Podcasts about shoah

Genocide of the European Jews by Nazi Germany and other groups

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Focus
HORS-SÉRIE LES GRANDS TÉMOINS - Ginette Kolinka, rescapée de la Shoah

Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 20:02


Elle est l'une des dernières survivantes des camps de concentration nazis. Rescapée d'Auschwitz-Birkenau, Ginette Kolinka, 98 ans en février, publie "Une vie heureuse" chez Grasset, un livre dans lequel elle raconte sa vie après le camp de la mort. L'infatigable nonagénaire, qui a côtoyé Simone Veil à Birkenau, continue de sillonner l'Hexagone pour témoigner auprès des élèves. Du lundi au jeudi, Marion Calais revient sur un fait marquant de l'actualité avec les reporters, les correspondants et les experts de RTL. Le vendredi, c'est "Focus Culture" avec Anthony Martin et l'équipe de "Laissez-vous tenter". Et chaque dimanche, dans "Focus Dimanche" Mohamed Bouhafsi donne la parole à ceux qui la font.

Radio Vaticana con voi
Radio Vaticana con voi 27.01.2023

Radio Vaticana con voi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 49:00


La diretta del mattino di Radio Vaticana con i messaggi inviati al 335 1243 722, tanta buona musica, l'agenda del giorno, i principali titoli dei giornali e diversi ospiti! Oggi con noi: Margherita Dana, figlia di un sopravvissuto all'Olocausto, intervistata dalla collega di Radio Vaticana-Vaticannews, Antonella Palermo. Maurizio Fontana, caporedattore dell'Osservatore Romano, per le anticipazioni sul nuovo numero del quotidiano vaticano, reperibile on line dal primo pomeriggio sul sito www.osservatoreromano.va Daniela Dana, presidentessa della associazione Figli della Shoah, per riflettere sull'importanza della memoria e della divulgazione di ciò che fu l'Olocausto. Info: www.figlidellashoah.org. Conduttrice: Paola Simonetti

Keep the Faith with Shammai Engelmayer
Episode No. 115--Shoah Education

Keep the Faith with Shammai Engelmayer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 15:24 Transcription Available


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Unholy: Two Jews on the news
Everything, Everywhere, All At Once - with special guest Etgar Keret

Unholy: Two Jews on the news

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 70:06


In the week of Holocaust remembrance, Yonit and Jonathan talk to one of the country's finest, funniest writers, Etgar Kere - to reflect on his late mother, a survivor of the Shoah who never wanted that label, and give his take on the political turmoil. Plus, classic chutzpah and mensch awards – and a look at the gap between what Brits say and what they actually mean (also known as: the guide to understanding your British co-host). Special thanks to Ira Glass and the team of "This American Life" for their assistance in the making of this episode.  Follow us on Instagram and Facebook: Unholy Podcast.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Il cacciatore di libri
"I giorni della libertà" di Alessandro Milan e "La vita segreta dei libri fantasma" di Andrea Kerbaker

Il cacciatore di libri

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023


"I giorni della libertà - Storie di chi ha combattuto per l'Italia" di Alessandro Milan (Mondadori-Strade Blu) racconta quanto accaduto fra il '43 e il '45 in particolare a Milano: la caduta del fascismo, l'arrivo dei tedeschi, i bombardamenti, la guerra civile, la resistenza, gli scioperi nelle fabbriche. Racconta questa storia attraverso le vite di alcune persone realmente esistite: c'è Libero Temolo, operaio comunista e partigiano; c'è suo figlio Sergio, che all'epoca era adolescente; c'è Angelo Aglieri che lavorava nella segreteria di redazione del Corriere della Sera e che diventò partigiano e fu tradito dal fratello per soldi; c'è Carmela Fiorili, figlia di un anarchico, portinaia di un casermone dove convivevano fascisti e partigiani. Uomini e donne che in alcuni casi hanno sacrificato la vita per avere un paese libero e democratico. Nella seconda parte, un libro che parla di libri, precisamente di libri fantasma, ossia quei libri spariti dalla circolazione per le più svariate ragioni e di cui esistono magari al mondo solo poche copie. Si intitola "La vita segreta dei libri fantasma"(Salani) di Andrea Kerbaker, scrittore ma anche fondatore a Milano della Kasa dei libri, un luogo dove sono conservati oltre 30mila volumi e dove si organizzano eventi culturali. Nel libro si scopre che alcuni scrittori, come George Simenon, hanno cercato di far sparire dalla circolazione le copie di libri che a distanza di tempo gli sembravano brutti; altri che, dopo la caduta del regime, si pentirono di aver scritto testi a favore del fascismo (Elio Vittorini); c'è poi il caso di Stephen King che ha ritirato dal mercato un suo romanzo perché aveva ispirato le stragi nelle scuole. E infine il caso di un libro che avrebbe potuto diventare fantasma: "Se questo è un uomo" di Primo Levi venne rifiutato da Cesare Pavese e fu pubblicato da un piccolo editore senza alcun successo. Era destinato a scomparire. Solo con la pubblicazione Einaudi degli anni '60 diventò uno dei testi di riferimento sulla Shoah.

AJC Passport
‘Leopoldstadt' Actor David Krumholtz Sees Tom Stoppard's Holocaust Play as the Role of a Lifetime

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 28:20


Since its Broadway opening last fall, Tom Stoppard's “Leopoldstadt,” a play about a multigenerational Jewish family in Vienna, based on Stoppard's own family history, has been met with critical acclaim. Hear from celebrated actor David Krumholtz, who plays the patriarch of the family, on how his Jewish identity has been transformed by the role, why he speaks to his young children about antisemitism, and the importance of Holocaust education today. _ Episode Lineup: (0:40) David Krumholtz __ Show Notes: Leopoldstadt: Tickets and more information Photo credit: Joan Marcus Listen to:  Our most recent podcast episode: Shabbat Shalom No More? One Year Later, Colleyville Synagogue Wrestles with Impact of Hostage Crisis Follow People of the Pod on your favorite podcast app, and learn more at AJC.org/PeopleofthePod You can reach us at: peopleofthepod@ajc.org If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to tell your friends, tag us on social media with #PeopleofthePod, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review, to help more listeners find us. __ Transcript of Interview with David Krumholtz: Manya Brachear Pashman:  Since its official Broadway opening on October 2 2022, Tom Stoppard's latest play Leopoldstadt has received widespread acclaim. One of the hottest tickets in town, it has been extended through July 2023. The drama follows multiple generations of a Viennese Jewish family over half a century, beginning in 1899. Through the Holocaust and beyond, the fictional family and the story is based on Stoppard's own. When he was in his 50s, the playwright learned that he was Jewish and had lost his grandparents and many other family members in the Shoah. With us now to discuss his role in the play is actor David Krumholtz, who plays Hermann Merz, the tragic patriarch of this fictional family who has converted to Catholicism for purposes of social and professional mobility, but discovers in the end it is to no avail. David, welcome to People of the Pod.  David Krumholtz: Thank you so much. Thanks for having me.  Manya Brachear Pashman: So I described your character as tragic, but it is a play about the Holocaust. So would you say all of the characters in this play are tragic? Would you agree? Walk our audience through Hermann Merz's approach to life, to his Judaism. David Krumholtz: I don't see the character as tragic at all, which is sort of a conversation I needed to have with Patrick Marber, our director before I even auditioned for the role. I think he's heroic in many ways. He's doing the very best he can for his family, and for the future generations of his family, and in doing so, he has had to shed his Judaism. You get the sense, though, that he was kind of raised in the religion of business. The most important thing he inherited, this textile factory from his father, and his father did very well. And it seems to me that he was groomed  to take over and bring it to great success, build it farther than his father could have ever imagined. And for the sake of his family, and for the sake of future generations. So, certainly converting to Catholicism in late 19th century Austria, was one of the ways to do that, you know, he wasn't labeled anymore, it opened up channels that he probably would have had a harder time getting in on. He did all that he possibly could do to benefit from the choice. And it's a choice, ultimately, that he must have known broke his mother's heart, and alienated him from his family, from the more religious members of his family. And yet, he did it anyway. And he does suffer for it. And it seems to me he's willing to suffer for it. But when we learn about him, is that at the very core of who he is, he is Jewish. At the first instance, of someone challenging his Judaism or, you know, mocking his Catholicism, he's ready to kill the guy, literally. So we get the sense that this is a very, very deep seated issue that comes from, as he explains through a story about his grandfather being bullied for being Jewish. It's true. There's a trauma there that he is doing this from, it's not all just business-minded and flippant. This is something that he has been tortured by his whole life by the time we meet him. Which is why he has so many strong opinions on Israel and the future of Jews, and assimilation in Austria. Vienna, being at the time, the cultural center of the world with an emperor king who emancipated Jews from all wrongdoing. And was a sort of Jewish sympathizer who gave Jews quite a lot of leeway that they didn't have prior to his reign. So things are looking up when we meet Hermann Merz, looking up not only for his business and his family, but for Jews in Vienna.  I think he has every right to feel positively about the future, think positively about the future, and not want to move his entire family to the middle of the desert. He's righteous in that indignation. And sadly, time tells a different story. The next, you know, 40 years of his life, teach him that his ideals and his hopes for the future were obsolete or were futile. And that's the tragedy of the story of Hermann Merz. But I don't view him as a tragic figure. Manya Brachear Pashman: But what you're referring to is there's a kind of an ongoing debate through the play between Ludvig, his brother in law, if I'm not mistaken, and Hermann, and that debate is about assimilation and what the definition of assimilation is. Ludvig says assimilation doesn't mean to stop being a Jew. Assimilation means to carry on being a Jew without insult. Would you agree with that definition? And would you consider yourself assimilated, by that definition or another? David Krumholtz: I think for the time in which the play is set, that is a very keen definition. The idea of being anything other than what religion you're raised in, identifying with a nationality, let's say, was a novel concept at the time. The term thrown around by Ludvig in that scene a couple times is the word ordinary Jew, ordinary Jews, meaning not rich, middle class Jews who don't have access to all the luxuries that my character does. And that's an interesting little phrase there. ordinary jew, What is an ordinary Jew, what separates us? What makes you know, a Hasidic Jew a Hasidic Jew, what makes an assimilated Americanized for instance Jew, the same Jew or a different Jew? What's the difference?  I personally like to think that there is only a matter of degrees of religiosity between the two. I would hope that as appreciative of I am as I am as an assimilated Americanized Jew, as appreciative as I am of the Hasidic community of the religiosity of the ultra Orthodox community, the Orthodox community, that those communities would be as appreciative of me, that there'd be no judging.  Especially at this point, 80 years, past a genocide that we all suffered through, where it didn't matter how religious you were, at the end of the day, all that mattered was what was on your birth certificate. And one would hope that, 80 years later, we're all sort of on equal footing with one another. And we've all carried on being Jews without insult in one way or another.  I grew up in New York City. I grew up in Queens, which is the most multi-ethnic, multinational place on Earth, believe it or not, per capita. Queens represents more nationalities than any place on Earth. Just the borough of Queens alone, not to mention the entire city of New York. So for me, there wasn't any corner to fit into, it was all a melting pot, and I could be whatever I wanted to be. And so over time, after Hebrew school, and having had my Bar Mitzvah, I felt strongly that I didn't necessarily relate or feel attracted to the more religious tenets of Judaism. But that culturally I was Jewish. And I've taken great pride in playing Jewish characters, and telling the story of Jewish people over the last 30 years, in my work, when I get the chance to. and so in that way, I've carried on being a Jew without insult, you know, it is part of my identity, this play has made me sort of realize how much of that identity I maybe took for granted at times. But for the most part, it's nice to be a part of something that makes a clear statement. And that statement is that Judaism is more than just a religion, it's a cultural existence, it is something unique unto itself. And there are, there's a lot to be proud of, there's a lot of amazing history to be cherished and celebrated, and to be celebrated as well. Manya Brachear Pashman: So how did you find your way to Leopoldstadt? And I will follow that up with a question of, how have you found your way to your Jewish heritage, kind of discovering what you might have taken for granted through Leopoldstadt? David Krumholtz: Patrick Marber, the director of Leopoldstadt, had his sights set on me. It flabbergasted me to be honest, I haven't done a stitch of theater in 30 years. I'm not your sort of prototype for the role on paper. And yet, he was enamored with my work and sensed that it would all pan out nicely. And so I don't look a gift horse in the mouth. So I took the opportunity.  My father would have loved this play. My father was a deeply devout Jewish culturalist at heart. You know, he grew up in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. He was surrounded by Jewish people, his upbringing was surrounded by old world Jews who had settled in America prior to the war, and Jewish survivors of the Holocaust who had just come back. That was his reality growing up as a kid in New York. And so these themes were an obsession for him his whole life. So I thought, well, one way to connect was to evoke the memory of my father, and so I did that, and in doing so, I came to some pretty tough realizations, one being my father was quite frustrated with me, and how I sort of abandoned the religion, early on in my life. There comes a time in, I think, in a lot of people's lives where they question the existence of God, they question the existence of biblical history. And that was happening to me and it frustrated my father a great deal, because he had a tremendous amount of faith. And it's only recently that I've had to take on quite a bit of faith in my life now that I'm a father and being an actor is a leap of faith. It took me a long time to realize that. I just know from doing this play, that it would have made my father very, very proud. And that if he could tell a story this is the story he would tell. And so, for me, rediscovering my Judaism, through this story, as a tribute to his life, is the formula for success. And for me finding greater pride and being Jewish than perhaps I've ever had before. Manya Brachear Pashman:   That's beautiful. This was not a typical role for you, and you hadn't done a stitch of theater for 30 years. I believe I read somewhere that, in fact, when you're making your commute into the city to do these shows, you call someone to kind of share how intimidated you are by this play, and that that call settles you down. Do you still do that? David Krumholtz:   There are certain days I just have to do that. The weight of this role is heavy. This is a heavy responsibility. In many ways, the role of Hermann is kind of, along with other roles in the play, but he's one of the anchors of this ship that is sailing to great success on Broadway, and that's not lost on me and you know, when I walk out of the theater at night and, and get teary eyed thank yous from our patrons, who clearly have been deeply impacted by what they've just seen. It's not lost on me. And so yes, you know, little old me on the way in, in my car to the city has to sometimes call anyone. But typically, my family, someone in my family and just sort of say, Hey, this is quite a mountain to climb and hang in here. But there are moments certainly where the pressure is enormous, and I feel unworthy of the glory of playing this role. It's just part of who I am. It's what motivates me. Those feelings of insecurity actually motivate a great  performance, or what I hope is a great performance. And, so I make those calls. And, you know, and like I said, they're family mostly because to me, family is just deeply important, and they know me better than anyone. Manya Brachear Pashman: Well, that leads me to ask about the family tree in Leopoldstadt, which plays a very important role. It's published in the program, so that you can study it. In fact, someone told us to study it before we even watch the play. I don't know if it made that much of a difference. It made so much more sense afterward. But there are, I believe, 31 characters in Leopoldstadt, is that right? 24 of them are members of this extended family. And even in the play, there's a reference to how confusing that family tree can be. Why? What's the point of that kind of complicated, many branches of that family tree? David Krumholtz:  Well, it's a stroke of brilliance by Tom Stoppard who's written quite a few pieces that are strokes of brilliance. It's purposeful. It's so that at the end of the play, when your frustration mounts at not knowing exactly who every character is, there's so many characters, and how they're related to each other. When that frustration mounts, you can equate that frustration with the fact that each one of those people, each one of those characters, individualism didn't matter. At the end of the day, they were killed for being something they couldn't help but be. They were killed for being Jewish. It didn't matter what their hopes were, what their dreams were, what their aspirations were, it didn't matter whose mothers were, who's who, you know, whose sons had mothers and whose mothers had sons. none of it mattered. Death is the final, there's so much finality in death.  And at the end of the play, we get a sense of that finality, that there is no coming back. There's only memory, there's only memory. And memory, for as impactful as memory can be at times, is also a thinly veiled representation of the real person. And so when our audiences walk out of the theater going, I didn't get to know that character, I didn't get to know that character…you knew as much as they knew about themselves, before they were killed, before their life ended. The frustration you feel with the frustration of generations worth of Jewish families that lost their loved ones. And that's the point. Yeah, Manya Brachear Pashman: You talk a lot about walking out of the theater and how you encounter audience members. My husband and I walked out of the theater, and we kind of stood off to the side, just really in stunned silence. We were still processing everything we had just watched and heard. And these two ladies came by and they were taking smiling selfies outside the right by the poster. And my husband and I were like, Did you just see the same play that we saw? shocked that, you know, they show it was there, you know, maybe first time on Broadway and you know, this was a Tom Stoppard play, it's exciting. But we were so kind of emotionally drained.  David Krumholtz: We've been told by a lot of audiences that they're not prepared to clap for us, when we take our vows, that the ending in the play is so deeply tragic and so stunning that suddenly there are these actors on stage taking their vows. And, our crowds aren't quite ready to process. The difference between what they just saw and reality, the difference between 1900 and 2023. And we feel it as well. And we are as a cast somewhat desensitized to the trauma of the play. But during the rehearsals, and during our first couple of weeks of runs, we all had a very, very, very difficult time processing the different, more depressing aspects of the play. There were countless tears shed. It was amazing for us to bond over something that we all clearly felt so moved by. So we're not surprised, we often have to remind ourselves, oh, this is the first time these people are seeing the show. And how it felt the first time we read it, or how it felt the first time we heard it out loud, or how it felt the first time we got it up on its feet and looked into each other's eyes and performed it. You know, we have to remind ourselves of how deeply impactful The show is. And it doesn't take much because at the end of most performances, we hear audible weeping in the in the crowd and we see it in the eyes of people standing to give us you know, an ovation and It's some of the most important work. You know, you always strive as an actor or an artist of any sort to do relevant work. So much of the work you do in between relevant work is down to whatever reasons, you know, whether it be to make a living or to, you know, to cement some future for yourself or whatever. And then in between, and then once in a while very rarely do you get to do something that is truly timeless, if you will. And that's what I believe about this play. It's timeless, in its impact. It tells the story of humanity in a very unique time. It's historical, and so the pride we all feel is just incredibly palpable. Manya Brachear Pashman:   And you should really, it is truly incredible. I also want to ask you how you've changed your behavior, what you have done, if anything. As a result of being part of this play, this is a very small thing I shared with you before we started recording, one of the lines during that comedic scene actually really pierced me and that was when the grandmother was looking through the photo album. And they don't know who people are here. She says, Well, here's a couple waving goodbye, but who are they? It's like a second death to lose your name and a family photo album. And I immediately burst into tears. And came home and started writing names on the back of photos in our family photo album because I realized, oh my goodness, what truth that line delivered. David Krumholtz:   Well, yeah, I think that theme of that desperation of clinging to memory desperately, is made all the more impactful when you realize that lives were meaninglessly lost. When tragedy strikes, memory both takes on more and less meaning. You know, because you're clinging so desperately to it, because you've lost something that you felt wasn't complete. And you're completing it in your memory, if you will. And yet it's just a memory. It's a Central as a memory, it exists here, maybe in your heart. But, there's no tangible proof that that person existed any longer. Again, it's Tom Stoppard hitting you over the head with a very, very bleak truth about the nature of murder of genocide, about the robbing of individual individuality, about the discounting of a person's dreams, of a person's hopes, of a person's family, of people's reliance on each, other dependence on each other. Just wiping people out of this general blanket of death. That memory becomes a more desperate thing. It's haunting, it's terribly haunting. And at the end of the play, we see the ghosts. What we essentially see, live in the flesh, is the new family photo album, filled with people that we just hope we can remember. And if we can't, then well, that's even more tragic.  Manya Brachear Pashman: Do you do anything different? Do you talk to your children differently about your Jewish traditions, history?  David Krumholtz: You know, I grew up incredibly frustrated by racism, because as I'm in my mid 40s, my generation grew up with the stories and the harrowing sort of, the wagging- be careful, you never know, this could happen again. I could touch and feel my great grandmother, I could see the tears in her eyes in recalling her memories. She lost 11 brothers and sisters in the Holocaust. And so I can see it. My kids can't.... So for me, it's just important. I debated – my daughter's eight, this is heavy fare for an eight year old. And I debated whether or not it was important that she see the play. I don't want to hurt her. I don't want to scare her. And at the same time, it's important that she knows and that the message is delivered by me. And so we're gonna have her come see the play before I'm done with it, and hopefully, that impacts the way it should. Manya Brachear Pashman: That's a wonderful point. I wrestle every day with how much to share with my children, because you don't want to scare them. Because you don't want them to run away from their Jewish traditions and heritage either out of here. I'm really grateful to the rabbi at our synagogue who, every Shabbat during the Mourners' Kaddish, will share six names of the 6 million killed. And my children will often look up at me when he mentions the name and age of a child that was killed during the Holocaust. It just highlights the importance of remembering, but doing so in a safe space, in a community, in a sacred space where we're all together, illustrating: we all survived, but it's important to remember those who didn't. When are you done with Leopoldstadt? David Krumholtz: I'm done March 12. Play is going through, as of right now it's extended to July 2, it may extend again, another wonderful actor is going to come in and take my place. I can't tell you who that is yet. I will have done six months. Something like 175 performances, for me, is plenty. This is a hard play to live through and live in the skin of and so, you know, I'm going to take my leave, but it's been transformative and the role of my life. It's just, for someone like Patrick Marber and Tom Stoppard, Sonia Friedman, to have believed in me, to the extent that they did to take on such a huge responsibility just means the world. And hopefully I can take that with me through to the next important job. Manya Brachear Pashman: Why is it important for people to see this play now? David Krumholtz: Well, we live in a time when, unfortunately or fortunately, where we can openly communicate our deepest darkest feelings to one another. Sometimes, those feelings are feelings of hatred. Sometimes those feelings are ignorant feelings of hatred, that are blanket generalizations based on small experiences that people may have had. People tend to use social media, for instance, to make things a lot more, a lot bigger than they are. And so something like a man with 11 million followers saying something anti semitic, can snowball very, very quickly into this kind of real world danger that the show presents that actually happened not too long ago. And so it's very important that now that people of all races, religions, creeds, this could happen to anyone. As Jew as Jews, we have to make sense of what happened to us. Part of making sense of what happened to us, I believe, is telling the story in order to warn not only our own people, but all minorities, all people that this could happen again, that this actually happened, that humanity did this, that hate created murder, can create  genocide. And it's our responsibility to pay the lesson we've learned forward, the painful lesson. It's easier to turn a blind eye, or to say, well, that's just Jewish people's problem. The truth is, it's a problem for all humanity. And so hopefully, we're not playing to a bubble of people who need to see this, want to see this, or are Jewish enough to see it.. And I think it has the power to be a play that's impactful for all people. And we found that to be true thus far, it's a really clearly communicated olive branch in a way to say, hey, we went through this, we're telling you this could happen. And stay safe, be smart, and love one another before your time's up. Manya Brachear Pashman: Thank you so much, and thank you for joining us to talk about it today.  David Krumholtz:  All right. My pleasure. Thanks for having me.

