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Words of affirmation (yes) and negation or contradiction (no)

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  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about nope

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Latest podcast episodes about nope

Fundamental Health with Paul Saladino, MD
Acid/Alkaline balance on an Animal Based diet

Fundamental Health with Paul Saladino, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:09


Plant-based pundits love to bloviate about the benefits of eating an "alkaline" diet, but is there any real science to support this?    Nope.    In this week's edition of Controversial Thoughts (available here and all podcast feeds as well as YouTube) I dig into the acid/alkaline balance and note how adding some fruit to a carnivore diet (= Animal Based diet, voila!) can be beneficial from a urinary pH perspective - which probably also reflects interstitial pH.    As I noted in last week's controversial thoughts, infants self-select for a balance of acidic/alkaline foods. Might be something for us to think about as adults, also.    #theremembering

Der YeahFußball-Podcast
Der Guttmann-Fluch

Der YeahFußball-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 25:56


Der Guttmann-Fluch bringt Fans von Benfica Lissabon auch heutzutage noch ins Schwitzen. Denn der ehemalige Trainer Béla Guttmann hatte diesen Fluch 1962 in der Stunde des Triumphes ausgesprochen. Damals hatte Benfica Lissabon gerade das Finale des Europapokals der Landesmeister gegen Real Madrid gewonnen. Es war der zweite Europapokal-Titel in Folge. Béla Guttmann wollte einen Bonus bzw. mehr Gehalt, doch die Klubführung ging nicht darauf ein. Daraufhin verfluchte Béla Guttmann Benfica Lissabon mit den Worten, dass Benfica in den nächsten 100 Jahren kein internationales Finale mehr gewinnen würde. Doch wer war Béla Guttmann überhaupt? Irgendein Irrer? Nope! Béla Guttmann zählt zu den großen Trainern der Fußball-Geschichte. Ein Globetrotter, der als Trainer in 25 Jahren bei 40 Vereine arbeitete. Dabei ging das 4-2-4-System auf seine Kappe. Und Benfica? Die standen häufiger in einem Finale, doch konnten den Fluch bisher nicht brechen. Alles über diesen Fluch und Béla Guttmann gibt es in dieser Episode.

WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE (with doctor shannon) | Stop Drowning | Start Sipping | Daily Inspiration | Hope | Certainty | Abundanc

It's about redefining GOOD and great. Good is part of great. So how do you go from good to great? Human nature has this way of making us focus on the one “good” versus all the great. Why is that? Do you catch yourself doing this often in your own life? When it's good, does it have to be great? What would make it great? We look at our lives, and oftentimes forget to be grateful for the great because we're focusing on the good. OR we forget to be grateful for the good because we're comparing it to GREAT (or our definition of what we think GREAT "should be.") TRUTH is what makes "GREAT." Feedback is good, but remember it's only FEEDBACK. Look at what you desire, and clearly define (redefine) what would make it great for you. Let's not forget the 5-Star experiences because we're focusing on the 4-Star ones, nor overlook the 4-Star ones because we're comparing them to others. Does better make BEST? Does it make GREAT? Nope. Knowing the TRUTH does. It's what allows us to live in freedom. And freedom is both good AND great! TODAY'S SACRED S.O.L. STEP: 1. Please let me know what would make this podcast a 5/5 experience for you. 2. Please give the podcast a RATING and REVIEW on iTunes and/or Stitcher.  THANK YOU SO MUCH! I really appreciate it and YOU. Thank you for being here, and allowing me to Sip On Life with you. If you've been feeling like you're stuck, overwhelmed, or perhaps you still feel like you're drowning in your life, please don't hesitate to reach out. YOU ARE NOT ALONE... Request a FREE copy of my best-selling book, Date Yourself Well — The Best-Selling 12 Engagements Of Becoming The Great Lover Of Your Life (all you'll pay for is shipping.) www.dateyourselfwell.com If you've received value from the podcast, please let me know. I'd LOVE to hear from you — please email me at: drshannon@doctorshannon.com AND PLEASE TELL YOUR BESTIES AND INVITE THEM TO SIP ON LIFE WITH US. FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM @doctorshannon! See you there... And learn about an incredible opportunity for a select sacred group of 25 women who are ready and willing to RISE UP AND BE THE WOMAN. If you've been feeling like you're stuck, overwhelmed, or perhaps you still feel like you're drowning, please don't hesitate to reach out. I'd be more than happy to schedule a Discovery Call with you to see if Healing Life Coaching is a good fit for you. Email me at drshannon@doctorshannon.com Come over to the WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE S.O.L. MOVEMENT Closed FB Group and Join the MOVEMENT: https://www.facebook.com/groups/WSOLMovement/ By the way, if you haven't already listened/downloaded my new song (EPISODE 291), you can also listen to it here: letsnottalkaboutex.com, and cast your vote for your favorite version. Visit WomenSippingOnLife.com for more free resources, including my CHECKLIST FOR CHANGE, Engagement Checklist + Evaluation Rating, Six Sacred S.O.L. DATE Secrets…and a FREE copy of my best-selling book, Date Yourself Well. You can also check out my Dr. Shannon Facebook Page for more daily S.O.L. TRAINING. I look forward to seeing you again tomorrow. Please invite your best girlfriends to come and join our S.O.L. PARTY. xo Dr. Shannon. Inspiring minds that want to grow and hearts that want to know, so you can love you, your life, and your life's work well. ONE SIP AT A TIME. A special thanks to the following souls for helping me launch our WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE podcast… Intro/Outro done by UNI V. SOL  Outro music by Jay Man: Mind Over Matter (www.ourmusicbox.com)  Podcast cover design and web site done by: Pablo Aguilar (www.webdesigncreator.com) Podcast cover photo by Kate Montague of KM Captured (www.kmcaptured.com)

John & Tammy in the Morning on KSON
Dan + Shay Talk San Diego Show This Saturday!

John & Tammy in the Morning on KSON

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:45


We learned something about Dan + Shay this morning that we never knew before, they are the most DIY artists ever! Do the have one of their "people" call us and connect them? Nope! They do it themselves! We love these guys so much and it was so fun to catch up this morning and talk about their show this Saturday at Pechanga Arena.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nope! Too Creepy
"We broke into a museum. I can't unsee what we found."

Nope! Too Creepy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:44


A group of drunk friends break into a local museum, and stumble upon a hidden exhibit filled with unimaginable nightmares.

Bearing Arms' Cam & Co
Taking On The 2A Lie That Just Won't Die

Bearing Arms' Cam & Co

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 24:04


Was the Second Amendment really put in place to protect the power of slave owners instead of the right to own and carry firearms? Nope, though anti-gun scholars are once again promoting that baseless theory. Second Amendment attorney and scholar Stephen Halbrook joins Cam to talk about the real history of the right to keep and bear arms, and why this particular 2A lie just won't die.

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast
Episode 175: Tim Ohai on Strategic Decision-Making to Lead Transformation

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:49


Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast, I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space, and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs. Today, I’m excited to have Tim Ohai from Workday join us. Tim. I would love for you to introduce yourself, your role in your organization to our audience. Tim Ohai: Hey, aloha everybody. This is Tim Ohai and I am a director at Workday. We provide cloud-based solutions in HR, and fins, and strategic sourcing, and employee engagement areas. I work specifically with our Salesforce globally around helping them figure out how to be better in the conversations and interactions they’re in. And we work heavily with not only the AEs, but the RSDs, the RVPs, and then cross-functionally with our pre-sales organization and value, etc. And I get to play in all those spaces. SS: I love that, Tim. And we’re so excited to have you here today. We’ve been connected for some time and on LinkedIn, you actually wrote an article earlier this year on the impact of poor decision-making. So I’d love to start there with our conversation. What are some of the factors that can drive poor decision-making for business leaders these days and how can poor decision-making impact the organization? TO: Wow. So, yeah, that’s a huge topic because I’ll lead off with this idea that the number one reason that businesses fail is poor decision-making. And you could take that down to initiatives and projects, etc. Decision-making is where you not only get off on the right foot, but you stay on the right foot all the way through to execution. The biggest problem I see is there’s often a lack of clarity of what success looks like and in that article you mentioned, I talk about goal clarity and role clarity, and they’re huge. Man, go back to the 1970s and then the eighties with GE when they were pushing really hard to be a number one or number two in their industries and one of the things that they drove, part of the secret of their success back then, was to make sure people had goal clarity and role clarity. The result is, if you make it really clear what success looks like and bring people into alignment so they all have the same goal, they’re all pursuing the same definition of success, it’s amazing how people naturally just clean up in their efforts. The same thing then comes right down with role clarity. If you know what the goal is, and everybody is doing their job and not undoing somebody else’s job or redoing somebody else’s job, it changes the entire execution. So all of those elements are contingent upon great decision-making. Unfortunately, A, we don’t provide that clarity so people wind up making their own information up as they go and that affects decision-making in the moment. And B, we have a tendency to inject a lot of bias in how we think, so if we don’t have that information, we don’t have that clarity, then you wind up seeing leaders actually stumble over each other. Well-intentioned, wonderful human beings are literally causing conflict in their own organizations and it’s really true. It’s really true in sales enablement. So when I think about how poor decision-making impacts an organization, I have to think about how great decision-making impacts an organization. That’s where I would say, what can you do as a sales enablement professional to both surface that idea, bring it into the discussion and say, okay, how can we make sure that we’ve got clarity? Because if you’re asking the question, what does success look like? You can go one step further and say, what’s the outcome you’re looking for? What are the metrics we’re going to apply? And what are the requirements you’re expecting as a sponsor of this initiative that we should all know? I’m amazed at how often those three questions get, well, I won't say blank stares, but you will get senior leaders and senior executives going, that’s a great question, I haven’t thought that through. So it cleans up dramatically, not only your alignment with your executive sponsor, but all of a sudden when that is stated and then shared, everybody starts moving in the same direction without even telling people they need to make better decisions, they’re going to. SS: I love that and I think that leads into the next question. I’d love some advice for our audience. What are some things that leaders, from your perspective, can do to make better, more impactful decisions? TO: Well, that whole definition of success conversation is critical, I start there. Actually, I’ll start with who’s the sponsor and what’s their definition of success? People often say it’s got to be better and I go, well, so that’s not very specific, walk me through the outcome that they’re really looking for and how we’re going to measure it. If people have that answer, fantastic, we aligned very quickly. If they don’t, then it becomes a door opener. Should we go talk to that person now and ask them directly? Or can you do that? It’s always better, of course, to go there with that person, but it’s not always possible. But when you get that clarity, one of the things I’ll ask is, especially if I’m talking to the leader directly, I’ll ask him or her I’ll say, “Hey, are you saying that if we achieve this outcome, we measure it this way, and we meet the requirements that you just stated, and I’ll list them out, you promise you won’t complain about anything else?” That last question it’s incredibly crystallizing because if a leader is spot-on then they go, “Nope,” and that’s exactly what I want. Fantastic, we’re ready to run. But if they have that intake of air, they go, “Oh let me think for a second,” it completely changes the entire dialogue and goes one click deeper and you really make sure you’re getting those spoken and unspoken things figured out. But the key here is that you're having that leader say something that they may have only said in their head. If you can really master that conversation, all the other things that are in your toolkit open up. If you take away that conversation, all the other tools in your toolkit become an extra weight to carry. SS: Now you alluded to data earlier in your response and you also wrote an article on how to make data meaningful. I’d love to learn from you, how can sales enablement leverage data to make better decisions and what is the impact of doing so? TO: Sure. So in that article, I talked about how a lot of times we over-rotate into our pipeline data and my experience, actually what we do at Workday and what we teach our leaders as an expectation, even we’re changing how we run our QBRs, lead with the people data first. Your people data are driving what you’re seeing on your pipeline data. So if you have great results, or you have horrible results, or you have in-between results, at least 80% of the time, that’s going to be driven by people's gaps or people's strengths. So when I talk about people data, I’m looking at the classic stuff like, do we even have people enrolled? So in some places, especially right now with a great resignation, there is a lot of open headcounts and at the same time, we’re calling it the great swap, because there are some people leaving, but there are people coming in. We have this nether space to fill, but at the same time, it’s going deeper. So people data for us is around the capabilities of the individual players, not just AEs, but also the sales leaders themselves. So we have two different frameworks and that people data tells us that if people struggle, for example with account planning, we have correlational data from our analysis that says, “Hey, that’s going to affect your win rate.” Or we have a gap in deal size, or we see some groups are doing better than others. We can go into the people data and see which capabilities are driving win rate and which capabilities are driving deal size and get very specific by market. We can then tie into how we do things with other leaders, like around recruiting or even promotion and saying, “You want to copy your best performers? Then use this people data to drive those sales results. From this, we’re literally seeing regions around the globe turn around their performance by leveraging people data before their pipe data and that's the game-changer. Unfortunately, if you only focus on pipe first and maybe people data comes later, or if people data comes at all, you want to play whack-a-mole. How do we increase our win rate? How do we get deals? How do we get better velocity? How do we get all of those different things, better presentation rates, et cetera? It’s just whack-a-mole and you’re going to constantly be chasing after KPI busting instead of actually driving a true revenue engine. SS: Absolutely. I love the whack-a-mole analogy. I was playing that with my son yesterday. TO: Hey folks, if you’re laughing at whack-a-mole or more important, or you’re living in whack-a-mole, trust me, we all are. SS: No, I love that. Now you mentioned this earlier and you also actually wrote an article on this, which we’ll share with our audience later, that when functions within an organization compete with each other, that time and resources are just completely wasted. So how can sales enablement gain internal alignment to kind of help increase that efficiency and maximize business impact across the organization by creating a sense of collaboration? TO: So that’s a huge topic, right? So let’s back up. We open with, how do we really drive a great business? With decision-making and one of the most important decisions you can make is how you prioritize. I go so far as to say, prioritization is the Achilles' heel of strategy. You can have a great strategy, I mean, a phenomenal strategy, and you can have really smart people, really highly collaborative inputs, but when it comes to execution if you don’t prioritize appropriately, what’s going to happen is either, A, everything is a priority therefore for nothing is, and or, B, resources will be used in the wrong way. So because you didn’t prioritize accordingly, you don’t have the resources you need when you’re in the middle of execution. That is what I’m talking about when I see functions competing with each other, whether it’s marketing and sales, or business development, or enablement, and field sales ops, and corporate sales ops and all these other groups because everybody is trying to help. Let’s just pause and recognize that nobody’s trying to break this thing. Everybody’s trying to help, but if we don’t prioritize together and really create a unified roadmap then we’re going to struggle to execute. That is when you start getting into how to get a much tighter, shorter list of focused objectives? Then we put everything we have behind the shorter, tighter list. That’s really the key here. SS: Absolutely. Now I want to close on a question, because from my perspective and I’d be willing to bet you agree with me Tim, I do believe that sales enablement is a significantly strategic arm of the business within any organization and in particular, I think that they are uniquely positioned to help the executive team set the strategy within the business. I want to kind of tie that back into the topic at hand. How, from your perspective, is enablement uniquely positioned to help executive leaders in their decision-making? As an enablement leader, what are some of your best practices for bringing insights to the leadership team to help inform their strategy? TO: Wow. So this could be its own podcast by itself. It’s really big. It’s a big thing because if you don't position yourself as a true business partner with your business leaders, you’re going to lose your credibility and credibility is our currency. It’s true in sales and it’s very true in enablement. If you don’t have credibility, you’ve got no resources, so to speak, to be able to leverage when it comes to making a difference in the business. I want to be very clear on what I say, so I’ve got three points for this question. The first one is, start with understanding is the request from the business or the need for the business to transform or optimize? Because if you’re putting a lot of your time and energy behind optimizing things, when the real need is to transform, you’re going to lose your credibility. Then you’ll be given what I’ll call the tactical projects and everybody’s got onboarding, we all get that, but you may be just onboarding. That may be all you get to do because just make it better, just fix it, just to keep it going. If you really need to understand how to position yourself differently, that is a whole other discussion. But, start with understanding is the need to transform or is the need to optimize? Transformation, I always challenge or I press and lean in on the conversation, so I'll go, “So how much disruption are you asking me to generate? Because if you’re not going to give me permission to disrupt, I cannot transform. Or if you want me to optimize, then I get the goal of optimization is to minimize or reduce disruption,” and have that discussion as well. That’s first and foremost because that sets your strategy and unfortunately, sometimes you get in a case where you get transformation overload. Everything has changed and you just need to stop and pause and say, “Look, leaders, stakeholders, everyone. Let’s calm down for a minute. Let’s pull the firehose back. Can we go spend some time, maybe a quarter, maybe a year on just reinforcing what we’ve already transformed and just optimize it? One of our leaders talks about extra coats of paint. Can we just get extra coats of paints on this thing and even just give it time to dry? If you do that, just by that alone, you’re going to position yourself as a huge business advisor to the leaders that you’re serving. Secondly then, is to focus on manager enablement. The number one enablement you can give any AE is a great manager and that is beyond salespeople. Invest in leadership development and invest in manager enablement. The way I kind of test how we’re doing overall as an industry is, how many individual seller podcasts are out there versus how many sales leader podcasts are out there? There are a few really good ones. One of my favorites I’ll give a shout-out to is Mike Weinberg, just as a person, he gets this, but generally speaking, there is a constant appetite for leaders to find stuff and they have to often go outside of sales leadership and get into generic leadership, where there is a gap in how we provide manager enablement. But, if you can be that gap, if you could bring in your own leaders, do your own internal podcasts, that’d be huge. But it’s beyond podcasts, it’s really about getting involved and helping people grow and develop into the best version of themselves as a senior leader and not as an individual contributor. Lastly, that gets right into this third point of are you trying to fix the system, or are you trying to fix the function? Not everybody has this mandate though, so I want to be careful here with this last one because this is a little bit of playing with fire. But, our reality is that our customers need us to show up in the most coordinated way possible and that means we need to think like systems thinkers, not just function thinkers. It’s not just about helping sales, it’s about helping the sales experience and more importantly, that customer experience and designing backward. I love the way that we’re starting to talk now about the customer journey and that broader, bigger perspective of how do we design backward from that customer’s experience, from the very beginning and all the way through to renewal? We need to be thinking around that whole system because it’s the content, it’s the technology and tools, it’s the behaviors, and it’s the coordination of all those things that come together. If you really, really, really want to change your game as an enablement pro, go there. SS: I love that, Tim. Thank you so much for taking the time out to join our podcast and provide this advice to our audience. I really appreciate the time, Tim. Thank you. TO: My genuine pleasure. SS: To our audience, thanks for listening. For more insights, tips, and expertise from sales enablement leaders, visit salesenablement.pro. If there's something you'd like to share or a topic you'd like to learn more about, please let us know. We'd love to hear from you.

Flowdreaming for Self-Love & Co-creating
656: What Is Manifesting and Does It Actually Work?

Flowdreaming for Self-Love & Co-creating

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:31


Aren't these the million-dollar questions! Summer walks you through 6 rules for understanding what manifesting is, how it works, and for discovering the best technique for you. And don't for a second think this is an episode for newbies. Nope, these insights are deep and rich. Enjoy! To read the blog that inspired this episode, visit https://www.flowdreaming.com/what-is-manifesting/

3-bit Gamer Show
Episode 235 - Nope Terson

3-bit Gamer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 71:01


Peterson's out this week, and Jenna does a great job filling in his gigantic shoes. We talk about the massive Twitch leak, Amazon's New World servers, and JD gives Carl's Jr. a fudos. Later, Jenna compares and contrasts Ghosts of Tsushima and Kena: Bridge of Spirits, then JD and Trent give a First Impression Rose to Metroid Dread.

