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A No Nonsense Podcast : Football
Golden Generations Turn To Rust, Luis Suarez Gone But Never Forgotten in Ghana, Football Needs Even More Techno - World Cup 2022 Show

A No Nonsense Podcast : Football

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 78:37


With the group games wrapped up and the last sixteen ties being confirmed, the boys recap the exciting final round of group stage matches.Our World cup Fantasy is live!! Follow  the link to join and be in with a chance to win a world cup jersey of your choosing. https://play.fifa.com/fantasy-classic/join-league/4KLICQWGMAKE SURE TO RATE US 5 STARS ON SPOTIFYhttps://www.instagram.com/no_nonsense_pod/https://twitter.com/anononsensepodEMAIL - ANONONSENSEPODCAST@GMAIL.COMHit us up with questions or feedback and we'll read it out on the next episode!

The Clean Energy Show
When Electric Cars Aren't Reliable; The Benefits of Processed Foods

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 53:49


Brian talks about Wired.com's story on the benefits of processed foods. James is depressed because his beloved Nissan LEAF needs a new PTC cabin heater with a hefty price tag. The city of Houston has a boil water advisory because of a blip in their power grid. The Tesla Semi seems to be for real. Musk says it completed a 500 mile journey pulling an 81,000 pound load. The upcoming Sizewell C nuclear power plant in the UK was in need of public funding. Why the Saudis have electric buses.  There's a new record size for off-shore wind turbines and it's 16 megawatts. Ebike subsidies expand across the United States. GM dealerships are repairing Teslas. Will they also fix James's LEAF? Buy us a cup of coffee with PayPal Donate! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow   Transcript Hello, and welcome to episode 141 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. I finally come clean this week about a secret I've been keeping for two months. And, no, I'm not pregnant. And, yes, I would make an excellent mother. The city of Houston is under a boil water advisory. Because of power outages. Everything is bigger in Texas, including grid problems. The Tesla semi completed a 500 miles journey with a load weighing 81 £0, or roughly half the weight of Elon Musk's eagle. The upcoming Sewell Sea nuclear power plant in the UK was in need of funding. Ultrawealthy prime Minister Rishi Sunak has stepped in with a cash infusion. Oh, wait, I'm being told it's taxpayer money. He's not an idiot. All that and hopefully borrow this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Brian I'm sweating like a hog and I'll tell you why. Yes, I'm not a sick. I was shoveling the driveway because it blew in. And before the show, I frantically tracked down a plug in electric snow blower. My partner was coming home for lunch and I said, can you swing by the Walmart because there's one left. It was like $100 less than if I made this decision a few days ago. I would have had all the Cyber Monday Friday deals, but I missed out on that. But I found one with specs that was really good. Now, I've got a battery operated snow shovel. Not cutting it. What's going to happen now is we're going to get trace amounts of snow for the next five years, but I say, fine, it's worth spending the money for that to happen, because it's worth it. We've been snowed in and my partner had to park on the street and the driveway was daunting. So I quickly assembled it at lunchtime. While you were having your happy nap. Yeah. And I went out there with a short extension cord and did what I could. And now I'm sweating like a crazy. I'm soaked in sweat because my heart was going maximum, which doesn't take much these days, but when you're doing anything clearing snow, it gets the heart rate going, unfortunately. So, like a plug in kind rather than battery operated, I guess, is a lot cheaper. It is cheaper. I did splurge, though, and get pretty much the most powerful one you can get. It's about 14 amps. You can get a 15 amp one, but then you have problems with your extension cords overheating and blowing breakers and things. It's kind of the maximum that it will handle on an ongoing basis. But I went out there with, I would say, a 15 inch drift and went right through it like it does a foot of snow. But it will go under the drift and it will still keep going under the drift and you just go over it a second time. So, yeah, I'm happy with it. Those are a pain in the ass. I've had them before because the extension cord but I knew that I wanted power, and this was a bigger unit, and it was a couple of couldn't really afford it, but I said, man, because we got to clean the sidewalks this year by city by law. By city by law. Yeah. Well, just a quick update. Last week I was complaining about GoComics.com, this website I go to every day to read daily comic strip. It was down for a full five days and finally came back online. They offered no explanation of exactly what happened. It was supposedly a cyber security issue, which I had read on another website. But anyway, our long nightmare is over. It's back. And coincidentally, this week on Saturday, it was Charles Schultz's, what would have been his 100th birthday, the creator of the Peanuts comic strip, the legend of newspaper comic strips. It was his 100th birthday, so a lot of the comic strips had special tributes to him on Saturday. So that was a lot of fun to read. All the cartoonists got together and decided to do that. And then the last thing, comic strips do you remember the soap opera comic strips when you were a kid? There were only a couple of comic strips that were not funny. Yeah. Give me an example of one, can you? Well, there's two main ones. Mary worth. Okay. And Rex Morgan, MD. And these trips have both been around for, like, 100 years by this point. Anyway, I started reading them a couple of months ago because I was looking for new, exciting things to follow, and I'd always avoided them like the plague when I was a kid because it's like, this is ridiculous. There's no joke here. What's the point of this anyway? I've been reading for a couple of months now, and I'm starting to get into it. It's kind of fun. A bit speechless here. You're reading soap opera comic strips after resisting them your whole life. My whole life. I mean, I thought, is it a gossipy? Pleasure, man, what's going on here? Yes. I don't know. I just like comic strips, and there's not enough good ones, so I just been looking to expand my horizons. What happened to the creators? Did their kids take over? I mean, if these are 100 years old yeah, often that is the case. I don't think that's the case with Mary. We are Rex Morgan, but yeah, often it's passed on to a son or a daughter or a nephew or a niece or something. I don't know. They've all been around now, a lot of them, for 100 years. I don't know. It's a weird thing. All right, Brian, I've got an announcement to make. I've been hiding something from you for two months. Wow. You and the listeners. Wow. And it is regarding my leaf. Oh, yeah. My leaf has major problems. It happened just before we recorded a show about two months ago, and I was so distraught, I couldn't bring it up, and I couldn't bring it up for two months. I was just so unhappy about it. That's terrible. I don't know how the hell I made it through that episode. But if you could find a very glum James about two months ago trying to struggle through an episode, I guess it's all muscle memory. That's how we've done so many of these shows already. Yeah. And also, it doesn't have to be that good. No, I mean, well, we try. We do try for our listeners, don't we? Every week a good show. Come on. Okay. Now, I know that we have a lot of long time listeners, but we also have a lot of new listeners. And I wanted to just talk about electric cars with you for a little while, about the reliability. And I don't want to just jump into it without talking about what model I have, because it's going to probably be different than what you are considering. Although a friend of ours texted me the other night and was asking me about the Leaf, wanting to buy one. And I said, well, here's what happened, and you can make up your own mind. What had happened is my 2013 Nissan Leaf. Now, remember, this is the first mass produced allelectric car by a car company. They started making them at the end of 2010, and they made them for a couple of years in Japan, and then they opened up a Tennessee factory, and one in the UK as well. Mine comes from Tennessee, and it comes from the United States and was imported into Canada. So there's a few little things like daytime running lights that had to be added, and a bigger washer tank for some reason. It's just one of those weird things just to get up to Canadian standards. So it was imported already. And Quebec, the problems with Quebec, they had just terminated at that time, but they had incentives for used vehicles that lowered the used market for Leafs. And that's how I got one as cheap as I did. It was about $10,000 in change, and that was a pretty good price at the time. But it was a base model, so it was the base model S. It had no cruise control. And just when I started making those models, they put a heat pump in them in the upper trim levels. They had three trim levels. I had the low one, so I didn't even have a fast charger on mine, or a reverse camera. Or there was some things I gave up to get a really cheap one, because everyone was designing the other ones. Had I gotten one that was one of the other trim levels, I would have had a heat pump and a PTC heater. PTC heater is basically like a toaster. Now, these suckers and electric cars heat up fast. They connect rate to the high voltage battery, and it's a heater that gets red hot and air blows through it. So you have instant heat in your car, which is wonderful. And when I preheat my car in the winter time even -40 I'll get into it and it feels like a toaster oven. It just feels hot and dry and completely warm and habitable in there. It's wonderful feeling. If you leave it long enough, it'll melt all the snow that's on the car. Right. And that's what I do. So in the leaf it will preprogram itself. You just give it a departure time and based on the weather and how long it took to get to temperature and previous days, it will add more time. I think up to 2 hours. I'm not sure about that. So I probably abused it and I lost my PTC heater. So I have no heater in the car for two months now. A month ago you were talking about getting your heater replaced under warranty, which I did. Went up to Saskatoon and yeah, they replaced that under warranty and it was the same thing. Your car and I and mine are the same in that sense. That they just have a PTC heater. Later models may have had both or at least a heat pump and yours for more efficiency. Heat pump is like reverse air conditioner if you're new to the show. And it works a lot more because a great deal of power goes into these. I think 5000 watts goes into mine. That's more than the car driving. So your range goes down. So since my heater broke, my winter range is excellent, by the way. It only goes down based on denser or cold air. Do you have a little bonfire going in there or something? No, I eat some beans sometimes before. It's not a great experience. And what I've done, we have an SUV that I thought initially I thought I would just place the SUV for the winter and it's going to be expensive and it'll heat up and it will be, you know, but then even without the damn heater, Brian, I just love that bloody car. Like, I just love it. I just love driving it. I hate getting into the Prius, which is a combustion engine in the wintertime, it's cold anyway, unless your destination is a long ways away or you've warmed it up. That thing takes a while to warm up too. And it's not like an electric car and it just doesn't feel the same as an electric car. And I finally got the wheel bearings fixed, so it was nice and quiet. And I've decided that one of the great things about electric cars is after I had my wheel bearing fixed, because they were very loud, is when you get up to speed in the city, it's almost like you can feel the wind in your hair. Like you could just feel and hear the wind and nothing else. And it's just such an exhilarating feeling to just hear that. And there's something I don't know, just beyond anything a gas car can do. When I looked at yours, was covered under warranty. I found somebody who spent $1200 in Canada, basically, to do it. And the part was about six or $700, $700 for the part. And then they did some labor. Now, in the Leaf, I looked at doing it myself, but it's very complicated. Basically, the whole inside of the car has to be taken apart. And it's a $4,000 job in most cases. Oh, no. I spent ten on the car. I just spent 2100 that I didn't have, fixing the front wheel hubs, which cost way more than they should have because I got screwed by a local shop because there's no Nissan dealer here to fix it. I also need some front suspension work. Now, the car is one month short of ten years old. This is something important because we're talking about electric cars not needing maintenance. And that is true for the most part. And people say, well, it's electric car. Something weird can go wrong in it. Well, I guess this is it. Aside from the battery, which are covered under eight year warranties. Always. Always. You know, there's the charger, I suppose, could go in the car, that there's a built in charger that can wear out over time. I would have to worry about that. I could have some bad battery cells, so you might have to replace some modules at some point. But the cars would have been great. But some people put in diesel heaters. Like, there's a guy in Swift Current who bought a brand new F 150 pickup truck, and he put in a diesel heater so that he wouldn't lose any range. Like, you have a diesel heater in an electric truck? That's right. It's basically this unit that you have to exhaust, and it just kind of burns away. It is crazy. And it's got electronic controls. This is what people are doing. And I don't know, did you ever know somebody who had a really old Volkswagen Beetle? Because I think, like, some of those had a propane heater because the Volkswagen Beetles were air cooled. So you don't get that circulating fluid that you normally use for your heater in your car. So old Beetles had a propane heater, which often apparently also did not work. So, yeah, I knew a guy who had to drive around in the winter and a Beetle scraping the inside of the window because there was no heat. Well, here's what I've done. Okay, first of all, the part, it wouldn't be so bad if I was a Tesla out of warranty. Twelve hundred dollars to go from an unusable car to a usable car. Great. I actually put in a space heater, like the one you have with a cottage into my car on a timer. Like it's a plug into the lighter? No, it plugs into an extension cord. Okay, so you just run an extension cord in there because when I was a kid, my parents had in their car a block heater. A lot of people listening don't know what a block heater is. That is a heater that heats the oil in a car in a very cold climate so that it will turn over, that it's viscous enough to turn over. And we have them in all of our cars here. But yes, my parents also had an interior warmer as well. And you plugged it in with the block heater. Yes, that's what my parents did. Yeah. And so same thing like, you can have your car warm in the morning. I seem to remember it running overnight. Do you remember my parents did that too? Just left both the heater and the interior one plugged in overnight. Yeah, different times. Because it would have been like a thousand watts, probably. Yes, it would have been extremely wasteful. And for what? I don't remember the snow being melted on the windows. That's not something that I remember. Yeah, no, I know somebody who used to do that, lived in an apartment building where the plugins in the parking lot were free. Like you didn't have to pay for the electricity. So I know somebody who did that kept it plugged in all night and all the snow melted on the car just because he didn't have to pay for the electricity. It is warming up to the interior and at least getting it usable. The problem is you have to run some air on the window to defog it at the lowest setting. And if it's cold out, that feels really bad because we're talking what temperatures have we had here? Minus ten celsius -20, and it's going to get colder. It's going to be high -20 in a few days. I was hoping for a naturally warm winter and a lottery ticket win. A couple of things that I was hoping for. And if I got it fixed, I would have to ship the car all the way up to a city called Prince Albert, which is the closest Nissan dealer that is certified to do electrical work. So basically when people do these fixes, they take out the front car seats and all the dash and they have to unplug the high voltage system underneath the car. And there's also this fuse that is hard to get at, that always blows. I confirmed it because I have sort of the computer connection to my phone app and it has the right error codes on there so that the heater is seen on the phone. Now, I knew this was something that I worried about because I've seen it with other people. I've seen it online a few times, but now that I'm really looking, I haven't seen it that much at all. Like, there's a few references to it and there's people saying, well, it was bad welding and there should be a class action suit but there really isn't that many people. I think a lot of people actually had them done under warranty because I'm only a couple of years off the warranty actually. Well that's not true. I don't know if this would have qualified for that, but a lot of the high voltage stuff did and the battery and stuff like that. So I'm very depressed Brian, because and I haven't even told my partner yet. My kids know, my partner does not. She just thinks I spilled something in the car and I've got a heater going in there. I'm just so ashamed of myself because I'm an electric car advocate. I've been telling everybody they don't break down and I put my family at risk of this and now we don't have a car that's working. So I drive my kid to school, it's a ten minute drive. She doesn't complain. Well, I don't know if this makes you feel any better and you've certainly told me this as well, like you crunched the numbers when you bought that car and it's basically probably already paid for itself. If you think of all the fuel that you've saved, that was on all numbers, that was before gas went up. Before gas went up. So first of all, the car has been free so far? Basically, yes. Another way I could look at it is that these things are selling for 6000 more than I paid for it. Yeah, prices are up since when you bought it, so there's that incentive to fix it and not feel so bad about it or sell it to somebody in the summer. No, well, I would never do that. Never. That would be awful. Well, now that the evidence is out there by the way, you can't here's a tip for your kids out there. If you buy an electric car in the summer that's used check the heater just because you want to make sure it works. Now, if I had one of those models that wasn't the base model I would have had in my case a heat pump and a PTC heater. Yeah. So the heat pump, I don't know what they work efficiently at in a leaf. It might only be -15, or something like that. And it gets much colder where we are. But I would have had some heat and I could've preheated it for a couple of hours and it would have got somewhat comfortable in there, you know, and that would have been fine. Maybe not on every day, but most of our winter days aren't necessarily brutal. Hopefully it would work out, I don't know. Warm days are only five months away. Shut up, shut up, shut up. It can't be that long. There's heated seats and front and back in the Prius or in the Prius and the leaf that helps. There's a heated steering wheel. That's great. Now I've ordered off of Amazon for $30 a dinky little electric cigarette lighter, heated defroster. So I will see how that works. Is going to come in a couple of days. I'll tell you next week if it does anything. I had one many years ago when I was a teenager because my rear defrost didn't work my $300 car. So I bought one at the hardware store, and I think it sort of did something. So it's a little portable heater, like just 100 watts or something. Just a cheap yes, about 100 watts. But hopefully it will be better than just blowing cold air as far as the feeling of it. But we'll see how I survive. Actual really cold temperatures that are coming up this week, I may not you know how teenage girls dress for school? My daughter doesn't dress very warm to get her into school and even with the car, not have producing heat and try to convince her to put things on so she doesn't get hypothermia. But on the bright side, Brian, I'm feeling better. Yeah, well, like we were talking about last week, we sometimes don't dress for the climate anymore because we're just used to going from one warm environment to another warm environment. I don't have a lot of stuff this week because Twitter has gone haywire, and I get a lot of my information from climate people and various activists on Twitter. They've all left for mastodon and other places. Like, they're all completely gone, and I hope they come back. But there's talk of Tesla shareholders getting upset with Musk doing what he's doing because that seems to be affecting the Tesla stock. Just the fact that he had to sell a bunch to buy that social media platform is a little crazy. Anyway, I'm on the Chevy Voltage group. I thought it was interesting. Every now and again I see an interesting story that really talks about the economics of electric cars. We talked about how mine for $10,000 covered the gas and my SUV. That would have been five years of gas. And that's just incredible. And plus, you're saving the environment a little bit too. Obviously, it's a lot more pleasurable too, but so somebody's paying $520 for a Chevy bolt. This is one of the cheapest EVs. You can buy the monthly payment for five years with no money down or anything like that. And he's saying that he saved 175 gallons of gas, and at $4 a gallon, minus $60 a month increase in electricity, he's saving $580 a month. Both has over two months. Over two months. It's like getting a car for very little money, and it will basically pay for itself in eight to ten years. So in his case, he's buying a brand new car and getting it free after eight to ten years. The more you drive, the better deal it is. Yeah, that's for sure. And as they come down in price, this is going to be more and more things especially if you're dealing with fleets that do a lot of driving. And free is one thing, but you're still saving you're still saving over a gas car. So that's something. The New York Times had an interesting piece about how the Saudis are trying to keep gas alive. And one of the ways that they're doing it is they're buying a whole bunch of EVs and Ebuses for Saudi Arabia so that they can get this burn less gas. They want to sell the gas to other people. They don't want to waste any of it using it themselves. That's a really good point, doing that. That just struck my craw, like it's stuck in there. Well, there's going to be sort of EV have countries and EV have not countries and yeah, that's keep selling them your oil, I guess. So the Texas grid, what's going on there? Yeah, we talked about that occasionally. Texas in the US. Has its own electricity grid that tends to be cut off from the rest of the country. And they've had problems lately and I just thought this was an interesting problem there's currently, and it should be ending today, but a boil watery advisory in the city of Houston, which is a massive city for the whole city. For the whole city. And so school has been canceled. Yeah, that's first nation reserve up north kind of territory, or small town at least. And it's because they had power outages at their water filtration system when the power goes out and they were supposed to have power backup and for some reason it didn't work. But the water pressure drops within the filtration plant and once the water pressure drops down past a certain amount, they basically have to put out a boil water advisory so it's entirely possible the water is still safe to drink. It's a precautionary thing. It's a precautionary thing. And they need to let it go for a couple of days, test the water again. And they will probably lift the boil water advisory today. But I just thought it was interesting because it's just one of those things where we don't think about necessarily in terms of the grid, why it's important to have a reliable grid. And this is just one of those instances where a bad grid with frequent power outages can lead to things like a boil water advisory for a massive city like Houston. These are things that I worry about with armageddon scenarios. If there's some sort of war or something, we really need to have our water because we don't have a well in our backyard. And I'm not currently collecting rainwater. You're talking about doing that at the new cottage. But I guess we could melt some snow during the winter. Oh, yeah, not the yellow. I'll just blow it into a big pile of my new snow blower and melt it. Melt it with what, though, right? I have to collect firewood on the prairies. That's no fun. Burned gopher carcasses or something like that, I thought. I would also mention these two Chinese companies announced that the production of the largest offshore wind turbine to date has been announced. Because this is something we talked about before, so I thought I'd bring it up again. You love a big turbine. I do love my turbines to be setting records, Brian. And we knew that this would be broken because there was rumors of it. The previous record is 14 MW. This is something that can power a house for two days with one rotation of the blade. One little rotation can power your home and your family for two days, and now they've gone up to 16. There's two companies in China that have developed 16 MW. It's interesting to watch when professionals have discussions online about what the theoretical limit is. But a lot of times in the clean energy space, people think that nothing can go any further, and it does. There's always some sort of development or some sort of technique. Some of it is just a placement where you place it. They have better modeling now than they used to 20 years ago. The groups on November 24 showed off the turbine factory in Fujian Province. And the turbine has a 252 meters rotor diameter with 50,000 meters sweep area. That is a large sweep area. If you want to compare sweep areas, it's a large 146 meters. The hub of it, the middle, the turning point, 146 meters. One and a half football fields off the ground. And I saw another wind turbine blade on the highway the other day, which is always an amazing sight to see. Those checks right here. Blades? Yeah, it was heading towards Moose Jaw. That's interesting. I wonder where from, because that's kind of where it was going. Not sure. That is actually the biggest restriction on this wind turbine size, is that you physically can't turn corners on any sort of roads with those wind turbines. It was right here you saw when I saw one of Colorado was amazing. It was just blocks long, and it's just, you know, the largest man made item I think I've ever seen up close. It was like looking at a massive rocket or something. Okay, so I've got a great story here from Hannah Ritchie, who is the head of research at Our World in Data. And she is still on Twitter, and I would recommend following her. She's a great follow on Twitter, amazing information. So she's the head of research at Our World in Data. Fabulous website that just collects all kinds of data and presents it in website form. A lot of people have been going there through the COVID pandemic because it's a great place to go for sort of COVID statistics and stuff like that. So she wrote this amazing article at Wired magazine, and it's about processed foods. Every once in a while, people stop me on the street. And they say, hey, are you the guy from the Clean energy show? Why are you promoting processed foods all the time? Go on. The idea of processed food, it just has a really bad rap. We all know, I think, that we should eat raw vegetables from the garden or whatever, and processed foods can be bad. It turns out that there's sort of two categories. There's processed foods and then there's ultraprocessed foods. There's literally two categories to describe them based on how much processing. It's just a massive oversimplification. And this fantastic article summarizes everything, and it's things that we basically kind of talked about on the show before, but I just thought the article was great because it really explains it really nicely. One example of a good instance of processed food would be iodised salt. So iodine is a thing that we all need in our bodies. And iodine deficiencies used to be a really common problem around the world, and increased risk of stillbirth and miscarriages reductions in IQ from lack of iodine. That's why I'm so smart. All the processed foods I've been eating, all that. Yeah. So reduce cognitive development. But many years ago, we started adding iodine to salt. So most salt is iodized, and this kind of fixes that problem. But it's really the ultra processed foods that tend to be the problems, like, you know, snack foods like Twinkies and stuff like that. So where would we get iodised salt in nature to keep us healthy before? I'm not sure where that even comes from. Yeah, presumably our meat paleolithic cells were eating the right roots and vegetables or whatever. I'm not sure it's the ultra processed foods that we really should be railing against. Technically, something like Beyond Meat is ultra processed, but it's not that simple. It's just an oversimplification to say it's bad because it's processed well. So when I think of processed foods, Brian, I think of losing the nutritional value because of the way it's processed. I think of added salts, and I think of added sugars. That's a very common thing, too. And spaghetti sauce. And practically everything has sugar that doesn't need it. No. And as you said on the show many times before, it's not intended to be health food. Like Beyond Meat is not intended to be health food. It's intended to be a substitute for meat. So ground beef. So what you really need to compare it against is ground beef. So when you do that, meat substitutes tend to be lower in calories, lower in saturated fat, and higher fat fiber. Yes. Really? Because I thought some of the criticism of these Beyond Meat and what's the other one called? What's the other one called? Yes. Impossible Burger. Impossible Burger. That they were worse than regular meat. Or maybe that's the beef industry saying that it could all be tweaked. I mean, it can be whatever you want it to be. We're still early stages here, right? I mean, we're still developing stages. If people are saying, oh, this tastes like crap, well, then they can add in more fat. They can add in more sugar or whatever. So meat substitutes lower in calories and saturated fat and higher in fiber, which is good to their detriment. Some are lower in protein and often contain lower quality protein, meaning they contain less of the essential amino acids that we need. I didn't know there were different levels of protein. That's something new for me. Yeah. When it comes to sodium, it's sort of a mixed bag substitute. Burgers tend to be comparable to meat. When it comes to sodium, the substitute sausages have less salt than their pork equivalents. A lot of these substitute products are now fortified with B Twelve, iron and calcium, which is something you're not necessarily going to get from the meat. The Impossible burger has more B Twelve and iron than beef does. Really many plant based milks are fortified as well. So on balance, they're probably a bit better for your health than the meat equivalent. And I see this as just the beginning because we talk about the concept of food software that you can program the food that you're going to be making with precision. Fermentation in the future will be inventing new foods that have protein in them and different tastes and different flavors that don't necessarily come from an animal or plant. Or we can just tweak the things that are mimicking what we already eat, but to our taste, to what we like. And chefs, I think a chef 20 years from now could be a bit of a computer programmer and just experimenting with different things, and it could be an interesting world. Well, I've always been fascinated by that. I think I saw, like, a documentary one time about somebody who was a chef at a fast food restaurant, and it's just the idea of that I find interesting. Like somebody has to do, even if it's just regular meat, and somebody has to design that stuff to be then replicated literally billions of times. It's a fascinating sort of thing. It is. And you go to the McDonald's campus and you see they've got all these chefs making a lot of money there. And every time they come up with a new product, I always think of them and I think, you stupid buggers, you really screwed up. You know, I'm very disappointed in this rap that you made. This rap so that teenagers can put it together when they're hungover and use basic ingredients, and it's just crap. All these chefs are making these things that are disappointing and everything that you eat. I was talking to my family about Tim Hortons. What a compromise of a restaurant that is. Yes, everything is bad. Even the donut. It's a donut shop, and they can't even make a decent donut. I don't want to be the old man here, but when I was a kid donuts were pretty damn good. They're a lot better than they are. There no. And even Tim Hortons. It was about 20 years ago, they switched, and they forced all of their franchises to buy basically frozen dough or frozen donuts. Well, they make them in a factory. I've seen the news stories on them. They make them in a centralized factory, and they have baked them. They just finished the baking process and specialized ovens here, which make them somewhat fresh. But they're not a good product, which is not. No, but up until that point, they were made in the restaurants, and they were slightly better. So there's a couple more issues raised from this article. First, the idea that food processing could alleviate malnutrition for billions of people. So meat substitutes are mostly targeted at wealthy consumers. But the implications of a backlash to process food are just as harmful for people with less money. More food processing, not less, could improve health and nutrition in developing countries. So there's a lot of countries that can't afford to eat a lot of meat, and in some ways, that's good. In other ways, it's bad. There are certain things that you lack in your diet, perhaps if you're not eating meat. And some of those things could be added, like iodine to salt could be added into the thing. And plus, there's an appetite for people that they may want to eat more meat in countries where they can't afford it, and this gives them an option that is like that that's similar to meat. If you're new to the podcast, I should tell you that we talk about food on the show because it affects the climate. The new technologies and food are lower. Carbon, like, Impossible Burger is 25 times less carbon per gram than the hamburger. No, the final point from the article is the carbon footprint. I mean, it's absolutely insane how much lower the carbon footprint is from the substitute food than regular meat. The environmental toll can be ten to 100 times lower than beef or lamb, beef being the most carbon intensive. I came across another one the other day. People often complain about almond milk. Milk substitute made of almond because it uses a lot of water, you need tons of water. It's growing in places that doesn't have water. It doesn't have a lot of water. And this is true of the milk substitutes. Almond is the one that uses the most water, but it's like a 10th or 100th of the water needed if you get the milk from a cow. Like, the water needed for the beef industry is insane. So I would have assumed the opposite. Wow. It's not even close. You're saying it's not even close? Well, because I've driven by those almond farms, and you see all the irrigation, and you see the outside the border, it's a desert. So to join them in the desert and you think, wow, this is not a good idea. No, but you see the chart for the carbon footprints, and beef is the most carbon intensive of all of the meats. And one last thing here and again, it's from our World in Data. There was a really nice graph of meat consumption per person around the world. And so, quick quiz. What country do you think eats the most meat per person? My initial response would be the United Kingdom or the United States. It is the United States. Yeah, that's kind of almost a stereotype. It's a stereotype that appears to be true. Argentina eats a lot of meat. Australia eats a lot of meat. So in the US. It's 124 year per person, which is a lot. Canada is now at 82. Lot less in Canada. That was surprising to me. Now, why would that be? We have a lot of agriculture here. We have a lot of land. Why would we I don't know, except I know that anytime I've been to the States and you go to a restaurant and you order a meal in a restaurant, it always seems to be a very large portion of meat. Yeah. Yeah. But there's a wonderful graph there on our World in Data, meats applied per person. This is 2017, so the data is a bit out of date, perhaps. Well, the article is on wired.com and it's called The World Needs Processed Food. I'll put a link to it in our show notes, and you can check it out there. So the Tesla semi, according to a tweet by the CEO of Tesla, did its 500 miles trip with a full load. Now, Tesla a few years ago announced that it was making a semi allelectric semitruck. The CEO of Nicola, who is now, like, in prison, I remember reading his tweets. He was really upset that this was against the law of physics. There's no way you could carry an 18,000 pound load, which is kind of like the load that you want to carry. The Tesla semi carry this 18,000 pound load 81,000 pardon me, 81,000 for 500 miles, which is, Bill Gates said, not possible. I don't know why these people say these things, Brian. Why do they doubt us? Why do they put themselves on the record saying it's not possible? Now, lots of people said that at the time that the Tesla announcement was suspicious because people didn't think it was possible. But it's been so long since they made that announcement that battery density, the energy density, the more you can get more energy in the same weight of battery and volume than you could back then, it tends to improve by something like 18% a year. But we're kind of there now, and it sounds well, we'll know in a couple of days, right? Because on December 1 of having an event. Yeah, but apparently they've done it, and they've decided that he's invited Bill Gates to come have a ride. And, you know, I was thinking that would be a fun thing to own. And I know a lot of Tesla fanatics are actually got orders in for the semi just to have other driveway, some YouTube channels, which will be fun. Yeah, definitely fun if they buy one and drive it around because they're fast without a load. They're just really fast and quiet and tall and just such a weird thing for somebody to own. And probably not that much more expensive than some of the highly spec pickup trucks that are out there for $120,000, be a couple of hundred thousand dollars, it sounds like. But yeah, we'll learn more on December 1. And looking to learn more about the charging speeds and the infrastructure and stuff. Yeah, we'll learn how they plan to do it. But it sounds like this is for real now. If it is for real, this is a big deal because there's lots of people making electric semis, but they're making them for shorter scenarios, okay? They don't have the battery technology or the efficiency that Tesla has with their motors, their inverters, and the way that they have their batteries. And plus they've just done pretty serious design with the aerodynamics and everything and maximize everything they can get and wait. So we'll see. But this is a game changer. A lot of people are saying the cost per mile is going to be significantly lower enough that it will pull triggers on a lot of people will pull triggers on it right away once they see the difference in the cost per mile. So it's very interesting. Just as your Nissan Leaf basically paid for itself with the gasoline savings, these will pay for themselves with the diesel savings. I'd love to have one to pull. You could pull an RV right? There's people talking about that. And I'm sure somebody will make an RV based off the platform. That will probably take a while, but they'll turn one of these units into just a kickass RV, which will it'll have a massive battery, which you can power off the grid and do all kinds of amazing things. Plaster the RV part with the solar panels and charge it up as well. It just seems like a great way to RV because towing is such a pain in the butt. And a Tesla semi or pickup truck, I guess, would do a great job too. Yeah, so from Power Magazine, the UK government steps up as a 50% owner of the 3.2 gigawatt sizewell C nuclear reactors. So they've been building this nuclear reactor for a while, planning it, and guess what? It turned out to be more expensive than they expected. So they really needed the government to step in. And the government has stepped in with a 679,000,000 pound investment that's $815,000,000. So yeah, they're going to own half of it from that. But as we've discussed many times, government really has to own these because they are not profitable for any private industry there, especially by the time these get built. And I hate to go on about nuclear. We tend to bash nuclear every episode or so, but especially by the time this is finished, it will be years from now. Years, as we all know, the cost of solar and batteries, my cars will be cold and dust like so it's already a bad monetary investment now, but that's just going to get worse as time goes on. And we have a story coming up in the lightning round that says that the cost of uranium is really going up. So that's making the economics of all this very it's getting worse, I'm afraid. But yeah, private ownership and investment pardon me, in nuclear, it's not happening because governments have to do it. Then when governments do it, that makes you and I the investor. We're suffering. We're going to waste money because they don't listen to our podcast. If they only listen to our podcast, everyone would be the world would be a better place. And there was a story from Japan, too, on Bloomberg. They're looking to extend the life of their 60 year old nuclear plants, which they were planning to phase out at age 60. And keeping nuclear running that we already have is probably a good idea, but 60 seems a bit pushy. It's kind of pushing it, but they're studying it now to see if it's going to be worthwhile. Okay, well, I have no problem, as long as it's safe of extending nuclear, if that's what it takes. So Electric says that there are more electric bike subsidies coming to the United States. I guess it was in the Inflation Reduction Act, but then it got taken out like there was going to be a killer ebike subsidy that everyone would have got in the states, but that's not there anymore. So individual cities and states have since picked up the slack. They say. Vermont launched the first state incentive program in the US. Denver, Colorado, also launched the very popular ebike rebate program that repeatedly sold out and they had to renew it. New York is now considering its own ebike rebate, and now we can add Oregon to the list. It could become the latest date. They're talking about $200 off an ebike that costs, well, at least $950. But Brian, that would be free. I mean, my math isn't so good, but if all you have to spend is 950 and you get up to 1200 off, I assume if you spent 950, they'd give you 950. Yes, I know, but still, that's a free. That's free. That's what I'm saying. It goes to zero. Free bike. That's crazy. I mean, who wouldn't buy one? I mean, even if you didn't want one, it would be sitting around the house and then the bikes are going to be sold. I don't know. They have to do something about that. They can't do 100% of the purchase, but maybe it's prorated. Maybe somebody in Colorado can tell me the details. But also they would go right up to $700 if it's an electric cargo bike. I think I forgot a friend in Vancouver has an electric cargo bike. Yeah, basically, it's a cargo bike not because you're a courier, but because you're living your life off the thing. So you're getting all your groceries and your snow blowers from Walmart. And by the way, it's going to snow in Vancouver. If you're in Vancouver look good for the snow. It doesn't usually snow there. Electric cargo bikes are going to be huge. Okay, so Ireland and France are going to connect their electricity grids. How is that possible, Brian? Physically, it's with a giant extension cord. Really? Does it go underwater? It goes underwater. So it is a massive cable that is 575 km long. And so this is the first time that France has been connected to a grid in the UK. And it's for sharing power back and forth between Ireland and France. They're just beginning it now, so it will be operational by 2026. It'll be 700. MW can go through the cable, which is enough to power 450,000 households. So, yeah, I'm just always interested in these kind of stories. We need to make our grids smarter and more interconnected to share the power. Ireland and France seems like an odd combination. How did these two hook up? What's going on there? What would their accent be like? No, I'm not sure, but I'm just glad to hear it. Well, it's time for the Tweet of the Week. Well, the Tweet of the week comes from Said Razuk this week, and he says building new solar is three to ten times cheaper than operating existing gas fired power. So you have a gas fired power in a lot of places in the world. It is cheaper, like the United States, southern United States, three to ten times cheaper to build new solar than just to operate the gas. Yes. We're not talking gas this building solar, we're talking building a whole new thing is three to ten times cheaper just than existing gas. So if gas funds were invested in renewables like they're not right at the moment, europe would get rid of gas by 2028. And this is via PV magazine that he quotes data from. Well, it is time for the lighting round. Short one for you this week, Brian. General Motors dealerships have repaired thousands of Tesla electric cars, says GM, and it's annual Investor Day presentation. I have not heard this before, but apparently people are taking their Teslas to GM dealership. Maybe I could take my Leaf to the GM because they fixed. Screw you, Nissan. I'll just take it to the GM dealership. Yeah, that might work. I mean, if you could take a Tesla, why couldn't you take a Nissan? Yeah, no, that's the first time I've heard of this. First booked on Barons. A slide in the presentation simply reads eleven 180 repairs and Teslas, but they did not elaborate. So GM Volvo say that EVs won't cost more than gas vehicles by 2025. Both automakers see the Inflation Reduction Act as a key for achieving price parity by middecade, despite recent supply chain challenges. So that's good news. If true, the UK government will bolster a proposed OK, that's something we already talked about, so I'm going to skip that. It's time for what is it time for? A CES, a clean energy show. Fast fact. The International Atomic Energy Agency said 437 nuclear power reactors were operational throughout the world at the end of 2021. And that has a total net capacity of 389 gigawatts. So it's less than a gigawatt per reactor on average. The agency said 56 additional units were under construction. Some of those are in China, most of those are not other places. And as I said before, uranium prices are on the rise, thus making nuclear even less competitive. And Russia is partially the thing for that. They're raising the prices of gas and oil and also uranium. So we screwed everything up. The Department of Energy is to test rapidly deployable portable wind turbines for military use. I remember once we had on the show a story about the military with rapid deployment of solar panels that would sort of be like a transformer and unfold on a portable truck that would give energy into the field. Well, this is good for disaster relief and military use. So disaster relief and military use. A team of three labs will use remote communities to study the efficacy of turbines designed to fit into 20 foot shipping containers, perhaps towed by a Tesla. Semi clean energy jobs now outnumber jobs in fossil fuels, according to a new IEA report. Now, I'm going to continue to keep my eye open for reports like this and studies, because it seems like we are at the point now where the transition is happening, where the clean energy jobs are way overtaking fossil fuel jobs. So, by the way, France's first offshore wind farm, which is about half a gigawatt, is now fully online. So France has never had an offshore wind farm before. And speaking of offshore wind, our final story this week, before we go, is Denmark is helping India identify 15 offshore wind zones. And apparently India has some sweet wind zones, Brian, and they need electricity. We talked about huge solar developments in India, while offshore wind is next up on the list, and that will be a huge boon for them. Nice. That is our time for this week. It's more than our time. We'd like to hear from you. Please, for God's sake, contact us. Cleanenergy Show@gmail.com. That is our email address. Cleanenergyhow@gmail.com. Anything that's on your mind. Some criticism, some doubts, some things you like, some things that you're doing. Some questions about EV purchases. Let us know. We are on social media at the handle at Clean Energy Pod. And we have a YouTube channel which we have special features on. You can see me looking a bit more sweaty than usual this week. You can leave us a voicemail at speakfight. Comcleenergyow. And now, Brian, you can actually donate to the clean energy show. Buy us a coffee or PTC heater using the PayPal link on our website or in the show notes. If you're new to the show, remember to subscribe. Subscribe on your podcast app. Because our new shows, they come every week. Because we're machines. We're clean Energy machines, and we're here every week. We'll see you next time, Brian. you.

A No Nonsense Podcast : Football
Another Messi Moment, The USA Expect Wins, France Keep It Suspiciously Simple - World Cup 2022 Show

A No Nonsense Podcast : Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 64:06


The World Cup is officially in full swing as the games have gotten increasingly better and better. This week..Portugal are looking good despite people writing off their incredible squad before a ball was kicked. With two wins in the bag they are one of the first teams through to the knockout stageFrance similarly are through and looking good. But is all as it seems or has there been some trickery afoot behind the scenes regarding Benzema's injury? Put on your tinfoil hats folks.The USA and England played out the worst game of the tournament while both sets of pundits compete to see who is the least likeable and level headedMessi has still got it believe it or notLewandoski finally manages to bag his first World Cup goal in his illustrious career, and now all bets are off going forwardBrazil are a well oiled machine with Richarlison scoring bicycle kicks while Firmino sits at homeCameroon vs Serbia and Ghana vs South Korea play out the two best games in the tournament so far with goals, God and tears galore.Things are really heating up in advance of the USA vs Iran game, with Tyler Adams asked some VERY tough questionsCarlos Queiroz takes aim at the U.S, Jurgen Klinsmann and anyone else who stand in his way going forward.Our World cup Fantasy is live!! Follow  the link to join and be in with a chance to win a world cup jersey of your choosing. https://play.fifa.com/fantasy-classic/join-league/4KLICQWGMAKE SURE TO RATE US 5 STARS ON SPOTIFYhttps://www.instagram.com/no_nonsense_pod/https://twitter.com/anononsensepodEMAIL - ANONONSENSEPODCAST@GMAIL.COMHit us up with questions or feedback and we'll read it out on the next episode!

Breakaway Wealth Podcast
The Dirtiest Secret the Banks Don't Want You to Know with Fouad Bazzi

Breakaway Wealth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 37:49


In This Episode: Are taxes going up or down? Are those dollars in your pocket worth more today or the future? Would you rather pay tax on the seed or the harvest? These are the three questions that Jim asks people all the time, and the answers come so easily. Taxes are going up, of course, our dollars will be worth less in the future, and you would rather pay tax on the seed. Yet a traditional 401(k) or IRA violates all of these answers, and people are still putting their money there. Why? Because people still don't fully understand just how devastating inflation really is.   The only way to keep up with inflation is to have actual assets – not instruments in Wall Street eroding every day – but assets. After 21 years in banking, that's exactly what this week's guest learned. Fouad Bazzi realized he could step away from the corporate grind and that investing would be a better option, and as a result has been running a short-term rental business for the last year. He sold every stock he ever had and began investing in the rental sector, and his business is thriving. He joins Jim this week to share his journey into short-term rentals, what drove him to do this, and how he runs his business differently from the norm.   There is a reason that banks are the most profitable businesses in the world and it's because they control your money. But there is something the banks don't want you to know, and Fouad is sharing it with you this week. Jim and Fouad discuss the benefits of having assets, how Fouad broke away from the corporate sector, and the true power of real estate. Find out why people shouldn't be putting their money in Wall Street, the reasons more people don't invest in short-term rentals, and everything you need to consider if you are interested in breaking into the short-term rental space.   - Connect with Jim Oliver: Facebook: CreateTailwind & Jim Oliver Website: https://createtailwind.com/ YouTube: CreateTailwind LinkedIn: Jim Oliver Join the Community: https://community.createtailwind.com/ RSVP for the next community Q&A HERE: https://community.createtailwind.com/events Connect with Fouad Bazzi: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fouad-bazzi-4415973  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fouadbazzi_airbnb/  Linktree: https://linktr.ee/foubnb  Resources Mentioned: Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom by Robert T. Kiyosaki: https://www.amazon.com/Rich-Dads-CASHFLOW-Quadrant-Financial/dp/1612680054 Second Chance: for Your Money, Your Life and Our World by Robert T. Kiyosaki: https://www.amazon.com/Second-Chance-Your-Money-World/dp/1612680461 Boys Adrift: The Five Factors Driving the Growing Epidemic of Unmotivated Boys and Underachieving Young Men by Leonard Sax: https://www.amazon.com/Boys-Adrift-Epidemic-Unmotivated-Underachieving/dp/0465072100

A No Nonsense Podcast : Football
World Cup 2022 Preview Show

A No Nonsense Podcast : Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 117:41


What more can we say, its a group by group, team by team breakdown of the 2022 World in Qatar.Did we lose audio? Yes we did.Did we listlessly re record it? Absolutely.Did we also go out way to hard on Saturday and mess up the whole schedule, forcing us to use my headphone mic two days after the first half?  Who's to say.Our World cup Fantasy is live!! Follow  the link to join and be in with a chance to win a world cup jersey of your choosing. https://play.fifa.com/fantasy-classic/join-league/4KLICQWGMAKE SURE TO RATE US 5 STARS ON SPOTIFYhttps://www.instagram.com/no_nonsense_pod/https://twitter.com/anononsensepodEMAIL - ANONONSENSEPODCAST@GMAIL.COMHit us up with questions or feedback and we'll read it out on the next episode!

Build The Future
#73 — Eliot Peper: Science Fiction & Culture

Build The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 46:33


Today, we're talking with Eliot Peper (twitter) the novelist behind great science fiction books like Reap3r, Veil, Cumulus, and Bandwidth. Links mentioned:Our World in DataNadia Asparouhova's tweetMan in SpaceOliver Mortin's The MoonTo listen to more episodes and to stay connected, follow along atwww.worldsfair.cotwitter.com/worldsfaircoDon't forget to leave a review and subscribe.Until next time, go build!

Determined to Dance Podcast
S2 Episode 37 Intercession for Our World

Determined to Dance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 6:06


Welcome to season 2 of the Determined to Dance podcast. I pray that you'll be uplifted, encouraged, and will move forward each and every day. Today's episode, Intercession for Our World, considers the world we live in and how to focus our prayers. Show Notes: Praying Like Jesus: Intercession for Our World “Spirit, lead me where my trust is without borders, Let me walk upon the waters, Wherever you would call me.” The words above are to one of my all-time favorite Christian songs. What does part of the bridge from “Oceans,” have to do with praying for the world? When preparing for this episode, I thought, “God, the world is so big. There are so many people. So many needs. Besides people struggling, there are environmental issues. The continents. The oceans. The world is immense and so are its struggles.” Then, on Sunday morning, we sang “Oceans” at church. “Spirit, lead me” is the answer. We can't take on world prayer alone or even know where to start. It truly takes two to tango, waltz, or rumba. The Holy Spirit is our dance partner in prayer. When we give our lives to the Lord, the Holy Spirit comes to reside in us. John 14:26 says: “But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all things that I said to you.” NKJV The Holy Spirit will point the direction in which we are to pray for the world when we ask. Needs will be evident. Sometimes, we see these prayer focuses through: Watching the news. Prayer requests made at church. Social media. A missionary or visitor from another country. Dreams and visions. Paul had a vision of a man from Macedonia calling for help which led to prayer and a mission trip. God uses many means, through His Spirit, to teach us and bring thoughts and ideas to our remembrance. I'll never forget a day trip we made to a major city in another state. We enjoyed the short holiday, then decided to return home a different way. We drove through the west side of town and what I saw broke my heart. We passed mile after mile of empty malls, apartment complexes, and shopping centers. Places boarded up. Not a soul in sight. We wondered what happened and it led me to pray for renewal in the west side of this city. Years before, we'd stopped for gas while driving on the interstate and saw an empty mall. Abandoned. The Holy Spirit pointed it out and I prayed. Will these sections of cities ever be repopulated and renewed? I don't know but I can still lift them up. We can pray, noticing the part of the world where we are and its needs. Remember in Romans 8:26 Paul says: “Likewise, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. For we do not know what to pray as we ought, but the Spirit Himself intercedes for us with groanings too deep for words.” He longs to help us but we must first ask. I love this quote from John Bunyan, the author of Pilgrim's Progress: “Prayer is a sincere, sensible, affectionate pouring out of the soul to God, through Christ, in the strength and assistance of the Spirit, for such things as God has promised.” We pray to God, through Jesus, assisted by the Holy Spirit. How can we not succeed when praying for the world with their help? Here are a few ideas to think about: Pray for specific countries during specific seasons. Our church has focused a lot of prayers for Ukraine because of the war they are fighting. Pray for world leaders. Find godly leaders to lift to the Lord. Pray during natural disasters. Hurricanes, tsunamis, blizzards, earthquakes, and other traumatic events can affect nations for weeks and months. Pray for the peace of Israel. We are specifically told in scripture to remember Israel. “Pray for the peace of Jerusalem; they shall prosper that love thee.” Psalm 122: 6 KJV Praying for the world is possible when the Holy Spirit assists you. Today's featured author is Izzy James, author of Rita: A Yorktown Christmas Time-Travel No...

Breaking Down: Collapse
Episode 111 - The Rise of Fascism

Breaking Down: Collapse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 49:22


Fascist ideologies are on the rise around the United States and the Western world. What is fascism, why is it threatening us now, and how does it relate to collapse? Learn More: Eco-fascism: What It Is, Why It's Wrong, and How to Fight It | Teen VogueWhat Is Eco-Fascism, the Ideology Behind Attacks in El Paso and Christchurch? | GQEco-fascism: The greenwashing of the far right – DW Where in the world do people emit the most CO2? - Our World in DataSupport the show

Anxiety at Work with Adrian Gostick & Chester Elton
Are you Afraid at Work? Tools that give you Freedom at Work and Transform your Life!

Anxiety at Work with Adrian Gostick & Chester Elton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 28:08


Our guest this week is Traci Fenton, Founder and CEO of WorldBlu®. She has earned the "Oscars" in management award as a prestigious "Thinkers50 Radar Awardee," and has been recognized in Inc. Magazine as a “Top 50 Leadership Thinker.” She also earned the Game Changer award for "Outstanding Results in Shaping the World." She is a Marshall Goldsmith "Top 100 Coach" & has been recognized as a "World-Changing Woman in Conscious Business."Traci is the author of the book, Freedom at Work: The Leadership Strategy for Transforming Your Life, Your Organization, and Our World. She founded WorldBlu in 1997 and has helped spark and lead the global conversation around reinventing organizations using freedom and organization democracy rather than fear and control.###If you love this podcast please share it and leave a 5-star review! We would love to hear from you on LinkedIn & invite you to join our online community at The Culture Works, a safe place to talk about anxiety and mental health at work.###Your hosts, Adrian Gostick & Chester Elton have spent more than 20 years helping clients around the world engage their employees on strategy, vision and values. They provide solutions for leaders looking to manage change, drive innovation and build high performance cultures and teams.Authors of award-winning Wall Street Journal & New York Times bestsellers All In, Leading with Gratitude, & Anxiety at Work. Their books have been translated into 30 languages and have sold more than 1.5 million copies. They have been called “fascinating” by Fortune and “creative and refreshing” by The New York Times. Gostick & Elton have appeared on NBC's Today Show, CBS 60 Minutes, and are often quoted in Forbes, Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal.Learn more about their Executive Coaching practice at TheCultureWorks.com. To book Adrian and Chester to keynote at your event, contact christy@thecultureworks.com###A shout out to our wonderful sponsor, LifeGuides. LifeGuides is a peer-to-peer community that helps people navigate through their day-to-day stressors with a Guide who has walked in your shoes, experiencing the same challenge or life experience as you. We have a special offer for A@W Community from LifeGuides.  Schedule a demo and drop Healthy2021 in the “Any Questions?” box for 2 FREE months service.goHappy Hub is an inclusive and timely way to communicate and engage directly with your frontline employees and candidates with 95%+ open rates. Send text messages directly from corporate and enable permissions for your frontline leaders to communicate with their team - notes of gratitude, logistical updates, referral opportunities, LTO's, new hire introductions, learning content, celebrations and more. Easily get the right message to the right people with simple segmentation by location, job type, language, etc, and get feedback from the field in a structured, digestible and actionable way. For a 60 day trial, just tell 'em Adrian & Chester sent you!

The Nonlinear Library
EA - How many people die from the flu? (OWID) by Lizka

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 2:25


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: How many people die from the flu? (OWID), published by Lizka on October 24, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Saloni Dattani and Fiona Spooner at Our World in Data (OWID) have recently published a new article on the annual death toll of the flu — I thought the article was interesting and am link-posting it. The article also explains some issues with measuring this, how this has changed over time, factors that increase the chances of dying from the flu, and why some flu seasons are worse than others. The headline (emphasis mine): The risk of death from influenza has declined over time, but globally, hundreds of thousands of people still die from the disease each year. The annual mortality caused by seasonal influenza was estimated by the Global Pandemic Mortality Project II using data between 2002 and 2011. They estimated that, during this period, seasonal influenza caused between 294,000 and 518,000 deaths each year globally. For reference on what 300,000 to 500,000 looks like, here's a chart (from a different article) that shows deaths by cause: An excerpt and a couple of charts — or just see the article itself. Globally, hundreds of thousands of people die from seasonal influenza every year. During large flu pandemics, when influenza strains evolved substantially, the death toll was even higher. But the risk of dying from influenza has declined substantially over time from improvements in sanitation, healthcare, and vaccination. People born in 1940 had around a third of the risk of dying from influenza as those born in 1900 – even when they reached the same age. This decline continued, and those born in 1980 have a risk of half that of those born in 1940. Influenza still remains a large burden around the world, because of an aging population and a lack of access to healthcare and sanitation in many countries. In this article, we look into these developments in detail: how many people die from seasonal influenza and how this has changed over time. We will also look at which factors increase the risk of dying from the flu and understand why, in some years, influenza has led to large pandemics that caused millions of deaths. This knowledge can inform us about the risks of influenza in the future. Thanks for listening. To help us out with The Nonlinear Library or to learn more, please visit nonlinear.org.

LABOSSIERE PODCAST
#41 - Jason Crawford

LABOSSIERE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 39:52


Jason Crawford is the founder of The Roots of Progress, a nonprofit dedicated to establishing a new philosophy of progress for the 21st century. He writes and speak about the history and philosophy of progress, especially in technology and industry.He's also the creator of Progress Studies for Young Scholars, an online learning program about the history of technology for high schoolers, and a part-time technical consultant and adviser to Our World in Data.Formerly, he was a software engineering manager and tech startup founder. He was co-founder & CEO of Fieldbook, a hybrid spreadsheet-database.He's also been an engineering manager at Flexport, Amazon and Groupon, and was at a few other startups as co-founder or early employee. Long ago he helped build a biotech supercomputer for D. E. Shaw Research. The Roots of Progress: https://rootsofprogress.org/Jason's Personal Site: https://jasoncrawford.org/Find Jason on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jasoncrawford

FHCC
The Gospel Establishes a Church in Ephesus

FHCC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 33:11


Our World's illusions of power fail as an altrnative to the true power of God.

Breakaway Wealth Podcast
Great Books on IBC With Nick Kosko

Breakaway Wealth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 45:15


In this episode, you'll discover some great tools and resources if you are interested in learning more about infinite banking. Nick Kosko and Jim share their favorite books, why they find them so useful, and the biggest messages they take from these resources. If want to learn more, the best thing to do is to listen to the full episode here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWcYbM0y9Cc&t - Resources Mentioned in this Episode: The Case for IBC by R. Nelson Nash, L. Carlos Lara, Robert P. Murphy PhD:  https://www.amazon.com/Case-IBC-R-Nelson-Nash-dp-0999778617/dp/0999778617/ Building Your Warehouse of Wealth by R. Nelson Nash: https://www.amazon.com/Warehouse-Nash-infinite-Grassroots-Fractional-Banking-Think/dp/B009AEXZV8/ How Privatized Banking Really Works by L. Carlos Lara and Robert P. Murphy: https://www.amazon.com/How-Privatized-Banking-Really-Works/dp/061532682X  Financial Independence in the 21st Century by Dwayne Burnell and Suzanne Burnell: https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Independence-Century-Dwayne-Burnell/dp/B01FIW7PX4 Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! by Robert T. Kiyosaki: https://www.amazon.com/Rich-Dad-Poor-Teach-Middle/dp/1612680178/ Cash Flow for Kids Game: https://www.richdad.com/products/cashflow-for-kids  Second Chance: for Your Money, Your Life and Our World by Robert T. Kiyosaki: https://www.amazon.com/Second-Chance-Your-Money-World/dp/1612680461 The Richest Man In Babylon by George S Clason: https://www.amazon.com/Richest-Man-Babylon-Magic-Story/dp/1939438632/ - Connect with Jim Oliver:   Facebook: CreateTailwind & Jim Oliver Website: https://createtailwind.com/ YouTube: CreateTailwind LinkedIn: Jim Oliver Join the Community: https://community.createtailwind.com/ RSVP for the next community Q&A HERE: https://community.createtailwind.com/events

Hear This Idea
#54 – Edouard Mathieu on Our World in Data

Hear This Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022


A full writeup of this episode, including references and a transcript, is available on our website: hearthisidea.com/episodes/mathieu Edouard Mathieu is the Head of Data at Our World in Data (OWID), a scientific online publication that focuses on large global problems such as poverty, disease, hunger, climate change, war, existential risks, and inequality. We discuss: What Ed learned from working with governments and the WHO A simple change the WHO could make to radically improve how countries share data for the next pandemic The idea of 'experimental longtermism' How Ed is thinking about collecting data on transformative artificial intelligence and other potential existential risks Figuring out the impact of making everyone slightly better-informed Lessons for starting a career in impact-oriented data science And finally... Ed's favourite OWID chart If you have any feedback, you can get a free book for filling out our new feedback form. You can also get in touch through our website or on Twitter. Consider leaving us a review wherever you're listening to this — it's the best free way to support the show. Thanks for listening!

Synapsen. Ein Wissenschaftspodcast von NDR Info

Zu viel Stickstoffdünger, zu wenig Kohlenstoff, zu viel Erosion: Der Zustand der landwirtschaftlich genutzten Böden weltweit ist katastrophal. Vor sieben Jahren schlug die Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), die Ernährungs- und Landwirtschaftsorganisation der Vereinten Nationen, Alarm: Nicht mal zwei Generationen lang wären die Böden demnach noch nutzbar. Wissenschaftsjournalistin Nele Rößler ist der Frage nachgegangen, wie realistisch diese Zahl ist und hat Bodenkundlerinnen nach Lösungsmöglichkeiten gefragt. Im Gespräch mit Host Lucie Kluth berichtet sie von dem komplexen Ursachengeflecht, sie erzählt von ihrem Besuch auf einem Hof, der Böden nachhaltig bewirtschaftet - und erklärt, warum guter Boden nicht wie Schokolade aussehen darf. Die Hintergrundinformationen • Grafik "Do we only have 60 harvests left?" | Our World in Data, Januar 2021 https://ourworldindata.org/soil-lifespans#:~:text=Summary,erosion%20is%20an%20important%20problem • Arbeitnehmende in der Landwirtschaft | Situationsbericht 2021/22 Deutscher Bauernverband, Dezember 2021 https://www.bauernverband.de/fileadmin/berichte/2021/index.html#0 • Landwirtschaftlich genutzte Flächen in Deutschland | Strukturwandel in der Landwirtschaft, Statistisches Bundesamt, Januar 2021 https://www.destatis.de/DE/Presse/Pressemitteilungen/2021/01/PD21_028_412.html • Buch "Dreck: Warum unsere Zivilisationen den Boden unter den Füßen verlieren" von David R. Montgomery, oekom-Verlag, 2010 • Wie kam es zum Untergang der Maya? | Prof. Dr. Nikolai Grube, GEO Epoche Kollektion Nr. 9, Dezember 2017 https://www.geo.de/magazine/geo-epoche-kollektion/18001-rtkl-yucatan-wie-kam-es-zum-untergang-der-maya#:~:text=Die%20%20Analyse%20von%20Pollenresten%20%20aus,in%20%20Zentralamerika%20%20kaum%20%20geregnet%20%20hat • Bodenhorizonte | Die wichtigsten Bodenhorizonte, Bundesverband Boden e.V. https://www.bodenwelten.de/content/die-wichtigsten-bodenhorizonte • Nähr- und Schadstoffe im Grundwasser | Umweltbundesamt: Nähr- und Schadstoffe, 2020 https://www.umweltbundesamt.de/themen/wasser/gewaesser/grundwasser/nutzung-belastungen/naehr-schadstoffe#belastungen-des-grundwassers • Nitrat im Grundwasser: EU macht Druck | Lorenz Storch, Bayerischer Rundfunk, März 2022 https://www.br.de/nachrichten/bayern/nitrat-im-grundwasser-eu-macht-druck,T0qHvot • Zahlen und Fakten zu den Böden der Welt | Anne Gerdes, Christiane Grefe, Urs Willmann, ZEIT, Februar 2019 https://www.zeit.de/2019/06/erdboden-nutzflaeche-oekologie-zustand-welt • Bodentypen | Bauernhof.net: Enzyklopädie https://www.bauernhof.net/enzyklopaedie/bodentypen/ • Die Fruchtfolge in der Landwirtschaft | Bundesinformationszentrum Landwirtschaft https://www.landwirtschaft.de/landwirtschaft-verstehen/wie-arbeiten-foerster-und-pflanzenbauer/die-fruchtfolge-in-der-landwirtschaft • Phosphorknappheit | Widerstandsfähigkeit der EU bei kritischen Rohstoffen: Einen Pfad hin zu größerer Sicherheit und Nachhaltigkeit abstecken, Europäische Kommission, September 2020 https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/DE/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:52020DC0474 • Phosphor: Was tun, wenn ein Pflanzennährstoff knapp wird? | Bundesinformationszentrum Landwirtschaft https://www.landwirtschaft.de/diskussion-und-dialog/umwelt/phosphor-was-tun-wenn-ein-pflanzennaehrstoff-knapp-wird • Zusammenhang Bodenbearbeitung und Lachgas | Umweltbundesamt: Lachgas - Distickstoffoxid, https://www.umweltbundesamt.de/themen/boden-landwirtschaft/umweltbelastungen-der-landwirtschaft/lachgas-methan • Agroforstwirtschaft | Agrosilvopastorale Systeme, Deutscher Fachverband für Agroforstwirtschaft https://agroforst-info.de/arten/baeume-acker-und-weide/ • Entwicklung des Bodens | Umweltbundesamt, 2013 https://www.umweltbundesamt.de/themen/boden-landwirtschaft/kleine-bodenkunde/entwicklung-des-bodens • Bodenkunde: Lassen sich Böden reparieren? | Friedrich-Verlag, 2018 https://www.friedrich-verlag.de/geographie/bodenkunde/lassen-sich-boeden-reparieren-2142 • Terra Preta/Pyrolysekohle | BUND-Einschätzung ihrer Umweltrelevanz, BUND, 2015 https://www.bund.net/fileadmin/user_upload_bund/_migrated/publications/150504_bund_sonstiges_bodenschutz_terra_preta_einschaetzung.pdf • Chancen und Risiken des Einsatzes von Biokohle und anderer "veränderter" Biomasse als Bodenhilfsstoffe oder für die C-Sequestrierung in Böden | Umweltbundesamt, 2016 https://www.umweltbundesamt.de/sites/default/files/medien/378/publikationen/texte_04_2016_chancen_und_risiken_des_einsatzes_von_biokohle.pdf

NDR Info - Logo - Das Wissenschaftsmagazin
(63) Nur noch 60 Ernten?

NDR Info - Logo - Das Wissenschaftsmagazin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 66:23


Zu viel Stickstoffdünger, zu wenig Kohlenstoff, zu viel Erosion: Der Zustand der landwirtschaftlich genutzten Böden weltweit ist katastrophal. Vor sieben Jahren schlug die Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), die Ernährungs- und Landwirtschaftsorganisation der Vereinten Nationen, Alarm: Nicht mal zwei Generationen lang wären die Böden demnach noch nutzbar. Wissenschaftsjournalistin Nele Rößler ist der Frage nachgegangen, wie realistisch diese Zahl ist und hat Bodenkundlerinnen nach Lösungsmöglichkeiten gefragt. Im Gespräch mit Host Lucie Kluth berichtet sie von dem komplexen Ursachengeflecht, sie erzählt von ihrem Besuch auf einem Hof, der Böden nachhaltig bewirtschaftet - und erklärt, warum guter Boden nicht wie Schokolade aussehen darf. Die Hintergrundinformationen • Grafik "Do we only have 60 harvests left?" | Our World in Data, Januar 2021 https://ourworldindata.org/soil-lifespans#:~:text=Summary,erosion%20is%20an%20important%20problem • Arbeitnehmende in der Landwirtschaft | Situationsbericht 2021/22 Deutscher Bauernverband, Dezember 2021 https://www.bauernverband.de/fileadmin/berichte/2021/index.html#0 • Landwirtschaftlich genutzte Flächen in Deutschland | Strukturwandel in der Landwirtschaft, Statistisches Bundesamt, Januar 2021 https://www.destatis.de/DE/Presse/Pressemitteilungen/2021/01/PD21_028_412.html • Buch "Dreck: Warum unsere Zivilisationen den Boden unter den Füßen verlieren" von David R. Montgomery, oekom-Verlag, 2010 • Wie kam es zum Untergang der Maya? | Prof. Dr. Nikolai Grube, GEO Epoche Kollektion Nr. 9, Dezember 2017 https://www.geo.de/magazine/geo-epoche-kollektion/18001-rtkl-yucatan-wie-kam-es-zum-untergang-der-maya#:~:text=Die%20%20Analyse%20von%20Pollenresten%20%20aus,in%20%20Zentralamerika%20%20kaum%20%20geregnet%20%20hat • Bodenhorizonte | Die wichtigsten Bodenhorizonte, Bundesverband Boden e.V. https://www.bodenwelten.de/content/die-wichtigsten-bodenhorizonte • Nähr- und Schadstoffe im Grundwasser | Umweltbundesamt: Nähr- und Schadstoffe, 2020 https://www.umweltbundesamt.de/themen/wasser/gewaesser/grundwasser/nutzung-belastungen/naehr-schadstoffe#belastungen-des-grundwassers • Nitrat im Grundwasser: EU macht Druck | Lorenz Storch, Bayerischer Rundfunk, März 2022 https://www.br.de/nachrichten/bayern/nitrat-im-grundwasser-eu-macht-druck,T0qHvot • Zahlen und Fakten zu den Böden der Welt | Anne Gerdes, Christiane Grefe, Urs Willmann, ZEIT, Februar 2019 https://www.zeit.de/2019/06/erdboden-nutzflaeche-oekologie-zustand-welt • Bodentypen | Bauernhof.net: Enzyklopädie https://www.bauernhof.net/enzyklopaedie/bodentypen/ • Die Fruchtfolge in der Landwirtschaft | Bundesinformationszentrum Landwirtschaft https://www.landwirtschaft.de/landwirtschaft-verstehen/wie-arbeiten-foerster-und-pflanzenbauer/die-fruchtfolge-in-der-landwirtschaft • Phosphorknappheit | Widerstandsfähigkeit der EU bei kritischen Rohstoffen: Einen Pfad hin zu größerer Sicherheit und Nachhaltigkeit abstecken, Europäische Kommission, September 2020 https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/DE/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:52020DC0474 • Phosphor: Was tun, wenn ein Pflanzennährstoff knapp wird? | Bundesinformationszentrum Landwirtschaft https://www.landwirtschaft.de/diskussion-und-dialog/umwelt/phosphor-was-tun-wenn-ein-pflanzennaehrstoff-knapp-wird • Zusammenhang Bodenbearbeitung und Lachgas | Umweltbundesamt: Lachgas - Distickstoffoxid, https://www.umweltbundesamt.de/themen/boden-landwirtschaft/umweltbelastungen-der-landwirtschaft/lachgas-methan • Agroforstwirtschaft | Agrosilvopastorale Systeme, Deutscher Fachverband für Agroforstwirtschaft https://agroforst-info.de/arten/baeume-acker-und-weide/ • Entwicklung des Bodens | Umweltbundesamt, 2013 https://www.umweltbundesamt.de/themen/boden-landwirtschaft/kleine-bodenkunde/entwicklung-des-bodens • Bodenkunde: Lassen sich Böden reparieren? | Friedrich-Verlag, 2018 https://www.friedrich-verlag.de/geographie/bodenkunde/lassen-sich-boeden-reparieren-2142 • Terra Preta/Pyrolysekohle | BUND-Einschätzung ihrer Umweltrelevanz, BUND, 2015 https://www.bund.net/fileadmin/user_upload_bund/_migrated/publications/150504_bund_sonstiges_bodenschutz_terra_preta_einschaetzung.pdf • Chancen und Risiken des Einsatzes von Biokohle und anderer "veränderter" Biomasse als Bodenhilfsstoffe oder für die C-Sequestrierung in Böden | Umweltbundesamt, 2016 https://www.umweltbundesamt.de/sites/default/files/medien/378/publikationen/texte_04_2016_chancen_und_risiken_des_einsatzes_von_biokohle.pdf

The HEAL Podcast
Danielle Laporte: The Genius of the Heart and the Power of Loving

The HEAL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 55:14 Very Popular


In this bonus episode, I sit down with one of my teachers, Danielle LaPorte. She is a member of Oprah's Super Soul 100 and is the creator of The Desire Map which had a profound effect on my life. Forbes named her website one of the top 100 websites for women as over 5 million people visit it a month and her podcast With Love, Danielle ranks in the iTunes TOP 10 for Wellness. Our mutual friend Marianne Williamson has referred to her as a bright light in the modern priestesshood and I would absolutely agree.  Danielle's most recent book How To Be Loving: As Your Heart is Breaking Open and Our World is Waking Up is exactly what the world needs right now, as the heat is rising (figuratively and literally) and so much shadow is coming to the surface to be healed. We break open the heart and take a look at the power of self compassion, shadow work, and divine guidance. We learn how to tap into the genius of the heart in order to understand our infinite nature and become the change we wish to see in the world.

The Ad Fontes Podcast
An Institute You Can't Disparage

The Ad Fontes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 65:43


This week, Alastair Roberts joins the crew to discuss his and Onsi's chapter on sex, marriage, and divorce in "Protestant Social Teaching: An Introduction", the Davenant Press's upcoming publication (due 10/13/22). The guys talk about how Augustine set the scene for Reformation debates on these topics, what Luther thought about marriage, Protestant views on divorce, and how Rome and the Protestants have influenced once another on this topic.NOTE: most books below are linked via Bookshop.org. Any purchases you make via these links give The Davenant Institute a 10% commission, and support local bookshops against chainstores/Amazon.Currently ReadingOnsi: Heirs of the Apostles: Studies on Arabic Christianity in Honor of Sidney H. Griffith Colin: TheOresteia by Sophocles  Rhys: Harmony: A New Way of Looking at Our World by H.R.H. The Prince of Wales Alastair: Nationalism: A Short History by Liah Greenfeld Texts Discussed"On Marriage and Concupiscence" by Augustine"The Estate of Marriage" by Martin Luther"Commentary on Genesis 38" by John Calvin"Gentle Discipline: Spenser's Faerie Queene and Christian Elites" by Joshua PatchSpotlightProtestant Social Teaching (publication 10/13/22)The Anchored Argosy - Substack by Alastair Roberts and Susannah Black

Tuesdays with Merton Podcast
2022-10-11 - Julianne Wallace - Of Messengers of Peace: A Liturgy for Our World in the Voices of Merton and Francis

Tuesdays with Merton Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 61:14


JULIANNE E. WALLACE Of Messengers of Peace: A Liturgy for Our World in the Voices of Merton and Francis Please join us for a special Tuesdays with Merton as we gather to celebrate a liturgy for peace. This service, integrating music, readings, poetry, and reflections from the wisdom of Thomas Merton and St. Francis of Assisi, will provide a moment of reflection during times where peace often seems just out of reach. We invite you to be renewed and nourished in the wisdom of Merton and Francis. Dr. Julianne E. Wallace is Vice President for Mission at Saint Mary's College in Notre Dame, Indiana. She holds a Doctor of Ministry in Educational Leadership from Virginia Theological Seminary, a Master of Theological Studies in Word and Worship from Washington Theological Union, and a bachelor's in Music Performance from the University of Mary Washington. She has been active in Franciscan higher education for almost twelve years, most recently as Vice President for Mission and Ministry at Alvernia University. She served as Associate Director of Faith Formation, Worship, and Ministry at St. Bonaventure University in New York. She has been an active ITMS member since 2015, site-coordinator for the 2017 Annual Meeting and coordinating the liturgical life at many other ITMS conferences.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Max Fisher: Social Media and the Havoc on Our Minds

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 70:20


Do we really understand the reach and impact that social media has on our lives? We all have a vague sense that social media can be bad for our minds, for our children, and for our democracies. Yet that doesn't stop us from constantly using it. New York Times investigative reporter Max Fisher looks at how Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other social networks drive everyday users to extreme opinions and, increasingly, extreme actions. Fisher tracks the evolution of free speech to hate speech and its spillover into violence—that first festered in far-off locales to their dark culmination in America during the pandemic, the 2020 election, and the Capitol insurrection. He also addresses the cultural shift in which people are polarized not by beliefs based on facts, but by misinformation, outrage and fear. Hear more about the influence that social media has and how it isn't just changing our lives, but the world. SPEAKERS Max Fisher International Reporter and Columnist, The New York Times; Author, The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World; Twitter @Max_Fisher In conversation with DJ Patil Former U.S. Chief Data Scientist; Member, The Commonwealth Club of California Board of Governors; Twitter @dpatil In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on September 22nd, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Adventures In Coffee
The Oat Debate: Scott's Milk Quest

Adventures In Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 38:26


Have you ever noticed that there always seems to be a new plant-based milk? For about 20 years, Scott's wife Rachel has always been able to enjoy soy milk with her coffee while other plant-based milks have fallen in and out of favor.However, lately, soy milk seems to be disappearing and is being replaced by the “new kid in town”: oat. And, when Rachel asks questions in coffee shops about the move away from soy, she frequently gets told that she should not be drinking soy milk because its bad for the environment. But, is that actually true? If coffee shops do not carry soy to be more sustainable, then why are they still carrying dairy? To dive deeper into this, Scott attended the Caffè Culture Expo to get a better understanding about how cafe owners are choosing their milks and how they feel about sustainability. Then, Scott and Jools deep dive into current research through a website called Our World in Data and talk to environmental sustainability scientist and consultant Dr. Isaac Emery to get an expert opinion.Is soy milk actually bad for the environment? Which milk is the most environmentally sustainable? Is this all just a successful oat milk marketing scheme? Find out on The Oat Debate: Scott's Milk Quest. —Join our Patreon to support the show! https://bit.ly/3vrispx Enjoy the legendary experience of a Moccamaster Coffee Brewers: https://bit.ly/3ANRBqQBecome your own barista with Rocket Espresso: https://bit.ly/3RiBXehWant to check out the next Caffè Culture? Check out their website: https://bit.ly/3dXHzMoWant to learn more about our wonderful guest Dr. Isaac Emery? Here is how! Follow him on LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/3E71xPzFollow him on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3SxF3vhLearn more about global engineering and consulting firm WSP: https://bit.ly/3Rqy6e9Listen to what you missed on Series 1 Ep 2: Am I damaging the planet with my coffee habit?: https://apple.co/3RxB0hnWant to learn more about the environmental impacts of dairy vs. plant-based milk? Check out the information that we referenced on Our World in Data: https://bit.ly/3SxTn7gTake a screenshot and tell your friends about Adventures in Coffee!Tag our Instagram handles:James Harper / Filter Stories: https://bit.ly/2Mlkk0OJools Walker / Lady Velo: http://bit.ly/39VRGewScott Bentley / Caffeine Magazine: https://bit.ly/3oijQ91

Over It And On With It
CC: How To Be Loving with Danielle LaPorte

Over It And On With It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 53:58 Very Popular


Author, speaker, teacher and force of love Danielle LaPorte joins Christine to dive deep into inner child work, forgiveness, radiance, choosing higher quality thoughts and so much more. Make sure to get her new book  How To Be Loving: As Your Heart is Breaking Open and Our World is Waking Up which is a nuanced perspective on the life-changing power of Self Compassion, shadow work and being more receptive to Higher Guidance. This is a guide on how to use the genius of your heart to create conditions for healing.   Learn more at https://daniellelaporte.com/

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會
220927 三劑疫苗的高牆 日本遲早會調整現行入境疫苗和上機前PCR陰性證明要求

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 29:22


日經新聞21日出了一篇,討論剩下三劑疫苗的高牆。 我認為日本接下來很可能也會調整現行入境疫苗要求。 水際対策緩和で国際線需要急増も 残る「3回接種」の壁 (邊境管制放寬,國際航班需求激增,“三劑接種”之牆依然存在) 以下是新聞內容 1.取消入境人數限制並恢復落地簽證,日本被稱為“鎖國"的嚴格邊境措施即將結束。不過,即使一系列緩解措施生效,2010年代的觀光入境榮景是否會重返日本仍是未知數。 2.其原因是陰性證明書。目前僅限有接種過三劑日本認證疫苗者在入境時不要求出示陰性證明。其他人則需要上機72小時內的PCR陰性證明。 3.根據首相官邸的數據,截至9月11日,日本約有65%的人口接種了三劑疫苗。三分之二的人返回日本時不需要陰性證明。 4.但是,全世界來看,接種了三劑疫苗的人是少數。根據「Our World in Data」,截至9月10日,全球每100人的第三劑注射僅為31次左右(不分疫苗種類)。 5.此表是照疫情前訪日的人數排行,看每100人打滿三劑的比例。美國僅有39.5,菲律賓僅有15.57。中國在訪日遊客人數中佔據壓倒性優勢,佔總數的30%。但是,日本政府不承認科興和國藥疫苗,中國以外的許多國家和地區都採用了中國製造的疫苗。從全球範圍來看,符合日本政府規定的標準,無需陰性證明即可入境的人數可以說是相當少。 6.觀察他國,美國要求除公民、永久居民、移民簽證持有者以外的所有人在入境時都必須注射過兩劑認證的疫苗,不需要陰性證明書。雖然入境韓國後需要進行PCR檢測,但從9月3日起,無論是否接種疫苗,都不再需要入境前檢測的陰性證明書。許多國家不要求出示疫苗接種證書,或者即使他們這樣做,他們是認定兩劑就足夠了。 7.從向公眾推薦加強疫苗接種的角度來看,我可以理解政府若沒注射三劑就需要陰性證明書的想法。另一方面,政府似乎正在放寬一系列邊境措施,以期在日元貶值的背景下,增加遊客振興經濟。是否要繼續要求海外旅客接種三劑疫苗?日本仍然面臨平衡感染控制和經濟活​​動的挑戰。 04b解讀: 1.我想接下來日本三次接種的牆壁當然是有可能打開的。畢竟很多國家也拿掉了對吧。岸田多次發言說邊境管制要比照G7七大工業國,所以會繼續放寬是很正常的。只是不確定何時會打開此限制。會不會在本次10月11日同步開放?讓我們拭目以待。 2.現有疫苗重點早就不是在防感染了。科學上我個人會覺得,規定打過三劑疫苗才能免除PCR規定,對於防感染沒有大意義。應該主要是怕外國人來,沒打過疫苗者,如果受到感染變重症,會增加日本的醫療負擔。所以這是有他的合理性的,像美國就是要求WHO認證的疫苗施打過任兩劑才能入境。但可能不需要到三劑啦,對多數健康者來說,兩劑其實就有一定防重症效果。 3.我七月去日本時是所有人都被要求要附上72小時內PCR陰性證明,那個心理壓力真的很大。這不僅是自費3500的問題,PCR過於敏感,去測了陽性可能只是幾個月內感染過的陰陽人,但陽性就確診要被通報隔離,你所有的旅館機票可能都要重新處理,同行的人是否照樣出發?難得的假期變成在家隔離。這都是問題。 4.高端取得國際認證的路看來不是很順遂。詢問連醫師,WHO的團結試驗雖早已收案完成,但也只能被動的等,不知道為何拖了這麼久還沒公布結果。目前比較有進展的是和澳洲從六月開始申請的緊急使用授權。我想最後是會等到日本先修正了現行入境疫苗要求吧,就和全世界目前也沒幾個國家在看疫苗接種證明了一樣。但還是希望連醫師多多加油呀,期待早日傳出好消息。(這部分獨立一集明天討論) 水際対策緩和で国際線需要急増も 残る「3回接種」の壁 https://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXZQOUC163BR0W2A910C2000000/ 何時可開放日本免簽證自由行? 台日兩邊的邊境開放可能進度整理 https://linshibi.com/?p=40268 歡迎追蹤前台大感染科醫師。04b的發聲管道! 我的電子名片 https://lit.link/linshibi 希望大家當我的種子教師,推廣正確的新冠衛教。科學防疫,不要只以恐懼防疫! 歡迎贊助林氏璧孔醫師喝咖啡,讓我可以在這個紛亂的時代,繼續分享知識努力做正確新冠相關衛教。 https://pay.firstory.me/user/linshibi Powered by Firstory Hosting

World vs Virus
Inflation: how can we tame it?

World vs Virus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 28:08


Inflation is a major concern around the world - for economic policymakers, for companies and for all of us who are seeing prices rise faster than our incomes.We've covered the issue on several previous episodes of Radio Davos - see links below. On this episode we hear from two experts who appeared on a video show hosted by Abhinav Chugh who works in the World Economic Forum's Strategic Intelligence platform, which joins the dots between the multitude of causes and effects that impact our world.The audio you are about to hear is from the video series called Our World in Transformation that Strategic Intelligence puts out to the World Economic Forum's digital  members every two weeks, and, as you'll hear, some of the questions he puts to the guests are from those members. You can sign up at the website www.weforum.org/join-us/home   On this episode, Abhinav speaks to Sandra Phlippen, Chief Economist at ABN AMRO bank, and Erik Peterson, partner and managing director at the consultancy Kearney. He starts with a look at the 2 percent inflation target that many central banks try to achieve --  with inflation in the US and Europe around 8 or 9% at present, he asks Sandra Phlippen if she thinks inflation can be wrestled down to that 2% level by next year.   Previous episodes on related topics: What is inflation, and should we worry? An economist explains (with UBS Chief Economist Paul Donovan) https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/02/what-is-inflation-radio-davos Ukraine, inflation and pandemics: the big issues in a changed world, according to historian Adam Tooze https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/04/top-global-issues-davos-2022-economist-adam-tooze What's next for the global economy? Experts talk inflation, stagnation and (de-)globalisation at Davos 2022 https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/06/davos-2022-global-economic-outlook Check out all our podcasts on wef.ch/podcasts: Meet the Leader  WEF Book Club Podcast Agenda DialoguesJoin the World Economic Forum Podcast Club Episode transcript: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/09/inflation-central-banks-abnamro-kearny-radio-davos

World Economic Forum
Inflation: how can we tame it?

World Economic Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 28:07


Inflation is a major concern around the world - for economic policymakers, for companies and for all of us who are seeing prices rise faster than our incomes.We've covered the issue on several previous episodes of Radio Davos - see links below. On this episode we hear from two experts who appeared on a video show hosted by Abhinav Chugh who works in the World Economic Forum's Strategic Intelligence platform, which joins the dots between the multitude of causes and effects that impact our world.The audio you are about to hear is from the video series called Our World in Transformation that puts out to the World Economic Forum's digital  members every two weeks, and, as you'll hear, some of the questions he puts to the guests are from those members. You can sign up at the website    On this episode, Abhinav speaks to Sandra Phlippen, Chief Economist at ABN AMRO bank, and Erik Peterson, partner and managing director at the consultancy Kearney. He starts with a look at the 2 percent inflation target that many central banks try to achieve --  with inflation in the US and Europe around 8 or 9% at present, he asks Sandra Phlippen if she thinks inflation can be wrestled down to that 2% level by next year.   Previous episodes on related topics: What is inflation, and should we worry? An economist explains (with UBS Chief Economist Paul Donovan) Ukraine, inflation and pandemics: the big issues in a changed world, according to historian Adam Tooze What's next for the global economy? Experts talk inflation, stagnation and (de-)globalisation at Davos 2022 Check out all our podcasts on :    Join the  Episode transcript:

FiveThirtyEight Politics
Is Social Media Turning Us Into Political Extremists?

FiveThirtyEight Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 59:16 Very Popular


Max Fisher, author of the new book, "The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World," speaks with Galen about the impacts of social media on politics globally and in the U.S. Tickets to the FiveThirtyEight Politics podcast live show in Washington, DC on October 25th can be found here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jews Talk Racial Justice with April and Tracie
Ep 107: Forgiveness without Apology?

Jews Talk Racial Justice with April and Tracie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 46:38 Transcription Available


“You are not obligated to forgive someone who has offered neither apology nor repair.” This opinion is one both April and Tracie have received at different points in their lives, and which is surfacing now as we approach the high holy days. And though we both needed to hear that message when it was delivered, we're also realizing that it is not the end of the story. The longing for healing and wholeness after hurt has us looking for a third way–a path toward teshuvah, or return, and wholeness, shalem/sh'lemut–even in the absence of apology. Share your insights or ask us a question at https://joyousjustice.com/jews-talk-racial-justice-questions.Join our mailing list at https://joyousjustice.com.  Check out our offerings and join one of our programs! https://joyousjustice.com/coursesFind April's TikTok videos here: https://www.tiktok.com/@aprilavivabaskin Follow us on Instagram (@joyous.justice), Twitter, (@JoyousJustice), or Facebook (www.facebook.com/joyousjustice365)Find April and Tracie's full bios and submit topic suggestions for the show at www.JewsTalkRacialJustice.comLearn more about Joyous Justice and join our mailing list: https://joyousjustice.com/Support the work our Jewish Black & Cherokee woman-led vision for collective liberation here: https://joyousjustice.com/support-our-workLearn more about Desmond Tutu and Mpho Tutu's work, The Book of Forgiving: The Fourfold Path for Healing Ourselves and Our World: https://www.harpercollins.com/products/the-book-of-forgiving-desmond-tutumpho-tutu?variant=32122225983522Read about the Japanese art of kintsugi, “golden joinery”: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KintsugiTara Brach relays the story of the Golden Buddha in her work Radical Compassion: Learning to Love Yourself and Your World with the Practice of RAIN: https://www.tarabrach.com/books/radical-compassion/April and Tracie talked about the Golden Buddha in our first-ever Rosh Hashanah episode, Ep 2: Rosh Hashanah, Prince, and Visions, Both Big and Small: https://jewstalkracialjustice.buzzsprout.com/1146023/5430970-ep-2-rosh-hashanah-prince-and-visions-both-big-small

The Numlock Podcast
Numlock Sunday: Max Fisher on The Chaos Machine

The Numlock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 32:24


By Walt HickeyWelcome to the Numlock Sunday edition. This week in another special podcast edition of the newsletter, I spoke to Max Fisher, author of the new book The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World.It's a fascinating book that looks at the science — the neurology, the social science, the psychology — of what social media usage does to us. It's riveting and provocative and will definitely change the way you view social media apps. The book can be found wherever books are sold, online and IRL and at independent bookstores. Max is on Twitter at @max_fisherThis interview has been condensed and edited. You are the author of a new book called The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World. I thought this was a really interesting topic for you, because normally you're a national security reporter. You cover a lot of different international events. I was really struck by why you were drawn to social media, but the more that I learned about it, the more it made sense. Do you want to talk about how you fell into this?Like you said, my background for years has been international reporting, so reporting on global politics and conflicts and wars. I did not think of social media as a story that was for me, or something that I frankly paid a lot of attention to. I thought these are just websites, it's just apps on your phone. How significant can it really be other than as a tech or business story? And that started to change for me, the way that I think it did for a lot of us, after the 2016 election, where there was kind of this sense that social media had something to do with Trump's election, but nobody was really quite sure what it was. It was with the platforms, they're very polarizing and there's a lot of misinformation on them. There are all of these weird, crazy groups and online subcultures on them that all seem to be converging on Trumpism.I, like most people, still thought, well, these platforms are just reflections of what's already happening in the world, or at most their experience, like any website that you would read or any publication you would read, and maybe there's just a little extra amount of misinformation or garbage in them than other places.That really started to more significantly change for me about a year after Trump's election when I went to Myanmar to report on the genocide there, which of course was this horrible and very sudden explosion of just complete societal violence between the majority Buddhist group and the Muslim minority.When I was there, I had the same experience that everyone who was reporting on the genocide there at the time had, which is that social media seemed to be just everywhere in the story. I don't just mean everywhere in that everyone you would talk to would be citing things back to social media, things they'd seen there, groups they organized there, social media being involved, although that was also a big part of it. But also in the sense that it was just very clear, although in this way that was really hard to define, that social media was playing a much more active role in what was happening.A lot of the hate speech and a lot of the incitement and this general sense of a societal movement to destroy an entire minority population was something that had emerged on the platforms, and in the way that people were using the platforms. They were experiencing on Facebook, especially, but also WhatsApp and Twitter, that it was pulling something out in them that had not been there just a few years before when social media had been completely absent from the country. Due to sanctions before like 2016, you couldn't get a cell phone, you couldn't get social media. And then all of a sudden social media was everywhere and then society took this huge shift.Shortly after I was there, even the United Nations had concluded that social media had played such an enormous role, that one of their officials said that Facebook had played a "determining role in causing the genocide," which was a crazy thing to hear, that just this website would be driving something so enormous and so wide-scale and something that felt like it was coming from up out of the ground, but maybe it was also coming from these platforms.It seems, just again, so much of what we've been talking about in just a general sense is social media as a business story. But I love how this happened accidentally, almost, because you just realized, no, they're just actually a social accelerant in different countries.Yeah, right. It's actually playing an active and really significant role in the way politics works and the way the society works. That was kind of the fuzzy sense that I, like a lot of people, were getting. Then I started to notice, because of my job, I would travel around to lots of different countries for different stories or just to report or get a feel for things. Everywhere I went, I would hear over and over again these stories that would link back to social media, that would be like a microcosm of the Trump phenomenon or the Myanmar phenomenon or usually kind of both.It would be smaller scale because obviously things of that scale only happen a few times in a century, but it would be a village that would suddenly combust into this crazy violence over rumors that had spread on social media. Or it would be a town that would get overtaken by this mass hysteria that would link back to YouTube. Or it would be this far-right figure or this far-right group who had always been on the fringes of society and then social media came in and all of a sudden that far-right group or figure was the most popular thing and completely running the culture and then would get elected to some local office.It started happening over and over again. That was when I thought, okay, there's enough of a pattern here that it's worth trying to understand, why does this keep happening? What is it about social media that seems to be at least potentially having this extreme of an effect on the way that societies and politics work? Why is it the same pattern over and over again?And that started for me in early 2018, and it became a series of stories for the paper. Then it became the book of trying to answer this question of, what is social media? How is it changing us? How does it change our behavior? How does it change the way that our minds work? How does it change our politics?I tried to pull in for that a lot of traditional on-the-ground reporting of finding a story of a place or people that had been affected by this and then retracing step by step how it had happened, what it had to do with social media.But also, and this is the part of the book that I'm really proud of because I feel like it's the first time it's been done on this scale, is to try to pull in every relevant field of scientific inquiry that was looking into this, because I wasn't the only one who was having this realization. There was also this whole constellation of neuroscientists and social psychologists and social scientists who were all having the same sense and were trying to empirically answer these same questions, pulling together a lot of their research. There's some original research of theirs that appears in the book. But to try to get a sense for how is this happening? Why is it happening? And what does it mean for us as a species?I've been reading your work a long time; one thing that I've always admired about it was you do really go to the mattresses when it comes to figuring out the research and actually what's being done in the academic world as well as the scientific world, as well as all that. And so I have been looking forward to that component of this. You want to talk a little bit about what the science is beginning to reveal about how social media gets its hooks in us?Oh, man. It's a big question.A book-length question, one might say.Right. Let me give you a couple of examples to give you a sense for how people are starting to understand it. These are just teeny tiny tips of the iceberg of understanding, because to understand something as huge as the effect of social media on society, there are like 18 different steps in the chain of you interacting with a post and then that happening on a scale of billions of people and then society changes. There are so many things that happen in that system that you can't understand all of them, but I couldn't possibly relay all of them in one anecdote, so I'll give you two.The first is, there was one study where these social scientists wanted to understand, okay, does social media actually change us? Is it just, we happen to be on the internet and other things are changing? Can we actually narrow this down?They took these two really big groups of people, an experimental group and a control group, and they had the experimental group deactivate Facebook for four weeks. So just four weeks, which relative to the amount of time that we all spend on these platforms — 10 to 15 years into the social media era — is very small. And just one platform, not even all of social media. You would expect the effects to be very small. Then over those four weeks, they monitored any possible thing they could think to measure. What's changing with these people? How are they changing the way that they think about the world, the way that they interact with the world? They found two really significant changes in the people who deactivated Facebook for those four weeks. The first was that they became just much happier. They had an increase in happiness and life satisfaction equivalent to about a third the effect of going to therapy, which blew my mind.Holy crap.I know. Because therapy has a huge effect on your happiness and it's also really expensive, but turning off Facebook is free. That was one of a lot of pieces of research that support this theory, that is now very widely accepted, which is that social media is addictive, physically addictive, and that it creates a chemical reaction in your brain that makes you feel compelled to go back to it. That is a piece of evidence that we don't use it because we like to use it or because it makes us happy, but rather we use it because we've been addicted, even if we hide that from ourselves and we tell ourselves that we just want to pull up Facebook or Twitter.The second thing that they found was that those people who had deactivated Facebook, their level of political and social polarization changed pretty dramatically. It was political and social issue polarization, which means the degree to which they were polarized on issues that were salient in society rather than overall how they kind of viewed the world. They found that that reduction in their polarization was equivalent to 50 percent of the overall increase in polarization in American life over the past 25 years, which is the entire cycle of the polarization of American politics. The researchers, if they were here, they would be grabbing at my shirt to emphasize that that doesn't mean social media drove 50 percent of overall polarization in American life. But it does mean that its role in the way that we as individuals experience that polarization is extremely dramatic.Of course, this is just a few thousand people for this study, but if you ask yourself, okay, what about if that's all of society, then the effect starts to become pretty dramatic. That's when it starts to change politics, overall. If everyone is 50 percent more polarized than they would be if they turned off just this one platform, God knows how much less polarized they would be if they turned off all the platforms and for a longer period of time. That was one piece of evidence that didn't measure how social media changes you, but was just really one of many very strong pieces of evidence that it does change you in these ways that we kind of have a fuzzy sense that they do, but okay, it really shows you that it does.Another study is one in the book that I cite the most, not because I think it's the most consequential, but because it hit really close to home for me personally. Everybody I know who's like you or me who's very engaged in media or in politics who spends a lot of time online, it's like, whoa, okay, that's a little scary, that did show how it changes you. For this study, a group of researchers took a group of people for this experiment, and before the experiment, they tested them all on their level of internal outrage. So how prone were they to outrage as people, and they gauge this.Then they had the experimental group of the people in this study send a fake tweet on this fake Twitter platform that was built to look like Twitter so that they could control the experience, that expressed outrage in it. Even if these are people who didn't really want to send an outrage tweet, they would say, “You have to send it.” For the group of these people who sent the outrage-filled tweet, they would show it back to them later and they would show it with a lot of engagements on it, a lot of retweets and likes.This is something that we know the platforms do, because there are these other experiments that show that if you have outrage words in your post its reach will be dramatically amplified. Sometimes you think, oh, outrage travels well because people respond to it. That's actually not why it travels well. The reason it travels well is because the platforms will deliberately pull it out and then shove it in front of a lot of people to engage them because it's this very charged emotion that gets a lot of participation.They've got a thumb on the scale.They've got their thumb way on the scale.So if you send an outrage tweet, it will get engagement almost certainly because the platform has ensured that it will, because it's a great way to keep you on the platform and keep your friends on the platform. What they did in this experiment is they would show people that their outrage tweet had done well, and they found that it made those people more inclined to send more outrage tweets in the future. If they went through this cycle a few times with people, had them send a few outrage tweets, the really stunning thing that they would find is that these subjects in the experiment, even if they had not been prone to outrage beforehand, even if they were not outrage-inclined people, that they would become that way. That they would become not just more inclined to send tweets with outrage in it, but even when they were away from the computer, even when they were away from social media, their internal nature had become much more outrage-prone.This training that they had received on the platform because they'd gotten this positive social reward, this is something that hits on this very deep school of social science and social psychology that says that our sense of morality, of right and wrong, is something that we derive heavily from social cues. If we think our community of people around us really want us to behave a certain way and will reward us if we do, we become internally more prone to chase and to seek out that behavior, not just because superficially we want the positive attention, but because our minds have tricked us into wanting to do that in order to get in good with our community because of the nature of the way that we evolved and just how we are as a species.That was something that really blew my mind, because it shows you that the platforms are deliberately inculcating a type of activity that doesn't just change how you behave with your own social media, but that changes your internal nature. It changes the way that your emotions are. It changes the way that you behave.And when you start to see these — because there are dozens of examples like this in the book, of these kinds of changes that it imbues in you — when you see all of these, and then you see that it's the overwhelming majority of Americans engaging with these systems dozens of times a day, American life today starts to make a little bit more sense. You start to see this kind of training effect and this change that really does feel like it's been society-wide, is something that is driven, I think, a lot more than we thought, or maybe wanted to admit to ourselves, by these incredibly powerful companies and their technology.It's so interesting that you call it a training effect, because as you were describing that experiment, I was like, yeah, I've seen that experiment before! If the monkey presses the button and then they receive apple juice, then all of a sudden they're going to really love pressing the button. It's weird that it's that simple, man.I know. I think this is one of the wild things about social media, is that it is that monkey with a lever button. But these companies figured out, not necessarily because they were so insightful about social psychology, although if you go back about 10 or 15 years, there would be very open discussions in Silicon Valley within the industry about exploiting our cognitive weak points, about training us, about changing our nature in order to —They hired people out of Vegas to do some of the engagement, is my understanding, too.They modeled the platforms specifically and deliberately on slot machines, because slot machines are physically addictive. If you look at your phone, it looks like a slot machine. You've got the colors, you've got the flashing lights. You get that haptic feedback when your phone vibrates.But even more than that, what they were trying to hook into was not just the kind of physically pleasing sense of pulling a slot machine, which is addictive and does make you want to go back to it. But they wanted to, and very successfully did, tap into social needs and social impulses, which is not something that we're used to having manipulated on a physical, chemical, personal level like that. I mean, we might be aware that it's happening with our politics, like, oh, politicians are appealing to our baser nature.But the platforms have learned how to do it in this, like you said, this kind of monkey-in-an-experiment way, that is both extraordinarily powerful because it bypasses all of the normal social checks and the social norms that we use to mediate our own behavior, mediate one another's behavior, by delivering it through these kind of electric bolts to the brain of these reward systems and punishment systems, but also because its influence is hidden.I think one of the most important things to understand about social media is that you log on and you think that you're having interactions with all your friends and all the people in your community, and that's where the feedback is coming from. That if you say something that they like and you get a lot of engagement, that means that your friends like it. And if you say something that gets no engagement, that means your friends didn't like it.But that's actually not what you're experiencing. What you're experiencing are the preferences and choices and desires of these very powerful algorithms and many other systems that are built into the technology, that are deliberately designed to encourage and train certain behaviors in you because those are going to be good for boosting your engagement and for boosting the engagement of people you interact with.It's interesting you mentioned politicians appealing to our baser natures, which has always been the case. For a long time I was wondering, what's the deal with social media? Is it additive or is it subtractive? Is it chipping away at the social mores that prevent us from being a******s to each other all the time, and is it subtractive? Or is it giving people new, fascinating ways to be cruel to one another and new ideas about how to do it, like additive?Over the past couple years, I've come more in line to the latter idea, and over the course of this conversation, I've really come around to that. Putting it to you, what do you think more of it is: Is it social media giving folks new ways to engage and new ways to kind of self-polarize? Or is it just revealing an inherent polarization underneath the hood, just kind of removing some of the guardrails?I mean, it's all of the above, I think. And when you're talking about something as complex, in the sense that there are many different inputs and outputs, as social polarization in American politics, there are going to be 30 different causes of that, and of course, none of them are going to be the sole cause and driver. The fact that there are 30 all at the same time means they're all kind of multiplying each other. You sometimes hear from the social media companies, they'll be like, "Well, how can you blame us for social polarization when there's a long history of racism in America and racism is playing a role in social polarization?" And it's like, sure, but if your product is worsening that by 10 percent, by 30 percent, by 70 percent, whatever the number is, then that's pretty significant even if there has to be something in there to multiply in the first place.I heard this quote from this one politician in a country that I went to called Sri Lanka to report on the way that social media had basically blown up the entire country over the course of a couple of months, where he said, "The germs are ours, but Facebook is the wind."What he meant by that was that there had been racial animus in this country, there had been distrust, there had been weaknesses in the social system before social media got there, but it was the social media systems that amped in and multiplied this, not just in the passive sense that social media multiplies everything, which is another defense that you hear from the companies, but in the sense that these systems have learned, even if the people designing them didn't deliberately design this in, they have learned to hone in very specifically on very specific impulses — moral outrage, us-versus-them tribalism, more extreme forms of identity, narrower forms of identity, distrust of institutions — to really hone in on these things and to dial those just way the hell up. And to not do that for other forms of sentiment, not with other forms of engagement, like bringing everyone together, or a kind of shared sense of unity and purpose, or just information that is spread because it's true rather than because it's emotionally engaging or negatively engaging.They just mega amplify those because those are the things that keep us plugged into the platform. The people who run social media companies, they actually have more than enough data to know this by now, because they started running internal experiments over the last few years to try to understand what their systems are doing. They're doing the same version of what social scientists have been doing from the outside, except they're inside the company so they have a lot more data that they can work with.And all of their own internal researchers reach the exact same conclusions, that these platforms drive people toward very specific kinds of conspiracy theories, that they create very specific kinds of identity, the most extreme of which is QAnon, but you see things like QAnon over and over on the platforms because that's what gets people to engage more.Even like Harry Styles and Chris Pine, that got real QAnon really goddamn quick in the course of like a day and a half.That's actually a great example, because it's something where you pick a side: you're team Harry Styles, you're team Chris Pine, you're team Florence Pugh. And then that becomes a group identity on social media, that like, "Hey, we all agree that Florence Pugh is the best. And we all agree that the people who support these other celebrities are the absolute worst. And I'm going to make posting all day about how mad I am at people in this social out group, which is Chris Pine fans, which I didn't know I hated until 10 minutes ago, but now absolutely hate, my whole deal and my whole identity."You see, it's exactly the kind of thing that does really, really well at boosting engagement. Social media did not invent Chris Pine and Harry Styles getting in a fight, but it did invent turning the fandom wars over it into just a whole-ass identity for seemingly a really large number of people. I think that that's actually a useful way to separate out what's the difference between what social media does and what are the preexisting things that it pulls from.My hope is that the last chapter of this book is telling solutions for this possible problem. I would like that a lot because it seems like there's a lot of problem here.I guess, let's do this two ways. One, what would you recommend people personally do in their own lives and with their loved ones regarding social media? And then two, what are the big solutions that you're kind of looking at as a way to address some of these problems?Sure. So there's a stock list of tips that I give, but I think what's more important than the specific tips is what ties them all together. I'll tell you the tips and then I'll tell you why they're important and what they tie together.Limit your time. Obviously, limit your time on social media. Give yourself specific times to go on it. It would be easy to say, just delete all the platforms, never go online, throw your smartphone away and live in a cabin in the woods as a poet. But most of us can't do that. We have to be online. We have to be on social media because these platforms have completely conquered the way that we relate to one another and relate to the news.Turning your phone on grayscale is actually a really, really effective way to make social media less addictive.Wait, what?Yeah. On iPhones it's really easy. You have to go into settings and change the setting where you turn it onto grayscale, and then if you tap the power button three times, it goes between color and grayscale. And because they're designed to be visually addictive, if you turn it on grayscale, you will just find that the emotional effect from being on the platforms goes way, way down and the ease of turning it off goes way, way up. It's amazing how much of a change you will see from that, which is again, proof that you're opening it because you've been addicted, not because you want to open it.If you are using it, try — and this is a hard thing to sell to people, especially in a time of high stakes in politics and deep political polarization and where it feels like every election is maybe going to be the last election in American democracy — try not to outrage post. And if you do, quote tweeting, where you take someone else's post that you don't like, that you thought was dumb, and then quoting it, and then adding a comment about, "Look at this idiot, what they had to say," try to just never do that at all.The reason not to do it isn't because that person doesn't deserve it. I'm not someone who worries about like, "Oh no, the coarsening of our discourse. Why can't we all get along?" Because there are good reasons we cannot all get along and there are some stakes for our politics right now. The reason not to do it is because, first of all, you're not actually adding anything. Probably this person you're quote tweeting doesn't matter. But also that is one of the most powerful ways that the system trains you to be prone to outrage, to stop reading, to shut down the intellectual and rigorous part of your mind and just engage the monkey brain, dopamine-chasing part of your mind.If you just stop doing that for a month, I think you will find a really pronounced difference in social media. Try not to dogpile people.Again, these are things where it's not just like, “Oh, it's not nice to do,” but it's because when you do that, you are complicit in the way that these mega companies are training you to use their product more and more, so you're taking more and more pulls of the cigarette.You're the centrifuge that is really increasing the volatility of the environment.If you're on YouTube, open it in incognito mode, because if you were logged in, or even if you're not logged in, but you are using it on non-incognito mode in your browser, it will track your views very carefully and it will serve you up related content that is going to be as likely to hook you in as possible, which is just a great way to be shown stuff incrementally over time, even if it's not immediately obvious, that is not healthy for you.What all of these little tips have in common is they're all about learning to see social media as a drug, which it is. It's a drug in the sense that it changes your brain chemistry. It's a drug in the sense that it's addictive. And it's a drug in the sense that when you're using it, your behavior changes, parts of your brain shut down, your emotions change, which is true of any drug that we use.It's also a piece of advice I'd like to give because, while there are a lot of drugs we can't do, there are quite a few that we have all kind of decided are worth it for us to do a little bit of occasionally. I had a cup of coffee this morning. I'll probably have, it's Friday, one to two glasses of wine tonight, maybe even three. But I know, because I understand that these are drugs, that they change my behavior, that they're not always good for me. I know to take them in certain ways that I have come to learn are healthy for me. I know not to drive a car after I have a certain number of glasses of wine. I know not to read certain things if I've had a drink because they might make me upset, or get into certain kinds of social situations. I also know that if I start to feel a certain way after I've had a drink or two, like I start to get annoyed with a friend who I'm out with, I know internally, okay, that's not me, that's the alcohol that's making me feel that way, and it becomes easier to mentally separate yourself from that.I think when you use social media that way it becomes so much easier to use it responsibly because you come to see maybe there are certain kinds of activities that you try not to do on social media, just like you try not to do certain kinds of activities when you're on a drug or when you're on alcohol, because you know it's not healthy and it's not safe for you. And you also come to see the difference between, okay, I'm on Twitter, I'm on Facebook, and I'm feeling a certain way.But now I understand because I know Twitter and Facebook are drugs that they are making me feel that way. It's not actually something real that's happening in the world. It's not something real that is happening in this conversation that I'm having that's making me feel that way, so I want to disengage from it. That's my number one tip for using it safely. It's just understanding what it does to you makes it much easier to kind of take a step back from it, I think.That's great. The book is called The Chaos Machine. It is the inside story of how social media rewired our minds and our world. Why don't you tell folks a little bit about it, where they can find it, and where they can find you.It is, as you would expect, everywhere books are sold. It got some good placements at Barnes and Noble and especially in independent bookstores, which has been great. It's on the major online shopping website. I know surprisingly a really large number of people who've gotten the audiobook. I'm not really sure why that is or why people love going to the audiobook for this one.It's basically just a podcast that has a point.Isn't that all books, are podcasts with a point?Listen, we don't want to crack this one wide open too quick. Where can folks find the book?Everywhere you buy books. You can find me, unfortunately, on Twitter at @Max_Fisher. That's really the only public-facing platform I use. That's another piece of advice, limit yourself to one public-facing platform. And yeah, I hope that people read it and enjoy it. And if you do, I would love to hear from you.Yes. And if they do, they should quote tweet you dunking on it so that the tweet accelerates in the algorithm's reward.Exactly.If you have anything you'd like to see in this Sunday special, shoot me an email. Comment below! Thanks for reading, and thanks so much for supporting Numlock.Thank you so much for becoming a paid subscriber! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Get full access to Numlock News at www.numlock.com/subscribe

National Security Law Today
News Roundup – Record-Breaking Drought, Ukraine Retakes Ground, and 21 Years Since 9/11

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 33:22


This week we're covering the range of national security related topics that have been making headlines. Host Elisa is joined by Bill Banks to discuss the latest impacts of climate change, Ukraine's comeback, China's elections, and looking back on 21 years since the attacks on 9/11. And stick around towards the end of the episode for NSLT's latest book recommendations! Bill Banks is Chair of the ABA Standing Committee on Law and National Security Advisory Committee, and Emeritus Professor at the Syracuse University College of Law: http://law.syr.edu/profile/william-banks1 References: Register for the 32nd Annual Review of the Field of National Security Law Conference – The Past, Present and Future: Celebrating 60 Years of the Standing Committee on Law and National Security – November 17th–18th, 2022: https://web.cvent.com/event/587890d9-7f23-4662-af87-6f106dedfece/summary The National Intelligence Estimate on Climate Change: https://www.dni.gov/files/ODNI/documents/assessments/NIE_Climate_Change_and_National_Security.pdf The Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF): https://www.congress.gov/107/plaws/publ40/PLAW-107publ40.pdf The Patriot Act: https://www.congress.gov/107/plaws/publ56/PLAW-107publ56.pdf Fisher, Max. The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World. Little, Brown, 2023: https://www.littlebrown.com/titles/max-fisher/the-chaos-machine/9780316703314/ Singer, P. W., and Emerson T. Brooking. Likewar: The Weaponization of Social Media. Mariner Books, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2019. https://www.likewarbook.com Canellos, Peter S. The Great Dissenter: The Story of John Marshall Harlan, America's Judicial Hero. Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, an Imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc., 2022. https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Great-Dissenter/Peter-S-Canellos/9781501188213 Wallach, Ari. Longpath: Becoming the Great Ancestors Our Future Needs: An Antidote for Short-Termism. HarperOne, an Imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2022. https://www.longpath.org/book Feingold, Russ, and Peter Prindiville. The Constitution in Jeopardy: An Unprecedented Effort to Rewrite Our Fundamental Law and What We Can Do About It. PublicAffairs, 2022. https://www.publicaffairsbooks.com/titles/russ-feingold/the-constitution-in-jeopardy/9781541701526/

Consider This from NPR
Does Social Media Leave You Feeling Angry? That Might Be Intentional

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 12:56 Very Popular


Social media platforms have helped fuel political polarization and incitements to violence across the globe, from the Rohingya genocide in Myanmar to the January 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.This is because algorithms consistently select content that evokes anger and outrage from its users to maximize engagement. And sometimes, those extreme emotions turn into extreme actions.New York Times reporter Max Fisher took a deep dive into the impact of social media in his book, "The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World." He shares with us how platform leaders have prioritized profit and growth over safeguards and how the polarizing effect of social media is only speeding up.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Parenting Our Future
Zen Parenting | POF166

Parenting Our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 69:05


There is no such thing as a perfect parent. Neither my guest or I would ever claim to be and in fact, we both agree that parenting can be looked at as a “practice” versus something we are striving to be “perfect” at. My guest is Cathy Cassani Adams who is the author of “Zen Parenting - Caring for Ourselves and Our Children in an Unpredictable World.” We talk about the meaning of Zen Parenting and that, in the simplest of terms, means to have an awareness of reality; what's really going on, and acceptance of what IS. I love it when Cathy talks about how two things can be true. For example, that we can love being with our kids and also miss working and being with adults. I think that knowing we can be both allows us to leave shame and judgement of ourselves at the door! To Download Cathy's handout, “Understand Ourselves, Our Kids, Our World,” you can download it for free from the Parent Toolbox. www.parent-toolbox.com About Cathy Cassani Adams Cathy Cassani Adams, LCSW, co-hosts the Zen Parenting Radio podcast and is co-founder of the annual Zen Parenting Conference. She is a social worker and former elementary school educator from a family of educators, and a yoga teacher who is a forever student when it comes to breathing and mindfulness. Cathy teaches in the Sociology/Criminology Department at Dominican University, and she lives outside of Chicago with her husband Todd and their three daughters. Contact information: Email: cathycassaniadams@gmail.com Social Media: Website: https://zenparentingradio.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/zen-parenting-radio/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ZenParenting Twitter: https://twitter.com/zenparenting Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zenparentingradio/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/zenparenting/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/zenparentingradio Thanks for listening! It means so much to me that you listened to my podcast! If you resonate with my message and would like my personal help in your parenting journey, I'd love to talk to you. Please visit my website to book a call with me where we can talk about your parenting frustrations and I'll share how I can help you. www.parentingforconnection.com My intention with my show is to build a community of parents that can have open and honest conversations about parenting without judgement or criticism. We have too much of that! I honor each parent and their path towards becoming the best parent they can be. My hope is to inspire more parents to consider the practice of Peaceful Parenting. If you know somebody who would benefit from this message, or would be an awesome addition to our community, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a note in the comment section below! Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe on the podcast app on your mobile device. Leave a review I appreciate every bit of feedback to make this a value adding part of your day. Ratings and reviews from listeners not only help me improve, but also help others find me in their podcast app. If you have a minute, an honest review on iTunes goes a long way! Thank You!!

For Real
Women in Sports

For Real

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 44:12


This week Kim and Alice go down a rabbit hole talking about A League of Their Own and talk nonfiction about women in sports. Follow For Real using RSS, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher. For more nonfiction recommendations, sign up for our True Story newsletter, edited by Kendra Winchester and Kim Ukura. This content contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Nonfiction in the News Barbara Ehrenreich, author who challenged American Dream myths, dies at 81 [Washington Post] Recommending Books Based on the Weirdest Facts They Taught Me [Book Riot] New Nonfiction Thinking 101: How to Reason Better to Live Better by Woo-Kyoung Ahn Off with Her Head: Three Thousand Years of Demonizing Women in Power by Eleanor Herman The Godmother: Murder, Vengeance, and the Bloody Struggle of Mafia Women by Barbie Latza Nadeau Africa Is Not a Country: Notes on a Bright Continent by Dipo Faloyin The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World by Max Fisher Year of the Tiger: An Activist's Life by Alice Wong Women in Sports Hail Mary: The Rise and Fall of the National Women's Football League by Frankie de la Cretaz and Lyndsey D'Arcangelo Dust Bowl Girls: The Inspiring Story of the Team That Barnstormed Its Way to Basketball Glory by Lydia Reeder Baseball's Leading Lady: Effa Manley and the Rise and Fall of the Negro Leagues by Andrea Williams Curveball: The Remarkable Story of Toni Stone the First Woman to Play Professional Baseball in the Negro League by Martha Ackmann Reading Now Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley by Charlotte Gordon I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff by Abbi Jacobson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rich Roll Podcast
The Chaos Machine: How Social Media Rewired Our Brains and Our World

The Rich Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 147:07


It's no secret that social media's influence on us is designed to be invisible. It can tell whatever story it wants, affecting not only what you think but how you think—and ultimately how you behave in the world.Here to help us unpack these important ideas is Max Fisher, a New York Times investigative reporter, Pulitzer Prize finalist, and author of a brand new, vitally important book entitled, The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World—a referendum on all of the individual and social damage currently being wrought by Big Tech and the social media empires that that have come to monopolize our attention, foment division and fracture our world.We start by covering Max's journey to reporting on social media and politics, the specific ways social media changes its users' morality, and how algorithms can make users more prone to violence.We also dive into cutting-edge research on how social media inculcates a super-exaggerated feeling of outrage and intolerance, making users more likely to believe misinformation and the complicated role offree speech in it all.And we close things out by sharing the dangers of Big Tech behemoths holding such large data sets on human behavior—and why social media addiction is so terrifying.Watch: YouTube.Read: Show notes.Levels: Whether you're tuning your diet, optimizing your exercise, or just trying to stay healthy, monitoring your glucose with Levels can help. Learn more at levels.link/RICHROLLBirch Living: The best, most affordable, organic, and sustainable mattresses on the market with a 100-night risk-free trial. 1% of each purchase is donated to the National Forest Foundation. For 400$ off ALL mattresses + 2 Eco Rest Pillows visit birchiving.com/richroll.Indeed: There are no long-term contracts and you'll only pay for quality applications matching the sponsored job description. Start hiring NOW at Indeed.com/RICHROLL. Terms and conditions apply. Cost per application pricing not available for everyone.Athletic Greens: 75 whole food sourced ingredients designed to optimize 5 key areas of health. Invest in your health without compromise! Go to: athleticgreens.com/richroll to get a FREE year supply of Vitamin D ​AND​ 5 free travel packs of AG1 with your first purchase.Outerknown: Founded by pro-surfer Kelly Slater, Outerknown creates high-quality, sustainably produced, and great-looking men's and women's clothes, ethically manufactured in the world's cleanest solar-powered factory. When you're ready to amp up your wardrobe with awesome sustainable duds, go to outerknown.com and enter my code ROLL at checkout to get 25% off your full-price order.This is an admittedly scary but vitally important conversation about how social media's reach and impact run far deeper than we have previously understood.I hope you learn as much as I did—and adjust your screen time accordingly.Peace + Plants,Rich Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Intelligence Squared
How to Improve the World for the Generations to Come, with Will MacAskill

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:33


Sign up for Intelligence Squared Premium here: https://iq2premium.supercast.com/ for ad-free listening, bonus content, early access and much more. See below for details. Will MacAskill is the philosopher thinking a million years into the future who is also having a bit of a moment in the present. As Associate Professor in Philosophy and Research Fellow at the Global Priorities Institute at the University of Oxford, he is co-founder of the effective altruism movement, which uses evidence and reason as the driver to help maximise how we can better resource the world. MacAskill's writing has found fans ranging from Elon Musk to Stephen Fry and his new book is What We Owe the Future: A Million-Year View. Our host on the show is Max Roser, Director of the Oxford Martin Programme on Global Development and founder and editor of Our World in Data. … We are incredibly grateful for your support. To become an Intelligence Squared Premium subscriber, follow the link: https://iq2premium.supercast.com/  Here's a reminder of the benefits you'll receive as a subscriber: Ad-free listening, because we know some of you would prefer to listen without interruption  One early episode per week Two bonus episodes per month A 25% discount on IQ2+, our exciting streaming service, where you can watch and take part in events live at home and enjoy watching past events on demand and without ads  A 15% discount and priority access to live, in-person events in London, so you won't miss out on tickets Our premium monthly newsletter  Intelligence Squared Merch Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

POD OF JAKE
#113 - JASON CRAWFORD

POD OF JAKE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 45:13


Jason is the Founder & President of The Roots of Progress, a nonprofit dedicated to establishing a new philosophy of progress for the 21st century. He is also an adviser to Our World in Data and the creator of Progress Studies for Young Scholars, an online learning program about the history of technology for high schoolers. Jason writes and speaks about the history and philosophy of progress, especially in technology and industry. Follow him on Twitter @jasoncrawford. [2:18] - How Jason's evolving interests have influenced his understanding of human progress [10:53] - Jason's experience “dropping out” of high school and choosing to learn on his own [15:22] - Why Jason chose to transition from building tech startups to studying human progress [18:35] - Introducing The Roots of Progress [24:07] - The kind of CEO Jason is looking to lead The Roots of Progress foundation and its fellowship program [28:05] - Writers and models that have inspired and influenced Jason's studies [32:32] - Humanism vs. Environmentalism [39:44] - Why Jason views the invention of electricity as one of the most important drivers of human progress in the last 150 years --- Support the show by checking out my sponsors: Join Levels and get personalized insights to learn about your metabolic health. Go to https://levels.link/jake. --- https://homeofjake.com

Caribbean Radio Show Crs Radio
The Wha A Gwaan Show

Caribbean Radio Show Crs Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 123:00


All about goals........setting and reaching them  for  a better you each and everyday as you rise alive in this big old mystical world.........still reaching for my own right now and sometimes you need others to do it as no man stands alone and no one is an island,,,,,,,,same way you need support is the same way I need it too here aEveningglo,nd now and that helps me to support others that's in need  and that could be you someday

The New Abnormal
This Group's Vote Will Ultimately Decide the Midterms

The New Abnormal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 59:45 Very Popular


The upcoming midterms will depend on the voices and votes of those in the suburbs, according to hosts Molly Jong-Fast and Andy Levy on this episode of The New Abnormal. After a key win for Democrats in New York's 19th Congressional District, where Pat Ryan defeated Republican Marc Molinaro in Tuesday's special election, Levy says that despite the bad news for the party, the Dems still need the suburban vote to get them across the line. Then, Dahlia Lithwick, who writes about the courts and the law for Slate and hosts the podcast Amicus, talks former President Donald Trump's little dust-up with the National Archives. This week, Politico revealed that the Archives had recovered more than 700 pages of classified documents from Mar-a-Lago in January and that federal investigators were concerned “by Trump's resistance to sharing them with the FBI.” Also, Max Fisher, who writes The Interpreter column for The New York Times and is the author of The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World, discusses how social media “is distorting you in ways that you are probably not quite aware of.” Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

App Talk with Upptic
Building Great Teams & Cultures with Derrick Morton (FlowPlay)

App Talk with Upptic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 55:05


Our guest this week is Derrick Morton, CEO of FlowPlay. FlowPlay creates community-focused digital worlds – including Casino World, Vegas World, Live Game Night, and ourWorld, that can be enjoyed by anyone of any age anywhere in the world. They were also rated one of Washington's best workplaces in 2021 by the Puget Sound Business Journal. In this week's podcast we take a dive into how to build great teams and work cultures. Derrick details what sets FlowPlay apart that makes it such a great place to work, how to grow a team effectively, ways to deal with conflict, and what aspiring team leaders should do. Plus, we discuss Embracer Group's acquisition of Lord of the Rings game, movie, and book rights, Animoca's continuing crypto strategy, and FTX's revenue report. SOURCES & MORE: https://upptic.com/building-great-teams-cultures-with-derrick-morton-flowplay-app-talk-with-upptic/

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Pressing News Front Page by AndreFerretti

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 0:37


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Pressing News Front Page, published by AndreFerretti on August 24, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. "A newspaper that would cover the most important facts about the last 24 hours would cover the 15,000 child deaths on its cover page every day."—Our World in Data So here you go: I hope to inspire a fellow human to write about what matters to humanity, not newspapers' ad departments. Thanks for listening. To help us out with The Nonlinear Library or to learn more, please visit nonlinear.org.

The Nonlinear Library
EA - The world is much better. The world is awful. The world can be much better. by Max Roser

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 6:12


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: The world is much better. The world is awful. The world can be much better., published by Max Roser on August 22, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. (Cross-posted from Our World in Data.) The world is much better. The world is awful. The world can be much better. All three statements are true. Here I focus on child mortality, but the same can be said for many aspects of global development. There are many aspects of development for which it is true that things have improved over time and are terrible still, and for which we know that things can get better. The world is awful In the visualization below, I present three scenarios of child deaths. The blue bar represents the actual number of child deaths per year today. Of the 141 million children born every year, 3.9% die before their 5th birthday. This means that every year, 5.5 million children die; on average, 15,000 children die every day. [1] Clearly, a world where such tragedy happens is an awful world. The world is much better The big lesson of history is that things change. The scale of these changes is hard to grasp. The living conditions in today's poorest countries are now in many ways much better than they were even in the richest countries of the past: Child mortality in today's worst-off places is between 10-13%; in all regions of the world it was more than three times as high [30-50%] until a few generations ago. It's estimated that at the beginning of the 19th century, 43% of the world's children died by the age of five. If we still suffered the poor health of our ancestors, more than 60 million children would die every year — 166,000 every day. [2] This is what the red bar represents in the visualization below. If you want to see how child mortality has changed, read Hannah Ritchie's post: From commonplace to rarer tragedy — declining child mortality across the world Such large improvements are not limited to health; the same is true across other aspects of life (as I show in my short history of living conditions). In a number of fundamental aspects (obviously not all), we have achieved very substantial progress and know that much more is possible. These aspects also include education, political freedom, violence, poverty, nutrition, and some aspects of environmental change. What we learn from this is that it is possible to change the world. I believe that one of the most important facts to know about our world is that we can make a difference. (You can see a larger version of this graph here.) The world can be much better Progress over time shows that it was possible to change the world in the past. But what do we know about what is possible for the future? Were we born at an unlucky time in modern history, in which global progress has come to a halt? Studying the global data suggests that the answer is no. One way to see this is to look at those places in the world with the best living conditions. The inequality in living conditions in the world today shows that there is much work left to do. If health across all countries of the world was equal, it would not be possible to really know whether further improvements are possible or how to achieve them. But the fact that some places have already achieved much better child health leaves no doubt: Better child health than the global average is not just a possibility, but already a reality. So what would global child mortality be if children around the world became as well off as the children in those places where children are healthiest today? The dark green bar in the visualization shows the answer. The region with the lowest child mortality is the European Union. The average in the European Union (0.41%) is 10 times lower than the global average (3.9%). In the EU, 1 in 250 children die, whilst globally the figure is 1 in 25. If children around the wor...

The Overpopulation Podcast
79 Eileen Crist: A Profound Vision For An Ecological Civilization

The Overpopulation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 68:34


In this enlightening interview with Dr. Eileen Crist—a deep, profound, and compassionate systems thinker—we are led through a journey on how to reframe our relationship to the planet for a more harmonious co-existence with all life on earth. We discuss the biodiversity crisis and destruction of wild places, pathways to halt these trends, and ways forward toward creating an ecological civilization. Dr. Crist shines a light on the worldview of human supremacy that foregrounds our relationship of dominion towards non-human animals and all of nature, and the role that human expansionism plays in driving a multitude of ecological crises. She concludes the discussion with a grounded, yet inspiring vision of how to protect this incredible life-giving planet by shifting our language, our identities, and our actions—through pulling back and scaling down—so that we are more in alignment with our indigenous-inspired roles as Earthlings. ABOUT US The Overpopulation Podcast features enlightening conversations between Population Balance Executive Director Nandita Bajaj, cohost Alan Ware, and expert guests. We cover a broad variety of topics that explore the impacts of our expanding human footprint on human rights, animal protection, and environmental restoration, as well as individual and collective solutions.  Find us here: Population Balance https://www.populationbalance.org/ MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: About Eileen Crist https://eileencrist.com/ Population Balance Board of Directors https://populationbalance.squarespace.com/our-team  Abundant Earth: Toward An Ecological Civilization https://www.amazon.com/Abundant-Earth-Toward-Ecological-Civilization/dp/022659680X  Earth Tongues: Publications by Eileen Crist https://www.ecologicalcitizen.net/author.php?id=au14  Val Plumwood https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Val_Plumwood  Derrick Jensen: The Myth of Human Supremacy https://derrickjensen.org/myth-of-human-supremacy/  Nature Paper: Global human-made mass exceeds all living biomass https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-3010-5  Scientific American article: Human-Made Stuff Now Outweighs All Life on Earth https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/human-made-stuff-now-outweighs-all-life-on-earth/  Our World in Data: Meat and Dairy Production https://ourworldindata.org/meat-production  Podcast Episode 77: Dr. Paul Ehrlich https://www.populationbalance.org/episode-77-paul-ehrlich  Share Your Thoughts With Us https://www.populationbalance.org/contact-us  Join Our Monthly Podcast Club https://www.populationbalance.org/join-our-meetup  Support this Podcast https://populationbalance.squarespace.com/donate 

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea
Futureproof Extra: The Last Days of the Dinosaurs

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 13:11


There has been a lot said about the extinction of the dinosaurs. But aside from the actual extinction event itself, when it comes to the days, weeks, months, and years immediately following it well, not so much. So, how exactly did any species survive it, and why those specific species? Riley Black is a freelance science writer specializing in evolution, paleontology, and natural history, and the author of ‘The Last Days of the Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction and the Beginning of Our World' - She joins Jonathan to discuss.

The Mayn Idea Podcast
#47: Cindi Thompson - AI Climate Technology, Climate Change, Severe Weather, and the Future.

The Mayn Idea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 77:09


Cindi Thompson is CEO and co-founder of Climate Companion, which offers knowledge fusion for sustainability experts. Cindi has a background in Artificial Intelligence and Data Science, working primarily in academia and consulting. Please support this show by checking out our sponsor below: - Athletic Greens: https://athleticgreens.com/abe EPISODE LINKS: Technology & General Information: Climate Companion Climate Change AI Project Drawdown Greenhouse gas emissions - Our World in Data The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPPC) Assessment Report The summary for policymakers for each of the reports is a good place to start Terra.do (education) Communities with Slack Spaces: Climate Action Tech MCJ Collective Work on Climate People Mentioned In Episode: Doug Engelbart Katherine Hayhoe and Global Weirding Bill McKibben PODCAST INFO: Podcast website: https://mailchi.mp/abemaynard.com/the-mayn-idea-podcast Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-mayn-idea-podcast/id1587799395 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1v6OzDxxMUYlNUXN1AAPw3?si=eda5aae609874c69 RSS: https://anchor.fm/s/6b4fbe04/podcast/rss YouTube Full episode playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMGFodxtKEioDkOtd65xyuXs5p1qNjQpC YouTube Clips Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYA_B1bx0rWVs-mNWc2QidA SUPPORT AND CONNECT: Climate Companion Twitter: https://twitter.com/ClimateCmpanion Cindi LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cindithompson/ Cindi Website: https://cindithompson.com/ Cindi Twitter: https://twitter.com/CindiThompson Show Instagram: https://instagram.com/abemaynard Show LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/public-profile/settings?trk=d_flagship3_profile_self_view_public_profile --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/abraham484/support

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Large-scale International Educational Migration: A Shallow Investigation by Johannes Haushofer

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 37:39


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Large-scale International Educational Migration: A Shallow Investigation, published by Johannes Haushofer on August 12, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Jasmin Baier, Johannes Haushofer, Hannah Lea Shaw with input from Toman Barsbai and Merve Demirel 1. Introduction Two thirds of the world's population live on less than $10 per day (Our World in Data), and 60% of the global variability in income is explained by where one is born (Milanovich, 2015). Perhaps as a result, many people want to permanently migrate to another country: in low-income countries, the share ranges from 20–59%; among Africans under 25, it is 33% (Gallup World Poll, own calculations; Figure 1). At the same time, many high-income countries experience significant gaps in their labor force, both in terms of skills and raw numbers, resulting from low birth rates and aging populations. The OECD estimates that this workforce gap will amount to 450 million people by 2050. These figures suggest that increased international migration would have benefits both for migrants themselves, and for destination countries. Indeed, the economic benefits of removing international migration barriers amount to large fractions of world GDP — one or two orders of magnitude larger than those of trade barriers (Clemens, 2011). Recognizing this, many high-income countries are actively working to reduce migration barriers. This is especially true for educational migration: many countries are working towards internationalizing their higher education systems, simplifying student visa and work requirements, and reducing tuition costs (e.g., in the case of Germany, keeping university completely free, even for third-country nationals). For the migrants, international educational migration provides access to the labor market in the destination country, and additionally combines the returns to migration with those to education. The goal of this investigation is therefore to explore international educational migration as a possible mechanism to increase migration opportunities and alleviate poverty. 2. Potential Impact 2.1 Direct Economic Impact on Migrants Cross-country estimates of the returns to migration suggest potential impacts on income around 1,500% (Figure 2). Studies that permit causal claims have shown that international migration generates income increases of several hundreds of percent. For instance, labor migrants from Tonga to New Zealand increase their income by 263% one year after migration (McKenzie, Stillman, and Gibson 2010). Similarly, Mobarak et al. (2020) estimate returns of around 200% in terms of income from low-skilled migration between Bangladesh and Malaysia. Because these studies estimate individual economic gains from labor migration, often low-skill, we view these estimates as lower bounds for the impact of educational migration, which combines the benefits of migration with those of education. Specifically, education itself has large returns, on the order of 10% per year (Peet, Fink, and Fawzi 2015). Importantly, these returns are unlikely to decay over time. (This stands in sharp contrast to e.g. cash transfer programs, whose effects have been shown to dissipate over time; e.g. Blattman, Fiala, and Martinez 2020). Unfortunately, we are not aware of causal evidence on the returns to international educational migration. However, to provide a concrete example for the likely returns, we briefly summarize estimates for the impact of the educational migration program Malengo, with which we are associated. Malengo enables Ugandan secondary school graduates to apply for and complete an English-taught Bachelor's program in Germany. The cost of the program per student net of administration costs is EUR 11,971, which includes a living expense stipend and semester fees for the first year; application expense...