was a good move.Although that's the best thing about avatars and the internet is that your avatar never ages. It always looks the same. It stays the same weight. My avatar never overeats he exercises right here. Angie really gets along well with others and doesn't have any kind of social anxiety either. So he's pretty cool.Yeah, it goes a little downhill with me in person. So[00:49:21] Nathan:Yeah. So is it, that's something that like, it gives you some distance between you and readers, or it gives you some anonymity that, you know, you don't want to be recognized in the streets?[00:49:32] Dave:No, no, it's, it's, basically just what I described. It's like, I literally prefer the, the attractiveness of my avatar versus me, but also actually my avatar is really awesome. my logo, so it's also iconic and scalable. so it looks awesome on t-shirts even people who don't know what Next Draft is when they see, by son wearing his t-shirt, whatever, it just looks awesome.So that that's that's as much of it as anything. I thought your response was going to be mad. You seem perfectly attractive to me. I don't know what the issue is, but no, you went with, am I doing that for some other reason? Yeah. So, I get this all the time.Cause my wife is a very attractive person also. So when people meet me, they're always like, whoa, we were once a very famous celebrity came up to me and I said, oh, I'm Gina's husband. And she was like, wow, you did well. Oh, you know? So I'm like, thanks a lot. That helps. So just gave her a picture of my, my icon and walked away.[00:50:31] Nathan:Then that worked. I'm sure that she has it framed in her office, from now on. it's just interesting to me. You're you're sort of at this intersection between personal brand and, like media brand. And I think the avatar helps push you over into the media brand side. and I don't have any real commentary on it other than I find it interesting.[00:50:53] Dave:Yeah, no, I think there probably is some of that. I I've never really been a fan of using my actual face, or my actual person as a logo. I love the process of designing or working with people to design logos and taglines and all that. But yeah, probably at some point there was a, a goal with Next Draft to make it seem bigger than it is.I know a lot of people that are solo operators. They regularly say we, when they're talking about their brand to make it seem bigger, I actually think that's sort of been flipped on its head though. in the last few years where so many people are coming into the space, it's very clear that what they're doing is leaving a big brand, leaving a we and going to an eye.And I think it's actually a selling point in a lot of ways. So, I mean, I, I still get a lot of emails that say, I don't know if anybody at Next Draft is going to read this email, you know, or if you do, can you get this message to Dave? He's an asshole or whatever. And it's like, I'm the only one here, you know, or the other one I always get is when I email back to people that go, oh, I can't believe you actually emailed back.I didn't think this would get to anybody. It's like, you hit reply. And it had my email, like where else would it go? Exactly. You know? But I think actually having people thinking of you as a person, instead of a brand, Is a benefit today. Whereas if you would ask me when I was younger, I probably would have said, make it seem like you have a big company behind you.[00:52:24] Nathan:Yeah. And I think that that indie shift overall, like people are looking for that.[00:52:29] Dave:Yeah,[00:52:29] Nathan:Want to ask about the intersection between your investing and the newsletter. like, are you still actively investing today and doing author.[00:52:38] Dave:Yeah, yeah, no, I, I still invest a ton. I usually follow along with people who are a little more in tune with today's companies than I am. I don't really go out there and brand myself as an investor much, but I've been really lucky. I have very little intersection actually, if any, with my newsletter and my investing and I definitely want people to. To think of me as a writer first, for sure. Not as an investor who has this hobby, because that's definitely not in terms of time or passion, the reality. but I've been really lucky over the years that, I've invested with people or co-invested with them that were cool with me. branding myself as a writer first, but still looking at deals that came through their brands because they were branded as BCS or investors or angels.That's probably a bigger deal now than when I first started. There were like five angel investors, basically. Nobody really did small, early stage seed deals. you know, I mean, we all knew each other that did it and now there's like thousands of them. So you really have to be either a really pretty well-known entrepreneur or you have to. Sort of attach yourself to our organization or two who are really branding themselves well, getting out there and building a stable of companies,[00:53:58] Nathan:Yeah.[00:53:59] Dave:It's pretty different, more, much more has changed about that than the newsletter game, actually, which is pretty much the same as it was the day I started actually.[00:54:07] Nathan:Are there a few of those I'm curious who are a few of those, people that you would tag along with, you know, when they're investing where like, oh, this person puts money into something I'd like to be right there with them.[00:54:19] Dave:I mean, I have some people that are like entrepreneurs and former entrepreneurs that do it, and if they like it I'll do it. but generally I co-invest with, at any given time, a different group of people, used to be a larger group. When I first started out, my whole investing career, I've co-invested with this guy named Bob zip who's much smarter and much wiser than I am about all things business and.Startup world. So that was really great. And he used to work at a company called venture law group in the first boom, and they represented Google, Hotmail. eGroups all the big, huge, early internet companies, and so he really knew the space well. And when he became, I used to get deals from him.That's how you used to get deals actually was by a couple of law firms that focused on startups. I've been co-investing with him all along and he's been generous enough to, he left the law firm a long, long time ago and became an investor primarily. And he had a fund and was well-known guy and well-respected guy.So I got to sit in when he would hear pitches. and we sort of, we weren't investing together out of the same fund, but we would sort of make our decisions together. And we still do that a lot. these days, I almost always follow along with a guy named run-on barn Cohen and a really good friend of mine.He was for many years at WordPress, basically, most of the things that make money at WordPress, he did. and now he's a investor at a VC called resolute. If anybody's looking for a good VC, he's like incredible, like Bob zip much, much smarter than I am about this stuff. Unbelievably ethical, great business sense.Great technical sense. so I mostly just follow him. So if he does something that's usually good enough for me. And if I see something that I think it's good, I'll pass it along to him, but it's mostly that, but I've been really fortunate. I can't express that enough, that I've been able to invest in companies without having to spend all of my time, branding myself as an investor.That's just been unbelievably lucky. So, I've been able to focus a ton of my energy on my six.[00:56:31] Nathan:That's right. I'm writing a newsletter about the news. I guess, as you're looking to grow and continue on, right? Like the next phase of readers and, and all of that, since we can just say directly that we're all narcissists and we do this for the attention. what's what's sort of that next thing that you're looking for, it's going from 140,000 subscribers to say 200,000 and beyond.[00:56:54] Dave:Yeah, well, I'm, I'm hoping that, I'm not just trying to sell my book here. I'm hoping that the book and the newsletter will sort of have, a coexistence with them because the new the book is really an extension of the brand and the brand is that icon to Next Draft. So I'm hoping that the tricky part about writing about marketing a newsletter, like we discussed earlier, there's not really a natural virality to them.So. You Have this piecemeal growth from people telling each other or their friends or forwarding it to somebody or maybe occasionally tweeting or sharing a Facebook link. Oh, you should check this out. But it's all sort of small little blips. If you get a news story or a big blog story about it, or another newsletter recommending you, that's probably the fastest way people grow these days is by, co-sponsoring each other's newsletters or co-promoting them.Those big hits are more rare and they usually require like, I've had a ton of stories written about Next Draft, but most of them a long time ago, because it's basically a similar product to what it was when they wrote about it the first time. So they're like, Hey, I'd love to write about it, but what's the hook.What's the new thing, you know? so I'm hoping that the book provides that emphasis. It's like, we're doing now a ton of people who may by either been on a podcast in the past, or they've wanted to do a podcast with me say, okay, now's a great time. I'd probably want to move your book and, we can set something up.So it's sort of as an impetus. So I'm hoping that that will be the next big newsletter thing that most, most people who write about the book will also write about the newsletter and the two things can sort of grow together.[00:58:35] Nathan:I think that's spot on.[00:58:36] Dave:That's in terms of, you know, marketing and promotion, otherwise, I do want to try, one of these referral programs because people definitely do like products.And, I am lucky that my icon looks really good on shirts so that people actually really want them. And I have a great designer named Brian Bell who makes all of my shirts.[00:58:58] Nathan:There's something like when creators thinking about products, often if you spread yourself too thin, you're like into the newsletter, the book, the podcast, and like the 14 other things that you could make all at once you sort of hinder the growth of each thing, but then if you really build one of them up to a significant level, then at that point it can start to stall out and by shifting to another medium or have it like launching another product in this case, the newsletter to a book, then that book can have a bunch more momentum that feeds back into it.And so there's just sort of this interesting balance of like, no, When to like, keep pushing on the thing that you have versus when to add the next thing that like, then they feed off of each other and go from there. So I think you're doing it with good timing.[00:59:45] Dave:Hopefully it'll work. All that kind of stuff is the tricky part of doing this stuff. Especially stuff like podcasts and newsletters that are—it's really a ton of word of mouth, unless you get lucky and get some press, and word of mouth is just slow.There's some point where you're going to hit a tipping point where you're going to go from five or 10,000 to like 50,000 much quicker, more quickly because instead of three people going home and saying, “Hey, did you ever hear of this newsletter?” there's like 30 people going home and saying that. But, even with that they hit a plateau, and then you figure out what's the next thing. That's why doing something you're into is so important.And I don't think it's bad to try those other mediums or stretch yourself out, because you never know you might've been writing a newsletter three years, and then you do a podcast and it catches on. For some reason, you're like awesome. Less typing, more talking, let's go. So, but it's tricky. I wish I was better and had better advice for people on promotion and marketing.I'm not awesome at it, and it's not in my nature. So, begging for favors or telling people, even in my own newsletter, to buy my own book is very painful for me. I'm very sensitive to criticism about it. So, if people just all bought it and then made everybody else buy it, that would be a huge relief for me.[01:01:13] Nathan:That would be great. Well, along those lines, where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter, and then follow you on your preferred channel, and then ultimately buy the book?[01:01:24] Dave:I don't want like two or 300,000 people taking my site down. So let's go with if your last name starts between A and M you can start by going to NextDraft.com and sign up for the newsletter there. Or, you can also just go to the App Store and search for Next Draft. If you're N through Z, you can start with the book, and that's at: PleaseScream.com.It has links to all the various audio, and Kindle, and hardcover versions.[01:01:50] Nathan:That's good. I liked how you split the traffic, that way there's no hug of death, and we'll do well there.[01:01:57] Dave:I don't want to get fireballed.[01:01:58] Nathan:That's right.Dave. Thanks for coming on. This was really fun.[01:02:01] Dave:Yeah, thanks a lot for having me.

Sam's Army
Ep 2.116: USMNT & Berhalter postmortem, weekend prevu + chat with Ferencvaros' Henry Wingo

Sam's Army

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 108:37


Thoughts on a wild international break for USMNT and where things stand with the #BerhalterOut movement, plus some new tidbits about the Weston McKennie drama [17:25] and which players helped or hurt their case this window. Headlines [37:40]: Argentina/Brazil go full CONMEBOL (never go full CONMEBOL) and crazy transfer news involving PSG/Mbappe and Barcelona/Griezmann. Premier League weekend preview ft Lester vs City and Arsenal vs Norwich [45:30]. Rest of World [53:30] ft games to watch this weekend and then in Champions League. Best Bets [57:15] and GOAWs. Next up Henry Wingo [1:02:30] discusses life in the Seattle Sounders system and what prompted the move overseas, what Norwegian ultras are like, how often Eastern Europeans bring up the Habsburg Empire, the pluses and minuses of playing for Hungary's biggest club Ferencvaros and coming to terms with still having a Hotmail email account.

Power Trippin
Episode 207 - ghettoberries@hotmail.com

Power Trippin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 94:16


This week's show starts with Toot looking at baby assholes. We discuss Drake's new album. Does the Flava Flav and Trick Daddy remind you of each other? Fat Joe vs Ja Rule for Verzuz is going to be terrible. Why does Lil Boosie always think about Lil Nas X? Fan mail asked us about condoms and not using them. Did you know that lamb skin condoms aren't really expensive? Or cheap? But why use them? We have an Aaliyah vs. Brandy discussion. We also try to find out who is responsible for bringing everyone to the podcast. Follow the show on Instagram and Twitter: @powertrippinpod Follow us on Tik Tok: @powertrippinbitch Send fan mail to powertrippinpod@gmail.com or www.hevytraffick.com/power-trippin Subscribe, rate and review on all streaming platforms and the iHeart Radio app.

GeekWire
Startup secrets; Windows 11 launch; In defense of the Blue Yeti

GeekWire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 35:00


A global pandemic might seem like the wrong time to pursue a new startup idea, given all the uncertainties, but in many ways, the timing couldn't be better. That's one of the insights from our GeekWire Podcast conversation this week with Seattle-area entrepreneur and investor Shirish Nadkarni, author of the book From Startup to Exit: An Insider's Guide to Launching and Scaling your Tech Business.  The changes in user behavior and tech platform shifts caused by the pandemic dovetail with one of the lessons Nadkarni is hoping to get across to entrepreneurs. "Look for opportunities where there is either some major technology shift or some macro trend that either surfaces an old problem, or enables you to build a solution in a unique fashion that could not be done before," Nadkarni says. "I think those are the best opportunities for an idea to succeed." We also talk about startup opportunities in artificial intelligence and machine learning; the impact of the IPO and SPAC craze on startup psychology; and the effect of remote work on investing and recruiting. Nadkarni founded mobile wireless email pioneer TeamOn Systems, acquired by Blackberry in 2002, and co-founded language learning site Livemocha, acquired by RosettaStone in 2013. He began his career at Microsoft, working on Windows development tools, overseeing MSN's transition into a web portal, and leading Microsoft's Hotmail acquisition.  In the news this week ... Microsoft announced an Oct. 5 release date for Windows 11, but said it won't be making Android apps available on the new OS until a later date, under a partnership with Amazon. Seattle-based money remittance company Remitly disclosed key financial results on its path to its upcoming IPO. It posted $257 million in revenue and a $32.5 million net loss in 2020. And in our final segment, we hear from a loyal listener, Steve Case (no, not the AOL founder), with feedback on our recent behind-the-scenes episode about the audio technology we use for the show. I had critical things to say about the Blue Yeti mic on the show, to which Steve gave this response: I like and use the Blue Yeti (with an external pop filter). It was the logical choice when I was doing a bit of voiceover, and pondering podcasting. The Yeti is perfect for podcasting because of its three condenser capsules and four modes, so it's good for one person (cardioid mode) or interviewing someone in person (bi-directional mode). Of course that was back in the pre-quarantine days when we might actually sit on the other side of a microphone from someone outside of our household. Many people who use these for podcasts, YouTube videos and the like, don't seem to understand the modes – or even which side to talk into. This is a side-address microphone, but I see people talking into the end of it, or even into the back side when using cardioid mode. Then there are the folks way too close to the mic, without a pop guard, and the gain set to full. The built-in gain control is a great feature, but with the power to change gain at the microphone comes the responsibility to set it appropriately. Noted! Thanks to Steve for his insights. You can reach us at podcast@geekwire.com with your thoughts on mic technology or anything else we discuss on the show. Audio editing by Curt Milton. Theme music by Daniel L.K. Caldwell. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Por el Placer de Vivir con el Dr. Cesar Lozano
Bloqueos de tu inconsciente que te impiden conseguir pareja

Por el Placer de Vivir con el Dr. Cesar Lozano

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 34:33


Aunque no lo creas una de las posibles razones por las cuales no consigues pareja ni en rifa, se debe a ciertos bloqueos mentales que proyectan una imagen errada y generan el rechazo del sexo opuesto. De la vista nace el amor y a como te ven te tratan. Mamá Chelo, nos acompañó en estudio y nos platicó sobre la importancia de hacerte "Producción personal". 

Professional Success Podcast
Quick Tips to Modernize Your Resume

Professional Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 12:00


Quick Tips to Modernize Your Resume, 31/08/2021 In today´s episode of ‘Professional Success Podcast',your host Sheila Boysen-Rotelli, a Master Certified Career Coach, Recruiter and Talent Development Leader gives some vital tips on updating and reconditioning your resume. She stresses that it is a great time for people who are considering switching careers, to make a transition.  Episode Highlights:  The foremost item that Sheila thinks might be there in the resume is to limit the job history. The second tip that the host discusses about is to avoid potential things that could cause ageism. Unfortunately, assumptions that people make about age referred to as ageism becomes a problem. Sheila recommends dropping off email addresses including AOL, Hotmail or Yahoo as they are considered outdated and shift to something that's of much more importance like Gmail. The host states that due to the recent pandemic situation, it could be a really good time to play-up your remote skills in the resume. Even if a person doesn't necessarily have experience working remotely, there are other transferable experiences to highlight in this section. Sheila says, “This really is a particularly good time to refresh your resume and to start looking for that new position.” Sheila points out that it is a great time for people who are considering switching careers, to make a transition. 3 Key Points: Sheila reminds not to include every single thing you did on your resume. She says you can always include other important things in a cover letter or discuss those during an interview conversation. So beyond limiting occupational history that contains dates to 10 or 15 years Sheila also suggests omitting any graduation dates omitting any graduation dates. She also says that showcasing objectives on top of the resume is a very outdated practice and should not be used anymore. Sheila mentions that beyond people switching positions within their industry, the current job market could really also provide prospective job seekers with the ability to test a new career path. This current pandemic situation is highlighting more companies to consider transferable skills and skills based hiring, as a way to hire new talent. Tweetable Quotes: “Now you wouldn't want to do that for seven different employers that would fall into this additional experience section so you want to be judicious here.” - Sheila Boysen–Rotelli “This could potentially open you up to ageism, with certain age identifying resume elements.” - Sheila Boysen–Rotelli “Instead, we want to shift our mindset, we want to shift that top part of the resume to be our summary of qualifications rather than here's what I want.” - Sheila Boysen–Rotelli “So you want to make sure that you're kind of finding those ways to showcase that you're able to collaborate and work effectively virtually.” - Sheila Boysen–Rotelli “I encourage you to take some of these tips, put them into play and get that resume, refreshed.” - Sheila Boysen–Rotelli  Resources Mentioned: Sheila Boysen-Rotelli: Website   Podcast

Top Expansion

⭕ Así se vivió el regreso a clases en México.

Computer Talk with TAB
Computer Talk 8-21-21 Hr 1

Computer Talk with TAB

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 35:45


T-Mobile & AT&T Hack, Dallas Police delete crime data, can't get it back, Polly Network may hire the hacker that robed them blind, FTC taking on Tesla “self-driving”, How do I figure out what App I removed from my device if I want it back, Hotmail scam, Keyspan adapter for Tripplite, What Apple MAC Book should I get?, Router Suggestions, Time Machine backup. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ura-Tech ウラテック
EP34 - ダラダラした夏の日 "Dog Days of Summer"

Ura-Tech ウラテック

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 50:49


このエピソードではオフィスリターンポリシー、CostcoとHotmailなどについて話しました。 In this episode, we talked about going back to office policies of tech companies and Costco and Hotmail.

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 2 - Is Nick Fake Woke?

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 26:34


We discuss how many emails the average person has had in their lives, a round of I'll Have What She's Having, and why Jason thinks Nick is fake woke. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Crypto News Alerts | Daily Bitcoin (BTC) & Cryptocurrency News
635: TIM DRAPER STANDS BY $250K PER BITCOIN, SAYS IT'S MODERN INFLATION HEDGE!! RARE BULLISH BTC SIGNAL!!

Crypto News Alerts | Daily Bitcoin (BTC) & Cryptocurrency News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 19:29


Billionaire Tim Draper, a prominent BTC investor, who has supported Tesla, Skype, Hotmail, Twitter, Coinbase and other prominent companies with his money, still believes in his prediction that Bitcoin will hit $250,000 by the end of 2022 or early 2023. In a recent interview, he has confirmed his bullish take on the near future of Bitcoin, saying that BTC will be getting massively popular as its adoption will be growing. In particular, Draper stated that Bitcoin is about freedom and trust. The particularly string effect made by BTC has recently been felt in Argentine and Nigeria, as per him, where are the local currencies have been constantly devaluating. For complete show notes and for the full premium experience with video, visit our YouTube channel at http://CryptoNewsAlerts.net

21st Century Visionary
Ep. 36 Billionaire Investor Tim Draper on Why he predicts Bitcoin will reach 250K, How he chooses Investments, and Adapting to Globalization

21st Century Visionary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 0:49


Today's episode features one of my personal heroes, the prominent Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist with investments in unicorns like Skype, Hotmail, Tesla, Coinbase, Robinhood, Twitch, and SpaceX... Tim Draper. Tim is also a leading spokesperson for Bitcoin, Blockchain, ICOs, and cryptocurrencies. He won the US Marshall's auction in 2014 (where he bid on 50,000 bitcoins) and invests in over 50 crypto companies as well as leads investments in Coinbase, Ledger, Tezos, and Bancor, among others. He has received various awards and honors including the World Entrepreneurship Forum's "Entrepreneur of the World." I first learned about Tim in Ep. 12 with Rohan Gupta, where he talked about having Tim as a guest speaker and developing a mentor relationship with him. So, it was surreal to finally get to sit down with Tim alongside CEO of TILE Sid Sridhar and talk about experiencing the variety of life, Bitcoin, NFT's, future disruptions, his investing thesis, Education, Why Draper University students have gone on to build over 500 companies, embracing globalization, taking bold bets, and much more!

Namely 90s
#58 - July 1996 - Independence Day, Trainspotting, & Kazaam

Namely 90s

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 44:30


Join Andrew and Brandon as they journey back to July 1996, but first they. After the break Brandon attributes Andrew as the person that got him his free emails over the year. Andrew questions the Texas book ban. They both share horror stories of flying through Georgia, sparked by the 1996 Summer Olympics. Finally they move onto the summer blockbuster, Independence Day and go through Roland Emmerich's work. Brandon introduces Andrew to Trainspotting and then Andrew gives a lecture about toxoplasmosis. Then Brandon touches on Harriet the Spy and the paint scene. Finally they finish on Shaq's Kazaam.Like the show? Leave us a 5 star review and subscribe!Send us a tweet at @Namely90sDiscuss the show on Instagram @Namely90sFind us online at Namely90s.comConsider joining our Patreon at Patreon.com/Namely90sFollow Brandon on Twitter at @bschwittyFollow Andrew on Twitter at @NamelyAndrewOutro:Pixelland by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4222-pixellandLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Billionaire Investor, Activist, & Educator Tim Draper - China, Bitcoin, and Free Societies

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 38:40


Ryan Zauk hosts legendary venture capitalist, billionaire, bitcoin investor, activist, and educator, Tim Draper. Tim Draper helps entrepreneurs drive their visions through funding, education, media, and government reform. His investments over the last few decades include companies like Baidu, Hotmail, Skype, Tesla, SpaceX, Robinhood, Twitter, Carta, Coinbase, and many more. He also is a large holder of bitcoin, having bought 50,000+ bitcoin when it was priced below $1,000. Draper Associates: draper.vc DFJ: https://www.dfj.com/ Website: timothydraper.com Book: https://www.amazon.com/How-Startup-Hero-Textbook-Entrepreneurs-ebook/dp/B078HWH29T They discuss: - His bullish views on bitcoin and the 1 reason he will never sell - His investment in Robinhood, Carta, and others - His very strong libertarian views and why he believes in minimal government, which ties into his bitcoin thesis - Why the Mt Gox hack improved his belief in bitcoin - His thoughts on the current state of China and where it's headed - And a fun rapid-fire round including the first bank branch in space and his updated bitcoin price target About Tim: Tim Draper is a prominent Silicon Valley venture capitalist and founder of Draper Associates, DFJ, and the Draper Venture Network, a global network of venture capital funds. The firms' investments include Baidu, Focus Media, YeePay, KongZhong, Skype, Hotmail, Tesla, SolarCity, Coinbase, Ledger, Robinhood, Athenahealth, Box, TwitchTV, SpaceX, Cruise Automation, Carta, Planet, PTC, and many others. Tim is a leading spokesperson for Bitcoin, Blockchain, ICOs, and cryptocurrencies. He won the US Marshall's auction in 2014 (where he bid on 50,000 bitcoins) and invests in over 50 crypto companies as well as leads investments in Coinbase, Ledger, Tezos, and Bancor, among others. He created viral marketing, a marketing method for exponentially spreading an electronic service from customer to customer. Tim is regularly featured on major networks, in publications, and in social media as a proponent for entrepreneurship, innovative governance, free markets, and Bitcoin. He has received various awards and honors including the World Entrepreneurship Forum's "Entrepreneur of the World." He has also been highly ranked on several notable lists including one of the top 100 most powerful people in finance by Worth Magazine, the top 20 most influential people in Crypto by Crypto Weekly, #1 most networked venture capitalist by AlwaysOn, #7 on the Forbes Midas List, and #48 most influential Harvard Alum. In his mission to promote entrepreneurship, Tim created Draper University of Heroes, a residential and online school based in San Mateo, California, to help extraordinary people accomplish their life missions. School alumni have gone on to build 350 companies including crypto leaders, QTUM, Spacecash, DataWallet, and Credo. He also started Innovate Your State, a non-profit dedicated to crowdsource innovation in government; and BizWorld, a non-profit that teaches young children how business and entrepreneurship work. Tim is involved in California politics and education/organizations, having served on the California State Board of Education and starting a movement for local choice in schools that led to him becoming a proponent for a statewide initiative for school vouchers. He also led a statewide initiative to create competitive governance with Six Californias, followed by an initiative for Three Californias. Tim received a Bachelor of Science from Stanford University with a major in electrical engineering and a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School. He also has two honorary doctorates from The International University and Trinity College of Dublin. -- For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Ryan's Twitter: twitter.com/RyanZauk LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/wharton-fintech-club/

Inside Outside
Ep. 254 - Alistair Croll and Emily Ross, Co-authors of Just Evil Enough on Getting Noticed & Subversive Go-to Market Strategies