Screaming in the Cloud
Changing the Way We Interview with Emma Bostian

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:30


About EmmaEmma Bostian is a Software Engineer at Spotify in Stockholm. She is also a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast, author of Decoding The Technical Interview Process, and an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters.Links: Ladybug Podcast: https://www.ladybug.dev LinkedIn Learning: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/emma-bostian Frontend Masters: https://frontendmasters.com/teachers/emma-bostian/ Decoding the Technical Interview Process: https://technicalinterviews.dev Twitter: https://twitter.com/emmabostian TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the weird things that I've found in the course of, well, the last five years or so is that I went from absolute obscurity to everyone thinking that I know everyone else because I have thoughts and opinions on Twitter. Today, my guest also has thoughts and opinions on Twitter. The difference is that what she has to say is actually helpful to people. My guest is Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify, which is probably, if we can be honest about it, one of the least interesting things about you. Thanks for joining me.Emma: Thanks for having me. That was quite the intro. I loved it.Corey: I do my best and I never prepare them, which is a blessing and a curse. When ADHD is how you go through life and you suck at preparation, you've got to be good at improv. So, you're a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast. Let's start there. What is that podcast? And what's it about?Emma: So, that podcast is just my three friends and I chatting about career and technology. We all come from different backgrounds, have different journeys into tech. I went the quote-unquote, “Traditional” computer science degree route, but Ali is self-taught and works for AWS, and Kelly she has, like, a master's in psychology and human public health and runs her own company. And then Sydney is an awesome developer looking for her next role. So, we all come from different places and we just chat about career in tech.Corey: You're also an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters. I'm going to guess just based upon the name that you are something of a frontend person, which is a skill set that has constantly eluded me for 20 years, as given evidence by every time I've tried to build something that even remotely touches frontend or JavaScript in any sense.Emma: Yeah, to my dad's disdain, I have stuck with the frontend; he really wanted me to stay backend. I did an internship at IBM in Python, and you know, I learned all about assembly language and database, but frontend is what really captures my heart.Corey: There's an entire school of thought out there from a constituency of Twitter that I will generously refer to as shitheads that believe, “Oh, frontend is easy and it's somehow less than.” And I would challenge anyone who holds that perspective to wind up building an interface that doesn't look like crap first, then come and talk to me. Spoiler, you will not say that after attempting to go down that rabbit hole. If you disagree with this, you can go ahead and yell at me on Twitter so I know where you're hiding, so I can block you. Now, that's all well and good, but one of the most interesting things that you've done that aligns with topics near and dear to my heart is you wrote a book.Now, that's not what's near and dear to my heart; I have the attention span to write a tweet most days. But the book was called Decoding the Technical Interview Process. Technical interviewing is one of those weird things that comes up from time to time, here and everywhere else because it's sort of this stylized ritual where we evaluate people on a number of skills that generally don't reflect in their day-to-day; it's really only a series of skills that you get better by practicing, and you only really get to practice them when you're interviewing for other jobs. That's been my philosophy, but again, I've written a tweet on this; you've written a book. What's the book about and what drove you to write it?Emma: So, the book covers everything from an overview of the interview process, to how do you negotiate a job offer, to systems design, and talks about load balancing and cache partitioning, it talks about what skills you need from the frontend side of things to do well on your JavaScript interviews. I will say this, I don't teach HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in-depth in the book because there are plenty of other resources for that. And some guy got mad at me about that the other day and wanted a refund because I didn't teach the skills, but I don't need to. [laugh]. And then it covers data structures and algorithms.They're all written in JavaScript, they have easy to comprehend diagrams. What drove me to write this is that I had just accepted a job offer in Stockholm for a web developer position at Spotify. I had also just passed my Google technical interviews, and I finally realized, holy crap, maybe I do know what I'm doing in an interview now. And this was at the peak of when people were getting laid off due to COVID and I said, “You know what? I have a lot of knowledge. And if I have a computer science degree and I was able to get through some of the hardest technical interviews, I think I should share that with the community.”Because some people didn't go through a CS degree and don't understand what a linked list is. And that's not their fault. It's just unfortunately, there weren't a lot of great resources—especially for web developers out there—to learn these concepts. Cracking the Coding Interview is a great book, but it's written in backend language and it's a little bit hard to digest as a frontend developer. So, I decided to write my own.Corey: How much of the book is around the technical interview process as far as ask, “Here's how you wind up reversing linked lists,” or, “Inverting a binary tree,” or whatever it is where you're tracing things around without using a pointer, how do you wind up detecting a loop in a recursive whatever it is—yeah, as you can tell, I'm not a computer science person at all—versus how much of it is, effectively, interview 101 style skills for folks who are even in non-technical roles could absorb?Emma: My goal was, I wanted this to be approachable by anyone without extensive technical knowledge. So, it's very beginner-friendly. That being said, I cover the basic data structures, talking about what traditional methods you would see on them, how do you code that, what does that look like from a visual perspective with fake data? I don't necessarily talk about how do you reverse a binary tree, but I do talk about how do you balance it if you remove a node? What if it's not a leaf node? What if it has children? Things like that.It's about [sigh] I would say 60/40, where 40% is coding and technical stuff, but maybe—eh, it's a little bit closer to 50/50; it kind of depends. I do talk about the take-home assessment and tips for that. When I do a take-home assessment, I like to include a readme with things I would have done if I had more time, or these are performance trade-offs that I made; here's why. So, there's a lot of explanation as to how you can improve your chances at moving on to the next round. So yeah, I guess it's 50/50.I also include a section on tips for hiring managers, how to create an inclusive and comfortable environment for your candidates. But it's definitely geared towards candidates, and I would say it's about 50/50 coding tech and process stuff.Corey: One of the problems I've always had with this entire industry is it feels like we're one of the only industries that does this, where we bring people in, and oh, you've been an engineer for 15 years at a whole bunch of companies I've recognized, showing career progression, getting promoted at some of them transitioning from high-level role to high-level role. “Great, we are so glad that you came in to interview. Now, up to the whiteboard, please, and implement FizzBuzz because I have this working theory that you don't actually know how to code, and despite the fact that you've been able to fake your way through it at big companies for 15 years, I'm the one that's going to catch you out with some sort of weird trivia question.” It's this adversarial, almost condescending approach and I don't see it in any other discipline than tech. Is that just because I'm not well-traveled enough? Is that because I'm misunderstanding the purpose of all of these things? Or, what is this?Emma: I think partially it was a gatekeeping solution for a while, for people who are comfortable in their roles and may be threatened by people who have come through different paths to get to tech. Because software engineer used to be an accredited title that you needed a degree or certification to get. And in some countries it still is, so you'll see this debate sometimes about calling yourself a software engineer if you don't have that accreditation. But in this day and age, people go through boot camps, they can come from other industries, they can be self-taught. You don't need a computer science degree, and I think the interview process has not caught up with that.I will say [laugh] the worst interview I had was at IBM when I was already working there. I was already a web developer there, full-time. I was interviewing for a role, and I walked into the room and there were five guys sitting at a table and they were like, “Get up to the whiteboard.” It was for a web development job and they quizzed me about Java. And I was like, “Um, sir, I have not done Java since college.” And they were like, “We don't care.”Corey: Oh, yeah, coding on a whiteboard in front of five people who already know the answer—Emma: Horrifying.Corey: —during a—for them, it's any given Tuesday, and for you, it is a, this will potentially determine the course that your career takes from this point forward. There's a level of stress that goes into that never exists in our day-to-day of building things out.Emma: Well, I also think it's an artificial environment. And why, though? Like, why is this necessary? One of the best interviews I had was actually with Gatsby. It was for an open-source maintainer role, and they essentially let me try the product before I bought it.Like, they let me try out doing the job. It was a paid process, they didn't expect me to do it for free. I got to choose alternatives if I wanted to do one thing or another, answer one question or another, and this was such an exemplary process that I always bring it up because that is a modern interview process, when you are letting people try the position. Now granted, not everyone can do this, right? We've got parents, we've got people working two jobs, and not everyone can afford to take the time to try out a job.But who can also afford a five-stage interview process that still warrants taking vacation days? So, I think at least—at the very least—pay your candidates if you can.Corey: Oh, yeah. One of the best interviews I've ever had was at a company called Three Rings Design, which is now defunct, unfortunately, but it was fairly typical ops questions of, “Yeah, here's an AWS account. Spin up a couple EC2 instances, load balance between them, have another one monitored. You know, standard op stuff. And because we don't believe in asking people to work for free, we'll pay you $300 upon completion of the challenge.”Which, again, it's not huge money for doing stuff like that, but it's also, this shows a level of respect for my time. And instead of giving me a hard deadline of when it was due, they asked me, “When can we expect this by?” Which is a great question in its own right because it informs you about a candidate's ability to set realistic deadlines and then meet them, which is one of those useful work things. And they—unlike most other companies I spoke with in that era—were focused on making it as accommodating for the candidate as possible. They said, “We're welcome to interview you during the workday; we can also stay after hours and have a chat then, if that's more convenient for your work schedule.”Because they knew I was working somewhere else; an awful lot of candidates are. And they just bent over backwards to be as accommodating as possible. I see there's a lot of debate these days in various places about the proper way to interview candidates. No take-home because biases for people who don't have family obligations or other commitments outside of work hours. “Okay, great, so I'm going to come in interview during the day?” “No. That biases people who can't take time off.” And, on some level, it almost seems to distill down to no one likes any way that there is of interviewing candidates, and figuring out a way that accommodates everyone is a sort of a fool's errand. It seems like there is no way that won't get you yelled at.Emma: I think there needs to be almost like a choose your own adventure. What is going to set you up for success and also allow you to see if you want to even work that kind of a job in the first place? Because I thought on paper, open-source maintainer sounds awesome. And upon looking into the challenges, I'm like, “You know what? I think I'd hate this job.”And I pulled out and I didn't waste their time and they didn't waste mine. So, when you get down to it, honestly, I wish I didn't have to write this book. Did it bring me a lot of benefit? Yeah. Let's not sugarcoat that. It allowed me to pay off my medical debt and move across a continent, but that being said, I wish that we were at a point in time where that did not need to exist.Corey: One of the things that absolutely just still gnaws at me even years later, is I interviewed at Google twice, and I didn't get an offer either time, I didn't really pass their technical screen either time. The second one that really sticks out in my mind where it was, “Hey, write some code in a Google Doc while we watch remotely,” and don't give you any context or hints on this. And just it was—the entire process was sitting there listening to them basically, like, “Nope, not what I'm thinking about. Nope, nope, nope.” It was… by the end of that conversation, I realized that if they were going to move forward—which they didn't—I wasn't going to because I didn't want to work with people that were that condescending and rude.And I've held by it; I swore I would never apply there again and I haven't. And it's one of those areas where, did I have the ability to do the job? I can say in hindsight, mostly. Were there things I was going to learn as I went? Absolutely, but that's every job.And I'm realizing as I see more and more across the ecosystem, that they were an outlier in a potentially good way because in so many other places, there's no equivalent of the book that you have written that is given to the other side of the table: how to effectively interview candidates. People lose sight of the fact that it's a sales conversation; it's a two-way sale, they have to convince you to hire them, but you also have to convince them to work with you. And even in the event that you pass on them, you still want them to say nice things about you because it's a small industry, all things considered. And instead, it's just been awful.Emma: I had a really shitty interview, and let me tell you, they have asked me subsequently if I would re-interview with them. Which sucks; it's a product that I know and love, and I've talked about this, but I had the worst experience. Let me clarify, I had a great first interview with them, and I was like, “I'm just not ready to move to Australia.” Which is where the job was. And then they contacted me again a year later, and it was the worst experience of my life—same recruiter—it was the ego came out.And I will tell you what, if you treat your candidates like shit, they will remember and they will never recommend people interview for you. [laugh]. I also wanted to mention about accessibility because—so we talked about, oh, give candidates the choice, which I think the whole point of an interview should be setting your candidates up for success to show you what they can do. And I talked with [Stephen 00:14:09]—oh, my gosh, I can't remember his last name—but he is a quadriplegic and he types with a mouthstick. And he was saying he would go to technical interviews and they would not be prepared to set him up for success.And they would want to do these pair programming, or, like, writing on a whiteboard. And it's not that he can't pair program, it's that he was not set up for success. He needed a mouthstick to type and they were not prepared to help them with that. So, it's not just about the commitment that people need. It's also about making sure that you are giving candidates what they need to give the best interview possible in an artificial environment.Corey: One approach that people have taken is, “Ah, I'm going to shortcut this and instead of asking people to write code, I'm going to look at their work on GitHub.” Which is, in some cases, a great way to analyze what folks are capable of doing. On the other, well, there's a lot of things that play into that. What if they're working in environment where they don't have the opportunity to open-source their work? What if people consider this a job rather than an all-consuming passion?I know, perish the thought. We don't want to hire people like that. Grow up. It's not useful, and it's not helpful. It's not something that applies universally, and there's an awful lot of reasons why someone's code on GitHub might be materially better—or worse—than their work product. I think that's fine. It's just a different path toward it.Emma: I don't use GitHub for largely anything except just keeping repositories that I need. I don't actively update it. And I have, like, a few thousand followers; I'm like, “Why the hell do you guys follow me? I don't do anything.” It's honestly a terrible representation.That being said, you don't need to have a GitHub repository—an active one—to showcase your skills. There are many other ways that you can show a potential employer, “Hey, I have a lot of skills that aren't necessarily showcased on my resume, but I like to write blogs, I like to give tech talks, I like to make YouTube videos,” things of that nature.Corey: I had a manager once who refused to interview anyone who didn't have a built-out LinkedIn profile, which is also one of these bizarre things. It's, yeah, a lot of people don't feel the need to have a LinkedIn profile, and that's fine. But the idea that, “Oh, yeah, they have this profile they haven't updated in a couple years, it's clearly they're not interested in looking for work.” It's, yeah. Maybe—just a thought here—your ability to construct a resume and build it out in the way that you were expecting is completely orthogonal to how effective they might be in the role. The idea that someone not having a LinkedIn profile somehow implies that they're sketchy is the wrong lesson to take from all of this. That site is terrible.Emma: Especially when you consider the fact that LinkedIn is primarily used in the United States as a social—not social networking—professional networking tool. In Germany, they use Xing as a platform; it's very similar to LinkedIn, but my point is, if you're solely looking at someone's LinkedIn as a representation of their ability to do a job, you're missing out on many candidates from all over the world. And also those who, yeah, frankly, just don't—like, they have more important things to be doing than updating their LinkedIn profile. [laugh].Corey: On some level, it's the idea of looking at a consultant, especially independent consultant type, when their website is glorious and up-to-date and everything's perfect, it's, oh, you don't really have any customers, do you? As opposed to the consultants you know who are effectively sitting there with a waiting list, their website looks like crap. It's like, “Is this Geocities?” No. It's just that they're too busy working on the things that bring the money instead of the things that bring in business, in some respects.Let's face it, websites don't. For an awful lot of consulting work, it's word of mouth. I very rarely get people finding me off of Google, clicking a link, and, “Hey, my AWS bill is terrible. Can you help us with it?” It happens, but it's not something that happens so frequently that we want to optimize for it because that's not where the best customers have been coming from. Historically, it's referrals, it's word of mouth, it's people seeing the aggressive shitposting I engage in on Twitter and saying, “Oh, that's someone that should help me with my Amazon bill.” Which I don't pretend to understand, but I'm still going to roll with it.Emma: You had mentioned something about passion earlier, and I just want to say, if you're a hiring manager or recruiter, you shouldn't solely be looking at candidates who superficially look like they're passionate about what they do. Yes, that is—it's important, but it's not something that—like, I don't necessarily choose one candidate over the other because they push commits, and open pull requests on GitHub, and open-source, and stuff. You can be passionate about your job, but at the end of the day, it's still a job. For me, would I be working if I had to? No. I'd be opening a bookstore because that's what I would really love to be doing. But that doesn't mean I'm not passionate about my job. I just show it in different ways. So, just wanted to put that out there.Corey: Oh, yeah. The idea that you must eat, sleep, live, and breathe is—hell with that. One of the reasons that we get people to work here at The Duckbill Group is, yeah, we care about getting the job done. We don't care about how long it takes or when you work; it's oh, you're not feeling well? Take the day off.We have very few things that are ‘must be done today' style of things. Most of those tend to fall on me because it's giving a talk at a conference; they will not reschedule the conference for you. I've checked. So yeah, that's important, but that's not most days.Emma: Yeah. It's like programming is my job, it's not my identity. And it's okay if it is your primary hobby if that is how you identify, but for me, I'm a person with actual hobbies, and, you know, a personality, and programming is just a job for me. I like my job, but it's just a job.Corey: And on the side, you do interesting things like wrote a book. You mentioned earlier that it wound up paying off some debt and helping cover your move across an ocean. Let's talk a little bit about that because I'm amenable to the idea of side projects that accidentally have a way of making money. That's what this podcast started out as. If I'm being perfectly honest, and started out as something even more self-serving than that.It's, well if I reach out to people in this industry that are doing interesting things and ask them to grab a cup of coffee, they'll basically block me, whereas if I ask them to, would you like to appear on my podcast, they'll clear time on their schedule. I almost didn't care if my microphone was on or not when I was doing these just because it was a chance to talk to really interesting people and borrow their brain, people reached out asking they can sponsor it, along with the newsletter and the rest, and it's you want to give me money? Of course, you can give me money. How much money? And that sort of turned into a snowball effect over time.Five years in, it's turned into something that I would never have predicted or expected. But it's weird to me still, how effective doing something you're actually passionate about as a side project can sort of grow wings on its own. Where do you stand on that?Emma: Yeah, it's funny because with the exception of the online courses that I've worked with—I mentioned LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters, which I knew were paid opportunities—none of my side projects started out for financial reasonings. The podcast that we started was purely for fun, and the sponsors came to us. Now, I will say right up front, we all had pretty big social media followings, and my first piece of advice to anyone looking to get into side projects is, don't focus so much on making money at the get-go. Yes, to your point, Corey, focus on the stuff you're passionate about. Focus on engaging with people on social media, build up your social media, and at that point, okay, monetization will slowly find its way to you.But yeah, I say if you can monetize the heck out of your work, go for it. But also, free content is also great. I like to balance my paid content with my free content because I recognize that not everyone can afford to pay for some of this information. So, I generally always have free alternatives. And for this book that we published, one of the things that was really important to me was keeping it affordable.The first publish I did was $10 for the book. It was like a 250-page book. It was, like, $10 because again, I was not in it for the money. And when I redid the book with the egghead.io team, the same team that did Epic React with Kent C. Dodds, I said, “I want to keep this affordable.” So, we made sure it was still affordable, but also that we had—what's it called? Parity pricing? Pricing parity, where depending on your geographic location, the price is going to accommodate for how the currency is doing. So, yes, I would agree. Side project income for me allows me to do incredible stuff, but it wasn't why I got into it in the first place. It was genuinely just a nice-to-have.Corey: I haven't really done anything that asks people for money directly. I mean, yeah, I sell t-shirts on the website, and mugs, and drink umbrellas—don't get me started—but other than that and the charity t-shirt drive I do every year, I tend to not be good at selling things that don't have a comma in the price tag. For me, it was about absolutely building an audience. I tend to view my Twitter follower count as something of a proxy for it, but the number I actually care about, the audience that I'm focused on cultivating, is newsletter subscribers because no social media platform that we've ever seen has lasted forever. And I have to imagine that Twitter will one day wane as well.But email has been here since longer than we'd been alive, and by having a list of email addresses and ways I can reach out to people on an ongoing basis, I can monetize that audience in a more direct way, at some point should I need them to. And my approach has been, well, one, it's a valuable audience for some sponsors, so I've always taken the asking corporate people for money is easier than asking people for personal money, plus it's a valuable audience to them, so it tends to blow out a number of the metrics that you would normally expect of, oh, for this audience size, you should generally be charging Y dollars. Great. That makes sense if you're slinging mattresses or free web hosting, but when it's instead, huh, these people buy SaaS enterprise software and implement it at their companies, all of economics tend to start blowing apart. Same story with you in many respects.The audience that you're building is functionally developers. That is a lucrative market for the types of sponsors that are wise enough to understand that—in a lot of cases these days—which product a company is going to deploy is not dictated by their exec so much as it is the bottom-up adoption path of engineers who like the product.Emma: Mm-hm. Yeah, and I think once I got to maybe around 10,000 Twitter followers is when I changed my mentality and I stopped caring so much about follower count, and instead I just started caring about the people that I was following. And the number is a nice-to-have but to be honest, I don't think so much about it. And I do understand, yes, at that point, it is definitely a privilege that I have this quote-unquote, “Platform,” but I never see it as an audience, and I never think about that “Audience,” quote-unquote, as a marketing platform. But it's funny because there's no right or wrong. People will always come to you and be like, “You shouldn't monetize your stuff.” And it's like—Corey: “Cool. Who's going to pay me then? Not you, apparently.”Emma: Yeah. It's also funny because when I originally sold the book, it was $10 and I got so many people being like, “This is way too cheap. You should be charging more.” And I'm like, “But I don't care about the money.” I care about all the people who are unemployed and not able to survive, and they have families, and they need to get a job and they don't know how.That's what I care about. And I ended up giving away a lot of free books. My mantra was like, hey if you've been laid off, DM me. No questions asked, I'll give it to you for free. And it was nice because a lot of people came back, even though I never asked for it, they came back and they wanted to purchase it after the fact, after they'd gotten a job.And to me that was like… that was the most rewarding piece. Not getting their money; I don't care about that, but it was like, “Oh, okay. I was actually able to help you.” That is what's really the most rewarding. But yeah, certainly—and back really quickly to your email point, I highly agree, and one of the first things that I would recommend to anyone looking to start a side product, create free content so that you have a backlog that people can look at to… kind of build trust.Corey: Give it away for free, but also get emails from people, like a trade for that. So, it's like, “Hey, here's a free guide on how to start a podcast from scratch. It's free, but all I would like is your email.” And then when it comes time to publish a course on picking the best audio and visual equipment for that podcast, you have people who've already been interested in this topic that you can now market to.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I'm not sitting here trying to judge anyone for the choices that they make at all. There are a lot of different paths to it. I'm right there with you. One of the challenges I had when I was thinking about, do I charge companies or do I charge people was that if I'm viewing it through a lens of audience growth, well, what stuff do I gate behind a paywall? What stuff don't I? Well, what if I just—Emma: Mm-hm.Corey: —gave it all away? And that way I don't have to worry about the entire class of problems that you just alluded to of, well, how do I make sure this is fair? Because a cup of coffee in San Francisco is, what, $14 in some cases? Whereas that is significant in places that aren't built on an economy of foolishness. How do you solve for that problem? How do you deal with the customer service slash piracy issues slash all the other nonsense? And it's just easier.Emma: Yeah.Corey: Something I've found, too, is that when you're charging enough money to companies, you don't have to deal with an entire class of customer service problem. You just alluded to the other day that well, you had someone who bought your book and was displeased that it wasn't a how to write code from scratch tutorial, despite the fact that he were very clear on what it is and what it isn't. I don't pretend to understand that level of entitlement. If I spend 10 or 20 bucks on an ebook, and it's not very good, let's see, do I wind up demanding a refund from the author and making them feel bad about it, or do I say, “The hell with it.” And in my case, I—there is privilege baked into this; I get that, but it's I don't want to make people feel bad about what they've built. If I think there's enough value to spend money on it I view that as a one-way transaction, rather than chasing someone down for three months, trying to get a $20 refund.Emma: Yeah, and I think honestly, I don't care so much about giving refunds at all. We have a 30-day money-back guarantee and we don't ask any questions. I just asked this person for feedback, like, “Oh, what was not up to par?” And it was just, kind of like, BS response of like, “Oh, I didn't read the website and I guess it's not what I wanted.” But the end of the day, they still keep the product.The thing is, you can't police all of the people who are going to try to get your content for free if you're charging for it; it's part of it. And I knew that when I got into it, and honestly, my thing is, if you are circulating a book that helps you get a job in tech and you're sending it to all your friends, I'm not going to ask any questions because it's very much the sa—and this is just my morals here, but if I saw someone stealing food from a grocery store, I wouldn't tell on them because at the end of the day, if you're s—Corey: Same story. You ever see someone's stealing baby formula from a store? No, you didn't.Emma: Right.Corey: Keep walking. Mind your business.Emma: Exactly. Exactly. So, at the end of the day, I didn't necessarily care that—people are like, “Oh, people are going to share your book around. It's a PDF.” I'm like, “I don't care. Let them. It is what it is. And the people who wants to support and can, will.” But I'm not asking.I still have free blogs on data structures, and algorithms, and the interview stuff. I do still have content for free, but if you want more, if you want my illustrated diagrams that took me forever with my Apple Pencil, fair enough. That would be great if you could support me. If not, I'm still happy to give you the stuff for free. It is what it is.Corey: One thing that I think is underappreciated is that my resume doesn't look great. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education, and I don't have any big tech names on my resume. I have a bunch of relatively short stints; until I started this place, I've never lasted more than two years anywhere. If I apply through the front door the way most people do for a job, I will get laughed out of the room by the applicant tracking system, automatically. It'll never see a human.And by doing all these side projects, it's weird, but let's say that I shut down the company for some reason, and decide, ah, I'm going to go get a job now, my interview process—more or less, and it sounds incredibly arrogant, but roll with it for a minute—is, “Don't you know who I am? Haven't you heard of me before?” It's, “Here's my website. Here's all the stuff I've been doing. Ask anyone in your engineering group who I am and you'll see what pops up.”You're in that same boat at this point where your resume is the side projects that you've done and the audience you've built by doing it. That's something that I think is underappreciated. Even if neither one of us made a dime through direct monetization of things that we did, the reputational boost to who we are and what we do professionally seems to be one of those things that pays dividends far beyond any relatively small monetary gain from it.Emma: Absolutely, yeah. I actually landed my job interview with Spotify through Twitter. I was contacted by a design systems manager. And I was in the interview process for them, and I ended up saying, “You know, I'm not ready to move to Stockholm. I just moved to Germany.”And a year later, I circled back and I said, “Hey, are there any openings?” And I ended up re-interviewing, and guess what? Now, I have a beautiful home with my soulmate and we're having a child. And it's funny how things work out this way because I had a Twitter account. And so don't undervalue [laugh] social media as a tool in lieu of a resume because I don't think anyone at Spotify even saw my resume until it actually accepted the job offer, and it was just a formality.So yeah, absolutely. You can get a job through social media. It's one of the easiest ways. And that's why if I ever see anyone looking for a job on Twitter, I will retweet, and vouch for them if I know their work because I think that's one of the quickest ways to finding an awesome candidate.Corey: Back in, I don't know, 2010, 2011-ish. I was deep in the IRC weed. I was network staff on the old freenode network—not the new terrible one. The old, good one—and I was helping people out with various things. I was hanging out in the Postfix channel and email server software thing that most people have the good sense not to need to know anything about.And someone showed up and was asking questions about their config, and I was working with them, and teasing them, and help them out with it. And at the end of it, his comment was, “Wow, you're really good at this. Any chance you'd be interested in looking for jobs?” And the answer was, “Well, sure, but it's a global network. Where are you?”Well, he was based in Germany, but he was working remotely for Spotify in Stockholm. A series of conversations later, I flew out to Stockholm and interviewed for a role that they decided I was not a fit for—and again, they're probably right—and I often wonder how my life would have gone differently if the decision had gone the other way. I mean, no hard feelings, please don't get me wrong, but absolutely, helping people out, interacting with people over social networks, or their old school geeky analogs are absolutely the sorts of things that change lives. I would never have thought to apply to a role like that if I had been sitting here looking at job ads because who in the world would pick up someone with relatively paltry experience and move them halfway around the world? This was like a fantasy, not a reality.Emma: [laugh].Corey: It's the people you get to know—Emma: Yeah.Corey: —through these social interactions on various networks that are worth… they're worth gold. There's no way to describe it other than that.Emma: Yeah, absolutely. And if you're listening to this, and you're discouraged because you got turned down for a job, we've all been there, first of all, but I remember being disappointed because I didn't pass my first round of interviews of Google the first time I interviewed with them, and being, like, “Oh, crap, now I can't move to Munich. What am I going to do with my life?” Well, guess what, look where I am today. If I had gotten that job that I thought was it for me, I wouldn't be in the happiest phase of my life.And so if you're going through it—obviously, in normal circumstances where you're not frantically searching for a job; if you're in more of a casual life job search—and you've been let go from the process, just realize that there's probably something bigger and better out there for you, and just focus on your networking online. Yeah, it's an invaluable tool.Corey: One time when giving a conference talk, I asked, “All right, raise your hand if you have never gone through a job interview process and then not been offered the job.” And a few people did. “Great. If your hand is up, aim higher. Try harder. Take more risks.”Because fundamentally, job interviews are two-way streets and if you are only going for the sure thing jobs, great, stretch yourself, see what else is out there. There's no perfect attendance prize. Even back in school there wasn't. It's the idea of, “Well, I've only ever taken the easy path because I don't want to break my streak.” Get over it. Go out and interview more. It's a skill, unlike most others that you don't get to get better at unless you practice it.So, you've been in a job for ten years, and then it's time to move on—I've talked to candidates like this—their interview skills are extremely rusty. It takes a little bit of time to get back in the groove. I like to interview every three to six months back when I was on the job market. Now that I, you know, own the company and have employees, it looks super weird if I do it, but I miss it. I miss those conversations. I miss the aspects—Emma: Yes.Corey: —of exploring what the industry cares about.Emma: Absolutely. And don't underplay the importance of studying the foundational language concepts. I see this a lot in candidates where they're so focused on the newest and latest technologies and frameworks, that they forgot foundational JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. Many companies are focused primarily on these plain language concepts, so just make sure that when you are ready to get back into interviewing and enhance that skill, that you don't neglect the foundation languages that the web is built on if you're a web developer.Corey: I'd also take one last look around and realize that every person you admire, every person who has an audience, who is a known entity in the space only has that position because someone, somewhere did them a favor. Probably lots of someones with lots of favors. And you can't ever pay those favors back. All you can do is pay it forward. I repeatedly encourage people to reach out to me if there's something I can do to help. And the only thing that surprises me is how few people in the audience take me up on that. I'm talking to you, listener. Please, if I can help you with something, please reach out. I get a kick out of doing that sort of thing.Emma: Absolutely. I agree.Corey: Emma, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Emma: Well, you can find me on Twitter. It's just @EmmaBostian, I'm, you know, shitposting over there on the regular. But sometimes I do tweet out helpful things, so yeah, feel free to engage with me over there. [laugh].Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:35:42]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I appreciate it.Emma: Yeah. Thanks for having me.Corey: Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify and oh, so very much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an incoherent ranting comment mentioning that this podcast as well failed to completely teach you JavaScript.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Perfect Pup
Your Dog Is NOT a Robot

The Perfect Pup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:11


I've always loved robots! The idea of a machine that can complete tasks for you is fascinating. And nowadays, we deal with robots every day. You have one on your phone (Siri, etc.), a speaker in your house that will do exactly what you ask, and you may even have a robot that vacuums your house (best appliance I own). You give an input or command, and get the same output every single time. Unfortunately, I think that because we are so used to getting the exact same output from these robots, we often, inadvertently, view our dogs in the same manner. We want A=B always, but that's just not reality with our dogs. And while I know you don't actually think your dog is a robot, I want to discuss ways that you might act like your dog is a robot. What Works for Me, Might Not Work for You I have two sister Labrador Retrievers. So you would think that of all the dogs out there, they would surely behave in a similar fashion. Nope. They are extremely different in more ways than I can explain. But needless to say, they do not behave the same way in every situation. And how I train and raise them individually is extremely different. So, why do we often think that a technique that worked for a neighbor's dog is going to work for our own? And even beyond that, why do we think that a toy your neighbor's dog loved will be loved by your own dog? It's important to remember that the things you learn (even from us here at Pupford) may need some tweaking to best fit your dog's needs. Or, they may not work for your dog… and that is okay! Don't be afraid to try out different variations of training techniques you learn to best meet your dog's needs. Don't Be Too Robotic as a Trainer While this episode is about how your pup isn't a robot, it's a good reminder for us as humans to not act too robotic when training our pups. My opinion is that when we get into ‘training sessions' we often get hung up on trying the same things over and over. And sometimes that just doesn't work. Don't be afraid to mix it up! If your pup is struggling with recall, try turning it into a game. Or, try jumping up and down when you call your pup to you. Again, remember that if your training becomes too robotic it may lead your pup to tune out and not focus as well. Give Your Dog a Break My dog Sunny has hip dysplasia. When I tell my dogs to go to their place (typically their bed), I do not expect Sunny to lay down. It can be uncomfortable for her and so a sit is just fine, even though I expect my dog Scout to actually lay down on her place. That example illustrates that it's more important to look at your own dog's situation than a conventional ‘this is how a behavior is done' mindset. And sometimes, our dogs just need a little bit of a break when they aren't “performing how we hope”. There are so many factors in their surroundings including sounds, smells, and other stimuli that we may not even notice. That isn't to say we should be okay with our dog not listening to us or following behaviors that they are capable of! Rather, it's a reminder that our dogs are creatures with nuance, and we should be okay with that. Recap While we all know our dogs aren't actually robots, we sometimes get into the trap of thinking they should behave like robots! Remember that not every technique will work for your dog and that sometimes may just be having an off day or off moment when we ask for a behavior. As we try to view our dogs through the lens of them behaving variably, it can help us remember to be patient and consistent with teaching new behaviors! Thanks for listening, please leave us a review! Download the Pupford app here: https://pfrd.site/appfree-here --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/perfect-pup/message

Gift of the Day
E345 10.12.21 If you were blind, would you act and feel the same as you do now? NOPE. And that sucks.

