Podcasts about social determinants

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Best podcasts about social determinants

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Latest podcast episodes about social determinants

Relentless Health Value
EP388: Merrill Goozner on the Future of Healthcare and Glide Paths to Get There

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 34:55


In this healthcare podcast, I have Merrill Goozner on the show talking about his prognostications for the future of healthcare in this country and how, realistically, it could be engineered so that the healthcare industry rightsizes itself relative to our GDP. Merrill offers three glide paths to this end. Okay … so, let's break this down some. First, Merrill talks about the full impact of huge numbers of patients/people in this country who are scared to seek medical attention. They are afraid to play the game at the end when the bill comes in the mail and they open it up having no idea what it is going to be. It's a magical mystery guessing game of luck and chance where losers go bankrupt. This is not a victimless situation we have going on here in this country. All these deaths of despair and life expectancy going down … this is unprecedented. So now, we're level-set on the stakes. Interestingly, Merrill plots out the aspiration for healthcare spending in exactly the same way that David Muhlestein, PhD, JD, did in episode 364. The goal, according to both of them, isn't to reduce healthcare spending per se. That would be nie near impossible to pull off in the real world, but we could work on holding healthcare cost increases below the rate of GDP growth. Optimal might be healthcare costing, say, 13% of GDP like it does in Switzerland instead of upwards of 20% ($1 out of $5) getting stuffed in the pockets of a healthcare entity or their shareholders. Fifty percent of that, by the way, is being paid for by the government, the other 50% largely coming out of the wages of employees either directly or indirectly. Okay … so, what is the lightning-in-the-bottle moment where we clip in for this journey toward rightsizing healthcare prices? Merrill says it's a combo of patients and employers and taxpayers crying uncle at the same time that technology and new competitors move in on the supply side and start to chip away at older incumbents like hospitals, especially hospitals who have broken their social contract with their communities—and there I'm paraphrasing some terminology Vikas Saini, MD, uses in an upcoming episode on hospitals and their embarrassing levels of charity care. So, it's harnessing forces on the demand side of the equation and on the payment side of the equation, coupled with goings-on on the supply side. With all of this going on, Merrill says that, in this crucible of transformation, we could get better care for lower costs. To accomplish that, he says step 1 is for the team for healthcare costs going down—employers taxpayers, government policy makers—gang up, create a value alliance, and work together. These allies then tell the healthcare industry, “Look, gang … ixnay on the growth rates you've been accustomed to in the past. Period. You are going to need to deal with that, so get used to it.” That is kind of where all of this starts. Merrill mentions three glide paths that will help up get from here to there, and he names the three: Accountable care—essentially putting providers at risk, giving them budgets that they are responsible to work within Paying for value. We have PCPs who deliver a lot of value. We should pay 'em more. We should also put docs on salary like they do at Mayo and some of these other leading Centers of Excellence. All-payer pricing, which we do get into. They have this now in Maryland. It's basically when everybody pays the same price for the same service. Merrill says this all kind of rolls up into removing the incentives that reward low-value care. That can be really expensive. I'm paraphrasing here. I'm sure for many of you, Merrill Goozner needs no introduction. He's been the editor in chief of Modern Healthcare. He wrote a book on the drug industry. He was a reporter for many years before that and also did public interest work. Thank you to Hugh Sims, MD, MBA, for his support and insight! You can learn more at GoozNews. You can also read his book on the drug industry, The $800 Million Pill. Merrill Goozner served as editor in chief of Modern Healthcare from 2012 to 2017 and, as editor emeritus, continued to write the magazine's weekly column until April 2021. In October 2020, he launched GoozNews.substack.com, where he continues to write about healthcare, the environment, and other subjects. Prior to joining Modern Healthcare, his journalism career spanned nearly 40 years as an editor, writer and journalism educator. In 2004, he authored The $800 Million Pill: The Truth Behind the Cost of New Drugs. He previously served as a foreign, national, and chief economics correspondent for the Chicago Tribune (1987-2000) and a professor of journalism at New York University (2000-2003). He has contributed to numerous lay press and scientific publications over the course of his career, ranging from the New York Times to the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. He earned his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University in 1982 and his bachelor's degree in history from the University of Cincinnati in 1975. The University of Cincinnati named him a Distinguished Alumni in 2008 and inducted him into its Journalism Hall of Fame in 2016. 06:24 How is the rise of the high-deductible plan affecting the nation's health? 07:20 What is one of the big issues not being discussed in America today? 08:33 What kind of tipping point is in store for hospitals in this decade? 09:01 What two trends are we going to see in healthcare in the coming decade? 10:50 What are the ways in which the changes in healthcare go well, and what pitfalls do we need to look out for? 11:14 “[This] is about what is sustainable and what is not sustainable.” 12:35 “Healthcare is misnamed. It's sick care.” 13:12 Why do we need to talk more about who gets sick in this country? 13:51 “Pricing is part of the problem, but volume is the other part [of the problem].” 15:40 “The world is gonna change, you're gonna change, and we're gonna provide you a glide path … because this is what we need as a society.” 17:20 What should be the overall goal for healthcare spend? 18:45 EP364 with David Muhlestein, PhD, JD. 19:40 Why do we need to address physician pay? 25:31 Why does the single pricing system create equality? 30:11 EP363 with David Scheinker, PhD. 30:34 EP370 with Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu. 30:55 What are the three glide paths for the future of healthcare? You can learn more at GoozNews. You can also read his book on the drug industry, The $800 Million Pill.   @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast How is the rise of the high-deductible plan affecting the nation's health? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast What is one of the big issues not being discussed in America today? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast What kind of tipping point is in store for hospitals in this decade? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast What two trends are we going to see in healthcare in the coming decade? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast What are the ways in which the changes in healthcare go well, and what pitfalls do we need to look out for? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast “[This] is about what is sustainable and what is not sustainable.” @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast “Healthcare is misnamed. It's sick care.” @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast Why do we need to talk more about who gets sick in this country? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast “Pricing is part of the problem, but volume is the other part [of the problem].” @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast “The world is gonna change, you're gonna change, and we're gonna provide you a glide path … because this is what we need as a society.” @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast What should be the overall goal for healthcare spend? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast Why do we need to address physician pay? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast Why does the single pricing system create equality? @_GoozNews discusses the future of #healthcare on our #healthcarepodcast. #podcast   Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! Betsy Seals (EP387), Stacey Richter (INBW36), Dr Eric Bricker (Encore! EP351), Al Lewis, Dan Mendelson, Wendell Potter, Brian Klepper (Encore! EP335), Dr Aaron Mitchell (EP382), Karen Root, Mark Miller, AJ Loiacono, Josh LaRosa, Stacey Richter (INBW35), Rebecca Etz (Encore! EP295), Olivia Webb (Encore! EP337), Mike Baldzicki, Lisa Bari, Betsy Seals (EP375), Dave Chase, Cora Opsahl (EP373), Cora Opsahl (EP372), Dr Mark Fendrick (Encore! EP308), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP371), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP370), Keith Hartman, Dr Aaron Mitchell (Encore! EP282), Stacey Richter (INBW34)  

A Health Podyssey
Meera Kotagal Identifies Area-Based Socioeconomic Deprivation Indices

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 24:59


Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews Meera Kotagal from Cincinnati Children's Hospital discussing her and colleagues' paper in the December 2022 issue examining 15 different area-based socioeconomic deprivation indices.Order the December 2022 issue of Health Affairs.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

The IndeVets Happy Hour
Episode 43: Access to care in the veterinary world

The IndeVets Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 33:23


Dr. Andrew Heller interviews Dr. Miguel Ortiz, IndeVet and member of the Western Veterinary Conference board, about the access-to-care issue facing our industry. Access to Veterinary Care Coalition Report : https://pphe.utk.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/avcc-report.pdf AVMA Report on Economic Picture of Access to care in US https://avmajournals.avma.org/view/journals/javma/260/14/javma.21.11.0486.xml Association of demographics and veterinary care: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33466270/ Overview of Social Determinants that limit access to care: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fvets.2021.787555/full AVMA Article on trauma, burden transfer, and burnout: https://avmajournals.avma.org/view/journals/javma/260/12/javma.22.05.0196.xml

Relentless Health Value
EP387: Medicare Advantage Trends and How Medicare Advantage Plans Will or Will Not Succeed, With Betsy Seals, CEO and Cofounder of Rebellis Group