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 36:50


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Alistair Croll and Emily Ross, co-authors of the upcoming book Just Evil Enough. We talk about the changing role of marketing and how companies can subvert systems, undermine industry norms, and get platforms to behave in unexpected ways that tilt the scales to generate attention and demand. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help you rethink, reset, and remix yourself and your organization. Each week, we'll bring you the latest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses, as well as the tools, tactics, and trends you'll need to thrive as a new innovator.Interview Transcript with Alistair Croll and Emily Ross, Co-authors of Just Evil EnoughBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have some amazing guests. Today we have Alistair Croll and Emily Ross authors of the new book, Just Evil Enough, which is a book about getting noticed in this noisy environment and subversive go-to market strategies. Welcome to the show guys. Alistair Croll: Thanks for having us. Emily Ross: Thanks a million. Brian Ardinger: Well, I'm super excited to have you on this call to give our audience a little bit of a sneak preview of the upcoming book. But first let me give a little bit of background. So, Emily Ross, you are a founder of a tech marketing consultancy company called Ink Vine based in Ireland. So we appreciate you coming across the pond to give us some insights on what's going on. And Alistair and I go back a long time back in the days of Lean Startup. And he's the coauthor of Lean Analytics. We brought him back to Nebraska about six or seven years ago, I guess it was, when I was working with Nmotion to help with our startup teams in that. So thank you for both being on the show. The title of the book, Just Evil Enough. How'd  you come up with that  and what's it all about? Alistair Croll: So I'll tell you a quick story. We ran an accelerator in Montreal called Year One Labs. And one of the companies in Year One Labs was a company called Local Mind. And Local Mind was a platform for asking people questions, asking strangers questions about an area.It was later acquired by Airbnb and Lenny Rachitsky,  the CEO ran supply-side growth there. And he's now the author of one of the most prominent newsletters for startup growth marketing, Lenny's Newsletter. And in the early days they were doing what every startup does, which is building lots of stuff. But because we were very Lean Startup focused, we have them ask what the biggest risk was.And it turns out the biggest risk was that whether people would answer questions from strangers. So they ran a very quick study, which we talk about in Lean Analytics. And they found that 94% of people on Twitter would answer a question from a stranger. But this happened because I had been asking Lenny, are you being evil enough?And they were like, we're not evil. And I said, yeah, but just a little evil, because it turns out that people answer questions, but people on the platform won't ask questions. The real risk is the supply of questions. And so they actually built a system that would ask fake questions of new users. So they get in the habit of asking questions. Now you can debate the means versus the end, but what we have found ever since that time is that almost every startup that's successful has some little dirty secret in their background, where they were able to take advantage of an emerging technology or subvert the way a platform is supposed to work and turn it to their advantage.And so the basic idea behind Just Evil Enough is that almost all the time, the problem isn't whether or not you can build something it's whether anyone will care. So your job should be creating attention you can turn into profitable demand. Emily Ross: I think the subversive word is really, really important because we want to clearly differentiate between nefarious, which is downright evil and subversive, which allows you to think a little bit differently.And it's very hard for people who've been conditioned to think a certain way, to try and think differently.  So the book is about trying to teach people how to think subversively, and to show examples and frameworks in order to do that. And I remember working at a platform years ago and one of the engineers said, right, I'm going to put this button on the website to test if people will click it.And my instant reaction was, but it doesn't go anywhere. That's a terrible idea. They're going to have an awful experience and that's bad for them. And he's like, no, but I don't want to build something unless I know they're going to need it. So I'm just going to put that button there and yeah, I'm going to burn a few thousand clicks and they're gonna have a terrible experience. I don't care. I'll learn something. And he was prepared to be disagreeable in order to learn something different and to save an awful lot of time and money. And it was funny. It was like, okay. I need to think a little bit differently about how we're treating users sometimes. Alistair Croll: Yeah, we did a similar thing at Gradient. We had a reporting feature. Gradient was a startup that I launched in 2001. Eventually got acquired by BMC, their TrueSight product line. And we were about to launch reports in the product. And so we created our reports tab, and the reports tab went to a survey page. It says, we're going to do reports soon, what would you like to see?And people put in their email address and the report they'd like to see. And of course we were building a generic reporting tool. So what we did is we then generated like the top 20 requested reports. Made them defaults and then mailed those people saying we loved your feedback. Thank you so much. We've built the report you're looking for. Forget about the fact that 40 other people ask for the same report. Every one of them felt like they were a unique and special snowflake. And so we were exploiting the asymmetry between what we knew, which was 20 people asked for it and what they knew, which was, Hey, look at this, I'm special. You listened to me. And the customers loved it. Right? Is that evil? Well, it meant that we were able to build the default reports people wanted, which made the product better, but it's a little subversive. Brian Ardinger: Well, I think part of that learning is the fact that I think a lot of people think that they need to build the entire thing, because that's what shows the value. But, you know, again, you have to incrementally de-risk some of these new startup ideas. And so how do you do that with building just enough to get the learning that you need so that you can move it to the next level and build it out if you need to? Alistair Croll: Well, I would say that the problem's not minimum viable product, it's minimum viable attention.Emily Ross: Yeah. And actually, if you think about, and this is the one thing that the book, I suppose, hammers home, is that getting your go-to market strategy right, is as important, if not more important than getting your product right. Because if you can't capture attention and turn it into profitable demand, then no one's going to know about your product. And it's all about various different approaches that you can use to figure out how to do that. And  asymmetry being just one of about 10, I think that we cover. Brian Ardinger: So, is it a form of customer discovery almost so rather than the traditional customer discovery interviews there, you're looking for different ways to engage with a marketplace, engage with a customer to get that understanding of what their demand is and where they want to go from there?Emily Ross: Well, it's really interesting. Some of the examples in the book are not business examples. There's a lot of historical stuff in there, right back from Machiavelli,  all the way through to The Godfather. There's businesses, oh, tell the Genghis Khan story. I love that one. Alistair Croll: So I mean, the idea behind a lot of this is that if you know something to be true, that other people discount, you can take advantage of that. And there are many times where people knew they could do something better, but didn't Genghis Kahn, for example, knew that women could be very effective rulers. This was something that was not widely held. And so he would conquer a city, marry one of his many, many daughters off to the leader of that city. Send that leader off to war, he'd promptly get killed. Now you have a blood relative in charge of that city. Was that evil? Well, Genghis Khan did a lot of nasty things, but he did have a decent amount of respect for women's ability to run cities, which was something nobody else was factoring in. And this was an unfair advantage. Right. And I think, I mean, we're getting a little ahead of it. One of the things that Emily talks about a lot, is the idea that you need to know the norms of your system in order to subvert them. So do you want to talk a little about the water stuff? Emily? Emily Ross: Yeah so normative versus formative is like super interesting. So there's a story of by two fish and they're swimming along, and a much older fish is swimming the opposite direction. And this is from... Alistair Croll: it's a commencement address, right?Emily Ross: That's it, the older fish says, Oh how's the water? And the fish swim on a little bit and they turned to each other and go, what the hell is water? So, you have to be able to recognize the fact that you're swimming in the medium. And the best way to do that is to use external viewpoints to help recognize what you're swimming in or downing  in.I also use a log jam metaphor, which works as well. And this is a one I use all the time for teaching for problem solving, but it's really, really applicable as well too, to recognizing the difference between normative and formative. So when these to say a logs down the river, to ship them to the log yard, And they would occasionally get tangled up and a team of river pigs used to have to surround the problem really quickly because it's obviously getting worse and worse all the time, and figure out which was the one key log that you could extract to unlock the whole problem.And the only way they could do it really, really well, was through diversity of thought, opinion, and perspective. By surrounding the problem, by sharing ideas, by looking at it from lots of different perspectives. And that's why diversity in your teams, that's why diversity of perspectives is so important so that you can actually recognize what you're swimming in, whether it's water or something, a little bit stinkier. And also getting the sense of looking at it from outside, what you're used to. So ideas from different verticals, from different walks of life. That's going to help you think subversively. Alistair Croll: And that's kind of the supervillain stuff. I mean, Brian, I'll give you an example, that's a concrete example from when I came to visit you .One of your startups was making a rotary sprinkler solution.So to recap, rotary sprinklers, when they're lateral to a strong wind, get blown over and this costs a lot of money to fix. And so they built a thing that could measure the weather and the incoming winds and rotate the sprinkler downwind kind of like a wind sock, so it wouldn't fall over. And they're having a hard time selling. And what the startup revealed to me at the time when we were meeting, was that there's this weird existing system between farmers, farm subsidies, insurance, salespeople, and the makers of those sprinklers.They don't really mind when it gets knocked over because everyone makes some money and then they use that money to go on a fishing trip. If you don't know that you're in that water, all your efforts to sell are going to fail. You've got to recognize that and then go, huh? Maybe this is something I can sell through the maker of the sprinklers, or like maybe I can, you can subvert that system.Maybe you have to create an awareness campaign that farm subsidies being wasted and they could be spent on something else. But if you don't know that strategy, you can't subvert it. And that word subvert just means find another version. By definition, the hardest problems we face are the ones for which we don't have an obvious solution, because the normal approaches don't work.Which means you've got to find an unusual approach and that's normally called hacking, right? Hacking is getting something to work in a way it wasn't intended. Whether you're using a Pringle can to focus wifi signals, or you're getting a computer system to throw an error, so you can own a system. The problem with hacking is that in startups, hacking has a horrible polar reputation. Growth hacking is a bag of cheap tricks.Brian Ardinger: Talk about some of the examples in the book that maybe some people have heard of or can get a visual around. I know you've mentioned in past talks and that I've seen around this is like things like Peloton or Burger King.  Can you give examples from that? Emily Ross: I would quite like to talk about one of the ones that I had the hardest time with is about being disagreeable. And we talked about it slightly there in terms of doing things that you wouldn't necessarily think of as being quite right. But as a woman, I have been raised to be polite, to be agreeable. And actually, if you look at some of the most innovative, interesting entrepreneurs in history, quite a lot of them have been profoundly disagreeable.They've been prepared to be unliked or unloved. And this is something, a behavior that you can adopt or think about as a means to finding new ideas, or it means of finding new ways of doing things. One of the examples that we talked sports a little bit earlier, but Wilt Chamberlain was arguably one of the best basketball players of all time. He has on more than one occasion scored over a hundred points in a single game. But he had a problem. He couldn't shoot free throws to save his life. Back in college, he had a really high score, but over his career, it went down and down and down and he had a career low of like, I think 26% success rate.He was a star player. He got fouled a lot. So this was a really big problem for him. So he went to see Rick Barry. Rick Barry was the guy who could not miss. He actually had a career average of 89.3% and he got better and better as his career progressed in the last two years of his career, he had a 94% success rate from free throws. But he actually threw in a really interesting way. He threw underhand, which is actually kind of a cool word for the, Just Evil Enough book, because he shot underhand. But he was the best at shooting. But this was called the Granny Style. This is, you know, if you throw like a girl, you throw under hand. He didn't care. His father had drummed it into him from a very young age, how to shoot underhand, overhand, underhand, overhand, and he could just nail it every single time.So Chamberlain went to see Barry learned to shoot underhand and his performance doubled. He went from a career low, to a career high, in that same game where he scored a hundred points. So it turns out it's a much better approach. However, Chamberlain didn't have the guts to keep shooting underhand because he cared too much about what people thought. His career best was 61% from the line in 1961, he sank 28 of 32 free throws against the New York Knicks.So after a while, though, he reverted to shooting the way he knew, and his percentages  plunged. And he admitted that he felt like a sissy. He worried too much about what other people thought. And unlike Barry who was rational, Chamberlain was being agreeable and wrong. Barry meanwhile said he could be as selfish as he wanted to without hurting his team. So being a little bit disagreeable or asking yourself what you're prepared to do is a really good first start. Alistair Croll: Just to chime in quickly, we've all heard of growth hacking right? Growth hacking is these little tricks that get people to click a button or move down a funnel or whatever. The problem with any of these known tricks is that they're known.  Andrew Chen talks about the law of shitty click-through rates, which is simply the idea that as you find a vulnerability, if you will, a way to change the market, it becomes widely known immediately.So the first click-through ad on Hot Wired had an average of 44% click-through rate. Some people say it was as high as 70% for a banner ad. What's that at now? Emily? Brian Ardinger: Well, industry averages will tell you, or they'll tell you it's 0.1%. But in my opinion, it's closer to 0.02%, if you're lucky. Alistair Croll: So that's a huge decline. Same thing happened with email and so on. And so there are these known hacks that are the sort of marketing equivalent of a script kitty, who's running an attack on WordPress. And if you haven't patched your site, you'll be selling Viagra off your website. What you should be doing is trying to find the marketing equivalent of a zero day exploit.So in security a zero day, is an attack that nobody knows about yet. And they're incredibly valuable. Two of them were used to retard the Iranian nuclear program and damaged centrifuges. The marketing equivalent of a zero day exploit, we call this zero day marketing, is finding a new way to get a platform to behave in an unintended manner, with which you can create attention you can turn into profitable demand. And there's some amazing examples of like Farmville, for example. When Farmville's app would send you a message saying, Hey, Brian, Alistair's cows need some grain. And you'd click on it. Now you're a user. Well, they got to 30 million users before Facebook went, Whoa, we maybe don't want apps posting to people's friend feeds.There are so many examples of this, and we can tell you those examples. But the point is you can't use those examples because they've already been done. Right? What you have to do is devote much more of your time to inventing your own zero day marketing exploits. Brian Ardinger: So from that perspective, is it a series of experiments that you just have to run? You, you come up with some ideas and you run them like that, or is this, talk me through the process of how you get better at it? Emily Ross: One of the examples that I like to share, if you see it often enough, you begin to understand how you can apply the thinking. It's a model and you just try and apply it to your own environment. So if we take the information asymmetry, and example, the idea of subverting, one thing for another. Or a bait and switch. The idea of you're selling one thing, but actually getting another and Tupperware parties did this, you know, you think you're going for dinner and you end up getting guilt ridden into buying a load of plastic.But when I was working in a comparison platform, we subverted the PR channel for the generation of white hat backlinks. So PR is generally around building brand and brand awareness. But one of the side effects of PR was the generation of backlinks. So this is back in like maybe 2013. So what we did was we mined data. We attached big data trends to celebrities, pushed out, press releases to high value domains, and pretty much one in five hit would generate a backlink. When we started. We had about 1400 high quality backlinks. And we were generating about 60,000 non-brand organic visits to site per day. And after three years of pushing out two releases a month, month in, month out, we had over four and a half thousand unique domain backlinks and almost 200,000 non-brand organic visits per day.And this was a platform that turned traffic into money. I won't tell you how, but what we did for example, was we mined hair transplant trends and prices. And one example of the many, many crazy pushes we did was the Jude Law index of baldness. So here's a scale up from Colin Farrell all the way up to Dr. Evil,  of how bald are you? And you find yourself on the index and you see, Oh, this is how much it would cost for me to have hair transplants. It was a price comparison website for private health clinics. And this was a fun, interesting way to attract attention and turn it into traffic to the sites. But actually it wasn't really about traffic. It was always about the backlinks. So one in five hits generate a backlink, but again, it was channel burnout. It was a zero day exploit because you know, over the course of the three years, the number of backlinks that were being generated, went from maybe one in five to one in 10, because the platforms themselves started to recognize the value that they were accidentally giving away.So naturally you get published in a paper. If there's an online version of it, they print it online and they put a backlink out. It was a side effect of the real, a pure PR. And channel burn happened, those backlinks are no longer as readily available as they were. But it worked for about three years, four years. It was a fun time. Brian Ardinger:  You have to have a continuous funnel  yourself of new things that you need to explore it. Emily Ross: Exactly.  Exactly. So that was a, we had a good run, but it's about thinking about, well, what is the channel? What is the platform? So PR was the channel and we used it in a way. It wasn't intended to be used for our benefits. And so what are your channels? How can you use them differently? And that's a really great question to ask of yourself, no matter what you're doing. Alistair Croll: One of the things we often do is. What has changed in a technology platform. So for example, Travis Kalanick has this new startup Cloud Kitchens. What has changed in restaurants? Well, first of all, there's a huge abundance of restaurants that I could order from. Far more than I would know about. So I'm already overwhelmed with selection when I go to order food, because we're all at home, in a pandemic, ordering food. And second of all, The fact that the storefront is virtual, it means one kitchen can have many restaurant front ends. And so Cloud Kitchens will set you up with brands and their brands have games like Fucking Good Pizza, My Pasta, Dirty Little Vegan Bitch, Don't Grill My Cheese. None of these tell you about food, but when you're overwhelmed, and you have that sort of paradox of choice, you go, no, I'll just order it from that one. That sounds fine. Right? That's only possible because that brand is part of an experiment. You're ordering from an experiment. And they're constantly testing, which ones get more attention and then the restaurant can deliver all of those things that might be the same kitchen. And so Cloud Kitchens has taken advantage of an exploit within the traditional model of food ordering. So it's looking at, you know, what technology changes or combinations of technology, makes something possible that wasn't possible before that you can then subvert to your ends. Brian Ardinger: How do you go from not just creating a gimmick or how do you, I guess also approach being wrong, like trying these things and, and being wrong?Emily Ross: Growth hacking is gimmicks. Growth Hacking is doing something that maybe it's a publicity stunt or, I mean, one of the examples that we use in the book is pairing two things unexpectedly together. That's a great way to draw attention and Heineken did this really well in the UK just last week, where they put out a mobile hairdressing units and bar, so you could get a free haircut and a pint together.So this generated publicity and it's nice, but it's gimmicky, right? Is that really going to move their needle? You know, for the year? Possibly not. It's a nice story. So, but if you look at governments have been doing this for years and they've done it so well, there's a really good example in the book, which I won't go into now about how the government shamed people into stopping spitting in the twenties, as they tried to fight TB. Instead of just saying it's bad to spit, they actually made people feel bad, and socially, and vulgar  by spitting because before that it was perfectly normal.And if you look at the Chinese government, they use Fapiao.  Fapiao  are receipts. And they use Fapiao  as a lottery to fight corruption. So this is really interesting. In China, corruption can be rampant. Merchants will give their customers a discount, if the customer doesn't ask for a receipt.So the merchant doesn't have to report the income and like just pockets to the savings. The government used an incentive to combat this called Fapiao, which is a receipt  from the merchant. And there's a couple of hacks in here that are super clever. So the merchants have to buy the receipts beforehand and then hand them out to customers in return for payment.So the first one is the merchant has to pay tax before the transaction. That's really smart. And then customers demand their Fapiao, because there's a scratch and win lottery element. And then the government runs the lottery and customers can scratch off the panel to see if they've won anything. And so the second hack there is create demand for a receipt by making it a game.And then of course the government can also adjust the prize amount of each lottery to create just the right amount of incentive. So they're literally able to alter the rewards of the game to like tilt the Nash equilibrium, which is just like super smart. So you can do this at a macro level and absolutely get away with it.Alistair Croll: I want to just make sure we address your question about gimmicks. One of the big differences between a Zero Day Exploit and traditional Growth Hacking is that it's not known. But another is that it is intrinsic to your business model. The haircuts aren't intrinsic to Heineken's beer, but when Dropbox launched, they were the first to pioneer this, both of us get something. I invite you, we both get storage. That's built into the product, right. That's intrinsic to the system itself. And I think what it means is that you're factoring in Zero Day Exploits, marketing exploits, to your business model and your product roadmap. Not just to your marketing campaigns. I mean, Genghis Khan's  a good example, right?It wasn't just a tactic. It was a fundamental change in how he thought that societies could be ruled. So the real lesson here is, I'll give you one more example. There's a company that makes software called Energage  and they make workplace surveys. So they would sell to an enterprise and the enterprise would survey their employees and do  360 stuff. And so on. But the way they go to market is they launched this thing called the top workplaces project in concert with the Washington Post, the Denver Post, the Dallas Morning News and so on. And they run this survey and they say to these newspapers, Hey everybody, here's the survey. We'll take care of it.So now you go do it. And like, Whoa, isn't this great. My company is one of the best workplaces. I'll buy an ad in the newspaper. Everything's wonderful. And then Energage can go back and go, Hey, congratulations on being the third best workplace in Nebraska. Too bad about the other results. And you go what other results? Well, you know, we got more data than that, would you like to see it? Okay. And now you have a new customer, right? It's intrinsic to the business model, right. Rather than just being a little trick or hack. Brian Ardinger: That's an interesting point. And it also goes to the point where you see a lot of these examples in startups, because you can build it early on into the business model and that. How does this play out for a large existing company that wants to try to use some of these tactics?Emily Ross: So big companies really need to think about reframing and they also need to give themselves permission to think in ways they're not used to. One of the exercises I like to recommend is called a pre-mortem. And you basically give them permission to imagine the worst possible outcome. You invite them to invent the worst, worst, worst thing that could possibly happen and then work backwards from there.And it's amazing what happens in an environment like that, because that group think is real. That tribal behaviors of wanting to be agreeable and wanting everyone to pull together is very much a systematic thing that you see in large organizations. So giving them permission to think disagreeably.  Giving them methods to reframe where they are, what they do. These are all great frameworks for them to try and think subversively. Alistair Croll: First of all, I think that it's really important. I mean, I would consider a marketing department, have a Red Team. Have a second group, hmm, that has the same product and resources, but their job is to put the first group out of business. What do you do? Right. That's just hypothetical. You're going to think better. We Red Team on security. We Red Team on PR. Why don't we read team on go-to-market strategies.  And the second thing is, if you look at great brands that changed how people discussed a product or a service, they found a frame of reference that favored them. For decades we used to talk about electric cars. We would talk about sustainability and range. Pretty boring stuff, right? Lots of hippies sitting around going let's save the planet and look at my Prius. Elon Musk put one of them on a race track against supercar and beat it. And all of a sudden the conversation on electric cars was performance. He'd reframed the discussion about electric vehicles to performance, right?When Gmail first launched, your inbox on Hotmail or Yahoo mail had 10 mgs. That's like one photo, right? We don't remember that. My daughter doesn't believe this. When Gmail came along, Google knew that they did not have strength in folders and archiving and hierarchy and export, but they were good at with search and storage.So they said, Hey, email's not about your ability to manage your folders and your inbox and organization and management. It's about abundance storage. And they reinforced that so much that they actually had a counter showing you how much storage you get. Salesforce, when it first launched, was a web based CRM, but web-based CRMs had very few features compared to Siebel and Vantive and Clarify, companies that you don't see anymore.So they said no CRM is about not needing IT. In fact, their logo was no software. They had us the word software with a slash through it, despite the fact that they own their own programming language called Apex. Right? And so each of these companies found a way to reframe things, even like Listerine. Listerine was this clinical health thing. And then along comes scope and says, Hey, you know what? Mouthwash is actually about being attractive and sexy, not about clinical health. One action that a lot of big brands should take is to step back and say, what is a new frame that favors us and disadvantages our competition. And then what is it about that frame of reference that we can do to prove it that will then allow the customer to find a different way of valuing the product?Emily Ross: I would also chime in there and talk about generally large marketing teams will have, they'll have done their marketing degrees and their MBAs or masters on they'll turn out the four P's from, you know, the 1960s or the seven P's of service. And like there's too much P. Just stop peeing. Guys just stopped doing it.Right. Chuck, all of that in the bin and start thinking about creating attention. And it's as simple and as complicated as that. We talk about human motivation and Alistair  I think coined laid, made, paid, afraid. I tidy that up a bit to the piratey AARG. Which is appeal, authority, risk, and greed. So think about your customers. Think about your competitors. Think about the marketplace through the lens of human behavior and whether you're selling radiator bits or cars or Cola, people have all those very basic triggers. They want to be liked that's appeal. They want power that's authority. They want to feel safe. That's the risk lens.And then greed, you know, people want the things that they want. So. We're just human meat bags, right? We're just walking bags of meat with emotions. We have very simple motivations at the end of the day. And in a B2B setting for a big organization, the AARG framework is a really useful function. Like, so throw out the P. Think about AARG.And if you're trying to convince people to act, you need to appeal to base emotions more than you do plain reason, because most people really aren't very rational. There's also really a good examples of the seven deadly sins. If you look at the big, big enterprises, I think Chris Pack said this on Twitter.I thought it was really, really good. Uber and Amazon are slough. Instagram and Tik Tok are pride. Door Dash is gluttony. Tinder is lust. Pinterest is envy. Twitter is rath. And Bitcoin is greed. So think about the fundamentals. Just think about the basics. We haven't changed all that much. Alistair Croll: But I think the biggest thing here is that big brands haven't realized that the biggest risk they face is that someone else will subvert attention that they could otherwise be getting and turned into their profitable demand. And so if you don't do that, you're going to get eaten alive. If we can get the world to realize that the biggest risk is not whether you will build something, but whether anyone will care, we've already given people a huge headstart.Brian Ardinger: Well, and the fact that the world is changing so fast on the fact that you can go from company like Airbnb in 12 years to being, you know, one of the most recognizable brands, you know, overnight effectively from what used to be to build a business. New technologies, new marketplaces, new access to talent. All of that is just accelerating the opportunities to be disrupted. Alistair Croll: We used to have a new platform come along. You know, we had writing that took a few thousand years. Then we got to radio. It took a few hundred years. And then we got to television that took a decade, the rate of introduction of new platforms. And therefore, if you're thinking like a hacker new attack surfaces, Is incredible, right? The Cloud Kitchens example happened because of the pandemic and the rise of Uber Eats and Door Dash, and so on. The pace at which new exploit opportunities appear is very, very fast. And as a result, there are far more opportunities to subvert the status quo or the norms of your industry with one of these new platforms.So we're trying to get people to be much more opportunistic. And part of what we do, like I said I can't tell you do this thing, because if I tell you, then it's already been done. What we can do is we can say, here are some ways to think about it. You know, is there an innovation that happens? Can you reframe things? Can you do a substitution where people think they're getting one thing and they're actually getting another. Can you appeal to the foibles of human psychology? Emily Ross: Don't be afraid to be disagreeable. Alistair Croll: It's weird because in the past I've written books that are very technical. There is a right answer. And Emily's written lots of articles on like how to do stuff. This is a more subjective thing and candidly more uncomfortable for us as writers, because we want to make sure that there are applicable lessons, but it's almost like, you know, teaching someone Zen. I can tell you what it is, but you're going to have to go sit on a rock and figure it out for yourself.But once you start thinking this way, everything becomes a subversive opportunity. And once you have that subversive lens, you're not being evil, you're just being just evil enough. Opportunities are everywhere. Emily Ross: And actually, if you think about it, just coming back to your very first question, which is a nice cyclicity.  The title of the book is exactly what we set out to do, which is we got your attention and we're turning it into demand. So the book title is a really, really simple and effective way to showcase the thinking. And I think if you take one thing away from it, it's change what you spend your time on. So building a subversive go-to market strategy is just as important as thinking about your product. And if you get the balance, right, you're going to be unstoppable. Brian Ardinger: Well, and you've also from the book perspective, the book's not out yet, but you're doing things to grab attention differently than a lot of, I mean, I get pitched every other day by a book author trying to get their book noticed and that. But I know that you've been doing some things as far as live online course that's leading up to the book. And you have a interesting little survey. I don't, if we got to talking about any of the things that you're doing from a attention perspective to, about the book. Emily Ross: Well one of the things I love, this was so much fun, is that you can't just order the book. You can't just pre-order it. You have to take a quiz so that we can decide if you're evil enough. So you take the quiz and if you're not evil enough, we think, you know, you're not going to be able to handle the book. And if you're too evil, then this book could just perhaps be too powerful. So we have gamified the experience of the pre-order function, which was a lot of fun. And we've done a ton of tons of things, just mostly because we'd like to mess around, but that's just one of the things we've done so far. Alistair Croll: It's also great that Emily has like a whole team of web developers that stand up.  Emily's business is actually, she's like the SWAT team or the MI6 for some very advanced tech brands, who can't really explain what they do well. And Emily figures out how to do that. So she has a team of people to build stuff. So a good example of that is we wanted to do a survey to see whether people would take our cohort based course, which we're going to be running with Maven, the founders of  Alt MBA and UDemy,   set up this new, online cohort based course program. But we wanted to get people to take the survey. So we told them one lucky winner will get a free workshop or talk from us for their organization, which is usually something we charged a lot of money for. But we also wanted to make sure they shared the survey, which is a paradox because I want the greatest odds of winning. So I'm not going to tell my friends, right?So we made two surveys. One was Team Orange, one was Team Black. And we say, we'll choose the winner from the survey that has the most responses. That's a bit subversive. Right. And we found some funny things about people getting kind of tribal and like I'm Team Black and so on. We even did things to tweak the survey questions a little bit between the two.So we ran like six or seven social experiments in the survey. But would you buy a book from people who weren't thinking subversively? I mean, I wouldn't buy a book on subversiveness for someone who went through normal tactics. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Absolutely. Well, I appreciate you both coming on Inside Outside Innovation to share some of this subversiveness and hopefully get more folks to be Just Evil Enough. People want to find out more about yourself or the book itself, what's the best way to do that. Emily Ross: Just Evil Enough.com and I'll actually, I landed Alistair in it on a talk we did last week because we were live Tweeting. They wouldn't let us take live questions. So we just got everyone to jump on Twitter and ask us questions there.And I promised everyone lives that if they hashtag Just Evil Enough that Alistair would read out whatever they wrote. And they all said smart, intelligent things. And I was like, I can't believe none of you are like trying to flog a course or a book or promote something. Like he will have to say anything you like. So people should...Alistair Croll: I think one guy had me mention his podcast, but there's a good example where like, Oh, you think you're getting free promotion in this thing we're recording, but you're actually following the Just Evil Enough account. Emily Ross: But yes, Just Evil Enough.com is where you can take the quiz. You can hear about the cohort class. You can, pre-order the book and there's an Evil Enough Twitter account too. You can check that out. Brian Ardinger: Well Emily, it was great to meet you for the first time here and Alistair. Always good to catch up with what's going on in your world. So appreciate you both for being on here and looking forward to the conversation in the future.Alistair Croll: Thanks so much for having us. Emily Ross: Thanks Brian.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. 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Inside Outside Innovation
Ep. 254 - Alistair Croll and Emily Ross, Co-authors of Just Evil Enough on Getting Noticed & Subversive Go-to Market Strategies