Gift of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:18


Michelle and David discuss an epiphany that David had watching a viral video that had completely different intentions, but through the gift of observation, David say differently and delivered a potent question to all listeners. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/red-kite-movement/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/red-kite-movement/support

Think Bigger Real Estate
Dominating in Real Estate with TikTok & IG Reels | Glennda Baker

Think Bigger Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:34


For many, Glennda Baker Atlanta Realtor has become a household name. With close to 500k followers on TikTok, 51.7M views and 6.5M likes, she is sought out on social media platforms and some of the industry's biggest stages. I know what you're thinking, she must be a great dancer to be such a star on TikTok. Nope! She's done all of this with no dancing! But how? That's what we're going to uncover in this episode including the following questions: What does it mean to be true to yourself?  What does authenticity mean to you?  What advice would you give yourself if your younger self were getting into the business today?  Does social media present an opportunity? If so, what is that? What about it also presenting a responsibility?  What are you afraid of?  What do you dream about?  What helps you to continue to Think Bigger?... to ever be expanding your possibilities?  Links:Full episode with video, audio, timestamps and full transcription—Explore past episodes:  justinstoddart.com/podcastDownload my international best-selling book, The Upstream Model, here: justinstoddart.com/freebookIf you enjoy the podcast, please leave us a short review on Apple Podcasts.  I love reading reviews and engaging with our community.Follow Justin:Instagram: instagram.com/justinstoddartFacebook: facebook.com/justincstoddartYouTube: youtube.com/c/justinstoddart

Haunt Jaunts
5: Cases of Creepy Haunted Houses

Haunt Jaunts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:33


Sometimes houses aren't haunted by ghosts. Sometimes the restless spirits living under the same roof as the legitimate owners and tenants aren't unseen souls of the dearly departed. They're very much alive and secretly dwelling within.  Wait, what? That's just the stuff of urban legends and horror movies like Crawlspace, Hider in the House, or People Under the Stairs, right? Nope.  There have been real-life cases of uninvited phantom boarders and stalkers, such as Denver's Spiderman of Moncrieff Place and New Jersey's Westfield Watcher. Those are the two cases we examine in this episode of Haunting American True Crimes. And if you happen to know the name of the movie I'm struggling to remember, or if you think it could be The Unseen, let me know. Drop a line to podcast@HauntJaunts.net. Sources Referenced in This Episode The Encyclopedia of American Crime https://www.thecut.com/2018/11/the-haunting-of-657-boulevard-in-westfield-new-jersey.html https://gothamist.com/news/i-went-to-westfield-nj-to-track-down-the-watcher https://www.hauntjaunts.net/house-really-haunted-stalker/ https://patch.com/new-jersey/westfield/infamous-westfield-watcher-house-has-new-owners https://patch.com/new-jersey/westfield/creepy-westfield-watcher-house-netflix-series-ready-film Want more Haunt Jaunts? Jaunt with us online anytime at HauntJaunts.net. Read more blog posts, find Paracons and Horror Fests, or shop the Skareporium. Jaunt with us socially at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HauntJaunts Twitter: https://twitter.com/HauntJaunts Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hauntjaunts/?hl=en And if you liked what you heard, remember to subscribe too.  Host & Guide Courtney Mroch MUSIC Halloween Haunted House  by Frank Schröter Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/6615-halloween-haunted-house- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license SCP-x7x (6th Floor) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/6737-scp-x7x-6th-floor- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Big Eyes  by Rafael Krux Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/5306-big-eyes- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

Stinker Madness - The Bad Movie Podcast
Dragonheart - Death by cheese cart!

Stinker Madness - The Bad Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 86:51


Wherein a dragon saves a terrible person's life and everyone blames the dragon for said terrible person's terribleness. Its a funny old world we lived in back in 984 AD. So yeah, the plot here is that a oppressive king dies in a moronic manner and his awful Joffreyesque turd of a child becomes king. Before he can reimplement prima nocta, a girl falls onto him; knocking him into a lethal cheese cart. Yes that's right. Before the movie even starts up, the villain has been killed by a cheese cart. So his mentor, Bowen (played by Dennis Quaid) takes him up to a dragon's cave where Draco (Sean Connery) takes a chunk of his heart and stuffs into said brat and revives him, all while making him swear an oath to be a just and kind king. Before the little wanker can make it back to his castle, he's already issued a decree to enslave the people to build a vanity project for him. Bowen, being the perfect judge of character that he is, blames Draco for King Twat's cruelty and vows to hunt him to the ends of the earth. 12 years later, and both Bowen and Draco forget that they ever met, despite Bowen still being on a genocidal hunt to murder ALL dragons and Draco feeling the literal pain of sharing his dragonheart and the mistake of his one good deed to allow him into dragon heaven being the continuation of a monarchy that enslaves and murders its own subjects. Well the pair team up to run the mob's protection racket and hijinx ensue. Eventually (about 85% of the film length) they decide to take on King Butthole and end his reign. Despite how incredibly stupid the plot is, it still doesn't qualify for the idiot plot. King Longsuck still would have been a terrible ruler and eventually someone was going to rise up against him. A dragon sure would be helpful in a rebellion, one would think, but Draco doesn't even do anything to support the rebellion. Burn some castles! Go full Targaryen! Nope he just flies around. So its clear you do NOT need a dragon to have a successful rebellion. One could argue that without Draco reviving the little dickhead that the plot wouldn't happen. Little BH would be dead. Problem solved. Well, yes, the plot wouldn't exist. But its not Draco's fault the kid's a little Hitler. He didn't know. Bowen should have so he's an idiot but it wasn't just him that took the kid to Draco - it was the Queen Mother's idea. And can you really call a mother an idiot for wanting to save her child's life, even if he's the antichrist? I'm not going to. Mom's rule (except mine who went out for a pack of smokes and never came back. How far away is that gas station, anyways?). Long story short: Draco is poorly designed, does very little "dragoning", its tedious and draggy as it does its best to fill in the time as it avoids the main plot, the action is drab and the jokes are intolerable. You can leave after Prince Caligula dies by falling on some cheese.

The Morning Stream
TMS 2187: The Spice Squirrels!

The Morning Stream

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 96:00


Colonoscopies are a Real Shit Show. 13 Flavors At Raskin-Bobbins!! The Northern lights sound like Nickleback? I'm out. Nope to the Pope. Canadians Eat Like The Rest Of Us. World's Smallest Poutine Launcher. Rocky Road Colonoscopy is not a new Ben and Jerry's flavor. The TikTok McNugget Challenge! No 4:3 for you!! 612 Days of not watching Parasite. Sheldon's head on Batman's body. Carolinas Fist Bump. Never tell me the odds! Never tell me the calories! Let God Sort my Screws. Making Things with Bill! Major Spoilers and more on this episode of The Morning Stream.

FRIGHT SCHOOL
179 - Accidentally a Musical - The Wicker Man (1973)

FRIGHT SCHOOL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 69:22


Welcome back to Fright School! We're still celebrating Spooky Season and starting to watch our favorite Halloween movies and shows! Joe has been watching SQUID GAMES. Joshua checked out THE ADDAMS FAMILY 2. We chat about foreign films and what might get lost in translation. Maybe we're all way smarter and cooler than Hollywood gives us credit for? This week we are continuing our Folk Horror explorations with the original THE WICKER MAN! This is another film that is considered part of the "Unholy Trinity" of Folk Horror that helped define the genre. We discuss the particular cultural anxieties of Christian men, the echoes of pagan faiths in Catholocism, interpreting the film from different social positions, and wonder if we can all agree that Howie is a dick. Grab your lute, since we're in an accidental musical, and join us 'round the sacrificial pyre! Summer is icumen in! Loudly sing Cuckoo! Eerie Earfuls Vol. I: Haunted Sounds of Halloween Night on BANDCAMP Just in time for Halloween, Lonely Spectre Productions brings you a retro-inspired Halloween sounds album that innovates the platform. Recommended Reading/Viewing: Official Theatrical Trailer THE WICKER MAN (1973) The Wicker Man (Robin Hardy, 1973) by Daniel Lammin The Wicker Man and the horrors of denialism By Sean T. Collins The unforgettable pyre: How The Wicker Man changed the face of horror by Ed Power A History of Horror with Mark Gatiss (Part 2 of 3) Home Counties Horror Extra Credit: Check out THE LIST WE MISSED "Have you seen this movie? Nope, but we'll put it on the list!" Besties AJ & Jacki will finally get to "the list" and watch all of the movies that they told people they would watch. We can't wait for the RENEGADE FILM FESTIVAL! Follow all of their social media for updates! We hope to see you there! FOLLOW US! Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkTree EXTRA CREDIT: WE HAVE ALL NEW TEES AND MERCH AVAILABLE! WE KNOW PODCASTING! There would be no Fright School without the incomparable assistance of one Matt Kelly. Now you can benefit from his and co-founder of WE KNOW PODCASTING Chris Fafalios' 25+ years of combined experience to take your show to the next level. They want to share their experience with you, giving you a leg up on the competition. In a world of run-of-the-mill podcasts, you can stand out from the crowd with a professional and engaging show! Fright School Recommended Texts: Creepy Bitches: Essays On Horror From Women In Horror by Alyse Wax, Rebekah McKendry, PhD. and more! Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror by Robin R Means Coleman The Horror Genre: From Beelzebub to Blair Witch by Paul Wells Men, Women, and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film by Carol J. Clover Monsters in the Closet: Homosexuality and the Horror Film by Harry Benshoff The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror by David J. Skal Projected Fears by Kendall R. Phillips Support FRIGHT SCHOOL by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/fright-school Find out more at https://fright-school.pinecast.co This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Our Run Club
Gross

Our Run Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 19:02


It's a fact. We runners are a gross bunch, snot rockets, blisters, sweat and who knows what else we deal with. Does all the gross stuff stop us from getting out there? NOPE. We still run. This week we chat all about the gross stuff we runners put up with. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/our-run-club/message

The Nathan Barry Show
051: Sean McCabe - Launch a Successful Business by Starting With Writing

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:59


Sean McCabe is the founder and CEO of seanwes media, and Daily Content Machine. Sean is a prolific and successful creator, author, and influencer. His course, Learn Lettering, made $80,000 in the first 24 hours. For nearly a decade his podcast, blog, and courses have helped creators grow their brands, content, and skill sets.Sean's website is a treasure trove of courses and resources for anyone looking for business knowledge and creative support. Sean's book, Overlap, shows creators how to turn their passion into a successful business while working a full-time job. His podcast includes almost 500 episodes on content creation and entrepreneurship. His latest venture, Daily Content Machine, turns creators' best content into clippable moments they can share across their social media accounts.I talk with Sean about what it's like being a successful creator. We talk about growing your audience and connecting with them. We cover how to learn new skills fast, and about developing a growth mindset. We also talk about managing stress as a founder, how to handle burnout, and much more.In this episode, you'll learn: Why good writing is the foundation of great content How to connect better with your audience Leveraging short-form content to grow your brand Pricing at full value without feeling guilty How to avoid burnout, and what to do if you're already there Links & Resources Sean McCabe on The Nathan Barry Show episode 003 Craft + Commerce conference ConvertKit Enough Ryan Holiday James Clear Marie Forleo Ramit Sethi Sean McCabe's Links Follow Sean on Twitter Check out Sean on Instagram Sean's website Daily Content Machine Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Sean:If you are a founder, you should be in therapy. Full-stop. You need a therapist. I thought I didn't. I had a great upbringing. I'm all good. Everything's healthy. I don't have any problems. The problem was I didn't know the problems that I had. I didn't realize what I was stuffing down. I didn't realize what I was avoiding.There is so much to unpack that you don't know you need to unpack.[00:00:30] Nathan:In this episode I talk to my friend, Sean McCabe. We've known each other for seven years now. It's been a long time. We've been in a mastermind group together. He's actually been on the show before. Sean is a wildly talented designer. He got his start hand-lettering.I think last time he was on the show, years ago, we were talking about that aspect of his business and how he built this substantial course business. Selling courses on hand-lettering, on marketing, on writing. He's spoken at our conference Craft + Commerce, all kinds of things. Sean is one of the most prolific creators that I've ever known.It's also super fun that he's a friend and lives right here in town. We just have a great conversation. We talk about how you create content, which is one of those things that it's not even how you create content, it's why. Where that comes from. The internal drive in what you use. Where you choose to have as a source of fuel and energy to put into that creative output.How some sources are really good and productive, and others can be kind of like a house of cards, and it can be harmful. We also talk about scaling teams as a creator. How do you know when to build out a team around your business? He's done that two different ways. So I get to ask him about some of the things he's learned and applied differently.I'm going to stop there. There's a lot of good stuff. So with that, let's dive in.Sean. Welcome to the show.[00:01:59] Sean:Hey, Nathan, just saw you recently. We were playing volleyball, or something.[00:02:03] Nathan:Or something, like two days ago. You moved to my city. It's kind of…[00:02:08] Sean:Yeah. It's horrible. It's a terrible place. Boise. Don't move to Idaho.[00:02:15] Nathan:You mean Iowa? Boise, Iowa.[00:02:17] Sean:Iowa. Yeah. Don't, yeah. Did I do okay?[00:02:21] Nathan:Yeah. That's exactly what you're supposed to say. If you Google something about Boise, Google has the accordion of extra questions, or things you might want to know. One of them is, “Does Boise smell?” and it's just like auto complaints in there.And I was like, what is up with that? I clicked on it, and it's this satirical article that has 12 reasons you shouldn't move to Boise. One of them is the city dump is right in the middle of the city. Another one is like that the Ebola outbreak hasn't been fully contained yet.So it's not really safe. I think there was something about lava. Anyway, it's just an article about all the reasons to not move to Boise. So I think you're right in line.[00:03:08] Sean:Stay, away. That's what they tell me to say.[00:03:11] Nathan:Yes, but if someone were to ignore that and move to Boise, they could come to our weekly volleyball game on Wednesday nights.[00:03:19] Sean:It's casual. It's open.[00:03:21] Nathan:Let's try it. Yeah. It's been so fun having you and Laci here. It's also been fun because you started a new company. Your company is producing and editing and creating all the clips for this podcast. So, connections on so many levels.[00:03:37] Sean:Yeah. We produce this show, like the video show, the audio show, and then find clips and make those clips for social media. It's been great. We love this show. Our team's favorite content. So, I'm a little biased, but it's fun to be on. Because my team's going to work on this.[00:03:58] Nathan:Yeah, exactly. I made sure to spell your name correctly in the setup, and I know they'll get it all.I wanted to ask what sparked—like maybe first give a summary of Daily Content Machine, since that's what you're spending nearly all of your time on. More than a normal amount of time on. So, what sparked it, and what is it?[00:04:19] Sean:Fun fact. This is not the first time I've been on the show. The last time was episode three, 2,624 days ago.[00:04:30] Nathan:Give or take[00:04:32] Sean:I was doing different stuff then. It's been a crazy journey. Right now the newest iteration is an agency.We produce video clips. We turn long form video shows. If you have a video podcast or other kind of long form video content, we found that the hardest part is finding all the good moments in there, and turning those into short clips. That's what we do. I designed it for myself, really.I wanted it to be where you just show up, you record, and, everything just happens? What is your experience, Nathan, with having a video and audio podcasts made, and clips and all that published? What do you, what's your involvement.[00:05:14] Nathan:Yeah. So I think about who I want on the show, I email them and say, will you come on the show? And then I talked to them for an hour, and then I read no, either way. I don't even do that. Yep. That's my full involvement. And what happens is then really what I see is when the show comes out, which I don't touch anything from that moment on. I actually probably notice the show coming out like, oh yeah, that's the episode that we post this week. Cause we have a three week delay on our, production schedule. And so I noticed like, oh yeah, I had a David Perell on the show when I get the Twitter notification of like, David, Perell just retweeted you.And I'm like, oh, what did oh, right. Yeah. Because his episode came out and then every, I mean, David was especially generous. Right. But every clip that week seven in a row, he retweeted and posted to his, you know, hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers. Right. Cause it makes him look really good. It's clips of him delivering these, you know, soundbites of genius, perfectly format.And he's like great retweet share with my audience. I think that one, I picked up like hundreds of new Twitter followers, just, you know, maybe more just from, from, that. So it's a, it's a great experience. The side that I haven't done as much with that I really want to. and you and I talked about this a lot when we. Like early days of Daily Content Machine and what could it be? And, and then, getting my show set up on it is the transcripts in the show notes that you all do. cause first you found the most interesting points of the show and then second there's text versions of all of that. And then they're all like neatly edited and, and everything.And so,[00:07:01] Sean:A lot of re-purposing options.[00:07:04] Nathan:Yeah, so like if you ask the same question or a similar question, like, Hey, how'd you grow from a thousand subscribers to 10,000. Tell me about that process. If you ask that consistently, which I'm not great about asking the same questions consistently, but then over the course of 20, 30 episodes, you have this great library of answers to that question and you could make like compile it all, write some narrative and it's like, oh, there's an ebook that would be 15 pages long and could be a free lead magnet or a giveaway or anything else. It's just a total by-product of the podcast and Daily Content Machine. So I'm a huge fan. That's my experience.[00:07:42] Sean:Well, it's great to hear. yeah, we wanted to make it, I wanted to make it, so I just show up. I record myself doing a podcast with the camera on, and then I walk away. Like I don't have to, the footage sinks. It goes to the team. They produce it. They made me look good. They make me sound good. They find all of the best things. I said, things my guests said, they think about my target audience. What are their struggles? What are their goals? What do they want, what do they need? How would they search for it? How would they say it themselves? And they work together to come up with good titles for them, then produce it, flawless captions, you know, do the research, how's the guests build their name.How does their company name capitalize? Like make sure it's, it's all polished and then publish it everywhere. So I just show up once a week for an hour and record, and then I get to be everywhere every day. That's that's at least the goal. And I'm hearing you say like one of the benefits, but one of the benefits of finding clips out of your long form shows to post on social media is you give your guests something to share.And there's kind of two, two ways of approaching podcasts. And one is kind of the old school way, you know, People used to blog and the used to subscribe to RSS feeds and like, you know, that's how they consumed their content. And definitely you still want to build your own platform, have a website, have a blog, you know, definitely have an email newsletter on ConvertKit but now we're, we're posting Twitter threads. We're posting more content natively and people are consuming more natively on the platforms. So there's the old idea of, I have a podcast, here's a link, go listen to my podcast, go watch my podcast, go watch my video shifting from that to, Hey, why don't we deliver the best moments of the show?Because people are consuming short form content, and that's how they're evaluating whether they want to subscribe, whether they want to spend an hour listening in depth to that interview. We're giving them all of these entrance points and just providing value natively on the platform. Instead of asking them to go off the platform and interrupt their experience, it's here you go.Here's some value here's where you can get more.And, and that that's such a great way to. Bring new listeners on as well as to give the guests something to share, because think about the experience between a guest, being told like, Hey, your episodes out, will you, will you share a link to it? And they're like, Hey, I was on a show, go listen to the show.It's such a great interview. You know, we, we do it. We want to help out that, that person with the podcast. But imagine if the best moments that, where you said that the smartest things with all of your filler words remove and your tangents remove was tweeted, and there's a video right there. All you have to do is hit retweet.It's free content for you. It looks good. But then also for you as the show host, it promotes your show and gives you a new awesome.[00:10:28] Nathan:The other thing in it, like the retweet is fantastic, but a lot of people want that as original content on their social channel. And so having like the, the deliverable that I get from you all is, is. Yeah, it just shows up in Dropbox of here's all the videos for all the platforms and everything, you know, from my archives and all that.And I've sent those on to the guests when they're like, Hey, can I post this? Not every tweet. Like I want to post it with my own, title or tweaks on that. And so I can just share that whole Dropbox folder and they'll, they'll go find the exact thing they want to share and, and use it in their own softens.Like, yes, absolutely. Because the pre-roll or like the, or the post roll on that video is like, go subscribe to item newsletters. It's like, yes, please.[00:11:14] Sean:And it's not like Nathan, that you would have trouble getting guests, but if one had trouble getting guests for their show, or you want to get someone that's like really big, really busy, they get all kinds of requests all the time. Well, imagine if they're evaluating between these different shows, you know what, what's the audience size?What am I going to get out of it? You know, especially if you don't have millions of downloads on your podcast. Well, if you're providing these additional assets, like, Hey, we're going to make clips of this. You're going to get content out of this. It can help people make that decision to come onto your show as opposed to maybe another.[00:11:46] Nathan:Yeah, totally. I want to go, so somebody different directions. This is, we talked about an agency and the business that you're starting. I have a question that I've kind of asked you one-on-one sometimes. And I want to know why build a business with a team and like build this X scale of business rather than go the indie creative route.Right? Because if we want to, if you wanted to say independent, no team, you could probably make a business doing $250,000 a year. Work on it, maybe 20 hours a week, something like that, you know, hanging out in the studio, you'd still have your podcast. You could sit down and like, you're one of the most prolific writers I've ever met. so you could do a bunch of those, those things. And yet you keep trying to do and succeeding in doing these much harder businesses of building a team. And I have to know why.[00:12:39] Sean:Nathan, I don't know. I don't know why. I kind of know why, uh it's it's like it's going to get deep. I mean, it, it probably really goes back to childhood and being, being the oldest of 13 kids feeling like. I don't know if my parents are watching, but like, I felt this, this pressure to be successful, to be a good example, to be, to be a leader, you know, like to be productive.And, you know, I'm working through a lot of that stuff in therapy, like learning, like where did my motivations come from? And like, you know, it is this healthy because, you know, you know, my, my background of extreme workaholism for like 10 years, like, Nope, no joke. It was really bad. Like 16 hour days, seven days a week for 10 years, like all I did was work and like that's, that's my tendency.And I think something beautiful came out of that, which is this sabbaticals idea where since 2014 now I've taken off every seventh week as a sabbatical. So I work six weeks and I, I take off a week and we do that with our team and all of our team members. I paid them to take off sabbaticals and it's just been beautiful.The heartbeat of the company. And like, it's been really good for me as well in terms of, you know, burnout prevention and just unlocking my best ideas, but that's, that's my tendency. And, you know, th there's, there's all kinds of reasons. And, you know, there there's messages that we hear that maybe were said or implicit, you know, growing up that we internalize.And so I think, honestly, Nathan it's, it's probably just like chasing, like, I'm going to be dead honest, like, like it's, it's just like, I think of your post that post that you titled about enough, you know, and, you know, thinking through it, like, like if I were to just think of a number, you know, it's like, no, that's not enough, you know, and I know that's not healthy.So like, yeah, I could totally, I could totally do the solo thing. I could totally make 600. Work part-time, have less stress and maybe I should, you know, maybe I will eventually, but there's something in me that wants to build something bigger, but at the same time, it's just so much fun. Get it, like, I just love processes and systems and like, you know, building things that can scale.And so, yeah, it's.[00:15:08] Nathan:Well, let's lean into it more because I have the same thing on two different sides. Like I made the same leap from a solar creator to having a team. and there's sometimes I miss aspects of the solo creator thing. Like there's a level of simplicity and like, I look at somebody's product launch or something, and it does $25,000 or $50,000.And I'm like, oh, I remember when that amount of money was substantial in that it moved the needle for the business and like, and drove real profits. Now, like 25 or $50,000 gets eaten up by that much of expenses, like immediately, you know, cause the, the machine is just so much, so much bigger. And so I have the same thing of, of pushing for more and trying to figure out what. Like, what is that balance? And, and, yeah, I guess, how do you think about the balance between gratitude and enough and drive and ambition?[00:16:08] Sean:Yeah, that is a great question. It is. It is a balance. And as someone who has a tendency towards all or nothing thinking like, I'm, I just get obsessed. Like if I'm, if I'm about something like, I'm just all in, or I don't care at all. Like I'm really not in between. And that I think is a double-edged sword.Like it's a reason for my success, but it's also a reason for all of my downfalls and like, you know, going years without exercising and losing relationships and friendships, because I was so consumed by what I was building, you know, it is very much a double-edged sword. And so I think the answer is balance, you know, in what you're saying, w what do you, what do I think about the balance?I think it is a balance. It has to be, you have to be operating from a place of enough and then have things that are pulling you forward. You know, something that you're working towards having goals I think is healthy. You know, it's. Something that gets you out of bed in the morning. You're excited about what you're doing.You have this vision for where you're going, but it's operating from a healthy place of, I'm not doing this to fill a void in my soul. Right? Like I'm not doing this because I believe I'm not enough because I believe I'm not worthy of something. But, but because I know, yes, I matter I'm worthy. I'm important.And I'm excited. Like, I think that's the, I'm not saying I'm even there. I just think that's the balance to strike[00:17:34] Nathan:Yeah. I think you're right in this. It's interesting of the things that you can do in your, I guess, life, maybe the creative Dr.. I think there's a tendency of using that insecurity to drive creative success that can work really, really well for an amount of time. Like if you need to finish a book, grow your audience to a thousand subscribers, you know, like accomplish some specific goal.And he used the chip on your shoulder and the feeling of like, this person doesn't believe in me and that like triggers those deep insecurities on one hand, it's wildly effective and on the other, it can be super destructive and it's such a weird balance and place to sit in.[00:18:21] Sean:Yeah, a double-edged sword, for sure. Like it can, it can be what helps you succeed? And it can be your downfall. So you have to wield it wisely. unintentional illiteration you ha you have to be careful with that because it's so easy to just get consumed by it, to drown in it, to let this, you know, whatever it is, this, this, this drive, this motivation, the chip on the shoulder, whatever it is to let it take you to a place where you're just like, along for the ride, you know, on a wave, going somewhere on a, on a, you know, a tube floating down the river, right.You're just being taken somewhere, but are you being taken where you wanna go?[00:19:05] Nathan:Well, yeah. And then realizing, like, it might feel like you are up into a point, but then I guess if you're not aware of it and you're not in control of it, then you'll get to the point where the thing that you were trying to succeed, that the book launch, you know, hitting $10,000 in sales or whatever else, like that's not going to have any of the satisfaction and.[00:19:25] Sean:If I can take an opportunity here just to speak very directly to a point. If you are a founder, you should be in therapy. Full-stop like you, you need a therapist. I thought I didn't. I was like, I had a great upbringing. I'm all good. You know, everything's healthy. I don't have any problems. The problem was, I didn't know the problems that I had.I didn't realize what I was stuffing down. I didn't realize what I was avoiding. There's so much stress, you know, being a founder or even any, any C level executive in a company, like there's just so much going on, and you're responsible for so many things it affects your personal life. It affects your relationships.It affects how you see yourself. There is so much to unpack that you don't know, you need to unpack. And there's probably also stuff that, you know, you need to unpack. and Maybe you don't want to, but I went my entire life until the past year. Never going into therapy, never went to therapy. I'm like, yeah, that's great.You know, if you have some serious problems or a really bad childhood or whatever, like yeah. That's, you know, I support, it like positive, you know, like golf clap and I'm like, oh my gosh since I've been going on. I'm like I didn't know why I was doing the things I was doing, what my reasons were, what my motivations were, the ways that it was unhealthy to me, the way that it was affecting my relationships.So I just want to encourage everyone to go to therapy. I promise it's going to be beneficial[00:20:53] Nathan:Yeah.I cannot echo that enough. I've had the same experience and just having someone to talk through whatever's going on in your life, whatever, like even just interesting observations. When someone said this, I reacted like that. And that doesn't quite add up. Like, can we spend some time digging into that kind of, you know, and you realize that like, oh, that wasn't, that wasn't a normal, like healthy reaction.And it had nothing to do with what the person said or who they are or anything like that. I had to do it. This other thing, the other thing that I think is interesting about therapy is when you're following people online, you're partially following them for the advice and what they can do for you and all of that.But I think the most interesting creators to follow are the ones who are on a journey and they bring their audience, their fans, along that journey with them. And a lot of people are on a really shallow journey or at least what they put out online is a really shallow journey of like a, I'm trying to grow a business from X to Y I'm trying to accomplish this thing.And it's like, Like, I'm happy for you. There's like tips and tactics that you use along the way. And that's moderately interesting, but I think if you're willing to dive in on therapy and why you do, or you make the decisions that you do and what really drives things, it makes for as much deeper journey, that's a lot more interesting to follow. And all of a sudden the person that you followed for like learning how to do Facebook ads is talking about not only that, but the sense of gratitude that they were able to find in the accomplishments that they made or how they help people in this way or other things that's like a really authentic connection.And I think that, even though like growing a more successful business is not the goal of therapy and, and all of that. Like, it has that as a by-product.[00:22:42] Sean:It does. It definitely does. Although I'm, I definitely look at things the way that you're saying, which is like, what is. Productive output of doing this thing. And it's like, yeah, that's why I need to be in therapy to understand why I apply that lens to absolutely everything. but I I've found it immensely helpful.I would say I would echo what you're saying. in terms of sharing your journey, both the ups and the downs. I think that the highs of your journey are only as high as the lowest that you share, because otherwise it's just kind of it's, it's flat, you know, there's nothing to compare to like th th in the hero's-journey-sense you know, we we're rooting for the underdog who is going through challenges, and then we're celebrating with them when they have the wins.If you know, if you're not sharing the, the, the low points, it's not as relatable. Now that doesn't mean you have to share everything you're going through. You don't, you know, you can keep some things, you can keep everything personal. I'm just saying, if you have the courage to share what you're going to find is that you're not alone.You're not the only person going through these things. You're not the only person feeling these things. And sometimes the biggest failures or, or the things that, that hurt the most or the most difficult to go through when you share those, those can actually resonate the most. That can be where your, your community really steps up.And you, you feel that, more than any other time.[00:24:07] Nathan:Yeah. I think that, like I wrote this article a few years ago, titled endure long enough to get noticed, and it was just actually wrote it, it was off the cuff. I was on a plane just like needed to get something out that week. And it was an idea about serum on my head and I wrote, wrote it out, send it off.And, just the replies from it, because it took a more personal angle and it was talking about some of the struggles and a bunch of the replies were like, oh, that's exactly what I needed in this moment. Like, I was about ready to give up on this thing, you know? And, and that was that bit of encouragement. It ends up being this thing that feeds both ways. If you're able to take care of your audience and then if you let them, your audience can take care of you of saying like, oh, that that was really, really, meaningful.[00:24:49] Sean:Can I turn it around on you for just a second and, and ask, I, I know Nathan, you've been writing recently, you're on a bit of a streak and for those. Following your journey for a long time. They know you've, you've gone on streaks for periods of time. You made an app to log those things. We're talking about this recently.And I was just curious, what, what made you start writing again? And it may be, if you can touch on like the identity piece that you were sharing with me.[00:25:17] Nathan:Yeah.So most good things that have come in my business. Many of them, at least for a whole period of time, he came from writing. I wrote a thousand words a day for over 600 days in a row. And like, that was. Multiple books, a 20,000 subscriber audience, like just a whole bunch of things so I can work it from and everything else. And I've, I've tried to restart that habit a handful of times since then. And yeah, you were asking the other day, I'm trying to think, where are we out of the brewery? Maybe? I don't know.[00:25:51] Sean:Yeah. Something like.[00:25:51] Nathan:Well, I've all something. And you're just asking like, Hey, you're restarting that what what's driving that. And the thing that came to, I actually came to it in a coaching therapy conversation was like, I'm a writer. That's who I am. You know, it's part of my identity and yes, I'm also a, a creator and a startup founder and CEO and whatever else, but like, realizing that. I'm most at home when I'm writing, that's not what I'm doing. Writing is my full-time thing. And like, here's the cadence that I put out books, you know, obvious thing of like Ryan holiday, he's super prolific, like a book or two a year, you know?I'm not a writer in that way, but I, I have things to say and, words have an impact on people in the act of writing has such an impact on me that I realized that I feel somewhat of this void if I don't exercise that muscle and stay consistent of not just like teaching and sharing, but also taking these unformed thoughts that bounce around in my head and it, and like being forced to put them out in an essay that is actually coherent and backs up its points and like, Yeah, it makes it clear.So anyway, that's the, that's why I'm writing again. And so far it's been quite enjoyable. I'm only on, I think, 20 days in a row of writing, writing every day, but it's coming along now. I have to look. 21 today will be 22.[00:27:19] Sean:Nice. Yeah. Right. Writing is so great for clarifying thinking. And I love the, the identity piece. It's like, I'm a writer, you know, that's what I do. And I think it's interesting to think about whether it's kind of chicken and the egg, right. Maybe, maybe James clear would, would disagree, but like, does it start with a belief that you're a writer and therefore you write, or is it the act of writing that makes you a writer?And if you, if you aren't writing, then you're not.[00:27:50] Nathan:Yeah. I wrote something recently and maybe it's a quote from somebody of, if you want to be the noun and you have to do the verb, you know, and so we're looking for, how do I become a writer? How do I become a painter? How do I become a musician An artist, any of these things? And it's like, if you want to be a writer?Yyou have to write, you know, like, and I think we, we get so caught up in the end state that we start to lose track of the, the verb, the thing of like writers, write painters, paint, photographers, take photos, you know? And so if you're not seeing progress in that area, then it's like, well, are you actually doing the verb?And yeah, that plays a lot into identity and, and everything else.[00:28:37] Sean:I like what James, James clear says about like casting a vote for the person you want to[00:28:43] Nathan:Yeah, I think I referenced James on. So it's the, I reference you probably every fourth episode. And then James, maybe at like, just on alternating ones.So the thing that I quote you on all the time is the show up every day for two years, like I always had create every day as a poster on my wall, and I really liked the for two years, angle. And so I I'd love for you to share where does the for two years part come from and why, why that long? Why not for two months or two decades or something else?[00:29:16] Sean:Right. It really, the whole show up every day for two years, idea came from me, drawing letters, hand lettering. You know, you think of the Coca-Cola logo. That's not a font. That's, you know, customer. That's what I would do is draw letters. Like, like what you have behind your head, that type of style of lettering.And I just enjoyed doing that and I, it wasn't a job or anything, and I really didn't pursue it seriously for a long time, even though I enjoyed it as a kid, because I thought I could never make a living at this, you know? And it's that like productivity filter again, what can I be successful at? You know, as opposed to like, Hey, what do I enjoy?You know? And, it took an artist telling me, Hey, if you enjoy it, just create. because cause you enjoy doing it. Just create. I was like, yeah, I don't know why I needed that permission, but I did. And I just started creating and I was creating for me, like, because I loved it. And I was sharing on Instagram and Twitter and places like that, the drawings I was making, but nobody really cared or noticed for the first two years.And it, it, it, that was okay with me because I was doing it for myself. I loved the process. I love the act of. But somewhere right around two years, it was just this inflection point. It's kinda like you say, you know, like do it until you're noticed, right. And people started asking for custom commissions, do you have posters?Do you have t-shirts? And the reason I recommend that people show up every day for two years is it's not going to happen overnight. You know, hopefully in that time you find the reason for yourself that you're showing up. and the two years part is arbitrary for some people within eight months, they're on the map and people notice their work and maybe they could quit their job or, or whatever.Right. But two years is really just to give people a mark, you know, to, to work towards. by that time they figure out like, oh, it's not actually about two years. It's about showing up every day.[00:31:16] Nathan:Yeah. And a lot of what I like about two years is it since your time horizon correctly. and it helps you measure your like past efforts. I think about, you know, if you've thought about starting a, like learning a musical instrument or starting a blog or any of those things, you're like, eh, I tried that before, you know, and you're like, yeah, I showed up most days kind of for two months, maybe, you know, like when you look back and you analyze it, you're like, oh, I didn't show up every day for two years. And there's also sort of this implicit, I guess conversation you have with yourself of like, if I do this, will I get the results that I want? And cause the, the most frustrating thing would be to put in the effort and to not get the results and how the outcome you're. Like, I tried it for so long and I didn't get there. And so I believe that if you're doing something like creating consistently showing up every day, writing every day for two years and you're publishing it and you're learning from what you, you know, the results you try and consistently to get better, you almost can't lose. Like, I don't know of examples of people.Like no one has come to me. I actually emailed this to my whole list and said, like, what is something that you've done every day for two years, that didn't work. And people came back to me with story after story of things that they thought would be that. And then it like started working a year or year and a half in, or at some point in there because it's really hard to fail when you're willing to show up consistently for a long period of time.[00:32:54] Sean:And I think there's a point of clarification there kind of a nuanced discussion where some people might say, well, you know, where where's, where's the other end of the spectrum, where you're just continually doing a thing that doesn't work, you know, doing the same thing and expecting different results.And I don't think that's what we're talking about here. Like when we say show up every day, Showing up everyday to your craft, you know, for yourself to better yourself, whether that's writing or drawing or working on your business. This doesn't mean never course-correcting, this doesn't mean adapting or adjusting to find product market fit.We're talking about showing up for yourself. This doesn't mean even posting every day. It's not, it's really not for others. Like share what you want. If you want to tweet every day, if you want to blog or post your art every day, go for it. I actually tried that and, you know, it was pretty exhausting and that's part of why I made Daily Content Machine.I was like, how about I show up one hour a week and you turn that into Daily Content for me. but still on all the other days, I want to show up for myself. And, and often for me, it starts with writing as well. I think it all starts with writing, whether it's a business idea or a course or a book or content like writing is just the seed of all of that.So I like writing, not because I. It was born a rider or anything. I just see results from it. So for me, it's showing up in writing, even if I'm not posting that, or I'm not posting it now, you know, it's just for me.[00:34:19] Nathan:Yeah. And that's an important point because a lot of the time my writing is just chipping away at some bigger thing. Like some of the long essays that I've written have been written over the course of three or four months, you know, it's not like I got it together and like published it and it was ready to go.It was like an ongoing thing.What, like, what are some of your other writing habits? Because you're someone who has written a ton, I've seen you consistently write like 4,000 words a day for an entire month and stuff like that. yeah. When someone asks you, how do I become a better writer? How do I write consistently any of that? What are some of your tips?[00:34:55] Sean:Yeah. I'll tell you how not to do it, which is how I've done it, which is back to our earlier discussion. Just kind of all or nothing. my first book I wrote in 14 days, 75, 80,000 words, and my, my second book, which I still haven't edited and published. I was like, I want to show people that things take, as long as the amount of time you give them, how long does it take to write a book a year, 10 years a month?You know, two weeks, I was like, I'm going to try and write a hundred thousand words in a single day. So I live streamed it, and my idea was to speak it and have it dictated, right. Have it transcribed. I made it to 55,000 words. And these are like, it's, it's all you, you can find it. it's, it's coherent words like this.Isn't just feel like, like the book was in my head. I made it to 55,000. My voice was going and I'm like, I think I've got most of the book. I'm not going to kill my voice. And that's, as far as I made it. So I failed on the goal, but still got 55,000 words. But then for the next, like three, three or six months or something I hardly wrote.Cause I was just like, oh yeah, you know, look what I did. You know, I wrote all those words and it's like, no, that's not the right way to do it. Like I actually, I think there was a point to what I was doing and it was, it was a fun stunt or whatever, but I kind of regret that, you know, I wish I just stuck to, you know, you had that, that idea of like write a thousand words a day and this is something I would share with people as like an idea for starting out, Hey, try and read a thousand words a day.And I found out people would get stuck on that. They'd be like, I wrote 830, 2 words. I'm a failure. I'm just gonna give up and wait until the weekend when I have more time. And it's like, no, that's not the point. The point is to just show up and, and put some words there. So maybe for you, it's a time like write for 20 minutes, write for 15 minutes, write three sentence.And maybe you keep going, you know, but like put in the reps, show up, you know, put on the running shoes and go out the front door. If you don't run the five miles, that's fine. You know, walk around the block, but show up. And so I I've done it both ways and I don't prefer the stunt way where I write 50,000 words in a day.I prefer the, the, the ones where I write 400 words every single day, that week[00:37:06] Nathan:Yeah, I think that's absolutely right. And I've, I've, had that a lot of times where I was like, oh, I can't write today because I, I wouldn't have time to hit 500 or a thousand words. And so that's something I'm doing differently this time around of like, look even a hundred or 200 is a, is a success, any amount of, of doing the reps as good.[00:37:26] Sean:I want to lean in on that idea of defining success as less. What I mean by defining success as less is, and this is especially helpful. If you're going through a hard time, if you're feeling burned out, if you're feeling depressed, w with remote work, growing and growing, you know, w we're commuting less, we have more time.We have more flexibility in our day, but we, we tend to fill that time with just more and more work. And it's really easy to get to the point where you feel overloaded. And you, you go into your day just too ambitious thinking. You can get too many things done and ending with disappointment. Like I didn't get all the things done, you know, and you're just on this perpetual cycle of disappointment every day, setting yourself up for disappointment, trying to do too much.And instead of defining success as less. And so if you're, if you're feeling depressed, I mean, this gets as small as today as a success. If you brush your teeth, like today's a success. If you shower, today's a success. If you walk around just your block, that's it not run a mile, you know, not come up with a new business plan or outline a whole course or something.Less defined success is less, when I would do podcasts, I, you know, a podcast is what an hour, maybe two hours or something like that. But it takes a lot of energy. If you've never been on a podcast, you know, it takes energy to record. And I would feel bad after I record a podcast, not getting as much done afterward, you know, like, oh, I didn't get that much done.I mean, I recorded a podcast, but then I was supposed to have this and this and this, and just beat myself up. And I realized like, Hey, that, that podcast I recorded, that's going to be heard by thousands of people. That's really high leverage work. And I brought my best self and I really showed up and I really delivered.And that was good work. And you know what, on days where I have a podcast, I'm going to define that day as a success. If I show up and record that podcast, anything else is a bonus. And, and you just make that smaller and smaller and smaller until it's accessible to you until it's attainable for you. So maybe it's like write three sentences.If you show up at all to your writing app and write three sentences, the days of success. And what you'll find is more often than. You'll keep going.[00:39:34] Nathan:I think that's so important in, and I imagine most creators have been in that position of no motivation feeling depressed. And then you beat yourself up because you didn't get anything done, like deriving yourself worth. This kind of goes back to the earlier conversation, driving your self worth from what you create can both be very powerful in that it can feed itself really well.And then it is also incredibly fragile. And I've gotten to that point where if you end up in the downward spiral version of that, then like not creating, not accomplishing something. Leads you to feel more upset and depressed and so on. And it like when it works, it works well. And when it stops working, it fails spectacularly.And I think you're right. That the only way out of it is to lower that bar of success to something crazy low that you can't consistently. And then, you know, gradually you're way out of it from there.[00:40:34] Sean:Yeah, you, you are more than what you do. You are more than what you create. You are more than what you produce. You are more than your job. You are not your company. You're not the money in the bank. You're not how much you make each month. You're not the decline in revenue from this month compared to last month.Like you're none of those things. You're a person you're a human outside of that with independent work. And that's such a hard thing to internalize, but, but if you can, I mean, you, you, you just become impervious to all the things that can come against you. You know, you just become unstoppable. Nothing's going to phase you.Like you can embrace the highs and embrace the lows and just ride the rollercoaster. And I'm just describing all the things that I don't know how to do, but I'm working.[00:41:20] Nathan:Yeah. It's all the things that we're trying to, like lean in on and remind ourselves of, in those, in those tough times, I have a friend who has his game, that he played his, a few little kids, and his sort of a little game that he plays with them over time. And he like in a playful, joking voice, he asked them like, oh, what do you need to do to be worthy of love? And it's like turned into the thing for they, like, they're like nothing, you know? And he's very purposefully trying to counteract this idea of like, oh, I need to earn worthiness. I need to earn love. If, if I like show up for my parents in this way, if I take care of my family in that way, if I'm not a burden on other people, then like, Then I'll be okay and I'll be worthy of love and all of that.And so he's just playing it, like making it a playful thing with his kids from a very young age to basically instill this idea of like, you are a complete whole person and you can't, like earn worthiness of love and you also can't lose it.[00:42:19] Sean:I'm just thinking of the titles for this episode, that my team's going to come up with, like how to be a founder worthy of love.[00:42:26] Nathan:Yes, exactly.[00:42:28] Sean:Don't use that title.[00:42:31] Nathan:Okay. But I want to go, you've built a, a team twice, for first for Sean West, as a business, you know, of the course and content, community business. And then now for Daily Content, I want to get into, like what you like, how you built the team differently between those two times and what you learned. but before we do that, let's talk about as a solo creator. When you're thinking about making that leap to something where you need a team to build it to the next level, maybe you're at a hundred thousand dollars a year in sales, and you're looking at maybe the roommate's eighties and the Marie Forleo's of the world where like a few, rungs above you on the same ladder.And you're like, okay, that would require a team. What are some of the things that you think people should consider in that leap?[00:43:22] Sean:My biggest mistake was applying the right advice at the wrong time.Like I'm not a, I'm not a reckless person. Like I'm going to do my research and learn and like get all the smart people's advice. And so every, every big mistake I've made was as a result of applying great advice from smart people at the wrong time.And so it's, and, and I don't think I've ever heard anyone really, really talk about this. There's a lot of people slinging advice who should really be asking questions, but at the same time, you can't even blame them. Cause like Twitter, there's no room for nuance. Like you tweet fortune cookie tweets, you know, with, with advice and like, hope that people apply it at the right time.Like, that's just kind of how it goes. But like, you know, to, to your point of like looking to other people and what they've built and like, oh, that's what I would need and stuff, you know, I, I heard things. Delegate, you know, you don't want superhero syndrome. Like you need to empower other people and delegate the things you're not good at delegate the things you don't like to do, delegate the things you're good at.And you like to do, but you shouldn't do because you're the founder and you need the vision, you know, like, so it's like delegate, delegate. And so, okay. All right. Hire. This is going to sound really stupid, but no one told me that you need to make sure the thing that you're doing is working before you hire, because hiring is scaling, which means to make something bigger.And if you've got a bucket at the beach and the bucket has holes in it, and you scale that bucket, you have a bigger bucket with holes. Like th th that's not better. That's like, do you, do you like the stressful problems you have now? How would you like problems with another zero on that? Like you have $30,000 problems.Do you want $300,000 a month problems? Like, you know, it's not fun. so nobody's told me that and looking back, it's like, it's so dumb. Like, do you think making this big. Automatically makes it better. It's just going to automatically make the problems go away. No, you need to, you need to scale. What's working, do more of what works and, and, and slow down and hold off and make sure the thing you have is working before you grow it.I don't know if I answered the question, but I'm just speaking to my past self.[00:45:32] Nathan:You totally did. So what are the things that, like, how does that play out as you're building Daily Content Machine, versus the previous team?[00:45:40] Sean:The difference here is my, my previous business required me to function and I hired people around me, you know, to support me. So I wasn't doing all the work, but I had to show up. I had to, you know, whatever I had to write, I, you know, come up with an email or blog or. Or live stream or podcast or whatever.It was like, it was built around me and there's nothing wrong with that. Like, that's totally fine. You can build a business where you do what you love and you're supported by your team. I just found that you can, you can do something that you love and burnout, like after you do that for years and years and years, it's not even that I don't like podcasting or I don't like writing cause I actually do what it ultimately came down to is that I don't like having to do it.And if I don't, if I don't, then everything falls apart. And so with this new business, the agency, it was like, okay, like the first thing I want to build from is this can't require me to function. It has to be built in a way that the team can run things where it's like, I don't have to be on the strategy call.I don't have to do the marketing. Like my face isn't necessarily the reason people are coming to. and that, that really shifted how we build things.[00:47:01] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, that, that's a huge thing. And like, I imagine you defining all of these roles and early on, you might be doing a bunch of them to test if it works and to build out the systems, but none of them are like defined by your own unique skillset. Like you actually I've loved watching your systems and the, as you've shown me behind the scenes, because you're breaking it down and you don't need one person who is a fantastic video editor and copywriter and project manager talking about that, actually, because I think so often we're trying to find the employee or the team member. That's like the, the unicorn perfect fit. And you've made a system that doesn't require.[00:47:42] Sean:Exactly. And we did start out that way, where, when, when I was initially hiring for, you know, this Daily Content Machine service that we have, what's involved in that process and we talked. Clients and prospects all the time that like the Mo one of the most common things they try to do is either build a team in-house that can find all the best moments scrubbed through the long form content, edit it.Well, you know, titles, research, all of that, the build that team in house, or hire a freelancer and the problems with either of those is like what I've identified as it comes down to the person doing, doing content repurposing well requires nine key skills among them like copywriting and marketing and design and animation and rendering, and like, you know, SEO and all of that stuff.And I'm not saying there's, there's no one out there with all those skills, but, but those people are doing their own thing most of the time,[00:48:38] Nathan:I think I'm a pretty good Jack of all trades. And I think if we get to five of those, probably maybe on a[00:48:45] Sean:You could probably do most, I can do most too, but I don't scale, you know, so I'm trying to, I'm trying to scale me. and the first thing I tried to do was hire someone who could do all the things like, okay, you need to be able to, and that very quickly was not the way that was not going to work.So we realized we need specialists. We need people who are really good writers. We need people who are really good animators. People who are good editors, people who are a good quality assurance, reviewers, people who are good project managers, you know, all of that. And that's, that's what probably sets us apart.You know, the most unique thing is like, we learn about your audience and we find all of the moments and like teaching people, I've talked to people who have their own teams, or they're trying to build teams for doing this. And that's the hardest part is how do you teach someone how to find those moments?Like video editing is commoditized. You can find a video editor anywhere, but what happens when you try and get a freelancer who can just chop up clips and animate it and put a slap a title on it? Yeah. Th they're not, they don't care about the quality. They're not capitalizing the book titles and the company names and spelling the guests.Right. You know, and the titles of the clips, that's like half of it, you know, like half of it is the title, because that's going to determine whether someone sticks around and clicks or watches or whatever, and they're not thinking the right way, or they're not finding the right moments. And so the person who's outsourcing, they're trying to go from, I've been doing this myself.I've been editing my own video. I've been scrubbing through my own long form content to now, okay, you have got this freelancer, but now you're a project manager and a quality assurance reviewer because their work isn't up to par. And so I have people asking me like, how do you teach people how to do this?Well, how to find those moments, what's going to provide value to the audience. How do you title it all? and that part, I'm not giving away because that's, that's our home.[00:50:33] Nathan:Yeah. And that, that makes sense. So you described Daily Content Machine as an agency and it is, but I was like, great. You're an agency. Here's my other idea for a show where. Like a dream it up and produce it. Or actually we build my website for me, like your, your designers on all that.Right. And your answer would be like a flattened and I think that's really important for the business. So can you talk about the difference between the agency that you're running in productized services and how you think about making that scale versus like a, an agency of, Hey, this is our hourly rate.These are the projects we're best at, but we'll kind of take on anything.[00:51:11] Sean:So maybe I'll I'll I'll title the clip of this moment, how here's, how you will try it like this. Here's how you create a six figure agency. And for. It is by saying no to almost everything and getting really specific about what you offer and to whom. So my previous, the previous iteration of my business, I was out of a scale of one to ten I was working at a level 11 effort, you know, to bring in six figures with this version of the business. It's like a one or two in terms of, you know, getting people to give you vast amounts of money. And the difference is in what you're providing and, and to whom. So you've kind of got this, this matrix of products or services that either make money for your clients, or they're just nice to have.And then on the people side, you have, it's a generalization, but people who have money and people who don't, and I was always playing on hard mode, you know, I was trying to sell like kind of more premium stuff to people who didn't have money. And I'm like, you know, feeling bad about not being able to give stuff to the people who don't have money.And it's like, you know, what a really great way to do this would be to provide premium services that make money for people who have. So I decided I'm going to start with six to seven figure business owners. What is it that they need? And what is it that, that I'm good at, you know, core competencies. And that's where we came up with this idea.And the hardest part has been not giving into shiny object syndrome. All of the things that we could do, all of the services that I want to build. And it's like, no, there's so much more juice in this one thing. If we just stick to this and just become the best at finding, identifying, and producing and distributing clips from long form content and just be really, really good at that.There's enough complexity in that, you know, and just see that as the game, like, how can we get really good at this? How can we sell this better? How can we deliver it better? How can we increase the quality and just getting really focused and aligning what you offer the value of that to the people you're offering it to within four weeks with just a page and a form.This was a six figure book.[00:53:16] Nathan:When I think about the price of the offering. So I think I have. for what I pay for and Daily Content Machine paying about $5,000 a month. Is that right? I think somewhere in there.[00:53:28] Sean:So, what we didn't say is you, you kind of talked me into, adding another service, which is, we also do the video and audio show notes, transcript, like podcast production piece. So like, we'll produce the full thing. You just show up and record sync the footage to us. We'll produce the show and we'll make the clips.That's actually been a really nice bundle, but I'm like, okay, that's it, that's it. You know? So you kind of have some extra services in there.[00:53:53] Nathan:Yeah.To be clear, you don't want to let your friends, even if they live in the same town, as you convince you to like change your agency,[00:54:00] Sean:Nathan's very convincing.[00:54:03] Nathan:I distinctly remember. I even invited you over for dinner and convinced you of it,[00:54:07] Sean:How am I supposed to say no,[00:54:08] Nathan:Exactly.[00:54:10] Sean:You made an offer. I couldn't refuse.[00:54:13] Nathan:But in that, so you're talking about like what you're selling to someone who might not be able to afford it, or like you might make a course that you charge $5,000 for that is absolutely worth every bit of that when in the right person's hand and apply it in the right way. But you're going to have a bunch of people trying to buy it, who like, aren't that person who's going to get the leverage to make it a clear 10 X value or something like that. And so you might have in this position where someone's like, oh, $5,000 is expensive. Should I buy it? I don't know. And you're like, honestly for you, I don't know if you should buy it.Like you're not in the target market and that's, that's $5,000 one time in the case of this. And this agency, this productized service, I guess, $5,000 a month. And so actually two of those clients, and you've got a six figure a year agency business. And it's just interesting. The thing that you said made me really drove home the point of, there's not necessarily a correlation between effort and income and, and effort and output. And so you found a model and kept, kept tweaking until you found one where it was like, look, there's a ton of work that goes into this, obviously. And there's a bunch of really smart people working on editing and transcribing and captioning and everything in the show. but like, it, it doesn't have to be crazy complicated, whereas some of the other business models that you and I have both tried have been way more effort for way less.[00:55:40] Sean:Yeah. And what can really hold you back is not realizing who you're trying to market to. And. getting Talked down in your prices by accidentally catering to the wrong people. So like people who can't afford your services, you could get on call consultation calls with them. And they're just like, I just don't have this much money and can you do discounts?And you, you almost start to feel bad. Like, you know, how can I charge this much? I must be charging way too much. And it's like, or maybe you're serving the wrong customers. Like, you know, when you talk to the right people, that may actually be really cheap. I remember when I started designing logos, this is like a decade ago.My first logo, I charged like 150 And then, once I sold that I got enough confidence to charge 300. And then I was like, I, you know what, instead of doubling again, I'm going to charge $750[00:56:30] Nathan:Ooh.[00:56:31] Sean:I did that. And you know, I'm like slowly building on my portfolio and I got up to like, $1,500 and clients were paying that and right around there, you start to get people resisting.Now you've got a price with a comma and it gives people. pause And they're like, can you come down? Can you do a little bit cheaper? And it's so tempting. You, you want to do that because you want the job. You, you want them to be happy. It could be a good portfolio item. And I remember just kind of fast forwarding through this, but like, you know, just mindset shifts and stuff.Eventually I got to the point where there was this startup out of San Francisco they wanted a logo. And I was like, this would be really valuable for this company, you know? And I somehow mustered up the courage to charge $4,000. And I found out later from a friend of a friend, you know, from someone that worked there that they thought I was like super cheap because someone else they knew or some other agency was going to charge $25,000 And I was like, wow, like I'm over here. Just like feeling bad about my prices, thinking I'm going so big. And really I'm. I was just serving the wrong code.[00:57:34] Nathan:Yeah. And it's so interesting because the person who's only able to pay $500 or only thinks the logo is worth $500. It's not that they're wrong or they're devaluing your service or something like that. It's that maybe it's for a side project or it's for a business that just got off the ground or any of that. And so it's not worth getting offended over or something like that. It's like, we just don't have product market fit, like product customer fit. It's not a thing here, you know, and my services are better for, you know, bigger, more established companies. So the saying no to, to, services, occasionally getting talked into specific services by your somewhat annoying local friends. but then where does it go from here as far as what are you looking to, to, to add more clients and, and keep scaling and growing?[00:58:30] Sean:Yeah. That's what we're trying to figure out right now is it's always tricky. It's a blessing and a curse when you have an audience, because it can kind of create false product market fit. Like you, you think you have something and then you exhaust your audience and then you're like, oh, like I kinda need to figure this out.You know, that's like, we're experiencing that right now because like, I was getting like 40% close rates on consultation calls on sales calls, and now we're not, and it's. Oh, no, like what's happening. And it's like, well, I think those people probably knew me for several years, you know? And then like, there's just all this trust and still Nathan we're a year in and we don't have, like, we don't have a proper website for, for the agency.It's like a page with a form. That's it? There's no, there's no examples. There's no case studies. There's no portfolio item and we've made it this far. but you know, when people don't know you, they need that social proof and they want the examples and they're looking for past versions of success. And like the sales cycle is a little bit longer.And so that's where we're at right now is like figuring out kind of like Mar marketing channel fit. And I know well enough to know, like it's better to, and back to right advice, wrong time. it's a good idea to be everywhere if you can, you know, cause different people consume on different platforms.Even if you don't use Instagram. Other people do, even if you don't use YouTube, other people do it's. Beyond LinkedIn, even if you don't, you know, that like there's, there's some, there's some sound reasoning to that at the same time. You don't want to try to do all of that all at once, you know, and, and spread yourself too thin, like pick one channel, do one channel.Well, and when you've got that down and it's easy and you have systems and it's not taking too much time, then expand to another channel with the goal of like, ultimately diversifying kind of like investments. You don't want to just diversify all at once. You know, like, like try some things out, you know, focus on one thing at a time, see what works for us.I, at least I know that much. And so it's like, okay, I'm not trying to do every version of marketing, you know, like, oh, do we do affiliates? Do we do ads? You know, do we do content? Do we do cold outreach? You know? I'm trying not to do everything at once. So we're kind of dabbling in one thing at a time and seeing what fits.[01:00:48] Nathan:So how many clients do you have now for the agency that are the consistent tenders?[01:00:53] Sean:Not a lot. It's still very small. And we've had like, I it's under a dozen cause like some, we had like several accounts, like not renew and stuff. So it's still very small. And for three or four months, I stopped marketing and sales completely because I did not want to break this thing with scale because I notice things in operation that were the operations that were not going well.I'm like, this is going to be really bad. Like if we just sign more clients, it's going to be really bad. So, I had clients pay upfront for like six months or 12 months of service, which kind of gave us time to focus on operations. And now everything's humming along smoothly. Like the systems we've built can support like dozens or hundreds of accounts, even like, we don't need it right now, but it'll support where we want to go.But it's still a very, it's actually very small, like again done, like almost no marketing a year end, still don't have a website. Like it's pretty much just been all internal focused.[01:01:52] N

No Driving Gloves
More Movie Car Talk? Nope. 187

No Driving Gloves

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 74:11


We meant to talk more about TV and movie cars, but unscripted caught us. So Derek and John had a conversation while those on the chat on the live stream had their own conversation. Fun was again had.

ConnectCalgary
The Most Important Word in the Bible?

ConnectCalgary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 34:12


There are about 1 million words in the English bible. (I have no idea who counted them all!) But there is one word used that might be the most important of all. Which one could it be: Salvation? Money? God? Nope! "The Gospel" is a phrase you've heard many times before, and today pastor Dan explains why it's so wonderful.

Power Trippin
Episode 212 - Silverado Ced

Power Trippin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 102:23


Pissing in the pool is nasty to everybody right? Nope, not on Power Trippin. We reminisced on the first time we tasted beer. Who are the new neighbors? Ced is accused of ruining the show. MC Hammer is beefin with the show as well. R. Kelly says he's going to tell on other people now. We talk about the Dave Chapelle special on Netflix. BeBe came back. Is Nelly a legend? Follow the show on Instagram and Twitter: @powertrippinpod Follow us on Tik Tok: @powertrippinbitch Send fan mail to powertrippinpod@gmail.com or www.hevytraffick.com/power-trippin Subscribe, rate and review on all streaming platforms and the iHeart Radio app.

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder
Shooting bullets of PURITY to SEE GOD ps119:9,11 s4e124

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 8:00


Why might I want to pursue purity and become a mini-Puritan? Just so I can stop at the NO?  Nope! One shoots bullets of purity so that one gets to the YES; that is so that you SEE GOD.We are majoring on the PRACTICAL today with 3 bullets:1 Cor 10:13 Am I the only one? Where is God? Is this too much temptation for me? Is this beyond my ability? How can I get out of this?  This passage answers all of those questions.Ps 119:9,11 Should I memorize this passage? Am I a young man, old man, young girl, or old woman? Is this enough of a fire to fight a fire with?the PEOPLE of God.  Can I ask the real question of anybody in my world: "How's your purity doing?" and expect a real answer?  If not, then you are not really in the people of God. You can do better.We SHOOT THESE BULLETS of purity to get to the good stuff:  SEEING GOD.  May you get started today. Subscribe with CastBox, Pandora, Pocket Casts, Spotify, Apple, or Google Podcasts.  There is a 7 minute daily podcast available, every single day, to shoot a bullet of purity. To see the face of God.

DarrenDaily On-Demand
Do This or End Up Fat, Broke & Lonely

DarrenDaily On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 3:09


How many of you want to... get fat... go broke... get divorced... become estranged from your family... end up with no friends? Anyone? Nope, no takers? Well, then you need to hear Darren's message in this episode to help prevent you from ending up as all those things.

Outweigh
Does Weight Loss = Happiness? Nope.

Outweigh

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 19:07


"Life will be better when I lose 5 pounds" (or some variation of that statement) was something that Amy used to say to herself regularly. Licensed therapist @Kat.Defatta is on to help us understand why we might be chasing happiness through weight loss & why it won't work.  Follow the hosts on instagram! @lisahayim @radioamy SUBSCRIBE and follow so you never miss an episode and SHARE with your friends & family.  Questions? Guest Submissions? Email us: hello@outweighpodcast.com This podcast was edited by Houston Tilley Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Ledge (mp3)
The Ledge #492: New Releases (Pt. 2)

The Ledge (mp3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 116:48


As announced last week, this week’s episode is a carry over of the previous episode’s new release format. Not that these are second rate to those aired last week. Nope, that’s not how it works on The Ledge. You had two hours of tracks that worked well together last week, and now this week is another two of the same excellent quality. Yes, there are more great tunes from the Rum Bar Records’ Rocktober II sampler, but there are also fine new releases from veteran acts such as The Bevis Frond, Divine Horseman, Mountain Movers and many more, along with newer acts like Mom and Bitch Queens. I would love it if every listener bought at least one record I played on either of these shows. These great artists deserve to be compensated for their hard work, and every purchase surely helps not only pay their bills but fund their next set of wonderful songs. And if you buy these records directly from the artist or label, please let them know you heard these tunes on The Ledge! Let them know who is giving them promotion! For setlists and other information head to http://scotthudson.blogspot.com

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network
The Ledge #492: New Releases (Pt. 2)

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


As announced last week, this week’s episode is a carry over of the previous episode’s new release format. Not that these are second rate to those aired last week. Nope, that’s not... Real Punk Radio podcast Network brings you the best in Punk, Rock, Underground Music around! From Classic Oi!, Psychobilly and Hardcore to some Classic Rock n Roll and 90's indie Alt Rock greatness!! With Tons of Live DJ's that like to Talk Music From Garage Rock, to Ska.. We are True MUSIC GEEKS!

Keys For Kids Ministries

Bible Reading: Psalm 86:8-12Elijah sat at the kitchen table tapping the screen of his tablet. "What are you doing?" asked his older sister, Bella."Our teacher at church gave us some homework," Elijah explained. "He's going to give a prize to whoever finds the most names for God used in the Bible, but I haven't found very many." Suddenly he brightened. "Hey, maybe you can help me. Don't you learn that kind of stuff in Bible college?" Elijah looked hopefully at his sister. "Mr. Benson doesn't care where we get our information, just that we learn." "Well, how about the Good Shepherd?" Bella asked. "Do you have that?""Nope!" Elijah eagerly wrote it down. "Can you think of any more?""There's several in the New Testament," said Bella. "In the book of John, Jesus talks about being the True Vine and the Door.""Oh yeah! I've already got some others from the book of John where Jesus says He is the Way, the Truth, and the Life.""Right!" Bella pulled out her phone to look up more verses. "Isaiah 9:6 mentions a lot of names for God. In that verse He's called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, and Prince of Peace."Elijah was writing the names down as fast as he could. "Any others?" he asked.Bella smiled. "How about Alpha and Omega?" "Alpha and Omega?" Elijah asked doubtfully. Quoting an expression their mom often used when she didn't understand something, he said, "That's Greek to me!"Bella laughed. "Those words are Greek, Elijah! Alpha and Omega are the first and last letters in the Greek alphabet. Used as names for Jesus, they mean He's the beginning and the end of everything. He always was and always will be.""Cool!" said Elijah as he wrote Alpha and Omega on his paper."Yes, that is cool," Bella agreed. "And it's cool that God is everything the other names for Him suggest too. He's our mighty God and our everlasting Father who loves us so much He sent His Son, Jesus, to be the door to eternal life and bring us peace."Elijah looked at his list, then smiled at his sister. "Thanks, Bella. If I win the prize at church, I'll share it with you!" -Lenora McWhortenHow About You?How many of God's names do you know? Think about what each one of them represents. For instance, a counselor is someone who can help you when you're faced with a difficult situation, and God is called Wonderful Counselor, which means we can trust Him to help us and guide us through life's difficulties. Learning the names of God and what they mean will help you understand who He is and how much He loves you. Today's Key Verse: Lord, there is no one like you! For you are great, and your name is full of power. (NLT) (Jeremiah 10:6)Today's Key Thought:Learn who God is

Real Estate Marketing Dude
$600,000 in closed GCU from YouTube Organically

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:42


These days there are so many social media platforms it is hard to keep up and easy to fall behind your competition. There's one platform you should not be overlooking and that is YouTube. You can spend all your money on ads and still not see a return and today's episode is going to change that. We're going to be talking to a 28 year old named Cody Steck who in just two years is on track to close near $600,000 and close GCI 100% from YouTube. More impressively, he did this 100% organically and free.Covering everything from strategy to keywords and SEO, this episode will be one for the books. As a long time Realtor, and real estate investor, Cody has a strong understanding of the real estate market for the Salt Lake Metro area and the entire Wasatch Front. Born and raised here in Utah, Cody knows the ins and outs of each city and neighborhood and has become a local celebrity on YouTube.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeThe importance of finding your nicheHow to make videos pertaining to topics people will actually search forAmount of content to put out a monthResourcesCody's YouTube ChannelReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas in real estate marketing. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know like trust most importantly refer but remember it is not their job to remember what you do for a living it's your job to remind them let's get started what's up ladies and gentlemen welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast What is up everybody? What we're going to do today is bring you live individual agent actually doing the shit we talk about every fucking week on this damn show. So she knows there's people out there doing it we're not doing his his stuff but he's doing you know basically what we do for a lot of people so this is like every PP there's a lot of people doing this exact same strategy and we're gonna focus today specifically on YouTube. How the hell did he get in the business two years ago 28 years old and he's gonna close near $600,000 and close GCI 100% from YouTube Well, he knew the strategy he knew how to get found he created content he started doing it consistently and guess what people started knocking on his damn door and he did it without spending $1 in ADS I think we're gonna find out though because this is what an interview is so without further ado, we're gonna go ahead and introduce our guest His name is Mr. Cody stack what's up Cody?What's going on guys happy to be here. Can't wait to jump into thisYeah, dude, we appreciate having you on the show here Why don't you go ahead and tell everybody a quick rundown Who are you what market are you in and then we'll get on into the interview.Yeah, sure. So Cody stack I've been in the business for six years but just been on YouTube for only two years now so everything I do is almost exclusively YouTube at this point it's all 100% organic and free like you said i've you know I'm on track by the end of 2021 over the last two years I will have closed about $600,000 in gross commission just from youtube so in addition to that I'm doing you know friends and family and investors and all these other people I still have my market still so but as far as just lead generation new business coming in 100% YouTube right now and absolutely love it you know this stuff works and you know if you're thinking about doing it you got to do it you know now's the timeyeah and because like you know, you're in Salt Lake City I was checking out your channels pretty impressive. So if you go to his channel we'll give you the link later but just look up living in Salt Lake City I mean the dude owns every single search term out there and then you can see what his view counts are and you know he's gonna own that probably forever which is the best part about it and there are still some markets you could actually still penetrate and get in there some major cities as a matter of fact where people really haven't done the done the videos I've done that the content yet but it's limited I give it another 12 maybe 18 months maybe in the country and then all these search terms all this content I think you're starting to be so well that would be something else with YouTube because there is a specific strategy that for whatever reason, I don't know why. But I sort of know why like that people search for and why these videos get so much views and attention organically which is the key and what is the percentage of buyer or people that come through Is this how many percentages or relocations coming into the market versus let's talk about types of leads and get off YouTube that will go into types of content?Yeah, sure. So it's probably 90% relocation a lot of people move in from out of state it was kind of fortunate that I started my channel about six months before the whole COVID pandemic shit came about and I you know business was the YouTube channel was just kind of getting started I was starting to get traction and then that hit and you know it kind of was a blessing in disguise that I already had six months of content out there because I picked up on a lot of people trying to escape from the northeast from California from the northwest all these different places trying to get to Utah to you know because now they're working remote they can work anywhere or they're coming here for the jobs that we have you know Utah's growing like crazy we've got a big tech and healthcare scene so a lot of high paying jobs coming in and people are getting you know new jobs here in the area or just working remote and want to you know have access to the outdoors so tons of people coming in probably 90% relocation I do get the occasional lead that already lives here in Utah and they're just kind of doing research and they find me and say hey, I just came across you on YouTube love your stuff you know we'd love to help get your help with buying a place but you know and then I also do get a probably you know I've probably had three or four investors reach out as well I do a little bit of investing content on my channel as well talking about how to invest you know what to look for I'm an I'm a real estate investor myself that's how I got in the business but anyway made some content about that so you can you can really attack that angle as well if that's your your niche. I mean, you can go after that. So there's tons of different niches you can go after, but for me it's been mostly relocation.Yeah, and that's the key niche. A lot of times people will be like, Hey, we get the question all the time. Like, just if you start just creating like just real estate content, like hey, how to buy and sell the same Timer? blank, the home selling process, like it's very, you're not going to get any views on YouTube or you like or you're gonna lose a lot of people are going to search out that type of content. Yeah, it's bad content. Yeah.It's just, uh, nobody's searching it right? I mean, there's been 1000s of agents who have done those types of videos, and nobody's searching for that type of content. That's why, you know, when they're when somebody's looking at buying a house, and they want to learn about the escrow process, or inspections or appraisals, most people I found don't really care about that stuff. They're relying on you to just tell them what they need to know, handle it, make sure they don't get in a bad spot, take care of the rest, right? They don't really care about the details of how an appraisal is valued. They just care that their home appraises so people aren't searching for that they want to know more about the area and more about your expertise as the agent who knows that area and can get the job done.100% when I moved here you guys in the California I say this often on the show, but you know I went to YouTube to look up and see I'm like what the fuck is Encinitas look like? What are the housing look like? What is the strip look like? Like where am I gonna go get beer at where am I going to go take my kids to the park I just wanted to see what it looked like you know and oftentimes the reason why this is theory but I think it's accurate I'm appreciate your opinion on it. But the reason why I think so many reloads come in the market is twofold one they're doing what I was doing visually looking to see what the area is and then when they see someone there it's that know like trust factor and that's what video does 90% of it's based upon the body language and the tonality we're expressing it's not the fucking content. So like if you're if you're approachable on video, they like your personality, which is why they call you it's not because of the content you're spitting out most of the content is so damn boring to be honest with you. It's how you're saying it that people are actually interested in and they're like I can like this guy and then they call because they just want those boots on the ground. Whereas if you look at local business and how local businesses transacted over 80 85% of its gonna come from someone you already know used in the past or personally met or bumped into so when you look at that someone relocating and doesn't have that referral base they don't have that that network which is why a lot of online lead generation which is why everything on YouTube comes in so much relocation is because they're simply just not being referred to the people that they normally would if they're making a local transactionYeah, exactly. Like you said, I mean you hit it right on the content is as an agent the content seems boring and repetitive but for the person who's never been to your area, they gobble that stuff up I can't tell you how many texts and emails and phone calls I've had where people contact me and say I watch your videos I can't believe you know I'm talking to you your videos like a celebrity right?Yeah already status Yeah,I've had people like you know basically say that to me that you're like I can't believe I'm talking to you and it's a little weird you know, but it's like they know me because they've watched hours upon hours of my content. I have no idea who they are but they already know me like me and trust me like you said and that's the most important part of business right when it comes to real estate this some I preach all the time to especially newer agents or agents who aren't doing a lot of business it comes down to people it comes down to how you present yourself the body language and the confidence that you have to be the person that they need to trust in order to get that job done it doesn't come down to how well you know real estate or how good your YouTube videos are. I mean, yes, that will help right? You want to have high quality videos, but my first videos were absolute garbage I mean, audio sucked you know, the video sucked. I was stuttering the editing was bad everything was bad about it. And yet I've got I don't know 10,000 20,000 views on some of those first videos and they still consistently put out 100 you know 50 to 100 views every couple days so it doesn't matter right the content the quality doesn't really matter it's how you present yourself indentistry dude yeah authentic Yeah, my daughter watches like YouTube all the time. So I get all these like YouTube celebrities from Mr. Beast to like you know, you know, you name it. Yeah, you watch their content and the reason why it's like reality TV like people perfection doesn't exist a second you try to be perfect as a second you start turning everybody off. But let's go back to why the look at the positioning on this and this isn't just like this is on YouTube, like people who are just farming their local market with video to our attracting local market. a client's exact same way because you put the personality with the name, and people just want to feel like that know, like and trust. So we did a podcast with a dude named grant wise I forget what episode is it's been a while. But anyways, he's done a study on this or he researched a lot of this and what he came up with was like, hey, on you when people are on video, it's like, ingrained into our brains because as kids, it's like, why do you think your kid runs up to Mickey Mouse and like gives him a hug and thinks a superhero? It's just some drunk dude in a costume. And yet your kid thinks that this Mickey Mouse a superhero? Well, because the kid was seen him on television and TV growing up so when they see him in person, you get like this celebrity status. There's actually a study done. I wish I knew the name of it, but it's very interesting. You're exactly right people are like feel like you're a celebrity doing it and the positioning is crazy on that yeah. Okay so let's go through a couple other things because you're mentioning YouTube content What do you do for editing now and content creation a lot of people overthink these like scripts but it's really just like keep them conversational is what I tell people it's one on one you're just telling people what you already know and you don't need to be an expert in buying or selling real estate you need to be an expert in your community.Yeah, exactly. I rarely talked about buying or selling real estate in my videos like the specific details of that process. It's almost entirely about what's my area What does it look like? What are the pros and cons? How much does it cost to live there all those you know different types of things on the video that's what's most important that people actually care about so you know, when it comes to making content that's that's what you really got to focus on.How much content you put out, I mean videos a month, what your schedule like what's your frequency?Yeah, so right now I'm about one per week I've been trying some different types of videos I've been doing some home tours and stuff just try and test that out see how the you know what the feedback is. So I'm gonna I'm kind of somewhere between one and two videos per week. If you were just getting started if you don't have that backlog of videos you know on your channel already I'd say you absolutely need to be two if not three videos per week in my opinion, to build up that base of videos that people can go watch at least until you've got 10 to 20 videos out there. So yeah, I'm about one per week right now. And most of them are in the office or out vlogging so you know it might be just a sit down video like this where I talk about my area show some stuff on the screen and that's it or I'll be out in my area filming the sidewalks the houses the businesses everything that people want to see. And you know those are the two types of videos I do and then you asked about editing. In the beginning I edited everything myself I wanted to kind of understand the process and figure it out but I've since moved on and I've got a virtual assistant who edits everything for me at this point.What kind of performance difference you've seen on talking head stuff when you're sitting down as opposed to being out on the street on the beach showcasing the demonstrating area?Yeah, that's that's a great point. Um, I would say that a lot of people I think people really get attached to my videos on the vlog type videos where I'm actually out and about doing stuff that those are the videos where people are like Yeah, I saw your video on this on this city and it was great because I got to see how many trees there were you know, was there dirt was there a sidewalk was it paved you know, like all that stuff, whatever just kind of how it visually looks so people get attached to that. You know, which is nice, but at the same time I think people appreciate the talking head stuff because they can just throw it on while they're driving. They don't have to watch me or anything necessarily they just listened to it kind of like you would a podcast or whatever. So they both do well i think i do think you need both in order to be successful.Yeah, that's a good point. There's you got informational, like community informational content, and you have community demonstrated demonstratable content, like the tours, the downtown areas, that's what people want to see. And those do really well. And you're right, it's sort of like, like the vlog stuff, people overthink the formatting of it. But scripting is like very simple when you just break down storytelling, and essay writing and how your book reports when you're in second grade, it's the same shit. attention getter, Introduction body outro. attention getter, Introduction body outro. So you guys follow y'all have y'all have the skill set to do this. It's not very difficult just that for whatever reason. I don't know why Cody, but people buckle at the knees when the record button goes on. And I'm always like, Dude, why are you buckling at the knees? Bro? You're a grown ass man. Like, you just sold a $20 million property and just made like $200,000 you're gonna let the red light make you buckle at the knees? Like Come on, bro. Like you're tougher than that. Why is that? Why do people hesitate?So I don't know. I haven't figured it out.When you started were you sort of like hey, this feels weird or Yeah,I mean it's definitely weird to like talk to a camera. I'm not generally that type of person. I mean I've gotten too used to it now and now I don't even have an issue I just click it on and I just go and I you know, I stumble through it and I can edit it out and redo it and you kind of learn that stuff. I think a lot of people get hung up at the very beginning they think has to be perfect right? They have to say the right thing they can't stutter. They have to you know, have a smile on their face whatever like all that all that shit that doesn't really matter. I mean, it does matter, right? Like you want to do your best but like don't overthink it. Just hit record and just get a video out. That's the biggest thing. It's not the scripting. It's not the content. It's not anything else. It's simply just hitting record, getting a video done looking at it saying oh yeah, I could have done this better and fix it next time and release the video and you know, get on with it.Yeah, I mean, I can tell you firsthand we just some people overthink the first video. I'm like, dude, like it no one cares. Frankly, no one cares what the hell you do, but like the more imperfect it is. in its own way, oftentimes the better it performs Yeah, well isn'tthat Vanya? Maybe because it's authentic its authentic right and the thing is you put that first video out you might get 12 views anyway right like that very first video over time it might give us but at the beginning you're only gonna get 10 1215 views maybe you know so it's not like the whole world is watching this it's not like you're on CNN or something you know what tons of exposure right off the bat you know, so don't overthink it And the beautiful thing about YouTube is look you know some of those first videos I've gone back and remade them and they do great you know, now that my audio quality is better my video quality is better I'm better on camera, Christmas better whatever, all that stuff you can just remake the video nobody even sees the first one anymore you know so it's not the end of the world if it's not perfect.Makes a lot of sense. What else do you see coming out on on with YouTube? You know, I know that a lot of a lot of people are familiar now with the you know, 18 months ago says like the hidden strategy, right? And I'm like, wow, YouTube. But now you know, you see a lot of people doing the pros and cons videos and all that. Yeah. Are you seeing any other avenues open up? Beyond the tours beyond the pros and cons of time neighborhoods? The cost of livings all that stuff? Are you seeing any other avenues coming down the pipe for different areas of content creation that people haven't quite seen yet?Yeah, that's a that's a great question. Um, I think that you I think that YouTube will still be the number one platform in my opinion, or at least for the next three to five years so it's going to be video content number one. Number two, you know, it's going to have to go beyond pros and cons and cost of living and all that stuff it's going to have to go into more vlogs I think that's going to be more important showing the area especially for relocation and also once you've built up an audience I think it's easier to niche down a little bit and start talking about commercial real estate start talking about investors start talking about these you know new construction, whatever it might be, if you want to go into new construction I mean you can build up a portfolio of home tours and talking about new construction and how the framing process works and whatever and who knows maybe you pick up a builder client they give you 50 listings right because they know like hey Cody can sell he's good on video he knows how to market and he knows the construction process this is gonna be huge you can use that once you've got you know a repertoire of videos and you know the confidence to display that on video that can be really helpful so I think that's going to be you know, niching down is going to be another thing that gets more important you know, I've seen some agents on YouTube who do only investment type stuff and absolutely crush it for people in their local market. Going beyond that, I think that you know, increasing the quality is going to be extremely important you know, going forward, I've seen a couple agent start to pop up that have really figured out how to be charismatic, how to entertain how to joke how to you know, really kind of be a performer when it comes to YouTube and I think that's going to make the difference right if I just sit here you know, cold if I just sit here like a cold statue, nobody's going to really relate to that but if I can be charismatic, I'm moving my hands are moving you know whatever. People are going to attach to that and I think that's going to give you a leg up so doing higher quality content, you know, maybe going the professional videographer route all those I'm just kind of you know, shooting off the hip here some different ideas that I'm exploring and kind of the direction that I want to take my channel to continue to maintain that top spot in my market.It's good to evolve though that I remember like 20 years ago was at 2010 I remember riding around in Chicago on a scooter thinking I was so cool. And with a flip camera doing a selfie video like yeah with the sunglasses on I was probably the cheesiest thing I ever did in my life but just like but I mean videos evolved that I remember back then you didn't have to do anything just like Facebook Live came out he didn't have to do anything yeah he just got on Facebook Live it was a call it was he alive is he live and that got a lot of attention but yeah, you're seeing the need for added content versus the talking heads because the talking head stuff everybody's doing it when everyone's doing something you have to Zig or zag or do different direction because you lose attention. Tell me how you're multipurpose seeing the content beyond YouTube. Are you just putting the content on YouTube or what else are you doing with it beyond Yeah, posted on YouTube?Yeah, it's 100% YouTube I've thought about repurposing into a podcast format but you know just they've never gone that route. I don't know if it's just because viewership would be low or or whatever. But I've just had so much so much success with YouTube that I've just stuck with that so I do a little bit of repurposing and my again, my virtual assistant helps with this. He'll take the video and just kind of cut it up and occasionally we do something on Facebook or Instagram just a short video. It doesn't actually it's not actually a link to the direct video. It's just kind of a short clip. But that's basically it. I mean, it's 100% YouTube, postthem to Facebook, you send them your database, video, email, modern anything.Nope. We don't do anything like that we just you know, we basically just let YouTube do its thingcool cool cool any other tips that you taken anything else you want to shareand you just got to get started like that's that's the biggest thing just get started if you're in your market I mean the space now I've been doing some research on how many other agents are in the market you know just in different markets trying to do this and you go to one city and there might be five or 10 agents trying to do this right so five or 10 is still not very much compared to how many agents are out there door knocking or cold calling you're trying to do Facebook ads right everybody's on Facebook ads or at least was you know I've been out of that world for a couple years now but like two years ago, Facebook everybody was doing Facebook right people were signing up for these these you know websites and you know generating these leads and they're getting 50 calls a day right from these people from these different agents so although there might be five or 10 agents on YouTube in your you know market if you're better at video if you're more confident you're more consistent and you put out higher quality you know content, you will get business from it. The thing I love about YouTube as well that I think people don't realize is the closing ratio is extremely high. I'm probably at about a seven to 8% closing ratio for leads who reach out and then eventually actually end up buying or selling with me And the beautiful thing is that the people who do reach out want to work with me right if they didn't want to work with me they wouldn't be contacting me they wouldn't call me they wouldn't email me they wouldn't text me because they maybe they don't like my personality maybe they don't like how I presented something maybe I piss them off because it's something I said whatever. And that's fine I'll never know if they don't reach out you know, because they're just some random view on YouTube. But the people who do reach out respect me as an agent they respect what I do and they want to work with me which is uh would yousay seven to 8% of conversations you have with people that initially like comment on a video and say like hey, I'm interested in moving in when you talk to him like first time on a phone call or something off of YouTube like that would be what you consider seven eight, just you guys know like one to 3% of the national average like for Zillow or or other type of lead gen so he's saying it's three times as much in conversionYeah, yeah, exactly. So I'm considering a lead anybody who reaches out to me so it's not even a comment on a video. Most people who are interested will actually reach out as of right now I've probably got i don't know i'm probably at about 450 I don't know let me just check real quick Yeah, but 466 466 leads over the last two years so that's that's less than one per day, but that's how I get a closing ratio that's so high somewhere in that seven to 8% range from last time I checked. So these are people who have reached out either via a phone call a text or an email said hey, I'm thinking about moving to Utah and then they eventually doand it's not this is the difference guys between lead generation attraction like when they reach out you like put them in some kind of weird drip autoresponder Are you just being human and following up to human way?Yeah, I just do it 100% human I mean, again, I I have that first initial conversation with them if they're in a position where they're moving in the next I don't know maybe four to five months I keep in constant contact with them I'll check in every you know, a couple weeks or whatever. But to be totally honest, a lot of the people check in with me right? They're like, Hey, I'm coming into town like are you still available to show me some houses so they honestly do a lot of the check in for me if they're out more than five, six months you know, I just I I've got a system set up with a virtual assistant of mine and they kind of check in every two months or so with a with an email just Hey, how are your plans progressing, anything we can do for you? And that's it, you know, nothing fancy I I use an Excel spreadsheet to keep track of my leads. Like I know people are like all about the CRM and whatever. I keep it super simple. And it works.Yeah. That's it. Everyone's like, what do you need, you need some super duper honors. But this is not online lead generation. This is called online attraction. That's what video is video doesn't generate leads and attracts attention and then your personality generates a damn lead. It just allows you to basically give your sales pitch without you really giving your sales pitch because that's all people really hire when they hire a real estate agent. They're not hiring. The fact you have a real estate license or hiring What the fuck you can do with it. And whether they trust you That's it. Moving is a big deal. People are like shit, I'm scared. I don't know who to trust where to go. Like, you know, that's a big deal. And that's what that conversion has taken place during the consumption of the content. You're creating no other thing other than that, guys, don't overthink this stuff. This isn't as a giant popularity contest. And the more content you have, the more popular you become, the more conversations you create. Just like if you bought a lot of leads from Zillow, you'd have a lot of conversations, they just be different types. These conversations come to you it's totally it's attraction. So there's a major difference between marketing and advertising. It's, we're talking about marketing, and if everyone should do a little bit of both, I'm sure Cody does Some sort of lead generation stuff probably on his investment side what else you doing with lead generation? I mean no this has taken off but are you doing any geven need toYeah. So yes and no I mean I do postcards and keep in touch with my soI and past clients and stuff I'd send them a monthly mailer.Yeah I love that marketing it's not even lead gen you just yeahyeah just marketing so I mean as far as like lead generation I don't do anything you know, I the way that I look at it is I can go out there and I can you know call Facebook leads or cold call for three hours or I can just put together a video together in three hours and that video keeps on working for me you know, I it takes me three hours I spend you know 50 bucks to get it edited. And I put it out there and it works for me 20 473 65 and so that's kind of the passive income of YouTube and lead generation in real estate is you know, making a video is a way better use of my time than trying to go out there and cold call or lead generate for three or four hours a day.I 100% agree well put dude. Cody wants to tell everybody how they can find you. I'm sure they want to check out your stuff and see how you're doing it.Yeah, for sure. Yeah, so you can find me as we mentioned before living in Salt Lake City, Utah. Just type that into YouTube and hopefully I should pop up as number one at least for the first I don't know probably eight out of 10 videos I hope you can find my channel there Feel free to jump on there copy it steal you know whatever you want to do take the video and just make it your own right Feel free to copy the content for your own local city so that's where you can find my my actual YouTube channel and then I've got another one called the YouTube realtor where I talk I make videos just like this you know kind of talking about how to be successful on YouTube how to be successful as a real estate agent you know just all general real estate agent stuff so just just look up the YouTube realtor on YouTube and you should find itappreciate you man thanks for sharing all the stuff and congrats on all your success it's awesome to keep going like folks if you actually take action things can happen it's not rocket science there's a check out his channel listen to what he's doing and then just take action and do it you either have two ways of doing this you can either do it yourself and figure it all out or if you want someone to do it for you contact a real estate marketing dude it's what we do we'll script that and distribute real estate content. If you choose part of your strategy that's what we do or maybe you're not into blown up your channel maybe just want to build a local celebrity brand he just hit in your database, that's fine too. But either way is there's not a shortage of people that can help you whether you learn from a guy like Cody or you contact us so if you'd like to explore more what that looks like please visit us on our website at Real Estate marketing.com it's real estate marketing.com and thank you very much for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude calm podcast follow us on social Subscribe, subscribe to our channel i G and Facebook and I swear to God and to get to tick tock channel as soon as I get a damn minute. But appreciate you guys and we'll talk to you guys later and see you next week. Bye bye. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at www dot real estate marketing dude calm. We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training and then scheduled time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