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 34:50


Here's a big thing that Betsy Seals makes clear in this show: Big companies can be successful in Medicare Advantage (MA)—and I mean success in all of its financial glory—because they have experience and the scale and also the specialized departments who keep track of all kinds of intricacies that are rate critical to MA success. Specifically, things Betsy Seals talks about as critical success factors, for example, are having relationships with brokers and health systems and other provider organizations. She also makes it clear how much local market knowledge is necessary. A benefit design working great in one local market might be a medical trend disaster in another area with different levels of social determinants of health (SDoH) or different disease patterns, so scaling into new areas isn't a matter of just cutting and pasting. History has shown it's easy enough to go down in a flaming ball of unanticipated medical trend and/or OIG/DOJ scrutiny. So, this is one thing that big MA carriers can get right and potentially, for sure, benefit patients in their plans. Now I say this knowing full well that there's a brouhaha afoot in which there are some who are really pro-MA and there are some who are really not. In this show with Betsy Seals today, we do not get into this (ie, Do patients in MA plans fare better than patients in traditional Medicare?). But I have a point to make, and I'm just gonna make it here. Like most “Is this better than that?” questions in healthcare, there is not one answer; and anyone running around espousing pretty much anything as a broad-stroke holy grail is pretty much full of it—and I would say that as a general statement. Whether MA is better than traditional Medicare depends on who the patient is and also which MA plan we're talking about here. So, starting on the “not a fan” side of the house, Wendell Potter has said (with evidence) that if a patient is toward the end of his or her life or acutely ill or needs to go to an NCI-designated cancer center, it could easily be deduced that traditional Medicare is going to be better. On the other hand, there seems to be evidence, including a recent JAMA article by Ravi Parikh, MD, MPP, and Ezekiel Emanuel, MD, PhD, that concludes MA produces a 22% to 26% reduction in costs compared to MSSP (Medicare Shared Savings Program) arrangements. And this is across just a general patient population of all age ranges, if I'm reading the study right. The great results that are discussed in that JAMA article are what can happen when payers and providers align to tackle SDoH and preventative stuff and are willing to go out into the community to curb potentially avoidable downstream acute events. David Carmouche, MD, by the way, on episode 343 talked at length about this. But there are variables here, and let me mention one of them: how good the Medicare Advantage plan is at risk-based contracting with physician groups. How good are they at putting patients into accountable relationships with provider organizations who are getting paid to keep patients healthy, meaning the MA plan is offering budget-based prospective payment contracts to physician groups? This is the case in that Ochsner/JAMA article example that Dr. David Carmouche was talking about. Ochsner, the health system in Louisiana, and MA plans were working together; and both assumed risk for this population. Susan Dentzer, president and CEO over at America's Physician Groups (APG), does a great job at covering a bunch of these topics on the Race to Value podcast. Another thing that will impact care quality is how good the plan leadership is at balancing patient care and shareholder demand for profit. Bottom line, it is not productive to be indiscriminately pie-eyed about pretty much anything in healthcare or throw babies out with bathwater on a regular basis. As Ge Bai, PhD, CPA, has said on this show (and others have said), there's no angels and no devils in healthcare. Everybody is some combination of both. And, in general, the only reason anybody does anything in healthcare is because it appeals to their self-interest. So, not working with some other healthcare stakeholder because we perceive them as greedy or “industry” or whatever is gonna mean that nobody is working with anybody. Just keep your eyes wide open, check the math, and in your contracts, get actual dollar amounts and not discounts. In this healthcare podcast, as mentioned a few times now, I am speaking with Betsy Seals. Betsy Seals is CEO and cofounder of Rebellis Group, a managed care consulting firm working with Medicare Advantage plans. Oh, and one acronym alert before we dive in here: SNP stands for special needs plan. A special needs plan is a Medicare Advantage coordinated care plan that is specifically designed to provide targeted care and limit enrollment to special needs individuals. So, a special needs individual could be any one of the following: An institutionalized individual A dual eligible, meaning somebody who has Medicare and Medicaid An individual with a severe or disabling chronic condition, as specified by CMS SNPs are becoming a bit of thing in the MA space this year, and Betsy talks about this trend. You can learn more at rebellisgroup.com. Betsy Seals is the CEO and cofounder of Rebellis Group, a consulting firm established to provide advisory and hands-on services to Medicare Advantage Organizations (MAOs) and their subcontractors. Betsy is a nationally recognized leader in the managed care industry with over 20 years of experience. Betsy brings to the table a solid mix of leadership and business acumen, as well as regulatory and strategic knowledge within the managed care landscape. Betsy's expertise is focused in the areas of mergers and acquisitions, compliance, sales and marketing, strategy, supplemental benefit landscape, innovative benefit design that address social determinants of health, and health plan operations. Prior to founding Rebellis Group, Betsy served as the chief consulting officer for Gorman Health Group (GHG). In this role, Betsy managed the Medicare consulting practice, including implementation of strategic initiatives, development of new practice areas, and oversight of day-to-day consulting operations. Prior to her role as chief consulting officer, Betsy served as senior vice president, compliance operations, where she assisted MAOs and Part D sponsors to attain and maintain compliance with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations and guidance by conducting risk assessments, preparing organizations for CMS audits, performing mock CMS audits, and creating and implementing internal and delegated entity oversight programs. Before joining GHG, Betsy worked for MAOs, where she served in customer service and compliance with responsibility for creation and implementation of oversight programs, CMS audit preparation, implementation of internal corrective action plans, and the day-to-day management of compliance operations. Betsy has also worked as a CMS subcontractor to conduct CMS Compliance Program audits. 06:16 Is Medicare Advantage still a cash cow? 06:42 Why should Medicare Advantage be the most lucrative line of business? 07:07 “If there weren't a lot of money in it, nobody would do it.” 07:29 What should you know before jumping into the Medicare Advantage market? 14:04 What issues do upstarts overlook when getting into Medicare Advantage? 17:07 What is one of the next areas that Betsy thinks CMS will crack down on? 18:24 “Look at the data.” 19:53 “I think there's a lot of lessons that you could see over the past years in the industry.” 20:52 “That's what we see a lot of times is expansion without enough due diligence and thought put behind it.” 21:02 Why don't common business models always work in healthcare businesses? 22:29 What are the new key trends coming out of the Medicare Advantage space? 26:04 Why is it important to bring in your clinicians when entering a dual market? 27:52 What's going on in the chronic conditions space? 32:14 What's necessary to the infrastructure with any kind of SNP product? 32:56 What's Betsy's forecast for the future of Medicare Advantage? You can learn more at rebellisgroup.com. @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Is Medicare Advantage still a cash cow? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Why should Medicare Advantage be the most lucrative line of business? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “If there weren't a lot of money in it, nobody would do it.” @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What should you know before jumping into the Medicare Advantage market? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What issues do upstarts overlook when getting into Medicare Advantage? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What is one of the next areas that Betsy thinks CMS will crack down on? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “Look at the data.” @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “I think there's a lot of lessons that you could see over the past years in the industry.” @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “That's what we see a lot of times is expansion without enough due diligence and thought put behind it.” @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Why don't common business models always work in healthcare businesses? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What are the new key trends coming out of the Medicare Advantage space? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Why is it important to bring in your clinicians when entering a dual market? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What's going on in the chronic conditions space? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What's necessary to the infrastructure with any kind of SNP product? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What's Betsy's forecast for the future of Medicare Advantage? @betsyseals of @GroupRebellis discusses #medicareadvantage on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! Stacey Richter (INBW36), Dr Eric Bricker (Encore! EP351), Al Lewis, Dan Mendelson, Wendell Potter, Brian Klepper (Encore! EP335), Dr Aaron Mitchell (EP382), Karen Root, Mark Miller, AJ Loiacono, Josh LaRosa, Stacey Richter (INBW35), Rebecca Etz (Encore! EP295), Olivia Webb (Encore! EP337), Mike Baldzicki, Lisa Bari, Betsy Seals (EP375), Dave Chase, Cora Opsahl (EP373), Cora Opsahl (EP372), Dr Mark Fendrick (Encore! EP308), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP371), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP370), Keith Hartman, Dr Aaron Mitchell (Encore! EP282), Stacey Richter (INBW34), Ashleigh Gunter

SeamlessMD Podcast
83: U of Rochester's CMIO, Dr. Gregg Nicandri: VR Training to Improve Surgical Quality, Eliminating the Mouse and Keyboard to Streamline Clinical Documentation, SDoH for Equitable Access to Care

SeamlessMD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 55:44


On this episode of The Digital Patient, Dr. Joshua Liu, Co-founder & CEO of SeamlessMD, and marketing colleague, Alan Sardana, chat with Dr. Gregg Nicandri, Chief Medical Information Officer at the University of Rochester Medical Center about "VR Training to Improve Surgical Quality, Eliminating the Mouse and Keyboard to Streamline Clinical Documentation, and Social Determinants of Health for Equitable Access to Care."

Health Comm Central
Finding the Right Words for SDOH | Ep #19

Health Comm Central

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 17:56


Part One of Health Comm Central's first series! Over the next few weeks we will be looking at research and recommendations related to Social Determinants of Health, one of the foundational frameworks we consider when developing health communication strategy and training.  Today's episode focuses on the language we choose to talk about SDOH, health equity, and related concepts.  You might be surprised to learn that research suggests we eliminate the terms “social determinants of health” and “equity” from our messages.  We'll cover six tips to ensure that you find the right words to communicate these critical concepts in the most persuasive way possible.Resources:https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2010/01/a-new-way-to-talk-about-the-social-determinants-of-health.htmlhttps://www.nap.edu/download/21694https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hblog20191025.776011/full/https://www.naccho.org/uploads/card-images/public-health-infrastructure-and-systems/Talking-About-the-Social-Determinants-of-Health-FINAL.pdfPlease click the button to subscribe so you don't miss any episodes and leave a review if your favorite podcast app has that ability. Thank you!For more information, visit the Health Comm Central website at: http://www.HealthCommCentral.com© 2022 Karen Hilyard, Ph.D. Connect with me on:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/health-comm-central/Twitter: @HealthCommCtrlInstagram: @health.comm.central

This Is Nashville
Pandemic to pandemic: 41 years of AIDS

This Is Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 50:38


When the AIDS epidemic began in the 1980s, it was a time of fear, panic, misinformation and deaths. Thought to be a “gay men's disease” in those days, AIDS became stigmatized with lifestyle and sexuality rather than scientific understanding about its transmission. It's been 41 years since the U.S. saw its first reported cases of HIV. We now know more about how HIV/AIDS is transmitted and how to treat it so AIDS it is no longer the death sentence it was once considered to be. Now, around 20,000 Tennesseans are living with HIV, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. December 1 is Worlds AIDS Day. In this episode, we'll talk with people living with HIV and those who have been on the frontlines providing services and education to battle AIDS in Middle Tennessee since the early days of the virus. We'll also look at how our understanding of the AIDS epidemic provided a bedrock of understanding when COVID-19 took off. But first, we'll be joined by Tennessee Lookout Senior Reporter Anita Wadhwani, who reported on how the Tennessee Department of Children's Services has been housing children in hospitals. Guests:  Anita Wadhwani, Tennessee Lookout senior reporter Joseph Interrante, PhD, former CEO of Nashville CARES Dwayne Jenkins, GLBT prevention and education services director at Nashville CARES Regina Beck, Davidson County resident living with HIV Brandon Jones, public relations and social media manager at Nashville CARES Dr. Aimalohi Ahonkhai, infectious diseases physician and co-director of the Center for AIDS Research Scientific Working Group on Social Determinants of Health

A Health Podyssey
Abdinasir Ali on State Eviction Moratoriums' Impact on Health

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 18:36


Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews Abdinasir Ali from University of Iowa College of Public Health on his research assessing the effects of state eviction moratoriums on mental health.Order the November 2022 issue of Health Affairs.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Stretch: Relias Rehab Therapy Education
VBP - What Is the Value of Physical Therapy in Value-Based Care?

Stretch: Relias Rehab Therapy Education

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 61:54


PT, PTA – this podcast may help you meet your continuing education requirements. Access Relias Academy to review course certificate information.   What is value-based care or value-based payment models? Why, as a physical therapist, should you even care? In this episode, Ryan Gabel, DPT, MBA, DVP of Operations at CenterWell Home Health defines value-based care and discusses the role of physical therapy in these new payment models. When taken advantage of, the opportunities to demonstrate the value of physical therapy are significant. (02:20) Key Takeaways  (04:08) Definition of Value-Based Care  (05:36) Evolution  (14:30) Efficacy  (16:10) Keys to Success  (19:41) Scorecards  (22:42) Impact on Physical Therapy Practice Today  (33:00) Expanding Roles and Responsibilities of Physical Therapy Professionals  (35:03) PT Role in Medication Management  (46:02) PT Role in Social Determinants of Health  (52:36) Restorative Care  (59:21) Conclusion  The content for this course was created by Ryan Gabel, PT, DPT, MBA The content for this course was created by Tiffany Shubert, PT, PhD. Here is how Relias can help you earn continuing education credits:  Access your Relias Library offered by your employer to see course certificate information and exam;   or   Access the continuing education library for clinicians at Relias Academy. Review the course certificate information, and if eligible, you can purchase the course to access the course exam and receive your certificate.  Learn more about Relias at www.relias.com.    Legal Disclaimer: The content of Stretch: Relias Rehab Therapy Education is provided only for educational and training purposes for healthcare professionals. The educational material provided in this podcast should not be used as medical advice to treat any medical condition in either yourself or others. 

Diacast - a diabetes podcast
Please Don't Say That to Me - Setting Safe and Effective Boundaries

Diacast - a diabetes podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 71:43


Boundaries around diabetes are tricky but necessary. Be it family, friends, medical providers, or complete strangers, establishing healthy, sustainable boundaries is hard. Liz and Amy are joined by clinical psychologist Dr Mike Fulop to talk about what makes self-efficacy so challenging and the components of healthy communication (nothing productive happens in the heat of the moment, avoid using absolute words like “never” and always”) for young, old, and every diabetic in-between. For parents of diabetic kids, we talk about the struggle between encouraging diabetes management and good control, and teaching self-management and empowerment. Facilitative Parenting is a powerful thing. Shaming and scaring techniques never work (regardless of who they're coming from!), and interactions conveying love and acceptance without undermining a person's sense of freedom and autonomy predicts good diabetes-management across the life span. This episode is for everyone who has a diabetic in their life.Tweet us at @diacastEmail us at contact@diacast.comPlease feel free to join the wonderful diabetes communities on Reddit and Discord.r/diabetes subreddit:https://www.reddit.com/r/diabetes/r/Diabetes discord:discord.gg/diabetesPatreonhttps://patreon.com/diacastLinksDiabetes Etiquette Card https://behavioraldiabetes.org/product/diabetes-etiquette-card-for-people-who-dont-have-diabetes/Diabetes Etiquette Card for Parents of Teens https://behavioraldiabetes.org/product/teen-etiquette-card-diabetes-etiquette-for-parents-of-teens/Behavioral Diabetes Institute https://behavioraldiabetes.org/Social Determinants of Health and Diabetes: A Scientific Review Felicia Hill-Briggs; Nancy E. Adler; Seth A. Berkowitz; Marshall H. Chin; Tiffany L. Gary-Webb; Ana Navas-Acien; Pamela L. Thornton; Debra Haire-Joshu  Diabetes Care 2021; 44(1) p258–279 https://doi.org/10.2337/dci20-0053Fisher, Lawrence: Family Relationships and diabetes care during the adult years. 0071. Diabetes Spectrum Volume 19, Number 2, 2006Learn to listen: The art of empathic understanding William R Miller, Ph.D [2018]M de Wit, PM Trief, JW HUber, I Wiilaing: State of the art: understanding and integration of the social context in diabetes care:  DIABETICMedicine DOI: 10.1111/dme.14226  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/dme.14226 [2020]Wiebe, D; Helgeson, V; Berg, C [2016] The social context of managing diabetes across the life span. American Psychologist. V71[7] p 526-538. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0040355

Podcasts360
Social Determinants of Chronic Kidney Disease

Podcasts360

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 7:59


In this podcast, James Matera, DO, speaks about the impact of poverty and food insecurity on chronic kidney disease (CKD), including an update to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health on food purchasing patterns among participants of a dietary intervention trial who are African American with hypertension and CKD.