Inside Outside Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 36:50


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Alistair Croll and Emily Ross, co-authors of the upcoming book Just Evil Enough. We talk about the changing role of marketing and how companies can subvert systems, undermine industry norms, and get platforms to behave in unexpected ways that tilt the scales to generate attention and demand. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help you rethink, reset, and remix yourself and your organization. Each week, we'll bring you the latest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses, as well as the tools, tactics, and trends you'll need to thrive as a new innovator.Interview Transcript with Alistair Croll and Emily Ross, Co-authors of Just Evil EnoughBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have some amazing guests. Today we have Alistair Croll and Emily Ross authors of the new book, Just Evil Enough, which is a book about getting noticed in this noisy environment and subversive go-to market strategies. Welcome to the show guys. Alistair Croll: Thanks for having us. Emily Ross: Thanks a million. Brian Ardinger: Well, I'm super excited to have you on this call to give our audience a little bit of a sneak preview of the upcoming book. But first let me give a little bit of background. So, Emily Ross, you are a founder of a tech marketing consultancy company called Ink Vine based in Ireland. So we appreciate you coming across the pond to give us some insights on what's going on. And Alistair and I go back a long time back in the days of Lean Startup. And he's the coauthor of Lean Analytics. We brought him back to Nebraska about six or seven years ago, I guess it was, when I was working with Nmotion to help with our startup teams in that. So thank you for both being on the show. The title of the book, Just Evil Enough. How'd  you come up with that  and what's it all about? Alistair Croll: So I'll tell you a quick story. We ran an accelerator in Montreal called Year One Labs. And one of the companies in Year One Labs was a company called Local Mind. And Local Mind was a platform for asking people questions, asking strangers questions about an area.It was later acquired by Airbnb and Lenny Rachitsky,  the CEO ran supply-side growth there. And he's now the author of one of the most prominent newsletters for startup growth marketing, Lenny's Newsletter. And in the early days they were doing what every startup does, which is building lots of stuff. But because we were very Lean Startup focused, we have them ask what the biggest risk was.And it turns out the biggest risk was that whether people would answer questions from strangers. So they ran a very quick study, which we talk about in Lean Analytics. And they found that 94% of people on Twitter would answer a question from a stranger. But this happened because I had been asking Lenny, are you being evil enough?And they were like, we're not evil. And I said, yeah, but just a little evil, because it turns out that people answer questions, but people on the platform won't ask questions. The real risk is the supply of questions. And so they actually built a system that would ask fake questions of new users. So they get in the habit of asking questions. Now you can debate the means versus the end, but what we have found ever since that time is that almost every startup that's successful has some little dirty secret in their background, where they were able to take advantage of an emerging technology or subvert the way a platform is supposed to work and turn it to their advantage.And so the basic idea behind Just Evil Enough is that almost all the time, the problem isn't whether or not you can build something it's whether anyone will care. So your job should be creating attention you can turn into profitable demand. Emily Ross: I think the subversive word is really, really important because we want to clearly differentiate between nefarious, which is downright evil and subversive, which allows you to think a little bit differently.And it's very hard for people who've been conditioned to think a certain way, to try and think differently.  So the book is about trying to teach people how to think subversively, and to show examples and frameworks in order to do that. And I remember working at a platform years ago and one of the engineers said, right, I'm going to put this button on the website to test if people will click it.And my instant reaction was, but it doesn't go anywhere. That's a terrible idea. They're going to have an awful experience and that's bad for them. And he's like, no, but I don't want to build something unless I know they're going to need it. So I'm just going to put that button there and yeah, I'm going to burn a few thousand clicks and they're gonna have a terrible experience. I don't care. I'll learn something. And he was prepared to be disagreeable in order to learn something different and to save an awful lot of time and money. And it was funny. It was like, okay. I need to think a little bit differently about how we're treating users sometimes. Alistair Croll: Yeah, we did a similar thing at Gradient. We had a reporting feature. Gradient was a startup that I launched in 2001. Eventually got acquired by BMC, their TrueSight product line. And we were about to launch reports in the product. And so we created our reports tab, and the reports tab went to a survey page. It says, we're going to do reports soon, what would you like to see?And people put in their email address and the report they'd like to see. And of course we were building a generic reporting tool. So what we did is we then generated like the top 20 requested reports. Made them defaults and then mailed those people saying we loved your feedback. Thank you so much. We've built the report you're looking for. Forget about the fact that 40 other people ask for the same report. Every one of them felt like they were a unique and special snowflake. And so we were exploiting the asymmetry between what we knew, which was 20 people asked for it and what they knew, which was, Hey, look at this, I'm special. You listened to me. And the customers loved it. Right? Is that evil? Well, it meant that we were able to build the default reports people wanted, which made the product better, but it's a little subversive. Brian Ardinger: Well, I think part of that learning is the fact that I think a lot of people think that they need to build the entire thing, because that's what shows the value. But, you know, again, you have to incrementally de-risk some of these new startup ideas. And so how do you do that with building just enough to get the learning that you need so that you can move it to the next level and build it out if you need to? Alistair Croll: Well, I would say that the problem's not minimum viable product, it's minimum viable attention.Emily Ross: Yeah. And actually, if you think about, and this is the one thing that the book, I suppose, hammers home, is that getting your go-to market strategy right, is as important, if not more important than getting your product right. Because if you can't capture attention and turn it into profitable demand, then no one's going to know about your product. And it's all about various different approaches that you can use to figure out how to do that. And  asymmetry being just one of about 10, I think that we cover. Brian Ardinger: So, is it a form of customer discovery almost so rather than the traditional customer discovery interviews there, you're looking for different ways to engage with a marketplace, engage with a customer to get that understanding of what their demand is and where they want to go from there?Emily Ross: Well, it's really interesting. Some of the examples in the book are not business examples. There's a lot of historical stuff in there, right back from Machiavelli,  all the way through to The Godfather. There's businesses, oh, tell the Genghis Khan story. I love that one. Alistair Croll: So I mean, the idea behind a lot of this is that if you know something to be true, that other people discount, you can take advantage of that. And there are many times where people knew they could do something better, but didn't Genghis Kahn, for example, knew that women could be very effective rulers. This was something that was not widely held. And so he would conquer a city, marry one of his many, many daughters off to the leader of that city. Send that leader off to war, he'd promptly get killed. Now you have a blood relative in charge of that city. Was that evil? Well, Genghis Khan did a lot of nasty things, but he did have a decent amount of respect for women's ability to run cities, which was something nobody else was factoring in. And this was an unfair advantage. Right. And I think, I mean, we're getting a little ahead of it. One of the things that Emily talks about a lot, is the idea that you need to know the norms of your system in order to subvert them. So do you want to talk a little about the water stuff? Emily? Emily Ross: Yeah so normative versus formative is like super interesting. So there's a story of by two fish and they're swimming along, and a much older fish is swimming the opposite direction. And this is from... Alistair Croll: it's a commencement address, right?Emily Ross: That's it, the older fish says, Oh how's the water? And the fish swim on a little bit and they turned to each other and go, what the hell is water? So, you have to be able to recognize the fact that you're swimming in the medium. And the best way to do that is to use external viewpoints to help recognize what you're swimming in or downing  in.I also use a log jam metaphor, which works as well. And this is a one I use all the time for teaching for problem solving, but it's really, really applicable as well too, to recognizing the difference between normative and formative. So when these to say a logs down the river, to ship them to the log yard, And they would occasionally get tangled up and a team of river pigs used to have to surround the problem really quickly because it's obviously getting worse and worse all the time, and figure out which was the one key log that you could extract to unlock the whole problem.And the only way they could do it really, really well, was through diversity of thought, opinion, and perspective. By surrounding the problem, by sharing ideas, by looking at it from lots of different perspectives. And that's why diversity in your teams, that's why diversity of perspectives is so important so that you can actually recognize what you're swimming in, whether it's water or something, a little bit stinkier. And also getting the sense of looking at it from outside, what you're used to. So ideas from different verticals, from different walks of life. That's going to help you think subversively. Alistair Croll: And that's kind of the supervillain stuff. I mean, Brian, I'll give you an example, that's a concrete example from when I came to visit you .One of your startups was making a rotary sprinkler solution.So to recap, rotary sprinklers, when they're lateral to a strong wind, get blown over and this costs a lot of money to fix. And so they built a thing that could measure the weather and the incoming winds and rotate the sprinkler downwind kind of like a wind sock, so it wouldn't fall over. And they're having a hard time selling. And what the startup revealed to me at the time when we were meeting, was that there's this weird existing system between farmers, farm subsidies, insurance, salespeople, and the makers of those sprinklers.They don't really mind when it gets knocked over because everyone makes some money and then they use that money to go on a fishing trip. If you don't know that you're in that water, all your efforts to sell are going to fail. You've got to recognize that and then go, huh? Maybe this is something I can sell through the maker of the sprinklers, or like maybe I can, you can subvert that system.Maybe you have to create an awareness campaign that farm subsidies being wasted and they could be spent on something else. But if you don't know that strategy, you can't subvert it. And that word subvert just means find another version. By definition, the hardest problems we face are the ones for which we don't have an obvious solution, because the normal approaches don't work.Which means you've got to find an unusual approach and that's normally called hacking, right? Hacking is getting something to work in a way it wasn't intended. Whether you're using a Pringle can to focus wifi signals, or you're getting a computer system to throw an error, so you can own a system. The problem with hacking is that in startups, hacking has a horrible polar reputation. Growth hacking is a bag of cheap tricks.Brian Ardinger: Talk about some of the examples in the book that maybe some people have heard of or can get a visual around. I know you've mentioned in past talks and that I've seen around this is like things like Peloton or Burger King.  Can you give examples from that? Emily Ross: I would quite like to talk about one of the ones that I had the hardest time with is about being disagreeable. And we talked about it slightly there in terms of doing things that you wouldn't necessarily think of as being quite right. But as a woman, I have been raised to be polite, to be agreeable. And actually, if you look at some of the most innovative, interesting entrepreneurs in history, quite a lot of them have been profoundly disagreeable.They've been prepared to be unliked or unloved. And this is something, a behavior that you can adopt or think about as a means to finding new ideas, or it means of finding new ways of doing things. One of the examples that we talked sports a little bit earlier, but Wilt Chamberlain was arguably one of the best basketball players of all time. He has on more than one occasion scored over a hundred points in a single game. But he had a problem. He couldn't shoot free throws to save his life. Back in college, he had a really high score, but over his career, it went down and down and down and he had a career low of like, I think 26% success rate.He was a star player. He got fouled a lot. So this was a really big problem for him. So he went to see Rick Barry. Rick Barry was the guy who could not miss. He actually had a career average of 89.3% and he got better and better as his career progressed in the last two years of his career, he had a 94% success rate from free throws. But he actually threw in a really interesting way. He threw underhand, which is actually kind of a cool word for the, Just Evil Enough book, because he shot underhand. But he was the best at shooting. But this was called the Granny Style. This is, you know, if you throw like a girl, you throw under hand. He didn't care. His father had drummed it into him from a very young age, how to shoot underhand, overhand, underhand, overhand, and he could just nail it every single time.So Chamberlain went to see Barry learned to shoot underhand and his performance doubled. He went from a career low, to a career high, in that same game where he scored a hundred points. So it turns out it's a much better approach. However, Chamberlain didn't have the guts to keep shooting underhand because he cared too much about what people thought. His career best was 61% from the line in 1961, he sank 28 of 32 free throws against the New York Knicks.So after a while, though, he reverted to shooting the way he knew, and his percentages  plunged. And he admitted that he felt like a sissy. He worried too much about what other people thought. And unlike Barry who was rational, Chamberlain was being agreeable and wrong. Barry meanwhile said he could be as selfish as he wanted to without hurting his team. So being a little bit disagreeable or asking yourself what you're prepared to do is a really good first start. Alistair Croll: Just to chime in quickly, we've all heard of growth hacking right? Growth hacking is these little tricks that get people to click a button or move down a funnel or whatever. The problem with any of these known tricks is that they're known.  Andrew Chen talks about the law of shitty click-through rates, which is simply the idea that as you find a vulnerability, if you will, a way to change the market, it becomes widely known immediately.So the first click-through ad on Hot Wired had an average of 44% click-through rate. Some people say it was as high as 70% for a banner ad. What's that at now? Emily? Brian Ardinger: Well, industry averages will tell you, or they'll tell you it's 0.1%. But in my opinion, it's closer to 0.02%, if you're lucky. Alistair Croll: So that's a huge decline. Same thing happened with email and so on. And so there are these known hacks that are the sort of marketing equivalent of a script kitty, who's running an attack on WordPress. And if you haven't patched your site, you'll be selling Viagra off your website. What you should be doing is trying to find the marketing equivalent of a zero day exploit.So in security a zero day, is an attack that nobody knows about yet. And they're incredibly valuable. Two of them were used to retard the Iranian nuclear program and damaged centrifuges. The marketing equivalent of a zero day exploit, we call this zero day marketing, is finding a new way to get a platform to behave in an unintended manner, with which you can create attention you can turn into profitable demand. And there's some amazing examples of like Farmville, for example. When Farmville's app would send you a message saying, Hey, Brian, Alistair's cows need some grain. And you'd click on it. Now you're a user. Well, they got to 30 million users before Facebook went, Whoa, we maybe don't want apps posting to people's friend feeds.There are so many examples of this, and we can tell you those examples. But the point is you can't use those examples because they've already been done. Right? What you have to do is devote much more of your time to inventing your own zero day marketing exploits. Brian Ardinger: So from that perspective, is it a series of experiments that you just have to run? You, you come up with some ideas and you run them like that, or is this, talk me through the process of how you get better at it? Emily Ross: One of the examples that I like to share, if you see it often enough, you begin to understand how you can apply the thinking. It's a model and you just try and apply it to your own environment. So if we take the information asymmetry, and example, the idea of subverting, one thing for another. Or a bait and switch. The idea of you're selling one thing, but actually getting another and Tupperware parties did this, you know, you think you're going for dinner and you end up getting guilt ridden into buying a load of plastic.But when I was working in a comparison platform, we subverted the PR channel for the generation of white hat backlinks. So PR is generally around building brand and brand awareness. But one of the side effects of PR was the generation of backlinks. So this is back in like maybe 2013. So what we did was we mined data. We attached big data trends to celebrities, pushed out, press releases to high value domains, and pretty much one in five hit would generate a backlink. When we started. We had about 1400 high quality backlinks. And we were generating about 60,000 non-brand organic visits to site per day. And after three years of pushing out two releases a month, month in, month out, we had over four and a half thousand unique domain backlinks and almost 200,000 non-brand organic visits per day.And this was a platform that turned traffic into money. I won't tell you how, but what we did for example, was we mined hair transplant trends and prices. And one example of the many, many crazy pushes we did was the Jude Law index of baldness. So here's a scale up from Colin Farrell all the way up to Dr. Evil,  of how bald are you? And you find yourself on the index and you see, Oh, this is how much it would cost for me to have hair transplants. It was a price comparison website for private health clinics. And this was a fun, interesting way to attract attention and turn it into traffic to the sites. But actually it wasn't really about traffic. It was always about the backlinks. So one in five hits generate a backlink, but again, it was channel burnout. It was a zero day exploit because you know, over the course of the three years, the number of backlinks that were being generated, went from maybe one in five to one in 10, because the platforms themselves started to recognize the value that they were accidentally giving away.So naturally you get published in a paper. If there's an online version of it, they print it online and they put a backlink out. It was a side effect of the real, a pure PR. And channel burn happened, those backlinks are no longer as readily available as they were. But it worked for about three years, four years. It was a fun time. Brian Ardinger:  You have to have a continuous funnel  yourself of new things that you need to explore it. Emily Ross: Exactly.  Exactly. So that was a, we had a good run, but it's about thinking about, well, what is the channel? What is the platform? So PR was the channel and we used it in a way. It wasn't intended to be used for our benefits. And so what are your channels? How can you use them differently? And that's a really great question to ask of yourself, no matter what you're doing. Alistair Croll: One of the things we often do is. What has changed in a technology platform. So for example, Travis Kalanick has this new startup Cloud Kitchens. What has changed in restaurants? Well, first of all, there's a huge abundance of restaurants that I could order from. Far more than I would know about. So I'm already overwhelmed with selection when I go to order food, because we're all at home, in a pandemic, ordering food. And second of all, The fact that the storefront is virtual, it means one kitchen can have many restaurant front ends. And so Cloud Kitchens will set you up with brands and their brands have games like Fucking Good Pizza, My Pasta, Dirty Little Vegan Bitch, Don't Grill My Cheese. None of these tell you about food, but when you're overwhelmed, and you have that sort of paradox of choice, you go, no, I'll just order it from that one. That sounds fine. Right? That's only possible because that brand is part of an experiment. You're ordering from an experiment. And they're constantly testing, which ones get more attention and then the restaurant can deliver all of those things that might be the same kitchen. And so Cloud Kitchens has taken advantage of an exploit within the traditional model of food ordering. So it's looking at, you know, what technology changes or combinations of technology, makes something possible that wasn't possible before that you can then subvert to your ends. Brian Ardinger: How do you go from not just creating a gimmick or how do you, I guess also approach being wrong, like trying these things and, and being wrong?Emily Ross: Growth hacking is gimmicks. Growth Hacking is doing something that maybe it's a publicity stunt or, I mean, one of the examples that we use in the book is pairing two things unexpectedly together. That's a great way to draw attention and Heineken did this really well in the UK just last week, where they put out a mobile hairdressing units and bar, so you could get a free haircut and a pint together.So this generated publicity and it's nice, but it's gimmicky, right? Is that really going to move their needle? You know, for the year? Possibly not. It's a nice story. So, but if you look at governments have been doing this for years and they've done it so well, there's a really good example in the book, which I won't go into now about how the government shamed people into stopping spitting in the twenties, as they tried to fight TB. Instead of just saying it's bad to spit, they actually made people feel bad, and socially, and vulgar  by spitting because before that it was perfectly normal.And if you look at the Chinese government, they use Fapiao.  Fapiao  are receipts. And they use Fapiao  as a lottery to fight corruption. So this is really interesting. In China, corruption can be rampant. Merchants will give their customers a discount, if the customer doesn't ask for a receipt.So the merchant doesn't have to report the income and like just pockets to the savings. The government used an incentive to combat this called Fapiao, which is a receipt  from the merchant. And there's a couple of hacks in here that are super clever. So the merchants have to buy the receipts beforehand and then hand them out to customers in return for payment.So the first one is the merchant has to pay tax before the transaction. That's really smart. And then customers demand their Fapiao, because there's a scratch and win lottery element. And then the government runs the lottery and customers can scratch off the panel to see if they've won anything. And so the second hack there is create demand for a receipt by making it a game.And then of course the government can also adjust the prize amount of each lottery to create just the right amount of incentive. So they're literally able to alter the rewards of the game to like tilt the Nash equilibrium, which is just like super smart. So you can do this at a macro level and absolutely get away with it.Alistair Croll: I want to just make sure we address your question about gimmicks. One of the big differences between a Zero Day Exploit and traditional Growth Hacking is that it's not known. But another is that it is intrinsic to your business model. The haircuts aren't intrinsic to Heineken's beer, but when Dropbox launched, they were the first to pioneer this, both of us get something. I invite you, we both get storage. That's built into the product, right. That's intrinsic to the system itself. And I think what it means is that you're factoring in Zero Day Exploits, marketing exploits, to your business model and your product roadmap. Not just to your marketing campaigns. I mean, Genghis Khan's  a good example, right?It wasn't just a tactic. It was a fundamental change in how he thought that societies could be ruled. So the real lesson here is, I'll give you one more example. There's a company that makes software called Energage  and they make workplace surveys. So they would sell to an enterprise and the enterprise would survey their employees and do  360 stuff. And so on. But the way they go to market is they launched this thing called the top workplaces project in concert with the Washington Post, the Denver Post, the Dallas Morning News and so on. And they run this survey and they say to these newspapers, Hey everybody, here's the survey. We'll take care of it.So now you go do it. And like, Whoa, isn't this great. My company is one of the best workplaces. I'll buy an ad in the newspaper. Everything's wonderful. And then Energage can go back and go, Hey, congratulations on being the third best workplace in Nebraska. Too bad about the other results. And you go what other results? Well, you know, we got more data than that, would you like to see it? Okay. And now you have a new customer, right? It's intrinsic to the business model, right. Rather than just being a little trick or hack. Brian Ardinger: That's an interesting point. And it also goes to the point where you see a lot of these examples in startups, because you can build it early on into the business model and that. How does this play out for a large existing company that wants to try to use some of these tactics?Emily Ross: So big companies really need to think about reframing and they also need to give themselves permission to think in ways they're not used to. One of the exercises I like to recommend is called a pre-mortem. And you basically give them permission to imagine the worst possible outcome. You invite them to invent the worst, worst, worst thing that could possibly happen and then work backwards from there.And it's amazing what happens in an environment like that, because that group think is real. That tribal behaviors of wanting to be agreeable and wanting everyone to pull together is very much a systematic thing that you see in large organizations. So giving them permission to think disagreeably.  Giving them methods to reframe where they are, what they do. These are all great frameworks for them to try and think subversively. Alistair Croll: First of all, I think that it's really important. I mean, I would consider a marketing department, have a Red Team. Have a second group, hmm, that has the same product and resources, but their job is to put the first group out of business. What do you do? Right. That's just hypothetical. You're going to think better. We Red Team on security. We Red Team on PR. Why don't we read team on go-to-market strategies.  And the second thing is, if you look at great brands that changed how people discussed a product or a service, they found a frame of reference that favored them. For decades we used to talk about electric cars. We would talk about sustainability and range. Pretty boring stuff, right? Lots of hippies sitting around going let's save the planet and look at my Prius. Elon Musk put one of them on a race track against supercar and beat it. And all of a sudden the conversation on electric cars was performance. He'd reframed the discussion about electric vehicles to performance, right?When Gmail first launched, your inbox on Hotmail or Yahoo mail had 10 mgs. That's like one photo, right? We don't remember that. My daughter doesn't believe this. When Gmail came along, Google knew that they did not have strength in folders and archiving and hierarchy and export, but they were good at with search and storage.So they said, Hey, email's not about your ability to manage your folders and your inbox and organization and management. It's about abundance storage. And they reinforced that so much that they actually had a counter showing you how much storage you get. Salesforce, when it first launched, was a web based CRM, but web-based CRMs had very few features compared to Siebel and Vantive and Clarify, companies that you don't see anymore.So they said no CRM is about not needing IT. In fact, their logo was no software. They had us the word software with a slash through it, despite the fact that they own their own programming language called Apex. Right? And so each of these companies found a way to reframe things, even like Listerine. Listerine was this clinical health thing. And then along comes scope and says, Hey, you know what? Mouthwash is actually about being attractive and sexy, not about clinical health. One action that a lot of big brands should take is to step back and say, what is a new frame that favors us and disadvantages our competition. And then what is it about that frame of reference that we can do to prove it that will then allow the customer to find a different way of valuing the product?Emily Ross: I would also chime in there and talk about generally large marketing teams will have, they'll have done their marketing degrees and their MBAs or masters on they'll turn out the four P's from, you know, the 1960s or the seven P's of service. And like there's too much P. Just stop peeing. Guys just stopped doing it.Right. Chuck, all of that in the bin and start thinking about creating attention. And it's as simple and as complicated as that. We talk about human motivation and Alistair  I think coined laid, made, paid, afraid. I tidy that up a bit to the piratey AARG. Which is appeal, authority, risk, and greed. So think about your customers. Think about your competitors. Think about the marketplace through the lens of human behavior and whether you're selling radiator bits or cars or Cola, people have all those very basic triggers. They want to be liked that's appeal. They want power that's authority. They want to feel safe. That's the risk lens.And then greed, you know, people want the things that they want. So. We're just human meat bags, right? We're just walking bags of meat with emotions. We have very simple motivations at the end of the day. And in a B2B setting for a big organization, the AARG framework is a really useful function. Like, so throw out the P. Think about AARG.And if you're trying to convince people to act, you need to appeal to base emotions more than you do plain reason, because most people really aren't very rational. There's also really a good examples of the seven deadly sins. If you look at the big, big enterprises, I think Chris Pack said this on Twitter.I thought it was really, really good. Uber and Amazon are slough. Instagram and Tik Tok are pride. Door Dash is gluttony. Tinder is lust. Pinterest is envy. Twitter is rath. And Bitcoin is greed. So think about the fundamentals. Just think about the basics. We haven't changed all that much. Alistair Croll: But I think the biggest thing here is that big brands haven't realized that the biggest risk they face is that someone else will subvert attention that they could otherwise be getting and turned into their profitable demand. And so if you don't do that, you're going to get eaten alive. If we can get the world to realize that the biggest risk is not whether you will build something, but whether anyone will care, we've already given people a huge headstart.Brian Ardinger: Well, and the fact that the world is changing so fast on the fact that you can go from company like Airbnb in 12 years to being, you know, one of the most recognizable brands, you know, overnight effectively from what used to be to build a business. New technologies, new marketplaces, new access to talent. All of that is just accelerating the opportunities to be disrupted. Alistair Croll: We used to have a new platform come along. You know, we had writing that took a few thousand years. Then we got to radio. It took a few hundred years. And then we got to television that took a decade, the rate of introduction of new platforms. And therefore, if you're thinking like a hacker new attack surfaces, Is incredible, right? The Cloud Kitchens example happened because of the pandemic and the rise of Uber Eats and Door Dash, and so on. The pace at which new exploit opportunities appear is very, very fast. And as a result, there are far more opportunities to subvert the status quo or the norms of your industry with one of these new platforms.So we're trying to get people to be much more opportunistic. And part of what we do, like I said I can't tell you do this thing, because if I tell you, then it's already been done. What we can do is we can say, here are some ways to think about it. You know, is there an innovation that happens? Can you reframe things? Can you do a substitution where people think they're getting one thing and they're actually getting another. Can you appeal to the foibles of human psychology? Emily Ross: Don't be afraid to be disagreeable. Alistair Croll: It's weird because in the past I've written books that are very technical. There is a right answer. And Emily's written lots of articles on like how to do stuff. This is a more subjective thing and candidly more uncomfortable for us as writers, because we want to make sure that there are applicable lessons, but it's almost like, you know, teaching someone Zen. I can tell you what it is, but you're going to have to go sit on a rock and figure it out for yourself.But once you start thinking this way, everything becomes a subversive opportunity. And once you have that subversive lens, you're not being evil, you're just being just evil enough. Opportunities are everywhere. Emily Ross: And actually, if you think about it, just coming back to your very first question, which is a nice cyclicity.  The title of the book is exactly what we set out to do, which is we got your attention and we're turning it into demand. So the book title is a really, really simple and effective way to showcase the thinking. And I think if you take one thing away from it, it's change what you spend your time on. So building a subversive go-to market strategy is just as important as thinking about your product. And if you get the balance, right, you're going to be unstoppable. Brian Ardinger: Well, and you've also from the book perspective, the book's not out yet, but you're doing things to grab attention differently than a lot of, I mean, I get pitched every other day by a book author trying to get their book noticed and that. But I know that you've been doing some things as far as live online course that's leading up to the book. And you have a interesting little survey. I don't, if we got to talking about any of the things that you're doing from a attention perspective to, about the book. Emily Ross: Well one of the things I love, this was so much fun, is that you can't just order the book. You can't just pre-order it. You have to take a quiz so that we can decide if you're evil enough. So you take the quiz and if you're not evil enough, we think, you know, you're not going to be able to handle the book. And if you're too evil, then this book could just perhaps be too powerful. So we have gamified the experience of the pre-order function, which was a lot of fun. And we've done a ton of tons of things, just mostly because we'd like to mess around, but that's just one of the things we've done so far. Alistair Croll: It's also great that Emily has like a whole team of web developers that stand up.  Emily's business is actually, she's like the SWAT team or the MI6 for some very advanced tech brands, who can't really explain what they do well. And Emily figures out how to do that. So she has a team of people to build stuff. So a good example of that is we wanted to do a survey to see whether people would take our cohort based course, which we're going to be running with Maven, the founders of  Alt MBA and UDemy,   set up this new, online cohort based course program. But we wanted to get people to take the survey. So we told them one lucky winner will get a free workshop or talk from us for their organization, which is usually something we charged a lot of money for. But we also wanted to make sure they shared the survey, which is a paradox because I want the greatest odds of winning. So I'm not going to tell my friends, right?So we made two surveys. One was Team Orange, one was Team Black. And we say, we'll choose the winner from the survey that has the most responses. That's a bit subversive. Right. And we found some funny things about people getting kind of tribal and like I'm Team Black and so on. We even did things to tweak the survey questions a little bit between the two.So we ran like six or seven social experiments in the survey. But would you buy a book from people who weren't thinking subversively? I mean, I wouldn't buy a book on subversiveness for someone who went through normal tactics. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Absolutely. Well, I appreciate you both coming on Inside Outside Innovation to share some of this subversiveness and hopefully get more folks to be Just Evil Enough. People want to find out more about yourself or the book itself, what's the best way to do that. Emily Ross: Just Evil Enough.com and I'll actually, I landed Alistair in it on a talk we did last week because we were live Tweeting. They wouldn't let us take live questions. So we just got everyone to jump on Twitter and ask us questions there.And I promised everyone lives that if they hashtag Just Evil Enough that Alistair would read out whatever they wrote. And they all said smart, intelligent things. And I was like, I can't believe none of you are like trying to flog a course or a book or promote something. Like he will have to say anything you like. So people should...Alistair Croll: I think one guy had me mention his podcast, but there's a good example where like, Oh, you think you're getting free promotion in this thing we're recording, but you're actually following the Just Evil Enough account. Emily Ross: But yes, Just Evil Enough.com is where you can take the quiz. You can hear about the cohort class. You can, pre-order the book and there's an Evil Enough Twitter account too. You can check that out. Brian Ardinger: Well Emily, it was great to meet you for the first time here and Alistair. Always good to catch up with what's going on in your world. So appreciate you both for being on here and looking forward to the conversation in the future.Alistair Croll: Thanks so much for having us. Emily Ross: Thanks Brian.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

