Podcasts about American Innovations

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  • 95PODCASTS
  • 150EPISODES
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  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about American Innovations

Latest podcast episodes about American Innovations

American Innovations
Predator Drone | Hellfire | 2

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:09


The Predator proves its value as a “spy in the sky” for the U.S. military in Bosnia in the mid-90s. But it's not until the Predator is handed over to the Air Force that it reaches its full potential. Aided by a covert Air Force group, and a genius scientist known as “The Man With Two Brains,” the Predator is reborn as a lethal killing machine, with a new enemy to hunt: Osama Bin Laden.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!BetterHelp - Listeners of American Innovations get 10% off their first month at betterhelp.com/AI.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Predator Drone | From Albatross to Amber | 1

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:34


What if you could design a spy plane that could be flown remotely and hover in the sky for hours, providing reconnaissance for troops on the ground? In the early 1980s, the visionary inventor Abe Karem begins building drones out of his L.A. garage. Soon, the Pentagon and the CIA take notice. Though he faces many challenges, Karem is on the forefront of a revolution that will change the face of modern aerial warfare.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Pushing Painkillers | An Untapped Market | 1

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:33


Doctors once shied away from using opioids to treat chronic pain, citing the risk of addiction. But in the 1970s, a new generation of doctors started to argue that opioids should be reconsidered, and that allowing terminal patients to suffer in agony is torturous. As the palliative care movement grows, Purdue Frederick, a small pharmaceutical company, sees an opportunity to bring opioids out of the shadows and to the masses...to devastating effect.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Peloton- Learn more at onepeloton.com. New members can try Peloton classes free for 30 days at onepeloton.com/app. Terms apply.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Encore: Organ Transplant | A Short History of Living Longer | 4

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 61:38


In the past 100 years, we've doubled life expectancy. It might be the single greatest achievement of the modern era. So why haven't we done more to celebrate it?On this episode, Rufus Griscom, host of Wondery's “The Next Big Idea,” turns the tables and puts Steven Johnson in the interviewee's seat. They'll discuss Steven's book and PBS series “Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer,” about the many breakthroughs, large and small, that led to our increased longevity.To learn more about “Extra Life,” visit https://stevenberlinjohnson.com/.To hear more episodes of Next Big Idea, follow or subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Amazon, the Wondery app, or wherever you get your podcasts.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Vionic Shoes - Enjoy free shipping at vionicshoes.com with promo code INNOVATIONSBetter Help - Visit betterhelp.com/AI to get 10% off your first monthSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Encore: Organ Transplant | A Matter of Life and Death | 2

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 39:26


By the early 1960s, surgeons have proven that it's possible to transplant kidneys and lungs. Now, with heart disease still the leading cause of death, they've set their sights on performing the first human heart transplant. But first, they've got to overcome the ethical, legal, and surgical challenges of removing a donor's heart before it stops beating for good.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Monday.com - Visit monday.com/podcast for your free two-week trial. Peloton - Learn more at onepeloton.com. New members can try Peloton classes free for 30 days at onepeloton.com/app. Terms apply.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Encore: Organ Transplant | The Kidney Twins | 1

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 44:18


A century ago, organ transplants were the stuff of science fiction. But a handful of experimental surgeons believed that transplants were not just possible – they had the potential to save thousands of lives. Then, in 1954, a man agreed to donate his kidney to his twin brother – and one surgeon finally got his chance to prove the doubters wrong.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Public Rec - Go to PublicRec.com/INNOVATIONS to get 10% off.Vionic Shoes - Enjoy FREE SHIPPING at vionicshoes.com with promo code: INNOVATIONS.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Social Media | Interview: #DearInternet | 4

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 42:55


Facebook, Friendster and MySpace weren't the only companies that pioneered social media. In 2006, a new company turned the act of “tweeting” into an opportunity for wide-ranging commentary, and made your number of “followers” a status symbol. On this episode, Steven talks to Twitter co-founder Biz Stone, who also co-founded Medium.com and wrote the memoir Things a Little Bird Told Me.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Monday.com - Visit Monday.com/podcast for your free two-week trial.ZipRecruiter - Go to ziprecruiter.com/AI, to try ZipRecruiter for free.Nord VPN - Go to NordVPN.com/innovations, or use code innovations to get 73% off your 2-year plan plus 4 bonus months for free. Be quick because this offer is for a limited time only. Plus, there's a 30-Day Money back guarantee if NordVPN is not for you so there's no risk.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Social Media | Move Fast and Break Things | 3

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 42:12


By 2007, Facebook finds itself at a crossroads. Its sole focus has been growing its users and traffic. Now, it needs to turn a profit. Luckily for Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook possesses an invaluable asset: deep knowledge of the personal data and habits of its users. But when Zuckerberg teams up with Sheryl Sandberg to monetize that data, it will create a host of issues that will mire Facebook in controversy.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Peloton - New members can try Peloton classes free for 30 days at onepeloton.com/app. Terms apply.Monday.com - Visit Monday.com/podcast for your free two-week trial. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Social Media | It's Complicated | 2

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 40:17


It's the mid 2000s, and social media is mainstream. MySpace has eclipsed Friendster and been acquired by Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation. Meanwhile, another company is quietly reinventing social media yet again, founded by a college sophomore with a rare combination of technical skill and strong business instincts. His name is Mark Zuckerberg, and his company, The Facebook, will soon challenge MySpace and its new corporate owner for control of the social media landscape.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The History of Computing
The Innovations Of Bell Labs

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 22:18


What is the nature of innovation? Is it overhearing a conversation as with Morse and the telegraph? Working with the deaf as with Bell? Divine inspiration? Necessity? Science fiction? Or given that the answer to all of these is yes, is it really more the intersectionality between them and multiple basic and applied sciences with deeper understandings in each domain? Or is it being given the freedom to research? Or being directed to research? Few have as storied a history of innovation as Bell Labs and few have had anything close to the impact. Bell Labs gave us 9 Nobel Prizes and 5 Turing awards. Their alumni have even more, but those were the ones earned while at Bell. And along the way they gave us 26,000 patents. They researched, automated, and built systems that connected practically every human around the world - moving us all into an era of instant communication. It's a rich history that goes back in time from the 2018 Ashkin Nobel for applied optical tweezers and 2018 Turing award for Deep Learning to an almost steampunk era of tophats and the dawn of the electrification of the world. Those late 1800s saw a flurry of applied and basic research. One reason was that governments were starting to fund that research. Alessandro Volta had come along and given us the battery and it was starting to change the world. So Napolean's nephew, Napoleon III, during the second French Empire gave us the Volta Prize in 1852. One of those great researchers to receive the Volta Prize was Alexander Graham Bell. He invented the telephone in 1876 and was awarded the Volta Prize, getting 50,000 francs. He used the money to establish the Volta Laboratory, which would evolve or be a precursor to a research lab that would be called Bell Labs. He also formed the Bell Patent Association in 1876. They would research sound. Recording, transmission, and analysis - so science. There was a flurry of business happening in preparation to put a phone in every home in the world. We got the Bell System, The Bell Telephone Company, American Bell Telephone Company patent disputes with Elisha Gray over the telephone (and so the acquisition of Western Electric), and finally American Telephone and Telegraph, or AT&T. Think of all this as Ma' Bell. Not Pa' Bell mind you - as Graham Bell gave all of his shares except 10 to his new wife when they were married in 1877. And her dad ended up helping build the company and later creating National Geographic, even going international with International Bell Telephone Company. Bell's assistant Thomas Watson sold his shares off to become a millionaire in the 1800s, and embarking on a life as a Shakespearean actor. But Bell wasn't done contributing. He still wanted to research all the things. Hackers gotta' hack. And the company needed him to - keep in mind, they were a cutting edge technology company (then as in now). That thirst for research would infuse AT&T - with Bell Labs paying homage to the founder's contribution to the modern day. Over the years they'd be on West Street in New York and expand to have locations around the US. Think about this: it was becoming clear that automation would be able to replace human efforts where electricity is concerned. The next few decades gave us the vacuum tube, flip flop circuits, mass deployment of radio. The world was becoming ever so slightly interconnected. And Bell Labs was researching all of it. From physics to the applied sciences. By the 1920s, they were doing sound synchronized with motion and shooting that over long distances and calculating the noise loss. They were researching encryption. Because people wanted their calls to be private. That began with things like one-time pad cyphers but would evolve into speech synthesizers and even SIGSALY, the first encrypted (or scrambled) speech transmission that led to the invention of the first computer modem. They had engineers like Harry Nyquist, whose name is on dozens of theories, frequencies, even noise. He arrived in 1917 and stayed until he retired in 1954. One of his most important contributions was to move beyond printing telegraph to paper tape and to helping transmit pictures over electricity - and Herbert Ives from there sent color photos, thus the fax was born (although it would be Xerox who commercialized the modern fax machine in the 1960s). Nyquist and others like Ralph Hartley worked on making audio better, able to transmit over longer lines, reducing feedback, or noise. While there, Hartley gave us the oscillator, developed radio receivers, parametric amplifiers, and then got into servomechanisms before retiring from Bell Labs in 1950. The scientists who'd been in their prime between the two world wars were titans and left behind commercializable products, even if they didn't necessarily always mean to. By the 40s a new generation was there and building on the shoulders of these giants. Nyquist's work was extended by Claude Shannon, who we devoted an entire episode to. He did a lot of mathematical analysis like writing “A Mathematical Theory of Communication” to birth Information Theory as a science. They were researching radio because secretly I think they all knew those leased lines would some day become 5G. But also because the tech giants of the era included radio and many could see a day coming when radio, telephony, and aThey were researching how electrons diffracted, leading to George Paget Thomson receiving the Nobel Prize and beginning the race for solid state storage. Much of the work being done was statistical in nature. And they had William Edwards Deming there, whose work on statistical analysis when he was in Japan following World War II inspired a global quality movement that continues to this day in the form of frameworks like Six Sigma and TQM. Imagine a time when Japanese manufacturing was of such low quality that he couldn't stay on a phone call for a few minutes or use a product for a time. His work in Japan's reconstruction paired with dedicated founders like Akio Morita, who co-founded Sony, led to one of the greatest productivity increases, without sacrificing quality, of any time in the world. Deming would change the way Ford worked, giving us the “quality culture.” Their scientists had built mechanical calculators going back to the 30s (Shannon had built a differential analyzer while still at MIT) - first for calculating the numbers they needed to science better then for ballistic trajectories, then with the Model V in 1946, general computing. But these were slow; electromechanical at best. Mary Torrey was another statistician of the era who along with Harold Hodge gave us the theory of acceptance sampling and thus quality control for electronics. And basic electronics research to do flip-flop circuits fast enough to establish a call across a number of different relays was where much of this was leading. We couldn't use mechanical computers for that, and tubes were too slow. And so in 1947 John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and William Shockley invented the transistor at Bell Labs, which be paired with Shannon's work to give us the early era of computers as we began to weave Boolean logic in ways that allowed us to skip moving parts and move to a purely transistorized world of computing. In fact, they all knew one day soon, everything that monster ENIAC and its bastard stepchild UNIVAC was doing would be done on a single wafer of silicon. But there was more basic research to get there. The types of wires we could use, the Marnaugh map from Maurice Karnaugh, zone melting so we could do level doping. And by 1959 Mohamed Atalla and Dawon Kahng gave us metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors, or MOSFETs - which was a step on the way to large-scale integration, or LSI chips. Oh, and they'd started selling those computer modems as the Bell 101 after perfecting the tech for the SAGE air-defense system. And the research to get there gave us the basic science for the solar cell, electronic music, and lasers - just in the 1950s. The 1960s saw further work work on microphones and communication satellites like Telstar, which saw Bell Labs outsource launching satellites to NASA. Those transistors were coming in handy, as were the solar panels. The 14 watts produced certainly couldn't have moved a mechanical computer wheel. Blaise Pascal and would be proud of the research his countries funds inspired and Volta would have been perfectly happy to have his name still on the lab I'm sure. Again, shoulders and giants. Telstar relayed its first television signal in 1962. The era of satellites was born later that year when Cronkite televised coverage of Kennedy manipulating world markets on this new medium for the first time and IBM 1401 computers encrypted and decrypted messages, ushering in an era of encrypted satellite communications. Sputnik may heave heated the US into orbit but the Telstar program has been an enduring system through to the Telstar 19V launched in 2018 - now outsourced to a Falcon 9 rocket from Space X. It might seem like Bell Labs had done enough for the world. But they still had a lot of the basic wireless research to bring us into the cellular age. In fact, they'd plotted out what the cellular age would look like all the way back in 1947! The increasing use of computers to do the all the acoustics and physics meant they were working closely with research universities during the rise of computing. They were involved in a failed experiment to create an operating system in the late 60s. Multics influenced so much but wasn't what we might consider a commercial success. It was the result of yet another of DARPA's J.C.R. Licklider's wild ideas in the form of Project MAC, which had Marvin Minsky and John McCarthy. Big names in the scientific community collided with cooperation and GE, Bell Labs and Multics would end up inspiring many a feature of a modern operating system. The crew at Bell Labs knew they could do better and so set out to take the best of Multics and implement a lighter, easier operating system. So they got to work on Uniplexed Information and Computing Service, or Unics, which was a pun on Multics. Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, Doug McIllroy, Joe Assana, Brian Kernigan, and many others wrote Unix originally in assembly and then rewrote it in C once Dennis Ritchie wrote that to replace B. Along the way, Alfred Aho, Peter Weinber, and Kernighan gave us AWSK and with all this code they needed a way to keep the source under control so Marc Rochkind gave us the SCCS, or Course Code Control System, first written for an IBM S/3370 and then ported to C - which would be how most environments maintained source code until CVS came along in 1986. And Robert Fourer, David Gay, and Brian Kernighan wrote A Mathematical Programming Language, or AMPL, while there. Unix began as a bit of a shadow project but would eventually go to market as Research Unix when Don Gillies left Bell to go to the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. From there it spread and after it fragmented in System V led to the rise of IBM's AIX, HP-UX, SunOS/Solaris, BSD, and many other variants - including those that have evolved into the macOS through Darwin, and Android through Linux. But Unix wasn't all they worked on - it was a tool to enable other projects. They gave us the charge-coupled device, which resulted in yet another Nobel Prize. That is an image sensor built on the MOS technologies. While fiber optics goes back to the 1800s, they gave us attenuation over fiber and thus could stretch cables to only need repeaters every few dozen miles - again reducing the cost to run the ever-growing phone company. All of this electronics allowed them to finally start reducing their reliance on electromechanical and human-based relays to transistor-to-transistor logic and less mechanical meant less energy, less labor to repair, and faster service. Decades of innovation gave way to decades of profit - in part because of automation. The 5ESS was a switching system that went online in 1982 and some of what it did - its descendants still do today. Long distance billing, switching modules, digital line trunk units, line cards - the grid could run with less infrastructure because the computer managed distributed switching. The world was ready for packet switching. 5ESS was 100 million lines of code, mostly written in C. All that source was managed with SCCS. Bell continued with innovations. They produced that modem up into the 70s but allowed Hayes, Rockewell, and others to take it to a larger market - coming back in from time to time to help improve things like when Bell Labs, branded as Lucent after the breakup of AT&T, helped bring the 56k modem to market. The presidents of Bell Labs were as integral to the success and innovation as the researchers. Frank Baldwin Jewett from 1925 to 1940, Oliver Buckley from 40 to 51, the great Mervin Kelly from 51 to 59, James Fisk from 59 to 73, William Oliver Baker from 73 to 79, and a few others since gave people like Bishnu Atal the space to develop speech processing algorithms and predictive coding and thus codecs. And they let Bjarne Stroustrup create C++, and Eric Schmidt who would go on to become a CEO of Google and the list goes on. Nearly every aspect of technology today is touched by the work they did. All of this research. Jon Gerstner wrote a book called The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation. He chronicles the journey of multiple generations of adventurers from Germany, Ohio, Iowa, Japan, and all over the world to the Bell campuses. The growth and contraction of the basic and applied research and the amazing minds that walked the halls. It's a great book and a short episode like this couldn't touch the aspects he covers. He doesn't end the book as hopeful as I remain about the future of technology, though. But since he wrote the book, plenty has happened. After the hangover from the breakup of Ma Bell they're now back to being called Nokia Bell Labs - following a $16.6 billion acquisition by Nokia. I sometimes wonder if the world has the stomach for the same level of basic research. And then Alfred Aho and Jeffrey Ullman from Bell end up sharing the Turing Award for their work on compilers. And other researchers hit a terabit a second speeds. A storied history that will be a challenge for Marcus Weldon's successor. He was there as a post-doc there in 1995 and rose to lead the labs and become the CTO of Nokia - he said the next regeneration of a Doctor Who doctor would come in after him. We hope they are as good of stewards as those who came before them. The world is looking around after these decades of getting used to the technology they helped give us. We're used to constant change. We're accustomed to speed increases from 110 bits a second to now terabits. The nature of innovation isn't likely to be something their scientists can uncover. My guess is Prometheus is guarding that secret - if only to keep others from suffering the same fate after giving us the fire that sparked our imaginations. For more on that, maybe check out Hesiod's Theogony. In the meantime, think about the places where various sciences and disciplines intersect and think about the wellspring of each and the vast supporting casts that gave us our modern life. It's pretty phenomenal when ya' think about it.

American Innovations
Social Media | Find Your Friends | 1

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 44:48


Today social media is such a dominant part of our daily lives, it's hard to believe that only 20 years ago, it didn't exist. Then a newly single tech entrepreneur named Jonathan Abrams wondered: What if you could use the internet to expand your network of real-life friends? His simple idea became Friendster, the first social media site, which would change not only how people interact online, but the very nature of human connection and friendship.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations. Support us by supporting our sponsors! ZipRecruiter - Go to ziprecruiter.com/AI, to try ZipRecruiter for free.Nord VPN - Go to NordVPN.com/innovations, or use code innovations to get 73% off your 2-year plan plus 4 bonus months for free. Be quick because this offer is for a limited time only. Plus, there's a 30-Day Money back guarantee if NordVPN is not for you so there's no risk. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Fracking | Interview: The Price of Gas | 4

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 40:08


Families who leased their gas-rich land to fracking companies during the boom are still wrestling with the impact of that decision. On this episode, Steven talks to Eliza Griswold, an award-winning poet, writer and journalist. Her book, “Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America,” won a Pulitzer Prize for its immersive, insightful look into the fracking boom and its effect on Appalachian coal country.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Public Rec - Go to publicrec.com/INNOVATIONS to get 10% off. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Neil on Software
Remote Work’s Effect on American Innovation

Neil on Software

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021


American Innovations
Fracking | Something in the Water | 3

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 41:17


As stories of water contamination and health issues become public, one of the largest grassroots environmental movements in decades emerges to protest fracking. The fracking industry, led by Chesapeake Energy CEO Aubrey McClendon, fights back with lobbyists, PR flacks, and an unlikely ally: the Sierra Club. The battle over fracking will pit neighbor against neighbor, as poor rural communities are torn between the promise of easy money and the desire to protect their land and water.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors! Nord VPN - Go to NordVPN.com/innovations, or use code innovations to get a 2-year plan plus a bonus gift with a huge discount!Monday.com - Visit Monday.com/podcast for your free two-week trial. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Fracking | Land Grab | 2

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 40:10


By the early 2000s, fracking was seen as the most promising new energy industry technology in decades. And when a Penn State geologist discovered that the shale field sitting under Pennsylvania and Upstate New York held over 50 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, the race was on to bring fracking to the Northeast. But in the rush to frack the new field, accidents began to happen, making locals question just how safe this new technique really was.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!ZipRecruiter - Try ZipRecruiter for FREE at ziprecruiter.com/ai.Monday.com - Visit monday.com/podcast for your FREE two-week trial.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thresholds
Rivka Galchen

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 48:59


In this episode, Jordan talks to Rivka Galchen about the projects she never finishes, how hard it is for her to stay in love with an idea, and how often she throws projects away. They also talk about her most recent novel, Everyone Knows Your Mother Is a Witch, which Galchen says came out in a big “love-affair style rush.” Rivka Galchen is the author of Everyone Knows Your Mother is a Witch and is the recipient of a William Saroyan International Prize for Fiction and a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, among other distinctions. She writes regularly for The New Yorker, whose editors selected her for their list of 20 Under 40 American fiction writers in 2010. Her debut novel Atmospheric Disturbances (2008) and her story collection American Innovations were both New York Times Best Books of the Year. She has received an MD from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Galchen lives in New York City. Thanks to Our Sponsors! Try MUBI for 30 Days at MUBI.com/Thresholds. For more Thresholds, visit us at www.thisisthresholds.com -- and be sure to subscribe and review the show on your podcast platform! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

American Innovations
Fracking | The Source Rock | 1

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 46:08


In the late 1970s, oil and natural gas fields across the U.S. were drying up, making the country increasingly dependent on foreign oil. Then, a Texas energy magnate named George Mitchell decided to try extracting natural gas from shale, a layer of rock almost two miles beneath the surface, using a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. His innovation would kick off an energy revolution, and spur a massive environmental backlash.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Monday.com - Visit monday.com/podcast for your free two-week trial. Peloton - New members can try Peloton classes free for 30 days at onepeloton.com/app.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Encore: Heimlich Maneuver | Heimlich's Maneuver | 1

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 43:51


In the 1960s, choking was a national epidemic. In the United States alone, close to 4,000 people were dying from choking every year. Lobster, ham, and hamburger were common culprits. But steak was by far the greatest offender. Coroners called for a solution to these “Cafe Coronaries,” and the medical community responded with weird and dangerous gadgets: vacuum tubes and long tweezers. But Dr. Henry Heimlich knew this problem required something else; a simple technique that anyone can use to save the lives of choking victims—the Heimlich Maneuver. The Heimlich Maneuver would save the lives of thousands of people, including Carrie Fisher, Cher, New York Mayor Ed Koch, and at least one American President. And yet, Dr. Heimlich would spend a decade fighting for the legitimacy of his life-saving maneuver.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!PublicRec - Go to publicrec.com/INNOVATIONS to get 10% off. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Innovations
Cryonics | Suspended Animation | 3

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 44:20


Robert Ettinger was a science teacher and writer who launched the field of cryonics and became its most most fervent ambassador, even choosing to be cryogenically frozen himself. On this episode, Steven talks to filmmakers Josh Koury and Myles Kane. Their documentary short film, We Shall Live Again, is a unique window into the mind of Ettinger and the process of cryopreservation.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors! Peloton - New members can try Peloton classes free for 30 days at onepeloton.com/app. Terms apply.Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

The Maris Review
Episode 110: Rivka Galchen

The Maris Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 28:35


Rivka Galchen is the recipient of a William Saroyan International Prize for Fiction and a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, among other distinctions. She writes regularly for The New Yorker, whose editors selected her for their list of 20 Under 40 American fiction writers in 2010. Her debut novel Atmospheric Disturbances (2008) and her story collection American Innovations were both New York Times Best Books of the Year. She has received an MD from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Galchen lives in New York City. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

American Innovations
Cryonics | Frozen Heroes | 2

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 47:59


Bob Nelson is hoping cryonics will become the business boon he's been expecting. Operating on a shoestring budget and employing the most primitive methods of freezing and storing bodies, Nelson struggles to stay in business. He continues to believe he's one step from the big time. But a series of miscalculations and unforeseen complications leave him on the brink of disaster.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors! ZipRecruiter - Try ZipRecruiter FOR FREE at ziprecruiter.com/ai.Monday.com - Start your free 14-day trial go to monday.com. Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

That's All I Have To Say About That
Congress' 5 New Big Tech Antitrust Solutions, Explained

That's All I Have To Say About That

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 10:53


Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thatsall Congress has proposed five new laws that will help regulators: The American Innovation and Choice Online Act, The Ending Platform Monopolies Act, The Platform Competition and Opportunity Act, The Augmenting Compatibility and Competition by Enabling Service Switching Act, and The Merger Filing Fee Modernization Act. These new laws would update America's antitrust scheme … Continue reading Congress' 5 New Big Tech Antitrust Solutions, Explained →

American Innovations
Cryonics | Immortality On Ice | 1

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 38:42


Not everyone chooses burial or cremation after death. Some believe in cryonics, freezing their bodies in the hopes of being reanimated sometime in the future. Bob Nelson, a TV repairman with no scientific background, made history when he froze the first human being. But as Nelson would discover, freezing someone is easy; keeping them frozen is a lot harder.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovationsSupport us by supporting our sponsors! Monday.com - Sign up for your free two-week trial today at Monday.com.

American Innovations
Storm Chasers | Reaping the Whirlwind | 3

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 43:49


Storm chasing is part scientific inquiry, part amateur thrill seeking — and sometimes, a bit of both. On this episode, Steven talks to journalist Brantley Hargrove, author of The Man Who Caught the Storm, about legendary storm chaser Tim Samaras, whose breakthrough probe helped measure atmospheric conditions inside a tornado.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Monday.com - To start your FREE 14-day trial go to monday.com.

American Innovations
Storm Chasers | Blown Away | 2

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 39:38


Thanks to the movie “Twister” and the popularity of David Hoadley’s “Storm Track” newsletter, by the late 1990s, storm chasing has gone mainstream. But with more and more chasers on the road, it’s only a matter of time before some get a little too close to the eye of the storm. Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Monday.com - Visit monday.com for your free two-week trial.Peloton - Get started on your Peloton journey. Go to onepeloton.com to learn more.

American Innovations
Storm Chasers | Tornado Alley | 1

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 39:36


No extreme weather phenomenon fascinates us more than tornadoes. For most of human history, very little was known about how these graceful yet violent columns of swirling air formed or behaved. Then, in the 1950s, a teenager from North Dakota began chasing them, and a scientist from Japan began studying them. Together, they started a movement.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors! Vonics Shoes - Right now you can enjoy FREE SHIPPING at vionicshoes.com with promo code: INNOVATIONS.Monday.com - Visit monday.com for your free two-week trial.

KERA's Think
What’s The Longest You Can Possibly Live?

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 29:28


Over the last 100 years humans have doubled their life expectancy. How did we make that happen? Steven Johnson is host of the PBS/BBC series “How We Got to Now,” and the “American Innovations” podcast. He joins host Krys Boyd to talk about societal change that has pushed us to live older, fuller lives and why that’s dependent on the greater good. His book is “Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer.”

American Innovations
Hacking | Heroes and Villains of the Digital Age | 4

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 42:32


Hackers helped shape the digital world we live in today. But more than ever, that world is under attack by a new generation of cyber-criminals. On this episode, Steven talks to Wired editor-at-large Steven Levy, author of the seminal book “Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution,” about hacking’s groundbreaking past and weaponized future.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors! Peloton - Go to onepeloton.com to learn more.

American Innovations
Hacking | White Hat vs. Black Hat | 3

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 33:45


For two years, super-hacker Kevin Mitnick eludes the FBI by living under a series of false identities. But in a fit of hubris, he hacks Tsutomu Shimomura, one of the country’s leading computer security experts. It’s hacker vs. hacker as Shimomura sets out to do what the FBI can’t: stop Kevin Mitnick once and for all.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors! Peloton - Go to onepeloton.com to learn more. ZipRecruiter - Try ZipRecruiter FOR FREE at ziprecruiter.com/ai.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Daily Signal Podcast: Trump Allies Join Forces to Fight for ‘America First’ Policy Agenda

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021


Brooke Rollins spent three years working for President Donald Trump in high-profile White House roles at the Office of American Innovation and the Domestic Policy Council. Now, she leads a new group of Trump administration alumni to defend the former president’s policy accomplishments and prepare for the future. The mission of the America First Policy […]

Daily Signal News
Trump Allies Join Forces to Fight for ‘America First’ Policy Agenda

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 27:46


Brooke Rollins spent three years working for President Donald Trump in high-profile White House roles at the Office of American Innovation and the Domestic Policy Council. Now, she leads a new group of Trump administration alumni to defend the former president’s policy accomplishments and prepare for the future.The mission of the America First Policy Institute is to develop and promote policies that put the American people first. “AFPI is truly the defender of the American dream, but also the American people,” Rollins tells me on “The Daily Signal Podcast.”As president and CEO of the new organization, Rollins has assembled a team that includes former Small Business Administration head Linda McMahon, former National Economic Council chief Larry Kudlow, former Energy Secretary Rick Perry, and former National Intelligence Director John Ratcliffe.“I think that no matter what we do as conservatives, we know our policies are righteous and we know that they work, and we know that they truly help those who need help the most,” Rollins says.Also on today's show, we read your letters to the editor and share a good news story about a Texas teacher who was honored by her community in a special way during Teacher Appreciation Week.Enjoy the show! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

American Innovations
Hacking | The John Dillinger of Cyberspace | 2

American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 40:39


In the 1980s, computers, now more powerful and more affordable, become a bigger part of people’s work and life. And that makes hackers a greater threat. America’s laws are slow to keep up with this new form of break-in. Then, an incorrigible teenager with a talent for computers gets caught in the country’s shifting views of hacking, and becomes the most wanted cyber criminal in the United States.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and ad free, and access exclusive seasons of American Innovations with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/innovations.Support us by supporting our sponsors! NetSuite - Let NetSuite show you how they’ll benefit your business with a FREE Product Tour at netsuite.com/AI.ZipRecruiter - Try ZipRecruiter for FREE at ziprecruiter.com/ai.

Institute for Policy Innovation (IPI) Public Policy Podcast
IPI Policy Basics: 'Right to Repair' Is a Trojan Horse and a Threat to American Innovation (Audio: Podcast)

Institute for Policy Innovation (IPI) Public Policy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021


Five Minutes With Robert Nasir
2021-03-28 - Interview with Sean Albert - Five Minutes With Robert Nasir - Episode 56

Five Minutes With Robert Nasir

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 77:42


Robert & Amy interview Sean Albert, an instructor at the Henry Ford Academy in Dearborn Michigan, a charter school located within The Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation!

Uncharted Podcast
Uncharted Podcast #74, Dance In The Chaos: Why The Journey Matters More Than the Destination w/Adam Greenberg

Uncharted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2021 29:53


This week's episode is brought to you by Oracle NetSuite (sign up for a personalized product tour at www.netsuite.com/scale) and Indeed (get a $75 credit for your job post at www.indeed.com/scale). Adam Greenberg is the CEO of iUNU, a Seattle-based startup that provides AI and computer vision technology to help greenhouse growers optimize their operations. iUNU & Mr. Greenberg have been recognized with a Medal of Excellence nomination from Greenhouse Grower, best new indoor growing technology from United Fresh Produce Association, and at age 30, Adam became a member of GPN's 40 Under 40 Class of 2020. Greenberg has been a speaker & panelist at numerous universities, associations, seminars, and conferences such as Hemp Industry Daily, MjBizCon, Indoor AgCon as well as University of Maryland's annual MAVRIC technology conference. Mr. Greenberg created an AI symposium for Congressional staffers on Capitol Hill late last year, Farm Traveler featured Adam on their November 2020 podcast, Informing Choices on a February 2021 podcast, and Mr. Greenberg was a panelist on the IndoorAgCon January 21 webinar on AI & Robotics. Adam founded iUNU in 2013 to revolutionize the greenhouse industry by using machine vision technology and iUNU recently closed its Series A funding of $7 million. His passion for agriculture came from his father who is a botanist and entrepreneur. Mr. Greenberg earned his degrees in Finance and Entrepreneurship from the University of Washington and is a former financial analyst at Amazon. Adam is a member of the Board of Advisors of the Southern Christian Leadership Council's Global Policy Initiative and a member of the Board of Advisors of the Financial Services Innovation Coalition's American Innovation & Opportunity Fund. He is a fifth-generation native of San Francisco and lives in Seattle, Washington where he enjoys traveling and the outdoors. In Mr. Greenberg's own words, “The credit for our success goes to the team at iUNU. Look at the change we're making and look how far we've already come. At the end of the day, our goal is to add value to our customers.” Connect with Adam: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adamgreenberg1/ Connect with Poya Osgouei: https://www.linkedin.com/in/poyaosgouei/ Connect with Robby Allen: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robbyallen/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uncharted1/support

The Wonderland Murders by Hollywood & Crime
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Lie Detector

The Wonderland Murders by Hollywood & Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 8:48


On May 7, 1984, on a blustery day in Seattle, Gary Ridgway sat in an interrogation room. Strapped around his arm was a lie detector. After answering a series of questions, the investigators told him he was free to go. Gary would soon come to be known as one of the most prolific serial killers in United States history. But that day, he had beaten a lie detector test and walked out of the police station a free man. When the lie detector first found its way into police stations it was touted to the press as 100% accurate. But soon the cracks begin to show. Those claiming innocence would fail the tests. And even as The Green River Killer proved he could best the machine its popularity continued to grow. American Innovations: Lie Detector explores the evolution and validity of the Lie Detector. Listen at wondery.fm/liedetector

Hollywood & Crime
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Lie Detector

Hollywood & Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 8:48


On May 7, 1984, on a blustery day in Seattle, Gary Ridgway sat in an interrogation room. Strapped around his arm was a lie detector. After answering a series of questions, the investigators told him he was free to go. Gary would soon come to be known as one of the most prolific serial killers in United States history. But that day, he had beaten a lie detector test and walked out of the police station a free man. When the lie detector first found its way into police stations it was touted to the press as 100% accurate. But soon the cracks begin to show. Those claiming innocence would fail the tests. And even as The Green River Killer proved he could best the machine its popularity continued to grow. American Innovations: Lie Detector explores the evolution and validity of the Lie Detector. Listen at wondery.fm/liedetector

Murder in Hollywoodland
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Lie Detector

Murder in Hollywoodland

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 8:48


On May 7, 1984, on a blustery day in Seattle, Gary Ridgway sat in an interrogation room. Strapped around his arm was a lie detector. After answering a series of questions, the investigators told him he was free to go. Gary would soon come to be known as one of the most prolific serial killers in United States history. But that day, he had beaten a lie detector test and walked out of the police station a free man. When the lie detector first found its way into police stations it was touted to the press as 100% accurate. But soon the cracks begin to show. Those claiming innocence would fail the tests. And even as The Green River Killer proved he could best the machine its popularity continued to grow. American Innovations: Lie Detector explores the evolution and validity of the Lie Detector. Listen at wondery.fm/liedetector

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Mission to Mars

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 5:28


On July 20th, 1989, President George H.W. Bush announced his vision for a manned mission to Mars. Nearly 3 months later, NASA published a complex 30 year plan to get humans to Mars - with a hefty price tag - nearly $450 billion dollars. However, Congress refused to authorize the spending, and NASA’s manned mission to Mars was grounded before it could even get started. Over 30 years later, the power of government and big business necessary for such an undertaking is finally starting to come together and now the next chapter of humankind’s space-race is on. American Innovations: Mission to Mars explores what advancements have been made and what it will take to send humans to Mars. Listen at wondery.fm/missiontomars

Legal Wars
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Mission to Mars

Legal Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 5:28


On July 20th, 1989, President George H.W. Bush announced his vision for a manned mission to Mars. Nearly 3 months later, NASA published a complex 30 year plan to get humans to Mars - with a hefty price tag - nearly $450 billion dollars. However, Congress refused to authorize the spending, and NASA’s manned mission to Mars was grounded before it could even get started. Over 30 years later, the power of government and big business necessary for such an undertaking is finally starting to come together and now the next chapter of humankind’s space-race is on. American Innovations: Mission to Mars explores what advancements have been made and what it will take to send humans to Mars. Listen at wondery.fm/missiontomars

Sports Wars
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Mission to Mars

Sports Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 5:28


On July 20th, 1989, President George H.W. Bush announced his vision for a manned mission to Mars. Nearly 3 months later, NASA published a complex 30 year plan to get humans to Mars - with a hefty price tag - nearly $450 billion dollars. However, Congress refused to authorize the spending, and NASA’s manned mission to Mars was grounded before it could even get started. Over 30 years later, the power of government and big business necessary for such an undertaking is finally starting to come together and now the next chapter of humankind’s space-race is on. American Innovations: Mission to Mars explores what advancements have been made and what it will take to send humans to Mars. Listen at wondery.fm/missiontomars

American History Tellers
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Mission to Mars

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2021 5:14


On July 20th, 1989, President George H.W. Bush announced his vision for a manned mission to Mars. Nearly 3 months later, NASA published a complex 30 year plan to get humans to Mars - with a hefty price tag - nearly $450 billion dollars. However, Congress refused to authorize the spending, and NASA’s manned mission to Mars was grounded before it could even get started. Over 30 years later, the power of government and big business necessary for such an undertaking is finally starting to come together and now the next chapter of humankind’s space-race is on. American Innovations: Mission to Mars explores what advancements have been made and what it will take to send humans to Mars. Listen at wondery.fm/missiontomars

Inside Jaws
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Mission to Mars

Inside Jaws

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2021 5:14


On July 20th, 1989, President George H.W. Bush announced his vision for a manned mission to Mars. Nearly 3 months later, NASA published a complex 30 year plan to get humans to Mars - with a hefty price tag - nearly $450 billion dollars. However, Congress refused to authorize the spending, and NASA’s manned mission to Mars was grounded before it could even get started. Over 30 years later, the power of government and big business necessary for such an undertaking is finally starting to come together and now the next chapter of humankind’s space-race is on. American Innovations: Mission to Mars explores what advancements have been made and what it will take to send humans to Mars. Listen at wondery.fm/missiontomars

Inside Psycho
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Mission to Mars

Inside Psycho

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2021 5:14


On July 20th, 1989, President George H.W. Bush announced his vision for a manned mission to Mars. Nearly 3 months later, NASA published a complex 30 year plan to get humans to Mars - with a hefty price tag - nearly $450 billion dollars. However, Congress refused to authorize the spending, and NASA’s manned mission to Mars was grounded before it could even get started. Over 30 years later, the power of government and big business necessary for such an undertaking is finally starting to come together and now the next chapter of humankind’s space-race is on. American Innovations: Mission to Mars explores what advancements have been made and what it will take to send humans to Mars. Listen at wondery.fm/missiontomars

Fighting Coronavirus, from American Innovations
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Mission to Mars

Fighting Coronavirus, from American Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2021 5:14


On July 20th, 1989, President George H.W. Bush announced his vision for a manned mission to Mars. Nearly 3 months later, NASA published a complex 30 year plan to get humans to Mars - with a hefty price tag - nearly $450 billion dollars. However, Congress refused to authorize the spending, and NASA’s manned mission to Mars was grounded before it could even get started. Over 30 years later, the power of government and big business necessary for such an undertaking is finally starting to come together and now the next chapter of humankind’s space-race is on. American Innovations: Mission to Mars explores what advancements have been made and what it will take to send humans to Mars. Listen at wondery.fm/missiontomars

Inside Star Wars
Wondery Presents American Innovations: Mission to Mars

Inside Star Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2021 5:14


On July 20th, 1989, President George H.W. Bush announced his vision for a manned mission to Mars. Nearly 3 months later, NASA published a complex 30 year plan to get humans to Mars - with a hefty price tag - nearly $450 billion dollars. However, Congress refused to authorize the spending, and NASA’s manned mission to Mars was grounded before it could even get started. Over 30 years later, the power of government and big business necessary for such an undertaking is finally starting to come together and now the next chapter of humankind’s space-race is on. American Innovations: Mission to Mars explores what advancements have been made and what it will take to send humans to Mars. Listen at wondery.fm/missiontomars

Something You Should Know
The Myth of American Innovation & The Fascinating Physics of Life

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2020 53:15


The power of the human mind is amazing. This episode begins with a fascinating example of that. It turns out that how people feel about the medication they take determines how well it works. Things like cost, size of the pill and number of doses will influence your recovery. Listen and finds out how. https://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/05/health/research/05placebo.html There is sure a lot of talk about innovation. Who doesn’t want to be a great innovator? Interestingly though, there isn’t as much innovation going on as you might think and not all innovation is particularly good. Some innovation is actually destructive. That’s according to Andrew Russell, professor of history and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at SUNY Polytechnic Institute and co-author of the book, The Innovation Delusion: How Our Obsession with the New Has Disrupted the Work That Matters Most (https://amzn.to/30nuPon). After you hear what he has to say, you may think differently about what innovation really means. Sometimes it is hard to fall asleep. Listen as I explain a simple technique that will help just about anyone fall asleep faster on those nights where sleep does not come easy. https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/631357/breathing-technique-helps-you-fall-asleep-faster How does your GPS in your car really work? What is 2G, 3G, 4G and 5G mean and what is the difference? Why are there dimples on a golf ball. Why does a balloon stick to the wall after you rub it on your head? The answer to all these questions is : PHYSICS! Joining me to explain all these things and more is Dr. Charles Liu, he is an associate professor at the City University of New York and author of the The Handy Physics Answer Book (https://amzn.to/3cTtxqp) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Legal Wars
Introducing American Innovations: Video Games

Legal Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2020 6:04


Gone are the days of Pong and Spacewars, but their legacies live on in the video games of today through augmented reality, worldwide tournaments, and professional gamer leagues. But this trillion dollar global industry had humble beginnings. Not so long ago, video games were almost exclusively played by the programmers who made them. Wondery’s latest season of American Innovations is all about video games — who plays them, who makes them, and how they made their way out of a programmer’s computer and into living rooms across the world. Binge the full season now at http://wondery.fm/legalwars_AI.

Tides of History
Introducing American Innovations: Video Games

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2020 5:44


Gone are the days of Pong and Spacewars, but their legacies live on in the video games of today through augmented reality, worldwide tournaments, and professional gamer leagues. But this trillion dollar global industry had humble beginnings. Not so long ago, video games were almost exclusively played by the programmers who made them. Wondery’s latest season of American Innovations is all about video games — who plays them, who makes them, and how they made their way out of a programmer’s computer and into living rooms across the world. Binge the full season now at http://wondery.fm/innovations_TOH.

Business Wars
Introducing American Innovations: Video Games

Business Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2020 5:54


Gone are the days of Pong and Spacewars, but their legacies live on in the video games of today through augmented reality, worldwide tournaments, and professional gamer leagues. But this trillion dollar global industry had humble beginnings. Not so long ago, video games were almost exclusively played by the programmers who made them. Wondery’s latest season of American Innovations is all about video games — who plays them, who makes them, and how they made their way out of a programmer’s computer and into living rooms across the world. Binge the full season now at http://wondery.fm/businesswars_AI.