A Health Podyssey
Anna Gassman-Pines on Unemployment Insurance Access Disparities

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 27:49


Listen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews Anna Gassman-Pines from the Duke University on her recent paper assessing disparities in access to unemployment insurance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Order the November 2022 issue of Health Affairs.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google PodcastsListen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
Barriers and Solutions to Expanding PrEP Uptake: PrEP Inequities by Race

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 10:16


This is 1 of 6 short episodes taken from a webinar on barriers and solutions to expanding pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) uptake in the comprehensive program “Contemporary HIV Treatment and Prevention 2022.” In this episode, Timothy J. Wilkin, MD, MPH, discusses barriers to PrEP uptake in the context of racial inequities, specifically for Black and Latinx communities. His discussion includes: Inequities in PrEP uptake in Black and Hispanic and Latinx people compared with White peopleStructural barriers to PrEP adoptionKaiser Permanente study (2012-2019): PrEP continuum of care and new HIV infectionsEle[MEN]t study: PrEP persistence and discontinuation in young Black men who have sex with menCreating change: education of patients and healthcare professionals to address inequities in PrEP uptakePresenter: Timothy J. Wilkin, MD, MPHProfessor of MedicineDivision of Infectious DiseasesWeill Medical College of Cornell UniversityNew York, New YorkLink to full program:https://bit.ly/3VIsDTgFollow along with the slides at: https://bit.ly/3EcaYg0

Home Health Revealed
Ready or Not! OASIS-E is Coming!

Home Health Revealed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 8:33


Ready or Not! OASIS-E is Coming! This is a short bonus episode to give you some resources and tools for the upcoming changes to OASIS-E. Find up to date information at our website: https://healthrevpartners.com/oasis-e/ Looking for an easy to use cheat sheet? Here is our easy to use Crosswalk: https://healthrevpartners.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/OE-Crosswalk.pdf FREE Trainings can be found at this link: https://healthrevpartners.com/oasis-e/ Facebook Forum to interact with our VP of Education and Development, Anna Powers and our VP of Coding and OASIS Review, Jessica Cook as well as others in the Home Health industry: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1527350537702362 The following trainings can be purchased at: https://healthrevpartners.com/shop/ Webinar 1. Cognitive and Mood Assessment Presentation Gain an understanding of the official guidance related to the following new/modified OASIS items: 1. Brief Interview of Mental Status (BIMS) C0100-C0500 2. Signs and Symptoms of Delirium C1310 3. Mood Interview (PHQ-2 to9) D0150-D0160 4. Notable Change to Existing Item M2102F Webinar 2. Social Determinants of Health and Transfer of Health Information Gain an understanding of the official guidance related to the following new/updated OASIS items: 1. Administrative Items A1005-A1250 2. Transfer of Health Information A2120-A2124 3. Health Literacy, Vision and Hearing B0200-B1300 4. Social Isolation D0700 5. Notable Change to Existing OASIS Item M2401 Webinar 3. Health Conditions, Standard Assessment, and Special Treatments Gain an understanding of the official guidance related to the following new/modified OASIS items: 1. Pain assessment J0510-J0530 2. Nutrition K0520 3. High Risk Drug Classes and Indications N0415 4. Special Treatment, Programs and Procedures O0110 5. Notable change to Existing OASIS Item GG items Velocity is our analytic platform. Learn more about Velocity: https://healthrevpartners.com/velocity/ You can reach our team by emailing connect@healthrevpartners.com

A Health Podyssey
Brent Fulton on Cross-Market Hospital Consolidation

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 25:00


Listen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews Brent Fulton from the University of California Berkeley on his recent paper on the rise of cross-market hospital systems and their US market power.Order the November 2022 issue of Health Affairs.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google PodcastsListen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.

A Health Podyssey
Christopher Ruhm on COVID-19 & Economic Recession's Mortality Effects

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 26:38


Listen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.Health Affairs' Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews Christopher Ruhm from University of Virginia who published a paper in the November 2022 issue of Health Affairs examining the mortality effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related economic recession. He found that excess deaths in the U.S. during the first year of the pandemic were the result of both pandemic related effects and economic recession related effects.Order the November 2022 issue of Health Affairs.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google PodcastsListen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.

A Health Podyssey
Lisa Meeks on Ableism and Treatment of Physicians with Disabilities

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 29:12


Listen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.Alan Weil interviews University of Michigan's Lisa Meeks on her recent paper she and colleagues published exploring the topic of mistreatment of physicians with disabilities.Order the October 2022 issue of Health Affairs on disability and health.Health Affairs thanks the Ford Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for their financial support of this issue.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google PodcastsListen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.

In the Ring with Héctor Colón
Ep. 9: Knocking Out the Real Social Issues in Wisconsin with Governor Evers

In the Ring with Héctor Colón

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 38:10


In the interview, Colón asks Gov. Evers tough questions about the rise of behavioral challenges in Wisconsin and how he would more broadly address Social Determinants of Health (food insecurity, homelessness, unemployment, etc.). The two discuss the need for improving partnerships between health systems and social services organizations like LSS. Gov. Evers also shares his thoughts on the quality and outcomes of government contracts.

A Health Podyssey
Linda Long-Bellil Gives an Overview of Health Disparities

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 21:23


Listen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews University of Massachusetts' Linda Long-Bellil on an overview paper she and co-authors published in the October 2022 issue of Health Affairs. Using a biopsychosocial definition of disability, the authors found that health disparities among people with disabilities exist along race, gender and sexual orientation lines.Order the October 2022 issue of Health Affairs on disability and health.Health Affairs thanks the Ford Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for their financial support of this issue.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google PodcastsListen to Pew Charitable Trusts' new "After the Fact" podcast.

A Health Podyssey
Madeline Smith-Johnson on Disability Rates of Transgender and Cisgender Adults

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 25:46


Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews Rice University's Madeline Smith-Johnson on a paper in the October 2022 issue of Health Affairs assessing rates of disability among transgender and cisgender adults.Order the October 2022 issue of Health Affairs on disability and health.Health Affairs thanks the Ford Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for their financial support of this issue.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

THE EMBC NETWORK featuring: ihealthradio and worldwide podcasts

https://nhchc.org/ We are very excited to welcome Bobby Watts to the show! Bobby Watts is the Chief Executive Officer of the National Health Care for the Homeless Council, which supports the 300 federally funded Health Care for the Homeless programs and 100 Medical Respite providers with training, technical assistance, sharing of best practices, research, publications, and an active policy and advocacy program working to eliminate homelessness. Bobby has 30 years of experience in administration, direct service, and implementation of homeless health services, beginning as a live-in counselor at the New York City Rescue Mission. He spent most of his career prior to joining the Council at Care for the Homeless, which operates clinics, and shelters, and conducts policy analysis and advocacy in New York City, beginning as an intern, and serving as the executive director from 2005-2017. Under his tenure, the Federally Qualified Health Center agency tripled in size, adding major programs and initiatives –including constructing and operating a shelter for 200 mentally ill and medically frail women –and becoming licensed as a Diagnostic and Treatment Center in New York State. He has served on numerous boards, government-appointed task forces, and workgroups including serving as the finance officer for the NYC HIV Health and Human Services Planning Council, on the NYS DOH Medicaid Redesign Team's Affordable Housing Workgroup and Value-Based Payment Workgroup on CBOs and Social Determinants of Health, and as an inaugural member of the NYS Interagency Council on Homelessness, where he co-chaired its Health Committee. Contact us at www.counterpartsshow.com

THE EMBC NETWORK featuring: ihealthradio and worldwide podcasts

https://nhchc.org/ We are very excited to welcome Bobby Watts to the show! Bobby Watts is the Chief Executive Officer of the National Health Care for the Homeless Council, which supports the 300 federally funded Health Care for the Homeless programs and 100 Medical Respite providers with training, technical assistance, sharing of best practices, research, publications, and an active policy and advocacy program working to eliminate homelessness. Bobby has 30 years of experience in administration, direct service, and implementation of homeless health services, beginning as a live-in counselor at the New York City Rescue Mission. He spent most of his career prior to joining the Council at Care for the Homeless, which operates clinics, and shelters, and conducts policy analysis and advocacy in New York City, beginning as an intern, and serving as the executive director from 2005-2017. Under his tenure, the Federally Qualified Health Center agency tripled in size, adding major programs and initiatives –including constructing and operating a shelter for 200 mentally ill and medically frail women –and becoming licensed as a Diagnostic and Treatment Center in New York State. He has served on numerous boards, government-appointed task forces, and workgroups including serving as the finance officer for the NYC HIV Health and Human Services Planning Council, on the NYS DOH Medicaid Redesign Team's Affordable Housing Workgroup and Value-Based Payment Workgroup on CBOs and Social Determinants of Health, and as an inaugural member of the NYS Interagency Council on Homelessness, where he co-chaired its Health Committee. Contact us at www.counterpartsshow.com

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
What is the CURE for medical debt? | RIPMedicalDebt.org

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 45:51


On this episode Allison Sesso, the CEO & President of RIP Medical Debt talks about their unique approach to alleviating medical debt of Americans. By leveraging medical debt markets and partnering with hospitals, RIP Medical Debt is able to achieve 100X leverage on every dollar donated to wipe out debt at scale.   How big is the problem? The SIPP survey suggests people in the United States owe at least $195 billion in medical debt. Approximately 16 million people (6% of adults) in the U.S. owe over $1,000 in medical debt and 3 million people (1% of adults) owe medical debt of more than $10,000.     RIP Medical Debt by the numbers: $7,091,262,274 in medical debt relieved so far 3,987,191 individuals and families helped 2021 Annual Report   The debt relief we provide reduces mental and financial distress for millions of people. Here's how we got started.   RIP Medical Debt was founded in 2014 by two former debt collections executives. Over the course of decades in the debt-buying industry they met with thousands of Americans saddled with unpaid and un-payable medical debt and realized they were uniquely qualified to help those in need. They imagined a new way to relieve medical debt: by using donations to buy large bundles of debt that is erased with no tax consequences to donors or recipients. From this idea RIP Medical Debt was born, a New York based 501(C)(3). The results have been spectacular—billions in medical debt eradicated so far, providing financial relief for millions of individuals and families.   About Allison Sesso President / CEO Allison Sesso became the President / CEO of RIP Medical Debt in January of 2020. RIP Medical Debt was established for the sole purpose of reducing the medical debt burdens of low-income individuals with limited capacity to pay their medical bills by leveraging donations from people across the country. They have abolished $7,091,262,274 to date for over 3,987,191 people. Under Allison's leadership and in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, RIP Medical Debt launched the “Helping COVID Heroes Fund” focused on relieving the medical debts of healthcare workers and emergency responders like nurses, home health aids, pharmacists, social workers, hospital technicians, the National Guard and others working on the front lines of the pandemic. It also benefits service workers and others facing financial hardship resulting from the COVID induced economic downturn. Through this effort RIP has abolished over $100 million in medical debt. Prior to joining RIP Medical Debt, Allison served as the Executive Director of the Human Services Council of New York (HSC), an association of 170 nonprofits delivering 90% of human services in New York City. Under her leadership HSC pioneered the development of nationally recognized tools designed to illuminate risks associated with government contracts, including an RFP rater and government agency grading system. She led negotiations with New York City and State government on behalf of the sector and successfully pushed for over $500 million in investments to address the nonprofit fiscal crisis. During her tenure at HSC, Allison also led a commission of experts focused on socialdeterminants of health and value-based-payment structures and published the report,Integrating Health and Human Services: a Blueprint for Partnership and Action, that examines the challenges of operationalizing relationships between health and human services providers, offering several recommendations. She also served on the New York State Department of Health's Social Determinants and Community Based Organizations (CBO) Subcommittee helping to formulate recommendations around the integration of CBOs into Medicaid managed care. Allison's work on behalf of the human services sector led City & State to recognize her as a top nonprofit leader in 2018 and 2019, one of the 25 most influential leaders in Manhattan in 2017, and one of New York City's 100 “Most Responsible” in 2016. She recently received the 100 “Most Responsible” award for the second time for her efforts at RIP Medical Debt. Allison also serves as the Vice Chair of the nonprofit “Right to Be,” formerly Hollaback!, a global movement working to end harassment through bystander intervention training and storytelling.    Rough Transcript   [00:00:00] George Weiner: This week we have an awesome guest who I, I think I promised I would track down somebody from R IP medical Debt because they kept showing up in the news and innovative approach to dealing with, uh, a tremendous. Problem in America around, uh, I'd say healthcare and debt, and none other than Allison Seso, the CEO and President is joining us. [00:00:52] This means a lot. Thank you, Allison, for, for taking the time today. [00:00:55] Allison Sesso: Thanks for hunting us down and finding us. We love talking about our work and, and the issue of, of medical debt, so I appreciate every opportu. . Well, [00:01:05] George Weiner: let's drive right into it on the front page of r i p medical debt.org. On the front page of the.org site, I see every $100 donated relieves 10,000 in medical debt. [00:01:19] First off. That gets my attention. What a perfect way to start a conversation. But how does that work exactly? [00:01:29] Allison Sesso: Yeah. We are a, uh, a unique model and we take advantage of the for profit, uh, debt market, uh, and use it for a mission driven purpose, which is really exciting and, and I think unique. So we do get an incredible return on investment and it's because there is a market for debt buying, uh, that is, has been established, and That is because, uh, there is a for profit industry that we take advantage of, uh, and they are looking to make money off of the issue of debt. We, on the other hand, are trying to relieve debt, so we take donations from individuals, we take 'em to the debt market, and we buy large portfolios at. [00:02:10] So, the individuals that are in those portfolios tend to be financially burdened. They are poor, they are, um, in fact, to qualify for our program, you have to be 400% of poverty or below, or the debt birth burden has to be significant compared to your overall income. So it has to be 5% or more of your income. [00:02:28] We do an analysis of the debt portfolio and we buy all of the accounts that qualify and then we purchase them based on. For profit rates. And so we're competitive with that market, but because the for profit folks are trying to make money, they have to really depress the prices and they have to have a really deep discount in order to make sure that they're making their money back. [00:02:49] And so we don't have to make our money back. And so we're able to take, you know, $1 and turn it into a hundred dollars of medical debt relief. And as you pointed out, you can ex expand that. So, you know, $500 gets rid of 50. Um, $50,000 of medical debt. And so that's how we're able to, provide massive debt relief to the tune of $7 billion to date and grow. [00:03:12] George Weiner: Yeah, I think there's a lot to unpack there. Maybe I, um, wanna poke a little bit more into like, making sure I actually get this. So let's say I'm, you know, a family living below the, the poverty line meeting your, your standards. There's an, uh, unexpected accident and injury. I then am in the hospital for a few days and suddenly I'm walking around with 45 grand in debt overnight. [00:03:34] And because of the way our systems work, this is now. A debt I owe to creditors. Now that debt, as I understand, can first go from the hospital to maybe a secondary buyer, right? There's like all these markets of like, Oh, I'll grab that one, I'll grab that one. And then it seems like they're, there's a discount on it cuz it's not dollar for dollar you're getting. [00:03:56] A hundred x leverage on it. So there's some discounting of my debt with that 45,000. Can you just walk me through like the individual, like I am sitting here, I've got 45 grand in debt. I can run off to a sort of like Go fund me type site and be like, Please, please, please, please pay this money. I have a story. [00:04:19] I have a narrative. And unfortunately I have to compete with other stories around me. What is the alternative path that my 45 K debt takes in your world? [00:04:29] Allison Sesso: Yeah, so your, I could buy your debt probably for $45. That's the diff . That's, that's the difference. It's pretty, you know, I'm sorry, I don't understand. [00:04:39] I'm sorry For $450. Sorry. Yeah. Okay. Um, Um, Um, so yeah, I could buy your debt for $450 and that is because I'm not just buying your. I am buying the entire provider's portfolio of bad debt, so it's more attractive of an option. So basically I'm, I'm a hospital or another healthcare provider. I am serving people who can't afford to pay. [00:05:02] They are poor as you just described. And, and by the way, just to be clear, it's 400% of poverty or below, so it's not just under poverty, but four times the amount of poverty. So it's people that are poor but but not necessarily. Oh, so [00:05:16] George Weiner: four x the whatever, $45,000 Exactly. Anywhere you are. Okay. So [00:05:21] Allison Sesso: that, that matter. [00:05:22] So we're really like helping people that. Really trying to make ends meet but aren't actually, uh, technically in poverty based on the federal definition. So you, you know, you, there's, there's, you have to, In order for our model to work, we're buying the entire portfolio of many of those individuals who have the 45,000 or a thousand dollars or $2,000 of debt. [00:05:43] Uh, that all together. So it's source driven. So basically I'm going to the hospital or other healthcare provider and I'm saying, Give me the debts. Give me your entire portfolio of debt that you have tried to collect and you have been unable to collect and mostly been able, unable to collect because the individuals are, uh, financially stressed out and can't. [00:06:03] Afford to pay this bill. I will look at that portfolio and I will assess what can I pay for that? And this is if I'm a for-profit, not F R P medical debt, but as a for-profit debt buyer, I will say, Okay, I'm gonna pay this. I'm gonna pay you an X amount of dollars for the entire portfolio for thousands of people's bads. [00:06:23] On the bet that at least I can squeeze enough out of that. Mm-hmm. , you get to make up for the investment that I've made plus, Right. Cuz I'm looking for a profit and I squeeze those individuals either by calling them, by putting it on their credit, you know, and giving them bad credit by sometimes suing them and taking, putting leans out on their. [00:06:43] Um, on their cars, on their vehicles. So I take different tactic to try and collect on that. And so that establishes this debt market that establishes a price that is very depressed and discounted. And again, that's what r i p medical debt takes advantage of. So I'm competing with that already depressed price that is driven by the fact that people are trying to make a profit off of these bad debts. [00:07:05] But in my world, I've sort of flipped it on its head and I'm. I will pay the same as the for profits, but I'm not trying to make a profit. I'm just trying to provide relief. So I'm going to take donated dollars, so I don't need to make any money back. I'm gonna go to that same debt market. I'm gonna say, give me all of the bad debts that you have available. [00:07:25] I'm gonna pull out the ones that are for, which is most of them, like 80% oftentimes of people who are financially uh, struggling. And I will pay. this amount, and I pay based on, usually the debt is, um, the older it is, the cheaper it is because [00:07:42] George Weiner: the idea is it pays outstanding, puts a higher discount on the probability [00:07:46] Allison Sesso: that gets behind. [00:07:46] I'm, I'm paying like, you know, a million dollars for, you know, $300 million worth of debt in one fail swoop. And so it's thousands of people that are getting helped. [00:07:58] George Weiner: Mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm. . So staying with the story here, I have incurred this 45,000. I have not been able to pay it back in thirty, ninety, a hundred eighty days. [00:08:09] I am within that window of one to four x the poverty level. And do you like show up at my door? Like an oversized check. Is it like, uh, so like how am I notified that? Like, hey, you're suddenly like, you don't owe this anymore. Like, how does this final, like I release you of your burden before, Like what, Like is there a confetti? [00:08:34] I'm like, that would be a lot of, uh, groundwork for us because we've helped over 4 million people. So that'd be a lot. Lot [00:08:40] George Weiner: of confetti. And then we got the environmental problem on that. A lot of conf the [00:08:43] Allison Sesso: confetti ideas. Yeah, exactly. It would be a lot, lot of champagne, you know, it would be a lot. no, we, what we do, first of all, The debts tend to be at least a year old because the hospital does it is required like by regulation, they have to try to collect that could be sending one letter, it could be sending two letters. [00:08:59] It depends. And so every hospital is different. And the thing is, when you've seen one hospital and their approach to collections, you've seen one hospital and their approach to collections. So there is no like, well what's the standard? There's some norms, but there's really differences. Like for example, not while hospitals sell their debt roughly and. [00:09:17] Like, I'm not even a hundred percent sure, like, but it's roughly like 30% of hospitals that sell their debt. So not even all hospitals sell their, their debt to begin with. but we do get hospitals to sell to us that don't normally sell to other for profit debt buyers, which is, I think, important. But So you are that individual. [00:09:34] We would not have access to your file and your debt and when, until a hospital engages with us and agrees to work with us. So that's an important element of our model, is that hospitals have to be interested in working with us and say yes to dis debt relief. Once we get a hospital involved, we will get their entire bad debt portfolio. [00:09:53] So you, if your debt of that 40, uh, what did you say? $45,000? Mm-hmm. , then we. , uh, send letters in mass like we do to every other individual that's in that thousands at one time that basically say, We are our IP medical debt. We have relieved your debt. You are free and clear. Check us out. We're for real. [00:10:14] Like, believe us. and [00:10:16] George Weiner: oh yeah, but there's a lot of, Sure right Where, where's the timeshare agreement? [00:10:21] Allison Sesso: Right. And you don't have to do anything. And the other thing that's really important is there's no tax burden associated with it. When, when certain debts are relieved, there can be a tax burden because it's considered a gift equal to the amount of the debt that's been released. [00:10:33] Right, exactly. So could you imagine you get a debt relieved and then you get a tax bill. It's like when you win a lotto and you have to pay taxes. You're like, what? ? The good news is soured. but with r p medical debt, that is not the case because we are disinterested third party. So you get this debt relief free and clear. [00:10:48] And honestly, the, the debt relief happens whether or not you actually pay attention to the letter. They really can [00:10:53] George Weiner: just continue to do what you were doing, which was ignore the problem and hope it goes away. Which I have to say, never were, I can't use the word never, because apparently sometimes that works. [00:11:04] Allison Sesso: Well, I mean, look, the people who were, we are helping though, at the end of the. everyone. I mean, we get the stories back from individuals. Mm. They want so desperately to pay. They really do. And they feel like failures because they haven't been able to pay. Mm-hmm. . So these aren't people who are just like, Whoa, let's hope for the best. [00:11:25] I'll just keep ignoring this. And you know, these are individuals. Something happened to them. Either they got sick, they were in an accident, whatever happened to them. Maybe they just are poor, like, and, and have other obligations they have to pay for and they can't pay this bill. And so we are relieving those debts of individuals who were forced to pay a bill that they should have never been forced to pay because it's unaffordable. [00:11:51] George Weiner: Yeah. Cuz clearly they had that desire to pay it back, but not the means by which to do it. What's more, medical prices are not exactly accurate in the United States. [00:12:03] Allison Sesso: I don't know if the word is accurate. They are all over the place because we have this weird system where the insurance company is paying and the prices are ar. [00:12:16] Yeah. [00:12:18] George Weiner: Yeah. Uh, when you operate as an