The Wolf Of All Streets
Bitcoin Is Going To Be Worth A Lot More | Tim Draper

The Wolf Of All Streets

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 31:10


When it comes to picking winners, Tim Draper is one of the best, looking for investments that revolutionize the world. An early investor in Hotmail, Skype, Tesla, SpaceX, Twitter, and Coinbase, Draper has now fully shifted his focus, time, and money, towards cryptocurrencies. This new passion is driven by his belief that Bitcoin and the underlying blockchain technology will drastically reshape finance as we know it. Explaining that legacy systems will be redefined in ways we are just beginning to understand, it's safe to say Draper is a bull in the crypto space. In this episode, Tim Draper explores: - Elon wreaking havoc on the markets - Buying Silk Road Bitcoins - Timing tech bubbles - Picking winning investments - Redesigning legacy systems - The entrepreneurs' mission - Tokenizing everything - Hedging against inflation - Banks using more energy than Bitcoin - Bitcoin's walled gardens --- Voyager:  This episode is brought to you by Voyager, your new favorite crypto broker. Trade crypto fast and commission-free the easy way. Earn up to 9.5% interest on top coins with no lockups and no limits.  Go to https://thewolfofallstreets.link/voyager and download the Voyager app and use code “SCOTT25” to get $25 in free Bitcoin when you create your account. -- Matcha: Matcha is the easiest way to trade in DeFi. Matcha enables you to trade across all the major DEXs so you can be sure you're getting better prices than going to a centralized exchange or Uniswap.   Connect your wallet and start today at https://thewolfofallstreets.link/matcha --- If you enjoyed this conversation, share it with your colleagues & friends, rate, review, and subscribe. This podcast is presented by Blockworks. For exclusive content and events that provide insights into the crypto and blockchain space, visit them at: https://www.blockworks.co ーーー Join the Wolf Den newsletter: ►►https://www.getrevue.co/profile/TheWolfDen/members

Computer Talk with TAB
Computer Talk 5/8/21 Hr 2

Computer Talk with TAB

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2021 36:33


Win 7 System still updating, why, Ending 365 how to export Data to local system, Outlook issues how to export, HP Win 10 for the Blind, Hotmail e-mail hacked where do I go for help?, Elon on SNL, Adobe not working.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

POD OF JAKE
#60 - TIM DRAPER

POD OF JAKE

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 47:34


Tim is a billionaire venture capitalist and the the founder of Draper Fisher Jurvetson (DFJ) as well as Draper Associates, Draper University, Draper Venture Network, and Draper Goren Holm. His exceptional track record of investments includes Tesla, SpaceX, Baidu, Hotmail, Skype, AngelList, Ring, Twitter, DocuSign, Coinbase, Robinhood, and Twitch, among countless other companies. An early advocate of Bitcoin, Tim was the winner of the 2014 US Marshals auction through which he purchased approximately 30,000 bitcoins worth around $19 million at the time. [0:59] - The Draper family history in venture capital and Tim's successes to date [10:05] - Coinbase's early promise and Bitcoin's importance as a global currency [25:51] - Tim's investment thesis for Bitcoin [32:09] - Why Tim values global perspectives and experiences [38:57] - The role of politicians vs entrepreneurs in human progress --- homeofjake.com

30 Going On 13
Episode 45: A-MONTH-A BYNES Presents "She's The Man"

30 Going On 13

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 94:15


In this episode we discuss uneven nose holes, being a tall baby, formative Hotmail accounts, playing sports in a string bikini, the Bynesian accent, bra strap headbands, making a quotable movie your personality, looking like a Polar Express character, getting the heebie jeebies from Reboot, the phenomenon of not recognizing your own name, tripping in a flip flop, "move along Yvonne" interventions, halter tops, dressing up to go to The Keg, Limewire downloads, the mystery that is a "kissing booth", Olivia's advocacy group for Channing Tatum, Maddy's tragic Domino's undercover brother pepperoni incident and SO MUCH MORE!!!

DJ Bully B's Podcast Essence of Soul
Episode 69: Dj Bully B - Essence of Soul Mix Show - Djbully1@hotmail.co.uk 27-4-2021

DJ Bully B's Podcast Essence of Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 190:54


"I am at 'Life's Buffet'; I have to pick and choose wisely, because not everything will fit on my plate!"

Speak English with Tiffani Podcast
133 : Topical English | "Emails" Part 1

Speak English with Tiffani Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 37:04


Visit SpeakEnglishWithTiffani.com/Episode133 for show notes and the LIVE video link for this podcast episode.In today’s episode, I have a conversation with Teacher Julie about "emails". This episode will give you the vocabulary and expressions you need to speak fluently in English about this topic.NEW WORDS & EXPRESSIONS IN THIS EPISODE======================================Spam emailTemplatesActing up (Hotmail started acting up)A blessing and a cursePrivacy policyThe rest is historyEmail threadSentimentalDoodlingCalligraphyHeartfeltLeaving for goodSensitive information (Sensitive subject/topic)EstablishmentFraudulent purchaseWe were going back and forthReliveHard conversationLose your train of thoughtA period of rockiness / rocky periodPut things out thereBlow off steamBe calculatedHit a nerveMisconstrueThe tone of your emailImprove your vocabulary and fluency by learning how to properly use each of the expressions from today's episode. Click the link below:Weekly English WordsJOIN the Speak English with Tiffani Academy

Ex Offender
Request - What would you like to hear more of?

Ex Offender

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 2:18


I'm glad that I Have been able to help some of you. Honestly I'm kind of running out of things to talk about so I would like To ask all of you what it is you're interested in hearing more about, if you have any questions, comments, or are just interested in some topic. I could make different kind of Q&A session, or I can talk about it Particular topic. I want to help as much as you as I possibly can and get back, but I am running out of ideas on how to do so. Sometimes I hang out on Reddit an answer as many questions as I can, but I don't feel like it is as personal as talking to you through this podcast, so I would like to be able to do this as well. You can email me at offenderpod@gmail.com. I will never give out your information or ‘deanonymize' you. If you don't want to use a real email, check Google for “temp email”. Be aware, however, that I may Be unable to respond to you because of the nature of temporary emails. You can always create a new email just for this purpose through Hotmail, Gmail, yahoo, or any of the other email services. Thank you all I really appreciate your support and the fact that I can help in some way. I hope you all have a great day! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/Offender/message

El Ritmo de la Mañana
¿Cómo le pondrías a tu vida sexual si fuera un Hotmail?

El Ritmo de la Mañana

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 13:07


The Irish Tech News Podcast
How Entrepreneurs, Open Governments, and Female Shoppers Could Fuel a $10 Million Bitcoin Price by 2030, with Tim Draper

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 43:32


Excellent interview by Jamil with legendary investor and bitcoin advocate Tim Draper A World Filled with Heroes Tim Draper founded Draper Associates, DFJ and the Draper Venture Network, a global network of venture capital funds. Funded Coinbase, Baidu, Tesla, Skype, SpaceX, Twitch, Hotmail, Focus Media, Robinhood, Athenahealth, Box, Cruise Automation, Carta, Planet, PTC and 15 other unicorns from early/first rounds. He is a supporter and global thoughtleader for entrepreneurs everywhere, and is a leading spokesperson for Bitcoin and decentralization, having won the Bitcoin US Marshall's auction in 2014, invested in over 50 crypto companies, and led investments in Coinbase, Ledger, Tezos, and Bancor, among others. He is regularly featured on all major networks as a proponent for entrepreneurship, innovative governance, free markets and Bitcoin, and has received various awards and honors including the World Entrepreneurship Forum's “Entrepreneur of the World,” and is listed as one of the top 100 most powerful people in finance by Worth Magazine, the top 20 most influential people in Crypto by CryptoWeekly, #1 most networked VC by AlwaysOn, #7 on the Forbes Midas List, member of the Global Guru 30 Startup Gurus in the world, and #48 most influential Harvard Alum. About Jamil Hasan Jamil Hasan is a Generation X Author and experienced data intelligence technology builder with two decades of experience leading data-based teams at Fortune 100 companies, including AIG, Prudential Financial, and Ingersoll Rand. Jamil believes that skill and experience, not just age, is the most important factor required to build and lead corporate organizations. His unique story, as someone on the ground floor of the 2008 financial crisis and his role to help repay the $180 billion AIG bailout, enabled him to come face-to-face with many of the societal ills facing Generation X today and their causes. As the result of his experience, Jamil has developed a path forward for his fellow Gen Xers to restore his generation's financial standing in society today and to rebuild the American Dream for Generation X.

¿Qué Fue De Ellos?
E50: Tom de MySpace y otras leyendas del internet (con Leyendas Legendarias)

¿Qué Fue De Ellos?

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 122:10


¿Recuerdas a tu primer amigo en MySpace? Pues no encargamos de contarte que fue de Tom y de otras leyendas del internet como el creador de Napster, los gemelos a los que les robaron la idea de Facebook, así como programas como el Ares, Yahoo y Hotmail. Y que mejores invitados para este especial de leyendas del internet que Lolo y Badía de Leyendas Legendarias! Síguenos: https://www.instagram.com/quefuepodcast/ https://twitter.com/QueFuePodcast https://www.facebook.com/QueFuePodcast

Startup of the Year Podcast
#0051 - Tim Draper Tells Stories From His Life As A Venture Capitalist

Startup of the Year Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 61:13


On this episode of the Startup of the Year Podcast, we listen to Frank Gruber’s interview with Tim Draper at the Startup of the Year Summit in the fall of 2020. Tim is a top global venture capitalist, founder of Draper Associates, DFJ and the Draper Venture Network, a global network of venture capital funds. Tim’s investments include Coinbase, Robinhood, TwitchTV, Skype, Tesla, Baidu, Focus Media, YeePay, Hotmail, SolarCity, Athenahealth, Box, SpaceX, Cruise Automation, Carta, Planet, PTC, Ledger and many others. Tim is also a leading spokesperson for Bitcoin, Blockchain, ICOs and cryptocurrencies. He has served on the California State Board of Education, and led a movement for Local Choice in schools culminating in becoming proponent for a statewide initiative for School Vouchers. Tim also led an initiative to create competitive governance with Six Californias, followed by Three Californias, which was approved for the ballot, but was rejected by the California Supreme Court before the vote. We also hear from Rich Maloy, our VP of Engagement with Established and part of Established Ventures, who has some tips about keeping top of mind in a competitive funding landscape in a segment called the “VC Minute.” We also celebrate one of our alumni, Blake Hall, and his company ID.me (which is a digital identification platform that simplifies how individuals securely prove and share their identities online) recently raised Nine-Figure Round. There is also the upcoming CTA Foundation's 2021 Virtual Pitch Event (sponsored by AARP Innovation Labs) which will take place on March 31st. Join us as eight startups pitch their innovations and engage in Q&A with experts. This year there will also be an audience favorite award, where attendees vote LIVE as startups pitch! You can find out more info and register for the event at: est.us/331EB. We’ve also recently been active on the Clubhouse app where we have created our new “Startup Community Club” for our community and we hope that you all will join or follow the “Startup Community Club.” You can find it at est.us/clubhouse. We also invite all of our listeners to get involved with our program by visiting: established.us/programs. This is the best way to get notified of the various startup opportunities that we come across while working with various partner organizations and in a number of ecosystems across the country. It is also that time of year again when the Startup of the Year 2021 Application is open. So if you are a startup looking for exposure and to become part of an amazing community make sure to apply at soty.link/apply21. Lastly, we want to continue to let our startup listeners know that the NASA iTech program is looking for for startups for their various pitch sessions and you can apply by visiting our link at: est.us/nit Thank you for listening, and as always, please check out the Established website and subscribe to the newsletter at www.est.us Checkout Startup of the Year at www.startupofyear.com Subscribe to the Startup of the Year Daily Deal Flow: www.startupofyear.com/daily-dealflow Subscribe to the Startup of the Year podcast: www.podcast.startupofyear.com Subscribe to the Established YouTube Channel: soty.link/ESTYouTube *** Startup of the Year helps diverse, emerging startups, founding teams, and entrepreneurs push their company to the next level. We are a competition, a global community, and a resource. Startup of the Year is also a year-long program that searches the country for a geographically diverse set of startups from all backgrounds and pulls them together to compete for the title of Startup of the Year. The program includes a number of in-person and virtual events, including our annual South By Southwest startup pitch event and competition. All of which culminate at our annual Startup of the Year Summit, where the Startup of the Year winner is announced, along with an opportunity at a potential investment. Established is a consultancy focused on helping organizations with innovation, startup, and communication strategies. It is the power behind Startup of the Year. Created by the talent responsible for building the Tech.Co brand (acquired by an international publishing company), we are leveraging decades of experience to help our collaborators best further (or create) their brand & accomplish their most important goals. Connect with us on Twitter - @EstablishedUs and Facebook - facebook.com/established.us/.

Todo Que Ver
EP 3: Todo Que Ver Con Los Zillenials

Todo Que Ver

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 92:55


 Isabel Sesma, Carlillos, Isabel Saldaña,  Miguel Alejandro, Adrian Murra y Fernando Veloz platican sobre la generación Z en la cultura popular.Hablaremos de: Harry Potter, Gossip Girl, Riverdale, TikTok, YouTube, Nike, Jawbreaker, Mean Girls, Hotmail, Yahoo, Eight Grade, The Kissing Booth, Booksmart, To All The Boys I've Loved Before, Euphoria, Rick and Morty, stranger things, friends, ozark, la casa de papel, family guy, grey's anatomy,   SupernaturalRecomendanciones: El día que Nietzsche lloró, La insoportable levedad del ser, TikTok, YouTube, Ginny and Georgia, Song Exploder, Generation, The OneSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/todoquever)

Real Life French
Boite aux lettres (Inbox)

Real Life French

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2021 3:38


Texte: Microsoft est pris dans une tempête sur la vie privée après avoir admis avoir lu la boite de réception Hotmail d’un blogueur. Traduction: Microsoft is caught up in a privacy storm after it admitted it read the Hotmail inbox of a blogger.

Man of the Hour
The 90s

Man of the Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 54:21


Jump in the delorean and head back to the 90s with Seb and Pat on the latest episode of Man Of The Hour. This week the guys take a journey to the land before internet. Listen in as they discuss what life was like for them during the 90s. From baggy pants and band t-shirts to Hotmail and call waiting, the nostalgia is strong in this one.

INTHEBLUES Tone Podcast
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/InthebluesTonePodcast/~3/XhZrQSzReCY/ Wed, 03 Mar 2021 11:01:18 +0000 shane_diiorio@hotmail.com (Shane Diiorio / INTHEBLUES ) Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 25:37


This Needs to Stop! This podcast is about YouTubers that do not disclose to their…

No Sé, Dime Tú
4: El hotmail de Satanás

No Sé, Dime Tú

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 64:29


Clubhouse, Facebook, MySpace y las estúpidas camisetas de Gabriel. a el capítulo en video todos los Domingos en nuestro Patreon

DJ Bully B's Podcast Essence of Soul
Episode 34: Dj Bully B - Essence of Soul - Classy Nights - 25/1/2021 -djbullyb1@hotmail.co.uk

DJ Bully B's Podcast Essence of Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 120:23


Adversity is an opportunity for you to make a decision to change your life for the better. It can make you stronger and wiser. Difficult situations help you appreciate the good times.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Tech Talk with Craig Peterson Podcast: 5G, Bitcoin, NSA, DNS, Encryption and more

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2021 94:59


Welcome!   A lot has gone on this week with the installation of new US leadership and the ramp-up of security theater by the Democrats.  That aside we have lots to talk about on the technology front.  We will begin with the NSA and their warning to businesses in relation to DNS resolvers. Then we will talk about Law Enforcement and Smart Phone encryption, New safety regulations for automated vehicles, WhatsApp and Facebook, Signal secure messaging, Warren Buffett's thoughts on cryptocurrency, and More so be sure to Listen in. For more tech tips, news, and updates, visit - CraigPeterson.com. --- Tech Articles Craig Thinks You Should Read: The NSA warns enterprises to beware of third-party DNS resolvers How Law Enforcement Gets Around Your Smartphone's Encryption Trump team modernizes car safety regulations for the driverless era WhatsApp clarifies it’s not giving all your data to Facebook after surge in Signal and Telegram users Signal recovers from a day-long service outage Warren Buffett blasted Bitcoin as a worthless delusion and 'rat poison squared.' The Guy Who Built The World Wide Web Is Building A 'New Internet', Where You Control Your Data Superfast 5G in the US still a work in progress --- Automated Machine-Generated Transcript: Craig Peterson: [00:00:00] We all want to have a little privacy. So what should you be using? What are the apps that you can trust? We're going to talk about that. WhatsApp, Signal. iMessage, messenger, all of that stuff. That's our focus for today. We have really gone around the bend here. Just as far back as the federal government has been trying to get access to encrypted communications. This has been going on forever. Look at our constitution. Look at the amendments to the constitution, also known as a bill of rights. Trying to protect us. We're supposed to be secure in our papers among other things. So what does that mean? Why was that put into the constitution? It was because an authoritarian government is always trying to look over our shoulders and at the time that authoritarian government was their British monarchy and frankly parliament as well. And they just waltz in, they would break in a door if they had to. And they would start grabbing papers, trying to find someone that was an insurrectionist who was going to overturn the government. And of course, it didn't stop there. That's just one example here in America of what happened to us when we had a boot on our neck is what it's called. And so we established part as part of our country here in the constitution. Prime right to privacy, the absolute right to privacy. And over the years, we've had all kinds of invasions of our privacy. Of course, you know what happened with Wiki leaks and leaking of Hillary Clinton's emails, at least to some of them. I'm not sure we saw all of them. We saw the break into the NSA and the leaking of the tools that the national security agency had, that they were using to spy on us. You might even remember the Church commission back in the early seventies. And they found that the federal government had been given a direct pipeline, this massive pipeline since I think it was the late forties. But after the second world war ended, they had a direct pipeline from A T and T directly to our intelligence agencies. They had access to all of these conversations that were going on and who knows what they were doing with it. And so that's what the Church commission found out, frankly. I think we need another church commissioned to look into this. You remember J Edgar Hoover and what was happening with the FBI where he was using it to spy on people he perceived as enemies. I think he was even spying on mistresses and things, too, trying to figure out who was sleeping with whom and how might that be used in order to gain control over someone, to extort them. This has gone on again and again, and now we have the findings that came out of the house. From a subcommittee where the house Republicans released the findings on this Russia probe and that Russia probe ended up showing a: Hey, nothing happened. There was no collusion between Trump and Russia. In fact, The collusion existed on the left, on the Hillary Clinton campaign, which was basically something she had put together in order to use it against some other people. It wasn't originally intended to be used against Trump apparently. So now we fast forward to bill Clinton, the next, really big thing that happened. And that was, he was pushing our government to force people who made devices that use encryption to use something called the Clipper chip. And this Clipper chip was going to guarantee security guarantee privacy. And the idea was, by the way, there's a backdoor in there and we could not inspect the source code for this chip. We could not inspect its innards if you would. We had no idea what was going on, but it did come out. Yes, indeed. There was a back door, the back door was only there for law enforcement. Don't worry about it. People it's not, it's not going to be misused, but any time there is a back door, there's a hacker trying to get access to that back door, correct? Yeah. Yeah. Very correct. It happens all of the time. Our information that we are sharing with anybody just isn't safe. Look at the federal agencies that have been breached almost every one of them, including the federal agency that maintains all of the employee records for all the people that work and worked overtime for the federal government that was hacked. China apparently stole that. And that was the records of, for everybody, including their background check information, you name it. And of course, when the FBI is doing a real background check, they really dig. So what information did they get from that? Our information is not secure. And with this Clipper chip that was being pushed. I don't want to blame bill Clinton here. I'm not pointing a finger at Bill Clinton. Okay. Get me, right guys. But. W what happened was, again, the government's obsession with gaining access to our private materials. I'm not trying to hide something. I just don't have anything I want to share. I love that saying and it is so true. I am not trying to hide anything. Now, there are people that are trying to hide something. So what do you do about those people? That's always the argument, isn't it. And has been for. Ever, frankly, I'm sure it goes way back to the first community of two caveman families, right? Trust yet verify and verify means sneak in, look through the iPad, the iPhones, right? Look through anything they want to. Now I've got some information on that too, coming up. So that was the next, really big thing. Here was the Clipper chip and we're all gonna use the Clipper chip. Fast forward. We had, of course, the terrible incident in New York City on September 11th. I remember it. I had the news on, I could not believe my eyes watched it happen in real-time. Live. It was just shocking what had happened. And so in response, we pass something that we called the Patriot act and that Patriot act was there to protect us, but it gave these agencies more and more power. And we found out later on, they had been collecting all kinds of information on US citizens illegally. Illegally, not just unconstitutionally, which is, bad, very bad, but against the laws that were in place, the rules or regulations. They started ignoring them. So we just put it into, we codified it in law with the Patriot act, right? They can spy on us because heaven forbid, we talked to someone in another country without it being monitored. Now I want to make it clear. I am not against monitoring someone if you have a court order. And it's a legitimate court order, not one of these kangaroo courts where you don't get to represent yourself. No one in fact represents you. And as it turns out, lies are told. This whole Russian collusion thing where they started spying on the Trump Administration now that the transcripts are out from shifts committee, where he came out every day and bald-faced lie to everybody about how they had found all of this stuff on Trump and how terrible it was and how a lot of people were going to prison. Looking at the transcripts, now we see he was absolutely lying and knew he was lying and he still he's still in Congress. Oh, two cycles later. I don't understand these people, but they had testified to these FBI officials and others that if they had known then what they know now, they would never have signed off on having this. Kangaroo court effectively, this court that has minimal oversight, they would never have signed off on these applications to the court. In order to track the movements of the Trump campaign, what they said, what they did, everything you might remember. Soon after Trump came into office, he was informed that he was being spied on that he has his offices were tapped, et cetera. Do you remember that? And they had set up a skiff there for him, which is one of these secure Faraday cage things where you can't monitor electronically through this thing. So they had to set it up. And then they told the president that other agencies were spying on him. Continuing to spy on him nothing was ever found. When you can read transcripts now that came out of that committee and yet somehow they managed to impeach him anyway. Completely political process. It's just. It's insane where we have gotten. And so I am concerned because how many times are we going to say I have nothing to hide. I don't care if they have access to this information because a lot of this information could be used against us. And if the government has it or the government can collect it. The bad guys can too. That's what I was just saying that the federal government, I think pretty much every agency, certainly, all of the major ones have been hacked. So if they have our information, it's now in the hands of the bad guys, it's in the hands of China. We know that. Our backgrounds are out there. Even the people that got secret clearances and higher, it's all out there now. So how can we make sure our data has a modicum of success and being secure in private because privacy is guaranteed to us in the constitution. You're listening to Craig Peterson. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, the rest. We're taking a little time to talk about privacy and security. What kind of rights do we actually have when it comes to privacy and security? And what does it ultimately mean to all of us? It's getting crazy out there. I just read a little bit from the fourth amendment and we talked in the last segment. About what does this mean? Why were we trying to protect ourselves? And of course, things have changed a whole lot since those days. You had people who might break in the government, might steal, sneak a peek, et cetera. We know from some of these hearings we've had in Congress that all envelopes were steamed open and their contents examined. Okay. We had people who were being examined by the FBI for no reason. Other than that, their political views. It gets very difficult over time in history. After nine 11, they started spying on us even more and they started collecting more and more information about us. And part of what they set up was this secret court where they could get a court order. Too spying on you. And it was a secret order. You wouldn't know. No one would know, and they are spying on you. Now it's supposedly the FBI or whoever it is who's presenting this case to the court is supposed to represent your interest as well. They're supposed to present evidence that might show that you, in fact, are not guilty. You couldn't be guilty of what they're accusing you of. But we now know how that went. At least in some of these cases, it didn't go well. And in fact, people were charged and considered effectively guilty and warrants were issued without anybody knowing now. Oftentimes warrants are issued without people knowing anyway, whether or not it has to do with terrorism, whether or not you're a US citizen. Obviously, you're going to find out that there's some sort of a warrant and then you'll have a right to defend yourself. No, unfortunately, you probably don't have the resources that the federal government has in trying to defend. Defend yourself. The federal government effectively has unlimited money. The same thing's true for state government. They can spend $10 million investigating you. Look at what they did with the Russia hoax, where they spent $35 million investigating, just investigating President Trump and his team. Not finding any. Evidence of Russian collusion and it came out with, what was it, two indictments, neither of which had anything to do with Russian collusion. It basically trapped that were set up. We have less right. To be secure in our papers. Then we had not too many years ago and certainly not since when I grew up, but we do have the technology today. And that's where there is a bit of a win. You know that I have continually said, don't use Android if your phone is lost or stolen, but that phone can probably be pretty easily hacked into depends on how old it is and what version of the software you're running. But we're now. When our computers and our phones adding something called a TPM. And I discussed those in some detail in one of my more advanced security courses. But this module is designed in hardware to help protect. Everything on that computer. So it isn't just an encrypted desk. So the machine starts to boot up, asks you for the password, and now it can finish booting off of that encrypted desk and keep your data relatively safe. As long as it computer's turned off. If the computer is on that data is accessible and hackers can still get into your computer remotely and get it all to that data. So there's the whole thing of data at rest. Then data in flight that we deal with all of the time in the business community. And frankly, we have that same problem as individuals, but most of us can't do anything about it. So these manufacturers have included in their higher-end computers, these TPMS, and they're not that expensive when you order a computer. If you're buying it from Dell or some of these other places, you're going to pay less than $30 for this little module. If you buy an Apple computer, It's already there. It's been built in for quite some time into Apple models, but most of the stuff, if you're buying it from a big box, retailer is not going to have this module, but this modules designed to keep the secrets, like your secret keys, et cetera, in the module and that module. Cannot be broken into physically or electronically. The hackers cannot get into it. That is a very good thing. And the same, thing's true with some of our cell phones. So if it's an Apple phone, Yeah, it's built-in, if it's an Android phone, it depends, right? Android, isn't Android, isn't an Android, right? They all use different hardware. They may use the same central processor, but they also have controllers and then device drivers for those controllers, et cetera. So it's out of Google's hands as to how secure your phone is going to be. And then you're lucky. Consider yourself lucky if you get actual updates for your Android phone. For security problems, because most people cannot get them, even if they wanted to get them, it says serious problem. So you are now more likely to be able to have the hardware. That's going to keep things safe for, and you see some evidence of this with the thumbprint readers nowadays, you've got the facial recognition technologies, again, depending on the tech, you're using a lot of the Android devices, easy to fake the thumbprint thing on also on a lot of Android devices, easy to fake the facial records. Ignition much harder on some of these others, but some of these TBMs, some of these security hardware modules have been hacked, and that is now true of Apple equipment. If they can get your hand, their hand on that equipment, they may be able to break the way into it. Now Apple's continually improving the equipment, you go to a country and let's say you go to China and you are trying to get something manufactured there. You have your intellectual property from your company in the us. Some of it's there on your laptop. And you're thinking you're safe. There have been numerous documented instances where China gets their hands on your laptop or your phone. Whether you know it or not, sometimes they sneak in fact there's a whole security term just based on the evil maids. But they'll get into your room and then they will hack into your computer and they'll steal your intellectual property it's being done even in the United States. Look at what's happened here. Representative stall wall out in California has been carrying on a long-term relationship. Physical relationship with a female Chinese spy. We had both senators from California, who we had senators, Feinstein and Boxer, both had Chinese spies on their payroll, including one who was her driver for 20 years, was listening in on her conversations and relaying them back to China. Stonewall, believe it or not, is still not only in Congress, but it is on a secretive committee. If you can believe this. I'm, my mind is I'm rubbing my head here. I had to go to explode. And in this improving windows security course, I have and in fact, a slide when I had in duct tape so that it just doesn't explode because it's just unbelievable to me. So Apple is equipment, some of the newer, slightly older equipment. Is hackable. If they can get their hands on it. So what should you be doing? I want to get into, cause we're going to lose some of our listeners here. So when we come back, I'm going to get into WhatsApp and signal and I message and messages. I go into a great deal of depth in the improving windows security course, make sure you're on my email list. Craig peterson.com. So you get all of this training. So I think we've established the government spying on us means they're collecting data anywhere. There's data. You're going to find bad guys trying to get at it. And that means our data gets exposed when there is the inevitable government hack. I have been talking here about really constitutional rights. Should the government be able to spy on us? When do they have the right to examine our papers? Our homes, our persons, our effect as is under the fourth amendment, I'll leave that to a legal show, but we do have that right. And it is guaranteed to us. For very good reason. So ultimately, what can we do to stay safe? Because it isn't the government. That's a big worry, frankly. The big worry is the bad guys. It's the hackers. This is like a really good friend of mine. He just turned 76 right now. In fact, this last week. And he makes money by drugs, driving for Uber eats. And I think he does one other as well, but that's how he makes money. And he came to me with a problem because of his last paycheck. Which I believe was about $700 for one week. That's a lot of work, right? That's a pretty big paycheck. His last paycheck did not end up in his bank account. So he did some investigation. I did some investigation. He called up the company. He was doing some of this work for, and. It found out that the money that he had earned had gone into a hacker's bank account. Yeah. So there he is working really hard. He gets this paycheck and it doesn't show up and it's in the hands of a bad guy. The money has been transferred. They couldn't scrape it back. And here he is stuck. Now in his case, the problem was that he was not using secure passwords. So I set him up with one password, which is a password manager and we used it to generate. Passwords for his bank account. And also for these apps, he was using in order to get the orders for the food, et cetera. So we locked them down and I helped him on the phone when he called up the company because the bad guy had also grabbed his email account. So anytime you try and do an account reset the reset. Code was sent to the email that he no longer had access to an email he had for better than 20 years, a Hotmail email address, something I told him also should get rid of. So we had to play those games and then. And we went to Google and he didn't have a secondary reset ability here because his Google email account was tied into his Hotmail. So any reset for Google went to Hotmail. He didn't have access to the Hotmail account. And so he lost access to the Google account. See the problem here that was created all because he knows, we can tell he was using the same password on a bunch of different accounts. One of those businesses that he was using had been hacked. And that information was then used to break into his email account. And they found from his email account that he was delivering food on the sidewall, heck he's retired his only way to generate any extra income. And so they then took over his account. They changed his bank account number. In the Uber eats app and they changed it to one of theirs. And the account number was for one of these places that will issue you a debit card. No questions asked. And once the money hits that debit card, they pulled it out and moved it overseas. It's it is a bad thing to have to happen. And by having that information, they were able to take over his identity, at least in this case, and start receiving his paychecks. This is happening every day. What do we do? Already, I tell you, you got to use a password manager. It's just so important. And we go into that and I talk about them in my improving windows security course, because you've got to do it. You got to understand how to do all of that sort of stuff. But there are other ways that you can be spied on. For instance, sending text messages, we're seeing more and more a technique that's been used by police for years now being used by bad guys, they've set up something that's generically now. Called a stingray device. It's actually a device made by one company. There's multiple these types of devices, but it pretends it's a cell tower. It doesn't have to be up on a tower or anything. It just pretends it's a cell tower. So anybody's cell phone in the area is going to try and relay through them and they do literally let you relay through. So it goes from your phone to this fake cell tower. And then from the stage. Fake cell tower. It forwards it to the real cell tower. So now they have access to information about who you're calling, but they also now have access to your text messages, your SMS messages, and they're using that to commit scams. What do you do really? These prescriptions I'm giving here are pretty darn straightforward. They're not that difficult to do, but I understand they, they can be difficult to figure out. So that's why I'm doing these courses. I have these free courses, these emails I send out pretty much every week also had this free information in them. And then I had the more advanced courses too, but If you're using an end-to-end encrypted did messaging app. These stingray devices cannot pick you up at all. Okay. Yeah. Okay. They're going to see there's data being transferred, but they're not going to be able to get their hands on the actual messages they'll just see some data. So what do I recommend you use? I'm going to make this quick because we are almost out of time here on some of these stations, but here's what I use, but let's just leave it at that for now. We're going to get into more detail a little later on. If you get cut off of the show gets kinda off, make sure you go to Craig peterson.com. You can see the podcast there. You can listen to the whole thing. But what I use is an app called signal and. That's Signal. If the police have a warrant and they're coming for you, it's not going to really stop them. And in many cases, okay. There's other ways to get access to your data, but it is going to stop the bad guys, which is who we are really trying to stop here. We want to stop the casual viewing of our person's paper's effect. From the federal government and state and local governments, because unless they have a valid warrant, They have no right to monitor us. Okay. So it's going to stop that, but it's probably not going to stop them if they have a warrant, which is fine, because if they have a legit warrant, that's all well, and good. I am not against that at all, but it is going to stop. 99.99, nine, 9% of the bad guys, because they don't have the technology. They don't have the ability to decrypt or to put special malware on your phone or other things. So signal, it's an app that had an outage. We're going to be talking about that this last week because so many people started using it after Elon Musk advised people to start using it. So how's that for something right. It's just absolutely amazing. It's worth doing, let me tell you in the course, I go into some more detail on how to set it up and what to do and why it is the best option. Make sure you are on my newsletter that I send out pretty much every week. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. What are our options when it comes to some of these messaging apps? So we're going to talk right now about how they work. What's the bottom line SMS versus some of these apps. What should you look at? What should you use? You know what I use. I use something called signal, which is an app that's been out there for a little while. Moxie Marlinspike is the name of the guy that put it together and designed really the most secure messaging interface earlier. I mentioned how you can with some, something like a stingray. Intercept cell phones and cell phone signals. And one of the things that you can intercept is what's called SMS, which is a simple messaging system. Now to my surprise, in the course of the window, improving windows security that I have, I go into some detail about how SMS came about and where it is, but for now, let's just talk about the basics of SMS. It is obviously. Text message. That's what we call it. Very typically it's a very small message limited in the number of characters that you can send. In fact, that's what Twitter did. Twitter's a limit of the number of messages is based on the length of these SMS messages. Okay. I get that. And Assa mass was just designed as an afterthought as part of the new cellular technology. It really wasn't an integral part and they were smart to say, Hey, wait a minute, we've got a little bit more bandwidth here. And so they took that bandwidth and used it for messaging apps. When you send a. Text message from your cell phone, your sending it in the clear, which means that anyone can intercepted and that's no surprise. Anyone can pretty much intercept anything. But your message is not encrypted at all. So if your message is being intercepted, it is at that point now completely vulnerable to being read so bad guys that decide they're going to set up a sting raid type device can now listen into your conversations, frankly, they can inject things into it. The other thing about it is the. Phone company is also listening in. So remember how much I've complained about people, businesses, government agencies that collect our data. And one of the reasons I complain about it is they've got the data, that means they are going to be targets of the bad guys. Think about Sutton, right? Robbing banks. Why did he Rob banks? And the answer of course is supposed to be that because that's where the money is. Why would you Rob a bank? If there was no money, it doesn't make much sense. So why would they not go then and try and break into telephone companies or other places that have your messages stored? Remember? How my friend here just a couple of weeks ago, had his paychecks deposited into a hacker's account. If they can gain access to your text messages, they now have the ability. To potentially use that to recover an account. Now recover an account. Isn't really what they're doing. They're recovering your account. They're pretending they are you. So when you get that two factor authentication message coming in from whatever website it is out there that you've been using that two factor authentication messenger message is. Yeah, going to them because they can see it. So it really is that easy. I hope that's not too confusing. So you send a message to somebody using SMS using regular text message. It can be seen. It can be read. It is stored by everybody in that route. And they can include bad guys that are sitting there watching what you're sending. Then when it gets to the other side is still in the clear and that person goes ahead and reads it. So that's the basics of messaging, right? That's your very basic, your bottom line text message. If you move upscale a little bit. You now have some apps that can be used for messaging. And I don't want you to confuse Facebook messenger here because Facebook messenger of course, is used by Facebook. They are watching what's going on and what you're saying, and it's not a secure platform. I was going to say at all, it is secure, but it's not really secure enough for messages you want to send back and forth to friends. And it's definitely not good for account recovery because most of the account recovery stuff, and two factor authentication. Is not two factor authentication. So make sure you keep an eye out for my improving windows security course, which should be released and knock on wood in about another week or so I had said January, and I think we'll make the January deadline here of having it out there. Yeah. But in that I explained two factor authentication. Why you don't want to use SMS or text messages for it. And also some workarounds, including a free workaround that you can use. So that's all in the course, but let's stay basic here right now. Messages from Facebook or not considered secure what's happened is something that about 2 billion people in the world that is pretty dramatic. Yeah. And it is designed as an end to end encrypted. Did communications channel. It can be used for little short text messages, longer messages. You can have voice calls on it. You can have video calls on it, et cetera. We use at the office, a WebEx phone system. It's made by Cisco. It is encrypted. It is what on the president of the United States desk right there. Although he has a net, an extra encryption module on it. Just really cool. Plus he can turn off physically disconnect the microphones and things makes a whole lot of sense to be able to do that, but it set up so we can have secure communications. We have one that's called  compliant and we use it inside the business and it has cameras on the phones and displays and stuff. It's really quite cool and ties into the computers. So that's probably not something you guys are going to be able to have. So a lot of people use WhatsApp. And the WhatsApp app has been known to be quite secure. It is also using that algorithm, that software that was developed by Moxie Marlin spike. So it is end to end encrypted. So when you send a message from your smartphone using WhatsApp, It's encrypted on your phone and then it is transmitted over the regular internet. So that internet connection may be coming from the phone company. It may be over, a 5g or 4g or 10 G in the future, whatever it might. Be over their network and then against to the other side, by bouncing around in a whole bunch of networks, remember internet is interconnected networks. It's a whole bunch of them. So it'll bounce around. It'll get to the other side. And once it's on the other side, it will be decrypted and there are. Session keys. There are. When you're using signal, there are keys specifically for individual conversations, individual users, and even individual packets. It's really quite involved. You might have noticed about. Two weeks ago, as I did that, WhatsApp came up with a message and you read that message. And to me, it was scary because it looked like Facebook who bought WhatsApp for what was it? A couple of billion dollars. It was over a billion, I think about eight, nine years ago. They bought it. And they gave people until 2016 to opt out of having Facebook take copies of all of their WhatsApp contact. So the message you got from WhatsApp via, or from Facebook via WhatsApp here a couple of weeks ago said okay. So we are going to be basically gathering information about you. Now that really worried about a lot of people, myself included. So I made sure I had signal set up with everybody that I'm planning on talking to. Because signal is much more secure than what's happened. Some of these others.  Don't know, a lot of people jumped ship. The stats that are out there right now are saying that we had millions of people sign up for signal. They left WhatsApp because of the, what Facebook is calling confusion over this message they sent out. And Facebook is saying, Hey we're not breaking encryption. We're not going to watch what you're saying, but we are going to keep track of information about you and about your contacts and who knows how far they're going to go with it. Odds are that they'll start pushing in. Advertising into your stream and other things, which also really concerns me because all they need is a bug and that bug could potentially allow bad guys offers to get into your machine into the app. When I say offers,  it There could be a bug in the advertising interface that allows now access to private messages. So I would be cautious about it. And a lot of people have apparently about 25 million people over the course of just three days signed up for signal. On the app store, which is just amazing. Oh no, excuse me. That was telegram, which is another secure communications piece of software. I'm not a big fan of telegram, much bigger fan of signal. That's the only one I really trust out there. Hopefully this was clear enough for you. I do go into this and I have some diagrams and other things in my improving windows security course. Put together that helps you, of course improve security on your windows, computer. But because windows computers now are also tied in with surface tablets, which are people are using. And I understand why if you're stuck in the windows world, why you'd get a surface tablet and those surface tablets have built into them cell modems. I had to go and do the two factor authentication, more and messaging and how that all go. So hopefully understand all of that. Make sure you are on my newsletter list. So you get all of the latest above the courses that are going on. I've been trying to put. A little bit of training. I bought a three minute training into the emails over the course of the last couple of months. Really? And it's easy. All you have to do is go to Craig peterson.com and sign up when you get there. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. We'll take you there. The internet phone book, if you will, or address book is beyond repair right now. It's not beyond repair. There are some things going on right now to make you more secure. We're going to talk about that. So stick around. When we go online, use something known as a URL, right? You're familiar with that. That's that part of the bar up at the top of your browser, it's got the name of a site. It might have a slash and. Slash subscribe, like when you subscribed to my newsletter@craigpeterson.com slash subscribe. That first part of that URL, the Craig Peter sawn.com known as the left-hand side. And it's the part that comes right after the HTTPS colon slash. So that's the domain name? Craig peterson.com. Easy enough to just type that in. How do you end up at my website? DNS is something that's been a mystery of black box for a lot of people, but it has been hitting the tech news lately because of some problems, basic problems. One of them is that requests, that DNS requests, they request your turn. Craig peterson.com into an internet address is transmitted in the clear. The other problem is many times our ISP are taking that DNS request and fulfilling it themselves. Those are both problems. So the first problem where we have our ISP PS intercepting, our DNS requests means that they know what we're looking for, where we're going online. So your ISP, it could be Comcast or Verizon, or who knows who, depending on where you live. Your ISP sees that DNS requests and those Oh, okay. He's going to Craig peterson.com or Google or TD bank or whatever might be. They know it. Okay. That's some problem enough. The other problem I mentioned is it's in the clear, because it's sent in the clear your ISP can intercept it. No problem. Some RSPs are not only intercepting them. They are changing things and they're giving you different results. Which to me is very frustrating. So if you're trying to do a search, for instance, instead of sending it to duck, duck could go or whatever your favorite search engine is. Your ISP is going to grab it and fulfill it itself and give you advertising different advertising as part of the search results. And in some cases as well, if you try and go to a website that does not exist rather than telling you. Oh, Craig Peterson without an O a doesn't exist. It will send you to their own webpage that has advertising on it. So all of those things are rather annoying. Bad guys can also mess around with your DNS settings. Most small businesses and home users have a router at the edge of the network that handles a protocol called DHCP. It's DHCP is a protocol that hands out IP addresses. So for instance, if you look at the IP address for your machine, the odds are pretty good. It saying the one nine two.one six, eight.one dot something range. That's the most common address on the internet is called a non round-table address and they use nav at the network edge and stuff. But that server that is sitting in your router slash firewall is. Providing data to your computer or your other devices like your television, the Roku, et cetera. It's providing information to your devices, telling it which DHCP server to use. So if you're on your web browser and you type in Craig peterson.com, it knows your web browser, your computer knows what the IP address is too. Resolve that name, the DNS server it should be using. So another thing bad guys have been doing is they break into your router slash firewall at the network edge. And then they change the DHCP servers address in your router slash firewall. So you can imagine what happens now, if you're trying to go to a website, the bad guys can send you wherever they want. And in some cases, they are sending you to their own version of your bank's website, or they're sending you to their own version of Google three. They are completely hijacking your computer by just changing these DNS settings in your Rotter and firewall at the edge of the network. That's all they have to do. So yet another reason to make sure your router firewall has the latest firmware in it. Hopefully it doesn't have security problems. They're going to nail you. I have this in my course as well, more advanced networking course on what to do, how to do it, et cetera. How do you solve these problems? Some of these companies and organizations have decided they're going to use their own protocol, their own way of doing it. So instead of sending out the name request to the standard DHCP server that your computer was told, when it was powered on to use it, you're going to use theirs. And here's how they're doing it. They have in Mozilla, for instance, Firefox product. If you're using the Firefox browser, it is ignoring the DNS settings that are on your computer. And it's opening an encrypted session to a DHCP server that Firefox knows and loves. That can be a problem. It's not necessarily a problem. It's probably a better thing to do than what most people are doing in their homes right now, which is just leaving everything at the default and letting their ISP kind of decide which DNS server to use and how to use it and everything else. So I'm not going to blame them for that. I think from that aspect, it's a pretty good idea. But because it's encrypted, it's called deal H by the way, which is short for DNS over TLS, which is meaning it's encrypted. And DNS traffic is sensitive traffic. So why not encrypt it because they. The default protocol doesn't have encryption. So they now send the request directly from your browser to one of these cloud services that are out there. One of the common ones is one.one.one.one. Which is a very common nowadays site that you might see CloudFlare. There are some others as well. So the, your ISP cannot see the DHCP request. The bad guys can change the settings on your firewall. All they want. They're not going to be able to redirect your you via DHCP. And they cannot spy on where you are going online. All very good, right from that aspect. So for regular people using this inside of Firefox great idea very easy, very simple. The other nice thing about this system, because CloudFlare is looking at the records of DNS records and identifying potentially. Banned websites you don't want to go to it can, and it does filter them out. So you have that extra layer of protection. If there's a website, that's a bad site. It is getting filtered out. When you're trying to go there. However it doesn't do any good to a cause it can't filter applications that you're running. If there's malware on your computer, trying to phone home, not going to help with any of that. I do cover all of this, by the way, in the introduction to windows security course, that's coming out here. Of course you can sign up@craigpeterson.com and I'll let you know what's going on with it. But I do cover that. And how do you do it? However, here's the problem. If you are a business that is trying to stay secure, this is going to make you less secure because a business like mine or my clients that have information, that's valuable, they have bank accounts, they have intellectual property that they don't want to have stolen. So their information is valuable. They want to intercept. These DHCP requests, because you don't necessarily want your random user inside your business network. The sales guy or gal going to the dark areas of the web and you know what those are, where there's a whole lot of bad stuff without your knowledge, because you don't know. If they try and type in playboy.com and it gives them the IP address and they can get their you're none, the wiser. Because that request is encrypted. So one of the best things to do in a business network is to use something like Cisco's umbrella that we explained in the introduction to windows security course. And we also explained some free versions that you can get and you can use. So this is actually. Dangerous in some situations, DOH, it is much more or secure another situations, but I think there are better ways to deal with this and we covered in the course. So make sure you keep your eye out for the introduction to windows security course. That is coming your way very soon. And if you are on my newsletter list, you'll find out about it as well as weekly. Little micro trainings that we're doing. Craig peterson.com. The internet phone book, if you will, or address book is beyond repair right now. It's not beyond repair. There are some things going on right now to make you more secure. We're going to talk about that. So stick around. hello everybody. Craig Peter Sohn here. You're listening to us on news radio five 60 am and 98.5 FM w G a N. And you can listen also on your Google home device. Just say, Hey, Google play. W G a N. And it'll take care of the rest for you. It makes it easy. We, when we go online, use something known as a URL, right? You're familiar with that. That's that part of the bar up at the top of your browser, it's got the name of a site. It might have a slash and. Slash subscribe, like when you subscribed to my newsletter@craigpeterson.com slash subscribe. That first part of that URL, the Craig Peter sawn.com known as the left-hand side. And it's the part that comes right after the HTTPS colon slash. So that's the domain name? Craig peterson.com. Easy enough to just type that in. How do you end up at my website? DNS is something that's been a mystery of black box for a lot of people, but it has been hitting the tech news lately because of some problems, basic problems. One of them is that requests, that DNS requests, they request your turn. Craig peterson.com into an internet address is transmitted in the clear. The other problem is many times our ISP are taking that DNS request and fulfilling it themselves. Those are both problems. So the first problem where we have our ISP PS intercepting, our DNS requests means that they know what we're looking for, where we're going online. So your ISP, it could be Comcast or Verizon, or who knows who, depending on where you live. Your ISP sees that DNS requests and those Oh, okay. He's going to Craig peterson.com or Google or TD bank or whatever might be. They know it. Okay. That's some problem enough. The other problem I mentioned is it's in the clear, because it's sent in the clear your ISP can intercept it. No problem. Some RSPs are not only intercepting them. They are changing things and they're giving you different results. Which to me is very frustrating. So if you're trying to do a search, for instance, instead of sending it to duck, duck could go or whatever your favorite search engine is. Your ISP is going to grab it and fulfill it itself and give you advertising different advertising as part of the search results. And in some cases as well, if you try and go to a website that does not exist rather than telling you. Oh, Craig Peterson without an O a doesn't exist. It will send you to their own webpage that has advertising on it. So all of those things are rather annoying. Bad guys can also mess around with your DNS settings. Most small businesses and home users have a router at the edge of the network that handles a protocol called DHCP. It's DHCP is a protocol that hands out IP addresses. So for instance, if you look at the IP address for your machine, the odds are pretty good. It saying the one nine two.one six, eight.one dot something range. That's the most common address on the internet is called a non round-table address and they use nav at the network edge and stuff. But that server that is sitting in your router slash firewall is. Providing data to your computer or your other devices like your television, the Roku, et cetera. It's providing information to your devices, telling it which DHCP server to use. So if you're on your web browser and you type in Craig peterson.com, it knows your web browser, your computer knows what the IP address is too. Resolve that name, the DNS server it should be using. So another thing bad guys have been doing is they break into your router slash firewall at the network edge. And then they change the DHCP servers address in your router slash firewall. So you can imagine what happens now, if you're trying to go to a website, the bad guys can send you wherever they want. And in some cases, they are sending you to their own version of your bank's website, or they're sending you to their own version of Google three. They are completely hijacking your computer by just changing these DNS settings in your Rotter and firewall at the edge of the network. That's all they have to do. So yet another reason to make sure your router firewall has the latest firmware in it. Hopefully it doesn't have security problems. They're going to nail you. I have this in my course as well, more advanced networking course on what to do, how to do it, et cetera. How do you solve these problems? Some of these companies and organizations have decided they're going to use their own protocol, their own way of doing it. So instead of sending out the name request to the standard DHCP server that your computer was told, when it was powered on to use it, you're going to use theirs. And here's how they're doing it. They have in Mozilla, for instance, Firefox product. If you're using the Firefox browser, it is ignoring the DNS settings that are on your computer. And it's opening an encrypted session to a DHCP server that Firefox knows and loves. That can be a problem. It's not necessarily a problem. It's probably a better thing to do than what most people are doing in their homes right now, which is just leaving everything at the default and letting their ISP kind of decide which DNS server to use and how to use it and everything else. So I'm not going to blame them for that. I think from that aspect, it's a pretty good idea. But because it's encrypted, it's called deal H by the way, which is short for DNS over TLS, which is meaning it's encrypted. And DNS traffic is sensitive traffic. So why not encrypt it because they. The default protocol doesn't have encryption. So they now send the request directly from your browser to one of these cloud services that are out there. One of the common ones is one.one.one.one. Which is a very common nowadays site that you might see CloudFlare. There are some others as well. So the, your ISP cannot see the DHCP request. The bad guys can change the settings on your firewall. All they want. They're not going to be able to redirect your you via DHCP. And they cannot spy on where you are going online. All very good, right from that aspect. So for regular people using this inside of Firefox great idea very easy, very simple. The other nice thing about this system, because CloudFlare is looking at the records of DNS records and identifying potentially. Banned websites you don't want to go to it can, and it does filter them out. So you have that extra layer of protection. If there's a website, that's a bad site. It is getting filtered out. When you're trying to go there. However, it doesn't do any good to a cause it can't filter applications that you're running. If there's malware on your computer, trying to phone home, not going to help with any of that. I do cover all of this, by the way, in the introduction to windows security course, that's coming out here. Of course you can sign up@craigpeterson.com and I'll let you know what's going on with it. But I do cover that. And how do you do it? However, here's the problem. If you are a business that is trying to stay secure, this is going to make you less secure because a business like mine or my clients that have information, that's valuable, they have bank accounts, they have intellectual property that they don't want to have stolen. So their information is valuable. They want to intercept. These DHCP requests, because you don't necessarily want your random user inside your business network. The sales guy or gal going to the dark areas of the web and you know what those are, where there's a whole lot of bad stuff without your knowledge because you don't know. If they try and type in playboy.com and it gives them the IP address and they can get there you're none, the wiser. Because that request is encrypted. So one of the best things to do in a business network is to use something like Cisco's umbrella that we explained in the introduction to windows security course. And we also explained some free versions that you can get and you can use. So this is actually. Dangerous in some situations, DOH, it is much more or secures other situations, but I think there are better ways to deal with this and we covered in the course. So make sure you keep your eye out for the introduction to windows security course. That is coming your way very soon. And if you are on my newsletter list, you'll find out about it as well as weekly. Little micro training that we're doing. Craig peterson.com. Make sure you follow along there. Before he left President Trump made sure that the rules for our electric vehicles were overhauled because the federal government safety regulations were based on 1910 type of technology. We're going to talk about that. The Trump administration has done a lot with regulations and just before he left office, we saw a number of things, hit that they'd been working on for years. And until just the last week, really the federal government's car safety regulations were based on assumptions that came out of the 19 hundreds here. 19 zero, zero, they assumed that a vehicle had people inside and they also made a big assumption that one of those people will be the driver. That is not necessarily what's going to happen in the future. We've all had these beautiful dreams of what these autonomous vehicles are going to be like, where we're cruising down the road. Just sitting there reading a book or heaven forbid scrolling through social media or something. And the car's driving itself. There may or may not be a steering wheel. So in fact, that's one of the problems let's say there is a steering wheel. Who's the driver. Because you might want to have it so that you've got the driver and the passenger and they're looking forward and there you are doing a little bit of something else and all of a sudden they notice something, the cars misbehave, or maybe that last mile. As were, when you get off the highway and we're doing some parking and it's a little confusing for the car. W why not have the passenger takeover? Okay. Why have a steering wheel, why not have a joystick that either the passenger or the driver could control? Why not just have something that the passenger complaint and the car can sense the finger and where the fingers pointing and that's where the car goes. There are a lot of options that just are not. Built into our transportation code, federal or state. That's a very big deal. There are a number of vehicles out there that are designed for hauling cargo. You might've seen some of them deliver pizzas and beers on campuses of universities and they drive around by themselves. They avoid obstacles and they're really cool. And then when they get to the right person, Or at least to the right building, it sends a little text message off to the person that ordered it. They come down, they punch in a code, it opens up and there's their pizza and beer for the night. Okay. I can see that. But in that case, those vehicles are on a sidewalk. They're not covered by the same rules as vehicles that are on public roads. How about some of these vehicles? Like the neuro. And you are, Oh, I assume I'm pronouncing that right. This thing is very cool. It's almost like a little bigger brick, right? But it's fairly rectangular in shape and it has a couple of compartments inside. It has a refrigerated area. It has an area for general groceries and it is designed to haul cargo and go on the roads. It doesn't have any people inside. So why does it need to abide by the regulations that are based around people? It doesn't have a driver. There's no driver's seat. There's no steering wheel. There's no need for a windshield because the whole thing is enclosed. This is really a very big deal. And this is all part of the federal motor vehicle safety standard that requires every car have seat belts, airbags, his steering wheel, a brake accelerator, even a driver's seat. It has minimum standards for everything from not just the fact, you have to have a windshield, but what the strength of that windshield is how it's supposed to break crash, test performance, all of those sorts of things. But the whole, all of those assumptions are already frankly, out of date. And they're going to get more and more out of date. Remember how I said regulation, strangled technology. They strangle innovation, no matter what, whether it's technology or otherwise because they make assumptions based on old things. So the rules and regulations always tend to follow technology. But in some cases, they really squelch technology. Look at the nuclear regulations. There they're locked into the nuclear power plant designs of the 1950s. That's something President Trump tried to straighten out and had some success at. And now we're talking about regulations for motor vehicles that almost applied to the 1890s. When the first vehicles hit the roads out there. So one of the things the Trump administration did before it came to a close is it had the national highway traffic safety administration publish a new version of these vehicles, safety standards that recognize that some cars don't have drivers and some vehicles don't have. Any people inside at all. So thank goodness for again. So many regulations were updated under the Trump administration and a number of them. I mean like thousands that were useless, it didn't add anything. We're completely gotten rid of written off the bucks, but neuro is one of these companies that's really going to benefit from this. This is a startup, a very cool little delivery robot. You can look them up. Bond line and you are, Oh, they're designed to operate on-street rather than the beer and pizza robots that are operating in the universities on sidewalks. So very cool ARS Technica has a good article on this and the Herald. Neuro excuse me, neuro hailed. This new regulation is a quote, significant advancement that will help neuro commercialize our self-driving delivery vehicles. How's that for corporate speak. So it's actually very good. These requirements that were in these vehicles, safety standards make things worse in some case for delivery vehicles and are completely useless and make the vehicle heavier. Now, remember a heavier vehicle. Is potential if it's in an accident going to cause more damage, right? So requiring airbags requiring seat belts requiring a driver's seat just makes things worse for a vehicle that has no passengers makes things worse for everyone, including a pedestrian or a cyclist that might get here. We saw that just terrible accident that occurred here or a year or two ago. So we've got to be careful. Late last year, they asked for special exemptions for some of the rules because they don't have windshields. They don't have the right passengers, et cetera, et cetera. And the traffic safety administration waived the requirements. And also by the way, w way rules about the design of door locks and seats. These vehicles don't have to meet crash worthiness standards since they're already gonna have. Pizza or groceries on board. Very interesting. You're going to have classes of vehicles that are little delivery vehicles. You're going to have them that have passengers on board and you can have big trucks. They all require different standards. Glad Trump did this before he got out of there. I hope that this continues. Okay. Hope it continues. And we don't get a repeat of what happened in Tempe, Arizona. Back in 2018, when a new Burr self-driving cars, truck, a cyclist stick around. The lockdown has changed a lot of things, including some of these restaurants, why even have a physical restaurant, if everybody is ordering Uber eats or some sort of delivery mechanism, why. Just like that restaurant has been hard. Hit it just a terrible thing. I remember I went to get my shoes fixed. I went to a cobbler. I took a shoe in it. He fixed it for me. And yeah, I'm one of those guys, who knows where the cobbler is. And I went to pick it up my shoes up. And right next door was an older restaurant and this restaurant was really, in a little bit of a rundown area of town. Where else could a cobbler be nowadays? There's not as though it's a high-volume or high-profit business. And. He was, this guy was opening a bar and it was an Irish-themed bar and it was going to open on St. Patrick's day 2020. So think about that for a minute. St. Patrick's day in 2020 was not, I would say the best day to open. Up a bar. So let me see. Last year, 2020 St. Patrick's day was Tuesday, March 17. Do you remember what happened the day before? On March 16th. That's when the lockdowns started going into effect. That is not a good thing, frankly, because that lockdown meant that this poor guy who was, he was in there, he was by himself. He was painting repainting and stuff like that. The headline they're all green out in front of the bar and getting everything set up inside all of the taps for the beers and everything already. So he had put, I don't know, what does it cost at least a hundred grand open a restaurant. And most of them failed as like any other business. So I would imagine he's out of business and out of luck he'd been saving. He was a younger guy, probably his mid-thirties, maybe late thirties. And he'd been saving up to put this restaurant together. That's just one story. There's many stories of other restaurants that have been family restaurants in some cases for generations that just could not. Survive and you and I obviously with the lockdown we're not going to these restaurants like we used to, and I really miss it.  I've never been a big restaurant guy. I usually make meals at home or my wife feeds me at home and right. I get taken care of that way. It's been a wonderful life. Let me put it that way. Okay. But I do enjoy going out to a restaurant and talking with my buddies and just enjoying it, talking with my wife, going out with the kids, which we've done for many years and was a bit of a surprise sometimes when there'd be 10 of us, which is generally considered a large party. But no, that was just my wife and I and our yeah. Kids. People I'm going to sit down in restaurants at least right now. And with 20 to 50% of restaurants maybe never coming back. Where are we going to end up Pat? So there's been a whole new type of business. That's sprung up from this. And I had noticed this years ago, at least something similar to this where you would go into a restaurant and you'd find that they had in fact been sharing a kitchen. So that's very true in a lot of smaller hotels. You go to some of these little niches, hotels, and room services, really the restaurant next door. So you order something and it comes from that restaurant. That whole concept has just grown like crazy. And there's a great article in Forbes magazine about what are called ghost kitchens. A ghost kitchen is a kitchen that doesn't really have a restaurant attached to it. Very cool. And what I think coolish about it too. Maybe the coolest part about it is that these ghost restaurant might be making Chinese food and Thai food and Mexican food and American food all in one kitchen. And all you have to do is just start one of these. As you have a kitchen, let's say you're an existing restaurant, and you're trying to figure out how to stay in business. You get some of this software like Nimbus, and I M B U S. And Nimbus's just an example. I'm not recommending them, but an example of one of these companies that has software to allow you to. Really run these things. So now you put up a website saying in my town USA is this wonderful Mexican restaurant. And you've got all of the wonderful things about it and the testimonials and the menu, and people can go there and order whatever Mexican food they want. Very nice. I like that. But you also have a menu up for your Chinese food and it's a different website obviously, and it's got Chinese food and it's again, testimonials about how great Chinese food is. And you've got your Chinese menu there where you can select a little of this and a little of that. And you might have another w. Or another restaurant, quote, unquote selling Japanese food, whatever it might be. They're not even related in most of these cases. That is absolutely fascinating because it has altered a whole industry. Now you can have pizza in there too. So if you've got a kitchen, you could now set up a website for a number of different cuisines and you now have just one place. It's just a kitchen and you keep it busy. How's that for simple. All right. Do your chefs hopefully know how to make all these different types of foods, right? You gotta make sure the food's right, but you don't have to worry about seeding. You don't have to worry about all of the cleanings you'd have to do of the seating areas. You don't have to have someone out front greeting people as they come in. And the Uber food or whatever might be drivers, just show up at the door, they pick up the food and they deliver it. So that's a whole new type of business. It's called ghost kitchen. You'll see them out there. There are other things like Total food, this Nimbus thing, which is a hybrid breed between the traditional commissary kitchen and a ghost kitchen that got some bells and whistles on them. But this is fascinating. It is something you might want to look into if you own a restaurant or a bar because now most States are allowing the delivery of mixed drinks in these vehicles. It could be a savior for you. Okay. Oh, I absolutely love it. I think it's a great idea. Obviously. It's not going to replace everything a traditional restaurant's going to do. You're not going to be able to sit down with your buddies at a ghost, titch your kitchen. And at that ghost kitchen. Be able to very simply just have your meal, right? Cause it's, it doesn't really exist. The restaurant doesn't exist. The kitchen, obviously. That's so very cool. Very cool. Fran posts is another one, FRA, N P O S, which gives ghosts kiss kitchens, the power to monitor, manage their individual locations while removing all of the administrative burdens associated with running the kitch