A Quest for Well-Being
Spiritual And Embodied Prosperity

A Quest for Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:28


— Love what you do! Whether you're employed or not, this attitude shift of loving what you do is everything! Think about how much would change if you treated your work with utmost care, while learning how to open your heart even more. About 20 years ago, Michelle brought love to a job she didn't like, and within a few weeks, she had more job offers than she could say yes to. Magic? Nope, alignment! Hopefully, you're doing something you love now or are well on the way to discovering what that is. Part of running a successful business is learning how to bring love to all the actions that make it function. Valeria Teles interviews Michelle Boulé — a Transformational Business And Life Coach, Healer, Dancer And Speaker Michelle Boulé helps creative professionals and entrepreneurs all over the world clarify and manifest their visions with more confidence, impact, and alignment towards their truth. She runs a multi-six figure coaching+healing business, offering online group programs, private coaching, in-person retreats, speaking, and teaching. Her work draws from over 25 years of practice in somatic therapies, energy medicine, mindset psychology, spirituality, and her award-winning, international career in dance. To learn more about Michelle Boulé and her work, please visit: michelleboule.com     — This podcast is a quest for well-being, a quest for a meaningful life through the exploration of fundamental truths, enlightening ideas, insights on physical, mental, and spiritual health. The inspiration is Love. The aspiration is to awaken new ways of thinking that can lead us to a new way of being, being well. 

Nope! Too Creepy
Episode 23: "Crime Doesn't Pay"

Nope! Too Creepy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 41:41


This (week-late) mega-episode features 3 stories of devious criminals and their unexplainable crimes.

Creative Thursday with Marisa
253 Don't Hand in Your Resignation

Creative Thursday with Marisa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 29:42


Nope, not talking about your day job in this episode. We're talking about the days when your dream "job" working for yourself, isn't working out the way you hoped. What's your go to? How do you handle those days when you just aren't sure if this making a living as an artist is really right for you? In this episode, I share with you one of my go to's when those challenging moments come up. Join me for the special live workshop (+ replay recording if you can't join us live) "How to Effectively Use Social Media to Market your Art" https://socialmediaforartists.shinepages.com/ You can find all things Marisa and Creative Thursday creativethursday.com and on instagram and facebook @creativethursday        

Moneypants
Is Mom The Family Maid?

Moneypants

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:24


Paying kids for chores sound like a brilliant idea up until the moment one of your kids casually waves their hand at you and says, “Nah.  You know what Mom, I'm actually enjoying my book here, I'm not interested in the money today, you can go ahead and do the dishes for me instead.” That's typically when parents say, “Nope, we're not playing this game. You're gonna do your job because you live in this house”. Today we're going to discuss the Moneypants rules to follow when someone in the family neglects to do their job for any reason. After all, the jobs in the house aren't optional.  You can't just let dishes or garbage pile up.  Someone has to do them.  Today we'll discuss how to keep the home running smoothly and fairly whether some is unavailable, sick or simply refuses to do their part.  Plus, we'll share the simple solution of what to do when your teenager starts making money flipping burgers and mistakenly thinks it means they no longer need to help out around the house.  https://captainmoneypants.com

Yanks Go Yard Podcast
Yankees Eliminated by Red Sox. Let It All Out. Full Therapy Session.

Yanks Go Yard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 64:11


The haters are back to listen to Adam and Thomas rip the New York Yankees to shreds. Do they want to do this? Nope. Not at all. But what other choice is there? This team continues to get punked by its biggest rivals. They paid $324 million to Gerrit Cole to win this EXACT game and he lasted two innings. Only Giancarlo Stanton and Anthony Rizzo decided to show up on offense. What's the point? The Red Sox eliminated the Yankees by a score of 6-2. The season is over. Changes are coming. What are the ones you want to see made first? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Sunday Jumpstart Podcast
Quick Tip #45 Be Your Own Biggest Fan

The Sunday Jumpstart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 10:40


When it comes to your life and work, who is your worst critic? Is it your Instagram followers? How about your customers? What about your peers? You're probably shaking your head no because you know that it's you. YOU are your harshest critic. You shoot down your ideas, pick apart your work, and your self-talk game is so negative it wears you out most days.How about everyone else, are you as critical?  Nope,  chances are you become a superfan! You have no problem sliding in your faves DMs to sing their praises. Every time they post a picture, you're double-tapping with the quickness. When they drop new merch, your credit card can't get out of your wallet fast enough because you're so happy to support. And ain't nothing wrong with that, gone head and spread the love. But when it comes to you and your work, where's that same energy, boo? You spend so much of your time fangirling everyone else you forget to be your own biggest fan. So in today's #QuickTip, we're talking about the importance of recognizing your worth and value and why cheering yourself on is non-negotiable. The Ultimate Podcast Bootcamp | Show Notes + Transcripts |  Instagram | Contact Support the show (https://ko-fi.com/norealjewelry)

Greg & The Morning Buzz
Two Toilets? 10/6

Greg & The Morning Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 5:57


I'm going to vote a big NOPE on this topic.

Rotten Horror Picture Show
44. 28 Days Later (#108)

Rotten Horror Picture Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 90:25


This week on The Rotten Horror Picture Show Amanda and Clay head back to jolly old England, but instead of being quaint and full of outdated clothing and hairdo's, like in An American Werewolf in London, this time it's completely deserted and filled with bloodthirsty rage monsters and very few snacks. Nope, it's not baccarat… Continue reading 44. 28 Days Later (#108) Find all of our content at The Pensky File Links! • https://thepenskyfile.com/links • e-Mail : thepenskyfilevideo@gmail.com

Screaming in the Cloud
DevelopHer and Creating Success for All in Tech with Lauren Hasson

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 33:07


About LaurenLauren Hasson is the Founder of DevelopHer, an award-winning career development platform that has empowered thousands of women in tech to get ahead, stand out, and earn more in their careers. She also works full-time on the frontlines of tech herself. By day, she is an accomplished software engineer at a leading Silicon Valley payments company where she is the architect of their voice payment system and messaging capabilities and is chiefly responsible for all of application security.Through DevelopHer, she's partnered with top tech companies like Google, Dell, Intuit, Armor, and more and has worked with top universities including Indiana and Tufts to bridge the gender gap in leadership, opportunity, and pay in tech for good. Additionally, she was invited to the United Nations to collaborate on the global EQUALS initiative to bridge the global gender divide in technology. Sought after across the globe for her insight and passionate voice, Lauren has started a movement that inspires women around the world to seek an understanding of their true value and to learn and continually grow.  Her work has been featured by industry-leading publications like IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine and Thrive Global and her ground-breaking platform has been recognized with fourteen prestigious awards for entrepreneurship, product innovation, diversity and leadership including the Women in IT Awards Silicon Valley Diversity Initiative of the Year Award, three Female Executive of the Year Awards, and recognition as a Finalist for the United Nations WSIS Stakeholder Prize.Links: DevelopHer: https://developher.com The DevelopHer Playbook: https://www.amazon.com/DevelopHer-Playbook-Simple-Advocate-Yourself-ebook/dp/B08SQM4P5J TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring. Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. A somewhat recurring theme of this show has been the business of cloud, and that touches on a lot of different things. One thing I've generally cognizant of not doing is talking to folks who don't look like me and asking them questions like, “Oh, that's great, but let's ignore everything that you're doing, and instead talk about what it's like not to be a cis-gendered white dude in tech,” because that's crappy. Today, we're sort of deviating from that because my guest is Lauren Hasson, the founder of DevelopHer, which is a career development platform that empowers women in tech to get ahead. Lauren, thanks for joining me.Lauren: Thanks so much for having me, Corey.Corey: So, you're the founder of DevelopHer, and that is ‘develop-her' as in ‘she'. I'm not going to be as distinct on that pronunciation, so if you think I'm saying ‘developer' and it doesn't make intellectual sense, listener, that's what's going on. But you're also a speaker, you're an author, and you work on the front lines of tech yourself. That's a lot of stuff. What's your story?Lauren: Yeah, I do. So, I'm not only the founder-developer, but I'm just like many of your listeners: I work on the front lines of tech myself. I work remotely from my home in Dallas for a Silicon Valley payments company, where I'm the architect of our voice payment system, and I up until recently was chiefly responsible for all of application security. Yeah, and I do keep busy.Corey: It certainly seems like it. Let's go back to, I guess, the headline item here. You are the founder of DevelopHer, and one thing that always drives me a little nutty is when people take a glance at what I do and then try and tell the story, and then effectively mess the whole thing up. What is DevelopHer?Lauren: So, DevelopHer is what I wish I had ten years ago—or actually nine years ago. It's an empowerment platform that helps individual women—men, too—get ahead in their careers, earn more, and stand out. And part of my story, you know, I have the degrees from undergrad in electrical engineering and computer science, but I went a completely different direction after graduating. And at the end of the Great Recession, I found myself with no job with no technical skills, and I mean, no job prospects, at all. It was really, really bad, ugly crying on my couch bad, Corey.And I took a number of steps to get ahead and really relearn my tech skills, and I only got one offer to give myself a chance. It was a 90-days to prove myself, to get ahead, and teach myself iOS. And I remember it was one of the most terrifying things I've ever done. And within two years, I not only managed to survive that 90-day period and keep that job, but I had completely managed to thrive. My work had been featured in Apple's iOS7 keynote, I'd won the company-wide award at a national agency four times, I had won the SXSW international Hackathon, twice in a row.And then probably the pinnacle of it all is I was one of 100 tech innovators worldwide invited to attend the [UKG 00:03:41] Innovation Conference. And they flew me there on a private 747 jet, and it was just unreal. And so I founded DevelopHer because I needed this ten years ago, when I was at rock bottom, to figure out how to get ahead: how do I get into my career; how do I stand out? And of course, you know there's more to the story, but I also found out I was underpaid after achieving all of that, that a male peer was paid exactly what I was paid, with no credentials, despite all of the awards that I won. And I went out and learned to negotiate, and tripled my salary in two years, and turned around and said, “I'm going to teach other women—and men, too—how to get real change in their own life.”Corey: I love hearing stories where people discover that they're underpaid. I mean, it's a bittersweet moment because on the one hand it's, “Wait, you mean they've been taking advantage of me?” And you feel bad for people, but at the same time, you're sort of watching the blindfold fall away from their eyes of, “Yeah, but it's been this way, and now you know about it. And now you're in a position to potentially do something about it.” I gave a talk at a tech conference a few years back called “Weasel your Way to the Top: How to Handle a Job Interview” and it was a fun talk.I really enjoyed it, but what I discovered was after I'd given it I got some very direct feedback of, “That's a great talk and you give a lot of really useful advice. What if I don't look like you?” And I realized, “Oh, my God, I built this out of things that worked for me and I unconsciously built all of my own biases and all of my own privilege into that talk.” At which point I immediately stopped giving it until I could relaunch it as a separate talk with a friend of mine, Sonia Gupta, who does not look like me. And between the two of us, it became a much stronger, much better talk.Lauren: It's good that you understand what you were bringing to the table and how you can appeal to an even larger audience. And what I've done is really said, “Here's my experience as a woman in tech, and here's what's worked for me.” And what's been surprising is men have said, “Yeah, that's what I did.” Except for I put a woman in tech spin on it and… I mean, I knew it worked for me; I have more than quintupled my base salary—just my base salary alone—in nine years. And the results that women are getting from my programming—I had one woman who earned $80,000 more in a single negotiation, which tells me, one, she was really underpaid, but she didn't just get one offer at $80,000 more; she got at least two. I mean, that changed her life.And I think the lowest I've heard is, like, $30,000 difference change. I mean, this is, this is life-changing for a lot of women. And the scary thing is that it's not just, say it's $50,000 a year. Well, over ten years, that's half a million dollars. Over 20 years, that's a million, and that's not even interest and inflation and compounding going into that. So, that's a huge difference.Corey: It absolutely is. It's one of those things that continues to set people further and further back. One thing that I think California got very right is they've outlawed recently asking what someone's previous compensation was because, “Oh, we don't want to give someone too big of a raise,” is a way you perpetuate the systemic inequality. And that's something that I wish more employers would do.Lauren: It's huge. I know the women and proponents who had moved that forward; some of them are personal friends of mine, and it's huge. And that's actually something that I trained specifically for is how to handle difficult questions like, “How much are you currently making?” Which you can't legally get asked in California, although it still happens, so how do you handle it if you still get asked and you don't want to rule yourself out? Or even worse—which they still can ask—which is, “How much do you want to make?”And a lot of times, people get asked that before they know anything about the job. And they basically, if you give an answer upfront, you're negotiating against yourself. And so I tackle tough things like that head-on. And I'm very much an engineer at heart, so for me, it's very methodical; I prepare scripts in advance to handle the pushback that I'm going to get, to handle the difficult questions. Without a doubt, I know all of my numbers, and that's where I'm getting real results for women is by taking the methodical approach to it.Corey: So, I spent my 20s in crippling credit card debt, and I was extremely mercenary, as a result. This wasn't because of some grand lost vision or something. Nope. I had terrible financial habits. So, every decision I made in that period of my life was extraordinarily mercenary. I would leave jobs I enjoyed for a job I couldn't stand because it paid $10,000 more.And the thing that I picked up from all of this, especially now having been on the other side of that running a company myself, is I'm not suggesting at any point that people should make career decisions based upon where they can make the most money, but that should factor in. One thing we do here at The Duckbill Group, in every job posting we put up is we post the salary range for the position. And I want to be clear here, it is less than anyone here could make at one of the big tech unicorns or a very hot startup that's growing meteorically, and we're upfront about that. We know that if money is the thing you're after and that is the driving force behind what you're going for, great; I don't fault you for that.This might not be the best role for you and that's perfectly okay. I get it. But you absolutely should know what your market worth is so you can make that decision from a place of being informed, rather than being naive and later discovering that you were taken advantage of.Lauren: So, I want to unpack just a couple things. There's just so many gold nuggets in that. Number one, for any employer listening out there, that is such a great best practice, to post the range. You're going to attract the right candidates when you post the right range. The last thing you want is to get to the end of the process to find out that, hey, you guys were totally off, and all the time invested could have been avoided if you'd had some sort of expectation set, upfront.That said, that's actually where I start with my negotiation training. A lot of people think I start with the money and that it's all about the money. That's not where I start. The very first thing I train women, and the men who've taken it, too, on the course is, figure out what success looks like to you. And not just the number success, but what does your life look like? What does your lifestyle look like? What does it feel like? What kinds of things do you do? What kinds of things do you value?Money is one of those components, but it's not all. And here's the reason I did that: because at a certain point in my life, I only got out at—broke even out of debt, you know, within the last five years. That's how underpaid I was at the time. But then once I started climbing out of debt, I started realizing it's not all about money. And that's actually how I ended up in my dream position.I mean, I'm living out how I define success today. Could I be making a lot more money at a big tech unicorn? Yeah, I could. But I also have this incredible lifestyle; it's sustainable. I get on apps like Blind and other internet forums, and I hear just horror stories of people burning out and the toxic cultures they work with. I don't have that at all. I have something that I could easily do for the next 50 years of my life if I live that long.But it's not by accident that I'm in the role that I'm in right now. I actually took the time to figure out what success looks like to me, and so when this opportunity came along—and I was looking at it alongside other opportunities that honestly paid more, I recognized this opportunity for what it was because I'd put in the work up front to figure out what success looks like to me. And so that's why what you guys are saying, “Hey, it's a lifestyle that you guys are supporting and mission that you're joining that's so important.” And you need to know that and do that work up front.Corey: That's I think what it really comes down to is understanding that in many cases… in fact, I'm going to take that back—in all cases, there's an inherent adversarial nature to the discussions you have about compensation with your employer or your prospective employer. And I say ‘adversarial' not antagonistic because you are misaligned as far as the ultimate purpose of the conversation. I'm not going to paint myself as some saint here and say that, oh, I'm on the side of every person I'm negotiating against, trying to get them to take a salary that's less than they deserve. Because, first, although I view myself that I'm not in that position, you have to take that on faith from me, and I think that is too far of a bridge to cross. So, take even what I'm saying now from the position as someone who has a vested interest in the outcomes of that negotiation.I mean, we're not one of those unicorn startups; we can't outbid Netflix and we wouldn't even try to. We're one of those old-fashioned businesses that has taken no investment and we fund ourselves through the magic of revenue and profitability, which means we don't have a SoftBank-sized [laugh] war chest sitting in the bank that we can use to just hurl ridiculous money at people and see who pans out. Hiring has to be intentional and thoughtful because we're a very small team. And if you're looking for something that doesn't align with that, great; I certainly don't blame you. That isn't this, and that's okay, I'm not trying to hire everyone.And if it's not going to work out, why wouldn't we say that upfront to avoid trying to get to all the way at the end of a very expensive interview process—both in terms of time and investment and emotionally—only to figure out that we're worlds apart on comp, and it's never going to work.Lauren: A hundred percent agree. I mean, I've been through it on both ends, both as someone who is being hired and also as a hiring manager, and I understand it. And you need to find alignment, and that's what negotiation is all about is finding an alignment, finding something where everyone feels like they're winning in the situation. And I'm a big proponent—and this is going to go so counterculture—I think a lot of people overlook a lot of opportunities that are just golden nuggets. I think there's a lot of idol worship of the big tech companies.And don't get me wrong; I'm sure they pay really well, great opportunity for your career, but I think people are overlooking a lot of really great career opportunities to get experience, and responsibility, and have good pay and lifestyle. And I'm a big proponent and looking for those golden nuggets rather than shooting for one of the big tech unicorns.Corey: And other people are going to have a very different perspective on that, and that is absolutely okay. So, tell me a little bit more about what it is that DevelopHer does and how you go about doing it because it's one thing to say, “Oh, we help women figure out that they are being underpaid,” but there's a whole lot of questions that opens up because great. How do you do that?Lauren: I do a number of things. So, it's not all about pay either. Part of it's building your value, building your confidence, standing out, getting ahead. DevelopHer started, actually, as a podcast. Funny story; I wanted to solve the problem of, we need more technical women as visible leaders out there, and I said, “Where are the architects? Where are the CTOs? Where are the CSOs?”And I didn't think anyone would care about me. I mean, I'm not Sheryl Sandberg; I'm not [laugh] the CEO of Facebook. Who's going to listen to me? And then I was actually surprised when people cared about my own story, about coming back from being underpaid and then getting back into tech and figuring out how to stand out in such a short amount of time. And other women were saying, “Well, how did you do it?”And it wasn't just women; it was men, too, saying, “Hey, I also don't know how to effectively advocate for myself.” And then it was companies saying, “Hey, can you come in and help us build our internal bench, recruit more women to come work for us, and build our own women leaders?” And then I've started working with universities to help bridge the gap before it even starts. I partnered with major universities to license my program and train them, not only how do you negotiate for what you're worth, for your first salary, but also how do you come in and immediately make an impact and accelerate your career growth? And then, of course, I work with individual women.I've talked about I have a salary negotiation course that's won a couple awards for the work, the results that it's getting, but then I just recently wrote a book because I wanted to reach women and men at scale and help them really get ahead. And this was literally my playbook. It's called The DevelopHer Playbook. And it's, how did I break into tech? And then once I was in tech, how did I get ahead so quickly? And it's not rocket science. And that's what I'm working on is training other people do it. And look, I'm still learning; I'm still paving my own path forward in tech, myself.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: I feel like no one really has a great plan for, “Oh, where are you going next in tech? Do you have this whole thing charted out?” “Of course not. I'm doing this fly by night, seat of my pants, if I'm being perfectly honest with you.” And it's hard to know where to go next.What's interesting to me is that you talk about helping people individually—generally women—through your program, but you also work directly with companies. And when you're talking about things like salary negotiation, I think a natural question that flows from that is, are there aspects of what you wind up talking to individuals about versus what you do when talking to companies that are in opposition to each other?Lauren: Yeah, so that's a great question. So, the answer is there are some progressive companies that have brought me in to do salary negotiation training. Complete candor, most companies aren't interested. It's my Zero-To-Hero DevelopHer Playbook program which is, how do you get ahead? How do you build your value, become an asset at the company?So, it's less focused on pay, but more how do you become more valuable, and get ahead and add more value to the company? And that's where I work with the individuals and the companies on that front.Corey: It does seem like it would be a difficult sell, in most enterprise scenarios, to get a company to pay someone to come in to teach their staff how to more effectively [laugh] negotiate their next raise. I love the vision.Lauren: It has happened. I also thought it was crazy, but it has happened. But no, most of my corporate clients say, “We not only want to encourage more women into tech, but we already have a lot of women who are already in our ranks, and we want to encourage them to really feel like they're empowered and to stand out and reach the next levels.” And that's my sweet spot for corporate.Corey: Somewhat recently, I was asked on a Twitter Spaces—which is like Clubhouse but somehow different and strange—did I think that the privilege that I brought to what I do had enabled me to do these things, being white, being a man, being cis-gendered—speaking English as my primary language was an interesting one that I hadn't heard contextualized like that before—and whether that had advantaged me as I went through these things? And I think it's impossible to say anything other than absolutely because it's easy to, on some level, take a step back and think, “Well, I've built this company, and this media platform, and the rest. And that wasn't given to me; I had to build it.” And that's absolutely true. I did have to build it, and it wasn't given to me.But as I was building it, the winds were at my back not against me. I was not surrounded by people who are telling me I couldn't do it. Every misstep I made wasn't questioned as, well, you sure you should be doing this thing that you're not really doing? It was very much a fail-forward. And if you think that applies to everyone, then you are grievously mistaken.Lauren: I think that's a healthy perspective, which is why I consider you one of developers in my strongest allies, the fact that you're willing to look at yourself and go, “What advantages did I have? And how might I need to adapt my messaging or my advice so that it's applicable to even more people?” But it's also something I've experienced myself. I mean, I set out to help women in tech because I'm in women in tech myself. And I was surprised by a couple of things.Number one, I was surprised that men were [laugh] asking me for advice as well. And individuals and medicine, and finance, and law, in business not even related to tech, but what I'm really proud of that I didn't set out to build because I didn't feel qualified, but I'm really glad that I've been able to serve is that there were three populations that I've been really able to serve, especially at the university level. Number one, international students who, you mentioned yourself, English might not be their first language, but they're not familiar with the US hiring and advancement and pay process, and I help normalize that. And that's something that I myself in the benefit of, having been born here in the US. People who, where English isn't their first language; you think it's hard enough to answer, “Why do you think you should be promoted?”Or, “How much do you think you should make for this role? What do you want?” In your first language? Try answering it in your third, right? And then when I'm really proud of is, especially at the university level, I've been really able to help students where they're first-generation college students, where they don't have a professional mentor within their immediate family.And providing them a roadmap—or actually, the playbook to how to get ahead and then how to advocate for yourself. And these were things that I didn't feel qualified to help, but these are the individuals who've ended up coming and utilizing my program, and finding a lot of benefit from that. And it made me realize that I'm doing something bigger than I even set out to do, and that is very meaningful to me.Corey: You mentioned that you give guidance on salary negotiation and career advancement to not just women, but also men, and not just people who are in tech, but people who are in other business areas as well. How does what you're advising people to do shift—if at all—from folks who are women working in tech?Lauren: So, that's the key is it really doesn't shift. What I'm teaching are fundamentals and, spoiler alert, I teach grounding yourself in data, and knowing your data, and taking the emotion out of the process, whether you're trying to get ahead, to stand out, to earn more. And I teach fundamentals, which is five-point process.Number one, you got to figure out what success looks like to you. I talked a little bit about that earlier, but it's foundational. I mean, I start with that because that alone changed my life. I would still be pursuing success today and not have reached it, but I'm living out how I defined success because I started there.Then you got to really know your worth. Absolutely without a doubt, know how much you're worth. And for me, this was transformational. I mean, eye-opening. Like you said earlier, the blindfold coming off. When I saw for a fact how much employers paid other people with my skill sets, it was a game-changer for me. And so I—without a shadow of a doubt, I use four different strategies, multiple resources in each strategy to know comprehensively how much I'm worth.And then I teach knowing your numbers. It's not an emotional thing; it's very much scientific, so I talked about knowing your key numbers, your target, your ask, and your walk away, and those are all very dependent on your employment and financial situation, so it's different from person to person. And then I talk about—and this is a little different than what other people teach—is I talk about finding leverage, what you uniquely bring to the table, or identifying companies where you uniquely add value, where you can either lock in an offer or negotiate a premium.And then I prepare. I prepare. Just like you prepare for an interview, I prepare for a negotiation, and if I'm asking for the right amount of money, I am going to be prepared for pushback and I want to be able to handle that, and I don't want to just know it on the fly; I want to have scripts and questions prepared to handle that pushback. I want to be prepared to answer some of the most difficult questions that you're going—get asked, like we talked about earlier.And then the final step is I practice over and over and over again, just like a sporting event. I am ready to go into action and get a great thing. So, those are the fundamentals. I've marketed to women in tech because I'm a woman in tech and we don't have enough women in tech, and women are 82 cents on the dollar in tech, but what I found is that doctors were using the same methodology. I wasn't marketing it to them. Lawyers, business people, finance people were using it because I was teaching such fundamentals.Corey: Taking it one step further, if someone is listening to this and starting to get a glimmering of the sense that they're not where they could be career-wise, either in terms of compensation, advancement, et cetera, what advice would you have for them as far as things to focus on first? Not to effectively extract the entire content of your course into podcast form, but where do they start?Lauren: Yeah. So, you start by investing in yourself and investing in the change that you want. And that first investment might be figuring out how much you're worth, you know, doing that research to figure out how much you're worth. And then going out and learning the skills. And look, I have a course, I have a book that you can use to get ahead; if I'm not the right fit, there are a ton of resources out there. The trick is to find the best fit for you.And my only regret as I look back over the last 10, 15 years of my career is that I didn't invest in myself sooner and that I didn't go out and figure out how much I was worth, and that I—when they said, “Well, you're just not there yet,” when I asked for more money, that I believed them. And that was on me that I didn't go out and go, “I wonder how much I'm worth?” And do the research. And then, I regret not hiring a career coach earlier. I wish I'd gotten back into tech sooner.And I wish that I had learned to negotiate and advocate for myself sooner. But my knack, Corey—and I believe things happen to me for a reason—is my special skills is I take things that were meant not necessarily intentionally to harm me, but things that hurt me, I learned from them, I turn it around in the best way possible, and then I teach and I create programs to help uplift other people. And that's my special skill set; that's sort of my mission and purpose in life, and now I'm just trying to really exploit it and make this into a big movement that impacts millions of lives.Corey: So, what's next for you? You've built this platform, you've put yourself out there, you've clearly made a dent in the direction that you're heading in. What's next?Lauren: [laugh]. I am looking to scale. I'm just like any company; I've really focused on delivering value proof of concept. What a lot of people don't realize is not only did I build DevelopHer in quote, “my spare time,” but I did this without any outside investors. I funded it at all myself, built it on my own sweat equity—Corey: [laugh]. That one resonates.Lauren: Yeah. [laugh]. I know you know what that feels like. And so for me, I'm focused on scale: bringing in more corporate partners; bringing in more university clients, to scale and bridge the gap before it even starts; and scaling and reaching more women and men and anyone who wants to figure out how to get ahead, stand out, and earn more. And so the next year, two years are really focused on scale.Corey: If people want to learn more about what you do, how you do it, or potentially look at improving their own situations, where can they find you?Lauren: I am online. Go to developher.com. I have resources for individuals; I have a book, which is a great, cost-effective way to learn a lot.I have an award-winning negotiation course that helps you go out and earn what you're truly worth, and I have a membership to connect with me and other like-minded individuals. If you're a company leader, I work with companies all the time to train their women—and men, too—to get ahead and build their value. And then also, I work with universities as well to help bridge the gender wage gap before it starts, and builds future leaders.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:27:55]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Lauren: Corey, thank you so much for having me, and I really mean it. You know, Corey is a strong ally. We connected, and I am glad to count you as not only my own ally but an ally of DevelopHer.Corey: Well, thank you. That's incredibly touching to hear. I appreciate it.Lauren: I mean it.Corey: Thank you. Sometimes all you can say to a sincere compliment is, “Thank you.” Arguing it is an insult, and I'm not that bold. [laugh].Lauren: That's actually really good advice that I give women is, so many times, we cut down our own compliments. And so that's a great example right there, and it is not just women who sometimes I have a challenge with it; men, too. When someone gives you a compliment, just say, “Thank you.”Corey: Good advice for any age, in any era. Lauren Hasson, founder of DevelopHer, speaker, author, frontline engineer some days. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and an insulting comment telling me that my company is never going to succeed if I don't attempt to outbid Netflix.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Nate Shelman Show
Lt. Gov. McGeachin's 2nd Executive Order

Nate Shelman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 7:20


Nope, this is not an old story. Nate interviewed Lieutenant Governor Janice McGeachin about the Executive order she signed while Governor Little was out of town today. (10/5/21)

Stinker Madness - The Bad Movie Podcast
The Terror Within - The Texas Legislature should watch this

Stinker Madness - The Bad Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 86:17


In a post-apocalyptic world, a group of scientists find a pregnant lady and then the shenanigans ensue. A tea-drinking monster finds its way around their base, operating elevators and smashing speakers like The Who all with the singular objective of lady butt. The terror within, indeed. Essentially, this is Alien but underground and in a singular location ("singular" twice in as many sentences? take that English 102). Somehow, somewhy monsters called "gargoyles" are around wandering the wasteland. They don't eat people or animals. They just kill men and have their way with the women. Once a lady is impregnanted a new gargoyle comes out and the process repeats. However the host is killed. And because they killed the men, there's no more ladies being born to sustain their species. These things are dumb. Their lifecycle is about 7 days and they have holes in their skin and can't close their jaw. I think the remnants of humanity will be just fine. You just need to wait them out, they'll die out on their own. So what's fun here? Well, aside from their horrendously terrible rubber suit that the monster actor wears, its mostly the ineptitude of our band of heroes. While I say that humankind will be fine, I will retract that statement if the rest of us are as dumb as the occupants of Mojave Lab. Not to mention these guys are already dead from dehydration before the movie already started. There's no damn water supply! Ok, I'll move on. In one scene, they find themselves in a hall way that has oily rags in a bucket next to barrels that have "explosive" written on it. Of course, you're gonna explode your whole base. Our favorite character is Dr. Linda, who at point blank, tells her patient that all is fine - after being freshly raped and impregnated by a monster. "I'm not fine! I have a monster baby in me!""Nope, it's a human.""I wasn't pregnant yesterday. Today I am and it's because of monster rape!""Nope. You're good. Sleep well." While it can be a little slow and draggy here and there, the plot is enough to carry this into the do category for me, but two other SM hosts said it's a don't. Enter at your own risk, I guess.

More Movies Please!

On the podcast this time, Steven and Sean are hiding away all of our secret keys and keeping our evil doppelgängers from murdering us in the Jordan Peele film from 2019, Us. Hey folks, Evil Sean here. Wait, I'm supposed to have some sort of kooky name, right? Maybe something inspired by Roman mythology or other various theologies? Ummm, how about we go with Jove, because I'm just that into myself. So hey, Jove here. It's become my duty to tell you all about two things: This movie that was watched and talked about. How we're going to be coming up from the underground and taking over a good portion of the planet.   The movie ended up being pretty great, and it inspired a passionate conversation between Not Evil Sean and who I'm assuming is Not Evil Steven. Who would have guessed that this film would get the words flowing as it did? On the other hand, isn't that what all films that stand the test of time are capable of doing? If it's not going to make for a good discussion, then why would it be featured here? As for the second item, I'm not too sorry to say that it's going to happen and there's not a lot that can be done about it. Look, you've been living on the surface for decades. We've been trapped underground, walking into walls, and eating nothing but raw rabbits. There's a major disparity here with which you probably shouldn't be too comfortable. I mean, I'm not trying to wag my finger too much at you here, but… Look, it'll all be all right. We're open to a peaceful sharing of the world. We're not that greedy. Who are we, you? Nope, we're here to talk and work something out. So look, get back to us. Don't take too long. We're patient—we've been waiting under your feet for many long years—but we're not that patient, you know? Send a representative for the above-ground humans and let's get this all worked out. I think we can all come to an amicable solution to this. Sincerely, Jove. (Recorded on August 16, 2021) Links to Stuff We Mentioned: Us - IMDb Us trailer - YouTube Jordan Peele - IMDb Lupita Nyong'o - IMDb Elisabeth Moss - IMDb Winston Duke - IMDb Tim Heidecker - IMDb Hands Across America - Wikipedia Multiplicity - IMDb The Hunger Games - IMDb Snowpiercer (2013) - IMDb Arnold Schwarzenegger - IMDb Smaug - Wikipedia Pinky and the Brain - IMDb Smallville - IMDb Get Out - IMDb Follow Us: Give us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! Our Libsyn site! Our Instagram profile! Our Twitter profile!

Your Kickstarter Sucks
Episode 221: New Crypto Scam Just Dropped

Your Kickstarter Sucks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 104:49


Monday morning...Guess it's time to pour a cup of java, head to "my office" to drop some stink off, and tune in to the best podcast known to man. And after I'm done with whatever that is, I'll be listening to YKS, the show for which these next few paragraphs should serve as the description!On today's show we're talking about the wild world of wrasslin' (with apologies to all our friends who love it), possibly renaming Green Knight to reflect how nothing happens in it (Stink Night?), and an Mike's intense love affair with the scroll wheel. Plus, we're blowing away the poopoos with compressed air, sleeping at the hospital in a pine box, and narrating a dog jumping on a fence to millions of adoring fans. It's just THAT kinda day on YKS, folks, and if you don't think that's miracle shit, then it's not for you and very little is!Music for YKS is courtesy of Howell Dawdy, Craig Dickman, Mr. Baloney, and Mark Brendle. Additional research by Zeke Golvin. YKS is edited by Producer Dan. Executive Producer lola butt.Want more YKS? And would rather it be about horror movies than Kickstarters, feature good segments instead of bad ones, and have incredible guests instead of none at all? Kind of makes you think that should be the show all the time, huh? Nope! It's just one month and it's only on YKS Premium Presents: Miketober! This week's episode: Nic Newsham of Gatsby's American Dream joins us for Halloween III: Season of the Witch! No tricks, all treats baby!This week's episode is brought to you by HelloFresh! Ohhhh Hello Fresh! They're the number one meal delivery service in America for a reason...and the reason, you have to assume, is their excellent working relationship with the Your Kickstarter Sucks podcast. In fact, things have been going SO well between us that they gave us the all clear to hook our listeners up with a deal of dare I say epic proportions? Or portions, perhaps! That's right, heading over to HelloFresh.com/yourkickstartersucks14 and using the promo code yourkickstartersucks14 is gonna get ya 14 free meals plus free shipping. Now That's Fresh! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

FRIGHT SCHOOL
178 - Alotta Devil In That Angel - The Blood On Satan's Claw (1971)

FRIGHT SCHOOL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 69:23


Welcome back to Fright School! Happy Spooky Season, Dear Listener! We're so excited for all the Halloween content coming in. Joe has been catching up on DANCING WITH THE STARS and Joshua is feeling a little called out by ONLY MURDERS IN THE BUILDING. We are kicking off our Halloween 2021 series! This year we are dedicating October to Folk Horror! Finding its inspiration in folklore, Folk Horror embraces themes of isolation, rural landscapes, religious zealotry, the power of nature, and the very real horror hidden in the depths of humanity. This week we're watching one of the Folk Horror "Unholy Trinity" of foundation films: THE BLOOD ON SATAN'S CLAW! This cult classic answers the question "Do YOU know where your children are?!" by way of a Satanic orgy. We discuss Rural Paganism, the cultural anxiety and response to child murderer Mary Bell and the Manson Family, and the confusing messages of the film. Gather ye leeches, liquor, and plough! Dark things are underfoot... literally. Recommended Reading/Viewing: Official Theatrical Trailer THE BLOOD ON SATAN'S CLAW (1971) SO WHAT ACTUALLY IS FOLK HORROR? by Martyn Waites The Unholy Trinity of Films That Gave Birth to Folk Horror by By Kieran Fisher REFRACTIONS OF MARY BELL IN THE BLOOD ON SATAN'S CLAW: ANGEL, CATHY, AND MARGARET by David Annwn Jones A History of Horror with Mark Gatiss (Part 2 of 3) Home Counties Horror Extra Credit: Check out THE LIST WE MISSED "Have you seen this movie? Nope, but we'll put it on the list!" Besties AJ & Jacki will finally get to "the list" and watch all of the movies that they told people they would watch. We can't wait for the RENEGADE FILM FESTIVAL! Follow all of their social media for updates! We hope to see you there! FOLLOW US! Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkTree EXTRA CREDIT: WE HAVE ALL NEW TEES AND MERCH AVAILABLE! WE KNOW PODCASTING! There would be no Fright School without the incomparable assistance of one Matt Kelly. Now you can benefit from his and co-founder of WE KNOW PODCASTING Chris Fafalios' 25+ years of combined experience to take your show to the next level. They want to share their experience with you, giving you a leg up on the competition. In a world of run-of-the-mill podcasts, you can stand out from the crowd with a professional and engaging show! Fright School Recommended Texts: NEW RECOMMENDATION: Creepy Bitches: Essays On Horror From Women In Horror by Alyse Wax, Rebekah McKendry, PhD. and more! Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror by Robin R Means Coleman The Horror Genre: From Beelzebub to Blair Witch by Paul Wells Men, Women, and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film by Carol J. Clover Monsters in the Closet: Homosexuality and the Horror Film by Harry Benshoff The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror by David J. Skal Projected Fears by Kendall R. Phillips Support FRIGHT SCHOOL by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/fright-school Find out more at https://fright-school.pinecast.co This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Interior Integration for Catholics
Perfectionism: Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 76:40


  Join me as we discover explore all the elements of perfectionism, from its root causes to its surface manifestations, through an Internal Family Systems lens, grounded in a Catholic world view.  Through poetry, quotes, research findings, personal examples and the current professional literature, I pull together many strands into a unified whole to help you deeply grasp the internal experience of perfectionism. Intro The Quintessential Persona    Leanna Smith   We are together in this great adventure, this podcast, Interior Integration for Catholics, we are journeying together, and I am honored to be able to spend this time with you.   I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist and passionate Catholic and together, we are taking on the tough topics that matter to you.   We bring the best of psychology and human formation and harmonize it with the perennial truths of the Catholic Faith.    Interior Integration for Catholics is part of our broader outreach, Souls and Hearts bringing the best of psychology grounded in a Catholic worldview to you and the rest of the world through our website soulsandhearts.com Let's get into answering the questions -- the who, what, where, when, why, and how of perfectionism.  This is episode 85 of the Interior Integration for Catholics Podcast it's titled:  Perfectionism:  Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How Perfectionism -- a major, major problem for so many Catholics.   A major, major problem for so many of us.  Thomas Curran and Andrew Hill  2019 Psychological Bulletin Article:  Perfectionism Is Increasing Over Time: A Meta-Analysis of Birth Cohort Differences From 1989 to 2016 reviewed dozens of studies from a 27 year timespan all using the same instrument  the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale by Hewitt and Flett  164 study samples comprising more than 41,000 college students in the US, Canada and Great Britain between 1989 and 2016  Results:  there is no doubt.  Perfectionism among college students is on the rise.  Between 1989 and 2016,  the scores for socially prescribed perfectionism —  or perceiving that other have excessive expectations of me — increased by 33%.  Other-oriented expectations — putting unrealistic expectations on others — went up 16% and self-oriented perfectionism — our irrational desire to be perfect — increased 10%   The Who of Perfectionism -- the Parts The What of Perfectionism -- What is it?  What are the different kinds of perfectionism, what are the elements? Where Does Perfectionism Come From Within Us When Does Perfectionism Get Activated? Why Does Perfectionism Start and Why Does it Keep Going? How Do We Overcome Perfectionism?  How do we resolve it?  Not just a descriptive diagnosis, but a proscriptive conceptualization that gives a direction for healing, resolving the perfectionism.  Not just symptom management, this is your cross nonsense.  There are real crosses that God gives us. Yes.  But those crosses fit well.  The crosses we impose upon ourselves do not fit well.    What -- What is perfectionism?  You know that I want precise definitions when we dive into deep topics together.  I think it's ironic that there is a lot of unclear, sloppy thinking about perfectionism by perfectionists.  Shining a bright clear light on it.   Definition of Perfectionism Brene Brown:  The Gifts of Imperfection:  Perfectionism is a self-destructive and addictive belief system that fuels the primary thought: If I look perfect, live perfectly, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid or minimize painful feelings or shame, judgment and blame  Marc Foley O.C.D.  Editor of Story of a Soul: Study Edition  There is an unhealthy striving for perfection which psychologists call perfectionism. Perfectionism is the state of being driven to achieve a standard of perfection in an area of life that is fueled by either the fear of failure or the need for approval. This unhealthy striving is not the type of perfection to which God calls us.   So you may have perfectionistic parts that would like to challenge me on this.  Your perfectionistic parts may say to me  So, Dr. Peter, Mr. Catholic Psychologist, you want us to have low standards, huh?  You think that would be better, for us to be lazy, to be weak, to take our ease, to relax, to give up the fight, to be mediocre, to be lukewarm, huh?  Is that what you are saying?  Didn't St. Jerome say:  Good, better, best, never let it rest, 'till your good is better, and your better's best  First off, let's start with your quote.  Often attributed to St. Jerome, but there's no evidence for it in his writings:  Fr. Horton addresses this alleged quote on his blog fauxtations.   September 26, 2016 post.  "Good, better, best: St. Jerome?" Oldest google books attribution is from 2009.   1904 Dictionary of Modern Proverbs  1897 Christian Work: Illustrated Family Newspaper.   Others attribute it to Tim Duncan, NBA all-star player, often considered the greatest power forward of all time.   I want you to pursue excellence.   Perfectionism is not the same thing as striving for excellence or a commitment to self-improvement. There is a critical distinction between striving for excellence and perfectionism.   Let's discuss what perfectionism is not.    Brene Brown:  Perfectionism is not self-improvement./ Perfectionism is, at it's core, about trying to earn approval and acceptance  Most perfectionists were raised being praised for achievement and performance (grades, manners, rule-following, people-pleasing, appearance, sports). Somewhere along the way, we adopted this dangerous and debilitating belief system: I am what I accomplish and how well I accomplish it. Please. Perform. Perfect. Healthy striving is self-focused – How can I improve? Perfectionism – is other focused – What will they think?” End quote.  What will they think? Brene Brown  Daring Greatly: How the Courage to be vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent and Lead:  “Perfectionism is not the same thing as striving for excellence. Perfectionism is not about healthy achievement and growth. Perfectionism is a defensive move. It's the belief that if we do things perfectly and look perfect, we can minimize or avoid the pain of blame, judgment, and shame.”  Agnes M. Stairs, Smith, Zapolski, Combs, and Settles:  Clarifying the construct of perfectionism Assessment 2012  732 people 15 different perfectionism measures -- Factor analytic modeling  Found nine different personality traits associated with perfectionism:  Need for Order, Need for Satisfaction of a Job Well Done, Details and Checking, Perfectionism toward Others, High Personal Standards, Black and White Thinking about Tasks, Perceived Pressure from Others, Dissatisfaction with Personal Performance, Reactivity to Mistakes.   9 personality traits  Order  I like things to be neat  Things should always be put away in their place  I like to be orderly in the way I do things   Satisfaction I feel satisfied with my work after I do something well  I get excited when I do a good job  I feel great satisfaction when I feel I have perfected something   Details and Checking I often check my work carefully to make sure there are no mistakes  It takes me a long time to do something because I check my work   many times Perfectionism toward Others I have high standards for the people who are important to me  I expect a lot from my friends   I expect others to excel at whatever they do   High Standards I set extremely high standards for myself  I expect high levels of performance from myself  I have very high goals   Black and White Thinking about Tasks and Activities I will not do something if I cannot do it perfectly  There's no point in doing something if I cannot do it perfectly   Perceived Pressure from Others People expect high levels of performance from me  Others expect me to be perfect  I often feel that people make excessive demands of me   Dissatisfaction It feels like my best is never good enough   I often don't live up to my own standards  I rarely feel that what I have done is good enough   Reactivity to Mistakes When I make a mistake, I feel really bad  If one thing goes wrong, I feel that I cannot do anything right  I feel like a complete failure if I do not do something perfectly   Signs of Being a Perfectionist  GoodTherapy.org article last updated 11-05-2019  Not be able to perform a task unless they know they can do it perfectly.  View the end product as the most important part of any undertaking. As a result, they may focus less on the process of learning or completing a task to the best of their ability.  Not see a task as finished until the result is perfect according to their standards.  Procrastinate. People with perfectionism may not want to begin a task until they know they can do it perfectly.  Take an excessive amount of time to complete a task that does not typically take others long to complete.  Examples of Perfectionistic Behaviors -- GoodTherapy.org article last updated 11-05-2019 Spending 30 minutes writing and rewriting a two-sentence email.  Believing that missing two points on a test is a sign of failure.  Difficulty being happy for others who are successful.  Holding oneself to the standards of others' accomplishments or comparing oneself unfavorably and unrealistically to others.  Skipping class or avoiding a chore because it is pointless to make an effort unless perfection can be achieved.  Focusing on the end product rather than the process of learning.  Avoiding playing a game or trying a new activity with friends for fear of being shown up as less than perfect.   The Who of Perfectionism -- the Parts Definition of Parts:  Separate, independently operating personalities within us, each with own unique prominent needs, roles in our lives, emotions, body sensations, guiding beliefs and assumptions, typical thoughts, intentions, desires, attitudes, impulses, interpersonal style, and world view.  Each part also has an image of God and also its own approach to sexuality.  Robert Falconer calls them insiders.  You can also think of them as separate modes of operating if that is helpful.   Types of perfectionism -- Jay Early IFS therapist Self-Therapy Volume 3.  Four types of perfectionist parts -- Not-enough perfectionist  Creative Block perfectionist  Control perfectionist  Inner Critic   Not-Enough perfectionist Always must do more on your projects -- not good enough yet.   Working right up to deadlines, perfecting.   Afraid to finish project because your perfectionistic parts believe this will expose your shortcomings and led to being judged  and ridiculed -- humiliation.   Creative Block Perfectionist Need to be perfect the first time  Ideas are not good enough  Fear of being judged and rejected.   Mike Litman:  You don't have to get it right.  You just have to get it going.  This podcast is an example.  Didn't know what I was doing.  Early episodes were very different.  Learning curve.  How many people listened?  Not many.   Control perfectionist World must be perfectly in control and in order.   I must always do the right thing.   I must always make the right choice   Rigid control over behavior Saps vitality  Obliterates sponteneity   Need predictability to feel safe   Inner Critic  Enforces the goals of being perfect Judges and shames about your work, your life, your spiritual practices  Labels you stupid, incompetent, sloppy, inadequate or bad.   Good intention:  to help you avoid being judged or shamed for mistakes.   Types of Inner Critic:  Jay Earley Personal-Growth-Programs.com  -- Transforming your Inner Critic.  Freedom from your Inner Critic.   Perfectionist This critic tries to get you to do things perfectly.  It sets high standards for the things your produce, and has difficulty saying something is complete and letting it go out to represent your best work.  It tries to make sure that you fit in and that you will not be judged or rejected.  Its expectations probably reflect those of people who have been important to you in the past.   Guilt-Tripper This critic is stuck in the past. It is unable to forgive you for wrongs you have done or people you have hurt.  It is concerned about relationships and holds you to standards of behavior prescribed by your community, culture and family  It tries to protect you from repeating past mistakes by making sure you never forget or feel free.   Underminer This critic tries to undermine your self-confidence and self-esteem so that you won't take risks.  It makes direct attacks on your self-worth so that you will stay small and not take chances where you could be hurt or rejected.  It is afraid of your being too big or too visible and not being able to tolerate judgment or failure.   Destroyer It makes pervasive attacks on your fundamental self worth.  It shames you and makes you feel inherently flawed and not entitled to basic understanding or respect.  This most debilitating critic, comes from early life deprivation or trauma.  It is motivated by a belief that it is safer not to exist.   Molder This critic tries to get you to fit into a certain mold based on standards held by society, your culture or your family.  It wants you to be liked and admired and to protect you from being abandoned, shamed or rejected.  The Molder fears that the Rebel or the Free Spirit in you would act in ways that are unacceptable. So it keeps you from being in touch with and expressing your true nature.   Taskmaster This critic wants you to work hard and be successful.  It fears that you may be mediocre or lazy and will be judged a failure if it does not push you to keep going.  Its pushing often activates a procrastinator or a rebel that fights against its harsh dictates.   Inner Controller This critic tries to control your impulses: eating, drinking, sexual activity, etc.  It is polarized with an Indulger –addict who it fears can get out of control at any moment.  It tends to be harsh and shaming in an effort to protect you from yourself.  It is motivated to try to make you a good person who is accepted and functions well in society.   Three Main Manager Roles Contribute to Perfectionism in Catholics.   Often in serious Catholics there is a triumvirate of managers who govern the system if there is not sufficient self-energy.   Triumvirate   trium virum, genitive plural of tres viri "three men," from tres "three" (see three) + viri, plural of vir "man"  a group of three men holding power, in particular ( the First Triumvirate ) the unofficial coalition of Julius Caesar, Pompey, and Crassus in 60 BC and ( the Second Triumvirate ) a coalition formed by Antony, Lepidus, and Octavian in 43 BC. Standard Bearer, Primary Manager and the Inner Critic.   Talking only about Catholics here, Catholics who take their faith seriously. I'm going to simplify this down.  Three roles.    Most people are mostly blended most of the time.   Rare for someone to be really recollected at a natural level And most of the time with reasonably well functioning people, the blend is with a manager.   Managers are the parts who run our systems in such a ways as to proactively minimize exiles being activated and breaking through Managers handle the day-to-day activities Some of these managers are very, very competent, very good at what they do.  Efficient, effective.  They work strategically, with forethought and planning to keep in control of situations and relationships to minimize the likelihood of you being hurt.  They work really hard to keep you safe. controlling, striving, planning, caretaking, judging,  Can be pessimistic, self-critical, very demanding.    Three major roles in perfectionism.  The standard bearer, the primary manager, and the internal critic.   Standard Bearer  Definition of a Standard for a military unit -- Wikipedia:  A bright, colorful flag acting as a strong visual beacon to the soldiers of the unit -- -- it doesn't always have to be a flag.  The standard for a Roman Legion was their aquila -- their eagle. The standard of the Roman Legion, the eagle had quasi-religious importance to the Roman soldier, far beyond being merely a symbol of his legion.  To lose a standard was extremely grave, and the Roman military went to great lengths both to protect a standard and to recover it if it were lost   Is the standard the deep and loving relationship with God?  Nope. Is the standard the close, intimate relationship with our Mother Mary?  Nyet.   What is the standard that the standard bearer carries aloft The standard is the unwritten list of rules and expectations that the standard bearer has come up with by his or her own limited vision, about what he or she things Gods wants from us.   The standard is the code of conduct that the standard bearer wishes to impose on all the parts The standard might be quite unreasonable, especially in the extreme cases of perfectionism and scrupulosity  And the standard needs to be interpreted -- other parts are not deemed capable of deciphering the standard.  Oh no.  Who needs to decipher and interpret the standard?  That's right, you've got it -- the standard bearer.  In the tripartite Freudian model of the mind, The standard bearer corresponds to the superego.   The standard bearer wants to act in the role of conscience, giving directives to the system.  Why?  To keep us safe and secure.  That's the goal.  Safe from internal enemies (such as exiles with their burdens -- especially shame -- the exiles with their burdens are Freud's Id) and external enemies.  Satan, demons, villains of all kinds  And also to keep us safe from God's Wrath.  Or God's Apathy.  Or God's disappointment.  Or Something Undesirable from God -- you like, like being smited with a thunderbolt.   Good Boy in my system  IIC 71 -- A New and Better Way of Understanding Myself and Others If blended.  That's key if he blends with me, takes over with other managers, he will lapse into this role of being a standard bearer.  Otherwise, he's not like that.   Primary Manager This is a part that is blended and in charge almost all the time in fairly "well-adjusted people."   When there seems to be a consistent single "personality" you are often seeing what I call the primary manager part.   This part can have a lot of self-energy, and only blend to certain degree.   This part can also believe that it is essentially the self, or that it needs to function in the role of the self  Primary manager parts either Doesn't trust the self  Or forget.  Lapse back into old patterns  Or get caught up when exiles are activated.   Collaborator in my system -- formerly the Competent One Inner Critic Evaluator in my system.  Formerly my Internal Critic.  My internal critic's attitude toward farms growing up in Wisconsin.   If I ever have a farm.   Now I have a farm.  Radical new views.  Never painted my barn.   How my parts work together on this podcast episode When I am blended and have taken over the self, I set the standards.  I speak for God. I am in the role of standard bearer.   When I am blended, I shielded Good Boy from the unreasonableness of his demands.  I goaded Collaborator, pressed him on to ever better performance.  I am the workhorse.  Executing.  Trying to make it all happen   I'm a firefighter.  I get angry and rebel against the triumvirate of managers -- YouTube time.   Other firefighter activity -- Chocolate, video games, masturbation, porn, food, shopping, chocolate.   Backlash exacerbates the polarization.     I work to protect us.   Where Does Perfectionism Come From Perfectionism is a symptom.  It's an effect of a deeper issue. Still a problem in itself.  Curran and Hall:  Our findings suggest that self-oriented perfectionism, socially prescribed perfectionism, and other-oriented perfectionism have increased over the last 27 years. We speculate that this may be because, generally, American, Canadian, and British cultures have become more individualistic, materialistic, and socially antagonistic over this period, with young people now facing more competitive environments, more unrealistic expectations, and more anxious and controlling parents than generations before.  Pete Walker  “Perfectionism is the unparalleled defense for emotionally abandoned children. The existential unattainability of perfection saves the child from giving up, unless or until, scant success forces him to retreat into the depression of a dissociative disorder, or launches him hyperactively into an incipient conduct disorder. Perfectionism also provides a sense of meaning and direction for the powerless and unsupported child. In the guise of self-control, striving to be perfect offers a simulacrum of a sense of control. Self-control is also safer to pursue because abandoning parents typically reserve their severest punishment for children who are vocal about their negligence.”  Jay Earley:  Self-Therapy Vol. 3 chapter on perfectionism.   Fear Need for approval Marie Forleo, Everything is Figureoutable “Perfectionism at its core isn't about high standards. It's about fear. Fear of failure. Fear of looking stupid, fear of making a mistake, fear of being judged, criticized, and ridiculed. It's the fear that one simple fact might be true:  You're just not good enough. Michael Law  “At its root, perfectionism isn't really about a deep love of being meticulous. It's about fear. Fear of making a mistake. Fear of disappointing others. Fear of failure. Fear of success.” Hiding -- driven by shame.  Genesis 3.  Chinonye J. Chidolue  “Perfection is a faux. It's a mask carved by our own poor esteem to hide who we really are and make others see what really isn't us.”  But what's behind those?  Let's go deeper Shame.  Deep sense of fundamental inadequacy.  Not being loved.  Not being lovable.  Essentially flawed.  Being bad.  Unworthy.   Episodes 37-49     When Does Perfectionism Get Activated?   Some are perfectionistic all the time Some are episodic. Some of the time.  Situation factors or internal factors activate Shame.   Fear Anger Shame is:  a primary emotion, a bodily reaction, a signal,  a judgement, and an action.   Why Does it Keep Going?  Self Images Shame -- that is the main driver of perfectionism.  I am unacceptable as I am right now.  I have to engage in a self-improvement program.   That's what he took away from experience.  Not just taught, but construed.   The potential to become good enough to earn the love -- provides hope for the future in the short run.   But hamster on a wheel.   Breeds rebellion, acting out.   Perfectionistic parts always get what they don't want.  Winding up alienated, isolated, alone Glennon Doyle Melton  "We can choose to be perfect and admired or to be real and loved."  Ze Frank -- salty quote:  “Perfectionism may look good in his shiny shoes, but he's a bit of an asshole and no one invites him to their pool parties.”  How Do We Overcome Perfectionism?  Standard Advice -- focused on symtpoms  Oregon Counseling Become more aware of your tendencies toward perfectionism  Focus on the Positives  Allow yourself to make mistakes  Set more reasonable goals  Learn how to receive Criticism  Lower the pressure you put on yourself  Focus on meaning over perfection  Try not to procrastinate  Cut out negative influences  Go to therapy.   Others Sharon Martin, LCSW in California Practice self-compassion  Adopt a growth mindset  Instead of focusing on outcomes, enjoy the process  Be true to yourself rather than trying to please everyone  Be more assertive with your own needs  Love your imperfect self.   Tanya Peterson Choosing Therapy.com Keep track of your thoughts  Practice mindfulness  Focus on your strengths  Stop comparing yourself to others  Find your own meaning and purpose  Rekindle your sense of pleasure and gratitude  Think about your life at age 100  Let yourself experiment.   These are almost all symptom based approaches.  Superficial.  Likely to not get to the root cause.  Sound good.  Hard to accomplish though because of the perfectionism and its roots.   Two major types of approaches  Treat perfectionism as an enemy to be ignored, dismissed, fought against, or overcome.  Byron Brown based on the Diamond Approach 1999 Souls without Shame.   Robert W. Firestone and colleagues in their Voice Therapy approach  Conquer your Inner Critical Voice  Rick Carson in his 1983 book Taming Your Gremlin   By far the approach most serious Catholic favor in dealing with perfectionism and scrupulosity Will power  Suppression  Domination over the undesireable internal experience.  Triumph of the will!  Victory.  Never works.  Not for long.  And when it seems to work, it's unstable, tenuous, shaky.   Revenge of the repressed.   But what if perfectionism and the parts around it have something important to say to you?   Treat perfectionism as an ally to be seen, heard, to be accepted, befriended, understood, and ultimately transformed.   Hal and Sidra Stone based on Voice Dialogue,  1993 Embracing your inner critic: turning self-criticism into a creative asset Jay Earley and Bonnie Weiss based on Internal Family Systems therapy 2010 Self-therapy for your inner critic: transforming self-criticism into self-confidence Ann Weiser Cornell based on Inner Relationship Focusing in her 2005 book The Radical Acceptance of Everything Pat Allen also takes this approach in her 1995  book Art Is a Way of Knowing.[14]  These approaches see the inner critic as attempting to help or protect the person—but in a covert, distorted, or maladaptive way. This perspective makes it possible to connect with the critic and transform it over time into a helpful ally.  Earley's approach.    Getting to the root.  Shame IIC 37-49.   Engage with the parts burdened with shame.   Neural Networks -- one neural network Dan Siegel's interpersonal neurobiology.   Lee Health IFS is considered a brain-based psychotherapy designed specifically to access and modify neural networks through intentional interactions via a guided meditative processes.  These brain based interactions are the key to helping create different pathways often referred to as “rewiring” or “remapping”. IEADP Foundation These processes serve to engage the brain stem, limbic system and prefrontal cortex simultaneously in the safe and emotional tolerable setting of the therapist's office. This increase in the individual's ability to stay in the window of tolerance while being present with strong emotional states, body sensations and memories allows the client to engage the “witnessing mind” and increases the response flexibility to the strong emotional states that previously would elicit eating disorder behaviors Experiential Exercise What did you think -- let me know call or text 317.567.9594. Also, if you have found great resources that were helpful for your scrupulosity or perfectionism let me know.   Next episode Episode 86, will come out on November 1, All Saints Day Scrupulosity --  I have such a different take -- Scrupulosity is what happens with perfectionism gets religion.   One more element that we haven't discussed that is so central to scrupulosity, that make scrupulosity much more than a religious spiritual perfectionism.   My own battle with scrupulosity.   Grandpa Roberts:  God helps those who help themselves.   Today we laid a foundation for understanding perfectionism.  Next episode, we get much more into Solutions for scruplosity and perfectionism.   Remember, you as a listener can call me on my cell any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM.  I've set that time aside for you.  317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  Resilient Catholics Community.  84 on the waiting list.  Greater discussion of that in the last episode, episode 84.  We have been working through the Individual Results Sheet for dozens of RCC members -- amazed at how our Initial Measures Kit can provoke all kinds of new thinking about their parts and their internal worlds.  Work with Catholic Standard Bearers, Primary Managers and Inner Critics Catholic therapists or therapists in training -- If you are really interested in Internal Family System and you want to be with me and other Catholic therapists, working on your human formation with your colleagues, The Interior Therapist Community is for you.  We have a couple more spots open in the last Foundations Experiential Group for the fall of 2021, so check out all our offerings at soulsandhearts.com/itc.          

Murderlaide
Merry Mad Monis

Murderlaide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 28:36


After seven parts we made it.  The conclusion of the Lindt café siege.  This is the ending no one wanted but was not unexpected.  Any one else stay up all night that day watching the live coverage?? Nope you all have lives?? Ok thenMusic credit "The Brotherhood" By Darren Curtiswww.murderlaide.comwww.patreon.com/murderlaidemurderlaide@gamil.comIntro to help support Ann as a creator and help keep the podcast ad free Likes, ratings and reviews are how other Strangeone's find the podcast. Give a gal a hand and review the podcast todaySupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/murderlaide)

Why are people watching this?

Dave and Justin discuss Squid Game the #1 show on Netflix this week. Here's the official synopsis: Hundreds of cash-strapped contestants accept an invitation to compete in children's games for a tempting prize, but the stakes are deadly. Ashley joins the lads this week to explain why the protagonist of this show is in fact a good guy, and why Korean street food is da bomb. Dave finds himself dolling out life advice from a bathroom stall for people drinking nose blood. Justin really liked this show, even though the bad guys look like Teletubbies. Oh, and Justin and Ashley would totally trample Dave's dead body if they ever got the chance to play the deadly version of Red Light/Green light IRL. Justin's synopsis of Squid Game: Imagine a world in which the Teletubbies ran an underground gladiatorial arena where disenfranchised people and terminal cancer patients battle to the death in order to win confusingly large sums of money. It's like bum fights for kids crossed with a technicolor version of the holocaust. Sounds awful right? Nope. It's compelling and captivating and I don't understand why.

Climbing The Pocket
Vikings vs Browns - CTP's: The Final Score

Climbing The Pocket

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 28:48


The Vikings are 1-2 coming off their first win. Will they get their second one toady? Nope! From the crowd in US Bank Stadium and improving play by the Minnesota Vikings, they will will attempt to defeat the even better team of the Cleveland Browns. Nope! With Dalvin Cook looking to play, even first rounder Christian Darrisaw seeing snaps on Special Teams, the Vikes will test themselves against a very good Kevin Stefanski and Baker Mayfield led team. Can the O-line improve some more keeping Kirk Cousins clean and opening high holes in the running game? Nope! Can Adam Thielen and Justin Jefferson continue their touchdown streaks? Just JJ. Can the Purple be victorious? Nope! Catch us at the end of the game as we go live! 1) Highlights 2) Lowlights 3) Speed round and your questions 4) What's ahead The Final Score [the name for CTP's Postgame show] is ready for the season. There are 4 new regulars and the occasional guest. The focus will be on you the fan, and how you felt the team did. Hopefully racking up the wins in the regular season. Today, Jayson, Dave, Flip from the stadium and Matt will all be here. Did you like what you saw? #SKOL Fan with us!!! Guesting with Jayson and Dave tonight was Tyler Forness, @TheRealForno. Regulars Jayson Brown @brownjayson, Flip Mazzi @Flipmazzi, Matt Anderson @MattAnderson_8 and Dave Stefano @Luft_Krigare producing this @Climb_ThePocket Network's & @DailyNorseman's production. _____________________________________________________________________________________ Subscribe to us here! - https://www.youtube.com/c/climbingthepocket Watch it here: https://youtu.be/4xZdIPPUl8s Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Criminal Prints
The Murders of Nicole Brown and Ronald Goldman. (Part Seven)

Criminal Prints

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 21:23


OJ has been found not guilty in the criminal trial but he wasn't so lucky in the civil trial. At this point you would think he would do everything possible to avoid further trouble. Nope, not OJ. Remember the items he hid from the victims families to avoid being sold? Karma would find a way to get even. Likely the biggest shock of all is a book OJ helped write. It's titled If I did it.

Dynasty Owner
Week 4 Preview – The G.O.A.T.

Dynasty Owner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 19:06


Thanks for reading my weekly preview article. Every week of the 14-game Dynasty Owner regular season and three game playoffs, I'll present a player at each position (QB, RB, WR, TE) who you should have as a Starter in your Dynasty Owner lineup. After that, I'll name one player per position who should be on your Bench or Practice Squad. These won't be the obvious choices for Starters either. No recommendations to go ahead and start the G.O.A.T. (QB1), Derrick Henry (RB1), Cooper Kupp (WR1), or Travis Kelce (TE1). I also won't have “sleepers” like Chuba Hubbard listed this week since he's replacing Christian McCaffrey as the Carolina starting RB. More likely than not, if you have Hubbard, he's in your Starting lineup, you don't need me (or anybody else) to write a paragraph on why he should be there. Nope, I'm going to recommend you Start players who were clearly drafted to be on your Bench or Practice Squad, or who rank outside the Top 12 QBs, Top 24 RBs, Top 24 WRs and Top 12 TEs. For the Bench recommendations, I'll suggest players drafted to be Starters or who should be in your Starting lineup based on their current ranking, but who shouldn't be in there this week based on matchups, past performance against a team or something else. -------------------------------------------------------What is Dynasty Owner? Dynasty Owner is not your average fantasy football. You may have your DraftKings and Fanduels of the world but we are year-round and put you right in the seat of the Owner, Coach, and GM. Fantasy footballers all over have been wanting a game like this and you may have even heard our name from Christopher Harris or even the Dynasty Nerds podcast.We use real NFL contracts and salaries in our game so when something changes here in the real world it affects your team for the year. With a challenge of the salary cap and keeping your team under it, you get the feeling of what it's like to run a business and see your team get rewarded when they win.Learn more today at www.dynastyowner.com and come see what we are all about.-------------------------------------------------------Connect with Dynasty Owner:Visit us on the web -- https://www.dynastyowner.comFollow us on Twitter -- @Dynasty_OwnerFollow on Facebook - www.facebook.com/DynastyOwnerFantasySports

Dark History
12: MKUltra: Mind Control, Drugs and Robocats

Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 51:14


What if we told you the Government thought LSD could be used for mind control? What if we told you they tested this on thousands of people without their knowledge? Or what if we told you the CIA was slicing open cats and putting microphones in them to create adorable little spies? You'd probably think we're high. Nope. Just the Government. Well, today Bailey tells the story of a secret Government project called MKUltra, where they did all of this. And more. Episode sponosrs include: Zip Recruiter, Wicked Cloths, Upstart and Calm US!  Learn more during the podcast about special offers!  For 10% off go to Wickedclothes.com and use promo code DARKHISTORY.