Les Ambitieuses
#2 Saison 9 - Natacha Hochet Raab CEO de FRED: Assumer sa singularité dans l'univers du luxe

Les Ambitieuses

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 80:52


Dans cet épisode, je reçois Natacha Hochet Raab. Natacha passe une enfance heureuse, entourée de son frère et de ses deux parents médecins. Ces derniers lui transmettront les valeurs de travail et de mérite qui furent également inspirées de ses grands parents polonais ayant vécu la Shoah et l'immigration en France après la guerre. Jeune fille très énergique et curieuse de tout, Natacha rentre à l'Essec avant de viser le concours de l'ENA qu'elle décidera finalement de stopper pour des raisons qu'elle nous expose. Très tôt, Natacha a eu a coeur de cultiver sa singularité que ce soit au travers de sa chevelure rousse, de sa féminité assumée ou de son cheveu sur la langue qu'elle tenta un temps de corriger. Le piège de la perfection, Natacha est tombée dedans avant d'apprendre à s'en débarrasser pour conquérir sa liberté. Natacha démarre par une alternance chez Cartier avant d'entrer chez Sephora, qui est à l'époque une structure naissante qui vient d'être rachetée par LVMH et ou tout est à faire. Elle y rencontrera l'un de ses mentors qu'elle suivra chez Louis Vuitton ou elle expérimentera la réalité du management de terrain, en boutique, une révélation pour Natacha qui y vit une expérience humaine transformatrice. Promue avant de partir en congé maternité, Natacha a toujours su assumer ses ambitions, quitte à refuser des postes qui lui semblaient trop étroits. Natacha est une personnalité flamboyante, complète et authentique. Elle se livre sans fards sur le combat qu'elle a mené, plus jeune, contre l'anorexie. Mais aussi sur les difficultés qu'elle a pu rencontrer dans son parcours professionnel qui s'est poursuivi chez Dior durant plusieurs années avant de rejoindre la maison FRED. Natacha vient de fêter ses 50 ans et ne s'en cache pas, à raison. Elle se sent plus libre et alignée que jamais, court des marathons et célèbre la vie tout en contribuant activement à des causes qui lui sont chères: L'éducation avec notamment l'école Diagonale mais aussi la promotion des femmes dans l'environnement professionnel. Un épisode plein d'ambition, d'optimisme et d'authenticité avec une femme qui ne vous laissera pas indifférent.e ! Belle écoute !

Un jour dans le monde
La Shoah bientôt enseignée aux Emirats, une première dans le monde arabe

Un jour dans le monde

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 4:34


durée : 00:04:34 - Sous les radars - par : Sébastien LAUGENIE - Plus de deux ans après les “accords d'Abraham”, normalisant les relations entre les Émirats arabes unis et Israël, l'histoire de l'Holocauste sera incluse dans les programmes scolaires des cycles primaire et secondaire aux EAU, une décision historique très critiquée

InterNational
La Shoah bientôt enseignée aux Emirats, une première dans le monde arabe

InterNational

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 4:34


durée : 00:04:34 - Sous les radars - par : Sébastien LAUGENIE - Plus de deux ans après les “accords d'Abraham”, normalisant les relations entre les Émirats arabes unis et Israël, l'histoire de l'Holocauste sera incluse dans les programmes scolaires des cycles primaire et secondaire aux EAU, une décision historique très critiquée

Aus der jüdischen Welt - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Makkabi Deutschland Winter Games in Ruhpolding - Erste jüdische Winterspiele seit der Shoah

Aus der jüdischen Welt - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 8:45


Erstmals seit 1936 finden die Winterspiele der jüdischen Sportbewegung Makkabi wieder statt – und das in Deutschland. Etwa 400 Athletinnen und Athleten aus über 20 Nationen sind nach Oberbayern gekommen. Kurz vor Ende ziehen die Organisatoren Bilanz.Alfred Goldenberg im Gespräch mit Miron Tenenbergwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, Aus der jüdischen Welt mit ShabbatDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Immanuel Ka...st: Lezioni di Filosofia e Storia in mobilità
Letture ad alta voce: Annette Wieviorka - Auschwitz spiegato a mia figlia - parte 2 di 4

Immanuel Ka...st: Lezioni di Filosofia e Storia in mobilità

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 28:15


Lettura ad alta voce del celebre testo di Annette Wieviorka che affronta in modo rigoroso ma con un linguaggio e con un argomentare adatto a uno studente, i temi fondamentali della Shoah e le domande cruciali su cui l'uomo e lo storico continuano oggi a farsi alla presenza dell'orrore di Auschwitz senza talvolta trovare una risposta che possa consolare.

Religion – Die Dokumentation
Der Rabbi und der Arzt. Leo Baeck und Viktor Frankl: Seelsorge im KZ

Religion – Die Dokumentation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 53:10


Als im Januar 1942 hohe NS-Funktionäre in einer Villa am Wannsee einen "Gesamtplan zur europäischen Judenfrage" diskutieren, sind Leo Baeck und Viktor Frankl noch frei, sofern man zu der Zeit von Freiheit sprechen kann. Der Rabbiner Leo Baeck lebt, 68 Jahre alt und in der jüdischen Gemeinschaft hochgeachtet, in Berlin, der 36-jährige Psychotherapeut Viktor Frankl in Wien, wo er die neurologische Abteilung des Rothschild-Spitals leitet, des einzigen Krankenhauses, wo noch jüdische Ärzte jüdische Patienten behandeln dürfen. Baeck und Frankl sind gezwungen, den gelben Stern zu tragen. Ihre Deportation nach Theresienstadt steht noch bevor, beide werden viele Angehörige in der Shoah verlieren.