individual in a system designed for these large players that are charging what they will, it just breaks, it seems like, and you're just left with outrageous numbers, and debt burns. [00:12:32] Allison Sesso: I think that we've created a, a. Typical consumer approach to healthcare and it doesn't work like the economics don't align when you're buying healthcare, first of all, you would pay a lot more than you would for any other good or service, right? [00:12:49] Because it's your health and your wellbeing. So like your artificially willing to to pay more. And I think we take a little bit of advantage of that in some ways. And, and I think that the fact that we have insurance companies that are negotiating what to pay is. Makes it complicated and it's really hard to navigate this as an individual, nor I think should we have that expectation that people, while they're sick, should be navigating what they're gonna pay for a service that they have Really no real way of doing comparison shopping on. [00:13:24] George Weiner: this is very different than a lot of other models that I see. And you must, and I see it on the site saying, if you were an individual looking for medical debt relief, that is not us. And that must be hard because you were. You know, behind the curtain that's behind the curtain running in debt markets, which frankly, you know, this may be the first time many people are hearing about this. [00:13:51] I'm curious how, how did this organization come about? It's been around for, for a while. [00:13:59] Allison Sesso: Well, I mean, actually we've only been around since 2014, so it's not that old considering, I mean, a lot of nonprofits. Just years old. You know, we, we were . We've only been around since 2014 and we, we came we came into being, because we have two, uh, former debt buyers who understood the market. [00:14:17] I think that was a key element of it. Craig and Jerry understood, uh, how the debt market works and what it costs to buy. , they were inspired by Occupy Wall Street, actually. Uh, and they saw that there was this group doing this thing called the Jubilee, where they were trying to do just what r i p does in, in large scale, which is to buy medical debt, and relieve it, but to make a point. [00:14:42] And they recruited actually Jerry's help in this. And then Jerry referred Craig. Then they sort of made their point as part of the Occupy Wall Street movement, and they were gonna pack up and go home kind of on, on this whole debt relief front. And I think Jerry sort of said to Craig like, We gotta make this a real thing. [00:15:01] And so they did. They, they really, they, and I think that they have a book that, that they put out talking about this. You can find it on our. , it's called End Medical Debt, and it tells sort of the origin story of of R I P and and and how they thought about this and one of the key moments that really helped the organization propel forward. [00:15:20] Was being highlighted on John Oliver, which, you know, I'm a big fan of, I was before I got this role and knew about r i p medical debt, but he really, did some debt relief through the institution and, uh, and that propelled a lot of donors to come to the table. Cuz without donors, this really doesn't work. [00:15:38] I mean, I can go to the debt market all I want, but if I don't have a lot of people supporting my ability to buy the debt, it, it doesn't, it doesn't work. So, That's our story. It was two Defiers who were brave. They took some. They almost went into poverty on, on, on their own because of the fact that they, they took this, uh, this on and they just thought this was too good of an idea to let go. [00:16:00] And again, John Oliver helped propel us and then the board of directors, you know, said, Let's take it to the next level. And, and then I came in as a, as a seasoned executive director type and, and we were able to really, uh, propel this work forward and we're gonna keep doing. . [00:16:16] George Weiner: Yeah. I mean, 24, I mean, you've made it through some, some filter bubbles for sure. [00:16:22] In terms of like the filtering of can you make it five years, can you make it over a, a certain amount of revenue, but you're starting to, uh, really pull. Pull through. It also strikes me because medical debt is the number one reason someone declares bankruptcy and it seems like this is, uh, something that may slow that down. [00:16:45] Uh, but I don't know how big you need to be, like billions of dollars that you have done. 4 million people. I think you said like those are big numbers. How big do you actually need to be in your mind to, I'm not gonna use the word solve, because you, you are not solving, you are resolving a broken system that will continue to break things. [00:17:08] But how big do you need to. To take this actually on at the level that you'd imagine? [00:17:13] Allison Sesso: Yeah, I, it's a good question and it's one I often think about as an executive director, or sorry, as a, as a CEO of the institution, it's one I often think about. What I would say is that, , we need to both be a certain size and relieving a certain amount of debt every year. [00:17:32] And I don't know what exactly what that number is. It really depends on the donation size. Maybe it's 10 million, maybe it's 20 million. I like the number 25, in terms of our budget size every year, uh, I'd love to grow to that size and, and you know, we're, we're more than halfway there already today, in consistent revenue, but, you know, we'll, [00:17:51] But the other thing is, I, I loved how you framed it and said, We're not solving but, but resolving this, the issue. And that's a hundred percent true. And that is our mantra. What I wanna make sure is that we're not just trying to grow to a size that picks up and just keeps resolving the issue, but at, in the process of resolving the issue for individual. [00:18:12] We are very intentional about telling the larger story about the issue of medical debt and how systemic in nature it is, and that we are very intentional about pushing for larger changes that are above our pay grade as an institution. And so to me that is really the key. So our size almost doesn't matter as much as our. [00:18:36] And so by growing our voice within this work and growing our expertise and taking the data that we are getting in mass, so we are having a deeper understanding. How many people, uh, we, how many people we're helping, what their situation is, what is their race? What is their economic situation? Where do they live? [00:18:56] Is this, is this problem more prevalent at certain types of hospitals, nonprofit versus for profit? I think over time we'll be able to take a deeper look at our data collectively as we do more and more direct hospital work and contribute to this issue in a larger scale. And be able to hopefully push for, uh, larger solutions that are above again, our pay grade and who we. [00:19:22] George Weiner: So the debt, we were talking about this before, the debt that a individual incurs, going back to like, here's a, my $45,000 and surprise debt that I now owe. I have a family, uh, we live, you know, in a house we're doing right. But this is something that frankly does not fit into the budget, not even by a long shot. [00:19:42] Uh, I may. Go into bankruptcy, but it seems like there is a like actual adverse medical effect to having debt. There's like a relationship to having this like held over my head that has negative consequences. We think we were talking about the drama report or other reports out there that suggest that like, I mean, it's just. [00:20:09] It hurts my brain to put it in the order of logic that like I went to the hospital to get better and now I'm probably gonna get worse because of the overpriced and debt that now chases me indefinitely. And can you tell me a bit about that relationship of debt distress? [00:20:23] Allison Sesso: Yeah, absolutely. Uh, it is the number one theme that we see in the letters that come back from individual. [00:20:29] We help, uh, it's overwhelming for individuals and, you know, stress is. Undermining of health and financial stress. Stress is one of the biggest things, and we look at poor communities and we see. You know, diabetes, we see all these stress related diseases, heart issues that are all stress related, that are more extreme. [00:20:54] Uh, and so in, in terms of medical debt, it is in itself a social determinant of health. And the social determinant of health is something that hospitals have increasingly been looking at and are spending. Millions, billion dollars, billions of dollars across the country trying to invest in community programs that address social determinants of health. [00:21:16] And yet, as this Gemma report that came out just recently shows the medical debt created from going to the hospital itself is a social determinate of health. So if, if we can really look at medical debt, , we can actually get rid of one of the stressors that's causing people to have to go to the hospital or get care to in the first place. [00:21:38] So I think it's a really key issue that you're raising and one that we wanna make sure that we keep elevating. Cuz again, these providers, these hospitals are investing lots and lots of money into social determinants of health. Those are things like environmental situations family dynamic. You know, lot things that are in the environment, not your own personal health. [00:21:57] You know, living in a food desert. All those kinds of things contribute to the undermining of health. And it's a, it determines how well you're going to be healthy, hence, hence the social determinate of health language. And so the fact that medical debt itself is among those is something we need to really look at. [00:22:14] And I'm so grateful that there is this new report that points to this because I think it will create, To reexamine billing and practices at. [00:22:26] George Weiner: and I think this is the Jam and Network, uh, that that put this out. But we'll put a link in the, the show notes on it cuz there's a certainly a lot in there and it's one of those things I'm glad somebody did the research on and I am now forced to think about it, but also, I'm sadly not surprised. [00:22:44] I'm not surprised that having, uh, you know, the, the threat of somebody putting a lean on the house that, you know, my kid lives in, like wouldn't cause me stress. Like I go, I went in cuz I broke my ankle, right? I went in cuz I broke my, and I walk out like two years later with diabetes and other stress related disorders that put me back on that bill. [00:23:05] Like, [00:23:06] Allison Sesso: well not only that but the other on top of that, the. Stressor is that people don't go to that hospital because they're scared. They're either gonna incur more debt cuz they have had some, or they know of a friend or family member that's had debt and that it's put them in a, you know, difficult situation and so they don't go and get the care that they need. [00:23:24] People are sitting outside of hospitals waiting to see if the pain dissipates before they walk in. or they're just ignoring it and, you know, putting, you know, Ben Gay on their knee over and over and over again, and taking Advil and trying to ignore the problem until it gets to a point where it's actually even more expensive to solve and to adjust. [00:23:46] George Weiner: Yeah, I mean, the, the size of the problem, it, you know, it's, what I like is that this is a pretty smart and leveraged play at an intractable problem, like the, the scale that you need to play at. And I'll just play, I'll, I'm show my own hand. I don't think it's solved by GoFundMe. No. Truly just it is, and you also even brought up the tax issue that I'm pretty sure if I got my 45 grand from people giving me money, and it showed up as a check to me, I now owe at least a third of that I think in taxes, depending on where I [00:24:19] Allison Sesso: am. [00:24:21] Yeah, I'm not exactly sure how the GoFundMe works in terms of the tax system, but it's definitely a popularity contest. How. That's the problem because what I mean for GoFundMe to work you, you need to tell your story effectively enough to have people give to you over others. GoFundMe is, The number one thing people go to, like they go to GoFund me for medical debt. [00:24:47] It's the number one reason to go to GoFund me. And most of them do not work. They do not reach, reach their goals. And certainly you're not gonna reach your goal if you have an ongoing medical issue. Like what? If you have, uh, a chronic condition, you can't keep going back to the well and begging your friends and family. [00:25:02] Not to mention the fact that a lot of people are able to. Money if they have friends with money and people with money tend to have other friends with money. People without money tend to have friends without money. So the, the, the GoFundMe is absolutely not a solution and it really is a popularity contest. [00:25:18] It's how well you're able to tell your sob story. and I just think that's a freely heartbreaking situation that we're putting people in to have to put themselves out there in that way in order to solve their medical death. . [00:25:33] George Weiner: Yeah. The, you know, frankly, it's, it's not really the, the individual's supposed to do everything they can in their power. [00:25:39] and so if you're back into the wall, I understand the market force is there pushing there, but there's only one winner in that. It's the person that takes 2% of transaction. if you were looking at a macro system, something like r i p, medical debt, uh, I'm wondering if, you know, just to sort of speculate on it, are there other areas where you feel. [00:25:58] George Weiner: Financial levers, debt markets even are unexplored avenues for this type of impact. [00:26:08] Allison Sesso: I mean, I think that there's probably other kinds of unaffordable debt that could be looked at for sure. The thing is, medical debt is unique, and I do think that people are potentially more willing to donate to, uh, medical debt causes because you have such little control over the situation. [00:26:27] You, you can be insured. Most people actually are insured. 90% of Americans are insured today. yet 41% have medical debt. So it is not a matter of having insurance. So you can do everything right. You can have, I. , you can still and are likely actually to get medical debt. In fact, the, the number one cause of medical debt isn't, is, or, or directional relationship is not whether or not you have insurance, but whether or not you get sick, like, so you're, that's, that's the number one connector, which is that means you couldn't be insured. [00:27:02] So I. At the end of the day, we can't look at things like GoFundMe for the solutions here. I think you're right that it is, uh, just creating more profit on top of a, a profitable system. Yeah, we, we have to, we have to look at at bigger solutions beyond beyond this, and I think that, that our model could be used for other areas. [00:27:25] but I think that people are more likely to give to medical debt because of the fact that there's so much little control over how much debt you end up in. People are less forgiving if you end up overusing your credit card or, Yeah, even if you can't pay a utility bill. Honestly. Yeah. [00:27:40] George Weiner: Yeah, the story obviously, obviously matters, but also, you know, I'd say your ability to, as you came back to it, say like you're able to go through and understand the data behind the actual communities that you're choosing to go for, and just to track back on the conversation. [00:27:56] You're like in your. Ideal world, you're like, I think we have about 25 million worth of work you wish you could do every year in this. [00:28:05] Allison Sesso: Yeah, I think 25 million feels right today. Now, I don't know. I mean, ask me, you know, in, in a year from now how, how we feel about that. But I think 25 million gives us a pretty steady pace. [00:28:16] Of doing debt relief, in mass, right, For individuals while also investing in our own ability to tell the story of medical debt. Cuz that's important, right? Like not every dollar do we only spend on medical debt. We spend a lot, almost every dollar on medical debt relief. But we also are intentional about investing in storytelling so that individuals can be heard and that we're, we are thinking about what is, what it feels. [00:28:43] To have medical debt. And what are the implications on your mental health? What are your struggles with the hospital finance system? What is it like for your family every single day when you have this thing looming over your head? How have you avoided care? What other trade offs and decisions have you made? [00:29:00] Have you borrowed from friends and family? All those kinds of things. So we are investing in different systems, but I think 25 million. Feels good as an annual like rate of our budget size because I think that gives us a large scale ability to relieve debt across the country for a lot of people again, and, and lifting up the stories at the same time. [00:29:26] Yeah. [00:29:27] George Weiner: Yeah. Well, just, I mean, I won't call out your nine 90, but it, it is all public and so you're, you're hoping to grow there, it seems. [00:29:36] Allison Sesso: Yes. We're hoping to grow there. That's right. I mean, we've had, we've been, uh, lucky to get a 50 million gift from McKenzie Scott, uh, which is Jeff Bezos's ex-wife, and she's been wonderful in the nonprofit sector and able to. [00:29:51] push organizations forward. But that's a one time gift, right? Yeah. We're able to do those in multiple years, but we have to be careful about you not expanding our staff to have an expectation that that's gonna be our permanent bottom line. So we pay lot of attention to that reality, and so that's propelled us forward in a lot of good ways and allowed us to invest in even ways in which we can donate and become more, you know, In which we can maximize our ability to fundraise and then also look at our own systems, become more efficient so that we don't need as much staff. [00:30:26] Uh, so we've done those two things with those funds, but we need to grow to, I think, a, a permanent, like 25 million size where it's year after year we're able to support that. [00:30:38] George Weiner: And that makes sense. Part of my mind, I keep going back to this $45,000 family that just ran into this just stroke of unlock and, you know, following through the pattern. [00:30:50] Like it, it is amazing that there is R ip, medical debt that may show up like in some ways, like a lottery ticket that you're like, I didn't know I was playing this one, but I won. And like frankly, I've lost enough. That's amazing. I wonder if there's a world where the probability that I'd have to pay my full debt could be made more publicly known to me. [00:31:12] And I know there's also nonprofit hospitals that technically if they're serving the public benefit actually are. Uh, due to absolve some of that debt as well. But I feel as though you're not told the full truth when you're handed that bill for your, you know, scan your PT scan and you're like the what? [00:31:29] And your overnight visit. There's no like, and by the way, you know the probability if you're in this area and you make this much, that if you just wait, frankly one year and don't pay this, like nothing battle happen because the converse is true. We've been taught to pay every bill that shows up to us. [00:31:44] Cuz that's how you are an honest participant in. , uh, economic society, What does that look like? ? [00:31:52] Allison Sesso: Yeah. So it's, that's a difficult question to answer because I don't think we're in enough hospitals yet, by any stretch, to, for anyone to feel confident or comfortable to just, you're just gonna [00:32:02] George Weiner: run around and catch that fly ball. [00:32:04] Yeah. Yeah. [00:32:04] Allison Sesso: Right. And also, we're still investing in our fundraising abilities. And I don't know, at some point maybe people are exhausted about paying for this too. And our issue. Not as exciting. You know, we, we are competing, frankly for donate donor dollars with things like Ukraine or abortion rights or gun rights, you know, so there are, there is a limitation to how much I can guarantee that I'm gonna be able to relieve people's debt. [00:32:28] And also remember that in order for me to relieve your debt, you have to be financially burdened, right? So you have to be 400% of poverty or below, or the debt has to be large compared to your. So I would be leery of people feeling comfortable with the idea that eventually not [00:32:45] George Weiner: pay. By the way, this is not financial advice. [00:32:48] I repeat, this is a nonprofit podcast. This is not financial [00:32:51] Allison Sesso: advice. Right. And, and, and I will say, frankly, you know, there is some concern on the hospital and provider side that, that if they work with us, that that. That that will happen, right? That if that people will bush think, Well, I don't have to pay my bill. [00:33:04] So I don't think that that's a good way. Wow. [00:33:05] George Weiner: I didn't even think of that, but [00:33:07] Allison Sesso: Right. That, that's, that's a good way of [00:33:10] George Weiner: not you have thought about this as the ceo. Yeah, [00:33:13] Allison Sesso: exactly. And it's not something I would say we've experienced. What we've experienced is people who can pay their bills do pay their bills. [00:33:22] There's people in the middle Right. That also pay their bills, but to a, a large. where it's a a difficult situation for them to pay the bills. I would like to address those people as well, like they sign up for a payment plan that they can't afford. What I would advise people, is to not sign up for payment plans that they can't afford. [00:33:43] If it's $700 a month and that's gonna create a real financial burden on you and your family, then do not sign up for it despite all of the pressure that you might feel from the debt collector, if it's an individual, individual entity or if it's the hospital themselves. So that's what I would advise. [00:34:00] Unfortunately, as much as I hate having to tell people. be their own advocates. This system is set up that it expects you to be an advocate for yourself, and so you have to advocate for yourself and make sure that you don't sign up for things that you can't afford. [00:34:19] George Weiner: Uh, what a mess. It just, what a mess. In my mind, I'm just saying like, Well, what if I just waited, like I had my $45,000 debt and I just waited out of like, I'm gonna buy this back on a penny on the dollar in a year. I'm gonna come back to you as an independent broker, and I'm just go buy back. [00:34:36] Allison Sesso: Yeah, but you aren't, you can't do that. [00:34:38] Right. You know, you're not gonna have the negotiated power that I can collectively, and you can't come to r i p and. Well look, I got this one debt. It's 45,000. I'm in [00:34:46] George Weiner: Texas. Hear me out. I mean, you can, I will donate this much over here for the help my angle get better fund, right? Exactly. Doesn't, doesn't work. [00:35:01] No, [00:35:01] Allison Sesso: it doesn't. It doesn't work that way, unfortunately. But I do. But I will say this, when we work with hospitals and increasingly so, Our vision is for when we work with hospitals that they take a look at their financial assistance policies and try, because you're right hospitals, especially non-profit hospitals. [00:35:20] Mm-hmm. are supposed to give out charity care. They're supposed to focus on low income individual. Remember that [00:35:25] George Weiner: C3 classification in the old taxis? [00:35:27] Allison Sesso: Yes, exactly. But the thing is that, Hospitals don't really get that classification taken away. Like that's not, that's not a thing that really happens that frequently. [00:35:38] Yeah, I, and I, and I don't, I don't mean to imply at all that hospitals don't take that seriously. I think they take it very seriously there. They're nonprofit status, and again, not all hospitals are alike. There are some bad actors and there are some that are genuinely struggling right now. Hospitals are not really in a great financial place. [00:35:56] Compared to some of the patients, they're probably better off. It depends, you know, on the situation. But hospitals are supposed to provide charity care, bottom line, and so they are not necessarily as generous as our program. So there's people in between, like some of them could be 200% of poverty or there's discounts provided at 300% of poverty, not the full, you know, getting it all relieved like r I p. [00:36:21] So we do hope though, that by doing an analysis of their bad debt file people, that means people that did not get charity care, whose debt we are buying, that we're able to give them information that helps them reflect on their own charity care policies and approaches, like letting people actually know about the charity care, making sure the application process is not to burdensome. [00:36:45] We encourage hospitals to do what's called presumptive eligibility, meaning that they just take a look on their own by buying data from, from TransUnion like we do, or any other, you know, Equifax, whatever. Buying the data, looking at people's incomes and making assumptions about whether or not they deserve or, you know, can get. [00:37:02] Charity care based on their income, and then they just give it without, just like we do. We just give it away. We let people know that they've gotten this free kick, this debt relief without them having to fill out any paperwork or anything like that. . [00:37:17] George Weiner: So that's so interesting. I didn't realize You're not looking at pii, personally identifiable information to the degree where you see maybe a name and an address. [00:37:24] You're getting like top line stats on somebody Or could you do like, do the search for, you know, George, we in Texas who's got 45 K in debt and you're like, Ah, I found [00:37:34] Allison Sesso: you, you're there. No. Well, when we get a, when we get a file, so we are HIPAA compliant, right? So we, we have a DAA with the hospital and, and we, you know, we do keep , uh, we're very vigilant about our, our cyber security and all of that other stuff. [00:37:47] But, and we, we have to be able to have the information of the individual or else we wouldn't be able to let them know about the fact that we've relieved their debt. Right. Right. You do know it. Right. So we do have that information, but, When we analyze a file from a hospital, we're doing it in the aggregate. [00:38:03] We're not focusing on the individual at all, that we're completely ignoring the individual's name and all of that stuff. All we're focusing on is those elements that qualify them, and so we take the entire part that qualifies, and that's what we hold onto, and then we send out the letters after we've bought that debt, et cetera, etc. [00:38:24] George Weiner: Gotcha. I love, still, in my mind I'm thinking like, but there's technically a way I could go through and be like, if my name comes up, let's just say I'd be, uh, encouraged to make a donation. You'd never do it, but would it open up a second? Don't get my debt for me. [00:38:42] Allison Sesso: Let you know. We'd never, ever let you, We would not, we don't give away the names of the individuals that we. [00:38:49] if people want to tell their stories, they are encouraged to do so, and we let them do that and they can put their stories on their web, on our website, and they can talk to our anthropologist, but we would never tell a donor you helped X, Y, Z. Ever. [00:39:01] George Weiner: Oh, that's fair. I was saying in reverse like the, the person who's like in distress, like, could I go search a database to be like, Oh, I'm in this distressed category of people, but you can't open up it up because of hipaa. [00:39:11] Yeah. [00:39:12] Allison Sesso: Well, you need to find out if we already relieved your debt. If it's already gone, we, we would've notified you. [00:39:20] George Weiner: Oh, thank you for humoring me. I'm such a, such a rabbit hole runner. That's even a thing. All right, we're gonna move to rapid fire. okay. With your permission, Please keep your responses as short as you feel like they, eh, feel like. [00:39:34] Okay. What is one tech tool or website that you or your organization has started using in the last year? [00:39:40] Allison Sesso: Max Q D, which is a qualitative data analysis visualization tool. Cool. [00:39:49] George Weiner: What are some tech issues you're currently battling with? [00:39:53] Allison Sesso: Well, we are making sure that our cyber security is so to compliant, so we're really focused on that and we're super excited about that. [00:40:01] And we also are trying to send people emails in addition to hard copy letters, and so we're working to incorporate that into our model. , [00:40:10] George Weiner: what is coming in the next year that has you the most excited? [00:40:15] Allison Sesso: The ability to enhance how we analyze our data, specifically with a focus on. [00:40:24] George Weiner: Talk about a mistake that you made in or maybe earlier in your career that shapes the way you do things today. [00:40:33] Allison Sesso: Creating space for everyone who's a stakeholder, be it on the board, on your team, uh, donor to make their voice heard and to be part of decision making. By not doing that, I think you really undermine everyone's buyin to what you're doing and the direction you're headed. [00:40:52] And that was a mistake I made in my career that I have overcorrected for, probably . [00:40:59] George Weiner: Do you believe nonprofits can successfully go out of business? [00:41:04] Allison Sesso: I sure hope so. I really do. I think that nonprofits are generally not set up to solve problems, but resolve them in your. And I hope that nonprofits can have a greater voice in getting systemic change so that they can help solve problems at a larger scale. [00:41:24] George Weiner: If I were to put you in the hot tub time machine, back to the beginning of your work at r I p Medical debt, what advice would you give your dryer self yourself [00:41:34] Allison Sesso: to focus on the progress over the. So that I could feel more excited about the work that I'm doing going forward and less [00:41:43] George Weiner: stressed. Uh, if I were to give you a magic wand to wave across the industry you work in, what would it do? [00:41:52] And you can't say, just clean up every single bit of debt [00:41:57] Allison Sesso: across the industry. Uh, I would, I, I would say, and when I say the industry, I'm talking about the nonprofit industry at large, I would say improve the marketing of the industry. I think that we. A, a skewed view as if we are the secondary industry that's sort of just doing what everyone calls God's work, which I hate. [00:42:16] I think that we are doing an essential, fundamental, fundamental function for society and that it takes real skill that not everybody has, and not everyone can from a business can just jump in and do, and take over and do well. And I think that I would do a better job of marketing who we are and how important we are as an, as an industry in terms of non. [00:42:38] George Weiner: What is something you think you should stop doing? [00:42:43] Allison Sesso: Uh, sometimes I think we put our heads down too much and do the day to day work, you know, going in and outta of meetings, taking, checking off our to-do list and I think we need to stop doing that as much and put our, pick our heads up and look at the big picture and appreciate what we've accomplished. [00:42:59] George Weiner: How did you get your start in the social impact sector? [00:43:04] Allison Sesso: I don't have a good answer for that. I feel like it's a calling for me. As lame and cheesy as that sounds, I've always, uh, felt like I needed to work in a mission driven, uh, capacity. And so here I am. , [00:43:19] George Weiner: what advice would you give college grads looking to enter the sector? [00:43:24] make sure that you have a strong ethical and moral compass and that you have people to talk to to ensure you stay with that because money and donors even can really influence you in a way that's not [00:43:37] George Weiner: always. What advice did your parents give you that you either followed or did not? Heed [00:43:47] Allison Sesso: Finding balance in my life, both in terms of work happiness and personal happiness. [00:43:56] To be [00:43:56] George Weiner: clear, you heated that advice. I [00:44:00] Allison Sesso: did. Yes. I'm very happy in both my work life and my, My question [00:44:03] audio1239347413: could [00:44:03] George Weiner: have gone the other way there. Life, right? could have been a real dark turn. Yeah. Uh, that's wonderful. Uh, how do people find you? How do people help you? [00:44:14] Allison Sesso: Well, first donate to us please. Uh, r i p medical debt.org. [00:44:19] I can't do this work without that. You can also follow us on Twitter, on Instagram. Just add our ip medical debt. but I really encourage you to, uh, to take a look at our website, check us out and, and talk about the issue of medical debt, uh, how it impacts you. I think one of the biggest problems with this issue is that people feel like they've personally failed when the reality is the system is broken. [00:44:41] And you have to remember that. And unless we talk about it in our personal stories, this issue's gonna be with us and it's gonna be killing us slowly, literal. [00:44:51] George Weiner: I'm grateful for the work that you are doing. Thank you. Thank you for, uh, just, uh, continuing to, to make this a national issue and an Avenue, Avenue to finally put dollars to work, I think, in a high leverage way. [00:45:03] Thank you. Thank you.

A Health Podyssey
Tara Lagu on Physicians' Attitudes on People With Disabilities

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 28:15


Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews Northwestern University's Tara Lagu on the paper she published in the October 2022 issue of Health Affairs examining physicians attitudes toward patients with disabilities.Order the October 2022 issue of Health Affairs on disability and health.Health Affairs thanks the Ford Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for their financial support of this issue. Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Benefits Breakdown
Making Benefit Headlines and Building Health Plans

Benefits Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 25:32


Jared, Vanessa and Adam are joined by National Benefits Leader Robyn Piper with Piper Jordan, a recent addition to the Brown & Brown team of companies. Robyn discusses how to help build winning health plans and solve issues that employers and employees face. The team tackles a plethora of topics including Pharmacy Contracts, Social Determinants of Health, Food Deserts, Plan Discounts, High-Performance Networks, Low-Wage Plan Design and more! This fast-paced discussion will help you drive new ideas and conversations within your organization. Connect with the hosts: Jared Bowcutt Vanessa Longnecker Adam Compton

A Health Podyssey
Aliza Gordon on Surprise Billing Trends

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 21:56


Alan Weil interviews Aliza Gordon from Elevance Health on her and coauthors' recently published paper in the September 2022 issue of Health Affairs comparing trends in provider charges for surprise billing between two states, New York and California, which have different mechanisms for setting surprise bill payment levels.Order the September 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on nurses, care delivery, pharmaceuticals, and more.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Health Pilots
A Lower Touch Approach to Maximize Screenings for Social Determinants of Health

Health Pilots

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 27:05


To assess patients on a one-to-one basis for social determinants of health (SDOH) is an important, yet often high touch process conducted by health center staff. So what might a lower touch approach to these vital screenings look like? Northeast Valley Health Corporation (NEVHC) sought to explore  innovative solutions in order to assess the specific needs of their over 80,000 patients throughout Los Angeles County. Today we hear from Debra Rosen and Alejandra Mata at NEVHC about their exciting and ongoing journey in digitizing the patient screening process. They share how integrating different tools on a familiar platform can better identify specific patient population needs and allow them to offer pertinent community resources more widely - while also impacting the provider's quality of service at the point of care.Here's where you can learn more about the people, places, and ideas in this episode: Debra Rosen, RN, MPH, Director of Quality, Health Equity, and Innovation; and Alejandra Mata, Associate Director of Health Equity - Northeast Valley Health Corporation (NEVHC)One Degree, web and mobile platform that makes it easy for low-income families to find, manage, and review nonprofit and government servicesTechnology Hub, a CCI program that helps organizations vet, pilot, evaluate, and spread innovative digital health solutions targeting Medicaid markets and historically underinvested communities. *Exciting announcement! The "Test to Treat" Equity Grant application cycle is now open! Funded by California Department of Public Health (CDPH), this grant supports safety net clinics to quickly treat patients testing positive for COVID-19. The grant period is 10 months and amounts range from $50,000 to $1,000,000. Learn more now and apply by September 30, 2022 at T2Tgrants.org. © 2022 Center for Care Innovations. All Rights Reserved.

Decoding Healthcare Innovation
Digital Health Solutions and Value-Based Care with CareSignal CEO Blake Marggraff

Decoding Healthcare Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 25:46


In this episode, Carrie and Blake discuss: What exactly is "deviceless remote patient monitoring"?Why did CareSignal choose to focus in the value-based care space as early as 2015 -- and how did they succeed there?What role do Social Determinants of Health play in value-based care models?Key Takeaways: Deviceless remote patient monitoring strikes a good balance between remote monitoring and patient engagement for value based care without relying on peripheral devices. When a product is designed to be easy to use, it becomes accessible to as many people as possible and therefore has the potential to help as many people as possible too.CareSignal decided from a risk-reward perspective that it was optimal to take the risk that the value based care trend wouldn't pan out. The reward if they could build the first product that could really scale for remote monitoring and engagement in a true value based care arena would make that risk worthwhile.A lot of physicians and clinicians are experiencing burnout as well as staffing shortages. This fear that technology will displace them actually allows for companies to position their technology as a way to allow physicians and clinicians to operate at their highest level of practice while some of the other things are taken care of by technology. “Improving health equity by supporting social determinants of health is the right thing to do clinically, as humans. But now, it's the right thing to do financially as well. And it's just going to become more and more so.” - Blake MarggraffConnect with Blake Marggraff: Website: https://caresignal.health/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marggraff/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/blakemarggraff Learn more from Carrie and Rebecca: Healthcare Insights (a monthly deep dive into specific topics for innovators): https://nixongwiltlaw.com/healthcare-insightsTelehealth/Virtual Care Mgmt Update (a biweekly LinkedIn newsletter tracking legal and policy changes across the nation): https://www.linkedin.com/newsletters/telehealth-virtual-care-update-6901900767960068096/ Website: https://nixongwiltlaw.com/ Carrie on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carrienixon/ Rebecca on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccagwilt/NGL on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/nixon-gwilt-law/ 

B-Time with Beth Bierbower
The Impact of SDOH on health with UniteUs Co-founder & CEO Dan Brillman

B-Time with Beth Bierbower

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 23:02


Description: Today we are diving on Social Determinants of Health with Dan Brillman, Co-founder & CEO of UniteUs, an organization that connects health and care. We'll gain an understanding of SDoH and understand the impact on health and healthcare costs with Dan sharing quantifiable data and outcomes. We'll learn how UniteUs is delivering on its promise to truly connect the community. Show Notes: Book: The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building A Business When There Are No Easy Answers by Ben Horowitz

A Health Podyssey
Eric Roberts on Dual Eligibles Coverage

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 28:32


Alan Weil interviews Eric Roberts from the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health to discuss his and colleagues recent research comparing the experiences of dual eligibles enrolled in D-SNPs with those enrolled in Medicare Advantage and traditional Medicare.Read the full transcript.Order the September 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on nurses, care delivery, pharmaceuticals, and more.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

AMA COVID-19 Update
How social determinants of health impact health outcomes with Laura Zimmermann, MD

AMA COVID-19 Update

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 16:08


Laura Zimmermann, MD, Interim Division Chief of General Internal Medicine at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, discusses a step-by-step approach for physicians to address social determinants of health in their practice. American Medical Association CXO Todd Unger hosts. Looking for more resources? To access the AMA STEPS Forward® toolkit (CME credit), visit: https://edhub.ama-assn.org/steps-forward/module/2702762 Watch the full AMA STEPS Forward® webinar on social determinants of health here: https://bit.ly/3BMnlyj

Vanderbilt Health DNA: Discoveries in Action
Surviving vs. Thriving: Social Determinants of Wellness

Vanderbilt Health DNA: Discoveries in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 48:49


Does your environment affect your health and wellbeing? Explore what prevents you from bringing your whole self to work, school and your personal relationships. Experts weigh in on the question: Can you thrive if your mental and physical health aren't in sync? 

JAF Project Podcast
Counterparts - Bobby Watts - September 13th 2022

JAF Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 56:38


https://nhchc.org/ We are very excited to welcome Bobby Watts to the show! Bobby Watts is the Chief Executive Officer of the National Health Care for the Homeless Council, which supports the 300 federally funded Health Care for the Homeless programs and 100 Medical Respite providers with training, technical assistance, sharing of best practices, research, publications, and an active policy and advocacy program working to eliminate homelessness. Bobby has 30 years of experience in administration, direct service, and implementation of homeless health services, beginning as a live-in counselor at the New York City Rescue Mission. He spent most of his career prior to joining the Council at Care for the Homeless, which operates clinics, and shelters, and conducts policy analysis and advocacy in New York City, beginning as an intern, and serving as the executive director from 2005-2017. Under his tenure, the Federally Qualified Health Center agency tripled in size, adding major programs and initiatives –including constructing and operating a shelter for 200 mentally ill and medically frail women –and becoming licensed as a Diagnostic and Treatment Center in New York State. He has served on numerous boards, government-appointed task forces, and workgroups including serving as the finance officer for the NYC HIV Health and Human Services Planning Council, on the NYS DOH Medicaid Redesign Team's Affordable Housing Workgroup and Value-Based Payment Workgroup on CBOs and Social Determinants of Health, and as an inaugural member of the NYS Interagency Council on Homelessness, where he co-chaired its Health Committee. Contact us at www.counterpartsshow.com

A Health Podyssey
Michael Barnett on Mental Health Care Delivery

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 20:06


Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews Michael Barnett from Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health to discuss Michael and coauthors recent research on assessing trends in the supply of mental health care practitioners, including psychiatrists and nurse practitioners serving Medicare enrollees.Order the September 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on nurses, care delivery, pharmaceuticals, and more.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Bright Spots in Healthcare Podcast
Payer and Provider Strategies for Last Mile Care

Bright Spots in Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 59:06


Healthcare leaders from Avera, Blue Shield of California, Renown Health and the Partners in Care Foundation discuss solving the last mile In healthcare, the link between the consumer and where care is delivered. When consumers can't pass through the last mile connection to the healthcare delivery system, they never even get an opportunity to engage with healthcare up close. Our panel will share success stories and best practices for improving access, creating a new business model and engaging consumers in their care. Panelists:  Mitchell Fong, Vice President of Virtual Care, Renown Health Daniel Rivas, Senior Manager, Community Health, Blue Shield of California Rhonda Weiring, Vice President, Clinical Innovation, Avera @Home Dianne Davis, Vice President, Community Wellness, Partners in Care Foundation   Bios: https://www.sharedpurposeconnect.com/events/novel-approaches-to-last-mile-care/   This episode of Bright Spots in Healthcare is sponsored by Partners in Care Foundation. The Partners in Care Foundation aligns social care and health care to address the “Social Determinants of Health” that routinely affect diverse, under-served, and vulnerable populations. PICF serves as a bridge between medical care and what individuals can accomplish on their own at home, achieving greater equity of conditions and effectiveness of care. Partners' evidence-based programs and services have been demonstrated to improve quality of life, help participants avoid suffering, and reduce costly hospital readmissions, Emergency Department visits, and nursing home placements.   For over two decades, the Partners in Care Foundation has been innovating and improving SDOH solutions and driving life-changing, life-saving alignment between social care and health care for those we serve. Please visit https://www.picf.org for more information.  

A Health Podyssey
Leemore Dafny

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 27:54


On our 100th episode, Leemore Dafny from Harvard Business School joins Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil to discuss her recent research published in Health Affairs examining donations made by pharmaceutical manufacturers to patient assistance charities based on an analysis of drug spending among Medicare Advantage enrollees. Order the September 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on nurses, care delivery, pharmaceuticals, and more.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Read the Full Episode Transcript here.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Up To Date
Kansas City University medical students learn how social determinants affect health care

Up To Date

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 20:23


Care from a clinic or hospital accounts for about 20% of a person's health, while the other 80% is affected by the community that surrounds them. That's why one medical school professor is teaching medical students about social determinants.

A Health Podyssey
Excursion: Toyin Ajayi, CEO of Cityblock Health

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 40:16


Today, Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil takes an Excursion with Dr. Toyin Ajayi, co-founder and CEO of Cityblock Health.Dr. Ajayi is a primary care doctor and an entrepreneur. She co-founded a company with a multi-billion-dollar valuation based on meeting the needs of patients, many with quite complex needs, in their communities.Listen to Alan Weil and Toyin Ajayi talk about building a health care business that focuses on historically underserved populations, what inspired Dr. Ajayi's work, what challenges she has overcome, where Cityblock is heading, and more. Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

The Growth Collective
Helping Employees Overcome Obstacles: A conversation with Mark Peters

The Growth Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 52:51


Everyday across the globe, people bring their whole selves to work.  They bring every experience from the moment they are born to the moment before they walk in the door each day.  All of it. The good, the bad, the traumatic.   The stuff they bring can be called the Social Determinants of Health.  The determinants are big buckets of factors – environment, genetics, individual behaviors, social circumstances and medical care – that influence an individual's ability to be healthy and THRIVE.   Recognizing these factors influence one's ability to focus and engage at work or even just show up at work opens up a door of possibility for employers.  Employers who provide “benefits” to employees as part of a compensation package are uniquely positioned to provide resources and support that can help to address the factors that can be barriers to an individual who is trying to remain employed. My guest for this episode is Mark Peters, CEO of Butterball Farms, Inc. Mark recognized a long time ago, he could choose to learn about his employees' issues or ignore them and not play that role.   He learned quickly – everyone benefited when he and the organization decided to come alongside their employees to help struggling employees find resources they needed to help them keep their jobs and care for their families.  In 2003, he organized a pioneering group of CEOs and community leaders to found The Source, a not-for-profit organization that has helped hundreds of workers navigate personal challenges that interfere with their jobs. Listen in as Mark shares many of the lessons he learned along the way, actions organizations can take today to better understand the challenges their employees face and steps leaders can take to provide support that leads to reduced turnover and increased employee happiness.  Connect with Mark Peters Instagram: i_3leadership Facebook: i3Leadership1 LinkedIn: i-3 Leadership Connect with Susan Morgan Bailey Email: Susan.Bailey@marshmma.com  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/susanmbailey/  

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Is Primary Care the Endgame? Ann Somers Hogg helps us look at Amazon's moves through a theoretical lens. Is primary care the endgame, or a means to an end? And learn why she refers to the term Drivers of Health rather than Social Determinants of Health. All that, plus the Flava of the Week about reducing the cost of insulin. UnitedHealth Group is eliminating out-of-pocket costs for insulin for eligible members, and Optum is making insulin available at a low cost to the uninsured. How much can this impact the consumer experience? Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

Improve Healthcare
Technology & Primary Care Telehealth Innovation w/ Octiva CEO Cody Hall

Improve Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 14:58


Cody Hall is the Founder and CEO of Octiva Healthcare. Cody has a diverse background in military, technology, and healthcare making him capable of leading organizations and teams effectively. Cody led customer service and Human Resource teams from early-stage startups to industry-leading tech giants, creating benchmark customer experiences and employee journeys for teams, large and small.Following his time with larger organizations, he set off to impact innovative companies, starting and assisting multiple startups in developing world-class teams, customer experiences, and technology workflows.After years in technology, Cody was recruited to join the Titanium Healthcare Team as the Chief Compliance Officer. Cody led the company's cultural development, policy and refined the organization's human capital management abilities. Cody's time at Titanium inspired the creation of Octiva in 2020.Learn more at Octiva Healthcare

Ironically Serious
Tapping Into Sexuality, Self-Love, & Confidence Ft. Sex Coach Erika Eileen

Ironically Serious

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 77:30


In this episode Taylor is joined by sex and confidence coach Erika Eileen. Erika has been working in the coaching industry for 3 years now and studied Physical and Health Education as well as Gender Equality and Social Justice in university, and completed her undergraduate thesis on Social Determinants to Health in Type 1 Diabetics. They dive into Erika's story of her own journey to self-love and how she made her way into the coaching world. Erika shares some of her biggest tips on sharing your personal thoughts and self-image online, navigating emotions, and discovering one's path to sexual freedom. Taylor opens up about her own experience with discovering her sexuality, and this leads to a hot conversation about the strip club - including our favorite tips on how to make it work for you and your partner. Erika shares invaluable feedback on what it means to discover self-confidence and defy society's standards, sharing tip after tip that she normally shares in a private coaching setting. Finally, Erika shares more about the inception of the Cool to Connect Intimate Deck and how it can impact your sexual relationship with your partner(s).Stay connect with Erika on:Instagram @itserikaeileenTikTok @itserikaeileenwww.itserikaeileen.comListen to Erika's Podcast, Rated E for Erika, here.Buy Erika's Cool to Connect Intimate Deck here.Listen to Erika's sex playlists on Spotify here.Learn more about the Ironically Serious podcast at www.ironicallyserious.comFollow the podcast on Instagram @ironicallyseriouspodStay connected with Taylor @taytorresSubmit your SOS to be featured on an episode here.Leave Taylor a voicemail here. 

Health Comm Central
Explaining Social Determinants 101 | Ep #5

Health Comm Central

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 22:54


Understanding social determinants of health (SDOH) is fundamental to the work we do in public health to ensure that people can live their healthiest lives. But it can sometimes be hard to explain social determinants fully and succinctly to people outside our field. Whether you are searching for the words to help teach others or you are new to public health yourself and still trying to get a handle on why -- despite educational campaigns and even strong individual motivation and intention -- systemic barriers often prevent people from engaging in healthy behaviors, today's episode is for you!In addition to helping you explain the basics, we'll cover two critically important rules for discussing social determinants of health with people outside public health -- whether partners from other sectors, community-based organizations, decision-makers, even friends and family. And we will also set the stage with this discussion of “Social Determinants 101” for several other related episodes. So enjoy today's show and stay tuned for a whole lot more on social determinants soon!Resources:Social Determinants of Health, Healthy People 2030, published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.Social Determinants of Health (SDOH), from NEJM Catalyst, Social Determinants of Health (SDOH). Published by New England Journal of Medicine, Dec. 1, 2017.Please click the button to subscribe so you don't miss any episodes and leave a review if your favorite podcast app has that ability. Thank you!For more information, visit the Health Comm Central website at: http://www.HealthCommCentral.com© 2022 Karen Hilyard, Ph.D.

A Health Podyssey
Ann Nguyen on Practicing Across State Lines In An Emergency

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 28:23


As the COVID-19 epidemic hit the United States, New Jersey was an early hotspot with medical offices closing down, people encouraged to stay at home, and extreme pressure on the health system.The state of New Jersey adopted emergency rules to permit providers from out of state to care for people in New Jersey. This had many implications.Ann Nguyen from Rutgers University joins A Health Podyssey to discuss what happens when you suspend interstate barriers to medical practice.Nguyen and coauthors published a paper in the August edition of Health Affairs exploring the results of a survey administered to practitioners who received licenses through New Jersey's COVID-19 temporary emergency licensure program.They found that these practitioners met two very important needs: urgent hospital-based care and telehealth-based care. Order the August 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on spending, payment, and more.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Licensed to Live
What you missed part 3 #LTL22

Licensed to Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 31:54


I know that some of you could not make it to Licensed To Live: The Conference 2022 so I want to provide a few MORE gems to keep you going.   3:00 CME Credits 5:00 Social Determinants of Health 12:00 Maternal loss and disparities 15:00 Licensed To Live TV 20:00 Us vs. The Plant       To see the entire conference replay https://licensedtolive.com   Use authorship to build your brand: https://www.doctorjarretfree.com/authorship/   Show Sponsor, EH3 Coffee use coupon code: DoctorJarret    Licensed To Live   Go to https://www.doctorjarretfree.com/affirmations-ebookto get your own free 30 day affirmations book.  

Healthcare Triage Podcast
Addressing Health Disparities

Healthcare Triage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 34:24


In this episode, Dr. Jasmine Gonzalvo talks with Dr. Aaron Carroll about her team's efforts to address health disparities through Purdue University's Center for Health Equity and Innovation (CHEqI). They discuss ways CHEqI's work has expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic and how they're training the next generation of pharmacists to support underrepresented communities. This Healthcare Triage podcast episode is co-sponsored by Indiana University School of Medicine, whose mission is to advance health in the state of Indiana and beyond by promoting innovation and excellence in education, research, and patient care, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, a three way partnership among Indiana University, Purdue University and the University of Notre Dame, striving to make Indiana a healthier state by empowering research through pilot funding, research education and training. More information on the Indiana CTSI can be found by visiting IndianaCTSI.org.

The #HCBiz Show!
Care Pays Back: Addressing the Social Determinants of Success in Healthcare Education with Dr. Rebecca Sarlo

The #HCBiz Show!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 49:16


It is now widely accepted that socioeconomic issues like food, housing, transportation, and more, directly drive health outcomes in the U.S. These issues hinder access to quality healthcare, and create obstacles to education and stable employment. In the former context, they are often referred to as the Social Determinants of Health. In the latter context, we might consider them the Social Determinants of Success. One organization that sees it this way is Ultimate Medical Academy (UMA) – a nonprofit healthcare educational institution based in Clearwater, Florida. UMA has instituted what it calls a “culture of care”. That means they are fully committed to addressing the socioeconomic issues that make it difficult for students to apply, attend, and learn at their schools. UMA is committed to providing the support its students need to thrive inside and outside of school. The culture of care is grounded in a commitment to diversity, community development, and a lifetime of support pledge to every student.   They do this, of course, because it is the right thing to do. But it is also perfect for business! Good for their business as the word of mouth from past students becomes a powerful recruiting tool. And good for the business of health care too. After all, their students will know firsthand the value of receiving this type of support and they will bring it into the healthcare workforce with them. Who better to fix our SDOH issues than those who have already overcome them? We discuss this, and much more with Rebecca Sarlo, Associate Vice President, and Director of Ultimate Medical Academy's Clearwater Campus where she oversees both the academic and operational functions at the campus. For full show notes and links, visit https://TheHCBiz.com.

Healthcare Rap
Is Primary Care the Endgame?

Healthcare Rap

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 28:59


Ann Somers Hogg helps us look at Amazon's moves through a theoretical lens. Is primary care the endgame, or a means to an end? And learn why she refers to the term Drivers of Health rather than Social Determinants of Health. All that, plus the Flava of the Week about reducing the cost of insulin. UnitedHealth Group is eliminating out-of-pocket costs for insulin for eligible members, and Optum is making insulin available at a low cost to the uninsured. How much can this impact the consumer experience?  Thanks to Persado for spreading the awesome, yo! Persado provides healthcare organizations with pre-developed, pre-optimized marketing messaging focused on improving health goals and business objectives. (#225)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Health Podyssey
Rozalina McCoy on Modernizing Diabetes Care Quality Measures

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 27:01


Join Health Affairs Insider.There are currently an estimated 37.3 Americans living with diabetes, more than a 40 percent increase from a decade ago. Thus, it isn't surprising that efforts to measure and improve the quality of health care focuses a significant amount of attention on diabetes.Major health care quality datasets all include a number of measures related to the quality of diabetes care. Given the continuing growth in the burden of diabetes, it's appropriate to ask the question: What are we actually getting from measuring the quality of diabetes care as we do it today?Rozalina McCoy from Mayo Clinic joins A Health Podyssey today to discuss just that very topic.McCoy and coauthors published a paper in the July 2022 issue of Health Affairs examining diabetes quality measures in the US since the mid-1990s. They recommend some pretty significant changes in how we measure and report on the quality of diabetes care.McCoy's research was part of a six-paper cluster of research on type 2 diabetes, all of which were published in the July 2022 issue of Health Affairs.Order the July 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on type 2 diabetes and more.Currently, more than 70 percent of our content is freely available - and we'd like to keep it that way. With your support, we can continue to keep our digital publication Forefront and podcasts free for everyone.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

The City Club of Cleveland Podcast
The Social Determinants of Thriving in the Workforce

The City Club of Cleveland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 60:00


Recent news about a strong job market may sound like great news for workers, but in Ohio, even as the economy appears to be rebounding, vacancies and high turnover remain. In a recent survey of over 750 local employers by the Fund for our Economic Future, nearly 80% confirmed that they are struggling to not only attract, but also retain employees. A panel discusses obstacles and how employers can reevaluate their policies to ensure all workers can thrive in their jobs.rnrnThis forum is part of our Workforce Development series sponsored by the Deaconess Foundation, with additional support from Bank of America. Production and distribution of City Club forums in partnership with ideastream is generously provided by PNC and the United Black Fund.