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Tech Talk with Craig Peterson Podcast: VPNs, Ransomware, Facebook and More

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 84:05


Welcome!   This week I am spending a bit of time discussing why you should not use VPNs and why Google removed an Android VPN from the PlayStore. Then some tech predictions for the coming year and Ransomware and More so be sure to Listen in. For more tech tips, news, and updates, visit - CraigPeterson.com. --- Tech Articles Craig Thinks You Should Read: Google Removed Shady Android VPN App That Allowed MiTM Attacks Don't use VPN services. Kazakhstan spies on citizens’ HTTPS traffic; browser-makers fight back Twitter repeals retweet roadblocks, Facebook follows suit 2021 Cybersecurity Predictions: The Intergalactic Battle Begins Russia’s hacking frenzy is a reckoning FBI says DoppelPaymer ransomware gang is harassing victims who refuse to pay Intel falls on report Microsoft plans to design own chips for PCs and servers Facebook Repays News Industry It Destroyed With Print Ads Begging You to Hate Apple --- Automated Machine-Generated Transcript: Craig Peterson: [00:00:00] I mentioned on the air earlier this week, a friend of mine who got hacked, he's trying to make some money. He's retired doing a little grub hub type delivery service, and all of his money was going to a bad guy. So we're going to get into that. Hi everybody. This of course is Craig Peterson. Oh, I hope you guys are having a great week weekend. Hopefully a few have the week off next week. And we'll get back to it after the first of the year. The hacking frenzy is just not, I talked about it last weekend, where we've got now the bad guys, assuming it's the Russians. There seems to be a lot of speculation that it really is. However, I want to explain why you never really know who does a hack. There are. Tools out there that are used by hackers. And most of these tools are just shared within their little community out on the dark web. And you can go right now if you know how to get onto the dark web and which site to go to you can go right now and grab almost any of those tools that the hackers are using to break into your computer, Mike and beater. Everybody's computer out there. That is a problem. And it's a problem with trying to identify who's doing the hack because if you are using the tool that is usually used by China, for instance, there's a whole bunch of tools that are named after pandas because that's China. And it's just, the name is the name. It's doesn't necessarily have a whole lot of significance. Okay. But the tools China uses the techniques they use are used potentially by other countries as well. So Russia could be using tools that are usually used by the North Koreans. And, so how do you know by the tool you don't and then on top of it, you have the problem. Of people hopping around. You've seen that before. Remember war games, Matthew Broderick, man, when was at 80 sometimes sometime, and it was showing how it was hopping through different machines. And different modem banks in order to get where it wanted to go. And you've certainly seen that in bond movies and everything else where they're hopping from server to server. And so they're trying to trace who is this? Where are they coming from? Because we're going to go catch them. And they'll show a little graphic up on the screen and it shows, okay. Boom. Okay. Argentina, and then it's Brazil. And then it went over to Moscow and then over to Beijing and then over to Montreal. And then you can't do that, that, that technology does not exist. There's no way for you to know. Because if you don't have control or access to all of these servers that are all over the world, how can you know, you just can't and then to make matters, even worse, the bad guys have compromised, small business computers and home computers as well. That really creates some problems because now what we're talking about is the bad guys getting on to your home computer and using that as a base of operations. We've had many times where someone's home computer was used to attack the Pentagon and it had nothing to do with that poor person whose computer was being used. We've talked before on the show about how some of these terrorists have been taking over. Business servers, just regular web servers. Hey, it's my server. And I use it for whatever might be e-commerce nowadays. And didn't realize that Al-Qaeda was using my server to share a video of Americans being beheaded. That has happened. So if China wanted to attack the US would they necessarily want the US to know it was China, might they want the US to think it's Russia? All of these bigger countries have that ability and now even smaller company countries. We're seeing Vietnam now. One of these nation-state hackers. And we're seeing, of course, as you already know, North Korea and China and Russia have been hacking for a long time and it seriously looks like they interfered potentially even directly in our elections because this big hack, these solar winds hack that happened solar winds software that was used to penetrate. All kinds of federal agencies, businesses, infrastructure, et cetera. Also penetrated the election systems in some States. It also penetrated the company that makes the election software for most of our elections here in the United States, it is really that bad. So we can't say for sure that this was Russia. It might be, it might not be the full assessment of what even happened from that hack is still probably months or frankly years away. We know the department of Homeland security. Commerce treasury state, all founded their systems had been breached and they're saying it was Russian hackers and it may well be Russian hackers. I don't have access to any of the hard data to be able to tell you for sure that's who it was, but. These hackers, Russia or whomever, it might be we're in our government systems for months, including some of our election systems. Now, is that a big deal or what now? We're thinking that this is Russia's cozy bear. And they are basically turning business software into a Trojan. And that's what the solar winds thing hack was all about. They had software that is used in networks to monitor and control networks, and it had been turned into a Trojan. Now a Trojan is like a Trojan horse. It's a piece of software that looks like it's something other than what it is. That technique has been used for many years, but what did they do while they were in these networks? It's absolutely crazy to look at FireEye, which is the company that discovered this was using solar wind software. They discovered the hack on their own networks and the networks as some of them. Clients as well, FireEye is a three and a half billion dollar security company. They are huge. And they said that they had been hacked by a nation-state, and it goes through what the software was. It's a Ryan, which is one of the SolarWinds products. We have used their products before we stopped using them because of some security problems that we had found in their software. So we stopped using solar winds 18 months or so ago, and now it has come out that one of the people inside solar wind warned the company about the way they built the software and distributed it and that their software could be used for hacks, which is. In fact, it absolutely was, but this is really bad news because since March they've been in some of these systems, government, and otherwise they've been in our election systems. I saw this study. I don't know if you've seen it. That was reported out of, I think it was Michigan, where they had been looking at what's happened with the voting systems. One of the systems was given to a security team who looked into it and found, yeah. There are some serious problems here. It was misattributing votes and it was rejecting. What was it like 35% or more of the ballots that should not have been rejected and just open to everything up to total hacking? It's very bad. So are we at war with Russia? Because they have gotten into things like our water systems as part of this hack, our critical infrastructure, our government agencies. What's going on? There is a system in place that the federal government's been using is called Einstein patrols. Yeah. Just that Einstein. And what it does is it looks on the networks to see if they're being hacked, but just our software that so many of us use that we should not be using anymore. That is the antivirus. That's looking for signatures. Einstein only is effective at identifying known threats. So it's like a bouncer. If you go to a nightclub that has a list of people not to let in, and yet he, he lets him all of these people with knives and guns who are swearing. They're going to kill everyone inside because they're not on the list. All right. So this is very inadequate. This Einstein system that the federal government's using in the face of these types of sophisticated hack attacks, and they use these hackers that solar winds or Orion backdoor to gain access to these networks, they wanted access to one of the things that we are trying to get really moving here for smaller businesses is. Logging, because if you're not logging, what's going on, you don't know what the bad guys got access to. And you got to keep those logs. Those logs have to be searchable. And if your security company is doing their job, they should be keeping all of the logs from all of these machines for at least two weeks, if not months. And you might want to ask them that. Because what happens, frankly, with these things is there's a lot of retrospective work that goes on. Just like with my buddy who got hacked, just trying to make a few bucks over at grub hub. We'll talk more about his specific case in a few minutes, but. I had to spend hours going through forensic information. I can get my hands on him to figure out exactly what happened and what do we need to do to mitigate this problem for him. We're going to talk about that exactly. On one guy, trying to make some bucks gets hacked. What can you do to stop it? So how did my buddy get fooled or what happened here? That his accounts got hacked. He was locked out and the money that he was trying to make from driving for GrubHub just disappeared. We're going to get right into that. So let's get into this problem and it is a problem. It's a very big problem with hackers. We've been talking a lot about the nation-state stuff that's been going on, and frankly, the way this latest hack. Hit us all frankly, is very hard to address. This is like the attacker beams themselves into the business's network. But what about my friend? What happened to him? How did this all work? He has, and I understand this man. He has not been following all of my advice and I'm sure this is true for most people out there because much of this is confusing. And I'm thinking I should probably do a little bit of training on this one as well for you guys. And if you're interested, I need to know. And the only way I'll know is if you email me ME@craigpeterson.com and let me know, you're interested in protecting your online account. I'd be glad to put something together, believe me, and we can have a little bit of free training available for you guys. So again, me@craigpeterson.com, but this was a wake-up moment for so many people. In the case of my friend, here's what happened. He was expecting a payment from GrubHub and it could be anybody, it doesn't have to be GrubHub and it was going to go straight into his bank account. How does the configure where he's paid his password, his username, his email address? All of those are configured either in the app or on the website for GrubHub. All well and good. Isn't it. It should be pretty easy to do. And in fact, it was, and that's exactly what he did now. Let's talk about the mistake he made. He got an email with a link in it to GrubHub, and he clicked on that. You are you getting what's going on here now? So he clicked on the link for supposedly GrubHub and it wasn't GrubHub. But that's all he had to do. Cause now what he did is he confirmed that people are in fact, or that he in fact had a grubHub interest or GrubHub account. Now sometimes what'll happen is you click on it. It'll take you to a website of a bank or GrubHub in this case, and it's not the real website. It'll ask you to verify your username and your password, and you'll type it in. Between you and me, I think he probably did that, but he wouldn't admit to it. So what'll happen is that point is they now have your username and password. Cause you just typed it in and they'll will oftentimes say invalid password, please try again. They'll just. Automatically redirect you to the real website, assuming that you gave them your proper username and password, but they can still get you in many cases, even if you don't give your username and password. Rule number one. Remember when you are on your email account and you're looking at the emails and somebody says Hey, you've got to click here in order to verify something, or someone's trying to break into your account. So click here so that we can get, get things straightened out and taken care of and blah, blah, blah, rule number one, don't click on that. Rule number two is in. And if you do click on it, don't give any information about yourself, like your username and password, but by clicking on it, you gave a little bit of information. So here's what happens. The bad guys send out these. These are like Nigerian scam emails. They have a list of over right now. I think it's about three or 4 billion email addresses. So they'll send out emails to this list of addresses and people will randomly respond, even though they know they should not be responding. So they randomly respond to the email by clicking on it. Now they know that my buddy's email address is a valid email address and he was clicking through to do something like it. Might've said, Hey GrubHub, you got to verify your account information or your delivery route or something. Something that's compelling to people who deliver for GrubHub to click on. And frankly, even if you don't deliver, if you have a GrubHub account and you have a credit card, a credit card tied into it it might be worthwhile for them to steal that credit card information. Okay. So you collect and that's all you did was you clicked on that email. What happens next is then our friends will have the bad guys we'll say, Oh, okay. So that was email account xyz@hotmail.com and that's where his account email account was xyz@hotmail.com. Okay, great.  Let's have a look online. So I took my body to a website that I recommended you guys use many times and it's called, have I been poned.com? So I want you right now, whether you're on your phone or in front of a computer, go to have I been poned.com and that's spelled like you'd expect it to be it's. Have I been B E N P w N E d.com. Have I been polling.com and then type in your email address, I'm going to type in his right now. So this is the email address he was using. I'm not going to tell you exactly what it is. His email address don't embarrass him, but yeah. It says that he was postponed in eight data breaches and found no pastes. So here's what that means. Data breaches are where his data was Nolan from a third party. In his case, I'm looking@thelistandyoucangetthislisttojustgotohaveibeenponed.com and it says for him, Adobe and October 23rd, Teen 153 million Adobe accounts were breached. Okay. Funny. And so the compromised data from Adobe in 2013 was email addresses, password, hands, passwords, and usernames. Now they were, the passwords are encrypted, but it was done very poorly and easy to resolve back to plain text. Okay. So Adobe had his username and his password. And again, between you and me. He has not changed his password in at least 10 years. Okay. So that means they had his email address and his password from the theft from Adobe. Oh. But there's more, they also got his email address and password along the way with the email addresses and passwords of 164 million other people from LinkedIn in May, 2016. Oh, and by the way, LinkedIn was hacked also in 2012. So data's out there. It's you can just buy it. Let's see. Aluminum PDF. I don't use that, but apparently he does. It was hacked last year, 15 and a half million records of user data appeared for download. Included authentication tokens, which means they don't even have to log in. They can just hack it using a special web browser code, email addresses, genders names, passwords spoken languages and usernames river city media spam list 1.4 billion. Records that was in January, 2017 and share this 2018 41 million sTraffic it's a Israeli Mark marketing company at a database, 140 gigabytes of personal data, all kinds of stuff. And it goes on and on. So we'll tell you why clicking on that email is bad when we get back and how they use that. Along with this data that's available out there on the dark web. We were talking about our hack, a friend of mine whose account got hacked. His paycheck got stolen and he could not get anything back. So we're going through what happened, why and what I did about it. Don't forget, you can also go online. Craig peterson.com. Subscribe to my newsletter, get all of my show notes and warnings and information about trainings, all of that stuff. Craig peterson.com. We established that my friend had his information stolen multiple times within in fact, the last year online. Now that's a bad thing, frankly, especially when they've got your email address and your passwords. So they sent an email to him and he admits that they did, and that email had a link in it to click on and he admits that he clicked on it. And as I mentioned before, just clicking on that email becomes a problem. Because now all they have to do is they track who it is that collect. So they know it was xyz@hotmail.com because it's tracked. If you look at most links and emails, including the emails I send out, it actually doesn't take you to the ultimate destination. It takes you to another site that is tracking. What you're doing is tracking the. Number of clicks and what people are interested in. And that makes sense for people like me, where I'm trying to find out what are you guys interested in so that I can help you out and give you more of that type of information? In the case of the bad guys, they now know that X, Y, z@hotmail.com clicked on this email about the drivers for grub hub. All they have to do is look into one of these online databases of stolen identities and find the email address the email for in this case, right? X, Y, z@hotmail.com is that email in there. And the answer is going to be, yes, the email is in there and then they say, okay, X, Y, z@hotmail.com. What's the password and they've got the password right in there. So now all they had to do is use his email address and his password over at grub hub. So now they're in there in his account or grub hub, and these people were smart enough to know. All they have to do now is go to the account information pages and change the deposit to account. And that's exactly what they did. So they changed the deposit to account. So his payment for delivering all of these different things that GrubHub delivers from local restaurants, et cetera, that payment is now. In their bank account and they have what are known as money mules. I don't know if you saw that mule movie with Clinton sword. It was absolutely fantastic. But these money mules are people in the us that fall for the scam of hay. We have a few accounts and we can't have a us bank account. So what we're going to do is we're going to wire you the money in, let's say PayPal, and then I want you to split it up and wired into these other accounts. So now you are mule. You are money laundering for them. And a lot of people have fallen for that scam and the FBI and the secret service have arrested a lot of these ringleaders over this type of nastiness that they've been really perpetrating against all of us. So it's a bad thing. So what happens now is he goes to log in to his account. It still works. They didn't change his password. Life was still good for him. And he's able to do his work still. However, he notices that his money didn't show up and GrubHub says, yeah, we deposited the money in your account. No problem. So he goes in, he looks at a double-check see, count, just being thorough. And he finds, Whoa, wait a minute. This is not my account number. So now we start to get a little bit worried and that's when he calls me up and he comes over and we spend about four hours tracking this down and fixing it. What the bad guys ended up doing is he had changed his password. So now what can they do? They're out of luck, right? No, they're not because remember they still have access to who is X, Y, z@hotmail.com. Email. All they do is go to grub hub and say, forgot password and grub hub dutifully sends a password reset to his Hotmail account who has access to his Hotmail account. They do. And so he then says, Oh my gosh, I can't get into my GrubHub account anymore. So we go back and forth on this. Ultimately the bad guys. Turned on two factor authentication on his Hotmail account, which is Pinedale by Microsoft outlook.com nowadays. And with two factor authentication, you have to have an authentication app in order to. Change passwords, or even in sometimes now in his case, he was lucky because he was still logged in to outlook to his Hotmail account. And we were able to use that to get around some problems. I'm not going to get into all of the gory little details of it, but we managed to reset everything. Thank goodness. So he's now getting his money from grub hub, but ultimately what I ended up having to do is set him up with a one password account. Now I have done this for him before, and he has never used it because it is confusing. You gotta really pay attention when you're doing this stuff, because I had to do two or three times with some of these online services that he uses and his banks. But one password is what I recommend. He bought the family version, which is $5 a month. There's a one week free trial.  I don't get any money from this. One password doesn't pay me anything. Give me anything, nothing. They don't even acknowledge. I exist. All right.  We do use it for some of our clients as well, and we do use it for some of our internal stuff too, but what happened is, I got one password set up. We set it up to use two factor authentication. One password will act as an authenticator now. I like one password. It just spelled literally one, the digit one password.com. You'll find them online. With the two factor authentication, what happens is when you go to log in, you're going to give you a password. And then it's going to ask you for six digit number and that six digit number changes every 30 seconds, which is really a good thing, frankly.  We obviously changed his passwords. Now he was very concerned because he doesn't want to have to remember a different password for every website. That's what one password is there for. And we use one password to generate fairly memorable passwords, at least easy enough to type in for all of his websites who went through them. One by one, we changed the passwords. On those website, we using one password, had one password. Remember them, those websites that could use nothing indicator for verification, we set up the two factor authentication and now he's cruising along. Everything is reset. He has good passwords, different ones on each one of his accounts. And he only has to remember one password, which is that. The password, which is really a passphrase that he uses to get into one password. It makes life much, much easier. And an automatic automatically synchronizes between his iPhone and his desktop computer. It also runs on Android and windows and stuff too. So it's very good software. Check it out. If he had done this a few months ago. He would be in pretty good shape as it turns out he didn't, but thank goodness we were able to recover. And by the way, if he didn't have the two factor authentication, because remember the bad guys set it up, he'd have to wait 30 days. Another warning and a deletion from the Google play store this week for a VPN service. We're going to tell you about that as well as explain why you should not be using VPN services in most, but not all cases. Craig, Peterson here. You can visit me online@craigpeterson.com.  Hey, thanks for joining me today. VPNs, I think are one of the least understood technologies that many of us use almost every day. VPNs are used for us to connect to the office. Many people use VPNs to try and keep their information private. It's not as though there's anything to hide in most of these cases, it's just that it's nobody else's business. It's not something that people want to share. So they do use VPN. So how do they work? How do they not work? What are the issues involved? That's a little bit about what we're going to cover right now, but let's start with Google. There's a VPN called super VPN free. Now this is a VPN client and the way VPNs work is you have a server, which you can think of as the end point, and you have your client. So the client resides on your computer or your mobile device, and it connects to the server. If you're a business and you are trying to use a VPN in order to allow your no, usually not customers, but suppliers or employees to connect into the office. I hope that you're using a model called a zero trust model because what it is really is an Excel. to your network. So you're extending that employee's home network or that provider's network office network, you're extending it into yours and you're joining them together, which is obviously a very scary thing to do and can be a very bad thing to do and allow. Some of the malicious software to spread onto the networks. Okay. So we've talked about that a lot over time. In this case, the super VPN free VPN client. Has something that is called man in the middle. Now, the way this works is just think of broken telephone. If you've ever tried to play that before we used to do it with a cans, tin cans and strings. Between the cans. And so you'd have three people and one person would talk into the can and the person in the middle would hear the message and then would relay it through another can to another buddy who's down that piece of string. And that allowed us to go greater distances. It wasn't, it was a lot of fun. And then of course the old broken telephone game. That we used to play the, you might have 10 or 20 people and you try and pass a message from one person to the next and not mess it up. Now, some people of course would mess it up on purpose, but you really can have some fun with those games. In this case, the man in the middle was the VPN server. Cause you remember the data's going from your device over an encrypted, hopefully secure connection over the internet. And then it arrives at the VPN server and what this server was doing. And unfortunately, what far too many VPN servers was we're still doing is known as a man in the middle attack. Yeah, the data is going from your device to their server. It is encrypted and hopefully using good encryption. And then the next stage is it's decrypted at their server. So you're trying to go to the bank, you're entering account information. And, but that VPN server in the middle of this whole conversation is monitoring everything you're doing. So it gets onto their server. They can see your usernames, they can see your passwords, they can see your account numbers, and then it opens a connection from their server to your bank. Yeah. Dangerous. So if you had. This shady VPN app from the Google play store called super VPN free. You might want to remove it, but this is a more generic problem than just one single VPN app. This problem is in fact very common. So I want to run through some other reasons why you probably don't want to use VPN services. Remember number one. There might be a man in the middle attack going on and we've even got countries doing that. Now China does that, so they can monitor everything. Even when it's encrypted, we've got cows Exton right now, spying on citizens, HTTPS encrypted traffic. And it's a, it's a bad thing. Bottom line VPNs that we're normally using. Now, this does not mean a VPN. That's a private network. That's used internally inside of businesses, but the types of VPNs that consumers are buying, and unfortunately, far too many businesses are buying unknowingly. Number one logging, many of these VPN say that the services, Hey, we don't log, which somehow is supposed to make you feel better about it. Some of them say we only logged for 30 minutes. Remember that it's rare for the VPN servers themselves to be in a data center. That's owned by that VPN provider. So we have other servers on that same network and that provider that's giving or leasing or renting of that VPN server. Space in that data center is going to be logging all that. So remember, it's in the VPN providers best interest to log their users. It lets them deflect blame to the country. If the customer's doing something that's illegal, if they get a DMCA, take down notice, et cetera, et cetera. So if the VPN provider is logging, now, they. If they got into legal trouble would have a little bit of a leg stand on. Even if you're paying $10 a month for the vPN service, it doesn't even pay for their expenses. Most of these VPNs are making money off of you. Okay. Bottom line. And there's a number of ways they're doing it. I have a whole webinar on VPNs. And if you want, I'll send you a link. To the copy of my last VPN webinar. Be glad to let you know a little bit more about that. Now there are some VPNs that servers and services that have gone out of business. Recently, one of them is called hide my ass. They went out of business and they gave up all of the information about their users years ago. And this was w. We talked about, in fact, on my radio show, this was a G almost 10 years ago. And they handed over evidence that resulted in the arrest of some some of their clients, frankly, who were doing some things that were pretty nasty. Guess what? That provides us with another reason not to use VPN services because we are being lumped in with. Every type of evil person you can think of, right? There are the majority of these VPN users. They might be like you and me, and just trying to keep prying eyes from our ISP, from Comcast, from whomever, keep those prying eyes away from our. Our systems, our data is none of their business, and I don't want to share it with them. However, the criminals that are out there, the arch criminals that are out there, they are using these VPN services. So the IP addresses of most of these VPN services are actually blacklisted. By some of these providers that are out there and blacklisting is bad because have been using the VPN services or services like tore, for instance, in the onion network are you're going to be blocked at, in quite a number of different banks and other websites. We block them routinely for our. Clients as well, because we can't really tell, are you a bad guy? Are you a nation state like China or Russia trying to hack in or are you just using a VPN to try and stay safe? Okay. So there's another reason not to use VPNs. And you might say, Hey, listen, I'm paying anonymously. I'm using Bitcoin, whatever might be in order to pay for it. You remember, you're still connecting to the VPN service using your own internet address, and they can log that and it can be traced. VPNs. Don't provide security. Frankly, they are what we call in the business of proxy. And that means that you connect to a server that connects to another server and there might be cashing proxies, et cetera, in order to cut down on their bandwidth. But that's what they are. They just are not providing more security. If you think you want more privacy, remember VPNs, don't provide privacy with a few exceptions. They are, again, just a proxy. They're effectively a middleman. Sometimes you're even using this man in the middle attack. We talked about early, earlier. If somebody wants to tap your connection, they can still do it. They just have to do it at a different point. Now, remember that the VPN service you're using does not take you to that bank website that you want to go to. That VPN service takes you to some point in the U S or Italy or Sweden, wherever it might be. And at that point, now it's out on the open internet. If they want to tap your connection, they can still do it. They just do it a different point. And these major nation States that are trying to spy on people, they also rent. Server time and data from the exact same places that these VPN services are renting from. So they then launch attacks against the VPN servers so they can get it, all that information. They can decode. They can do the man in the middle attacks, whatever they want to do. So you're not getting more privacy because all they have to do is monitor at a different point. And although your internet service provider might be tracking where you're going online and selling some of that information, most of these VPN services are doing that exact same as well. Now, if you think that you want more encryption and that's why you're going to do it well, you know what? Just using HTTPS on your web browser, that is enough security for almost anything you might be doing. So make sure you using HTTPS colon slash. The websites you want to go to because that website is now connected to you via a VPN provided by that server, like your bank or wherever it is, you may be going online. I'm going to do more about VPNs after the first of the year, drop me an email me@craigpeterson.com, if you'd like to find out more. You are probably fairly familiar with all of the normal tips about shopping online. We're going to get into little more detail here and what you should do while you're shopping and after your view have been shopping. You can find almost all of this stuff up on my website@craigpeterson.com. And if you are not subscribed to my newsletter or my podcast, please take a minute to do that on your favorite podcasting application. There are a lot of tricks they're going on right now when it comes to online shopping things that we have to be very aware of. And you've probably heard about many of them before. There are, of course, all kinds of nasty people out there that are trying to trick us into maybe given a credit card where we shouldn't and I want to. Play it a little bit of audio as well from my daughter. And this is really sad, but she got this phone call and it came through on regarding some fallbacks activities in the state of Washington. Do we need to talk to you as soon as possible? This call is from social security administration. I'm literally trying to apartment (509) 524-9631. I think it's (509) 524-9631. Thank you. Now I usually don't play the phone number when someone leaves a message. But in this case, I don't know. I, if I was you, I probably would not call it. Cause now they