Podcasts about Electoral college

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Set of electors who are selected to elect a candidate to a particular office

  • 2,241PODCASTS
  • 4,098EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 1, 2022LATEST
Electoral college

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    Best podcasts about Electoral college

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    Latest podcast episodes about Electoral college

    Straight White American Jesus
    Weekly Roundup: SCROTUS

    Straight White American Jesus

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 62:20


    Brad and Dan are back together. They begin by discussing the validity and significance of Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony at the J6 hearing this week. Brad implores us not to get distracted by claims that her account of certain episodes is being disputed by off-the-record sources who won't testify under oath in front of the nation. They then turn to SCOTUS. Dan breaks down the religious freedom case in which the Court ruled that praying after football games is part of the free exercise of religion. He and Brad discuss why this is coercive, damaging to religious minorities, and just plain incoherent. In the final segment, Brad previews Moore v. Harper, a case SCOTUS will hear next term. This case could give state legislatures full control over the electors they send to the Electoral College. What does that mean? It means votes - and democracy - could be nullified when state legislatures decide that election results are invalid and they are sending alternative sets of electors with no oversight from state courts or the governor. Pre-Order Brad's new book, Preparing for War: The Extremist History of White Christian Nationalism and What Comes Next: https://www.amazon.com/Preparing-War-Extremist-Christian-Nationalism/dp/1506482163 To Donate: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/BradleyOnishi Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/straightwhiteamericanjesus SWAJ Apparel is here! https://straight-white-american-jesus.creator-spring.com/listing/not-today-uncle-ron For access to the full Orange Wave series, click here: https://irreverent.supportingcast.fm/products/the-orange-wave-a-history-of-the-religious-right-since-1960 For an ad-free experience and to support SWAJ: https://irreverent.supportingcast.fm/straight-white-american-jesus-premium Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://swaj.supportingcast.fm

    Loving Liberty Radio Network
    06-29-2022 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

    Loving Liberty Radio Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 109:37


    Hour 1 * Guest: Dr. Murray Sabrin, From the immigrant son of Holocaust survivors to an American Libertarian Icon Sabrin understands and communicates HOW Libertarianism Can Save America – MurraySabrin.com * Election ?Fraud? * FORTUNE publishes his forecast on the next bust. * Inflation, recession and the Federal Reserve. Dr. Murray Sabrin literally wrote the book (actually two books) on the Fed's direct responsibility for instigating both inflation and recession. * Supply chain disruptions – including baby formula. Made in DC! * Navigating the Boom/Bust Cycle: An Entrepreneur's Survival Guide. * Has WWIII started? Is the Russia-Ukraine war the flashpoint? * Is Secession A Real Possibility? * America: The Next Seventy Years – Video at Sabrin Center for Free Enterprise. * Gun Control. The Second Amendment is the libertarian answer. * Immigration. How to end the “invasion.” A proposal from an immigrant. * Abortion? Pro-life is the libertarian answer. Hour 2 * Howard Stern voiced his displeasure with the Supreme Court choosing to overturn Roe v. Wade. “I'm actually going to probably have to run for president now,” Stern, 68, told listeners, according to The Hill. * Stern is not a fan of the Electoral College system – “I'm going to do the very simple thing that'll set the country straight. One vote, one person. No more Electoral College. I'm getting rid of it. * Michael Stenger, who was the United States Senate sergeant at arms who oversaw January 6 found dead! * Stenger resigned from his duties as Sergeant-at-Arms a day after Jan. 6, 2021. * During a February 2021 hearing with the Senate Homeland Security Committee, Stenger had called for the investigation of the role of “professional agitators” during the incursion, Daily Mail reported. – “Investigations should be considered as to funding and travel of what appears to be professional agitators,” Stenger said. * Guest: Dennis Leavitt, President of United We Pledge – UnitedWePledge.org * Celebrating our Freedom, Family, & Faith – “United We Pledge is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan, nondenominational foundation established to celebrate our shared responsibility and allegiance to the traditional American values. * United We Pledge's goal for the Liberty Village in Hurricane, UT is to restore patriotism in the youth and citizens through educational programs. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

    The Daily Article
    Will Howard Stern run for president?

    The Daily Article

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 7:59


    Howard Stern is considering a presidential bid and says his platform will have only two goals: to amend the Electoral College and to add five more Supreme Court justices. In The Daily Article for June 30, 2022, Dr. Jim Denison covers why Stern wants to run for the presidency, an article by sports journalist Jemele Hill on why she chose to have an abortion, and another article by Anglican priest Tish Harrison Warren on the myth of "bodily autonomy." Author: Dr. Jim Denison Narrator: Chris Elkins Subscribe: http://www.denisonforum.org/subscribe

    The Voice of Reason with Andy Hooser
    The Voice of Reason- Wednesday June 29th, 2022

    The Voice of Reason with Andy Hooser

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 42:44


    Happy Mid Week! Guest Nathan Lewis, co-author "Inflation" joins to discuss economic struggles, why inflation is hitting hard, supply chain issues, going back to a gold standard, and more.  Recap Illinois primary elections. Another Trump endorsed candidate wins primaries...will this help Illinois GOP in general election, or was it a Democrat sabotage in an open primary?  Discussion of Electoral College at state levels...would it work and is it necessary?

    The Real News Podcast
    How America's broken electoral system made the Jan 6 insurrection possible

    The Real News Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 26:45


    America's electoral system is broken. From partisan gerrymandering and voter suppression to an Electoral College that sidelines the popular vote, it should surprise no one that a majority of Americans don't believe they live in a democracy. As the January 6 hearings play out in Congress, some argue that the attempted coup on that fateful day was only made possible by the fact that the American political system subverts meaningful democratic participation. How can progressives organize in the face of such widespread voter apathy and systemic barriers preventing so many from exercising their most fundamental democratic right? TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez chats with former TRNN senior reporter Jaisal Noor, who's spent the past few months reporting on grassroots get-out-the-vote campaigns from rural Georgia to Nevada.Read the transcript of this report: https://therealnews.com/how-americas-broken-electoral-system-made-the-jan-6-insurrection-possiblePre-Production/Studio: Jaisal Noor, Cameron GranadinoPost-Production: Cameron GranadinoThis story is part of a series that was made possible with the support of the Solutions Journalism Network, a nonprofit organization dedicated to rigorous and compelling reporting about responses to social problems.Help us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

    Liberty Roundtable Podcast
    Radio Show Hour 2 – 06/29/2022

    Liberty Roundtable Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 54:49


    * Howard Stern voiced his displeasure with the Supreme Court choosing to overturn Roe v. Wade. "I'm actually going to probably have to run for president now," Stern, 68, told listeners, according to The Hill. * Stern is not a fan of the Electoral College system - "I'm going to do the very simple thing that'll set the country straight. One vote, one person. No more Electoral College. I'm getting rid of it. * Michael Stenger, who was the United States Senate sergeant at arms who oversaw January 6 found dead! * Stenger resigned from his duties as Sergeant-at-Arms a day after Jan. 6, 2021. * During a February 2021 hearing with the Senate Homeland Security Committee, Stenger had called for the investigation of the role of “professional agitators” during the incursion, Daily Mail reported. - “Investigations should be considered as to funding and travel of what appears to be professional agitators,” Stenger said. * Guest: Dennis Leavitt, President of United We Pledge - UnitedWePledge.org * Celebrating our Freedom, Family, & Faith - “United We Pledge is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan, nondenominational foundation established to celebrate our shared responsibility and allegiance to the traditional American values. * United We Pledge's goal for the Liberty Village in Hurricane, UT is to restore patriotism in the youth and citizens through educational programs.

    The Pro America Report with Ed Martin Podcast
    A Time for Choosing Life | 06.27.2022 #ProAmericaReport

    The Pro America Report with Ed Martin Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 41:13


    What You Need to Know is it's a Time for Choosing Again — time to choose life! In the wake of the Dobbs decision, the left is sneakily constructing their new narrative: end the Electoral College! It's amazing the contortions they will go to in attempts to undermine the overturn of Roe v. Wade. Roe was a major blot on our wonderful American system of law, and we are finally free of it. With Roe on the ash heap of history, it is a time for choosing again! Choose LIFE.  Austin Ruse, President of the Center for Family and Human Rights and author of Under Siege: No Finer Time to Be a Faithful Catholic, joins Ed to discuss the pro-life movement in light of the overturn of Roe v. Wade. Where do we go from here, and what will the United Nations involvement be now in the abortion battle? Austin gives us great insight! Find out more about his work at www.c-fam.org.   Adam Rizzieri, co-founder of Agency Partner and co-host of the MyMichelleLive podcast, joins the Pro America Report to discuss Elon Musk's Twitter deal. Twitter's board has unanimously approved the takeover. Also, more on free speech and Chinese engagement in social media!  What You Need to Do is find the people in your community who are serious about loving others! Great examples of this are the wonderful people at ThriveStLouis.org. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Hartmann Report
    "STOP THE STEAL" DID NOT START IN 2020 - IT WAS 20 YEARS IN THE MAKING

    The Hartmann Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 58:41


    After the supremely corrupted court overturned Roe v. Wade, can abortion rights be saved? Thom Hartmann explains how women's bodily autonomy and other critical rights can be resurrected. The big difference between 2000 and 2020 is that in 2000 Roger Stone's plan worked. He stopped the vote count and cemented Bush's ascent to the White House, even though Bush lost the election. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    The Round Table: A Next Generation Politics Podcast
    The Best of Both Worlds: Electoral College Reform

    The Round Table: A Next Generation Politics Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 17:23


    At this week's Round Table, Inica and Madeline spoke with inspiring rising high school freshman Lyla Petroske about her work in electoral college reform. Lyla recently founded The Electoral College Reform Movement (ECRM) as part of her mission to fundamentally reform the Electoral College in a way that will destroy its faithfulness to the majority and give a voice to the United States' minorities. She is a fierce advocate for a fractional proportional system that would be a compromise between the Electoral College and the popular vote, and what would provide what she perceives as the best of both worlds. When Lyla first started investigating the Electoral College–back in fifth grade…–she initially thought it should be abolished and that it was standing in the way of democracy, truth, justice and the American Way. Upon deeper investigation, she came to feel that the Electoral College serves a significant role in the United States and should NOT be outright abolished. She came to feel that something more than the popular vote is necessary to incorporate different priorities in different places with integrity, reminding us that the United States is more than just a country: it's a collection of states. We talked about Lyla's “click moment”--what activated her around this complex topic at such a young age; the youth enthusiasm gap; and what ECRM is and how you can get involved. Oh and we also celebrated INICA'S FIRST VOTE. Thank you for listening! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message

    CrabDiving Radio Podcast
    CrabDiving – Wed 062222 – GOP Seditionists Tried To Foist Fake Electors Into The Electoral College Certification

    CrabDiving Radio Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 117:09


    GOP seditionists tried to foist fake elections into the electoral certification. Election workers Shaye Moss and Ruby Freeman recounted the hell they went through after being targeted by Trump over lies or election fraud. Profoundly dumb Senator Ron Paul tried to play a part in the Big Lie by offering to ferry alternate electoral votes to the Senate. Republican January 6th Committee member Adam Kinzinger and his family have received tons of violent threats from MAGATS. The Democrats are divided over how to make gases prices lower. Polio has been found in UK crap. Brexit has been horrific for the Britains. Dominion Voting Systems got the go ahead to bring a defamation lawsuit against Fox. Religious wanker Todd Starnes returned to the podcast spewing lies about Trump supporters physically beaten by progressives in 2016. A toothless gun control bill was passed by Congress. An Uvalde officer was restrained by fellow coos and not allowed to rescue his wife, one of the teachers killed by the gunman. Chicago piggies are no longer allowed to chase non-violent suspects on foot. A growing percentage of higher earning workers have been living paycheck to paycheck. Former Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum was indicted on fraud charges related to a campaign fundraiser.

    The Hartmann Report
    HOW RON JOHNSON ALMOST GOT AWAY WITH TREASON

    The Hartmann Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 58:20


    How did a corrupt senator even find himself in a position where he could've handed two pieces of paper to the VP that would have changed the outcome of our presidential election? It's about the Electoral College. How the GOP plans to impeach Biden. Anti-Abortionists have a very bad plan for women. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Hot Off The Wire
    Jan. 6 hearings resume; Biden calls on Congress, states to suspend gas taxes; Avalanche close in on title; Tony Siragusa dies | Top headlines for June 22 & 23, 2022

    Hot Off The Wire

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 12:42


    The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection will hear from former Justice Department officials who faced down a relentless pressure campaign from then-President Donald Trump over the 2020 election results. The officials are also expected to testify about a bizarre challenge from within their own ranks. Thursday's hearing will bring focus to a memorably turbulent stretch at the department as the Republican president sought to bend to his will a law enforcement agency that has long cherished its independence. The testimony aims to show how Trump tried to leverage the authorities of federal executive branch agencies in pursuing his false claims of election fraud. Millions of Americans who rely on their cars for work are changing their habits, signing up for carpools or even ditching their cars for bicycles as gas prices recently hit $5 per gallon for the first time ever. This week, it's averaging $4.95 per gallon nationwide, up from $3.06 per gallon a year ago, according to AAA. Some help could be on the way. On Wednesday, President Joe Biden asked Congress to suspend federal gas taxes for three months, which would shave 18.4 cents per gallon off the price of gas. He also called on states to suspend their own gas taxes. But in the meantime, gas is straining budgets. Asked about prospects for a political settlement following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters Thursday that “it's possible after Ukraine meets all the Russian demands,” adding that “Ukraine knows perfectly well what they are.” Authorities say six people were killed in a helicopter crash in West Virginia. The Vietnam-era helicopter was used for tourism flights and crashed near Route 17 in Logan County at about 5 p.m. Wednesday. A California man who was arrested near Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's home in Maryland earlier this month has pleaded not guilty to trying to kill Kavanaugh. Nicholas John Roske remains in custody after his arraignment Wednesday on one count of attempting to assassinate a Supreme Court justice. Baltimore Ravens linebacker Jaylon Ferguson has died at age 26. Police said the cause of death is still to be determined but that no foul play is suspected at this time. Ferguson played three NFL seasons. The Uvalde school district's police chief has been put on leave following allegations that he erred in his response to a mass shooting that left 19 students and two teachers dead. Superintendent Hal Harrell said Wednesday that he put schools police Chief Pete Arredondo on administrative leave. Arredondo has faced criticism for his role as commander in charge of the response to the May 24 massacre at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. In sports news, the Avalanche are a win away from their first Stanley Cup in 21 years, the Astros and Red Sox complete sweeps and a Ravens favorite has died.  A former West Virginia lawmaker who livestreamed himself on Facebook storming the U.S. Capitol and cheering on what he described as a “revolution” has been sentenced to three months in prison. Derrick Evans, 37, who pleaded guilty to a felony civil disorder charge, told the judge on Wednesday that he takes full responsibility for his actions and “was caught up in a moment.” Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell sought to reassure the public that the Fed will raise interest rates high and fast enough to quell inflation, without tightening credit so much as to throttle the economy and cause a recession. Testifying to the Senate Banking Committee, Powell faced skeptical questions about the Fed's ability to tame inflation, which has surged to the top of Americans' concerns as congressional elections near. Democrats wondered whether the Fed's accelerated rate hikes will succeed in curbing inflation or might instead just tip the economy into a downturn. Several Republicans charged that the Powell Fed had moved too slowly to begin raising rates and now must speed up its hikes. San Francisco police say one man was killed and another was wounded in a shooting on a crowded subway train.  Republican legislators in Wisconsin quickly adjourned a special session that Democratic Gov. Tony Evers called to repeal the state's dormant abortion ban without taking any action. Evers called the Legislature into special session Wednesday to repeal the ban as the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to rule in a case that could end Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that legalized abortion across the nation. Throngs of tourists have gleefully returned to watch geysers erupt and bison cross roads at Yellowstone National Park as it partially reopens following destructive floods. Park managers raised the gates Wednesday at three of Yellowstone's five entrances for the first time since June 13. Afghanistan's state-run news agency reported a powerful earthquake struck a rural, mountainous region of the country's east, killing 1,000 people and injuring 1,500 more. Wednesday's quake was the country's deadliest in two decades. Officials warned that the already grim toll may still rise. Information remained scarce on the magnitude 6.1 earthquake near the Pakistani border. A federal judge has agreed to postpone a trial for the former leader of the Proud Boys and other members of the far-right extremist group charged with attacking the U.S. Capitol to stop Congress from certifying the Electoral College vote. U.S. District Judge Timothy Kelly agreed Wednesday to move the start of a trial from Aug. 8 to Dec. 12 for former Proud Boys national chairman Henry “Enrique” Tarrio and four other men charged with seditious conspiracy. Harassment and violence have become common outside abortion clinics over the decades since the 1973 ruling legalizing abortion. Now providers and some in law enforcement are preparing for an increase in violence once the Supreme Court rules in a case that could end Roe v. Wade. They anticipate protests, harassment and other violence will increase in states where abortion remains legal. The National Abortion Federation and the hundreds of abortion clinics it represents have been on “heightened alert” since the opinion leaked. Sales of previously occupied U.S. homes slowed for the fourth consecutive month in May as climbing mortgage rates and prices discouraged many would-be buyers. The National Association of Realtors said Tuesday that existing home sales fell 3.4% last month from April to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.41 million. The national median home price jumped 14.8% in May from a year earlier to $407,600, an all-time high.  James Rado, co-creator of the groundbreaking hippie musical “Hair,” which celebrated protest, pot and free love and paved the way for the sound of rock on Broadway, has died. He was 90. Friend and publicist Merle Frimark says Rado died Tuesday night in New York City of cardio respiratory arrest. “Hair,” which has story and lyrics by Rado and Gerome Ragni and music by Galt MacDermot, was the first rock musical on Broadway, the first Broadway show to feature full nudity and the first to feature a same-sex kiss. “Hair” made possible other rock musicals like “Jesus Christ Superstar” and “Rent.” —The Associated Press See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    My Favorite Mistake
    MIT Professor Arnold (Arnie) Barnett's "Obnoxious" Media Mistake Got Him A Lot of Attention

    My Favorite Mistake

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 49:07


    Episode page with video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #169 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Arnold (Arnie) Barnett. He is the George Eastman Professor of Management Science and a Professor of Statistics at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Barnett holds a BA in mathematics from Columbia College and a PhD in mathematics from MIT. His research specialty is applied mathematical modeling with a focus on problems of health and safety. Cited as “the nation's leading expert on aviation safety,” Barnett was recognized with the 2002 President's Citation from the Flight Safety Foundation for “truly outstanding contributions on behalf of safety.” MIT Sloan students have honored him on 14 occasions for outstanding teaching. In this episode, Arnie shares his “favorite mistake” story about blurting out something to a New York Times reporter who called to get his comment about a US Airways crash that had occurred earlier in the day. Even though he regrets saying what he did, it gave him a reputation for being “willing to talk straight” which led a torrent of requests to speak and to be interviewed in venues ranging from radio programs to NBC's Today Show. We also talk about questions and topics including: 1994 US Air had a number of crashes – a “temporary spasm of bad luck”? The NY Times article he was quoted in — the “mistake” The word “amazing”: “causing great surprise or wonder; astonishing” Lesson about talking with the press? Are we bad at estimating probabilities in general? Bad at estimating the risk of driving vs. flying? You wrote an opinion piece in late March 2022 titled “Don't end the mask mandate for US airlines” “ending the requirement now would be a serious mistake.” —> why did you say that then and do you still say that now? I saw you give a talk about this — is the Electoral College a mistake? Is it a mistake that can be fixed? A simple fix for gerrymandering? “MIT now has a reputation of being very much woke” Tell us about the Leaders for Global Operations program… you are a popular internship and thesis advisor. Why do you like working with LGO students? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/favorite-mistake/support

    PBS NewsHour - Segments
    Jan. 6 committee examines how Trump pressured Pence to overturn the 2020 election

    PBS NewsHour - Segments

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 12:41


    The Jan. 6 committee held its third public hearing Thursday afternoon. The focus was on the role of former Vice President Mike Pence during the counting of the Electoral College votes, and public and private efforts led by former President Trump and his allies to pressure Pence to throw out the results. NewsHour's Lisa Desjardins and Laura Barrón-López join Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    PBS NewsHour - Politics
    Jan. 6 committee examines how Trump pressured Pence to overturn the 2020 election

    PBS NewsHour - Politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 12:41


    The Jan. 6 committee held its third public hearing Thursday afternoon. The focus was on the role of former Vice President Mike Pence during the counting of the Electoral College votes, and public and private efforts led by former President Trump and his allies to pressure Pence to throw out the results. NewsHour's Lisa Desjardins and Laura Barrón-López join Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    PBS NewsHour - Politics
    Congress nears deal to reform how Electoral College votes are counted

    PBS NewsHour - Politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 5:40


    A bipartisan group of lawmakers on Capitol Hill have agreed on a framework to reform the Electoral Count Act. It governs the way Congress counts and certifies Electoral College votes during the presidential election, and it has become the subject of scrutiny after the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to explain. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    PBS NewsHour - Segments
    Congress nears deal to reform how Electoral College votes are counted

    PBS NewsHour - Segments

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 5:40


    A bipartisan group of lawmakers on Capitol Hill have agreed on a framework to reform the Electoral Count Act. It governs the way Congress counts and certifies Electoral College votes during the presidential election, and it has become the subject of scrutiny after the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to explain. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Lagos talks 913
    The Conversation With Oluwakayode, Kunle Lawal, Achike Chude And Petra Onyegbule On Presidential Running Mates.

    Lagos talks 913

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 52:48


    With a few days to the deadline of presidential candidates selecting running mates, Oluwakayode hosted a few guests, Kunle Lawal; Executive Director, Electoral College, Achike Chude; Poet, Author and Social Commentator and, Petra Onyegbule – Former Chief Press Secretary, Gov. Yahaya Bello, Kogi State, to have them express their views on the situation of things.

    The Great America Show with Lou Dobbs
    JIM JORDAN SAYS THE DEMS WANT TO GET TRUMP BECAUSE THEY DON'T LIKE US AND AMERICA

    The Great America Show with Lou Dobbs

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 24:24


    Dems' Jan 6 committee is Impeachment round 3, they want to get rid of Trump and the Electoral College. The Committee won't answer why the National Guard wasn't called up after President Trump made them available or why the Capitol Police didn't have reserves and reinforcements. Dems first went after 1st Amendment liberties with the Disinformation Governance Board, now they're going after states to pass Red Flag Laws, contrary to Constitutional due process rights.   GUEST: REP. JIM JORDAN, OHIO

    Daily Kos Radio - Kagro in the Morning
    Kagro in the Morning - June 14, 2022

    Daily Kos Radio - Kagro in the Morning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 116:25


    Today's show kicks off just 25 hours shy of the start of the next round of January 6th hearings. Or does it?! The second hearing scored some additional points, including what we'll call the launch of the Big Ripoff theme. The impact of the hearings is certainly being felt, even among the book-writing crowd. In Big Lie news, Big Liar Jenna Ellis has joined the Big Lie-centered campaign of Doug Mastriano. Busted Idaho neo-Nazi will need to find his own Lebensraum. Correction: “Proud” Boys frightening the children (in order to save them from being frightened at) Drag Queen Story Hour were not Florida Men. Lunatic Big Liar Michael Gableman goes nuts in court, gets himself held in contempt. By the court. Not just me. And yes, it's absolutely part and parcel of the Trump Big Lie. January 6th made no sense to begin with. But it definitely wouldn't have made any sense if it weren't for the increasingly stupid-looking Electoral College. And Joan McCarter, now calling from one of several Portlands, largely agrees. Speaking of agreeing, Joan says it's time to get serious about impeaching Clarence Thomas. No, no one thinks they have the votes to remove him that way. But it does have the ability to make expanding the Court look less radical by comparison. (Even though there's nothing radical about removing insurrectionists and those who harbor them. That's a conservative thing to do!) Lastly, it should be known that Mike Lee is a puke.

    Thinking Outloud
    Electoral college

    Thinking Outloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 60:22


    Addressing the idiocy of the electoral college --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/george-bailey0/support

    Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie
    Ep. 121 — How Republics Elect Heads of Government

    Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 57:25


    During election cycles Americans often debate the value of the Electoral College.  Not every citizen understands why the Founders created it, how it works today, and why it is so important to the stability of our Nation.  Mr. Maibach traces its origin to the Constitutional Convention held in Philadelphia in the summer of 1787.  The Electoral College was a compromise between the 9 small states and the 4 most populous states when they met in Philadelphia.  The Electoral College is designed so that citizens of each state vote for their choice for President, and the aggregation of the Electoral votes of all the states decides the winner.  Join our student panel and our special guest, Michael Maibach of  Save our States, for a discussion about this unique American electoral process, and how it compares to how other republics around the world select their heads of government.   These stories will engage and may surprise the viewer. 

    The Dave Glover Show
    Harvard's Alex Keyssar dives into the Electoral College- hour 2

    The Dave Glover Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 31:11


    Mike Church Presents-The Red Pill Diaries Podcast
    Wednesday Red Pill Diaries- Demoncrats Are Holding A Constitutional Convention And Few Have Noticed

    Mike Church Presents-The Red Pill Diaries Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 10:24


    HEADLINE: Liz Cheney's Precious J6 Committee Wants To Screw Over Her Constituents By Nuking The Electoral College by Tristan Justice FROM THE ARTICLE: With fewer than 580,000 residents, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Wyoming is home to fewer people than the District of Columbia. The Electoral College, however, guarantees the state three electors to cast votes in presidential elections. While one elector represented 712,000 people in California in 2016, the last time the victor lost the official popular vote but captured the White House, one elector in Wyoming represented 195,000 people. The system at the foundation of the republic offers Wyoming's rural residents influence that would otherwise be erased by the abandonment of the Electoral College. QUESTION: What was in HR1? ANSWER: Legalized mandatory mandated, mail in balloting in congressional and senate elections. QUESTION: What else was in HR? ANSWER: The abolition of the Electoral College. We only surprised the left ONE TIME and that was the election of Donald J Trump.

    Guy Benson Show
    Hollywood Cameo: Matthew McConaughey Makes Plea For Gun Reforms

    Guy Benson Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 122:08


    3:05pm: Guest: Sandra Smith, co-anchor of America Reports with John Roberts & Sandra Smith  3:20pm: Roanoke poll: Youngkin more popular than Biden  3:35pm: Guest: Ilya Shapiro,  former executive director of Georgetown Law's Center for the Constitution  3:50pm: Axios: CNN evaluating partisan talent  4:05pm: Why people are comparing Biden to Jimmy Carter 4:20pm: Guy Benson Show 4:35pm: The House's Jan. 6 committee is split on abolishing the Electoral College  4:50pm: Did Biden blow off D-Day  5:05pm: Guest: Josh Kraushaar, Politics Editor at National Journal & Fox News Radio Political Analyst 5:20pm: Guy Benson Show 5:35pm: (Replay) 5:50pm: Homestretch: Finally, We Can Wear Shorts in the Office. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
    Three Martini Lunch: January 6th Circus, Threat to Democracy or Democrats? Washington Post Dysfunction

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022


    Join Jim & Greg as they roll their eyes in anticipation of the primetime hearings of the January 6th committee. They also laugh as former Obama communications director Dan Pfeiffer suggests Ben Shapiro having a larger online following than CNN or the New York Times is a “threat to democracy.” And they discuss the Washington […]

    The Dom Giordano Program
    Dom Offers Up His Top 10 Founding Fathers

    The Dom Giordano Program

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 2:42


    In honor of the foundation of the Electoral College, Dom decides to re-work his top 10 founding fathers list, a usual tradition for July 4th. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    Trish Intel Podcast
    Jun 6 - End of Electoral College?

    Trish Intel Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 14:26


    The left is making its voice heard; the electoral college, Democrats insist, is not representative of America. In today's show, Trish Regan dissects their argument. Plus, will Elon Musk really back out of Twitter now? Musk is making new demands from the company that could but the ENTIRE $44 billion deal in danger. Get more news and information from Trish on her website at https://TrishIntel.com. Today's links: https://LegacyPMInvestments.com - help hedge your inflation risk today. https://AMAC.US/Regan for great discounts while supporting America. Support the show: https://trishregan.store/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec
    JUN 06, 2022 - JAN 6 COMMITTEE CONSIDERS BANNING ELECTORAL COLLEGE

    Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 29:20


    With the January 6 Committee attempting to abolish the Electoral College, Jack Posobiec explains the history behind and the importance of the creation of the Electoral College - as intended by the founding fathers. Meanwhile, a Dallas, Texas bar hosts ‘Drag the Kids to Pride', a ‘child-friendly drag show' brunch complete with mocktails for the kids and the opportunity to perform on stage with the drag queen of their choice. The Department of Justice (DOJ) dismisses separation of powers and indicts former Donald Trump adviser Peter Navarro for contempt of Congress despite the lack of criminal contempt. Finally, Jack Posobiec analyzes the anarchical shooting in Philadelphia.   Here's your Daily dose of Human Events with @JackPosobiec Save up to 65% on MyPillow products by going to MyPillow.com/POSO and use code POSO Go to www.itargetpro.com to get 10% off and free shipping with offer code POSOBuy three boxers and get one free by going to GETUNDERTAC.COM with offer code POSO

    The Wilkow Majority
    January 6 Committee Plots End of Electoral College

    The Wilkow Majority

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 14:22


    What does January 6 have to do with the Electoral College? Nothing! But that won't stop Democrats on the January 6 Committee from blaming the Electoral College for the riot at the Capitol.

    Todd Feinburg
    Electoral College and Gas Prices (HR 1- 6/6/22)

    Todd Feinburg

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 38:17


    Philip Teresi Podcasts
    Thursday 6/2 Hour 1

    Philip Teresi Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 34:16


    Kicking it off with Buzz Question about the release of John Hinckley, Jr. Fresno State has announced 6 themed home games for its 2022 football season, all of which will be televised. The House Jan. 6th. Committee has obtained an email from a NY lawyer that outlined the "'President of the Senate' strategy," that outlined a legal theory which would potentially set aside Biden's Electoral College win and give more Trump more time in court to challenge the results of the 2020 election. Disgraced attorney, Michael Avenatti, has been sentenced to 4 years in prison for stealing money from his former client, Stormy Daniels.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KMJ's Afternoon Drive
    Thursday 6/2 Hour 1

    KMJ's Afternoon Drive

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 34:16


    Kicking it off with Buzz Question about the release of John Hinckley, Jr. Fresno State has announced 6 themed home games for its 2022 football season, all of which will be televised. The House Jan. 6th. Committee has obtained an email from a NY lawyer that outlined the "'President of the Senate' strategy," that outlined a legal theory which would potentially set aside Biden's Electoral College win and give more Trump more time in court to challenge the results of the 2020 election. Disgraced attorney, Michael Avenatti, has been sentenced to 4 years in prison for stealing money from his former client, Stormy Daniels.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Return to Order Moment
    Destroying The United States Will Not Bring A Return To Order.

    The Return to Order Moment

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 27:51


    Our nation is beset by many challenges. Some of them are big enough that they threaten the nation's very existence. From both the right and the left, there are calls for secession – literally to tear the United States apart. The idea is that the red states and the blue states have so little in common that they should just split apart. This so-called solution is simplistic. It can never work. At the same time, the left is trying to eliminate the Electoral College. That would place undue power in a few large cities and take many small states out of the process of electing the president altogether. Accomplishing either of these goals would be disastrous.

    City Cast Las Vegas
    Why So Much is at Stake in This Year's NV Secretary of State Election

    City Cast Las Vegas

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 21:23


    Nevada's Secretary of State election isn't one that typically makes too many headlines—after all, how many of us know what exactly that job entails? But, as the Review-Journal Politics and Government Editor Steve Sebelius reminds us, when it comes to elections integrity, the Secretary of State matters a whole lot: They preside over the state Electoral College, and ensure that the will of the people is carried out during elections. Today, Dayvid and Steve talk about outgoing Secretary Barbara Cegavske's strikingly nonpartisan tenure, where the candidates lie on the Big Lie spectrum, and why Steve thinks the Secretary of State race is Nevada's single most important race of 2022—and how democracy itself might be at stake.

    The Rights Track
    Democracy assaulted: are we our own worst enemy?

    The Rights Track

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 28:30


    In Episode 7 of Series 7 of The Rights Track, Todd is joined by Tom Nichols, Professor Emeritus of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College and Contributing Writer at The Atlantic. Tom specialises in international security affairs including U.S. - Russia relations, nuclear strategy, and NATO issues. His recent book – Our Own Worst Enemy: The Assault from within on Modern Democracy is an account of the spread of illiberal and anti-democratic sentiment throughout our culture.  Transcript Todd Landman  00:00 Welcome to The Rights Track podcast, which gets the hard facts about the human rights challenges facing us today. In series seven, we're discussing human rights in a digital world. I'm Todd Landman, in this episode, I'm delighted to be joined by Tom Nichols. Tom is Professor Emeritus of National Security Affairs at the US Naval War College and contributing writer at The Atlantic. He specialises in international security affairs, including US Russia relations, nuclear strategy, and NATO issues. He recently authored a book - Our Own Worst Enemy; The Assault From Within on Modern Democracy. It's an engaging account of the spread of illiberal and anti-democratic sentiment throughout our culture. So today, we're asking him who's responsible for this, and what we should  do about it. So Tom, it's fantastic to have you on this episode of The Rights Track. So welcome. Tom Nichols  00:51 Thank you. Thanks for having me. Todd Landman  00:53 So I have a rather unusual question to enter into this conversation with you and it involves Indian food, because in your book, you talk about the idea that you're not a big fan of Indian food. But tell me a little bit of the story. What happened when you just expressed this view that you know what, I don't like Indian food? Tom Nichols  01:10 Well, I didn't just express that I didn't like Indian food, I added this kind of snarky comment, because it was on Twitter, of course, and someone had said, post your worst food takes here. And of course, people said things like, well, I hate mayonnaise, and doughnuts are bad, and so on. But I said, Indian food is terrible, and we pretend that it isn't. And, of course, I meant my colleagues who would always drag me to Indian restaurants, and then spend the afternoon sweating and gulping water and you know, sweat running in their eyes. And I would always turn to them and say, so you can't possibly be enjoying this. Because I don't happen to like very spicy food. And this Firestorm broke out. I mean, within two days, you know, I was this, you know, genocidal racist maniac. You know, I was in all the Indian papers. I was in The Washington Post -  Russian television mentioned me. I mean, it was insane. All because I'm a middle aged New Englander, who just doesn't happen to like Indian food and is very snarky about it. The coda to this whole story is that finally the former US attorney in New York, Preet Bharara, when the pandemic finally lifted, he took me out and said I challenge you to come to dinner with me. And he took me to an Indian restaurant. And I said, I would sit there and I would just eat Indian food, while people were making donations that we're gonna be used for a COVID ward in India. And this challenge ended up raising about $135,000 for COVID relief in India. Todd Landman  02:42 That is fantastic. Now, I'm going to pick this apart a little bit, because what's interesting is what looked like an incidental and as you admit a bit of a snarky comment about your food preferences, what you really communicated there is the rapidity and the spread of information, geographically, how it gets picked up, it's a bit unusual how one tweet can be picked up and really run and other tweets just sort of die on the vine, as it were. So this captures this idea that you have in the book around the viral nature of information, regardless of its veracity, how it can spread around the world, and how the originator of that information might be vilified by an anonymous group of people out there. And then how stories get picked up. So is that your sort of summary of what happened there that it was just this kind of, you know, ridiculously rapid thing about it actually, just a personal preference? Tom Nichols  03:33 Yeah, absolutely. And there's two things to note about it. One is that the nature of hyper connectivity, where, you know, I mean, when I started my career, 35 years ago, in the late 1980s, a viewer mentioned in a newspaper, you know, people clipped that and sent it to you in an envelope and the thing that we used to call the US mail with a stamp on it, and they'd say, wow, you know, I saw that you were mentioned in a newspaper. Now, you can be mentioned in every newspaper in the world in 24 hours, you know, on the one hand, I suppose there's a good side to that, which is that we all have the opportunity to be more informed. But the second part of it that makes that so worrisome, is that the internet rewards negativity. And so instead of people saying, you know, taking that in kind of the light hearted or snippy spirit that I intended it, it was what rewards engagement is to assume that anyone you encounter in the virtual world has the worst intentions, and that it's your job to kind of, you know, reveal that to the world. I mean, I had people within about three days, literally sending emails to my workplace saying, I hope you die. Todd Landman  04:48 Just because you didn't like Indian food. Tom Nichols  04:51 And because I had said it in this very dismissive way, if I had said, and because also there were a lot of people deciding that this was an opportunity to show their own, you know, elevated consciousness about a part of the world about India. As I said, you know, many times after that incident, if I had said, you know, French food is overpriced, gluey junk, and we pretend it isn't, people would have shrugged, because there's no psychic income from defending expensive French cuisine. But this was, you know, this narcissism. And this is what I was getting at is that there are some times or some incidents that really speak to this problem that I talk about in the book of the rise of narcissism and people say, 'Uh huh!', you know, instead of reading this article, or tweet or letter, or whatever it is, this is an opportunity for me to say something about myself. And to say it loudly and to say, you know, by being very hostile to someone else, and I think that's kind of made the world crazy. When I wrote a piece initially about this tweet, I said, we've become planet Seinfeld. And famously, the creator said, it's a show about nothing. We are now a global culture that is constantly manufacturing things out of nothing, because that's a way that we generate satisfaction and actualization for ourselves. And it's very worrisome, because you can't sustain democracy on that. Todd Landman  06:20 Right? We'll get to the effect on democracy in a minute. I mean, I share your pain not in the palette, mind you. But you know, I write books like you do. I write articles for The Conversation for the Guardian, for other other outlets, and they get a modicum of interest and support. And then one time on BBC Breakfast, I was asked to comment on the intelligence reports about Russian interference in the US elections, and I happen to be out of sequence in the studio, I get on the couch, and they're running a story about a Marine who rescued people from Mount Everest. And they turned to me and I think, Wait a minute, they have the wrong guest. So I say 'you have the wrong guest' that got more hits, more attention, the analytics on my website went completely haywire. So that focus on either the negative or the humorous, can actually, you know, go out of control more than, you know, the erudite focused work that I tried to do in the day job, but I'm gonna get back to this point about the undermining of democracy. And I want to really start with a compelling argument you make in the book, and to me it references some really interesting political science literature, most famously published by Ronald Inglehart back in 1977, published a book called The Silent Revolution with Princeton press. And then he followed that up with a book called Culture Shift. And his main thesis was that at times of plenty, in advanced industrial democracies, there's a development of what he calls post material values. So people are not, if they're not concerned about roof over their head, food in their mouth job every day and a paycheck, they turn their attention to other things, like human rights, like nuclear power, like climate change, like women's rights and other issue areas that transcend traditional class issues that, you know, Marxists would want to talk about or those interested in the economy. Now, you're making a really interesting argument in the book, because you're basically saying that in those countries where we've had economic plenty, material progress, technological advance, and now we throw in an ability and a platform for people to share their you know, the thoughts they have, second by second onto a platform has actually created this phenomenon. You say people are too connected and too isolated at the same time. Tell us about that insight from the book. Tom Nichols  08:33 Right. It's great that you kind of do a touch back to Ron Inglehart, because there was so much that I wanted to think about with this book, and the idea that somehow, once you stop this kind of struggle for your daily bread, that you can actually think about other things, you know, at the time, I mean, now you might people listening might say, Well, that's obvious, you know, but that wasn't really obvious at the time. I mean, you know, people even through the Depression, we went from the depression into World War Two, we started thinking about things like making the world safe for democracy and all that. But then I think we went even further from some kind of post materialist thinking to postmodern thinking, where everything became mediated through our experience of it, that we just decided that the world was just one big TV show. It's kind of like The Truman Show or, you know, kind of virtual reality exercise where we were constantly connected to each other, and snooping in and out of each other's houses all day. You know, when people hear me say connected, I don't just mean by Twitter or Facebook. I mean, things like and I talked about this in the book, I mean, things like Zillow. I just gave a talk the other day where I had a group of I don't know it was talking to about 100 people. And I said, I mean, people here, come on, admit it. You've snooped on your neighbours, and looked inside their houses by going to Zillow and these kinds of hands sheepishly went up, you know, we spend a lot of time being very connected to and very interested in the lives of our neighbours, but not actually interacting with them in any positive way we don't talk, we don't do things with them. We don't. I thought maybe one of the other political science works here, we're going to name check. Here's one that I put in the book, which was Bowling Alone by Robert Putnam, you know, where we don't join bowling leagues, we go bowling, and then we post pictures of it, you know, we don't actually interact with that middle stratum of people who are somewhere between close friends or family, and strangers. You know, there are so many people, I learned this, you know, when I decided in my years ago in my 40s, to take up golf to try and you know, get some physical activity. And suddenly, I realised I knew a tonne of people in my community, I didn't know them well. But I knew them enough to be able to have a conversation with them. I mean, I didn't join a country club, it was a public course. And, you know, and having a beer at the bar afterwards. And you know, I got to know a lot of people, we don't do stuff like that any more. And so we are both connected and isolated. And in a way that just rewards negativity, it rewards that using other people and their views and their lives as raw material for us to express our own grievances and sense of entitlement. And you know, gripes and basically again, to make it about us rather than about other people. Todd Landman  11:18 Yeah. And you know, the reference to Bowling Alone is brilliant, because the thesis of that book, of course, is that because people aren't Bowling Alone, because they're not going to the PTA. They are engaged in chequebook activism, and now we're going to pay pal activism, I think. But actually, it erodes social capital, it erodes the fabric of society, it erodes that connectivity, that chance encounters you, whether it's a golf club, a bridge club, a local social club, or just going down to the local bar and getting a drink. People are now experiencing the world really literally through a screen. And certainly during COVID, that was raised to very high relief that people were isolated. And I wonder if there's going to be a post COVID effect. But what you're describing is a sort of post industrial or post material postmodern resentment, that focuses not only on the negativity, but also I'm going to throw in another term here, this idea of relative deprivation, if you spend all your day, looking at how everyone else is living their life, and we know that's a fiction, we know that what we see on Facebook, and Instagram and any other platform is an idealised, artificial version of somebody as they go about  enjoying their lives. That creates resentment as well and  the sense of relative deprivation. Why does that person have many more fun things to share on social media than me, including a really nice slap up Indian meal I might add, and that resentment that develops creates that ennui that sort of, you know, just this desperate sort of sense of negativity? And what I'm curious then is how does this then connect to a problem for democracy and by extension, a problem for human rights? Tom Nichols  12:53 What when you think that everyone's living better than you, and you develop that constant sense of entitlement? And we know, by the way, that's spending a lot of time I mean, this psychologists have actually measured this. Spending a lot of time on Facebook actually, will depress you. Because as you say, what do people post on Facebook? Here's my daughter's wedding. Here's my son's graduation. You know, here we are at Disney, nobody posts their, you know, first day out of rehab pictures, their divorce decrees, you know, their court appearances, you know, no one puts that stuff, I can say, Wow, My life sucks. And the conclusion you come to is that somehow this is a failure of government, because government's supposed to fix all these things for you. And therefore, it's a failure of democracy. And I want to anticipate one criticism, I know, that's always out there about this, you know, there are people who will say, but these are legitimate gripes, because of things like income inequality, for example, because of the very rich and the very poor. You know, this is why it takes so long to write a book like this, the data just doesn't bear this out. The two most important things to understand is that the anti democratic attitudes are centred heavily in the middle class. Back in the 50s, you know, the term lumpen bourgeoisie started to peak out a kind of middle class that is bored and restless and hates democracy, because they think they're not getting everything out of it, that they should. The example I use in this in the book is a good, you know, now passed away, unfortunately, but an old friend of mine from school, who literally was complaining to me about how bad things were while he was sitting on his boat, you know, a working class guy with a high school diploma and nothing else sitting on his boat talking about how the world you know, had done him dirt. That's very much the problem - it's not the poor and the dispossessed, and minorities and marginalised people who are giving up on democracy. It is middle class white people in Italy and Britain and the United States and Poland, Turkey and so on. The other problem with the income inequality argument is that most of the anger and most of the dissent in the country is not focused on you know, poor people versus Jeff Bezos, it's the middle class, griping at each other about subtle gradations among them. There's even a thing that social psychologists called the HGTV effect, where people spend a lot of time watching these go home and garden TV shows. And they literally then decide they have to improve their house because they find it intolerable that people they see on television who are like them, somehow have, you know, granite countertops and hardwood floors and recessed lighting, and they look around and they say, How come? These people are just like me, I don't have that. That leads to this anger that says, democracy is a rigged game that's always arrayed against me. And somehow I'm getting screwed in all this. And so the right answer to this is to burn it all down. Todd Landman  15:45 Right. So that's the crucial point. And I know the work of Robert Pape, out of Chicago has been looking at those people that were most involved with the insurrection on January 6 In the US Capitol. And he actually says, look, a large proportion of these people were actually white collar professionals. You know, people were estate agents from Texas, hiring private aeroplanes to fly to Washington, DC to protest the rigged system, as it were, they got caught up in something they maybe didn't realise they were getting caught up in. And then when they were arrested, they said, Oh, my God, they arrested me. Yeah, it broke the law. Tom Nichols  16:20 I think this is a really important point. And I think Bob's you know, work on this, that he and his team who just basically just sat down and kind of trawled through all of the arrest records and cross indexed and kind of did the deep dive on each of these people. These were not unemployed factory workers living in opioid decimated wastelands. They just weren't. That's a comforting thought. And I say comforting, because people think that if that were the case, it's something you can fix with better social policy. But they weren't. They just were not those people. What they were were people who were again, bored, narcissistic, grandiose, one of them, the person you're talking about, the real estate agent from Texas basically said something to the effect of, I'm just too white and blonde and pretty to go to jail or something, you know, and she turned her jail term, which was only I think, 45 days, she turned it into a stunt. Which, you know, for a lot of us, I think it's always bothered me that these people got, you know, these kind of piddly 30 and 45 day jail sentences, you know, six months in prison in a federal prison might have sobered her up a little bit. Todd Landman  17:27 And I think more controversially, what of him said, You're treating us like black people. Now that of course as the racist dimension to that observation. But if we get back to the topic of the digital, then, the technology that you talk about and being too connected, the platforms that technology like WhatsApp and Parler and some of the other things that were available, of course, did allow for a collective action and one might even say connective action that these groups were able to communicate with each other to plan and coordinate. I don't need to tell you this. You're a national security affairs professor at the US Naval War College, you know, how groups organised but the sort of organising infrastructure, if you will, of the digital world allowed for this to happen. There was chatter, there were security agencies that absolutely knew there was chatter, and yet there was an absence of response, at least in a timely fashion to prevent this from happening. And of course, so we see, for example, you know, pro democracy movements organised in the same way, anti democracy movements, organised in the same way. And the recurring theme on our podcast, this series has been this kind of, you know, technology is neutral. It's whatever people do with it, that you have to be worried about. So what can you say about that? Tom Nichols  18:35 I hope people understand I am not a technophobe, I actually, I'm 61. So I came of age when the internet did, and I loved the internet, I have a huge social media account. And, you know, I was the geek tweaking some computers and doing all that stuff in the 90s, and even into my dotage. But I agree that the problem is what you do with the technology. The other technology that really made a lot of this possible that I think we need to say, give a shout out to are mobile phones, which allowed people to kind of track each other and stay in touch with each other during this moment. But of course, in a lovely kind of, you know, karmic irony here, it also allowed the government to be able to pinpoint exactly who was where, you know, by checking that data from cellphone towers and locators and all that other stuff that put a lot of these people in jail. But again the problem is the social normality underlying it - when it comes to the connectivity, when it comes to things like email and chat rooms and social media, the way I kind of stole this from a writer named Yevgeny Simkin who said 'Every town had an end of the world guy right? That every town had a guy with a sandwich board saying the end of the world is coming. What the Internet did was make every one of those guys  able to reach out to every other one of those guys in every one of 100,000 towns and to believe hey we're a movement instead of saying I happen to be the one guy who's just kind of a bit off and you know and paranoid about the end of the world. No we're a movement - we're a social force and you see this with a lot of other things and sometimes with really tragic effects. The New York Times reported on a group of people who believed that the Government is watching them which is a problem that peopke with emptional issues have had long before there was an Internet. I mean I grew up with an Uncle who had that exact same problem in the 1950s and 60s. But they have now actually formed a kind of social movement by reaching out ironically through social media to say see it's not us that has the problem it's a real thing because enough of us believe it. That is how extremism grows through this. There is no counterveiling social  pressure. When you're the one guy who is you know an abject Hitlet-admiring racist, it matters that everyone around you says that's a terrible thing to believe. You're wrong. If you can go online and find 100,000 other peopke who believe that same thing, which you always will be able to do because it's a big world, then suddenly, you say, well, maybe I'm not wrong. Maybe I'm part of a movement, maybe everybody else is wrong, because look at all my new friends. That's the real danger here. It takes people out of their social environment, removes them from normal kind of interactions about what might be right or wrong, or good or evil, and lets them go find the community of people who will agree with them about anything. And that I think, is the behaviour we've really seen growing. I'll just add one more point, which is, those of us who write and have any kind of public persona, used to get the occasional crank letter here and there, angry crank letters, and people reaching out in the most hostile and violent way possible. Because again, this used to be something that was socially unacceptable, it required a certain modicum of effort, you actually have to write something down, put a stamp on an envelope, whatever, you know, is now just commonplace. It's just part of the cost of doing business. If you step at all into the public eye, it's just a normal part of being in the public view now, and again, I think, because people encourage each other to do it. Todd Landman  22:16 Yeah. A couple of keystrokes from a troll, and suddenly you've gone viral in a negative way. So Tom, I want to push you a bit on this then. So we have the socio economic question. We have the middle class point, the post material resentment, point, a bowling along point, all these things which come together and rather tragic and scary ways that undermine democracy that potentially compromise many different sets of human rights. But I wonder in the remaining time, we have together you might say, what are the couple of practical things we can do as a solution to actually curb the worst forms of this behaviour to regain faith in democracy and human rights in ways that sort of mitigate against the developments that you set out in the book, Tom Nichols  22:54 I'm sorry to say that I got to the end of the book, and I wasn't that optimistic. But I did have a couple of things. One is that we need to concentrate on small scale projects. But all of this, everything I'm about to say requires human beings engaging in an act of will, and self reflection to step away from their screens, and to turn off the TV for a moment. And to take a walk and say, What kind of person am I really and what kind of person do I really want to be? There are a lot of things that need to be done in your community. The problem is that as a very narcissistic grandiose culture, even people who mean well, you know, will say things like, well, we have to change the structure of the US Senate, or we have to do away with the electoral - Well, I have bad news for you, you're not going to do away with the Electoral College as heroic. And as satisfying as you may think that that is that you're going to change the US Constitution tomorrow. That's not going to happen. What you can do is reach out and work with other people in your community to register voters to volunteer at a polling site, to phone bank to help get the potholes filled to go to a city council meeting, to go to a school committee meeting. People don't do any of that because it's boring. And I noticed because my mother was a city alderman, I come from a working class background, uneducated, you know, high school dropout parents, but my mom, one year got very angry about the nature. I tell the story in the book, got very angry about a drug market operating down the street from our house. So she campaigned on it. She went and  got elected to City Council and fixed it. You know, you can do things like that. I was at a meeting recently where I talked to three or four local elected officials, who all told me that they had been in their jobs forever because they had no opposition because literally they were getting reelected every year or two years as Selectmen or Assemblyman or assessors or treasurers or whatever. It wasn't their town, because nobody wanted the job. Todd Landman  24:49 No one else was running against them. Tom Nichols  24:52 Yeah and because again, even well, meaning people say well, that's beneath me, that's too boring. I'm going to reform In the United Nations one day and you know, solve world hunger, and that's unfortunately, what we do. So that's one thing. I think the other is that if you are involved with a political party, at least here in the United States, and I think this probably would hold true for Britain, and other places as well, parties need to mean something. You know, in the United States, we had two prominent political figures, one of whom hijacked his party, the Republican Party under Donald Trump, and one of whom nearly hijacked the Democratic Party away from their nominating process, Bernie Sanders, who never joined the Democratic Party, he wasn't even a member of the party, you know, and I think that parties used to have some kind of coherent, ideological content to them. And now they're just tribal flags of convenience. And I think people ought to think about that. But I'm a former Republican, I worked for a Democrat, I'm now an independent, I'm not joining a party at this point in my life. But if you are younger, and you feel strongly about parties, then you know, they should mean something, and they should stand for something. But all of these mean, stepping away from the constant censoring stream of the internet, putting your own ego a little bit on hold, being kinder and thinking better of other people, and working on projects at a scale where you can start building up Todd, you mentioned social capital, and start rebuilding that Bank of social capital, those little interactions that give a society the resilience to hold on through bad times. Todd Landman  26:28 That's brilliant. And those examples are great, you really have highlighted this tension between, you know, hyper narcissism and community really . And you know, I was struck listening to you that what you're really saying, it goes right back to Alexis de Tocqueville, and his assessment of the strength of American democracy was in the natural inclination for Americans to join things and to help one another. And I think that in this current period, we've lost sight of that. And what you're saying is step outside yourself, step outside your home, get off the grid, help somebody, invest in your community. And you know, don't take yourself so seriously, actually, the technology will always be there, as we've been discussing on this series of the podcasts, technology advances, if it does follow Moore's law, it doubles every year, and it's likely to continue to do so. But really, there's a human story here that you need to step outside yourself, step outside your home, and engage with others and rebuild that social capital and social fabric in order to hold on to the institutions that have so well governed. Our society is not just the American society, but also democracies around the world. And we are seeing this democratic backsliding taking on at the moment, and you know, your views around joining, helping, reaching out and stepping away from the narcissistic self that is somehow isolated within this electronic bubble is the first step. So thank you so much for appearing on this episode of the Rights Track with us. It was absolutely brilliant listening to you and engaging with you. And for now, all I can say is, thanks very much, and have a great day. Christine Garrington  27:59 Thanks for listening to this episode of The Rights Track podcast, which was presented by Todd Landman and produced by Chris Garrington of Research Podcasts with funding from 3di. You can find a full transcript of this episode on the website at www.RightsTrack.org together with useful links to content mentioned in the discussion. Don't forget to subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts to access future and earlier episodes. Tom Nichols  27:59 Thanks for having me.  

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    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 181:38


    * Monkeypox: Is it a pandemic? Is it deadly? Is it sexually transmitted? Is it a Covid vaccine adverse effect? Fear porn is coming from both left & right but ask why is WHO & public health establishment pushing this narrative now?* WHO will be sovereign? The world has caught on quickly to the Pandemic Treaty and Biden power push to the WHO. But there's ONE deadly change that remains.* Why we need to EXPAND the Electoral College to State (and county) elections, NOT END it* Why no one should care about the worst-case scenario of the Climate MacGuffin* Auction of Mercedes classic car for $145 MILLION is a metaphor of what's happened to corporations, especially car companies, with ESG* Hawley vs Granholm — Yes, Granholm's "Putin Price Hike" is "utter nonsense". But GOP is utterly useless in addressing the biggest energy issue* Election corruption and corporate manipulation continue to expand even into email* LIVE from TN! - we made it thanks to Tony Arterburn WiseWolf.gold & Gard Goldsmith MRCTV.orgFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

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