Shapell's Virtual Beit Midrash
Rabbi Abraham Cooper - As Anti-Semitism Soars: The Lessons Of The Shoah We Must Remember

Shapell's Virtual Beit Midrash

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 65:13


Rabbi Abraham Cooper - As Anti-Semitism Soars: The Lessons Of The Shoah We Must Remember by Shapell's Rabbeim

Le goût de M
#78 Sandrine Kiberlain

Le goût de M

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 45:17


Une rue commerçante du 7e arrondissement de Paris. On franchit une grande porte bleue et on se dirige à gauche au fond de la cour. Sandrine Kiberlain nous reçoit, à l'occasion de la sortie du film Le Parfum vert de de Nicolas Pariser, chez elle, dans un espace « intime » auquel peu de gens accèdent et qui lui ressemble.La comédienne âgée de 54 ans évoque le quatuor formé pendant son enfance avec ses parents et sa sœur à Saint-Mandé dans le Val-de-Marne, ses grands-parents rescapés de la Shoah, les personnages qu'elle s'inventait pour jouer, son amour pour la musique de Françoise Hardy et de Michel Berger, son initiation à la scène grâce à Francis Huster, son adoration pour Ingrid Bergman, Diane Keaton, Meryl Streep ou Isabelle Huppert. l'évolution de ses personnages au fil de sa carrière et ses rôles dans les derniers films d'Emmanuel Mouret ou de Nicolas Pariser.Elle revient également sur ses dégoûts comme la familiarité – « je peux paraître froide au début, j'aime pas quand les gens font semblant de vous connaître alors qu'ils ne vous connaissent pas » – ou l'incompétence – « je ne supporte pas, ça me rend dingue, mais je le dis même pour moi ».Depuis quatre saisons, la productrice Géraldine Sarratia interroge la construction et les méandres du goût d'une personnalité. Qu'ils ou elles soient créateurs, artistes, cuisiniers ou intellectuels, tous convoquent leurs souvenirs d'enfance, tous évoquent la dimension sociale et culturelle de la construction d'un corpus de goûts, d'un ensemble de valeurs.Un podcast produit et présenté par Géraldine Sarratia (Genre idéal)préparé avec l'aide de Diane Lisarelli et Imène BenlachtarRéalisation : Emmanuel BauxMusique : Gotan Project Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online
Dr. Mehnaz Afridi, author of SHOAH THROUGH MUSLIM EYES

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 32:52


Join Dr. Mehnaz Afridi, professor of religious studies at Manhattan College and the director of the Holocaust, Genocide & Interfaith Education Center, as she introduces us to her book, Shoah Through Muslim Eyes, which was nominated for the Yad Vashem International Book Prize for Holocaust Research and the Jacob Schnitzer Book Award. In this presentation, Dr. Afridi takes us through her research on the Muslim perspective of the Holocaust and antisemitism, and introduces us to how the Muslim world in Africa, the Middle East, and Europe was impacted by the Holocaust. With her research and writing, Dr. Afridi brings to light the enormity of the Holocaust for the world and in particular the Muslim reader, and calls for readers to find interfaith solidarity with each other. This podcast is presented in collaboration with the Sandra Bornstein Holocaust Education Center Baxt Lecture Series, an annual event that brings Holocaust education to the greater Rhode Island community. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rhodyradio/message

SWR2 Glauben
Jiddisch lebt. Eine alte Sprache in der Gegenwart

SWR2 Glauben

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 25:01


iddisch war für Jahrhunderte die Muttersprache der osteuropäischen Jüdinnen und Juden, einer Welt, die mit der Shoah untergegangen ist. Das Jiddische aber hat überlebt. Streng religiöse Familien sprechen die alte jüdische Sprache heute noch im Alltag, etwa in Jerusalem, New York oder Antwerpen. Jiddisch ist auch die "Mamesloshn", die Muttersprache der Stuttgarter Künstlerin Mina Gampel, die Szenen aus dem osteuropäischen Shtetl malt. Und in deutschen Großstädten zelebrieren junge säkulare Jüdinnen und Juden die Sprache ihrer Vorfahren als Lebensgefühl. Ob orthodox oder säkular, jung oder alt: Für alle ist Jiddisch mehr als ein Verständigungsmittel. Mit der Sprache knüpfen sie an Vergangenes an und schaffen sich Identität und Heimat.

Aus der jüdischen Welt - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Israelische Nobelpreisträger - Mit Bescheidenheit und Demut

Aus der jüdischen Welt - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 6:21


Am 10. Dezember werden erneut die Nobelpreise verliehen. Insgesamt gibt es auffallend viele israelische Nobelpreisträger. Sie wurden zumeist von der Shoah geprägt - wie die Chemiker Aaron Ciechanover und Avram Hershko, die gänzlich bei Null begannen.Von Blanka Weberwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, Aus der jüdischen Welt mit ShabbatDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

DÉPÊCHE !
ARTE Radio part en live (6)

DÉPÊCHE !

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 7:07


Street Art Underground : les secrets du Palais de Tokyo Livo plonge dans les sous-sols du Palais de Tokyo normalement interdits au public. Guidé par Hugo, il découvre une oeuvre secrète du célèbre photographe et street artist JR, créée dans un tunnel souterrain en mémoire de la Shoah. Cette plongée dans l'underground donne à Livo l'envie de parodier le célèbre magazine musical d'ARTE, "Tracks". Dans les étages plus élevés, il échoue à infiltrer la soirée des commerciaux de BMW, mais réussit à squatter celle du gros cabinet de conseil Human and Work. En effet, comme beaucoup de lieux culturels publics, le Palais de Tokyo est obligé de privatiser ses espaces pour boucler son budget...  De septembre 2018 à juin 2022, Livo aka Olivier Minot a réalisé chaque semaine le podcast "Dépêche", habile mélange de revue de presse, de reportages et de blagues sonores. Livo a arrêté après 141 épisodes, épuisé par le rythme hebdomadaire. C'est pourquoi il a accepté de rempiler tous les jours du 3 au 12 décembre 2022 comme envoyé spécial sur l'événement "ARTE Radio part en live". Enregistrements : 7-8 décembre 22 - Texte, voix, réalisation : Olivier Minot - Mix : Samuel Hirsch - Production : ARTE Radio

Good Assassins
10. The Boy Who Shot the Nazi (Season 2)

Good Assassins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 38:03


Kristallnacht was the violent uprising against German Jews in November 1938 that was the opening to the eventual genocide of six million Europeans Jews—and then millions of others—during World War II. This final episode of Good Assassins Season 2 tells the story of Herschel Grynszpan, the young man whose story is at the dead center of the Holocaust. He became an assassin, and the assassination he committed on November 7, 1938 in Paris is the spark that set off the inferno that was the Nazi Holocaust. In 1938 Herschel Grynszpan was just 17 years old. This episode contains interviews with: • Joseph Matthews: author of the historical novel about Herschel Grynszpan called Everyone Has Their Reasons praised as a "A tragic, gripping Orwellian tale of an orphan turned assassin in pre-World War II Paris..."  • Armin Fuhrer: journalist, archivist, and historian who wrote Herschel: The Assassination of Herschel Grynszpan on November 7, 1938 and The Beginning of the Holocaust • Herman Kempinsky (Ziering): Holocaust survivor and former president of the Society of the Survivors of the Riga Ghetto. Clips from interviews with Lore Oppenheimer and Hermann Ziering from the Claude Lanzmann Shoah Collection. Created by Claude Lanzmann during the filming of "Shoah," used by permission of United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem. © United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Yad Vashem, State of Israel. For more information visit USHMM • Jonathan Kirsch: author of the book, The Short, Strange Life of Herschel Grynszpan: A Boy Avenger, a Nazi Diplomat, and a Murder in Paris. Clip from interview with Los Angeles Review of Books Learn more at diversionaudio.com/good-assassins “Good Assassins” is a production of Diversion Audio, in association with iHeartPodcasts. Featuring the voices of Matthew Amendt, Orlagh Cassidy, Raphael Corkhill, Manoel Felciano, Sean Gormley, Mikaela Izquierdo, Lenne Klingaman, Andrew Polk, John Pirkis, Steve Routman. This season is hosted by Stephan Talty and written by C.D. Carpenter. Produced and directed by Kevin Thomsen for Real Jetpacks Productions. Story Editing by Jacob Bronstein with editorial direction from Scott Waxman. Additional research and reporting by Sophie McNulty. Theme music by Tyler Cash. Sound Design, Mixing, and Mastering by Paul Goodrich. Sound Editing by Justin Kilpatrick. Executive Producers: Jacob Bronstein, Mark Francis and Scott Waxman for Diversion Audio. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4ème de couverture
121. Carole Bloch "Emmuré"

4ème de couverture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 30:05


Carole Bloch : "Emmuré" (Librinova 2022) À la fin des années 2000, un obstacle invisible empêche Carole Bloch de s'accomplir. La psychanalyse qu'elle entame la met sur les traces de son père, enfant caché pendant la guerre. Par-delà les générations, l'injonction à se cacher, à s'effacer et à s'isoler, s'est transmise. Carole engage une bataille contre le secret et remonte le cours de l'histoire de sa famille. Carole Bloch cherche à tracer l'itinéraire du silence et de l'enfermement psychique, hérité de la Seconde Guerre mondiale . Choix musical : Jean-Jacques Goldman "J'irai au bout de mes rêves" et  David Broza "Yihiyeh Tov"

Accents d'Europe
L'Histoire pour lutter contre l'antisémitisme

Accents d'Europe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 19:30


La lutte contre l'antisémitisme, un combat sans fin. En Allemagne, le nombre de plaintes pour des actes antisémites a doublé en quatre ans, passant de 1 500 à 3 000 l'an dernier (2021). Le gouvernement a lancé un nouvelle stratégie pour que la mémoire de la Shoah ne s'éteigne pas, malgré la disparition des derniers survivants. À Berlin, le musée de la Topographie de la terreur, a organisé une exposition dédiée à Beate et Serge Klarsfeld, le plus célèbre des couples chasseurs de nazis (jusqu'au 19 février 2023). Ils ont contribué, entre autres, à l'arrestation du boucher de Lyon, Klaus Barbie. Aujourd'hui âgés de 83 et 87 ans, ils s'inquiètent de la montée de l'extrême droite en Europe. Delphine Nerbollier a pu les rencontrer. En Suède, le combat d'une victime de l'holocauste Elle aussi s'inquiétait de la montée de l'extrême droite dans son pays d'adoption, la Suède. Hedi Fried, psychologue, écrivain, survivante de l'Holocauste, d'origine roumaine, est décédée le 19 novembre 2022, à l'âge de 98 ans. Elle était une figure de la vie publique en Suède, une voix qui n'a cessé d'alerter contre les idées néo-nazies et la résurgence du racisme. À Stockholm, Carlotta Morteo. Un musée à Thessalonique Et Thessalonique veut se souvenir. C'est dans cette ville portuaire du nord de la Grèce, que vivait la plus grande communauté juive du pays, 50 000 personnes. À tel point qu'on la surnommait la Jérusalem des Balkans. Mais, lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et l'occupation mondiale, la majorité ont été déportés et ont péri dans les camps. Aujourd'hui, un musée doit être construit en leur mémoire. En Grèce, les explications de Joël Bronner. La mémoire de l'Inquisition en Espagne L'antisémitisme au travers de l'histoire européenne, c'est aussi l'Inquisition en Espagne qu'il y a 600 ans a permis aux autorités catholiques d'expulser les citoyens juifs et musulmans de la Péninsule. Beaucoup d'entre eux ont trouvé refuge à Thessalonique justement. Une mémoire longue sur laquelle revient Martine Audusseau Pouchard, notre ancienne correspondante à Barcelone. Ce passé de persécution est encore très présent en Espagne, où on estime que 20% des habitants seraient des juifs convertis.  Une mémoire longue qui a conduit l'auteure à interroger sa propre histoire familiale. Dans son livre intitulé «L'épingle de Berlin» (aux éditions Sentiers du livre) part à la recherche d'un passé juif caché, ou ignoré, mais terriblement présent, c'est ce qu'on appelle la mémoire mnésique. L'œil européen de Franceline Beretti, sur le poids des «Histoires» dans notre patrimoine européen.

Métamorphose, le podcast qui éveille la conscience
#346 Boris Cyrulnik : La force de penser par soi-même

Métamorphose, le podcast qui éveille la conscience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 72:42


Anne Ghesquière reçoit dans Métamorphose Boris Cyrulnik neuropsychiatre, psychanalyste et écrivain. Pourquoi certaines personnes se conforment-elles au discours ambiant, à la doxa ? Pourquoi d'autres, au contraire, parviennent-elles à s'en affranchir, gagnant ainsi une part de leur liberté intérieure ? Choisir entre endoctrinement servile et doute constructeur. Autant de questions auxquelles Boris Cyrulnik a cherché toute sa vie à donner un sens, lui qui a échappé à la Shoah. Comprendre davantage pour être de moins en moins soumis : c'est le cœur de son dernier livre « Le laboureur et les mangeurs de vent – Liberté intérieure et confortable servitude » paru chez Odile Jacob. Un épisode remarquable. Épisode #346Avec Boris Cyrulnik j'aborderai les thèmes suivants (extrait des questions) :Pourquoi écrire ce livre maintenant sur la liberté intérieure ?Les laboureurs doutent et sont des explorateurs là où les mangeurs de vent gobent une chimère comme si c'était la vérité : expliquez-nous ?Comment nos blessures d'attachement agissent à travers nous et nous soumettent ? Et le terreau de la culture ?La pensée d'Hanna Arendt nous éclaire-t-elle sur ce sujet ?Pourquoi le sentiment d'appartenance, le partage d'une croyance est nécessaire, délicieux et dangereux dites-vous ! Pourquoi est-ce soulageant de désigner un coupable à l'extérieur de soi ?Qu'est-ce que le "délire logique ?"Dans quel état d'esprit êtes-vous, Boris Cyrulnik, quand vous regardez le monde d'aujourd'hui ?Qui est mon invité de la semaine, Boris Cyrulnik?Boris Cyrulnik est psychanalyste, neuropsychiatre et écrivain. Né au sein d'une famille juive ashkénaze arrivée en France dans les années 1930, il échappe à la Shoah. Grand penseur de la résilience il est l'auteur de plus de 60 ouvrages, notamment sur la honte, sur la mémoire, et sur les religions. Il sort son dernier livre Le laboureur et les mangeurs de vent – Liberté intérieure et confortable servitude » aux éditions Odile Jacob.Quelques citations du podcast avec Boris Cyrulnik : "La paresse intellectuelle donne des certitudes.""Le cerveau est sculpté par la structure du milieu.""Quand on récite la parole de quelqu'un on n'a pas à faire l'effort de penser.""Le simple fait d'être humain et de parler nous rend apte au délire.""Le slogan arrête la pensée alors que la rencontre donne le plaisir du doute, donc de l'exploration."Rejoignez-nous sur notre nouveau site Internet et abonnez-vous à notre Newsletter https://www.metamorphosepodcast.com/ Soutenez notre podcast en rejoignant dès maintenant la Tribu MétamorphoseRetrouvez Métamorphose, le podcast qui éveille la conscience sur Apple Podcast / Spotify / Google Podcasts / Deezer / YouTube / SoundCloud / CastBox/ TuneIn.Suivez l'actualité des épisodes Métamorphose Podcast sur Instagram, découvrez l'invité de la semaine et des surprises ;-)InstagramFacebookPhoto DR Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Tag für Tag Beiträge - Deutschlandfunk
Wo war Gott während der Shoah? Antworten von Holocaust-Überlebenden

Tag für Tag Beiträge - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 11:44


Brandt, Michaelwww.deutschlandfunk.de, Tag für TagDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Im Gespräch
Shoah-Überlebender Leon Weintraub - "Ich bin ein unheilbarer Optimist"

Im Gespräch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 40:41


Als junger Mann überlebt er Ghetto und KZ, später wirkt er als Frauenarzt in Polen, bis er 1968 erneut ins Exil muss. Heute lebt Leon Weintraub in Schweden und hält Vorträge vor Jugendlichen. Vergeben kann er nicht, sagt er, versöhnen schon.Bürger, Brittawww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, Im GesprächDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Search for Meaning with Rabbi Yoshi
Search for Meaning with Romy Rosen and Rabbi Yoshi Zweiback

Search for Meaning with Rabbi Yoshi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 65:21


In the latest edition of his Search for Meaning podcast, Stephen Wise Temple Senior Rabbi Yoshi Zweiback hosts 9-year-old actress Romy Fay Rosen, who is currently playing the roles of Young Sally and Mimi in the acclaimed Broadway production of "Leopoldstadt."The play, which follows a Viennese Jewish family from 1899 through 1955, grapples with the aftermath of the pogroms, assimilation, civil liberties, infidelity, Bolshevism, the rise of the Third Reich, and the devastation wrought by the Shoah. Together, Romy and Rabbi Yoshi—who attended college with Romy's father, officiated her parents' wedding, and attended her baby naming—explore how she got into acting, the casting process, balancing work and school, and how such a young actress (despite a lengthy resume) experiences the very personal adult themes in the show.From singing songs from "Annie" at age 2, to starring as Elsa in a community theater children's production of Disney's "Frozen" at age 4, Romy has built an extensive body of work, performing in commercials, short films, animated projects, and television series.Last year, she starred in the award-winning short film "Yes, Chef" (2021), and recently appeared on “Home Economics” (ABC, 2022) and “Face's Music Party” (Nick Jr., 2022). She can be seen in the major recurring role of Luisa Dubin on the new AppleTV+ series “Best Foot Forward” (2022), and as series regular Leeli in the streaming animated series “The Wingfeather Saga” (2022-23). Soon, Romy will appear in two national commercial campaigns and she'll lend her voice to another streaming animated series. The actress-singer-songwriter plays ukulele and piano, and will also soon be releasing an album of original songs.Romy prides herself on finding ways to relate to the characters she plays in order to make her portrayal more real, and, she says, "more like I am this character." That task takes on a new dimension in "Leopoldstadt," which is based on the real-life Holocaust experiences of playwright Tom Stoppard's family.Romy did not initially know that the play was about the Holocaust during the audition process, or what the Holocaust even was. Then she began rehearsals for her dual roles, playing two members of the same family decades apart—one in 1899 (Sally), and the other in 1938 (Mimi)."I didn't audition for the scary, getting-kicked-out-of-their-house part," Romy says. "I auditioned for the happy-girl-during-Christmas part at the beginning of the play."In order to bring her 1938 character to life, she drew from her own family's story."When we started rehearsals, I had this book about the Holocaust, because my mom and my dad wanted me to learn about the family history," Romy says. "I was getting to that age. I was getting to 9 and 10, which is when I should learn about my family history. It's a dark, dark past. They wanted me to know what went on back then."After reading the book and discussing it with her mother, Romy researched even further. She is currently in the middle of reading "The Diary of Anne Frank," and read a graphic novel about her life."My ancestors ... they experienced that, too," Romy says.

InPower - Motivation, Ambition, Inspiration
Boris Cyrulnik, Neuropsychiatre - Trouver le sens de la vie

InPower - Motivation, Ambition, Inspiration

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 84:51


Est-ce que vous avez peur de la mort ? Boris Cyrulnik, lui, n'en a plus peur. Déjà parce qu'il l'a affrontée très jeune : à tout juste six ans, il est victime de la rafle du 10 janvier 1944 et enfermé dans une synagogue avec des milliers d'autres Juifs, destinés à être déportés. Sauf que Boris comprend qu'il est en danger : il parvient à se cacher puis à s'échapper, devenant le seul survivant de sa famille. C'est ce qui pousse Boris toute sa vie à se poser des questions : quel est le sens de la vie ? Pourquoi faire le Bien ou le Mal ? La folie explique-t-elle le comportement des dictateurs, ou bien des facteurs sociologiques et éducatifs peuvent-ils l'expliquer ? Un épisode extrêmement enrichissant, que ce soit en termes historique, philosophique ou scientifique, avec un neurologue impressionnant : Boris Cyrulnik.     Pour découvrir les coulisses du podcast : https://www.instagram.com/inpowerpodcast/   Pour retrouver le travail de Boris : https://www.odilejacob.fr/rechercher/?mot=Boris+Cyrulnik   Et pour suivre l'aventure MyBetterSelf au quotidien : https://www.instagram.com/mybetterself/ Si cet épisode t'as plu, celui-ci te plaira surement : https://app.ausha.co/app/show/23818/episodes/preview/739306

Navigating the French
Navigating “Souvenir” with Ellen Hampton

Navigating the French

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 26:47


If the word souvenir evokes a plastic Eiffel Tower trinket, this episode is about to blow your mind. In French, souvenir is not just a noun but a verb, evoking the very act of memory. Emily is welcoming author Ellen Hampton back to the podcast to discuss the differences between personal and collective memory – specifically in the context of World War II – and exploring how the Resistance gained traction long after it was necessary and why France did not publicly acknowledge its role in the Shoah until 1995 – more than 50 years after the fact.Women of Valor: The Rochambelles on the WWII FrontJoin us on Patreon: patreon.com/parisundergroundradioFind Us OnlineWebsite: https://www.parisundergroundradio.com/navigatingthefrenchFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/parisundergroundradioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/parisundergroundradio/Credits- Host: Emily Monaco. @Emily_in_France; Website: http://www.tomatokumato.com and http://www.emilymmonaco.comProducer: Jennifer Geraghty. @jennyphoria; Website: http://jennyphoria.comMusic CreditsÉdith Piaf - La Vie en Rose (DeliFB Lofi Remix)

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Thématique : Jamais frères ? Ukraine et Russie : une tragédie postsoviétique / n°271 / 13 novembre 2022

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 59:30


Connaissez-vous notre site ? www.lenouvelespritpublic.frUne émission de Philippe Meyer, enregistrée au studio l'Arrière-boutique le 7 octobre 2022.Avec cette semaine :Anna Colin Lebedev, chercheuse spécialiste des questions post-soviétiques, maîtresse de conférences à l'université Paris-Naterre.Béatrice Giblin, directrice de la revue Hérodote et fondatrice de l'Institut Français de Géopolitique.Marc-Olivier Padis, directeur des études de la fondation Terra Nova.Michaela Wiegel, correspondante à Paris de la Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.Six mois après l'invasion russe en Ukraine, Anna Colin Lebedev, chercheuse française « d'origine soviétique », comme vous aimez à vous présenter, maîtresse de conférences à l'université Paris-Nanterre et spécialiste des sociétés post-soviétiques, dans votre ouvrage « Jamais frères ? (Le d'interrogation est important) Ukraine et Russie : une tragédie postsoviétique », vous vous attachez à déconstruire le mythe des « frères » slaves. Vous décryptez les similarités entre les sociétés russe et ukrainienne, le poids des traumatismes du XXe siècle et les trajectoires de plus en plus divergentes que les deux pays ont suivies depuis 1991.A l'époque de l'Union soviétique, vous rappelez-vous, la Russie était le centre, et l'Ukraine une périphérie. L'homogénéisation s'est faite en écrasant un certain nombre de différences, l'histoire commune avait été écrite en gommant certains aspects gênants qui ne rentraient pas dans le récit officiel. Les trajectoires contraires suivies par les sociétés russe et ukrainienne ne sont pas un argument suffisant pour expliquer la guerre entre les deux pays, observez-vous. Mais un certain nombre de sujets aident à comprendre ce qui se joue aujourd'hui. Sujets que vous passez au crible : rapport à l'histoire soviétique, construction d'une mémoire de la grande famine et de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, place des communautés juives et de la mémoire de la Shoah, rapport au pouvoir politique, rapport à la violence, place des langues. Votre livre décrit également la fracture entre les deux sociétés, lorsque Russes et Ukrainiens ont cessé, en 2014, de partager la même vision de ce qui se joue entre les deux pays, en Crimée et dans le Donbass. En 2022, la fracture s'est transformée en rupture.Ce qu'on présentait comme une fraternité, disent les Ukrainiens, s'est révélé un rapt. Côté russe, l'Ukraine serait une Russie transformée en anti-Russie par l'Occident hostile. La ligne de fracture que dessinent les deux discours montre bien, soulignez-vous, la nature existentielle d'une guerre qu'on ne peut réduire à une volonté de conquête territoriale ou d'accès à des ressources naturelles ou économiques. Existentielle, car pour l'Ukraine : soit elle parvient à vaincre la Russie - ce qui veut dire que Moscou renonce à toute prétention territoriale et d'influence sur l'Etat ukrainien - soit elle cesse d'exister. Contrairement à la société ukrainienne, la société russe, en grande partie aveugle à cette guerre conduite en son nom, n'a pas l'expérience de protestations qui auraient réussi. Vous dressez le portrait d'une société russe convaincue de son impuissance et soutenant sans enthousiasme une guerre qu'elle ne peut pas ou peu critiquer et qui ne réalise pas encore la profondeur de la déchirure, qui est pourtant entérinée du côté de l'agressé, l'Ukraine. Pour les Ukrainiens, désormais, tout ce qu'il pourrait y avoir de commun avec les Russes – la langue, les références culturelles partagées, la mixité, les souvenirs de l'époque soviétique - n'est plus vu que comme l'effet d'une domination ou d'une oppression. On avait pensé, à tort, les comptes de l'Union soviétique soldés lorsqu'elle s'était dissoute sans conflictualité majeure en 1991 écrivez-vous, le vrai prix à payer nous est donné aujourd'hui.Vous pouvez consulter notre politique de confidentialité sur https://art19.com/privacy ainsi que la notice de confidentialité de la Californie sur https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life
Talmud Class: Is There a Point of No Return?

From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 44:58


Some hypotheticals: After his lengthy prison term, Harvey Weinstein joins Temple Emanuel and wants to come to services. He says I now get it. I was wrong. Would you sit next to him? We receive a generous check from Jeffrey Epstein to be used by the Temple in any way we wish, and anonymously, no need to publish his gift. He writes I now get it. I was wrong. Would you accept his gift? After referring his 4.6 million followers to a vile Jew-hating movie that denies the Shoah, and after refusing to apologize for it, and after refusing to state that he has no anti-Semitic beliefs, Kyrie Irving goes on March of the Living. He goes to Auschwitz. He goes to Israel. He comes back and says I now get it. I was wrong. Would you support the Nets reinstating him? Would you now root for him? Is teshuvah always available to right our wrongs? Or do we ever reach a point of no return where teshuvah is not possible? It is a complicated question, and the evidence of the Torah is mixed. The concept of teshuvah is late, late, late, not until Deuteronomy chapter 30. Before then, the basic concept is that sinners pay the price. Adam and Eve are banished along with a host of other punishments. And in the reading tomorrow about Sodom, the categories are tzadik and rashah, translated by JPS as innocent and guilty, also translated as righteous and evil. That is a binary. What about people doing teshuvah and changing their ways? Teshuvah is not on the table in the Sodom story. Why not? There is a famous story in the Talmud where Rabbi Meir was attacked by brigands. He prayed that they would die. His wife Beruria took him to task. Wrong prayer, she said. Better instead to pray that they change their ways and sin no more. The issue comes to a point in the closing line of psalm 104: yitamu chataim min haaretz u'reshaim od einam, which is translated in very different ways by our siddur and our JPS Tanakh. Siddur: “Let sins disappear from the earth and the wicked will be no more.” Tanakh: “May sinners disappear from the earth, and the wicked be no more.” Are Harvey Weinstein, Jeffrey Epstein, and Kyrie Irving human beings who committed sins; or are they sinners? Do we ever reach a point of no return, and if so, when and what is that point of no return? Are we a healthier religion if we teach that there is a point of no return? Watch it. Live with an active awareness of it.

SWR2 Kultur Info
Autorin Lena Gorelik: Holocaust muss vielfältiger erinnert werden

SWR2 Kultur Info

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 6:52


Zum Gedenktag der Novemberpogrome 1938, bei denen mehr als 1400 Synagogen zerstört und mehr als eintausend Jüdinnen und Juden ermordet wurden, fordert die Autorin Lena Gorelik ein vielfältigeres Erinnern an das Leiden der Menschen in der Shoah.

Tagesthemen (320x180)
08.11.2022 - tagesthemen 22:15 Uhr

Tagesthemen (320x180)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 15:29


Themen der Sendung: Kongresswahlen in den USA: Stimmungstest zwei Jahre vor der Präsidentschaftswahl, Bundeskanzler Scholz fordert Freilassung des Menschenrechtlers Alaa Abdel Fattahs in Ägypten, Wird der Verkauf des Chipherstellers Elmos an einen chinesischen Investor von der Bundesregierung verboten?, Geste deutsch-israelischer Freundschaft 84 Jahre nach der Reichsprogromnacht: Eine Tora-Rolle für Shoah-Überlebende in einem Seniorenzentrum in Israel, Das Wetter

Tagesthemen (Audio-Podcast)
08.11.2022 - tagesthemen 22:15 Uhr

Tagesthemen (Audio-Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 15:29


Themen der Sendung: Kongresswahlen in den USA: Stimmungstest zwei Jahre vor der Präsidentschaftswahl, Bundeskanzler Scholz fordert Freilassung des Menschenrechtlers Alaa Abdel Fattahs in Ägypten, Wird der Verkauf des Chipherstellers Elmos an einen chinesischen Investor von der Bundesregierung verboten?, Geste deutsch-israelischer Freundschaft 84 Jahre nach der Reichsprogromnacht: Eine Tora-Rolle für Shoah-Überlebende in einem Seniorenzentrum in Israel, Das Wetter

Tagesthemen (320x240)
08.11.2022 - tagesthemen 22:15 Uhr

Tagesthemen (320x240)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 15:29


Themen der Sendung: Kongresswahlen in den USA: Stimmungstest zwei Jahre vor der Präsidentschaftswahl, Bundeskanzler Scholz fordert Freilassung des Menschenrechtlers Alaa Abdel Fattahs in Ägypten, Wird der Verkauf des Chipherstellers Elmos an einen chinesischen Investor von der Bundesregierung verboten?, Geste deutsch-israelischer Freundschaft 84 Jahre nach der Reichsprogromnacht: Eine Tora-Rolle für Shoah-Überlebende in einem Seniorenzentrum in Israel, Das Wetter

Common Places
Protestant Social Teaching and Just War - Marc LiVecche

Common Places

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 14:36


Some remarks by Marc LiVecche on his chapter in Protestant Social Teaching, "Just War," at the book launch party hosted by the Institute on Religion and Democracy in Washington D.C. Marc LiVecche is the McDonald Distinguished Scholar of Ethics, War, and Public Life at Providence. He is also a non-resident research fellow at the US Naval War College, in the College of Leadership and Ethics. Marc completed doctoral studies, earning distinction, at the University of Chicago, where he worked under the supervision of the political theorist and public intellectual Jean Bethke Elshtain, until her death in August, 2013. His first book THE GOOD KILL: JUST WAR & MORAL INJURY, was published in 2021 by Oxford University Press. Another project, RESPONSIBILITY AND RESTRAINT: JAMES TURNER JOHNSON AND THE JUST WAR TRADITION, co-edited with Eric Patterson, was published by Stone Tower Press in the fall of 2020. Currently, he is finalizing Moral Horror: A Just War Defense of Hiroshima. Before all this academic stuff, Marc spent twelve years doing a variety of things in Central Europe—ranging from helping build sport and recreational leagues in post-communist communities, to working at a Christian study and research center, to leading seminars on history and ethics onsite at the former Auschwitz-Birkenau Nazi concentration camp in Poland. This latter experience allowed him to continue his undergraduate study of the Shoah; a process which rendered him entirely ill-suited for pacifism. Marc lives in Annapolis, Maryland with his wife and children–and a marmota monax whistlepigging under the shed. He can be followed, or stalked, on Twitter @MLIVECCHE. Additional publications can be found at his Amazon author page.

Cultura.21: El magacín cultural
Cómo cambia en Israel la memoria de la Shoá

Cultura.21: El magacín cultural

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 4:25


La memoria de la Shoah también está cambiando en Israel. La cuarta generación de israelíes, nietos y biznietos de sobrevivientes del Holocausto, busca nuevas formas de recordar sin testigos.

Bonjour Chai
Noah to Shoah

Bonjour Chai

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 49:02


In 2019, 70 Holocaust survivors joined the March of the Living trip to Poland. In 2022, that number plummeted to eight. Separately, but relevantly, Israel recently announced it would stop sending students on school trips to concentration camps in Poland, in the wake of Poland's memory laws prohibiting educators from talking about Polish involvement in the Holocaust. The conclusion is clear: we're coming into an era where contact with the Shoah's primary sources—the actual people and actual places—is quickly diminishing. What will that mean for the future of Shoah education, Jewish communal identity and Jewish collective memory? What challenges does it pose? What opportunities might it open up? To ring in Holocaust Education Week and dissect these two topical issues, we're joined by two guests. Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, the chief curator of the core exhibition at the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw and a professor emerita at New York University, comes on the show to discuss the future of heritage tourism. After that, author Nathan Englander reads an excerpt from his short story, "What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank", and discuss its relevance today. Credits Bonjour Chai is hosted by Avi Finegold, Ilana Zackon and David Sklar. Zachary Kauffman is the producer and editor. Michael Fraiman is the executive producer. Our theme music is by Socalled. The show is a co-production from The Jewish Learning Lab and The CJN, and is distributed by The CJN Podcast Network. To learn how to support the show by subscribing to this podcast, please watch this video.

Love Story
[COUPLES ENGAGÉS] Beate et Serge Klarsfeld : une histoire de justice, de courage et de mémoire

Love Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 10:00


Dans cette nouvelle saison de Love Story, on vous parle de couples engagés. Ils ont marqué l'histoire et ont fait avancer la société en se battant pour leurs droits et pour leur amour. Alors que tout les séparait On les appelle les « Chasseurs de Nazis ». Beate et Serge Klarsfeld ont consacré leur vie à la reconnaissance des crimes de la Shoah et à la mémoire des victimes. Leur soif de justice et leur courage les ont liés, elle l'Allemande, et lui le fils de déporté, pour la vie, pour l'Histoire. Un podcast Bababam Originals. Retrouvez tous les épisodes de Love Story en cliquant ici. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

True Story
[LOVE STORY] Beate et Serge Klarsfeld : une histoire de justice, de courage et de mémoire

True Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 10:17


Vendredi signifie le jour de Vénus. Vénus c'est la déesse de l'amour dans la mythologie romaine. Si vous écoutez True Story, c'est que vous aimez que l'on vous raconte des histoires extraordinaires. Alors pour célébrer la déesse de l'amour, découvrez chaque vendredi des histoires d'amour hors du commun de Love Story, le podcast de Bababam qui parle le mieux d'amour. On les appelle les « Chasseurs de Nazis ». Beate et Serge Klarsfeld ont consacré leur vie à la reconnaissance des crimes de la Shoah et à la mémoire des victimes. Leur soif de justice et leur courage les ont liés, elle l'Allemande, et lui le fils de déporté, pour la vie, pour l'Histoire. Pour découvrir d'autres récits passionnants, cliquez ci-dessous : Georges Brassens, le poète qui ne voulait pas être chanteur La Grande Puanteur de Londres, une des pires crises sanitaires Del Martin et Phyllis Lyon : Aimer c'est exister Un podcast Bababam Originals Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CRIMES • Histoires Vraies
Youssouf Fofana : le cerveau du gang des barbares • Episode 2 sur 5

CRIMES • Histoires Vraies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 12:53


Après la Shoah, comment imaginer qu'un jeune Juif puisse encore être arraché aux siens, battu et torturé en France pour son appartenance religieuse et uniquement pour elle ? C'est impensable. Pourtant, 60 ans après la fin de l'Holocauste, à l'aube du troisième millénaire, c'est le sort qui attend Ilan Halimi."Crimes : Histoires vraies" est un podcast Studio Minuit.Retrouvez nos autres productions :Espions : Histoires vraies Morts Insolites : Histoires vraies Sports InsolitesSherlock Holmes - Les enquêtes1 Mot 1 Jour : Le pouvoir des motsJe comprends R : le dictionnaire du nouveau millénaireSoutenez ce podcast http://supporter.acast.com/crimes-histoires-vraies. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/crimes-histoires-vraies. Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

CRIMES • Histoires Vraies
Youssouf Fofana : le cerveau du gang des barbares • Episode 4 sur 5

CRIMES • Histoires Vraies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 13:15


Après la Shoah, comment imaginer qu'un jeune Juif puisse encore être arraché aux siens, battu et torturé en France pour son appartenance religieuse et uniquement pour elle ? C'est impensable. Pourtant, 60 ans après la fin de l'Holocauste, à l'aube du troisième millénaire, c'est le sort qui attend Ilan Halimi."Crimes : Histoires vraies" est un podcast Studio Minuit.Retrouvez nos autres productions :Espions : Histoires vraies Morts Insolites : Histoires vraies Sports InsolitesSherlock Holmes - Les enquêtes1 Mot 1 Jour : Le pouvoir des motsJe comprends R : le dictionnaire du nouveau millénaireSoutenez ce podcast http://supporter.acast.com/crimes-histoires-vraies. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/crimes-histoires-vraies. Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

On est fait pour s'entendre
L'INTEGRALE - Beate & Serge Klarsfeld : de la gifle à un chancelier nazi à la traque de Klaus Barbie

On est fait pour s'entendre

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 41:11


Ceux que JOUR J reçoit ce soir sont des éclaireurs du passé, des justiciers que rien n'a arrêté... C'est l'histoire d'une vie dédiée à la poursuite des nazis, au nom de toutes les victimes de la Shoah... Jour J, c'est l'émission des grands entretiens d'actualité internationale, culturelle, économique et politique. Chaque jour sur RTL de 20h à 21h et en podcast, Flavie Flament reçoit un acteur de l'actualité et revient avec lui sur une date fondamentale de sa vie.

Mama Needs a Movie
The Bridge on the River Kwai with Alex Kavutskiy

Mama Needs a Movie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 91:44


MNAM welcomes its first repeat guest, writer and filmmaker Alex Kavutskiy, who returns to discuss David Lean's World War II epic THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI starring William Holden, Alec Guinness and Sessue Hayakawa. The 1958 film concerns a British Lt. Colonel held in captivity as a prisoner of war by Japanese forces, and his obsessive need to finish a railway bridge connecting Bangkok and Rangoon. THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI was an unqualified success upon release, topping the 1957 box office and sweeping that year's Academy Awards, but on MNAM it will have to compete against all nine Saw movies for attention. Don't miss this in-depth discussion into one of Lean's crowning achievements, plus notable diversions into Michael Clayton, Saw, Shoah, The Office, Saw VI, Marry Me, roadtrip podcasts, Spiral: From the Book of Saw, and much much more. THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI is currently streaming on HBO Max.

Speakola
Give me your children! — Holocaust survivor Abram Goldberg as eyewitness to Chaim Rumkowski's speech to Jews in Lodź ghetto, Lodź, Poland, 1942 (with memoirist Fiona Harris)

Speakola

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 78:43


'Give me your children' is one of the most harrowing and disturbing speeches in history, It was delivered by Chief Elder and Nazi appointed representative of the Jews in the Lodź ghetto, Chaim Rumkowski. In the speech, Rumkowski announces that children under ten, the elderly, and the sick and infirm will be handed over to the Nazis to fulfill deportation demands, in order to save the rest of the ghetto. Holocaust survivor Abram Goldberg was in the ghetto's main square on that terrible day, and heard the speech and the screams of the crowd. In this episode he talks about Rumkowski, the leader's controversial and tarnished reputation, as well as Abram's own incredible story of survival, including a heart breaking promise to his mother at the train station at Auschwitz. Assisting 97 year old Abram in our interview is Fiona Harris, the co-author of his recent memoir, 'The Strength of Hope' (Affirm Press, 2022). Fiona has written children's books and co-produced and starred in the hit series, 'The Drop Off'. The reenactment of Rumkowski's speech is voiced by Tobias Menzies (The Crown, Outlander, Game of Thrones for Almeida Theatre's 'Figure of Speech' series. It is on YouTube Speakola is made entirely by Tony and supported by listeners. There is a Patreon page which you can join If you want to offer Tony regular support. Also welcome credit card donations,  which can be monthly or one off. Subscribe to our newsletter if you want a fortnightly email setting out great speeches by theme. Speakola is sponsored by DocPlay. Sign up here for 45 days free on the world's best documentary streaming site, then if you choose to continue, $7.99/m. The documentary 'A Film Unfinished' about a Nazi propaganda film in the Warsaw ghetto is excellent. Tony will share photos and write about his day with Abram and Fiona for his writer blog, Good one, Wilson. Email comments or ideas to tony@speakola.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Assassins
1. The Greatest Spy of WWII (Season 2)

Good Assassins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 33:17


The story of one of the most consequential spies in American history. Her name was Virginia Hall, and she was known to the Nazis as "The Limping Lady." The Nazis called her “the most dangerous of all Allied spies.” From spy to resistance leader, her story is a thrilling tale of a woman whose efforts in the face of fascism, racism, sexism, and ableism saved thousands of lives.There's maybe no figure of espionage in all of history like Virginia Hall. She embodies a lot of what's amazing about fictional spies like James Bond or Ethan Hunt or Sydney Bristow (from the TV show Alias). But unlike all those spies, Virginia Hall was very real. And she changed the course of history.Coming up on Good Assassins Season 2: a devious and double-crossing Nazi priest, elaborate dental work and disguises, and a dangerous trek across a mountain range to escape the most terrifying villains in world history.We'll bring you daring sabotage plots, thrilling espionage, and brutal war stories as we follow Virginia Hall's ascent from clerk to international spy to guerilla war leader. You've never heard a story like this. Learn more at diversionaudio.com/good-assassins Episode 1, "The Greatest Spy of WWII" contains clips from interviews with Lore Oppenheimer and Hermann Ziering from the Claude Lanzmann Shoah Collection. Created by Claude Lanzmann during the filming of "Shoah," used by permission of United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem. © United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Yad Vashem, State of Israel. For more information visit USHMMSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Grand reportage
En Autriche, une randonnée pour se souvenir de l'exode des Juifs après la Seconde Guerre mondiale

Grand reportage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 19:30


Grand Reportage nous emmène aujourd'hui en Autriche, où une randonnée retrace l'exode des Juifs vers la Palestine après la Seconde Guerre mondiale. À l'été 1947, entre 5000 et 8000 survivants de la Shoah, en majorité originaires d'Europe de l'Est, quittent clandestinement l'Autriche pour rallier l'Italie et gagner ensuite la Palestine. Ils durent, pour cela, marcher plus de 8 heures et traverser le col du Krimmler Tauern, haut de 2600 mètres.  Un trajet éprouvant que des centaines de volontaires refont chaque été, sous la houlette de l'association « Alpine Peace Crossing », afin de rendre hommage à ces rescapés. Isaure Hiace était aux côtés des marcheurs, en juillet dernier. « En Autriche, une randonnée pour se souvenir de l'exode des Juifs après la Seconde Guerre mondiale », un grand Reportage d'Isaure Hiace.

Le Cours de l'histoire
Vivre en temps de guerre, une histoire 4/4 : La guerre à hauteur d'enfant

Le Cours de l'histoire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 59:07


durée : 00:59:07 - Le Cours de l'histoire - par : Xavier Mauduit - À partir des années 1980, la question de l'enfance s'impose comme un objet d'étude dans l'histoire de la Shoah. Cet intérêt s'étend bientôt à tous les enfants et pas seulement aux premières victimes des persécutions : qu'est ce qu'un quotidien d'enfant dans la Seconde Guerre mondiale ? - invités : Isabelle von Bueltzingsloewen Historienne, professeure à l'Université Lumière Lyon 2; Laura Hobson Faure Historienne, professeure à l'Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life
Talmud Class: A Normal Rockwell Sukkot

From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 39:53


Let's draft off the energy of Yom Kippur. We are back in person on Shabbat morning. Please join us for coffee, conversation, and community as we discuss a Norman Rockwell Sukkot. One of Norman Rockwell's classic paintings—it commands its own room in the Norman Rockwell Museum in the Berkshires—is a family Thanksgiving feast entitled Freedom From Want. Follow this link. A family gathered happily together. A turkey ready to be gobbled up. Fine china. Fine stemware. Big smiles. Warmth. Home. Safety. Security. Plenty. There is only one problem. The year of the painting is 1943. America is in the middle of World War II. After Pearl Harbor. Before Omaha Beach. By the way, the Holocaust is happening. How are we to think about this family's feast in the middle of World War II and the Holocaust? Is their celebration of plenty the right move morally, or the wrong move? What impact should the war and the Shoah have had on their feast? Should they have feasted as if World War II and the Shoah were not occurring (which seems to be the case)? Look at the easy smiles on their faces. Should they have canceled their feast due to the sorrows of the world? Should they have had their feast, but done some readings to acknowledge the war and the Holocaust that were both happening that very day? This theme—how do you do daily life when the world is in tumult—is a recurrent theme for Norman Rockwell. A companion painting, also a classic, entitled Freedom From Fear, shows parents putting children to bed, domestic tranquility, parents grounding their children in the serenity of home and hearth, while the father holds a newspaper that has headlines about the war. Follow this link. Roll the film forward to 2022. Roll the film forward to Sukkot which begins Sunday night. If we sit in our Sukkah smiling and enjoying our festival meal, eating our fine food, drinking our fine wine, making pleasant conversation, is that a problem given the problems of the world? As just one small example, the New York Times Daily catalogues the infinite misery engulfing Pakistan as a result of biblical-like floods that are causing death, devastation, and hunger on a massive scale. How do we think about enjoying our holiday when there is so much pain in the world? What do Jewish sources teach us about navigating this tension between the world in grief and our world as sanctuary from the world in grief?

Programme B
À la recherche de Jeanne | 1/5

Programme B

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 19:38


Mousse de pomme, gâteau de semoule et pets de nonne. L'été 2018, Zazie apprend, grâce à une cousine, l'existence d'un carnet de recettes tenu par Jeanne Weill, son arrière-arrière-grand-mère déportée et morte à Sobibór, en Pologne, le 25 mars 1943.Dans la famille, tout le monde connaît Jeanne mais personne ne parle d'elle. Qui était Jeanne avant sa déportation ? Quels sont les souvenirs qui restent d'elle ? Zazie démarre son enquête et s'envole pour Tel Aviv.À la recherche de Jeanne est une série de Zazie Tavitian en cinq épisodes diffusée dans Programme B, un podcast de Binge Audio. Soutenue par la Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah, cette série a été écrite et réalisée dans les studios de Binge Audio (Paris, 19e). Ecriture et narration : Zazie Tavitian. Réalisation : Solène Moulin. Production : Juliette Livartowski. Voix : Nathalie Weill-Tavitian (Jeanne), Vincent Chastre (Serveur), Joël Ronez (policier) et Quentin Bresson (administrateur). Edition : Diane Jean. Musique originale : Ananda. Identité graphique : Clarisse Pillard et Sébastien Brothier (Upian). Direction des programmes : Joël Ronez. Direction de la rédaction : David Carzon. Direction générale : Gabrielle Boeri-Charles. Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Répliques
L'antisémitisme en France

Répliques

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 51:24


durée : 00:51:24 - Répliques - par : Alain Finkielkraut - De la Rafle du Vel d'Hiv à Paris en 1942 à l'antisémitisme en France aujourd'hui, débat avec deux historiens - invités : Georges Bensoussan Historien et ancien responsable éditorial du Mémorial de la Shoah; Laurent Joly Historien, directeur de recherches au CNRS