know that you are a person who is potentially going to be open for fraud. So don't call those numbers. I think that's an important thing for us all to remember. But in case you couldn't quite make it, how it was the social security administration calling and they were calling because they saw some fraudulent activity in Washington. And so they wanted to follow up with you and you, they wanted you to call back. So obviously. Don't do that. My daughter got this phone call just this Thursday and it was in her voicemail. Don't call these people back. I have a friend who he will see a phone number coming in, right call come in. Oh, I don't recognize that call. And so he'll just let it go to voicemail and he doesn't listen to the voicemail. He just calls the number back. Hi, you called. Don't do that. And there's a couple of reasons. One is in the, in most of these cases, they are trying to get information about you so they know you'll call them. So they might be able to trick you. But in most cases, that caller ID is fake. So they're sending you a caller ID and it says some phone numbers. Sometimes they even use phone numbers of police departments, which is really funny. There's a video online of a police captain getting one of these fraud calls and she keeps this fraudster on the phone and who's telling her that he's going to report her to the local police. They're going to come by and arrest her unless she pays him right now. And she's just doing everything she can to not laugh because she's the chief of police. Are you kidding me? And she knew it was a fraudster. So we have to be very careful with these people. And so many of us, particularly the older generations are trusting, and that can be a bad thing, but it's not just them. It's the young people too. I am shocked at what they will do, what they'll get away with and how they just don't. Care about cybersecurity. Really don't care. I had a discussion with one of my, one of my sons and he didn't care. He was just, he was pushing back as hard as he possibly could. So maybe it's a dad thing. Cause I'm his dad and I'm into cybersecurity. It's what I've done for a living for decades. And he is just rebelling. And he's how old is he now? He's probably 24 or something like that, but I know a lot of us rebel and push back against this stuff. Just like I talked about earlier with the printers, we know we should be keeping our firmware up to date, but we just don't. So watch out for those scammers. One time I was. On the floor of a trade show. And I was actually exhibiting there at the trade show and talking with people and everything back and forth. And I thought it was going pretty well. And then I got a phone call and I answered it and it was a lady from the IRS or at least that's what she said she was. And I knew it was just totally fake because the IRS doesn't just call you out of the blue, the social security administration. Doesn't just call you out of the blue. They will send you a letter. It's really that simple. So I hung up on her and she called back like six times and I told her, listen, this is a scam. I know it's a scam she was asking for. I think it was Apple gift cards were really Apple gift cards. I can see Amazon gift cards, but Apple's a little more limited, I don't know. I don't know. Maybe they'd just buy. Apple phones with those gift cards and then sell them on the gray market or the black market once they got the hands on. I just don't know. So it is happening and it is going to happen even more this year. And many people ask why would someone do that? Right there? In many cases, they don't really know what they're doing. They're just calling from a call center and they've got a script to read and they are told that it's legitimate, right? In another cases. And of course the people who are running this scam know it's not legitimate. And then other cases, they're an active participant, but they're making money. And it's the only way they know how to make money is rip people off, which is just a shame. And. Between you and I see this all the time in the it world, where there are a lot of businesses out there that are scam artists, they put up a shingle saying I'm a managed services provider, or I'm an it professional because there's money in it. And they're not, we have a client. This was absolutely fantastic on Thursday this week. One of our texts. One of our senior texts, one, one of my sons in fact, was out there. And he said that we were the best, it support people he has ever seen. And he's been in business for about 40 years and he was just ever so grateful. I was at to everything that we're doing for him and his. Team his company, helping him to grow and solving all of these it problems. He doesn't even have to think about them. He doesn't even hear about them because many times we solve them before they even know about it. But we're right on top of it. And we're helping them, we get the right equipment. So he doesn't have to. Buy it again, when it breaks and he doesn't have to do with the downtime that you always have to deal with when something breaks or something fails. So he is very grateful. And so am I frankly, for what he's done for us, which is pay his bill it's right. So yeah. They're very good people and made me feel very good about that. But anyhow okay. So I am going on and on here, but let's talk about the online shopping and the safety for online shopping. There is a great article that I picked up from Cece. Which is a federal government agencies called the cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency. C I S a.gov is where you'll find a lot of this online, but let's go through some of the tips. The first one is the best defense there is, frankly, which is be aware. Before you do anything, stop and look. And I do that all of the time. I get an email from someone. It might be a legitimate email. It might be legit from Amazon or from Walmart or whatever online store. So I always stop and look at it. And number one thing to look for is the grammar. Good English grammar, at least good enough. English grammar that you think that they're probably a native English speaker. Okay. Now you say, great. And there's all kinds are wonderful people who aren't here, English speakers in. That's true. Okay. There are multiple things to look at. We're just talking about one of them here right now, which is, are they native English speaker or is this very poor or grammar? Because most businesses are not going to send out an email. They're just full of grammatical mistakes or spelling mistakes. Does that make sense to you? They're not going to do that because frankly it just reflects very badly on them. And that's not something that you want to have happen. So that's the first thing to do next. Double check all of the URLs. So that email from address should be absolutely correct. Is it absolutely amazon.com or is it AMA dash Z O n.com or is it a M Z O n.com? Any of these. Misspellings common misspellings, things that you might just overlook normally, does that email contain any of those types of things? That's all a part of awareness. And what we're trying to prevent here are what are called phishing attacks, or even spear phishing attacks, where they are sending us something that looks legitimate on its surface, but obviously. Is not when you get right into it. So in most cases, when I get an email from somebody, what whomever they might be, I look at it and say, is this a legitimate communication? Am I expecting it? And if it's from a bank of mine or some other vendor, I rarely ever click on the link in there. I usually go to their website directly. There's usually most banks have the. Messages thing and you can right there in that messages say, yeah, okay, no problem. Here it is this the same message that they sent me via email. And if you do that, then, it's legit. It's just You don't call back a phone number. If they say they're calling from the local police department, you look them up in the book and yet, and you look them up online, right? Who has books anymore? You call that number, not the number that they gave him. All right. Now that we know the basics, let's get into the details of what are some of the things you can do. In addition, we're going to get into multi-factor authentication and much more. So here we go. Let's talk about these devices that we're going to be buying this year and in next year. 2020 is going to come to an end. I'm really hoping some of this stuff's going to spill over into next year. There's a few things you really should be doing, especially with your bank or Amazon, anywhere where you have financial data. And one of those things is called multifactor authentication. A lot of these businesses have this called also two factor authentication. You might see it abbreviated as. To FFA or MFA, but what that allows you to do is have something, and combine that with something you have. That's always been the best practice when it comes to security. Now, obviously there's even more stringent stuff that you could potentially do, but that's your basics of the best stuff. So what is this two factor authentication? In many cases, businesses are using a text to message that they'll send you when you log in. So you go into your account. Normally it's where you would set your password and you'll see something there about multi-factor authentication or two factor authentication. You'll go to that. And in most cases, they'll ask for your. Phone number and they'll send you a text message to verify it. And. You're off and running. So now the next time you go to log into that site, it's going to want your username or email address, and it's going to want also your password. And hopefully you're using a different password on every website out there. And then it's going to send you a text message and that text message will have a number that you can then type in on the website. And then this is okay. This is really you. Now you gotta be careful with this because there are a number of people who have been bamboozled by this. One of the ways they got bamboozled was where yes, indeed. People stole their phone number. So an attacker knows that you have something valuable, they want to get into your bank account, or maybe it's get into your Bitcoin account, whatever it might be. And they find out what your cell phone number is. And then they call up your cell phone provider and they say, Hey, I've got a new phone. And then they give the, all of the information for the new phone and they can bamboozle them. To get them to switch. And before you know it, cause you're not getting to notice, Hey, I just didn't get any phone calls. Not a big deal. In fact, it's wonderful that people haven't been bothering me on the phone, but what has actually ended up happening is they now have your email address. They have assumed. I assume that they have your password because most people use the same password on multiple sites, or it's an easy to guess password, easy enough to find the breached passwords on the dark web. I do it all of the time when I'm looking for dark web stuff for my clients, but now they have your phone number. So when they go to log into that bank account, They've got the email address. They got your password. Cause you, you have used that same password elsewhere. And when the bank sends a text message to your phone, it doesn't go to your phone and you don't even know it went to your phone. So here's an important tip. Contact your cell provider and have them use a pin or a password with you so that when you call up, they're going to ask you what's the password for the account. Now this is going to be a different password than you'd use on the website. But it's going to be a password. In some cases, it's a pin. So come up with something that you don't use anywhere else and set it up with your cell phone provider. All right. So that way, if they are going to hijack your SMS or text messages, it doesn't matter because even then they can't get through, but there's a better way. Okay. There's a better way to do all of this. There are some paid and some free two factor authentication apps. What I use personally, and what we use with our customers is called duo D U O. We've been using them for years. Cisco of course bought them because they were the best in the business. That's what Cisco does. So duo allows you to have a different type of two factor authentication. You can also use Google authenticator, which is free. You can use last pass. In fact, I got an email this week from one of the subscribers to my email list, thanking me for the recommendation for last pass. And by the way, if you want a copy. I have my special report. I'd be glad to send it to you. That talks about passwords talks about one PA password and last pass and what you should do a little bit about two factor authentication. So I use duo. I also have Google authenticator, although I don't really use that at all. I tend to use Google or do I should say. What happens with that is they'll display a QR code when you're setting up the two factor authentication. That's one of those square things that has all of the little squares inside of it that you can use to go to a website is typically what you'd use it for in this case, it then syncs up a special Countdown a few old 30 seconds, and it'll give you a six digit code that you can use. And that code is only good for 30 seconds. So now when you go to login, you're going to give you username or email. You're going to give your password. And then it's going to ask you for that. Code so you can use again with duo, I have adjust automatically. It comes up, it's integrated with my one password as well. So I can now log in and I know it's extra safe because even if someone steals my phone number, It's not going to do them any good because I do not use my phone for verification for two factor authentication. Now there's one more trick that you could play if you wanted to. And I have done this more than once. Some websites do not allow you to use an authenticator app. Yeah, I know behind the times, aren't they? So you have to use SMS. If you want to use two factor authentication, other words, you have to have a text message sent to you. So what I do with those sites is I have a phone number that isn't a real phone. So I have a phone number that I got years ago from a company that Google bought nowadays, Google calls it Google voice. So I have a Google voice number and I will give them that number. Now, why would I give him that number? First of all, I can filter calls that are coming in and text messages and everything out. And then Google will forward the text message to my phone. And remember it's Google. So it's not terribly private, but that's okay because those numbers are usually only good for a number of minutes. Okay. So it's not a very big deal, but the reason I use. Something like Google voice is it's not a real phone number, so they can't call up T-Mobile or Verizon or whoever you have your phone through pretending to be you and get them to transfer that phone number. Because they can't and they won't. Okay. It's very important. The, the SIM card that you have in your phone nowadays, some of these devices have virtual SIM cards. That SIM card that's in your phone can not be stolen or duplicated or anything else either if you're using one of these Google voice numbers. So some really important tips there. I hope you took some notes. If you didn't, you can find this online. I post these as podcasts that you'll find right on my website @craigpeterson.com. You can listen to them, take notes. My wife even provides a transcription of these things most of the time. Bless her heart she spends a lot of time doing that and she'd appreciate it. Check it out online craig peterson.com. We're talking about how to keep your devices safe that you're buying this year things you're getting for family, for friends, maybe for yourself as well. And we're going to get into it more. Now we've got some real surprising things for you guys. One of the things that we have to do, and this is again, over and over again, but better than 60% computers have windows, computers are not up to date. Remember we're buying nine devices that are basically computers. Do you remember that whole Barbie thing from not too long ago? I, in fact, was on TV with this thing and it was sending audio up to the internet and we were able to intercept it. We did a whole thing on television about this. Obviously it's a very big problem because it's your kid's information. Voices being sent up in the Barbie was interacting. Dope now Mattel cleaned some of that stuff up and that's always a good thing. But the point behind this whole computer in a toy or other device thing is that their computers we're talking about mobile phones. And Android phones, just not getting security updates. If you're going to insist on using an Android phone, make sure you get the latest model every two years, because even Samsung only supports their phones. They're top of the line phones for two years. Okay. Versus your iPhone, which is good for five or more years. So keep those phones up to date. In fact, when you first get the phone, probably the first thing you should do is check for a software update. Computers are the same thing. Whether you're getting one of these Chromebooks, which are very good in generally speaking, I'll remember it's Google. Okay. But the Chromebooks tend to be kept up-to-date because it's pretty much automatic. And I know a lot of security researchers. Use Chromebooks and use them exclusively because they don't have the same security problems as windows. What's one of the reasons apples don't get attacked as much as windows computers. Don't because the Macs frankly, are not as common. They're only about 8% of the market out there, depending on whose numbers you're listening to. So why would they go after it? Plus it's a little more hardened than windows is. In fact, it's a lot more hardened than windows is. And Microsoft is starting to FY fall in behind Apple's lead, which I think is a good thing. So those computers update them immediately. If you're still running windows seven, make sure you get 10 cause seven. Isn't getting the updates anymore. If you're running windows eight, 8.1, make sure again, you upgrade to windows 10, but brand new computers. Shouldn't come with those. Another quick word of warning about computers that you're buying the home edition of windows does not have the same features as the business additions or enterprise additions of windows. So you might want to, when you're buying something, look for windows professional, it has more options. And one of the options that could save your bacon is the ability to put off update. Now, you're I hear you saying Craig, you're always telling us to update. Early and update often. Yeah, that's very true because many times when you get that patch, it's because there is something going on in the wild, bad guys are actively using it to exploit you to exploit your fault. Okay. So there's some very good reasons to stay up to date, but. Hey, here's a problem. I had a law office call me up because right in the middle of them, putting together some documents for the court that were due in less than two hours windows and they were running home edition, decided it was going to force them to do an update. You can imagine the trouble that ensued because they weren't going to be able to get the paperwork filed with the court in time. Very big problem. But even if you're not an attorney, you're not dealing with the court. When the windows professional does give you the option to schedule the. Dates, you can push them off for a week and then you can get into the more advanced stuff too, with the device management, MDM type stuff where you can now manage that device and make that device secure most, if not all of the time. Okay. So let's move on to the next tablets again. You look at something like the Amazon Kindle, the firearms and the here's my watch talking hit the Siri button accidentally. So the Amazon Kindle fire that is an Android tablet. Now, one of the advantages is it is updated by Amazon automatically. It gets all of these security updates and other things. Yeah. That's a very good thing, and it gets them for a fair length of time and they are cheap. You can get them for 50 bucks, 70 bucks brand new from Amazon. And I got one a year or two ago, probably a couple of years ago. And it wasn't well packaged and it's shipping and the. The front screen was just cracked all the way down. So I returned it, they shipped me another one and that one wasn't cracked. So that's good, but I've kept an eye on it and it has been very good. And I also got with the Amazon fire tablet, one of these stands that you can put it in, it's a charging stand, but when you place it in the charging, stand it then becomes an Amazon Alexa. So a little kids come over grandkids, and they want me to play baby shark, which is an annoying song that the grandkids, every generation has this. I remember a slightly older grandchild. A granddaughter who used to love ah, jeepers. What was a gummy bear? That's what it was. Gummy bear. Remember that song was incredibly annoying too. And he, in fact, I ended up getting the guy who wrote the sock on radio show with me to talk a little bit about it. It was fun actually. Those of us who needed to be kept up to date all of those tablets, because they are real computers, but nowadays we're buying appliances. Like I remember five years ago, I think it was out of the consumer electronics show. I saw a, another one. Before, your home that you put into your home and it had an Android operating system in it, it connected to wifi and it allowed you remotely to say, Oh, you know that steak or Rosa told you to cook in the oven at 5:00 PM, I'm going to be late. Okay. So you just go online and I type it into my phone and ta-da, I am now all set. There we go. And it's not going to start cooking it until six 30. That's all well and good, but that appliance has a computer in it and it's sent into wifi. I have you updated it. And does it self update and for how long are they going to be providing updates for that oven? Or, I'm sure my now five years later, there's no more updates for it. So you now have a, an appliance, a device that is frankly dangerous on your network, because if somebody, again, they come over to your house, they've got a laptop, they connect to your wifi and it now infects your appliance. Okay. Whether it's your washer or your dryer. Those are the two most common, I think right now that are internet connected or your oven or your microwave or your garage doors or your security system or your lights, those can all get infected. And now they are used as launching points to infect everything else. You network. Check the update, make sure everything's up to date. And in some cases it's pretty hard to update, but it's worth it. You have to do it even your children's toys. One of the things I do is I put them on a network segment that has no access to anything else. I have an IOT wifi network, internet of things. All right. You're listening to Craig Peterson. Make sure you visit me online at craig peterson.com and sign up for my newsletter. We've talked about, multi-factor authentication, we've talked about, of course, protecting your devices by keeping your software up to date and that's everything nowadays, really, and how to do that. What's up for that. Now we're going to go into a couple more good points. So we did talk about multifactor or two factor software update. Now, once you've purchased an internet connected device, no matter what it is, if it's a router or firewall, if it's a Barbie doll, change the default password. Now, in most cases you can connect to the device, just using a web browser that makes it very simple. So you use the web browser, you connect to the device. Most of them have web servers on them. If you can imagine that, a little doll with a web server on it, but yeah, that's what happens. Your refrigerator probably has one of his internet connected and your washer dryer, a almost every even light bulbs have little web servers built into them and you want to connect to them and change the default password. So look up the manual. It's probably not going to tell you how to do it with. The information that's in the packing, but if you go online and search for that device, you can find out how to change it and use this is just normal recommendations, right? Use different passwords for every device and always use complex passwords. Now complex doesn't mean that it has to have special symbols in this upper case, that lowercase, et cetera, it can just be. Three or four words strung together. That's all it needs to be. You might want to throw a digit or two in there, maybe a special character too, but a phrase is the best. And in order to do that, you're probably best off. Using a password manager to help out. So that means using something like one password or last pass. And once you've got that in place, it'll generate these passwords for you automatically it'll remember them. It keeps them encrypted. So you only have to remember one password and that's the password you have set for. The password manager now, in my case, I've got it set up with duo again. So I'll go into one password and one password is going to ask me for my password and it's also going to authenticate me via duo on my smartphone. So there's a multifactor three factor authentication. Okay. So important for all of these devices that connect to the internet. Also check the devices, privacy, and security settings. And a lot of times the manufacturer will. Let you set up an account on their website. And from there, you can tell it what information you want to share and don't want to share. Now, remember what I was talking about in the last hour with Apple, they are being very good about this and they are now demanding that all of the app developers disclose to you. That you have in deed, given consent for this information or that information to be used by that app developer and sold. But you can go to the Mattel website, set up an account for your device or the Samsung or whatever it might be. And right there, you can examine. Your privacy settings and what do I want to allow the vendor to gain access to? Okay. Make sure you're not sharing more information. Yeah. Then you absolutely need to provide, they're not going to ask you for social security numbers or other things. There's no reason to write that stuff that the bank or the IRS is going to want. Not these guys, at least, hopefully. Make sure you're enabling automatic software updates, wherever you can. The latest version of the software. Usually tells you that it has the latest security fixes. Hopefully it does, but it also helps to ensure the manufacturer still support it. Because if you've got automatic updates and they're sending updates to you and a hundred thousand of your closest friends who also have the same device, they're going to continue to support it. And that way, the latest patches are going to be out there, but if you're not getting the updates and nobody else is the manufacturer is not going to have a lot of incentive to give you security updates, then there's the normal stuff about, don't use public wifi. Yeah. That's generally a good idea. But if you're using a secure server connection, That's that little lock up in the URL bar. Then you are effectively creating a VPN between your web browser and that remote server, and that's going to be quite safe. So purpose personally, I don't worry so much about that. I do worry about my machine being attacked, but I also have a very good firewall turned on and I have all of the services that I don't need to have shared. Turned off and I am going to do. Class on this, a little course on hardening windows. In fact, we've got it all written. We've got slides together. We'll probably be doing that after the first of the year. So keep an eye on your email for that. Cause anybody who gets my newsletter, I'll tell you about that. How to harden windows, so that even if you are on a public wifi somewhere, you're going to be relatively safe and the same. Thing's true. If you're. Using your phone for instance, and you're sharing your phone's network connection with your computer. It could still be used by bad guys to try and get into your phone. These ISP internet service providers are not completely on top of all the security. Okay. All of the basic stuff don't provide personal information, financial information. I tend to use. These one time, if you will use credit card numbers. So every time I, if I go to a site and I want to buy something let's say I'm on GoDaddy buying a domain or I'm on Walmart side or Amazon site. Each one of those, I use a different credit card number with, so check out your credit card provider, all of the major ones, visa and MasterCard. They have the ability to create virtual credit card numbers. And that way that credit card number can only be used on that website. So you give this, you create this credit card number. It's very easy to do. It's usually a plugin in your browser. You create a credit card number and it's for amazon.com. And now if somebody were to get that credit card number from Amazon and try and use it somewhere else, it will not work. It will only work on amazon.com. Isn't that cool. And then the other advantage is if someone starts to miss using it, then you can just turn off that virtual credit card number. It's really that simple. So have a look at that. Then one time use credit card numbers or these virtual credit card numbers, which is what I like. Where you can use it multiple times on that site, you don't have to create a new one every time, a available from most banks and all major credit card companies. Okay. Also be careful with the websites. You're going to make sure you type that URL correctly. As I said before, I always spend a few extra seconds. Whenever I'm on a website, I'm going to a website. I'm reading email, just making sure that it is correct. I spelled Amazon Houghton, or the email address that sent it to me. Is legitimate. I can't believe how many ti

First Ring Daily
First Ring Daily 956: Hugs, Not Hacks

First Ring Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2020 11:25


On this episode of First Ring Daily, Google goes down, Hotmail comes out, and everything is compromised.

DJ Bully B's Podcast Essence of Soul
Dj Bully B Essence of Soul Music World Mix Djbullyb1@hotmail.co.uk 18/11/2020

DJ Bully B's Podcast Essence of Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2020 193:48


Whenever you find yourself doubting how far you can go, just remember how far you have come.Try to be a rainbow in someone's cloud

The Startup Story
Steve Jurvetson, co-founder of Future Ventures

The Startup Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2020 83:28


About this episode In our entrepreneurial journeys, we need to think much bigger and therefore set our expectations and goals much higher. By doing so, we're forced to shift our perspective to play the long game. Steve Jurvetson knows this well and has a comparable perspective when it comes to investable technologies. While most investors want to know what your three to five-year plans are, Steve wants to know what your company will look like in 50 years. Steve is the co-founder of Future Ventures, current board member of SpaceX, and former board member of Tesla. Prior to Future Ventures, Steve was the co-founder and managing director for Draper Fisher Jurvetson, where he led the firm's investments in SpaceX, Tesla, Planet, Memphis Meats, Hotmail, and Skype. In 2016, former President Barack Obama announced Steve's appointment as a presidential ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship. He has also been honored by Forbes as one of the text best venture investors and by Deloitte as the venture capitalist of the year. Steve is arguably one of the most brilliant individuals I have ever spoken to. Tune in and enjoy a conversation that will blow your mind. In this episode, you'll hear. What Steve thought he wanted to do as a kid and what his parents encouraged him to do. His experience in electrical engineering and business school. How he progressed from Bain to venture capital. The moment he realized he wanted to do venture capital for the rest of his life. How he developed an intuitive approach to the market. How he connected with Elon Musk for an investment opportunity. The core areas he invests in now. Resources from this episode Join Grindology: https://grindology.com/ ExpressVPN: Get 3 Months Free → https://www.expressvpn.com/startupstory Get Emails: https://app.getemails.com/referrals/newaccount?ref=R18HWW5 The Startup Story Inner Circle: https://www.thestartupstory.co/vip The Startup Story on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/thestartupstory The Startup Story is now on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/jamesmckinney The Startup Story on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thestartupstory Steve on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevejurvetson/ Learn more about Future Ventures: https://future.ventures/ Share the podcast The Startup Story community has been so incredible sharing our podcast with others, and we thank you! We do have more stories to tell and more people to reach. There are three ways you can help. First, the most powerful way you can support this podcast is by leaving a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Second, follow us on Facebook and Instagram, and be sure to share your favorite Startup Story episodes with your friends and on social media. Tag or mention @thestartupstory.co so we can give you a virtual high five and a thank you! Lastly, share the podcast on LinkedIn. The Startup Story podcast is for entrepreneurs. Don't underestimate the power of sharing on LinkedIn so other entrepreneurs can discover us. With your support, we hope to further our reach in encouraging and inspiring the founders of today and tomorrow. Thank you! EPISODE CREDITS If you like this podcast and are thinking of creating your own, consider talking to my producer, Danny Ozment. He helps thought leaders, influencers, executives, HR professionals, recruiters, lawyers, realtors, bloggers, and authors create, launch, and produce podcasts that grow their business and impact the world. Contact him today at https://emeraldcitypro.com/startupstory

Speaking to Legends
#15 Tim Draper - To Predict The Future Invent It

Speaking to Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2020 35:08


Tim Draper is one of the most successful venture capitalists from Silicon Valley. 35 of his portfolio companies became unicorns which include firms like: Hotmail, Skype, Baidu, Tesla, Twitter and many more. In this episode, we discuss Tim’s path into finance, how he launched hist first VC fund, what his outlook for the adoption of AI is, and what he thinks about data privacy and venture capitals’ investing getting more quantitative.

Wellness Business Systems Podcast
13: Helping You Understand Email Marketing For Network Marketers

Wellness Business Systems Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2020 9:52


If you are partnered with a Network Marketing company and aren't a part of our Accountability and Support Group online, visit this link and join us! This group is all about Email Marketing For Network Marketers. You do not need to have an Email Marketing System in place to join. You can still apply all of our strategies using a free email provider like Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo, AOL, Outlook, etc. Why Email Marketing As A Network Marketer? Personally thank your customers for their recent orders Check in with your customers and receive feedback/provide support Send weekly new release emails or newsletters Provide trainings to your downline Track actions to know whether your downline trainings are being watched Send personalized emails to those who express interest in hosting events or joining the business opportunity Want to stand out in a company where thousands are selling the same products? Apply these strategies.

DJ Blaze Radio Show Podcast
Who Still Uses Hotmail Tho?

DJ Blaze Radio Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2020


On this episode Amy (@Amys22Cents) Dj Phenom (@iamdjphenom) and B-Eazy (@preacher_bp) discuss Trump's taxes, Naya Rivera's sister and Ex, Delonte West and this weeks episode of Power. They also read some listener feedback.  Email: Djblazeshow@gmail.com Call us up and let us know what you think 404-436-2370

DJ Blaze Radio Show Podcast
Who Still Uses Hotmail Tho?

DJ Blaze Radio Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2020 68:41


On this episode Amy (@Amys22Cents) Dj Phenom (@iamdjphenom) and B-Eazy (@preacher_bp) discuss Trump's taxes, Naya Rivera's sister and Ex, Delonte West and this weeks episode of Power. They also read some listener feedback.  Email: Djblazeshow@gmail.com Call us up and let us know what you think 404-436-2370

Holistic Investment w Constantin Kogan
☎️First Video Call, Unicorn investments & Decentralized Economy (w Tim Draper & Constantin Kogan)

Holistic Investment w Constantin Kogan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2020 56:22


This time I was delighted to join Timothy (Tim) Draper - venture capital investor, and founder of Draper Fisher Jurvetson (DFJ), Draper University, Draper Venture Network, Draper Associates and Draper Goren Holm. His most prominent investments include Baidu, Hotmail, Skype, Tesla, SpaceX, AngelList, SolarCity, Ring, Twitter, DocuSign, Coinbase, Robinhood, Ancestry.com, Twitch, Cruise Automation, and Focus Media. In July 2014, Draper received wide coverage for his purchase at a US Marshals Service auction of seized bitcoins from the Silk Road website. Draper is a proponent of Bitcoin and decentralization.

DJ Bully B's Podcast Essence of Soul
The Essence of Soul - Fantasy Mix Show 15/9/2020 -Djbullyb1@hotmail.co.uk

DJ Bully B's Podcast Essence of Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2020 241:23


“You’re not going to master the rest of your life in one day. Just relax. Master the day. Then just keep doing that every day.”

More Than Just Code podcast - iOS and Swift development, news and advice

We fact check Apple's stock if it had never split. FoS Joe Cabrera offers the inside view of FedEx driver tracking. Apple is preparing 75 million iPhone 12 for release. App Store appeals process is now live. Get ready for subscription offer codes. Apple is still trying to erase mac.com email addresses. Game IQ is a taxonomy to help publishers understand mobile game categories. Apple approves notorious malware to run on Macs. Picks: How to test deep links with UI Testing. How to manually add workout data to the Health app on your iPhone. World-first circuit board with Swift. Use !hws in DuckDuckGo.

The History of Computing
A Retrospective On Google, On Their 22nd Birthday

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2020 18:44


We are in strange and uncertain times. The technology industry has always managed to respond to strange and uncertain times with incredible innovations that lead to the next round of growth. Growth that often comes with much higher rewards and leaves the world in a state almost unimaginable in previous iterations. The last major inflection point for the Internet, and computing in general, was when the dot come bubble burst.  The companies that survived that time in the history of computing and stayed true to their course sparked the Web 2.0 revolution. And their shareholders were rewarded by going from exits and valuations in the millions in the dot com era, they went into the billions in the Web 2.0 era. None as iconic as Google. They finally solved how to make money at scale on the Internet and in the process validated that search was a place to do so. Today we can think of Google, or the resulting parent Alphabet, as a multi-headed hydra. The biggest of those heads includes Search, which includes AdWords and AdSense. But Google has long since stopped being a one-trick pony. They also include Google Apps, Google Cloud, Gmail, YouTube, Google Nest, Verily, self-driving cars, mobile operating systems, and one of the more ambitious, Google Fiber. But how did two kids going to Stanford manage to become the third US company to be valued at a trillion dollars? Let's go back to 1998. The Big Lebowski, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, There's Something About Mary, The Truman Show, and Saving Private Ryan were in the theaters. Puff Daddy hadn't transmogrified into P Diddy. And Usher had three songs in the Top 40. Boyz II Men, Backstreet Boys, Shania Twain, and Third Eye Blind couldn't be avoided on the airwaves. They're now pretty much relegated to 90s disco nights. But technology offered a bright spot. We got the first MP3 player, the Apple Newton, the Intel Celeron and Xeon, the Apple iMac, MySQL, v.90 Modems, StarCraft, and two Stanford students named Larry Page and Sergey Brin took a research project they started in 1996 with Scott Hassan, and started a company called Google (although Hassan would leave Google before it became a company).  There were search engines before Page and Brin. But most produced search results that just weren't that great. In fact, most were focused on becoming portals. They took their queue from AOL and other ISPs who had springboarded people onto the web from services that had been walled gardens. As they became interconnected into a truly open Internet, the amount of diverse content began to explode and people just getting online found it hard to actually find things they were interested in. Going from ISPs who had portals to getting on the Internet, many began using a starting page like Archie, LYCOS, Jughead, Veronica, Infoseek, and of course Yahoo! Yahoo! Had grown fast out of Stanford, having been founded by Jerry Yang and David Filo. By 1998, the Yahoo! Page was full of text. Stock tickers, links to shopping, and even horoscopes. It took a lot of the features from the community builders at AOL. The model to take money was banner ads and that meant keeping people on their pages. Because it wasn't yet monetized and in fact acted against the banner loading business model, searching for what you really wanted to find on the Internet didn't get a lot of love. The search engines or portals of the day had pretty crappy search engines compared to what Page and Brin were building.  They initially called the search engine BackRub back in 1996. As academics (and the children of academics) they knew that the more papers that sited another paper, the more valuable the paper was. Applying that same logic allowed them to rank websites based on how many other sites linked into it. This became the foundation of the original PageRank algorithm, which continues to evolve today. The name BackRub came from the concept of weighting based on back links. That concept had come from a tool called RankDex, which was developed by Robin Li who went on to found Baidu.  Keep in mind, it started as a research project. The transition from research project meant finding a good name. Being math nerds they landed on "Google" a play on "googol", or a 1 followed by a hundred zeros. And within a year they were still running off University of Stanford computers. As their crawlers searched the web they needed more and more computing time. So they went out looking for funding and in 1998 got $100,000 from Sun Microsystems cofounder Andy Bechtolsheim. Jeff Bezos from Amazon, David Cheriton, Ram Shriram and others kicked in some money as well and they got a million dollar round of angel investment. And their algorithm kept getting more and more mature as they were able to catalog more and more sites. By 1999 they went out and raised $25 million from Kleiner Perkins and Sequoia Capital, insisting the two invest equally, which hadn't been done.  They were frugal with their money, which allowed them to weather the coming storm when the dot com bubble burst. They build computers to process data using off the shelf hardware they got at Fry's and other computer stores, they brought in some of the best talent in the area as other companies were going bankrupt.  They also used that money to move into offices in Palo Alto and in 2000 started selling ads through a service they called AdWords. It was a simple site and ads were text instead of the banners popular at the time. It was an instant success and I remember being drawn to it after years of looking at that increasingly complicated Yahoo! Landing page. And they successfully inked a deal with Yahoo! to provide organic and paid search, betting the company that they could make lots of money. And they were right. The world was ready for simple interfaces that provided relevant results. And the results were relevant for advertisers who could move to a pay-per-click model and bid on how much they wanted to pay for each click. They could serve ads for nearly any company and with little human interaction because they spent the time and money to build great AI to power the system. You put in a credit card number and they got accurate projections on how successful an ad would be. In fact, ads that were relevant often charged less for clicks than those that weren't. And it quickly became apparent that they were just printing money on the back of the new ad system. They brought in Eric Schmidt to run the company, per the agreement they made when they raised the $25 million and by 2002 they were booking $400M in revenue. And they operated at a 60% margin. These are crazy numbers and enabled them to continue aggressively making investments. The dot com bubble may have burst, but Google was a clear beacon of light that the Internet wasn't done for. In 2003 Google moved into a space now referred to as the Googleplex, in Mountain View California. In a sign of the times, that was land formerly owned by Silicon Graphics. They saw how the ad model could improved beyond paid placement and banners and acquired  is when they launched AdSense. They could afford to with $1.5 billion in revenue.  Google went public in 2004, with revenues of $3.2 billion. Underwritten by Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse, who took half the standard fees for leading the IPO, Google sold nearly 20 million shares. By then they were basically printing money. By then the company had a market cap of $23 billion, just below that of Yahoo. That's the year they acquired Where 2 Technologies to convert their mapping technology into Google Maps, which was launched in 2005. They also bought Keyhole in 2004, which the CIA had invested in, and that was released as Google Earth in 2005. That technology then became critical for turn by turn directions and the directions were enriched using another 2004 acquisition, ZipDash, to get real-time traffic information. At this point, Google wasn't just responding to queries about content on the web, but were able to respond to queries about the world at large. They also released Gmail and Google Books in 2004. By the end of 2005 they were up to $6.1 billion in revenue and they continued to invest money back into the company aggressively, looking not only to point users to pages but get into content. That's when they bought Android in 2005, allowing them to answer queries using their own mobile operating system rather than just on the web. On the back of $10.6 billion in revenue they bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion in Google stock. This is also when they brought Gmail into Google Apps for Your Domain, now simply known as G Suite - and when they acquired Upstartle to get what we now call Google Docs.  At $16.6 billion in revenues, they bought DoubleClick in 2007 for $3.1 billion to get the relationships DoubleClick had with the ad agencies.  They also acquired Tonic Systems in 2007, which would become Google Slides. Thus completing a suite of apps that could compete with Microsoft Office. By then they were at $16.6 billion in revenues. The first Android release came in 2008 on the back of $21.8 billion revenue. They also released Chrome that year, a project that came out of hiring a number of Mozilla Firefox developers, even after Eric Schmidt had stonewalled doing so for six years. The project had been managed by up and coming Sundar Pichai. That year they also released Google App Engine, to compete with Amazon's EC2.  They bought On2, reCAPTCHA, AdMob, VOIP company Gizmo5, Teracent, and AppJet in 2009 on $23.7 Billion in revenue and Aardvark, reMail, Picnic, DocVerse, Episodic, Plink, Agnilux, LabPixies, BumpTop, Global IP Solutions, Simplify Media, Ruba.com, Invite Media, Metaweb, Zetawire, Instantiations, Slide.com, Jambool, Like.com, Angstro, SocialDeck, QuickSee, Plannr, BlindType, Phonetic Arts, and Widevine Technologies in 2010 on 29.3 billion in revenue. In 2011, Google bought Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion to get access to patents for mobile phones, along with another almost two dozen companies. This was on the back of nearly $38 billion in revenue.  The battle with Apple intensified when Apple removed Google Maps from iOS 6 in 2012. But on $50 billion in revenue, Google wasn't worried. They released the Chromebook in 2012 as well as announcing Google Fiber to be rolled out in Kansas City.  They launched Google Drive They bought Waze for just shy of a billion dollars in 2013 to get crowdsourced data that could help bolster what Google Maps was doing. That was on 55 and a half billion in revenue.  In 2014, at $65 billion in revenue, they bought Nest, getting thermostats and cameras in the portfolio.  Pichai, who had worked in product on Drive, Gmail, Maps, and Chromebook took over Android and by 2015 was named the next CEO of Google when Google restructured with Alphabet being created as the parent of the various companies that made up the portfolio. By then they were up to 74 and a half billion in revenue. And they needed a new structure, given the size and scale of what they were doing.  In 2016 they launched Google Home, which has now brought AI into 52 million homes. They also bought nearly 20 other companies that year, including Apigee, to get an API management platform. By then they were up to nearly $90 billion in revenue. 2017 saw revenues rise to $110 billion and 2018 saw them reach $136 billion.  In 2019, Pichai became the CEO of Alphabet, now presiding over a company with over $160 billion in revenues. One that has bought over 200 companies and employs over 123,000 humans. Google's mission is “to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful” and it's easy to connect most of the acquisitions with that goal. I have a lot of friends in and out of IT that think Google is evil. Despite their desire not to do evil, any organization that grows at such a mind-boggling pace is bound to rub people wrong here and there. I've always gladly using their free services even knowing that when you aren't paying for a product, you are the product. We have a lot to be thankful of Google for on this birthday. As Netscape was the symbol of the dot com era, they were the symbol of Web 2.0. They took the mantle for free mail from Hotmail after Microsoft screwed the pooch with that.  They applied math to everything, revolutionizing marketing and helping people connect with information they were most interested in. They cobbled together a mapping solution and changed the way we navigate through cities. They made Google Apps and evolved the way we use documents, making us more collaborative and forcing the competition, namely Microsoft Office to adapt as well. They dominated the mobility market, capturing over 90% of devices. They innovated cloud stacks. And here's the crazy thing, from the beginning, they didn't make up a lot. They borrowed the foundational principals of that original algorithm from RankDex, Gmail was a new and innovative approach to Hotmail, Google Maps was a better Encarta, their cloud offerings were structured similar to those of Amazon. And the list of acquisitions that helped them get patents or talent or ideas to launch innovative services is just astounding.  Chances are that today you do something that touches on Google. Whether it's the original search, controlling the lights in your house with Nest, using a web service hosted in their cloud, sending or receiving email through Gmail or one of the other hundreds of services. The team at Google has left an impact on each of the types of services they enable. They have innovated business and reaped the rewards. And on their 22nd birthday, we all owe them a certain level of thanks for everything they've given us. So until next time, think about all the services you interact with. And think about how you can improve on them. And thank you, for tuning in to this episode of the history of computing podcast. 

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Steve Jurvetson on 20 Years of Friendship with Elon Musk, How To Analyse Market Timing, Why Venture Does Not Scale & Why He Has Never Sold A Share in Any Company He Holds

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2020 55:01


Steve Jurvetson is the Co-Founder @ Future Ventures who announced their debut and flagship $200M Fund in 2019. Steve's incredible portfolio includes the likes of SpaceX, Tesla, Planet, Memphis Meats, Hotmail, and the deep learning companies Mythic and Nervana. Steve also sits on the board of both SpaceX and Tesla. Prior to founding Future, Steve was the co-founder of renowned valley firm Draper Fisher Jurvetson where he led investments in 5 companies that went public in successful IPOs and several others that became billion-dollar acquisitions. In Today’s Episode You Will Learn: 1.) How Steve made his way into the world of startups and Silicon Valley and how that led to his creation of “The Lean Startup Movement”? 2.) How does Steve think about and assess market timing? How does Steve assess technical risk? Given the long term horizons of such deep tech projects, does Steve think we need to change the 10 + 2-year fund life structure? How would Steve like to see funds structured? 3.) Given the sheer size of outcomes if these plays work, how does Steve assess his own price sensitivity? How does Steve approach the challenge there is a lack of downstream investors for such deep tech projects? How does Steve try and catch an industry on the cusp of a transition? 4.) How does Steve assess his own relationship to money? How has it changed over the years? Why does Steve fundamentally believe that venture partnerships do not scale? Where do venture partnerships breakdown? How can one introduce cognitive diversity into a firm? 5.) Having worked with Elon Musk across both SpaceX and Tesla, what does Steve believe makes Elon one of the most gifted entrepreneurs of our time? What is Steve's most memorable moment from his many years of friendship with Elon? What have been his biggest takeaways from SpaceX and Tesla? Items Mentioned In Today’s Show: Steve’s Fave Book: Out Of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World Steve's Most Recent Investment: Prellis Biologic As always you can follow Harry and The Twenty Minute VC on Twitter here! Likewise, you can follow Harry on Instagram here for mojito madness and all things 20VC.

Rise of The Young
Tim Draper - Silicon Valley Billionaire on Investing, The Future of Bitcoin, and The Current State of The Economy

Rise of The Young

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2020 26:52


Tim Draper is an American venture capital investor, and founder of Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Draper University, Draper Venture Network, Draper Associates, and Draper Goren Holm. His most prominent investments include Baidu, Hotmail, Skype, Tesla, SpaceX, AngelList, SolarCity, Ring, Twitter, DocuSign, Coinbase, Robinhood, Ancestry.com, Twitch, Cruise Automation, and Focus Media. In July 2014, Draper received wide coverage for his purchase at a US Marshals Service auction of seized bitcoins from the Silk Road marketplace website. Draper is a major proponent of Bitcoin and decentralization. Learn more about Draper University: https://www.draperuniversity.com/ Follow Tim Draper on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/timdraper/?hl=en Learn more about Tim Draper: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Draper

The Working With... Podcast
Should You Switch To The Latest Apps?

The Working With... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2020 11:57


This week, should you switch to the latest app? Well, it depends and that's the question I am answering this week.   Links: Email Me | Twitter | Facebook | Website The Time Sector Course Carl's Time Sector System Blog Post The FREE Beginners Guide To Building Your Own COD System Carl Pullein Learning Centre Carl's YouTube Channel Carl Pullein Coaching Programmes The Working With… Podcast Previous episodes page   Script Episode 140 Hello and welcome to episode 140 of the Working With Podcast. A podcast to answer all your questions about productivity, time management, self-development and goal planning. My name is Carl Pullein and I am your host for this show. Over the last few months, we've seen the launch of the noting taking app Roam Research and the email app HEY! Both of these apps have received quite a lot of publicity. The question is should you switch to any of these new apps? Well, it does depend on a number of things and that is what I shall talk about in this weeks episode.  Now, before we get to that, I just want to give you a heads up that the 2020 Your Digital Life course will be launching very soon. It's a little late this year because I've completely re-recorded it and updated it with the Time Sector System.  Although this version is now the 3.0 version, anyone already enrolled in the Your Digital Life 2.0 course will, of course, get this huge update completely free. I know, I'm mad! But for me, it's always about helping you to become better organised and more productive. So, keep an eye out for the launch. It's coming very very soon. Okay, it's time for me now to hand you over to the mystery podcast voice for this week's question.  This week's question comes from Jez. Jez asks; hi Carl, what do you think of the new notes app Roam Research and Notion? These new players look like they are taking over from Evernote.  Hi Jez, thank you for your question.  Every few months I get a lot of questions like this on Twitter and my inbox is inundated with app developers asking me to promote their latest offerings and I think it is fantastic that these amazing people are working hard to make our lives easier.  That said, though, App stores can be very dangerous places. You see one of the biggest issues is people app switching every few months because the latest and newest shiny object in the App Store is offering to solve all your productivity problems.  Let's get one thing straight first. No app whether it's new or old, will solve your productivity problems. Ever. Full stop.  You see if you have productivity issues it is not the app that is the problem. I mean, let's be honest here, as a species we survived pretty well with paper-based desk diaries and legal note pads for to-do lists. The issues many faces today, are the exact same issues knowledge workers have faced for decades. It's not the apps. It's the system you use, or not use.  So, there are two parts to this.  If you enjoy trying new apps and your productivity and time management systems keep you on top of your work, then that's great. Go ahead, play, research and learn. It can be fun trying out new apps and seeing what they can do. I do that myself. Last week I played around with HEY! The new email app. And for those you interested, it's not for me. I cannot send emails from my business email address only my HEY! Address. So it's a non-starter. I also do not like being forced to manage my emails in the way the app developer wants me to manage my emails.  There are also some marketing issues here too. Picking a fight with Apple may seem a noble cause, but to me, it smacks of a publicity stunt to get attention. And forcing people to only use their HEY! Email address seems to be exactly the same way Hotmail developed a following in the 1990s. It all feels very fake to me. But that's just my opinion.  Then there's the other side to this. If you believe that if only you have the right set of apps your productivity issues will somehow miraculously be solved, then you are deluding yourself. They won't.  In fact, if you are constantly switching apps, you are compounding your problems because you never give any app a chance to become a part of who you are. You will be constantly playing with feature sets, trying to figure out how to do something and importing your notes, tasks or events into another new app. All of which takes you away from actually doing the work.  The truth is no app with be a perfect fit. You will have to compromise. When I moved to Todoist five or six years ago, I did so coming from an OmniFocus background. I was used to start and due dates. With Todoist you don't get start dates. But the reasons for my move was much bigger than having start and due dates. It was because I was spending too much time in OmniFocus playing with perspectives and was not spending enough time doing the work. Todoist offered me a much simpler way of managing my tasks and it was the right move for me. It solved an issue of productivity for me. I quickly learned I did not need start dates anyway and I was only using them because they were a feature of OmniFocus. And that is the point. If switching to a new app improves your workflow and overall productivity, then your switch was the right thing to do. If, however, it solves nothing and you find yourself back with the same issues you had before, then you've just wasted a lot of precious time. Time you will never get back.  Now with a notes app, this is an interesting place for me. You see, the right notes app for you depends on the way your mind works. I have clients who are incredibly creative and love to doodle in meetings. They love the feel of pen on paper, They think better in images and drawings and charts. For these people, a notes app that allows you to drop images, scans of written notes and use an Apple Pencil or stylus would work fantastically for them.  Then I have clients who think more linearly and prefer written outlining with links to connected ideas and notes. For these people, something like Roam Research or even Workflowy, OmniOutliner or Google Docs works best.  The right notes app for you depends on the way you think.  The same actually goes for your to-do list. If you are a visual person, Trello or Asana are likely to be the best for you. If you are more of a linear thinker, then Todoist, Microsoft ToDo or Apple Reminders would work better. So, when it comes to choosing the right apps for you, you need to consider the way you think and work.  The problem with constant switching is you never learn how to use your app properly or build the all-important trust. If you do not trust your apps, you are less likely to use them properly.  The key to having a great set of apps is you instinctively collect everything into the app without thinking. I've used Todoist and Evernote for so long now, I don't need to think of the steps to get something into my system. It just happens. I have an idea, I pick up my phone or activate the keyboard shortcut on my computer and collect the idea or task. It's an automatic reflex. This is great because I stay focused on what I want to collect, instead of having to take my mind off that and try to remember how to save an idea.  And then we get to processing or organising what you collected. If you are constantly changing your apps you never really learn how to process quickly and efficiently. And with apps like Notion where there are so many customisable elements, the temptation to be constantly fiddling with your set up, the background colours or image means you spend a disproportionate amount of time playing and not enough time getting on with the work that matters.  What it all boils down to is what is it you want to achieve? Do you want to get better organised and become more productive, or do you want distractions and toys?  I agree it is important to keep up with the latest technology, but that should not be at the expense of your efficiency. I know plenty of productive people who still use a Franklin Planner. They routinely do their daily planning, they sharpen the saw and their planners are a gold mine of plans, appointments and tasks. They stick with it because it works and it is a system they trust.  It's your system that really determines whether you are productive or not. Developing your system, and making it work for you is what will improve your time management. The app you use really doesn't matter.  I think about the years I have been using Evernote and the incredible depository of notes, ideas and reference materials I have collected over the ten years of using Evernote is wonderful. Comparing Evernote to it's newer rivals makes Evernote look and feel old fashioned, but it works, it's never let me down (except on iOS which seems to have been fixed now) and I know how to find my notes in seconds. There's no temptation to customise it—you can't anyway— and because it has a fixed structure, I instinctively know how I want to organise my notes.  If I consider the time it would take for me to transfer all my notes from Evernote to something like Notion, it would just be a complete waste of time. I'm sure Notion in many ways looks and feels better than Evernote, but the real question is would it make me more effective? The answer to that is a resounding no. So, while I did try Notion a while ago, I quickly realised it was not going to make my system better or make me more efficient so the time cost involved in switching would not be worth it.  So, fix your system first. Make sure that works and that you use it automatically. Then find apps that work for the way you think, not because they look pretty or are the latest thing reviewers are talking about. All those reviewers will move on to the next things in a few weeks anyway. You will never be able to keep up with them and if you try your productivity will suffer. Just don't do that.  Hopefully, that helps, Jez. Thank you for your question and once again, thank you to you for listening.  It just remains for me now to wish you all. Very very productive week.   

The Tim Ferriss Show
#404: Books I've Loved — Steve Jurvetson

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2019 25:39


Books I've Loved — Steve Jurvetson | Brought to you by Four Sigmatic.Welcome to another episode of The Tim Ferriss Show, where it is my job to sit down with world-class performers of all different types—from startup founders and investors to chess champions to Olympic athletes. This episode, however, is an experiment and part of a shorter series I'm doing called "Books I've Loved." I've invited some amazing past guests, close friends, and new faces to share their favorite books — the books that have influenced them, changed them, and transformed them for the better. I hope you pick up one or two new mentors — in the form of books — from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life.Steve Jurvetson (@jurvetson) is an early-stage venture capitalist with a focus on founder-led, mission-driven companies at the cutting edge of disruptive technology and new industry formation. Steve was the early VC investor in SpaceX, Tesla, Planet, Memphis Meats, Hotmail, and the deep learning companies Mythic and Nervana. He has led founding investments in five companies that went public in successful IPOs and several others that were acquired for a total of over a $100 billion in value creation.Before founding Future Ventures and DFJ before that, Steve was an R&D engineer at Hewlett Packard and worked in product marketing at Apple and NeXT, and management consulting with Bain & Company. He currently serves on the boards of Tesla, SpaceX, and D-Wave.Please enjoy!You can find all books mentioned in this episode in the show notes.This podcast is brought to you by Four Sigmatic. I reached out to these Finnish entrepreneurs after a very talented acrobat introduced me to one of their products, which blew my mind (in the best way possible). It is mushroom coffee featuring Lion's Mane. It tastes like coffee, but there are only 40 milligrams of caffeine, so it has less than half of what you would find in a regular cup of coffee. I do not get any jitters, acid reflux, or any type of stomach burn. It put me on fire for an entire day, and I only had half of the packet.You can try it right now by going to foursigmatic.com/tim and using the code Tim to get 20 percent off your first order. If you are in the experimental mindset, I do not think you'll be disappointed.***If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests.For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Interested in sponsoring the podcast? Please fill out the form at tim.blog/sponsor.Discover Tim’s books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss