Podcast appearances and mentions of Asa Hutchinson

46th Governor of Arkansas

  • 139PODCASTS
  • 318EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Dec 2, 2022LATEST
Asa Hutchinson

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Asa Hutchinson

Latest podcast episodes about Asa Hutchinson

Amanpour
Where does the GOP go from here?

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 54:55


Regardless of who wins the Georgia's Senate runoff next week, the Democrats will hold the Senate in the next Congress, after an expected red wave at the midterms turned out to be more of a light splash. Even though the GOP took the House, the repercussions of that vote are spelling trouble for Kevin McCarthy, as fringe members of his party push back against his candidacy for House speaker. So where does the GOP go from here? And what does that mean for America as a whole? Asa Hutchinson, who has been Governor of Arkansas since 2015 and will soon leave the post after the maximum two terms, joins the show to discuss.  Also on today's show: Dr. Anthony Fauci, author Tiya Miles.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Politics Done Right
GOP Gov. dumps Trump. Todd dings GOP Rep. AMLO shows Progressives can win. Antiseptic S

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 58:01


GOP Gov. Asa Hutchinson throws Trump under the bus. Chuck Todd dings GOP Rep. James Comer. Mexican Progressive President shows people power. We should fight antiseptic slavery. Watch Chuck Todd ding GOP Rep. James Comer with inconvenient facts as he bloviated about crime: Another Republican gets dinged by Chuck Todd as he caught Rep. James Comer misinforming about crime. The GOP usually gets away with these willful lies. A fed-up Arkansas Governor, Asa Hutchinson, throws Donald Trump under the bus: Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson was clear that he is fed up with Donald Trump as he condemned his dinner with Kanye West & Nick Fuentes. Massive Demonstration of Support for Lopez Obrador in Mexico City: AMLO was elected in 2018 and heralded as the Bernie Sanders of Mexico. Hundreds of thousands marched with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on Sunday in a massive demonstration through Mexico City to show their support for Lopez Obrador. We willfully submit ourselves to the new bondage, antiseptic slavery: It is easy to be pessimistic in these times where most have acquiesced to an insidious form of bondage I refer to as antiseptic slavery. I am optimistic that grassroots action is the answer. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2976 - How Reconstruction Was Thwarted And Its Lessons For Progressives w/ Dale Kretz

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 90:18


Sam and Emma host Dale Kretz, visiting assistant professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, to discuss his recent book Administering Freedom: The State of Emancipation after the Freedmen's Bureau. First, Sam and Emma dive into updates on the US' sanctions on Venezuela, Elon Musk's targeting of left voices on Twitter, the collapse of Manchin's permitting side deal, and Georgia's early voting boom, before diving a little deeper into the blooming GOP Presidential race, with Asa Hutchinson addressing some of Trump's recent associates. Dale Kretz then joins as he dives right into contextualizing the role of federal government in the leadup to the US Civil War, with no income tax or major presence before beginning to change as the South split from the country, pushing the North to set up its “Yankee Leviathan” of state-sponsored expansion Westward alongside mass investments into the mobilization of resources, the aggrandizement of its federal authority, and the set up of a veteran-focused welfare state. Professor Kretz then shifts focus to the visions of emancipation that were present in the US leading up to Lincoln's proclamation, beginning with the more conservative theories grounded in colonization and imperialism, and the radical visions of abolitionists that focused on the bolstering of civil rights and redistribution of millions of acres of land to those that actually worked it, before diving into the actual program that attempted to bring about reconstruction: the Freedmen's Bureau. This bureau, as Kretz explores, was essentially set up (as much American bureaucracy is) to undermine its own aims, with focuses on individual cases, means testing, and incredibly minimal funding ensuring the processes would move slowly and help reconstruct the lives of only a handful of the 4 million folks it was created for. Wrapping up, Kretz, Emma, and Sam explore how the populist movements that followed this era fell to the exact enemy that reconstruction failed to address (institutionalized and cultural racism), a problem that still presents itself to working-class solidarity today, and why a progressive left critique of bureaucracy must both emphasize the empowerment of its people as citizens, including serving them en masse and recognizing the stratification of civil rights. And in the Fun Half: Sam and Emma discuss the ultimate grift of buying a silly little gift for a friend, before parsing a little further through Republican primary possibilities, diving into Donald's untouchable nature, the fallout of his dinner with Kanye and Nick Fuentes, and Ben Shapiro's lackluster response to such severe antisemitism. They also tackle Sam Harris' departure from Twitter, Brett Weinstein's acknowledgment of how well-practiced he is at apologizing for his blatantly false talking points, and Elon Musk's continued petty reign over the Bird App, plus, your calls and IMs!   Check out Dale's book here: https://uncpress.org/book/9781469671024/administering-freedom/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the ESVN YouTube channel here (NEW EPISODE STREAMING THERE TODAY): https://www.youtube.com/esvnshow Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here: https://am-quickie.ghost.io/ Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Get the free Majority Report App!: http://majority.fm/app Check out today's sponsors: Sunset Lake CBD:  This Black Friday Sunset Lake CBD & the Majority Report are teaming up to turn America's most consumerist holiday into a fundraising opportunity for a great organization. Visit https://sunsetlakecbd.com/, starting November 21st. All CBD products will be 30% off with coupon code “FRIDAY.” That's not all: orders over $100 will receive a jar of CBD Gummy Bears - A $40 value, FOR FREE. Sunset Lake CBD will donate 10% of proceeds from this Black Friday sale toFeeding Chittenden— the largest emergency food provider in Vermont, feeding over 12,000 each year. ZipRecruiter: Some things in life we like to pick out for ourselves - so we know we've got the one that's best for us - like cuts of steak or mattresses. What if you could do the same for hiring - choose your ideal candidate before they even apply? See for yourself! Just go to this exclusive web address, https://www.ziprecruiter.com/majority to try ZipRecruiter for free! Stamps.com: Taking trips to the Post Office is probably not how you want to spend your time. – that's why you should mail and ship online at Stamps dot com., the place where you get the services of the Post Office and UPS all in one place. There's NO risk - and with my promo code, MAJORITYREPORT, you get a special offer that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage and a digital scale. Just go to https://www.stamps.com/, click on the Microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in MAJORITYREPORT - that's https://www.stamps.com/, promo code MAJORITYREPORT. Stamps.com - never go to the post office again. Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Check out Ava Raiza's music here! https://avaraiza.bandcamp.com/ The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/  

State of the Union with Jake Tapper
Interviews with: Sen. Chris Murphy, Gov. Asa Hutchinson, Rep. Adam Schiff.

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 39:10


After another holiday marred by tragedy, President Biden vows to do more to stop gun violence. Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut sits down with Dana to examine the prospects for more gun reform in a lame duck Congress. They also discuss why existing gun laws in Colorado and Virginia weren't enough to prevent the shootings from happening.  Also, Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson joins Dana to respond to former President Trump's decision to host rap artist Ye and a prominent white supremacist for dinner at Mar-a-Lago. Gov. Hutchinson also previews his message for Republicans as he weighs running for president in 2024. Plus, Rep. Adam Schiff joins Dana to respond to reported tension within the House January 6th Select Committee over what to include in its final report. Rep. Schiff also comments on House Republican Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy's pledge to kick him off the House Intelligence Committee. After, the panel joins Dana to discuss the Georgia Senate runoff election, what lessons Democrats should learn from the midterm elections, and Trump's meeting with Ye and a white nationalist holocaust denier at Mar-a-Lago. Today's panel includes Hilary Rosen, Kristen Soltis Anderson, Marc Short, and Ashley Allison.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - A scary situation in Idaho

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 40:16


What's Trending: Moscow police are dealing with a difficult situation, Nancy Pelosi is stepping down from democratic leadership, and the Starbucks strike. // Asa Hutchinson of Arkansas talks about running for president. // A conflicting report on the Paul Pelosi story.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Matt Lewis and the News
Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Trump and 2024

Matt Lewis and the News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 29:59


Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson talks with Matt about the 2022 midterms, the problems with Donald Trump, and why Hutchinson might run for president himself in 2024.

Firing Line with Margaret Hoover

Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson of Arkansas joins Margaret Hoover to break down the results of the midterm elections, the weaker than anticipated performance of GOP candidates, and the direction of the party heading into 2024. Hutchinson, who is considering a 2024 presidential run, explains why he blames former President Donald Trump for the party's losses in key races and why he believes there is an urgent need for Republicans to look to a post-Trump future. He warns of the danger in the rhetoric of GOP election deniers like Arizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake and calls for a return to “common-sense” conservatism. Hutchinson also discusses the role of abortion rights in the election, the top priorities for Republicans if they take control of the House, and whether they should pursue impeachment of President Joe Biden. Support for “Firing Line for Margaret Hoover” is provided by Stephens Inc., Robert Granieri, Charles R. Schwab, The Fairweather Foundation, Asness Family Foundation, The Rosalind P. Walter Foundation, Damon Button, Pritzker Military Foundation on behalf of the Pritzker Military Museum and Library, and The Marc Haas Foundation.

Fast Break with Asa
Elections, Computer Science, and Economic Development - with AR Commerce Sec. Mike Preston

Fast Break with Asa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 31:19


In this episode of Fast Break with Asa, Governor Asa Hutchinson and Jay Bir discuss the mid-term elections and the newly released computer science enrollment and teachers numbers from the Arkansas Department of Education. They are also joined by Arkansas Secretary of Commerce Mike Preston to discuss the work and successes of economic development from the last 8 years in Arkansas.

The Weedsmen Potcast
He's a Man of Action

The Weedsmen Potcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022


On this week’s show Chris and Aaron talk about: Covid, owl eyes, disposable vapes, Netflix, Amsterdam movie, Uber and Leafly to partner in Toronto, Corey Booker hopes for the lame duck session, Bernie Sanders on Cannabis, and Asa Hutchinson on Biden’s clemency plans. Please follow us on Twitter @TheWeedsmen420, Instagram @TheWeedsmenPotcast, and on Facebook at... The post He's a Man of Action first appeared on Christopher Media.

Y'all-itics
The GOP Governor Next Door Who's (Likely) Running for President

Y'all-itics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 50:51


The race for 2024 begins next month – as soon as the polls close in the November midterm. There's already been lots of speculation about Florida Governor Ron DeSantis potentially running for the White House. But another Republican governor, who neighbors Texas, suggested to the Jasons he might launch his own bid for President. Asa Hutchinson is a former Congressman, the former head of the DEA, and now term-limited out as Governor of Arkansas. And unlike other Republicans today, Gov. Hutchinson is not afraid to disagree with Donald Trump. Which begs the question, can a center-right, Reagan-style Republican, survive nationally in today's GOP? Gov. Hutchinson, who was in Austin recently as a guest speaker for The Texas Tribune Festival, says leadership in that environment is a delicate balancing act. And in this episode of Y'all-itics, he has a candid conversation with the Jasons about his plan to secure the border, abortion and why he says limitations and restrictions are not the way out of gun violence.

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo
Trump tried to send message to A.G. Garland after home search

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 41:12


Trump's legal team files a new lawsuit to appoint a third-party attorney known as a "special master" to review the evidence gathered during the FBI's search of his Mar-a-Lago home. The panel discusses this unusual move, why Trump's attorneys took two weeks to make the request, and the message the former president tried to send Attorney General Merrick Garland three days after the search. Two Arkansas deputy sheriffs and one police officer are removed from duty after a video shows them punching and kneeing suspect Randal Worcester after pinning him to ground. The Governor of Arkansas, Asa Hutchinson joins to discuss the state police's investigation into the incident. Plus, as a black couple sues after they say their home valuation rose nearly $300,000 when shown by a white colleague, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Marcia Fudge tells Laura about the battle against racism in real estate, and what the Democrats are doing to address appraisal bias and violations of the Fair Housing Law. Hosted by Laura Coates.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Dr. Tommy Show
Biden MIA, Dems Kamala Problem, Helter Stelter, Bill Gates the Farmer, Dating Conservatives

Dr. Tommy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 49:01


Broadcasting from the Free State. Biden is missing in action for 3 days. Is he okay? If not, then Kamala is next up and that's not good. And the Democrats sure don't want her as POTUS, that much we know. CNN cans the human potato Brian Stelter. I'll miss the Mark Dice impersonations. Conservatives face an uphill battle on dating apps like OkCupid. Well, luckily there is The Right Stuff, a new app for those who aren't liberals. Dutch farmers are pissed off about Govt trying to end their livelihoods to please "Mother Earth" as Nancy Pelosi says. They allegedly burned down some grocery stores that Mr. Farmland and fake meat connoisseur Bill Gates invested in. By the way, the mini-Green New Deal signing means this is coming to a town near year. Weak GOPers like Mike Pence and Asa Hutchinson are never going to be able to lead conservatives against the hordes. They won't be first over the wall in any battle, so it really doesn't matter what they think about the FBI raid on Trump. Govt says ITT defrauded students so now they don't have to pay student loans. That's funny since most all universities misrepresent the value of their programs like the Govt says ITT Tech did. Eighty percent of Americans say justice system two-tiered, and its across party lines. Finally something we can all agree on! DoctorTommy.com/podcast

The Folding Chair
The Rose That Grew From Concrete: an interview with Tim Campbell

The Folding Chair

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 46:57


Tim Campbell is an activist and a native of Little Rock, Arkansas. Last spring, Campbell was the recipient of the Shannon Butler Bridge Builder Award for the Class of 2021, recognized as the school's top honor. The award is presented to a student in each graduating class who has displayed collaborative leadership skills and exemplifies the spirit of bringing people together. Campbell was appointed to the City of Little Rock's Racial and Cultural Diversity Commission in the summer of 2021. He was sworn in to the Pulaski County Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee in March 2021 and served as a member of Governor Asa Hutchinson's Task Force to Advance the State of Law Enforcement in Arkansas, which presented its findings to the Governor in December 2020. In the summer of 2020, he led peaceful protests in Little Rock following the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery. He was presented with the 2022 L.E.A.D. Service Award by the Arkansas Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission in recognition of his accomplishments and initiatives. In addition to earning his Master of Public Service, Campbell graduated from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff with a degree in health and wellness. He is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served as a Community Health Facilitator in The Gambia from 2016-2018. Following his tenure with the Peace Corps, Campbell spent a six-month practicum with the Office of International Programs and Studies at UAPB, serving as a Senior Adviser to UAPB's Peace Corps Prep Program. Campbell is the Founder of the non-profit The Arkansas Movement for Change.

The Hate Speech Zone
Governor Asa Hutchinson should practice what he preaches. Americans are supposed wait for facts from the FBI/DOJ?

The Hate Speech Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 13:22


America waited for three pieces of evidence from the Mueller hoax.  We never got those. America waited for details about Trump impeachments 1 and 2.  Instead, FOIA documents show Congress was trying Trump for things the Biden crime family did.  The FBI RAIDED the Trump residence taking bizarrely unimportant materials related to Roger Stone as well as Trump's passports.  (The media is still LYING about these details--because that's their job.) The Jan 6th timeline (and video) shows select DC Metro and Capitol Police firing on a peaceful gathering LONG before the breach and open door entrapment happened. This episode provides three ways out of this globalist stupidity. Make FBI investigations on citizens or your soil illegal. Act like this Marxist takeover is a Marxist takeover that hates our founding documents. (Which is the case.) Red state and county divorce.   Fool me once shame on you. Fool me 47 times shame on me. Gov. Hutch isn't asking for patience, he wants your unconditional surrender.

The Zone
Asa Hutchinson in The Zone 8-15-22

The Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 12:02


103.7 The Buzz

State of the Union with Jake Tapper
Interviews with: House Intelligence Committee Member Rep. Mike Turner, Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm, and Governor of Arkansas Asa Hutchinson.

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 41:47


First up, Brianna goes one-on-one with the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, Congressman Mike Turner. They discuss the stunning discovery of highly-classified material at former President Trump's home during an FBI search and Republicans' call for Attorney General Garland to justify the investigation. Brianna also presses Rep. Turner on if national security secrets were at risk and whether President Trump broke the law.Next, Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm joins Brianna to discuss the Biden administration's next steps to address the climate crisis after Democrats passed sweeping climate and tax legislation. Brianna also pushes Sec. Granholm over what that law will do to address inflation and lower costs for Americans in the near term.After, Brianna speaks with Arkansas Republican Governor Asa Hutchinson about the unprecedented FBI search of former President Trump's home and asks whether attacks on the FBI by some Republicans are putting lives at risk. Brianna also presses him on whether Republican-led states that are limiting or banning abortion access need to do more to support mothers and infants.To close: the panel discusses how FBI search of Trump's home will impact him politically, as well as Democrats' lingering anxiety about a potential Biden 2024 run despite his recent legislative wins.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Talk Business and Politics
NWABJ Report 08.14.22 with Asa Hutchinson

Talk Business and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 9:54


Capitol & Scott
Capitol & Scott: Extreme weather and Arkansas agriculture, Part 1 — A farmer's story

Capitol & Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 26:21


As Arkansas farmers are preparing for the upcoming fall harvest season, they’re also reeling from one of the worst droughts in recent history. Extreme heat and dry weather have plagued the industry this summer, causing Gov. Asa Hutchinson to appeal to the federal government for emergency assistance for the more than dozen counties now classified as disaster areas because of the excessive heat paired with no rain. This year’s summertime drought is a weather event that forms part of a larger climate change pattern that’s impacting farmers in Arkansas. Wetter springs and hot, dry summers are shifting planting times, increasing operating costs and reducing profits as crop yields decline from the unpredictability of weather patterns. As part of a two-part series exploring the impact of climate change on the state’s most important industry, Capitol & Scott host Lara Farrar visits SFR Seed, a 1,500-acre family farm in Jackson County established in the 1800s. The farm’s chief executive officer Hallie Shoffner explains how weather is changing the sector and the challenges farmers face in mitigating climate risks and staying in business. John D. Anderson, head of the University of Arkansas’ agricultural economics and agribusiness department and director of the Fryar Price Risk Management Center of Excellence will discuss economics, risk management and drought impact issues for part two of Capitol & Scott’s series focused on climate change and agriculture. That episode will air Wednesday, Aug. 17. Let us know what topics would you like to hear about in future episodes: arkansasonline.com/capitol-and-scott/

PBS NewsHour - Politics
Arkansas Gov. Hutchinson calls FBI search on Trump's estate 'alarming'

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 6:58


Questions are swirling after the FBI searched former President Trump's Florida home. Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, who served as U.S. attorney for the Western District of Arkansas under President Reagan, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the political implications. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on why the FBI raid on Trump's estate is 'alarming'

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 6:58


Questions are swirling after the FBI searched former President Trump's Florida home. Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, who served as U.S. attorney for the Western District of Arkansas under President Reagan, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the political implications. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Ozarks at Large Stories
Gov. Asa Hutchinson sees Johnny Cash statue for U.S. Capitol

Ozarks at Large Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:16


Work continues on the Johnny Cash statue that will be one of two new statues representing the state of Arkansas in the U.S. Capitol. Michael Hibblen from our partner station KUAR speaks with the sculptor and a Johnny Cash admirer.

Capitol & Scott
Capitol & Scott: The Arkansas School Safety Commission's interim report

Capitol & Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:55


With the first day of school in Arkansas less than three weeks away, campus safety is again at the forefront of the new academic year after the tragic school shooting on May 24 at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Two teachers and nineteen students died there. In the wake of that shooting, Gov. Asa Hutchinson asked the Arkansas School Safety Commission to review protocol for active shooters on K-12 campuses after multiple, systemic failures were identified in Uvalde in the aftermath of that tragedy. The commission released its interim report Tuesday during a news conference at the state Capitol. It included a broad range of recommendations, including increased mental health care for students and a statewide school safety tip line. Arkansas Democrat-Gazette capitol reporter Stephen Simpson has been covering the commission. He joins Capitol & Scott host Lara Farrar to share the major takeaways from the interim report. Let us know what topics would you like to hear about in future episodes: arkansasonline.com/capitol-and-scott/

Washington Post Live
Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on the impact of overturning Roe v. Wade and the future of the GOP

Washington Post Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 30:34


Washington Post Live anchor Leigh Ann Caldwell speaks to Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) about the impact of overturning of Roe v. Wade, the abortion law he signed three years ago, why he believes Donald Trump has been disqualified from a 2024 presidential run and whether he will make a run for the Oval Office himself. Conversation recorded on Monday, August 8, 2022.

Fast Break with Asa
Fast Break with Asa - Episode #3

Fast Break with Asa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 27:51


Governor Asa Hutchinson is joined by host Jay Bir to talk about the conclusion of the Governor's year as chairman of the National Governors Association, recent economic development trip to Europe, early days as an entrepreneur, and much more.

Work In Progress
The case for making computer science a part of every K-12 curriculum

Work In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 17:33


In this episode of Work in Progress, Code.org founder and CEO Hadi Partovi and I discuss a call to action aimed at the nation's governors, asking them to make computer science part of the basic K-12 curriculum in every U.S. school. Right now, the United States has over 700-thousand open computing jobs, but only 80-thousand computer science majors graduating from college each year. In high school, only 5% of students study computer science – a small percentage due to the fact that most K-12 schools in the country don't even offer CS classes. In an effort to change that, more than 500 business leaders, educators, and nonprofits released a letter today (July 12) calling on state governors and education leaders to make computer science a standard part of the K-12 curriculum in every school in every state. The initiative brings together a broad spectrum of groups and individuals, including the CEOs and founders of such companies as Microsoft, Amazon, American Express, and Walgreens and education organizations including the American Federation of Teachers. Leading this call to action – timed to coincide with the final day of the National Governors Association Summer Meeting in Portland, Maine – is the nonprofit Code.org. 'There is no company today that doesn't have significant technology needs.' "We're so excited to know that Bill Gates, or Jeff Bezos, or Mark Zuckerberg, or Satya Nadella, or Tim Cook are getting behind a call for computer science in schools, but nobody is shocked that they would do that," says Hadi Partovi, founder and CEO of Code.org. "When the largest players in banking, in air travel, in coffee, in footwear – when you have Nike and Hasbro and UPS – these are the companies you don't expect." But, as Partovi points out, there is no company that doesn't have significant technology needs today. "If they don't need coders, they need data scientists. If they don't need data scientists, they need cyber security. You can't find a large employer that doesn't need either a computer programmer for their website or somebody, a data scientist, just to look at their customer data or a cybersecurity expert to prevent their emails from getting hacked. "For a long time, everybody has known technology as the future. After the pandemic, people realize technology is the now. This is not some future need. All of these companies are feeling imminent pain that our education system isn't providing enough people for them to get these opportunities." In February, Arkansas governor Asa Hutchinson – the current chairman of the NGA – said that he was going to make a drive for governors to make a joint commitment for computer science. Partovi says he knew that Hutchinson was aiming for an announcement during the the NGA Summer Meeting. "I figured let's make a parallel drive to get CEOs and business leaders to say this is important. And to then use the voice of those business leaders to encourage governors to get behind this." 'Computer science provides an essential foundation – not only for careers in technology, but for every career in today's world.' The letter reads, in part: To the Governors and Education Leaders of the United States of America: The undersigned leaders have joined forces to deliver a bipartisan message about opportunity and the American Dream. We call on you to update the K-12 curriculum in each state, for every student in every school to have the opportunity to learn computer science. This has broad support among parents, students, teachers, and employers. Why? Because computer science provides an essential foundation – not only for careers in technology, but for every career in today's world. Studies now show that students who learn computer science outperform in school, university, and beyond. At a time when every industry is impacted by digital technology, our schools should teach every student how technology works, to learn to be creators,

La Wikly
🏳️‍⚧️ Batalla por los tratamientos trans

La Wikly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 16:51


11 de julio | Nueva YorkLeer esta newsletter te llevará 12 minutos y 58 segundos.📬 Mantente informado con nuestras columnas de actualidad diarias. Este martes, Anita te hablará sobre la Comisión de la Verdad en Colombia, el miércoles atajará las elecciones presidenciales de Brasil y el jueves Emilio dedicará su columna al tema del momento en Silicon Valley.Apóyanos con una suscripción premium:Mi nueva influencer favorita en Capitalist America. Bienvenido a La Wikly.🏳️‍⚧️ Cuestión de terapiaLo importante: Estados Unidos vive días de profunda división ideológica, especialmente en cuestiones culturales y sociales de la comunidad LGBTQ+ que involucran a menores de edad. Ahora, el país lidia con una cruda batalla sobre el futuro de los tratamientos médicos de menores trans.En ese contexto, recordarás que analizamos la ley No digas gay de Florida o las batallas que se están dando en las juntas electorales.Contexto: en Estados Unidos, más 1.6 millones de personas se identifican como personas trans. De esos, más de 300.000 son menores de edad, según un estudio del Instituto Williams publicado en junio.La cifra está muy por encima de otras estimaciones previas, pero coincide con los aumentos destacados de personas que se identifican como trans en países como Reino Unido y Países Bajos.La media de edad de un menor trans que acude a una clínica para explorar opciones sobre tratamiento médico tiene en torno a 14 ó 15 años.El aumento de jóvenes trans y de sus familias que buscan tratamiento médico especializado solo ha hecho que crecer, engrandeciendo la dimensión política de cualquier proyecto legislativo que les afecte.Es ahí donde nace la necesidad de explicar bien sobre qué se está debatiendo y por qué el partido republicano está llevando esta cuestión a la primera plana del debate público.Explícamelo: multitud de estados conservadores llevan más de un año considerando o aprobando leyes para limitar el acceso a tratamientos médicos para menores que se identifican como trans.Las encuestas muestran que la ciudadanía tiene opiniones muy dispares sobre el asunto, como se puede ver en esta pregunta de NPR e Ipsos: “¿Apoyas las leyes y políticas estatales que impiden a los jóvenes trans acceder a tratamientos médicos de transición de género?”.Quienes apoyan esas leyes, en verde, representan un 31 por ciento.Quienes están en contra, en naranja, son un 47 por ciento.La división ideológica entre demócratas y republicanos es obvia, pero quizá más interesante es el alto porcentaje de la población que carece de una opinión al respecto: el 23 por ciento.Por esa razón, cabe explicar primero qué es el tratamiento médico para menores trans para después contar qué tipo de leyes se están aprobando y por qué todo esto está ocurriendo justo ahora.🩺 Glosario de conceptosEl tratamiento médico para personas transgénero se divide, a grandes rasgos, en dos tipos: la terapia de conversión (conversion therapy o reparative therapy) y la afirmación de género (gender affirmation).La terapia de conversión parte de una premisa por la que las identidades de género distintas al biológico son patológicas. Es decir, los que apoyan este tipo de terapias entienden que una persona que se identifica como hombre pese a haber nacido con las características fisiológicas de una mujer padece una enfermedad.Por tanto, la terapia de conversión sirve para intervenir y alinear la identidad de género de una persona con aquella identidad asociada al género que le fue asignado al nacer: masculino o femenino.La Academia Estadounidense de Psiquiatría Infantil y Adolescente (ACAAP) y otras asociaciones médicas afirman que este tipo de terapia carece de credibilidad científica y de utilidad clínica, además de ser dañina para la salud de las personas transgénero.En varios estados del país, no hay legislación que la prohíba o limite:La afirmación de género, tal y como la define la Organización Mundial de la Salud, abarca una variedad de intervenciones sociales, psicológicas, conductuales y médicas “diseñadas para apoyar y afirmar la identidad de género de un individuo” cuando entra en conflicto con el género que se le asignó al nacer.Las intervenciones ayudan a las personas transgénero a alinear varios aspectos de sus vidas (emocionales, interpersonales y biológicos) con su identidad de género.Esas intervenciones van desde el asesoramiento hasta cambios en la expresión social, medicamentos como la terapia hormonal o los bloqueadores de pubertad y cirugías de afirmación de género.Una investigación realizada por el Instituto Williams este mismo año concluyó que los esfuerzos para apoyar a los jóvenes trans a vivir de acuerdo con su sentido interno de género se asocian con una mejor salud mental y para sentirse más seguros en el colegio.En cambio, la terapia de conversión se asocia con tendencias suicidas.📜 Proyectos de leyDesde marzo, al menos 15 estados están considerando leyes que restringirían el acceso a la atención médica para la afirmación de género. Cuatro ya lo han hecho, aunque tres de esas leyes han sido bloqueadas total o parcialmente por las cortes judiciales, según la Kaiser Family Foundation.Los proyectos de ley conllevan sanciones severas para los proveedores de atención médica y, a veces, para las familias que brindan o buscan atención de afirmación de género para menores.Según un artículo de la Unión Estadounidense por las Libertades Civiles (ACLU), que cita a profesionales y organizaciones de atención a la salud, el acceso a los procedimientos médicos transgénero reduce drásticamente la depresión y la ideación suicida.Un estudio de 2020 publicado en Pediatrics encontró que el acceso al tratamiento de supresión de la pubertad se asoció con menores probabilidades de ideación suicida de por vida entre los adultos transgénero.En 2021, Arkansas se convirtió en el primer estado del país en prohibir los tratamientos médicos para menores transgénero. A pesar del veto del gobernador republicano Asa Hutchinson, la legislatura estatal de supermayoría republicana votó para aprobar el proyecto de ley 1570 que limita el acceso a ciertos tratamientos para jóvenes menores de 18 años.La ley prohíbe a los médicos del estado proporcionar terapia hormonal de afirmación de género, bloqueadores de pubertad o cirugías de afirmación de género a menores, o derivar pacientes menores a otros proveedores de atención médica.Su aprobación fue rechazada por las principales organizaciones médicas de Arkansas y del país como la Asociación Médica Estadounidense y la Asociación Psicológica Estadounidense.Cuatro familias de menores trans y dos médicos denunciaron la ley ante los tribunales y una corte federal bloqueó temporalmente la ley en julio de 2021. El estado apeló y se espera un juicio para finales de este mes.En Texas, el gobernador republicano Greg Abbott emitió una orden restringiendo el acceso a la atención médica de afirmación de género para menores transgénero, incluido el uso de hormonas para retrasar la pubertad y promover el desarrollo físico que sea consistente con la identidad de género del menor.La orden clasifica la provisión de cuidado de afirmación de género como “abuso infantil” y ordena al Departamento de Servicios Familiares y de Protección del estado que investigue cualquier caso informado de proveedores de atención médica o padres que brinden o busquen atención sanitaria de afirmación de género para niños.Un tribunal estatal bloqueó la directiva, pero el Tribunal Supremo de Texas solo la restringió en lo que aplica a los demandantes del caso. Otras decisiones judiciales paralelas han limitado otras investigaciones del departamento estatal que seguía las órdenes de Abbott.Tras el anuncio de la directiva, la mayoría de las principales asociaciones médicas de Estados Unidos presentaron juntas un escrito de amicus curiae para oponerse a la resolución estatal.El informe establece que el cumplimiento de la directiva dañaría irreparablemente la salud de jóvenes y niños transgénero.También, que perjudicaría a los proveedores de servicios sanitarios al ser obligados a elegir entre enfrentar sanciones o poner en peligro a sus pacientes.Muchas de estas leyes estatales tienen el potencial de contagiarse por otros estados. Líderes republicanos en las partes más conservadoras del país están esperando primero a ver qué sucede con algunos de estos proyectos para aprobar unos similares en sus estados.Algunos están pendientes de Texas y de Arkansas o de lo que el gobernador republicano Ron DeSantis está proponiendo en Florida: prohibir el tratamiento médico de personas trans bajo el seguro médico Medicaid que existe para familias con pocos recursos.🧨 La batalla políticaLa controversia en torno a los tratamientos médicos para menores trans llega en un momento político en el que el movimiento conservador ha conseguido energizar a su electorado con guerras culturales anti-LGBTQ+.Las políticas son divisorias en el plano general del país, como muestra la encuesta de NPR e Ipsos que hemos adjuntado más arriba, pero lo son menos en los estados conservadores.En el caso de estados bisagra como Texas o Florida, sus líderes abogan por esas políticas porque les da fuerza entre su electorado conservador y atraen titulares que les ofrecen mayor presencia mediática a nivel nacional, clave para políticos con aspiraciones presidenciales como Abbott y DeSantis.Encuestas de The Trevor Project muestran que el 45 por ciento de los votantes en Texas y el 54 por ciento de los votantes en Florida creen que los menores deberían tener acceso a tratamiento médico para menores trans si los recomienda su doctor y lo apoyan sus padres.La administración de Joe Biden ya ha tomado algunas medidas para restringir la terapia de conversión en programas financiados con fondos federales y expandir el acceso a tratamientos médicos de afirmación de género, pero son los juzgados los que tienen más armas para bloquear las leyes estatales.¿Y ahora? Los republicanos están aprovechando otros frentes para atentar contra la comunidad trans. Especialmente, en el caso de la participación de chicas menores trans en equipos de deportes del género con el que se identifican.El 63 por ciento de los estadounidenses se oponen a que eso ocurra, una mayoría notable que incluye a un 77 por ciento de republicanos que se oponen con vehemencia a que eso pueda ocurrir, según la misma encuesta de NPR e Ipsos.El número de chicas estudiantes trans que compiten en deportes es muy bajo, según estadísticas de la Human Rights Campaign. Probablemente apenas unas pocas miles, lo que se traduciría en un 0.2 por ciento del total de estudiantes atletas en todo Estados Unidos.Pero aun habiendo pocas de ellas, los titulares que atraen cuando ganan alguna competición tienden a magnificarse con la ayuda del movimiento conservador. Y esa es la plataforma perfecta para seguir instigando el odio contra la comunidad trans y la promoción de políticas que les afecten.Y de ahí que también se vean decenas de proyectos de ley para prohibir la participación de chicas estudiantes trans en deportes femeninos.De cara a las elecciones de medio mandato de noviembre y de las presidenciales de 2024, cabe esperar que los temas sobre la comunidad trans seguirán recibiendo mucha atención por parte del partido republicano. Falta ver si la opinión pública los acompaña.¿Desea saber más? En The New York Times tienen un reportaje fascinante sobre la cuestión de los tratamientos médicos para menores trans y el debate que existe entre la comunidad médica para entenderlos y ayudarlos. Quizá hablemos de ellos más en profundidad algún día porque para esta newsletter ya se nos quedaba largo.🎬 Una recomendaciónCon la colaboración de FilminBy Emilio DoménechTomboy es una película francesa de 2011 dirigida por Céline Sciamma. Sigue la historia de una niña de 10 años que empieza a experimentar con la forma en la que se presenta a su entorno, pero no a su familia, llegando a adoptar el nombre de Mickaël.El filme se alzó con el premio Teddy en el Festival de Berlín de su año, cuando fue muy bien recibida por la crítica. El Teddy es un galardón que otorga un jurado independiente a largometrajes que tratan temas LGBTQ.Es la segunda película de Sciamma, que encadenaría después tres títulos encumbrados por la prensa con Girlhood, Retrato de una mujer en llamas y Petite Maman. En Filmin tienen dos de ellas, así que puedes hacer maratón Sciamma.En el caso de Tomboy, la cineasta gala ya dejaba clara su exquisitez formal y su sensibilidad textual con una película que explora la identidad de una joven que acaba de empezar a verse en el mundo de forma diferente a lo que estaba preconcebido para ella.Ayuda que al frente del trabajo esté la actriz Zoé Heran, incandescente en el papel protagonista.El naturalismo que exhibe el filme en algunas escenas, con conversaciones entre chavales que se sienten reales y puras, logra transmitir las complejidades de su cuestión principal sin que se sienta impostado, algo vital en películas como esta.En definitiva, una pequeña joya.Tomboy está disponible en Filmin.🤭 Mi bebito, fiu fiuBy Marina EnrichLo importante: si has entrado en TikTok durante la última semana, es probable que hayas visto vídeos con la canción “Mi bebito fiu fiu” de fondo. Es una canción producida por Tito Silva y cantada por Tefi C  (aunque la base de la canción es “Stan” de Eminem y Dido de 2000 - pedazo colaboración), y la verdad es que la letra tiene su qué:Caramelo de chocolate, empápame asíComo un pionono de vitrina, enróllame asíCon azúcar en polvo, endúlzameY es que tú eres mi reyQué lindo eres tú, eres mi bebé, mi bebito fiu fiuContexto: la letra de la canción es de unos whatsapps que se filtraron en 2020 entre el presidente de Perú de aquel momento, Martín Alberto Vizcarra, y su supuesta amante, Zully Pinchi, excandidata al Congreso de Perú.Aunque esta canción sea una parodia, la publicación de estos mensajes fue un escándalo en Perú, ya que revelaron una supuesta infidelidad —aunque tanto Vizcarra como Pinchi lo niegan.Los mensajes se publicaron porque Vizcarra estaba siendo investigado por una supuesta recepción de sobornos a cambio de contratos de obras públicas entre 2013 y 2014, cuando era gobernador de la ciudad de Moquegua. Debido a esta investigación, Vizcarra fue destituido como presidente.La clave. La canción lo está petando. Llegó al Top 50 éxitos virales en Spotify, aunque la retiraron hace unos días de la plataforma porque, aunque sea una parodia, a los que gestionan los derechos de la canción original no les gustaba que se les vinculara con el contexto político peruano, según Silva.Que Bad Bunny la empezara a cantar en el último directo que hizo en Instagram y que streamers como Ibai o Auronplay también lo hicieran definitivamente ayudó a que su viralidad.Marvel España, Netflix España o HBO en Latinoamérica también se han sumado al carro.¿Y ahora? La propia Zully Pinchi no ha dejado perder la oportunidad y ha hecho un vídeo con  ‘Mi Bebito Fiu Fiu’ pero dejando claro que los mensajes de “Caramelo de chocolate” eran poemas que ella escribió hace muchos años y que compartió con Vizcarra para que le diera consejos.En cualquier caso, la canción ya está sonando en las discotecas y la seguirás escuchando durante al menos unas cuantas semanas en TikTok y durante unos meses en Instagram.En otro orden de cosas, hoy vuelve Lunes por el mundo con la última hora desde Japón, donde el ex-primer ministro Abe Shinzo fue asesinado el viernes; y Sri Lanka, donde el gobierno ha sido descabezado por las protestas multitudinarias desencadenadas por la crisis económica que vive el país.Podrás seguir el directo a partir de las 20:00 hora peninsular de España en Twitch.Feliz semana, This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.lawikly.com/subscribe

Blunt Force Truth
Without the 4th of July, You Don't Have Juneteenth - an Interview with Donna Jackson

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 68:59


Today's show rundown: The Liberals and the democracy was dealt a huge blow by the Supreme Court - they defanged the EPA. The Left's little pet project who told us how to live, what to breathe, etc. etc. Monumental blow to the green new deal, an enormous step forward - what it really said was, that congress can not have government bureaucrats do their job for them. Mark introduces us to Donna Jackson, a returning member of Project 21 (see bio below) - she is back to talk about how Juneteenth Must Not Replace Independence Day. Donna gives us a history lesson on Juneteenth, the where's, the how's, and all the hub bub with Juneteenth. Chuck tells us a story about a show he was doing with some nut cases, during Christmas, and Chuck was told to celebrate Kwanzaa. Donna gives us a more info on her past and how she believes division is the only reason for all these forced religious segregations. Kamala Harris never ever ran as a black American when she was in California - she race hustled everyone when she decided to run for president. Donna wants to know the root cause of VP Harris's incompetence. Mark has heard that she is blatantly lazy and will not read the memos or the briefings. Thats what happens when you are in the state of California when you have no competitors, she didn't have to try very hard. Donna Jackson, a Project 21 member who serves as the program's director of membership development, is a seasoned accountant with public and private sector experience as well as previous forays into politics and ministry. Donna earned a Bachelor of Accountancy (cum laude) from the California State University San Marcos. She has worked in accounting, auditing and management roles with major companies such as Ernst & Young and Marriott International in the private sector before serving in the public sector as a deputy controller for the Export-Import Bank of the United States. She is a member of the National Association of Black Accountants. Prior to her career in accounting, Donna was a political operative in the state of Arkansas. She worked on the successful campaigns of Governor Mike Huckabee, Senator Tim Hutchinson and Representative (now Governor) Asa Hutchinson. She was active in campaign recruiting and communications. She played a vital role during the Huckabee governorship in recruiting black candidates for executive-appointed boards and commissions in addition to helping create job-training programs at a local community college and the Arkansas Office of Workforce Development. She is a former board member of the Little Rock Minority Disability Advisory Network and a former member of the Crittenden County (Arkansas) Workforce Development Planning Committee. She was also a contributor to the Ernst & Young Diversity Think Tank. Donna originally sought a role in the church. She is a former divinity graduate of Charles H. Mason Theological Seminary in Memphis, Tennessee. It was there that she was taught the gift of administration as a vital part of the Christian ministry. Donna is a firm believer in free markets and entrepreneurship, rather than government, as a means of lifting people out of poverty. https://nationalcenter.org/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PLf4wzJaPlbAPPE8K6OOlPS-ZlEARHlRDE&time_continue=2&v=DeAXbAq8Ki4&feature=emb_logo&ab_channel=NationalCenterforPublicPolicyResearch

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 07.07.22 - Gov. Hutchinson on Trump 2024

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 39:24


Hour 1 -  Good Thursday morning! Here's what Nick Reed covers this hour: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced his resignation on Thursday. Hunter Biden filmed himself smoking crack and drinking White Claw while on a detox. Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson vowed he would not support Trump if he decides to run in 2024 — with Hutchinson saying Trump constituted “a risk to the nation” in the aftermath of the 2020 presidential election.

Politics Done Right
Trump intended a violent coup. AOC destroys Arkansas Gov. Katie Porter on SCOTUS ruling.

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 56:55


AOC destroys Arkansas Governor: Little to no support for life after birth in Arkansas: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez aka AOC did not allow Gov. Asa Hutchinson to get away with the Supreme Court's draconian decision as she reminded him his state does not take care of children. Katie Porter is right. SCOTUS ruling is an attack on the economy & freedom. Filibuster must end: Congresswoman Katie Porter (D-CA) does not mince her words. She lays out the attack by SCOTUS on American women and the path to the solution. ‘I Don't F—ing Care That They Have Weapons': Trump Wanted Security to Let Armed Supporters March on Capitol: “They're not here to hurt me,” Trump said on the day of the January 6 insurrection, testified a former aide to ex-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

Marketplace Morning Report
Inflation and uncertainty unsettle the markets once again

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 8:40 Very Popular


The markets appear to be in decline this morning as investors recover from last week’s surprising inflation numbers as well as concerns over new COVID lockdowns in China. Arkansas governor Asa Hutchinson spoke to us at length about a variety of topics, which range from inflation to gun control to the legislative duel between Florida and Disney.

Marketplace All-in-One
Inflation and uncertainty unsettle the markets once again

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 8:40


The markets appear to be in decline this morning as investors recover from last week’s surprising inflation numbers as well as concerns over new COVID lockdowns in China. Arkansas governor Asa Hutchinson spoke to us at length about a variety of topics, which range from inflation to gun control to the legislative duel between Florida and Disney.

Face the Nation on the Radio
Texas School Shooting, Gov. Asa Hutchinson, Sen. Chris Murphy

Face the Nation on the Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 44:21 Very Popular


This week on “Face the Nation with Margaret Brennan,” another school shooting rocks the country. She sits down with Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) and Governor Asa Hutchinson (R-AR) on the steps politicians can take to avoid another tragedy.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

FreightCasts
Keynote: Governor Asa Hutchinson - Future of Supply Chain

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 27:04


Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson kicks off the FreightWaves Future of Supply Chain conference in North West Arkansas. Follow FreightWaves on Apple PodcastsFollow FreightWaves on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

FreightWaves LIVE: An Events Podcast
Keynote: Governor Asa Hutchinson - Future of Supply Chain

FreightWaves LIVE: An Events Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 27:19


Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson kicks off the FreightWaves Future of Supply Chain conference in North West Arkansas. Follow FreightWaves on Apple PodcastsFollow FreightWaves on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

La Wikly
🤰¿Y si el Supremo acaba con el aborto?

La Wikly

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:49


16 de mayo | Nueva YorkLeer esta newsletter te llevará 9 minutos y 24 segundos.Happy dogs. Bienvenido a La Wikly.🤰 Aborto, en peligroLo importante: el Tribunal Supremo de Estados Unidos estaría muy cerca de poner fin al derecho al aborto por primera vez desde 1973. Mientras tanto, una veintena de estados preparan leyes restrictivas contra el procedimiento que afectarían a decenas de millones de mujeres.Explícamelo: el Supremo tiene pendiente publicar de forma oficial su decisión sobre Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, un caso sobre una ley restrictiva contra el aborto aprobada por el gobierno republicano de Mississippi.La ley prohibiría todos los abortos en el estado sureño a partir de las primeras 15 semanas de embarazo, algo que va en contra de lo establecido por el precedente de Roe v. Wade de 1973.Según el borrador de una decisión del Supremo actual filtrado por POLITICO, cinco jueces conservadores tienen previsto acabar con Roe v. Wade y permitir que la ley de Mississippi pueda entrar en efecto.Contexto: en Roe v. Wade, y en otro caso posterior en 1992 (Planned Parenthood v. Casey), el Supremo dictaminó que los estados deben respetar el derecho a la privacidad de las mujeres para practicar un aborto hasta la viabilidad del feto fuera del vientre de la madre, normalmente en la semana 24 de embarazo.Es decir, que acabar con Roe v. Wade permitiría de forma automática que cualquier estado del país pueda legislar sobre el aborto sin adscribirse a las limitaciones impuestas por ese precedente.Por tanto, más de una veintena de estados gobernados por republicanos intentarán restringir el aborto en cuanto se haga pública la decisión.Los demócratas intentaron proteger el derecho al aborto a nivel federal desde las cámaras legislativas de Washington D.C. hace una semana, pero fue un intento fútil. Carecen de la mayoría necesaria para ello en el Senado.Nota importante: que sean las cortes quienes estén decidiendo sobre el aborto se debe a que desde 1973 nunca se ha pasado una ley específica al respecto a nivel federal.📜 ¿Un derecho constitucional?Cabe recordar que Roe v. Wade fue una decisión profundamente polémica en 1973. Los jueces del Supremo concluyeron que el derecho al aborto estaba protegido por la Decimocuarta Enmienda de la Constitución estadounidense.“Toda persona nacida o naturalizada en los Estados Unidos, y sujeta a su jurisdicción, es ciudadana de los Estados Unidos y del estado en que resida. Ningún estado podrá crear o implementar leyes que limiten los privilegios o inmunidades de los ciudadanos de los Estados Unidos; tampoco podrá ningún estado privar a una persona de su vida, libertad o propiedad, sin un debido proceso legal; ni negar a persona alguna dentro de su jurisdicción la protección legal igualitaria”.Con Roe v. Wade, los jueces de aquel Supremo de 1973 hacían tres cosas:Interpretaban que la palabra libertad incluye un derecho a la privacidad. Por tanto, según ellos, la Constitución protege la decisión de las mujeres de abortar sin impedimentos del gobierno.Incorporaban esa interpretación en los 50 estados del país. Es decir, ningún estado podía limitar el derecho al aborto de las mujeres porque era un derecho protegido por la Constitución.Limitaban el tiempo en el que las mujeres conservaban ese derecho. Y tal y como definió una decisión del Supremo en 1992 (Planned Parenthood v. Casey), el aborto solo podía ser restringido de alguna forma a partir de la llamada viabilidad del feto (semana 24).La determinación del Supremo de a partir de cuándo pueden los estados legislar sobre el aborto es relevante porque cualquier desafío a Roe v. Wade y Planned Parenthood v. Casey pondría en tela de juicio los marcos establecidos por la Corte. Y eso es lo que hace el caso Dobbs v. Jackson de Mississippi:Por un lado, reta la interpretación de la palabra libertad de la Decimocuarta Enmienda porque la Constitución, argumentan, “solo cubre derechos fundamentales que están arraigados en la historia y la tradición de Estados Unidos”.Por otro, reta el sistema que decide que la viabilidad del feto sea la vara de medir para decidir cuándo los estados pueden legislar sobre el aborto o no.El Supremo podría decidir mantener la interpretación del derecho a la privacidad vigente, pero descartar el sistema de la viabilidad del feto. Algo que, curiosamente, acercaría las leyes sobre el aborto de Estados Unidos con las que hay en la mayoría de países de Europa (aborto permitido hasta la semana 10-14).🔫 Las leyes gatilloDesde 1973, los estados más conservadores han sido incapaces de aprobar leyes que restrinjan el aborto o pongan demasiados impedimentos para que las mujeres puedan abortar (por ejemplo, contar con el consentimiento de su pareja). Eso provocó dos iniciativas:Proyectos de ley que las cámaras legislativas de numerosos estados gobernados por republicanos podrían aprobar en cuanto caiga Roe v. Wade.Leyes ya aprobadas que entrarían en efecto en el instante en el que el Supremo acabe con Roe v. Wade. Esas son las llamadas leyes gatillo.En Tennessee, la ley gatillo se llama Ley de Protección de la Vida Humana. Se aprobó en 2019 y entraría en vigor 30 días después de una posible revocación del fallo Roe v. Wade por la Corte Suprema.La ley de Tennessee convertiría en un delito mayor de clase C cualquier intento de realizar un aborto, excepto en casos extremos en los que sea necesario para evitar la muerte o lesiones corporales graves y permanentes de la madre.Ese tipo de delitos son penados por la ley de Tennessee con prisión de 3 a 15 años y una multa de 10.000 dólares. Las mujeres estarían exentas de ser criminalizadas.En Arkansas, el gobernador Asa Hutchinson firmó el año pasado una ley gatillo que convierte el intento de realizar un aborto en un delito grave punible con hasta 10 años de prisión y una multa de hasta 100.000 dólares —las mujeres embarazadas están exentas de ser criminalizadas,La ley solo contempla excepciones para aquellos casos en los que la vida de la mujer embarazada corra peligro debido a una “emergencia médica”.Tampoco permite que se presenten cargos contra las mujeres que se someten o intentan someterse al procedimiento, responsabilizando a los proveedores de servicios de interrupción del embarazo.En Utah se aprobó una ley gatillo hace un par de años que haría entrar en vigor una prohibición inmediata del aborto en el estado si la Corte revierte Roe v. Wade.La ley contempla excepciones en los casos de violación e incesto pero requiere que el médico verifique que la agresión haya sido denunciada a la policía, algo que en la mayoría de los casos no sucede.Pese a ser uno de los estados más conservadores del país, unos 4.000 manifestantes se reunieron en la entrada del Capitolio del estado este fin de semana para reclamar la eliminación de las normativas antiabortistas.Además, en muchos estados existen legislaciones antiabortistas previas a Roe v. Wade que, aunque quedaron inhabilitadas con el fallo, no fueron eliminadas. Por lo tanto, podrían restablecerse con un nuevo fallo de la Corte que invalide Roe v. Wade.Es el caso de Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Michigan, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Texas, West Virginia y Wisconsin.🏜 El caso TexasEn Texas, la legislatura aprobó el año pasado una ley que prohíbe el aborto en cuanto se detectan los primeros latidos del corazón del feto, en torno a la sexta semana de embarazo, incluso en caso de violación y/o incesto.La única excepción es para aquellos casos en los que el embarazo ponga en riesgo la vida de la madre o pueda suponer una “discapacidad sustancial e irreversible de una función corporal principal”.En su momento, analizamos la ley en profundidad porque el Supremo evitó bloquearla pese a que los precedentes nacionales permiten la interrupción voluntaria del embarazo hasta la semana 22 o 24.También porque la ley de Texas presenta una particularidad interesante: no es el estado sino los ciudadanos quienes hacen cumplir la normativa. Cualquiera que gane una demanda sobre un supuesto aborto ilegal puede ganar hasta 10.000 dólares y ser retribuido por todos los gastos legales que haya tenido.🤔 ¿Y ahora?Un fallo de la Corte Suprema avalando la ley de Mississippi no sólo haría retroceder la conquista de los derechos fundamentales de la mujer en el país. También significaría un desafío enorme para las clínicas e instituciones médicas de los estados que tienen aprobadas leyes de este tipo.Según una investigación del Business Insider, no son pocos los centros de salud que no tienen protocolos para abordar la posibilidad de que estas normativas entren en vigencia.Por ejemplo, en nueve de los trece estados con leyes gatillo, se permiten exenciones para proteger la vida de la mujer embarazada en emergencias médicas. Sin embargo, ninguna agencia estatal contactada por Insider en esos estados tiene protocolos sobre cómo se define ese “riesgo que pone en peligro la vida de la paciente embarazada”.“Una cosa es introducir y promulgar leyes inconstitucionales que sabe que su estado no podrá hacer cumplir. Puede abogar por ellas, puede aprobarlas, puede hacer muchas declaraciones y eso potencialmente puede ganar su atención y votos. (...) Ahora estamos pasando a una etapa en la que la Corte Suprema emite una decisión que permitirá a los estados hacer cumplir, por primera vez desde 1973, algunas de estas leyes".Elisabeth Smith, directora de política estatal y defensa del Centro de Derechos Reproductivos.¿Desea saber más? En Insider tienen un buen reportaje sobre las dificultades para hacer efectivas las leyes gatillo en los estados en los que se han aprobado. Y en la Kaiser Family Foundation ahondan en las posibles consecuencias de una decisión del Supremo que derogue Roe v. Wade.🎬 Una recomendaciónCon la colaboración de Filmin4 meses, 3 semanas, 2 días es una película rumana de Cristian Mungiu que ganó la Palma de Oro en Cannes en 2007. Sigue la historia de dos estudiantes universitarias que comparten habitación y tienen que lidiar con el aborto de una de ellas.Mungiu cuenta poquito más —ni la ciudad ni el año en el que se ambienta el filme. Tampoco aparecen referencias directas al contexto histórico, que sin embargo está presente de forma constante en todo aquello que rodea a las protagonistas.Sin desvelar demasiado: últimos coletazos del comunismo en Rumanía y una ley muy restrictiva del aborto.La mayor magia del filme es convertir un drama más en un profundamente angustioso relato sobre dos jóvenes cuya amistad es puesta a examen por una situación imposible. Es increíble ver cómo Mungiu lo consigue a través no solo del guion o de la impresionante interpretación protagonista de Anamaria Marinca, sino también de la puesta en escena, el montaje y la dirección.Un ejemplo: la forma en la que el hombre que las ayuda a abortar las manipula a través del contexto situacional (el hotel, la petición, las alternativas). Casi ni se verbaliza, pero se palpa. Cuando Mungiu deja de incluir a las dos protagonistas en el mismo plano, y por tanto es solo una con él o la otra con él, el espectador ya sabe que las escapatorias son pocas o ninguna.Otro ejemplo: la presión que siente la protagonista en una cena con la familia de su novio se siente porque sabemos de qué está en realidad pendiente. Y es la puesta en escena de quienes la rodean, el trabajo de cámara centrado en la protagonista e incluso el sonido intermitente del teléfono los aspectos que suman a la ansiedad del instante.Es, de verdad, una película soberbia que subraya los logros del cine rumano en los últimos 15 años. Porque si empiezas con Mungiu, no te pierdas después a Cristi Puiu, a Cãlin Peter Netzer o a Corneliu Porumboiu.4 meses, 3 semanas, 2 días está disponible en Filmin.🌟 Un buen memeEn otro orden de cosas, esta semana vuelve Lunes por el mundo con novedades en la OTAN y elecciones en Somalia, Filipinas y Líbano.Podrás seguir el directo a partir de las 20:00 en Twitch.Feliz semana, This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.lawikly.com/subscribe

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2835 - The Ideology That Led The Dems Astray, & Where It Stands Now w/ Lily Geismer

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 83:12


Sam and Emma host Lily Geismer, professor of history at Claremont McKenna College, to discuss her recent book Left Behind: The Democrats' Failed Attempt to Solve Inequality. on the shift from New Deal democratic ideology, to the neoliberal tactic of entrusting social development in private enterprise in a pivot to the white suburbanite. Professor Geismer first discusses the ascendancy of this Democratic ideology, situating us in the late 80s with the rise of the MIke Dukakises, Tony Coelhoes, and Bill Clintons, embracing tech, trade, and finance as the solution to economic growth, from the Route 128 in Mass to Coelho's focus on raising corporate money, and the inspiration Governor Clinton (during his Arkansas years) took from these policies. Next, she, Emma, and Sam walk through how this sector of the Democratic party came to be, as in the wake of the 1960s the Democrats found themselves on the defensive, with all of their policy coming as a reaction to the shifting GOP, and a new guard of “Watergate Babies” coming in and opposition traditional Democrats and fueling mistrust of government, asking for a shift away from the special interest groups of the labor movement and focusing on middle-class white suburbanites. Next, Professor Geismer looks to the shift that these Democrats took from focusing on “fairness” to promoting “opportunity” in a major move away from redistributive politics and towards promoting (supposedly) meritocratic capitalism, and dives deeper into what Bill Clinton's Arkansas looked like, from his attempted emulation of Silicon Valley to bringing in ShoreBank and other early microeconomic financiers, cutting social security in preference for privatized loans to certain poor folks. Looking to the Democratic primaries of the 1980s, they then dive into why this emerging neoliberal wing was able to win over the future of the Democratic party, coming to climax with Bill Clinton's market-driven pseudo-populism, and leading to three decades demonstrating exactly why this ideology cannot function. After briefly touching on the differences between the “Watergate Baby” form of neoliberalism and Milton Friedman's form of neoliberalism, Emma, Sam, and Prof. Geismer wrap up with a discussion on whether or not we are seeing the end of this era, and what the world we are moving towards might look like. Sam and Emma also discuss the protests in the wake of the Roe v. Wade leak and the State's unsurprisingly demeaning reaction, continued Russian war crimes, and US weapons sales to Ukraine. And in the Fun Half: Sam and Emma cover Governor Tate and Jack Tapper's really lovely conversation on the criminalization of doctors performing potentially life-saving surgeries on women, Governor Asa Hutchinson dives into why he really hopes that the state he is at the lead of passes exemptions for rape and incest in their abortion ban, and (supposed) FDNY members remind women protesters that their bodies are now his. Chris from the 718 calls in on the election in the Philippines, Ronald Raygun explores why it's a waste of time to give time to people who criticize how you spend your time, and how Sam and Emma could do it better. Steve Schmidt uses Mother's Day to write myriad threads on Megan McCain, why her mother hates her, and why her father was a Russian asset, and then A Squared calls in to explore the climax of the Conservative Justice's life projects of undoing Roe v. Wade. Plus, your calls and IMs! Check out Lily's book here: https://www.publicaffairsbooks.com/titles/lily-geismer/left-behind/9781541757004/   Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE:   https://majorityreportradio.com/live-show-schedule Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: fast growing trees: With Spring and Summer nearing, it's time to make your outdoor space feel more like a yard and less of a plant cemetery .When it comes to caring for your plants, know-how matters. That's why Fast Growing Trees.com's experts curate thousands of plant varieties that will thrive in YOUR specific climate and location. Go to https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/pages/majority right now, and you'll get FIFTEEN PERCENT OFF your entire order. Get FIFTEEN PERCENT OFF at https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/pages/majority. LiquidIV: Cooler weather makes it easier to miss signs of dehydration like overheating or perspiration, which means it's even more important to keep your body properly hydrated. Liquid I.V. contains 5 essential vitamins—more Vitamin C than an orange and as much potassium as a banana. Healthier than sugary sports drinks, there are no artificial flavors or preservatives and less sugar than an apple. Grab your favorite Liquid I.V. flavors nationwide at Walmart or you can get 25% off when you go to https://www.liquid-iv.com/ and use code MAJORITYREP at checkout. That's 25% off ANYTHING you order when you get better hydration today using promo code MAJORITYREP at https://www.liquid-iv.com/. ZipRecruiter: Some things in life we like to pick out for ourselves - so we know we've got the one that's best for us - like cuts of steak or mattresses. What if you could do the same for hiring - choose your ideal candidate before they even apply? That's where ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' comes in - it gives YOU, as the hiring manager, the power to pick your favorites from top candidates. According to ZipRecruiter Internal Data, jobs where employers use ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' get on average two and a half times more candidates — which helps make for a faster hiring process. See for yourself! Just go to this exclusive web address, https://www.ziprecruiter.com/majority to try ZipRecruiter for free! Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 05.09.22 - The Latest Biden Poll Numbers

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 37:34


Hour 3 -  Happy Monday! Here's what Nick Reed covers this hour: The Biden job approval numbers are underwater in all but four states. The latest poll found that Biden is seeing a positive net approval rating in Vermont, Massachusetts, Maryland, and Hawaii. Nick breaks down the ethnicity of those who took the latest Civiqs poll. The headquarters of a pro-life organization in Wisconsin was set on fire on Sunday morning. Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Sunday said a run for president is “on the table” for 2024.

On Brand with Donny Deutsch
Walter Isaacson: The Future of the Human Race

On Brand with Donny Deutsch

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 50:01


On this episode, Donny talks with bestselling author and former editor of Time Magazine, Walter Isaacson. Walter and Donny dive right in, discussing Elon Musk's unprecedented purchase of Twitter and Walter's prediction for the future of the platform. They then dive into Walter's new book, The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race, and why we need people like Steve Jobs and Jennifer Doudna to stand at the intersection of humanity and science. But first Donny takes us through his "Brands of the Week,” naming Nancy Pelosi, Asa Hutchinson, Amazon, Samsung, and many more as either "up" or "down."  THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: Freshly - Go tohttp://www.freshly.com/DONNYfor $125 off Chime - Go to http://www.chime.com/DONNY to get started Follow: @donnyjaydeutsch @walterisaacson See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Arkansas Democrat Gazette
5/2/22: Wrapping up a Fayetteville class with Ukrainian students...and more news

Arkansas Democrat Gazette

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 3:14


Wrapping up a Fayetteville class with Ukrainian students; The talk of an Asa Hutchinson presidential bid continues; The latest COVID-19 data in Arkansas; The Arkansas Division of Corrections is ready to jam cellphones

Doc Washburn Show
Doc Washburn Show, May 2, 2022-episode 142

Doc Washburn Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 63:39


The plot behind the “pronouns”, Biden sending $33 billion to Ukraine for “Pensions” and “Social Security”?, Asa Hutchinson attempting to be the “Jeb Bush” of 2024

Arkansas Times' Week in Review Podcast
The Asa's Cloak of Geniality Tour Edition

Arkansas Times' Week in Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 22:51


Arkansas Times editors Max Brantley and Lindsey Millar talk about Asa Hutchinson pre-presidential race appearance in New Hampshire, the latest on the mystery of the missing Arkansas Museum of Fine Arts sculpture and the Little Rock School District's new superintendent.

Arkansas Democrat Gazette
4/25/22: Governor Asa Hutchinson's not ruling out a run for the presidency...and more news

Arkansas Democrat Gazette

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 4:00


Governor Asa Hutchinson's not ruling out a run for the presidency; Little Rock police are planning a "real-time crime center"; A state agency wants stories about the barriers that women face in the workforce; A fifth straight day of more active COVID cases; Toad Suck Daze is back

Fast Break with Asa
Fast Break with Asa - Episode #1

Fast Break with Asa

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 27:48


Governor Asa Hutchinson is joined by Jay Bir to introduce the Governor's new podcast Fast Break with Asa. In the first episode, Jay asks the Governor about how basketball is important to him but also about how sports helped influence how he governs. The Governor brings up the state's response to the pandemic and how he helped keep Arkansas open and moving forward. The economy of Arkansas ranks high on a new study because of state's responses during Covid.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
A Conversation with Chairman of the National Governors Association Asa Hutchinson

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 69:34


The Commonwealth Club is pleased to welcome Asa Hutchinson, Republican governor of the state of Arkansas, and the current chair of the National Governors Association (NGA). Governor Hutchinson will discuss the critical role he has played in workforce training, infrastructure and new economy jobs not only in his state, but also across the country, leading the bipartisan National Governors Association. The NGA works alongside governors in their efforts to restore public health and continue a robust, sustainable economic recovery. When he became chairman of the NGA last year, Hutchinson pledged “to build on the areas where Republicans and Democrats agree and work to remove the obstacles in Washington where we can.” As chairman, Hutchinson has focused on K–12 computer science education, promoting his state's best practices, in addition to engaging other governors on their strategies for success, to help increase computer science literacy needed for the jobs of the future. A dedicated public servant, Governor Hutchinson was appointed by President Ronald Reagan as U.S. attorney for the Western District of Arkansas. In 1996, he won the first of three successive terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. During his third term in Congress, President George W. Bush appointed him director of the Drug Enforcement Administration and later as an undersecretary in the newly created Department of Homeland Security. His experience has established him as a national resource for his expertise on trade, energy, national security, and education. The governor has been invited to the White House several times to join discussions about health care, Medicaid and education issues. The governor is the former co-chair of the Council of Governors and the former chairman of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, Southern States Energy Board, and the Southern Regional Education Board. SPEAKERS Asa Hutchinson Governor of Arkansas; Chairman, National Governors Association Scott McGrew News Anchor, NBC Bay Area In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded Live In San Francisco March 28th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Talking Michigan Transportation
Fuel tax pauses, why U.S. transit projects cost so much, and EVs saving lives

Talking Michigan Transportation

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 22:53 Transcription Available


On this week's Talking Michigan Transportation podcast, a semi-regular conversation with Lloyd Brown, formerly director of communications at the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials and now with the consulting firm, HDR.Topics include:Fuel tax pausesMichigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's veto of a bill to pause the state tax on gas and diesel fuel. Meanwhile, the governor signaled support for a temporary freeze on the sales tax on fuel.Governors and lawmakers in several other states are implementing or debating similar measures, but Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said this week he would not support lowering his state's 24.8 cent gas tax.Transit infrastructure building costsAn in-depth look by Marketplace at the soaring cost of building transit infrastructure in the U.S. According to a 2021 Eno Center analysis, the U.S. spent an average of 50 percent more on a per-mile basis for both at-grade and tunnel transit systems than other peer countries. Highways and roads are costly, too.From the story: “We do spend a lot more money here in this country, and it seems to be particularly acute in New York. But the kind of a cost per mile of building new transit, you know, is substantially higher than other developed countries with similar economies and democratic structures,” said Paul Lewis, policy director of the Eno Center for Transportation, a nonprofit think tank.The reasons are many and varied, but one expert cites the attention to ongoing maintenance and rebuilding that is prioritized in other countries. “In Paris, for instance, they've been continually building and improving and upgrading and expanding their [subway] system, you know, for about a century now. While in New York, we basically took 60 to 70 years off, and we're not sort of maintaining our system,” Eric Goldwyn, assistant professor and program director of the transportation and land use program at NYU Marron, told Marketplace.Electric vehicles (EVs) and saving livesA major shift to EVs and a clean power grid in the U.S. could save tens of thousands of lives over the next few decades, according to a new report by the American Lung Association.A story in The Verge says a drop in pollution from tailpipes and power plants would prevent up to 110,000 premature deaths by 2050, the report projects. It would also avoid 2.8 million asthma attacks and 13.4 million lost workdays. All in all, that would amount to $1.2 trillion in public health benefits. 

Up in Your Business with Kerry McCoy
Reprise | First Lady of AR Susan Hutchinson

Up in Your Business with Kerry McCoy

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 53:36


Ep 289 | Aired 03/25/2022 My guest today on Up In Your Business with Kerry McCoy is the First Lady of Arkansas, Susan Hutchinson. I loved hearing her recount the charming story of how she first met and courted Governor Asa Hutchinson at Bob Jones University in South Carolina. But don't be fooled by Ms Hutchinson's demeanor. She is brilliant. She is also a classically trained pianist who believes it is important that every child be introduced to music and holds steadfast to the practice of music education in schools. Listen to hear Ms Hutchinson's passion for children as she tears up when talking about her work with the Children's Advocacy Center and gives tips on how to recognize the signs of child abuse.

Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
Speaking of Arkansas - Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson

Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 46:08


On this episode of the "Speaking of Arkansas" podcast, Gov. Asa Hutchinson speaks about: • Sarah Huckabee Sanders, viewed as his likely replacement in 2023, and her qualities as a potential governor. • Issues he plans to work on during his remaining months in office. • Jail and prison overcrowding and whether Arkansas over-incarcerates its population. • His advice on how to approach Ukraine and Russia. • Mobile sports betting's entry into Arkansas. • His nephew Jim Hendren's Common Ground Arkansas organization. • Whether anti-intellectualism is an problem in Arkansas. • Arkansas' positioning to be heavily involved in the future of transportation. Join hosts Greg Harton and Rusty Turner of the Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette as the governor covers a multitude of topics, including his post-gubernatorial plans (can you say "New Hampshire?).

Unmasked
Episode 11: Scott Morefield on Policy Failures, School Masking and The Media

Unmasked

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022


Scott’s work for Townhall is available here and you can follow him on Twitter here.His fantastic review of “Unmasked: The Global Failure of COVID Mask Mandates” can be found here, and the book is available through Amazon and Barnes and Noble.The podcast is also available through the Apple Podcast platform.Previous episodes of the show are listed below:Episode 10Episode 9Episode 8Episode 7Episode 6Episode 5And an auto-generated transcript for the episode is below:Ian Miller:Hello, and welcome to another episode of the Unmasked podcast. Today. We have a very special guest Scott Morefield from town hall. Well, first of all, thank you so much for doing this. Welcome to the show.Scott Morefield:Thanks for having me.Ian Miller:And I, before we kind of get into the questions, I just wanted to also say thank you for your, your excellent review of my book. You know, you really hit a lot of the important points I was trying to make with the data and kind of narrative of masking, and I'm really glad it came through and, and thank you for capturing it so well,Scott Morefield:Of course it was great. The book, it, it, it's just so important cuz we, we can see this stuff coming to an end. It seems like, but a lot of these assumptions are under the surface. So to have a book out there like this, that your work Barron's work I know Megan man mantel is coming out with a book. This stuff is just really important to hammer down the fact that it's just not, there's no science behind this nonsense and we can't let, 'em just get away with evading any sort of responsibility and pretending that their methods worked. And that's why they're now letting us free. So yeah, your book's really important to, to accomplish that.Ian Miller:Well, thank you. And I, I completely agree. That's the whole point is to try to destroy the kind of underlying arguments behind masking so that it, it can't ever be kind of brought back as some kind of semi permanent rolling measure down the road.Scott Morefield:Exactly.Ian Miller:So my first question for you just kind of early on, you know, what, what made you skeptical about the effectiveness of COVID policy? Was it something immediately you were skeptical of? Did it take some time? What was your kind of initial response to, to COVIDScott Morefield:Great question. My first town hall post critical of COVID measures to was released in March, 2020. It didn't take long to realize that all this, that they were just basically full of. And, and everything that they were trying to say. And the first thing that led me to that conclusion was the actual case fatality rate of the diamond princess outbreak initially. Because I, I remember following this some in January and February and you would see people you see these videos of people falling over and it was a little scary. I, I remember watching Tucker Carlson before the lockdowns, even before we knew that how, what this would be, he, he was saying, man, you know, there was, there may be no NCAA tournament. And I was like, you've gotta be kidding me, no NCAA tournament. Well, what is this?Scott Morefield:You know, and I was hoping maybe he was exaggerating and, and there were a lot of unknowns then, but just, just seeing the numbers come in and you could see if, if there were so even understanding the difference between case fatality rate and infection, fatality rate, and seeing that people who were logged as a case was a lot that that number was a lot lower than the amount of people actually getting infected. And they kept conflating that number early on and panicking people and making them think, man, I've got a 5% chance or a 3% chance of dying from this. And that's scary. I mean, regardless, I mean, we always knew the elderly were, were more susceptible when you start seeing these massive them using these high case, fatality rates and not even speaking to infection and the amount of people, the number of people who were actually infected it, it led me to think that there was more to this than what we were being told.Scott Morefield:So that's when I was like, this is, this is not why are they doing this? Because the best way, common sense logically the best way was always to protect the vulnerable and to let rib among the healthy population, because they were not gonna be susceptible. And it just seemed so common sensical. And this was obviously way for the great Barington declaration, but there were people saying this, even when I wrote that, I mean there were I remember seeing an interview from the Texas Lieutenant governor saying the same thing and he got a lot of flack for that, but yeah, it was pretty early. I could see through it pretty early.Ian Miller:Yeah. That's a great point. A lot of people forget that the initial numbers from like, like the world health organization, I think it was 3.4% or something was the fatality rate that they were, they were thrown out there.Scott Morefield:Terrifying. Yeah, exactly.Ian Miller:It's terrifying. It was totally incorrect, but it kind of set the tone for all the policies that came afterwards. Yeah.Scott Morefield:And now they'll admit that it's 0.2, what is it? Point oh two, you know, 0.2. They'll admit that now, but this is not what we were told at the beginning. Yeah. You know, that established this.Ian Miller:Exactly. so my next question is, is a little bit kind of going specifically into masks. At this point I think it's become pretty obvious to, to most people paying attention. We're, we're seeing that kind of more widely discussed. Now, there wasn't really any evidence or sign to suggest that mask wearing would work. And I've been asking a lot of people this, and I wanna get your opinion. What was it? Do you think that made them push it so hard? Why did they flip flop on this? Early on?Scott Morefield:Yeah, really the goal, I think, especially it, it may have been altruistic at the beginning. I think the goal was, people are panicking, really panicking, and we're gonna shut some things down. But as we open up, cuz this didn't have happened until may June that I, I never even thought that this would be an issue in March or April never even occurred to me. We were going in grocery stores with no masks. Everybody was, nobody was wearing a mask. It was not a concern. The virus goes down, they've gotta convince people to leave their basement. And, and so, all right, then I think the noble lie started that they call it, I would call it a noble. I, I wouldn't call it a noble lie, but in their minds, maybe that they, they say, oh, Fauci, the noble lie was, we were trying to save it for healthcare workers.Scott Morefield:No, the noble lie. He was telling the truth at the beginning. But the noble lie was, if you wear a mask, you'll be protected and you can come out. So I think that they were basically trying to get people to come out and engage in society and, and do conduct economic activity. And they knew they couldn't do that with out a security blanket. So I think that the mask were started as a security blanket to get economic activity going. And then they had to stick with that once they committed. So everything followed from that. So they had to ignore all the previous studies that you discussed in your book to ignore all that stuff and pretend this is something totally different, even though it's not, I mean, it is, but it's not, it's still a respiratory virus. It's still if it, if it doesn't work against the flu, it's not gonna work against, COVID never worked against the flu, doesn't work against COVID, but they had to convince. And then, and then I think as, as it went along, it became more and more about control about political politics, a political statement. So I think it it's morphed over the months and years, but, but I think it started off as kind of a noble lie.Ian Miller:Yeah. I, somebody asked me, but that, and mentioned noble I as like, I, I think it's better just to tell the truth there.Scott Morefield:Just tell the truth. That's a good, good strategy. Yeah,Ian Miller:Exactly. So early on, and it is kind of a political question in some ways, but do you think that if Donald Trump had come out and openly been kind of a, an advocate for masking had been really forcefully saying everybody should wear a mask, would the, the kind of mainstream media outlet's been doing, what you and I have been doing over the last year and a half? Like, what would they would, would the results have been different as far as media coverage? If Trump had been very openly supportive of masking,Scott Morefield:Probably it, it, whatever he said it, he messed up H hydrochloric one for everybody in inadvertently, cuz he, he says, oh, this could be great. And everybody's like, no, it, it can't. He could say, he could have said this sky, this is blue. And they would've said it was green. So but I'm not sure, honestly just thinking about that. I mean our governor here in Tennessee, bill Lee, he's pretty good. He's not as good as DeSantis or known during that era. He, he's not as good as some or Kim Reynolds. But I would rank him in the top five. I'd put him at, you know, at least between five and eight in terms of pretty solid governors during this pandemic. And he I remember I'll never forget just him going up there, face it, face mask work. You couldn't drive, you know, 30 minutes in Tennessee without seeing a billboard that had that. So they, they were really pushing it here early on. So I'm not necessarily convinced that that would've changed the narrative a whole lot. I mean, you, you can see how the react and how the reaction is to Trump now when he starts touting the vaccines. So, but yeah, they, they might, they might have it, it might have had some shift in it, but I, I don't know that it would've had a whole lot.Ian Miller:It's interesting. I, I have gone running around about that myself. I'm I'm not sure. I, I think that there would've maybe early on, especially there would've been more skepticism and that might've helped, it stopped spreading so widely as the most important thing toScott Morefield:Do. You're saying, you're saying if he would've led from the start and been the one saying, wear a mask, wear a mask. Yeah, yeah, yeah. If the media would've been skeptical,Ian Miller:Cause early on, there were some articles from even the wall street journal saying like everybody wore masks in the 1918 flu and it was useless. So you know, that's true. Maybe there might have been a little changeScott Morefield:That's intriguing. Yeah. That's intriguing. I, I don't, I don't know. That's it feels like such a, at this point now, anyway, it feels like mandatory masking is such an, an evil, like it's become such a societal evil and a menace that it it's hard for me to imagine the media being against it.Ian Miller:Yeah, yeah.Scott Morefield:Even with Trump,Ian Miller:I know,Scott Morefield:I think eventually they probably to come around and jumped on board. I mean, they do it with the vaccines they're they love the VA. They know that he's responsible in some way or, or in a lot of ways for these quick, you know, rest vaccines, but they're still behind those. So maybe not.Ian Miller:It's good. That's a lot of interesting hypotheticals there. Yeah. And you, you kind of brought this up a second ago, but I wanted to get your sense of, you know, who do you think has done the best job in the us policy wise? Or what are the governors that have handled this best or, or local politicians you think?Scott Morefield:Yeah. So I would say Cameron Reynolds, probably number one, right there. Maybe DeSantis a close second. Kim Reynolds, I mean, what other state passed the law? Banning mass mandates, banning mass mandates a real law that doesn't have a sunset. So there's a law in Tennessee now and, and we managed to, to pass that, but it has a sunset and it also says that the governor can override the law. So that's interesting. I don't know why that's there. But yeah, I guess I do know why that's there, but it's, it's not all it's played out to be but has stuff on the books that actually protect their people from COVID fascism going forward. And I know DeSantis has that mentality too. And so it just, maybe their legislature is not as conservative as I is. So I think that if he had his druthers on everything, he would be every bit as good, but I would Kim Reynolds Ron DeSantis, Christie, no comes to mind.Scott Morefield:I, I know that there's issues that conservatives would disagree with her on lately non COVID related, but as, as far as COVID, she's been really solid. Billy, because honestly I've got issues with Billy of Tennessee, but he never did impose a statewide mass mandate and I've gotta give him credit for that. That's, that's a, that's a huge thing in my book, if you, I mean, obviously a governor has more authority to do that than a president would. But I still don't believe the governor, a governor should have that authority. I think that's, I don't think anybody should have that a but if anybody does, it would be a local, it should be a local county officials. But yeah, I'm trying to think. See, Alabama had a mass mad at Louisiana had one Tate Rees came along later. Greg Abbot came along later. So the, those guys in a second, I would put those guys in a second tier about who am I missing? Oh Rick, its Nebraska. He, he was solid, really solid him in top five for sure.Ian Miller:One other one that I, I, I think we all kind of his flies on the radar a bit was I think it was Henry MCMA masters in South Carolina.Scott Morefield:Mm that's true.Ian Miller:They, he did a really good job. It's just it's cuz South Carolina just doesn't get any attention seemingly that'sScott Morefield:Right. He did fantastic.Ian Miller:Yeah. It, it is. I, I mean, so this is kind of a related question. So, you know, I, I, it seems like from what we've seen in national elections, even local elections recently that the, the politicians that of came out there and, and allowed for more freedom and fought back against kind of these insane policies have benefited in elections and in polling and things like that. But you know, we're seeing some of these, these kind of blue state governors and maybe even some national change in terms of, of policy direction. So, you know, in the next couple of years, is that gonna be forgotten, are people, or will it benefit somebody like Ron DeSantis from winning the, you know, the 20, 24 presidential election, for example, or, or is it gonna be kind of have faded in memory by that point that it won't be as big of a, a benefit?Scott Morefield:I hope that the people don't forget. I, I really do. I, I think that's, I think political necessity has, is what has caused, like you said, it has caused some of the leaders to kind of gravitate over to what we would call team reality on this. The public is very susceptible to forgetting things, but this has been a two year ordeal. This has not just been a month, two weeks to flatten the curve, whatever this has been two years to flatten the curve. I don't think that people are gonna be quite as forgiving. I mean, there, there's gonna be a little bit of that fade, but I people are not gonna be as forgiving as they have been for issues in the past now, to what degree that holds true. I don't know, but if what we're gonna see a lot this year with Florida, if DeSantis can pull off the wind and when reasonably convincingly, I think that'll be a really good sign that people are remembering, especially in that state where you've got a lot of, you've got just a lot of, of division and a lot of, a lot of diversity and, and a lot of it's just, it's, it's kind of a swing state.Scott Morefield:That's been leaning Republican lately, but if he can win that says that'll say a lot about that. And I don't know, as far as 20, 24, it's really hard to predict, you know, we're gonna see, I, I feel like you, this may be a future question, but I don't know that we're done with COVID. So this may be an ongoing battle and on sleeve, it is, it's probably gonna be good for conservatives because our side, yeah, we're going, it's going slow, but our side keeps gaining ground. It's not like we're giving up any ground here. We keep gaining groundIan Miller:Politically.Scott Morefield:So that's a good sign.Ian Miller:That actually was another question I had. So we'll, we'll go into that one right now. That's good timing. So, you know, I think my concern right now is that it's become more politically acceptable or even encouraged now for places to lift mask mandates or, or some remove some policies. But as soon as we get another new variant, which I'm sure will inevitably come, or, you know, we get the surges that we've seen seasonally in the summer when months, or, and especially in the winter months they'll go right back to it. And all of a sudden the science will change again. You know, is that too pessimistic? Do you agree with that? It seems like you agree, but what are your thoughts? Yeah.Scott Morefield:Yeah. I'm afraid of that in some areas, of course you see a little bit of a diminishing aspect to that, because if you interestingly like with the Delta wave, you, you would see some, you saw a, a decent amount of a decent number of places rolling back into mandates. And, but then with you saw a few less, so it's not like everybody just went right back, mass mandates all the GLP areas for the most part. I mean, I know you had ASA Hutchinson, Arkansas begging his legislature to overturn a law that he has signed banning mass mandates. Because you know, he's worthless, but, but in most red places lifeless normal mean I'm in Tennessee. Life was normal during Delta and onn for the vast majority of people for the large part, it was totally normal. Except a few times I had to fly and that was that's always hellish.Scott Morefield:But, but as far as just going into stores, there was no issues. Some people wear mask, some people don't and it's live and let live, which is really the way it's all. It should have been this whole time. But I don't know. I mean, it, it is, it's, it's hard to say what the as far as them going back into it, I will, I will say that they've backed themselves into the corner. That was my latest town hall actually on Monday. But because I know that some people don't like I'll bring up the fact that N 90 fives. Okay. So now they say that N 90 fives work as protection. Okay. So they've this whole time they've been saying that source control source control. So two people can be wearing a t-shirt material over their noses and it's source control, and then we're all protected.Scott Morefield:Right? Well, the more stuff that comes out, the more that's been deemed nonsense, but now you've got all these people, Leanna WY as east jaw the Washington post, the, the Atlantic saying that one way masking were works to protect you in a meaningful way. And so you would caveat that with wear it correctly, maybe double mask have it fit, tested, replace it regularly. Don't touch it. So you could, you could caveat with all these things, but theoretically, at least they're now claiming, well, they are claiming that one way masking works to protect the wearer. So what person would be, if someone, if anybody is going to wear a mask correctly, it's gonna be somebody who's themselves immunocompromised. So wear the mask. And I don't have to wear one because one may masking, according to them works. Right. So I don't know.Scott Morefield:Yeah, you would've, you, I know that you've done charts on N 95 mandates. We know they don't work the N 95 mandates. So we don't, there's reasons for that. One of the reasons that people don't wear 'em right. Whatever you could say, you know, it's not sustainable. You can't wear an N 95 for long, correctly, because you're not gonna be able to breathe. Yeah. but theoretically, right. They can protect themselves. So force masking should be over from a logical perspective. So like I had a tweet thread out the other other day, keep the receipts because I just put a link to in Avery tweet a link of all these articles where they're now saying that, because they're saying that to get their people on board with, Hey, we're gonna have to relax the Mendix for now. Sorry, but you guys are gonna have to come outta your basement. You know, we love ya. Yada, yada. So Leanna, WY, you know, the queen of the IANS, her self on CNN says this now, you know, she's the voice of reason now. SoIan Miller:You made a, a big money betting against that just six months ago.Scott Morefield:I would've never guessed that, you know, MIS lock the vaccinated in their homes exactly. Or the UN vaccinated, you know?Ian Miller:Yeah. so one of interesting thing you just brought up is kind of the protection of one way masking, but a lot of that same argument could be applied to like vaccination where people that have been vaccinated. Exactly. You're protected. Right. That's the whole thing, supposedly. So is it right? So you, you know, you should feel protected. You shouldn't be worried about what everybody else is doing around you because you're not gonna get seriously ill. Yeah. So kind of relatedly, you know, these politicians brought in vaccine passport policies in a lot of the country and in the world, which never made any sense by that logic, but there's still an effect in many areas, you know, France Italy's policy just got so much worse where they literally fired. I think it was over 500,000 people over 50 for not getting vaccinated. There's still an effect in, in LA, in San Francisco, New York are, are, you know, what are your think? Are these policies close enough to, is close to ending as well? Are they, you know, how is this remotely defensible at this point after this winter? You know, what, what do we do with this?Scott Morefield:That is mindboggling to me. I mean, you can see some, I I've seen trickles of different companies doing away with their vaccine mandates. So that's a good sign. Washington DC, a lot of pressure because you've Maryland to the north. You've got Virginia to the south. None of those have vaccine mandates. So it's absolutely crucifying DC restaurants. And I'm not sure that mayor Bowser even cares about any of that, but it is an interesting I love seeing the free market at work there because the more places that way, there's a, and that's what they've been trying to avoid, but they've not been able to avoid the fact that there's a control group. They hate that they hate control groups because it just shows their insanity for what exactly what it is. The vaccine mandates it. We're, we're talking about a vaccine that's two years, almost two years. It's not two years old, but it's, you know, it's been development for almost, you know, a year and a half. It's against the spike protein where three variants from that it's less and less efficacious for less and less time the longer time goes by. So they never explain that stuff. They never will say or explain why you need a vaccine against the spike protein of the is it the wild varying or the VE it's, you know, the, maybe the wild variant,Ian Miller:I think it's the wild. Yeah.Scott Morefield:Yeah. So why do we need a vaccine against the spike protein of the wild we're dealing with right now that evade it for the most part. And then if you're gonna have to get a new vaccine every three months, or even Reuters admitted six months that it loses most of its efficacy, whatever protection it, it got, which I'm not convinced there's any there, because you, you have a, for two weeks after getting the VA risk is greatly increased. So by the time you level that out, are you even getting any protection, but say you do get protection six months of you're gonna have to get this job again every six months. I mean, what kind of sense does that make? It is just not, it's not sustainable. So I don't wanna understand even the concept of fully vaccinated. Well, if they're, if they're gonna be intellectually honest with us, they would need to say that fully vaccinated is the same. They keep trying to make this different term and conflated with up to date. Well, what is that? Cuz if you were vaccinated a year ago, a I promise in any meaningful sense of the word, you're not fully vaccinated, you're only, you're not even, you're not even immune, but if you had it two years ago, we've got studies out. Now that say your antibody teachers are probably real similar to what they were when you first had it.Scott Morefield:Yeah. So it's astounding to me just ignoring the natural immunity. And then just the nonsense about the vaccine it's, it's, it's, it's become a God to them. I mean, vaccination and masking are basically the, I mean, this is their new God and they're gonna go down, swinging with it.Ian Miller:Yeah. kind of relatedly to that. Yeah. Have you been surprised by what people have been willing to put up with with these policies? I personally have been, but what have you been surprised? Yeah.Scott Morefield:Yeah. It's, it's, it's crazy. I remember walking into E even now in east Tennessee for me. I'm I'm for, I've been blessed, just living where I live. Where do you live by the way? IIan Miller:I'm in Southern California.Scott Morefield:Okay. Oh my gosh.Ian Miller:Yeah.Scott Morefield:Yeah, you you've you've had it rough. So you probably don't. I mean, it, it, you know, you're you probably don't have the luxury that I've had, but even here we had a mass mandate from, I guess it was August of 2020 until March, 2021. So about seven to eight months, we had a county mass mandate in our county and it was imposed by the health department and, and the mayor. And there was no teeth to it. So you, you, you know, there was nobody going in and checking a business and saying, where's your mask? Nothing like that, but, but even then I was shocked at how many people went along with it, cuz I never did. You know, so we would walk into places without a mask and you know, I would, I would see maybe one or two other people in a grocery store that didn't have one. It's always nice just to see somebody with some sanity there. But, but it was a little bit unnerving to be honest to how many people were going along with this. It's, it's always that. And so, and then I, I would listen to accounts of people, cast and whatnot and, and people in places like Ohio or where you are especially, and you know, you, you don't, you try not wearing a mask in a store and you're gonna get kicked out even wearing it under your nose would probably get you kicked out.Scott Morefield:Yeah. so yeah, it's, it's the people's compliance, is it, was it very unnerving? It is nice to see more and more, cause you know, back then you would see the polls in 70 plus percent of people supported mass mandates and that's gradually coming down so you can see some of that stuff coming down. So I think people are getting, like I said, you know, we're, we're winning, but not as fast as I would like. But I think people are starting to wise to it, but the, the willingness of people to just put away critical thinking to me is just, it's, it's, it's amazing. I mean, all of us have lost friends over this. I've lost friends people that just, you know, they, they, our views can abide and there's no way to get past it. Yeah. And it's, it's, it's, it's sad.Ian Miller:Yeah, absolutely. It, I, I definitely have lost friends and it is, it's kind of hard to believe that it's come to that, butScott Morefield:Made a lot of new friends too.Ian Miller:Exactly, exactly. So kinda switching gears for a second, you know, you write for, for town hall what are some of the challenges for you for writing, you know, writing for a news outlet? Have you felt any pressure to kind of self censor your opinions? So, you know, you're not offending people or is there, is there any of that or has it been totally fine?Scott Morefield:Yeah, that's a good question. It's I was at the daily Culver when the when I, this started and I, I had done a, I did a weekly call with town hall for a while done that since I guess, 2018. But, but as far as the news, we had to be really careful. I, I remember starting off, I would, I would just try to pick things to cover that I knew were we write straight at the daily, the call we, we wrote rate news. So I would just cover media hits that, you know, if Scott Atlas did a media hit on Fox news, that was gold. I would try to cover that stuff. Pretty, but I had to do it without bias in the writing part, but that's fine cuz he's saying what he needs to say. Well, everything that needs to be said, I don't need to say it.Scott Morefield:I just need to cover what he said. So it's, it's the, the, I would just try to pick things that, that further the truth in that regard, but it started as it got more and more political, it just got tougher and tougher to pick things that had to do. I know for a while the mask became, it was harder to get those kind of stories approved. And then, you know, at town hall, my column, I can cover what I want generally, but there's certain things you have to be careful about and it all revolves around and, and at daily caller too, it all revolves around not wanting to get kicked off Facebook and that's, that's where it all comes, what it all comes down to. So it's not that the people disagreed with me so much, it's just, Hey, we don't want to lose.Scott Morefield:We don't wanna get kicked off Facebook. And it's a, it's a, it sucks. I mean, that's why it is gonna, you know, truth socials coming out in a month and we've got alternate, finally, some alternate platforms that are workable, but they're still not Twitter and Facebook and you can't reach as many, nearly as many people. And, and if it's, if it's an echo chamber, what good is that? Yeah, in some ways. But I think that that covering stuff was, I, I, I had to choose my words. You can't just come out and say the things that I would say about the vaccine, if you and I were just talking in a bar somewhere you can't say the things that Alex Berenson says, even though I, I suspect that Alex Beren been correct almost a hundred percent of the time you couldn't come right out and say that stuff in a column, usually you just have to wait, you have to hide behind some bigger names saying it and then report that they said it, or just be really careful on how you write it. So yeah, if a column is different, obviously from a news coverage coverage. So, but I, I on the news coverage stuff, I had to be really careful with my words on a column. I could be a little stricter or a little looser with what I say, but even then I couldn't just be as open as I would like to be. And that's because they want, they don't want to get banned by Facebook.Ian Miller:They, that's interesting to bring that up. And I noticed you, you recently wrote a column about Joe Rogan which is, is obviously still a very hot topic of conversation and all the kind of going along with it, all the increased censorship calls from literally from the government, which is kind of scary. But so you know, what are your thoughts on this and what was important for you in your mind to take away from your article on Joe Rogan?Scott Morefield:Yeah, that, that was the, the fact that they're trying, that they were trying so hard and this was an op that there was no doubt that they came after him with both barrels. They purposely dug up just outta context, not defending the use of the N-word, but this was not even in their same planet as calling somebody that maliciously, you know, he's just uttering the syllables. Okay. That's not, it just it's non sense what they were going after him for, and they're doing it because he, he facilitates conversations. They don't like, and that's really scary because if the lift hates anything, they hate their worldview being challenged. And when you can convert back and forth and dialogue with people, maybe you can convince 'em that you might be right, or you can show them data. You can show them a chart, Hey, what's up with this chart?Scott Morefield:Explain this to me. It's a conversation. Joe Rogan has conversations and he has people on there that the left disagrees with. They hate that they would never do that. You're not gonna see one of us make it onto MSNBC for a conversation. You know, you're, you're not gonna, or a leftist podcast to, we're not gonna get invited to anything like that because we've got facts on our side and they don't want to hear that. So that's why they hate Joe Rogan. He he's kind of a, just himself, but he's just an open mind, go likes to talk and likes to he's open minded. And he likes to have conversations with people. So that's, it's, it's bone chilling. It's our well end. There's so much our well end about this age that we live in, but the attempts to silence this guy we're pretty blatant. I don't know. What's I don't think he'll, I mean, he, he probably won't lose his he's maybe too big right now, but they almost got him and yeah. And I think they'll still, they're probably still digging in the archives trying to find something that he said to try to get him.Ian Miller:Yeah.Scott Morefield:But it's not because they're, you know, they're not crying in a corner because the other, the magical syllables I can tell you that.Ian Miller:Yeah, absolutely. Intent matters, I think is, is a, exactly is a lesson that everybody needs to take to heart here. Yes. So I, I wanted to, I have just a couple, like two more questions for you, but the one of my, my senses has been that the media in a lot of ways has been responsible for a lot of these policies that we've seen by not covering them by not presenting any of the harms. I mean, you can see fact checks and they'll say like, oh, there's no harms for, for putting masks on kids, for example you know, by ignoring the data and not showing the impact of the policies, like basically just showing here's what we did. What was the result? Is there any hope to solve to them at this point? Are they totally gone? What can we do about the media?Scott Morefield:Yeah. It's, it's so polarized right now. There's no such thing as ma I guess the closest thing we might have the mainstream media is the wall street journal. Everything else is either a super right or, or, or they call 'em super right, because they're so they're, they're trying to report things as normal, but it's right by the left standards. And most outlets of course are, are super left leaning. So I don't know. I, I don't, I don't think there's any hope for 'em. I, I think that it, everybody is gonna go to their places to get the truth. I think Fox news does a good job of trying to be balanced as much as they can, and that comes across as right. Leaning just because these days being balanced is right leaning, but which is really crazy to, to think about. But and you know, they've got their opinion shows and stuff in the evenings, but as far as the website and their news division, that's as balanced as you can get. I think they do a good job with that, but I don't think there's any bringing back to left wing media. I think that they're too far gone and they're, they're, COVID co COVID cult members too. So you can't come back from that. You're, they're indoctrinated all the way.Ian Miller:I agree. It's it's painful to see some of the stuff that gets published and the comments that are made. And I mean, I, you know, I'm sure you see it. I do this all the time where it put these comments up from CNN and then they're immediately disproven shortly afterwards. Yes. so I, you wrote about this recently with the former CDC director. So is it important to you as we see the kind of conversation changing, you know, like Washington post saying mass mandates never worked, is it important to you that they, they just get it right now? Or is it, is it important that they kind of admit that they were always wrong from the beginning?Scott Morefield:Yeah. I'll, I'll settle for them just getting it right now, but it's, it's let's just, let's just take our wins, even Leanna win. Goodness gracious. I know that she's that she's been insane this whole time, but I'll take whatever she'll give us. And not just because that moves to the Overton window a little, it that's, the, the goal is to not let the, if our goal is to not let this happen again, that's the goal. So anytime they admit something, then they foster the goal of not having this happen again, I'll take that. It would be great if they would apologize. I don't think they ever will. Fcis definitely, you know, he'll probably never, never admit any of this stuff, but of course, yeah, the, the post about red Redfield, the former CDC director, he was, you know, talking about how they lot less, a lower opinion of mass than he wants had when he said they were as, as good as a vaccine, which that's an ironic statement in itself. It became one cause maybe he was right, but for different reasons. But yeah, we'll, we'll take what we can get from, from anybody that wants to come on board with some reality, always looking for those stories. I mean, when I'm clipping the headline or clipping news I do that on Twitter, like clip, clip you know, different, various talking heads saying things that's the stuff I look for the most for somebody on CNN that says something that may makes sense. I'll I'll put it up. Yeah. Cause they need to be watched.Ian Miller:Yeah. So my last question for you, and I think this was the case in Nashville. I'm, I'm not a hundred percent sure, but how can anybody look at the continuation of like school masking policies, where there's no mask mandate for anything else in life? Like, you know, you walk into the store and no problem, but the schools are, they're the only place that are masked. How can anybody look at that and, and say that this is based off of science or evidence at this point,Scott Morefield:None they're they're cult members there there's none. I mean, they, they they ignore and there's so much, there's so much evidence on this. And so many studies done and so many mainstream people coming out now and saying that this makes no sense. And you still have people hanging onto this. Thankfully they're a minority now. But that's the worst thing is, is the forcibly muzzling of children, the forcible muzzling of children. It it's horrifying that it's gone on this long. And just, just the fact at just the fact that there are still school districts allowing this to happen is beyond me. I, I, I, I don't understand it, but it's gonna take going and it's, it's gonna take running against school board members who vote for these things. I mean, we had a massive school board shift in San Francisco. I, I, I don't know how big a part mask played in that, but but interestingly, they were able to re they, they recalled three school board members just because of stupid COVID stuff.Scott Morefield:I mean, keeping the schools closed was a big factor. So it's gonna take just replacing school board members and going forward. Any, any school board candidate should be asked, Hey, if, if if there's a COVID resurgence, are you gonna forcibly muzzle our kids because, and what data are you gonna show that says, this has any effect? Cause like with your charts, if, if, if it, if it had any effect, we would it right, because Florida, Tennessee, a lot of states had counties that did mask in counties that did not mask, especially Florida. And there's no discernible difference at all.Ian Miller:Yep.Scott Morefield:And you would see that and they don't, I don't understand. It's just, it's so frustrating when you talk to people and they, they, I don't, it's, there's so much cognitive dissonance that they're willing to accept. And, and I, I still, I can only explain it by using terms like religion and cult, because that's the only way you can explain irrational behaviorIan Miller:And least. That's a great point about asking these potential school board, you know, politicians down the road and everybody's gonna have to pay a lot closer attention to this going forward. You know what absolutely. What's your position on this? Thank you so much, Scott, for doing this. I really appreciate you coming on the show. You can follow Scott on Twitter at SK Moorefield and then at obviously you read@townhall.com. There's tons of great columns you put up all the time. So go check it out and thank you again, Scott.Scott Morefield:Thank you Ian. It was great being here. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit ianmsc.substack.com/subscribe

State of the Union with Jake Tapper
Interviews with: Secretary of State Antony Blinken, New York City Mayor Eric Adams and Governor of Arkansas Asa Hutchinson.

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 38:59


First, Jake interviews Secretary of State Antony Blinken about Russian aggression overseas and the key test it represents for President Biden. The US vows “massive consequences” if Russia invades Ukraine, but with democracy in peril at home, does the US have leverage? Next, with thousands of kids across the US back to virtual learning due to the Omicron spread, New York City Mayor Eric Adams is drawing a line. He joins Jake to discuss how we can protect the education of our children and also defends the plan to let legal non-citizens vote in NYC. Then, Jake speaks with Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson, about how on the anniversary of the insurrection Republican Senator Ted Cruz called January 6 a “terrorist attack” before backtracking during a Fox interview, plus his view on Biden's vaccine mandates for businesses and the issue of Covid cases skyrocketing to record highs in his state. Finally, is January 6 who we are? Jake gives an analysis of the Capitol insurrection one year after the attack. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

State of the Union with Jake Tapper
Interview with Chief Biden Medical Adviser Dr. Anthony Fauci; Interview with Republican Sen. Pat Toomey; Interview with Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson; Interview with Oregon Gov. Kate Brown

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 39:46


First, Jake talks with President Biden's Chief Medical Adviser Dr. Anthony Fauci about the pandemic among unvaccinated Americans and the growing spread of the Delta variant. Then, Jake interviews Republican Sen. Pat Toomey about the latest on the infrastructure negotiations on Capitol Hill. Next, Jake speaks to Republican Governor Asa Hutchinson of Arkansas about what can be done to combat vaccine hesitancy in his state. Finally, Jake talks with Democratic Governor Kate Brown of Oregon about climate change playing a role in the fires in her state. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy