Podcasts about Carlsbad

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  • 468PODCASTS
  • 1,302EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Carlsbad

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Latest podcast episodes about Carlsbad

San Diego Magazine's Happy Half Hour
The New Owner of Mr. A's Joins us to Talk about what Changes He will (and will not) be Making

San Diego Magazine's Happy Half Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 65:42


The iconic Mister A's is being sold (don't worry, it's not going anywhere, and this is a good story). Last week, we talked with Bertrand Hug—the restaurateur of restaurateurs, the don of dining and longtime steward of the rooftop restaurant—about why he chose to sell to his right-hand man. Today on the podcast, we have the man himself, Ryan Thorson. Ryan earned this (and paid for it). The SDSU grad got his first job at Buster's Beach House in Seaport Village, then landed a low-level managers job at Mister A's and just dedicated his life to it. Worked 100-hour weeks at times. He rose through the ranks over 11 years, becoming Director of Operations. He and Hug developed a father-son relationship, and, when Hug decided it was time to let go and focus on his original baby—the world=class French restaurant Mille Fleurs in Rancho Santa Fe—he turned down offers for more money and entrusted Mister A's to his young partner and friend. Ryan tells us the whole story—including how he originally got turned down for the job because Bertrand didn't like his facial scruff—and what he plans to do with the San Diego classic when he takes over in March. He's not going nuts with the design, but he's enlisted top designer Mauricio Courturier, who designed this place. In “Hot Plates,” things get a little wild. Takashi Endo is opening another Menya Ultra Ramen in UTC, and we all give our answer about which is the superior soup: ramen or pho. We talk about Shake Shack opening in Carlsbad and I for sure am going to get driven out of Southern California in a hailstorm of fire because I admit I prefer it to our own better-burger legend (sacrilege). The Pink Lady—La Valencia Hotel–is renovating their famed Mediterranean Room and adding a new patio concept to celebrate its 95th birthday. Temaki Bar is going into Encinitas, a handroll place from Clique Hospitality (Lionfish, Serea, Joya Organic Kitchen) and sustainable seafood chef, JoJo Ruiz… And 3R Brewing—a Native American-owned craft beer from the Rincon Reservation—just opened in Ocean Beach. For “Two People, Fifty Bucks,” Troy was reminded how much he loves the vegan food at Cafe Gratitude, especially that butternut squash dip with focaccia. Ryan wastes zero time in declaring his love for everyone's favorite tequila-and-mole hideaway, Cantina Mayahuel. And David checked out the brand new Thai Street Food restaurant in North Park, Kin Len. Thank you for listening! As always, we want to hear from our listeners. Need a restaurant recommendation? Is there a guest you want us to book on the show? Let us know! You can call us at 619-744-0535 and leave a voicemail, or if you're too shy, you can email us at happyhalfhour@sdmag.com. Hope you all enjoy. See ya next week.

Tacos and Tech Podcast
Sustainability Simplified and Dignified with Kerri Leslie of Verity

Tacos and Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 27:26


Listen on Apple, Google, Spotify, and other platforms.  Kerrie Leslie is CEO and Founder of Verity, a sustainable packaging company that offers customized metal alternatives to single-use plastic containers. Verity provides sustainable packaging solutions to brands and businesses committed to combating the plastic crisis, giving viable packaging options without compromising user experience or brand aesthetics. Kerrie grew up in Baltimore, Maryland, and graduated from the University of North Carolina Wilmington before coming to San Diego. After re-evaluating her aspirations of becoming a doctor, she joined Spinal Implants, a Carlsbad-based medical device startup focused on spinal implants and instrumentation. There, she was able to use her medical background to work with surgeons and make customer experience better. Kerrie eventually became a technical marketing liaison between the surgeons and the company's engineering department, working in product development and meeting customer's needs. Wanting to focus on marketing, she left and joined Henry Schein, a global medical device manufacturer and distributor, and moved up to become Director of Marketing.  While building up her expertise in working with medical devices, she started an all-natural deodorant company, Noniko, and came across the problem of the plastic crisis. Realizing she needed to find a safe and sustainable packaging that could be recycled, she researched but found no existing containers to meet her needs. And that's how Verity began. She worked to design a stainless steel container for the natural deodorant product, and found there was a greater demand for sustainable packaging. By looking for a solution to her problem, she found a whole new business.  Listen to our latest podcast with Kerrie Leslie to hear more about her entrepreneurial journey in finding truly sustainable solutions for the beauty and personal care industry.  Her favorite local tacos: Lourdes in Encinitas   Connect with Kerrie: Kerrie Leslie   Learn more about Verity: Website: https://www.veritycase.com/  Facebook: @veritypackaging Instagram: @verity.case LinkedIn  

We Build Great Apartment Communities
077: Teaching Wealth Using Biblical Principles with Jared Williams

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 47:08


What is the best and Biblical financial approach? Well this very question is answered in our today's show by our guest, Jared Williams. Jared is the founder of Biblical Wealth Solutions - where they believe that in addition to honoring God with our investments, we should strive to improve the lives of others with our investments; we call this investing with Impact. He also helps Christian families achieve financial freedom for God's glory using real estate and other non-Wall-Street investments. So sit back, get comfy and get ready for this unique and fascinating episode as we all continue to learn how to build great apartment communities. Episode Highlights: How did Jared's niche come about Teaching wealth using biblical principles Jared talks about their screening process Conversations that you are typically having with your clients What are some of the parallels that you see in real estate relative to what you are doing now Understanding biblical investing How has the world of covid changing the minds of Jared's clients Top 3 qualities that Jared is looking for in a successful investment Jared describes his ideal real estate investment deal Real Estate Vs. Precious Metal Connect with Jared Facebook  LinkedIn  Biblical Wealth Solutions Website  Email About Our Guest: Jared Williams is on a mission to revolutionize Christian personal finance and is passionate about teaching Christian families a Biblical and better approach to investing and managing finances. Jared has dedicated his career to shedding light on the fact that most families are invested in companies that support and even profit from unbiblical practices such as abortion, pornography, and addiction. He wants families to know they have alternatives. After discovering that most families are losing over half of their wealth potential to hidden but definite losses, he was convinced there had to be a better way to prepare for retirement and build wealth. Through his business, Biblical Wealth Solutions, and as the host of The Biblical Wealth Podcast, Jared and his team helps families find alternatives to relying on the stock-market roller coaster - investments that could not only perform better, but can also actively improve the lives of others. As a husband and homeschooling father of three, Jared understands the significant lack of time most families have to put toward figuring out the best financial approach and loves helping Christian families develop a long-term approach and strategy that is both Biblical and better than their typical financial approach. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons
Why Does the World Hate Me?

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 20:04


This week's message is titled Why Does the World Hate Me? and the scripture reference is John 15:18-21. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

New Song Christian Fellowship - Carlsbad, NM
January 2, 2022 - All Things New in 2022

New Song Christian Fellowship - Carlsbad, NM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 56:50


Sunday Service recording on January 1, 2022 for New Song Christian Fellowship in Carlsbad, NM. Topic: All Things New in 2022 Donate Online: https://newsongcarlsbad.churchcenter.com/giving View the video - Visit Us on FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/NewSongCarlsbadNM/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/newsongcarlsbad/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/newsongcarlsbad/support

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons
Jesus Is So Wonderful

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 24:22


This week's message is titled Jesus Is So Wonderful and the scripture reference is Isaiah 9:6. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

St. Michaels by-the-Sea
Second Sunday After Christmas (1/2/22) - Fr. Chris Craig-Jones

St. Michaels by-the-Sea

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 11:07


St. Michael's by-the-Sea is an Episcopal Church located in the coastal Village of Carlsbad, California. As far as churches go, it's kind of a beachy version of the ancient Christian Faith, and is rooted in the Anglo-Catholic tradition. Whether you're in town for a week at the beach or a local pilgrim on a spiritual journey, you are welcome here! www.stmichaelsbythesea.org

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #52. Dr. Ian Hoffman: Start a non-profit and wipe out your student loan debt!

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 64:10


Chiropractor Dr Ian Hoffman wants to help you start a non profit and wipe out your student loans.  He is an amazing man with an amazing story. His desire to help a 4 year old cancer patient and his need to solve his crushing million dollar debt load lead to his inspired business.  The Student Loan Eraser program.    The Impact: In the 6 years that he has been teaching The Student Loan Eraser Program his clients will have started over 400 charities that are taking care of over 10,000 nonprofit visits a month!  AND those doctors are going to save over $100 million from their student loans.Ian tells us how he built his business with webinars and how creating a non profit to serve their community can save a doctor tens of thousands of dollars off their student loans.There's “Google Slaps”.  The power of the email list.  The Avatar Process and the perfect customer.  Sorting out the who and not the how.And of course, the proven formula to saving hundreds of millions in dollars of student loan debts for his customers.Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out Dr Ian Hoffman's Student Loan Eraser Program hear!  https://www.erasemystudentloans.com/WATCH the Table Rush Talk Show interviews here: www.TableRushTalkShow.comCheck out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript:Mischa Zvegintzov  00:10Welcome everybody to the table rush master class where we get back to the marketing and sales basics to help you the listener, the viewer to grow your business to $1 million and beyond. And I am very, very blessed today to introduce everybody to Dr. Ian Hoffman. Welcome Dr. Dr. Hoffman.Ian Hoffman  00:35Thanks, Mischa glad to be here.Mischa Zvegintzov  00:36Yeah, fantastic. So we chatted very briefly, maybe a week or two ago, when we were setting this up. And, and it's a big gift from for me to have you on here. Because whether you know it or not, you are a massive inspiration for me. And actually, ultimately, the creation of this show, because via mutual friends, you know, I started getting introduced to funnels, webinars, all this stuff. And, and, and this mutual friend was like, oh, yeah, you know, my buddy, effectively, Ian you know, has just doing amazing stuff. And I was just captivated. Right? I was like, "Oh, my God".  This is a two to three years ago. So to have you on. Super awesome. So thank you for joining.Ian Hoffman  01:27It's my pleasure. I'm so happy to hear that.Mischa Zvegintzov  01:29Yeah. So real quick. You have a you have a, a program, and it's called the Student Loan Eraser. Correct? Yeah. Fantastic. And so go ahead. Tell me quickly. Tell me about that. And then let's, let's talk about how you how you came to that and were able to bring it to market?Mischa Zvegintzov  01:54Sure. It's definitely a passion project of mine. You know, how it's a there are, I just feel like it was it was what I was put on this planet to do right now, which isn't an amazing feeling. So I'm actually a chiropractor to get into backstory. Yeah, dad's a chiropractor. Both of his brothers are chiropractors, I was born into that also. And I love being a chiropractor. And so what happened was, I was man, like three years into practice. My son was just born, I just came back to the office after taking a couple weeks off. And this, this pregnant mom came in as a new patient.Ian Hoffman  02:37And she brought her four year old daughter to the appointment. And this little girl had stage four cancer. That's the first thing that this mom said to me is my, my little girl. I lost it. I couldn't. I couldn't imagine no parent should have to go through that no child should have to go through that. So to make a long story short, that little girl really inspired me to actually start a nonprofit organization, a charity to expand access to chiropractic and holistic health care for underserved in my community.Ian Hoffman  03:09And as I was going through that process, it was right around the same time that I was really doing some research online about my student loans because I have a lot of debt. I remember having this. I hope I can say this this "Oh, shit moment."Ian Hoffman  03:28Because I remember I had I had just bought a house and between my wife myself, and our student loans, our cars, our mortgage, we had over a million dollars in debt. And that's a heavy weight? That's a heavy weight on somebody's shoulders. Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov  03:44So how old were you at the time? Oh, man,Mischa Zvegintzov  03:47I'm 29, 30 years old. 30, 31. Something around there? Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov  03:55And a young child. That's, that's heavy.Ian Hoffman  03:58Yeah, it was heavy.Ian Hoffman  03:59So when I started reading about this federal program called public service, loan forgiveness... I... I... My heart kind of skipped a beat. I had first read about it before I had even had this idea to start a nonprofit. And so there's only three requirements. But one of the major requirements is that you have to have qualifying employment, you have to work for the government or a nonprofit, to be eligible. And then once I had started my own nonprofit, I had this kind of Eureka moment that I might have reverse engineered my own eligibility. And that's exactly what happened. So, you know, fast forward a couple years from there, I wound up starting the student loan eraser, I put together this whole team, and we help doctors start charities with a dual purpose, which is to make the world a better place and get their student loans erased.Mischa Zvegintzov  04:52That's amazing.Ian Hoffman  04:54Thank you.Mischa Zvegintzov  04:54Oh, my gosh.Ian Hoffman  04:56Yeah, it's been quite a process. The transition wasn't easy. I was in practice full time, coming home, you know, having dinner with my family, they would go to bed, I'd be up till sometimes two, three in the morning.  Writing the webinars writing the emails, just getting the infrastructure together reading.com secrets.  Just feeding my, my, my my mind and getting educated on how to launch an online program because it's something I'd never done before.Mischa Zvegintzov  05:22So So you have the Epiphany, you're like, oh, my gosh, I can I am, you're in the middle of creating this nonprofit, you, you. You, you find out.Mischa Zvegintzov  05:34Here's a way for me to erase my debt, which if you don't mind me asking, What was that number for you? What was the chunk of that of your total debt?Ian Hoffman  05:42I borrowed around 150,000. And it was only going up because most doctors are on an income driven repayment plan, where their monthly payment is actually less than the than the debt, or I'm sorry, less than the interest. And so what happens is that on these income driven plans, they'll pay for 25 years. And at that point, anything that's left is forgiven, but the forgiven debt gets taxed as income. And so once once I heard that I'm like, Man, "this is a this is a black hole".  Because I'm gonna just pay for, you know, till I'm 5560 years old. And at that point, I would still have a six figure tax bill.Mischa Zvegintzov  06:27And you're at the 40%, maybe the your, your, whatever, the gradient tax bracket is 40%. SoIan Hoffman  06:35Oh, yeah, that's in California. So between federal and state taxes, it probably would have been closer to 50%.Mischa Zvegintzov  06:41Man.Ian Hoffman  06:42Yeah, crazy.Mischa Zvegintzov  06:43So we're talking about a real number here, perhaps 75,000 Plus, or since it's actually your debts incrementally growing, because you're paying less than the than the amount? You know, you've got 200, or whatever that number is?Ian Hoffman  06:58Yeah. So I tell most people to think about it, like their mortgage, over 30 years, whatever your purchase price is for, you know, on average, right? Interest rate plays a role, but most people are going to pay double, whatever their purchase price was over 30 years.Mischa Zvegintzov  07:13Yeah.Ian Hoffman  07:13And so that's the way I was thinking about my student loans is, if I borrowed 150,000, over 25 years, you know, it wouldn't quite double because I was making payments, but all of the monthly payment was going to interest only I wasn't, I wasn't actually taken care of any of the principal.Mischa Zvegintzov  07:31Yeah. So you have the reverse engineer moment. And, and your in the fire, right of this million dollar debt load, I've been there and it's heavy, right? That's a heavy load. When you're trying to build a business. You're, you've got a son, a son, right? That's that. Yeah. And so trying to balance, like, time with family with the, I get it. It's heavy. I've been there. But tell me about the moment of that. You go, oh, my gosh, a reverse enginer? Did you was it like an overnight epiphany? I could help people with this... And then or was that a slow build?Ian Hoffman  08:14It was it was an overnight epiphany. And then the infrastructure was a slow build.Mischa Zvegintzov  08:18Okay. Ian Hoffman  08:18Russell Brunson says it's, "it's the who not the how." So I needed to find the right people. You know, to put together the team. I needed to write the webinar.  I needed to really feel confident that at the end of the day I could deliver on the promise.  Because I know how much my student loans caused anxiety for me and sleepless nights.  And I didn't want to help anyone take that on; without really being certain that we could help them reach that goal, at the end of the day, of starting the nonprofit and then being able to qualify for you know, public service loan forgiveness. Yep. So it took quite some time.Ian Hoffman  08:19You know, it took me about a year and a half after starting my own nonprofit, to feel comfortable enough with the process to build the team because I'm not a lawyer. I'm not a CPA. I don't you know, I don't do those things. Yeah, so I need to...Mischa Zvegintzov  09:13Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov  09:14So the we throw... love Russell Brunson, right. I love his Dot com secrets, expert secrets, all that stuff. I'm in his his high end coaching group so thriving in there.  But what about finding that like what what what was the journey to alright, I can help people.  How did you stumble across Russell Brunson? Or was that just was that like someone said, Oh, you have this great idea try this guy? And you're like okay.  Or is that was that a? Was that a rocky transition.Ian Hoffman  09:46I think that's the genius of Russell Brunson and his marketing. He's really good about getting in front of the right people at the right time.Mischa Zvegintzov  09:52Yes. Ian Hoffman  09:52You know what I mean? I don't even know how I came across his material. I'm sure I was just searching online for you know how how to "how to launch" or "how to write a webinar", "how to do an online program". And I had come across other you know, other teachers actually before Russell Brunson. And it's really funny. One of the people that I wound up doing a little work with early on, even before Russell Brunson, is Bailey Richert.  And I wound up hearing her on a podcast and then reached out to her and I did her in for infopreneur Institute, I think is what it's called. Yes. That was fantastic. So I had other mentors along the way. But you know, and she was she was fantastic.Mischa Zvegintzov  10:08You do her Summit, and all that, or No?Ian Hoffman  10:47I didn't do her Summit. But she has a an online training. You know, that teaches you how to go from I think almost nothing, just concept idea to just step by step how to how to get your first online program launched.Mischa Zvegintzov  11:04Yes.  Okay.Ian Hoffman  11:06So I did that. And it was fantastic. It really helped me to clarify my vision and who was I serving and those kinds of details.  And then it turns out later she wound up working with Russell Brunson. So brand and so it's a really small world in the online marketing space.Mischa Zvegintzov  11:24Yeah, fantastic. So so your entry into Russell Brunson land was was Bailey Richert your you take her infopreneur whatever it's called Academy. And, and that's how the idea for the webinar starts to come to fruition and use and you start crafting it there, then you end up in Russell Brunson land is that the?Ian Hoffman  11:48The timeline is a little hazy. Because I was doing a lot of things all at the same time. I was trying to educate myself. So I read a book. Also written by a chiropractor, I'm blanking on his name, but it was it's called social media made me rich. And I read, you know, I was really just trying to I was listening to podcasts, reading books, I was really just trying to trying to get an education on this space. So and at the same time, I was even... I live in Carlsbad, California. And there's an amazing podcast called... Oh, man, I'm blanking on the name of it, too. Anyway, there's an amazing podcast on I think it's the "online marketing made simple" or "Made Easy podcast". But she she teaches webinars and her strategies. And so I've gone through multiple iterations of my current webinar. Ian Hoffman  12:56I did probably eight or ten live webinars. Recorded them all made little notes. Figured out what questions people were asking, tried to, you know, answer those questions in advance as I kept going. And then finally got to the one where we had a really great response as far as sales and people staying to the end of the webinar. And that one eventually went on evergreen.Mischa Zvegintzov  13:21Fantastic. And so is this what we would call a high ticket webinar. So you're trying when I look at your webinar, or your landing page? Yes, reserve my seat now. Great news. It what? I'll tell you exactly what it says plus get a free phone called conflict consultation at the end of the web class. So you're driving phone calls? Or is your... Do you have a do it yourself? Course? A all help you course, I'll do it all for you course?  What's your...Ian Hoffman  14:03I only have one...Ian Hoffman  14:04It's it's not a traditional funnel from the standpoint of like... I only have one offer, and that offer converts. And so really, it's $5,000 to $7,000. And at that, that price point, I think that most people...Ian Hoffman  14:21I've had a few people who clicked an ad, they watched the webinar, and they signed up without ever talking to me. And that's super cool. And I was excited about that.Ian Hoffman  14:32But the truth is I wanted to also be able to qualify my clients. And so I don't mind jumping on a 15 to 30 minute call with prospects to really get a feel for who they are, make sure their hearts in the right place with all of this. I'm sure that we would work well together. And to answer their questions, make sure that they know that there's a human behind this you know.  So My funnel now is different. It changes over time, right? But my funnel now basically is register for the web class, that is the most important first step, because I want people, frankly, to be pre educated before they jump on the call with me. I want them to be able to ask the right questions to at least have a basic understanding of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program.  About their student loans. About ways that we can help before they get on the call, so that when I get on the call answer questions, then it's a simple conversation of, you know, what's going on? How can I help what questions you have? Let's address those and then sign up?Mischa Zvegintzov  15:40Yeah, yeah. Ian Hoffman  15:41Yep.  Answering all the questions that that you know, you know, the top questions or the top, in sales line, let's call it rebuttals. Right. Ian Hoffman  15:41It saves me a lot of time. Because before I was spending between 30 minutes to an hour with each prospect, you know, sometimes multiple phone calls going over the same material. And that's where a webinar is really helpful in in kind of pre educating. And doing the sales process for me.Ian Hoffman  16:10Right.Mischa Zvegintzov  16:11But let's talk about it from it's more from a service standpoint, though, you're like, hey, I have this vision. This helped me, I want to help you. Not only are is it helping you the doctor, because it's saving you money and clearing debt and relieving stress and all this stuff. At the same time, you get to have a passion project and help the world right? We get satisfaction of the world. Yeah.Ian Hoffman  16:34Yeah, for sure. Most most doctors that I talked to, are already doing some form of this.Ian Hoffman  16:40I think most people got into health care, because they want to help people. You know that that's been really beautiful for me to see, as I'm talking and consulting with doctors. And it doesn't matter what the degree is dentists, chiropractors, naturopathic doctors, you name it. Most of them are already providing some level of discount or free care for, for people in need. And, and so they're just not doing it through a nonprofit. So we formalize that. We formalize their way of giving back, and they're able to qualify for student loan forgiveness as as a result.Mischa Zvegintzov  17:16That's amazing. I love that. That's, it's amazing. I just think it's my favorite thing. My goal is to help people help people, right. I'm like, I'm like, and so to hear you talk about the win win win scenario. That's like the best in the world right now. And I think that's what's genius about Russell Brunson, too, right. He's like, Hey, man, entrepreneurs are the people that are gonna save the world, shall we say, or make it better? Right?Mischa Zvegintzov  17:44And, and to have that win win win situation that you have created, or the universe helped you create, however you want to say it? Is, is beautiful. And inspiring. So thank you. I have a quick question.  Your frustration? Well, I want to start with the who, what? Not the how, because that's such a powerful concept. Building the team, and you set it like it was easy. Oh, yeah. I just needed to build the team and make this happen. Yeah, well, no, maybe you're like, I'll do this myself. And quickly, you realize this is going to be a here a Herculean effort. I need help or tell me about that sort of process?Ian Hoffman  18:26Sure.Ian Hoffman  18:26Well, I mean, I, I think it's a matter of, of taking inventory and knowing yourself and your strengths and what you're good at and what you enjoy. And also, what do you not want to do? What do you not enjoy? What what lowers your energy. And so for me, I love writing. So writing the copy, writing the webinar, that...I enjoyed that process.  But I didn't want to take on even the the the responsibility of filing these tax forms with the IRS and filing the articles of incorporation. And that legal work is something I knew nothing about and didn't really, I wasn't motivated to learn. So it's also it's also that is finding out, you know, where are the gaps between where you are and where you want to be.  And then filling in those gaps, either by educating yourself and then doing it or if you find that you're not motivated, you need to find someone else who that's what they do. So, so I wound up originally working with the the firm that started my own nonprofit, I brought this to them and they said, great, and we brought that to really to, to the scale that they could handle. They were a smaller firm, and then I wound up finding a bigger firm to work with and, you know, wound up transitioning over.  But yeah, I mean, I think that's the process is just knowing yourself and what you love and trying to to do that.Mischa Zvegintzov  20:03Okay, did you formalize that? Or was that all sort of intuitive for you? And when I say that I mean, did you? Were you like, Did you literally sit down and write out? Okay, this is what I'm good at. This is what I need help with? Or was it? Yeah, go?Mischa Zvegintzov  20:19I didn't do that I really, I wrote out kind of the curriculum and the steps of "what's the client's journey?" Right.Mischa Zvegintzov  20:30So once I, once I really went through the process of, okay, here's my modules, here's my, my, my system, my formula for the big promise of start a nonprofit and qualify for student loan forgiveness. What are the steps that people need to go through along that journey to really get that end end result that I'm trying to promise people? And then I was able to really clearly see what part of those steps can I teach? What can I help people with? What can we do for them? And then what do I need help with? You know, where can I fill in the gaps with other services?Mischa Zvegintzov  21:09Hmm, beautiful. Thank you. That's it. Thank you for that. Question in regards to Avatar. You mentioned that and everybody watching and listening avatar is "speak" for "your perfect customer".  The "the exact person you want to work with". I know for a lot of us, for me, that's an elusive concept, or can be shifting or, or the conversations I keep having are make it super narrow. And so I'll go super narrow, and then the people that are telling me to go narrow, inevitably say that's too narrow, or I get so tell me about your avatar process.Mischa Zvegintzov  21:47Totally. I'm a big believer in you know, for me personally, it was it was a little easier, I think, than some because I am my avatar.  You know, I was a doctor with six figures of student debt. And you know there are doctors with multiple, many multiple six figures of student loan debt. And so my avatar was was really anyone who... they I've worked with people that are not doctors, but really my avatar is anyone with over six figures of student loan debt who has a has a service based business.Ian Hoffman  22:28So, that's, that's the most general avatar. But the people who have the most student loan debt naturally are doctors and lawyers.  You know, people who went to grad school. So that's, that's where it went.Mischa Zvegintzov  22:28Okay.Ian Hoffman  22:28But the reason it's so important to have an avatar is because, um, you know, along this process of building a funnel, building a business, one of the most important aspects of that is where am I going to get traffic? How am I going to put my ads in front of the right people? And so for me, I know I can get my ads in front of chiropractors, naturopathic doctors, dentists, physical therapists, osteopathic doctors.  You know, those are my vertical markets. And in unless you have that avatar specifically drawn out, it's really hard to target.Mischa Zvegintzov  22:28Hmm.Mischa Zvegintzov  23:20And then then the ad process just is too inefficient. It did you can't you? Is that a good way to say it?Mischa Zvegintzov  23:29Yeah, absolutely. I mean, who wants to pay for ads that go to the wrong person that's not even interested? Or a qualified lead?Mischa Zvegintzov  23:37Yeah. Yeah. How was that? How was the do you do the ads? Or did you bring in? Did you bring in a who to do that for you?Ian Hoffman  23:46I've done both what I what I tend to do in my journey, my learning process is I want to learn as much as I can and try it myself first, and then hire an expert, so that I know what questions to ask. I know, I can get to a certain point, they better beat me. You know, they're going to get better results than I did if they're doing this as a professional. So you know, that's just how I am. Yeah. So that's how I started. I did really well, early on in Facebook ads. But then it became complicated because Facebook changed their marketing policy really related to student loan type advertising. And yeah, I mean, that people talk all the time about Facebook slaps and Google Slaps,Mischa Zvegintzov  24:30Google slaps. Yeah. You had one!  Tell me about it...Ian Hoffman  24:34So yeah, it happened. And so then, you know, again, it's the who not the how I didn't want to become a Facebook ads specialist on top of everything else I was doing. So then you find the right team who can get you back where you want to be.Mischa Zvegintzov  24:46And so was that a? Was that an overnight crack on the side of the head like your business effectively shut down?Ian Hoffman  24:54I wouldn't say it shut down.Ian Hoffman  24:55So that that is actually the power of having an email list. right? So that's where I'm really glad that I was collecting emails for people who joined my webinar, because there were a lot of people on my email list who didn't bought who hadn't bought. And so what I was able to do once traffic shut down, you know, as I was working on getting that back up with ads... I had an email list of about 4000 Doctors by that point. So I really started emailing my list more frequently.  And getting them back engaged and, you know, sending them more information.  And really just being more active with that. And that was able to drive sales for a considerable amount of time, as you know, rebuilding the apps.Mischa Zvegintzov  25:44That's fantastic. So let's dive into this email list a little bit. Are... You have a nurture campaign, which means do you email consistently? Or is it? So there's that question? And do you outsource that process that process or tell me about your nurturing of your list?Ian Hoffman  26:07Yeah, I don't outsource that... I do... I enjoy writing. That's one of the things that I enjoy. So for me, and I think those emails are so... those are really important. And I want people to get that kind of information directly from the source.  Directly from me. So I don't I don't hire out for that. And I also...Ian Hoffman  26:35I can probably be better about this. But when there's news when there's, you know, especially in 2021, there's been a lot of news, political news related to student loans.Ian Hoffman  26:53President Biden has already raised billions of dollars of student loan debt that President Trump never did for people who have, you know, for example, who were defrauded by their schools. And their schools shut down... they didn't get the you know, their degree. Or for people who have a total and permanent disability, now they can get student loan forgiveness. And so I follow these these things in the in the world of student loans. And I send, you know, information as it comes up to my list.Ian Hoffman  27:17One of the most recent developments in the world of public service loan forgiveness is that... before there were there was a very low acceptance rate into the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program. Hovering around 2%, actually, which is terrible. And that's because yeah, there are three requirements to qualify. There's actually four different types of federal student loans. Only one type qualifies for this program. There, there are like nine different repayment plan options. Five of those are income driven repayment, those are the ones that qualify.  And then you had to have qualifying employment with the government or nonprofit.   Ian Hoffman  27:57And the student loan industry is so complex. I personally believe it's designed to confuse so that people overpay. I mean, that's just that's just what it is. Right?Mischa Zvegintzov  28:08Yes.Ian Hoffman  28:08So unfortunately, unless people have done the homework and the research, like I did to say, most people don't even know what type of student loans they have, let's start there. So 15% of PSLF denials were because people just didn't have the right type of student loans. And they weren't being told that there's a free process that can turn any of the other types of federal student loans into the type that qualifies.Ian Hoffman  28:32So that's the first step with my program, I look at what type of loans they have, what repayment plan they're in, and we make sure that they meet those first two requirements. But because the program was so messed up... recently, there, I think it was President Biden or the administration said, "we're gonna we're gonna, you know, wipe away those first two requirements".Ian Hoffman  28:54So now any type of student loans and on any repayment plan, as long as you're a government and nonprofit employee, you can qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness right now. So they actually made it easier than ever before, to to enroll in this this program.Mischa Zvegintzov  29:11Wow. That's amazing. So you're disseminating information like that to your list and useful information. And obviously, strangely, it's either a blessing or a curse. You're fascinated by the by the, by the student loan process.Ian Hoffman  29:29Yeah. That was originally fascinated by it. But you know, I think originally when I, when I went to try to get my first mortgage, I was told that my income was good, but my debt to income ratio was all messed up because of the student loans.Mischa Zvegintzov  29:45Yeah.Ian Hoffman  29:45So I really got inspired to understand my student loans so that they didn't hold me back in life. You know what I mean? And then and then meeting that little girl with stage for cancer and everything else that came after it really was You know, the universe or something aligned? Yeah. To help this this product, this service come to fruition?Mischa Zvegintzov  30:08Yeah, I don't mean to go political, but I'm going to it almost seems to me, and I've had this thought that that a lot of these schools were, literally were created as a vehicle to create student loan debt. Right. Like, almost people with lots of money, we're like, we want to, we want to, you know, collateralize debt or securitized debt obligations, or whatever, you know, the bond market, right. And so they're like, alright, we got we want student loans, we can, the government will subsidize it. Right? So they got you got venture capitalists with billions of dollars that want to create CDOs, or collateralized debt obligations? There we go. And so they're like, how can we do this? This is just a theory. I don't mean to you, maybe you could speak to that for a second. You know, it's like,Ian Hoffman  31:11Yeah,Mischa Zvegintzov  31:12Yeah it's like... go ahead...Ian Hoffman  31:14I mean, I have heard a few different, you know, theories as far as the student debt crisis in America and how it came to happen. And, you know... I think that what we do know, is that part of the issue is that tuision, has just gone up and up and up and up far faster than the cost than the then the salaries that the degrees people are being trained in provide. And so...Ian Hoffman  31:50But the reason that they're doing that is because the schools know what someone can borrow. So if someone can borrow $10,000 a quarter, you know...They're gonna make their tuition, you know, whatever the the the very minimum that somebody can can have for, you know, room and board.Mischa Zvegintzov  32:10Yes. Ian Hoffman  32:11That, you know, plus tuition is $10,000. So, you know, that's, I think that's more of the issue is that it's not, it's not commensurate with what, what someone can expect to earn from that degree. It's not...Ian Hoffman  32:30There's a lot of unethical practices, I would say, but most importantly, is just that people aren't being educated on the responsibilities that they're taking on... when... you know, if... If I was 20, I'm trying to think of when I when I started at chiropractic school, graduated high school at 18. College at 22.Ian Hoffman  33:00So if I was 22 years old, and I went to try to get a mortgage for six figures, yeah, you know, there's no way but sure, you, we can give you six figures, you know, of debt for for college, right. So and it's an it's that it's a, it's a trap unfortunately, for a lot of people. I'm I'm, I value my education to no end. And I would do whatever it took to repay my debt. And and I was on that path. I was, you know, whether it was making my monthly payments, and then paying the tax bill.  Or earning more and paying it off more quickly, I would have done whatever I could, it wasn't about getting out of the debt.Mischa Zvegintzov  33:43Yes.Ian Hoffman  33:44But the fact that there's a federal program out there, that would erase my debt, because I was helping more people and providing a public service. I was all after that.Mischa Zvegintzov  33:54I love it. That's a great, great way to frame it, you are committed to like, Hey, I have this debt. If I took it on, I'm willing to be responsible for it. I as a matter of fact, I'm trying to pay it off sooner. So I can be a responsible consumer or whatever, you know, like... Reduce the lifetime interest on the damn thing or stuff. Right. Like and, and, yeah. But then you figure out an ethical way. I didn't even think about this. The you're like, oh, wait a minute, like, I'm trying to be responsible. Here's an alt solution to be responsible. And yeah, it's beautiful. Did I frame that right? Or did I say that right?Ian Hoffman  34:35Yeah, you did. You know, and, and...Ian Hoffman  34:35Why are we bailing out banks at three quarters of 1%? When a student who wants to become educated and become a doctor, we're gonna put them into student debt slavery for the rest of their life? You know, it doesn't make sense. So I do you feel, in some senses like Robin Hood you know... Trying to... cuz the student loan industry is huge.Ian Hoffman  34:35There's $1.5 trillion of student loan debt out there. It's more than credit cards and car loans combined. So it affects 45 million Americans, it's a huge issue. And that's why I feel really good about helping people to sleep better at night to get that student loan monkey off their back and to give back in the process.Ian Hoffman  34:37I go back to you know, you asked about the the student loan industry as a whole and I think what's crazy is when the banks needed a bailout, the federal government gave them that bailout at 0.75% interest rate. When I got my student loans, it was 6.8%.Mischa Zvegintzov  34:58Oh my god.Ian Hoffman  34:59So why that that feels backwards to me. Right?Mischa Zvegintzov  35:45Yeah, that's beautiful. Thank you for that. Let me ask you a question. As far as like, internally, you you're coming across these these professionals, medical professionals. Who are, you know, who have this burden who are trying to do the right thing and have a they're kind of doing the philanthropic thing, they might not even know it it sounds like right.  They have the activities and and you can wrap that, that nonprofit around it. What's like, the thing that, that they're thinking in their head that they're like, this doesn't make sense. What What's that? What's that? You know, what I'm saying? Like, how do you what is that thing that that, that that doctor in that situation internally is like, Yeah, but like, what's that thing?Ian Hoffman  36:35Regarding my program?Mischa Zvegintzov  36:36Yeah, regarding your program. Mischa Zvegintzov  36:39Yeah, like that internal, where they're like, they're thinking, like, well... I can't do it. Or I don't have the time. Or what is the what's like, what, what's the thing that stops people from taking advantage of this amazing thing internally? I guess, is what I'm trying to say. Right.Ian Hoffman  36:54Like, I mean, I think most often, it's that we have this silly phrase that, you know, if something sounds too good to be true, right? So I do hear that... And you know...there...Ian Hoffman  37:06Unfortunately, it's an industry where there are there are some scams out there, there are people taking advantage. And so I understand when my clients have questions, and they want to do their due diligence, and that's why I stopped selling the program directly from the webinar. And I want people to get on the phone with me. Because I want them to hear my heart and my purpose behind this. And I want to make sure that they're aligned with that. And I want to make sure that they understand that it's not me personally offering to forgive their student loan debt. And they do have responsibilities when they decide to join my program.  They have to run the nonprofit, effectively.  They have to learn the difference between how to run a nonprofit versus a for profit. We do all that training. But you know, there, I have this great quote, from www.nonprofitquarterly.org. Ian Hoffman  38:03They said six months of executive training for nonprofit professionals to on compliance costs between $4,000-$30,000. And that's included in my program, because I want people not just to help them start a nonprofit, I want them to be trained, so they can run it effectively in compliance with state and, and federal regulations. And so they're that means that they are taking on a different responsibility.  Instead of paying their student loan debt, they need to know that they are now going to learn how to run a nonprofit, and how to do that effectively, how to avoid conflicts of interest, and how to, you know, to meet the specific requirements for public service loan forgiveness.Mischa Zvegintzov  38:51So you help them do all that.Ian Hoffman  38:53We help them do all of that.Mischa Zvegintzov  38:55Is that like the biggest, the biggest sort of outside issue that that that a medical professional is going to feel when they when they come across this idea? Your your student loan? I forgot the name, I'm sorry, student loans eraser.Ian Hoffman  39:11Yes.Mischa Zvegintzov  39:12Is that is that is that the is that like the thing where they're like, wait a minute, this sounds too good to be true. But then they get you on the phone and they feel your heart? And they say, oh, no, this is real. I can do this. But then they're like, oh, there's this outside stuff. Like, is it that compliance piece? Or is it is it well, my wife's gonna think I'm crazy or what? What's that?Ian Hoffman  39:34So first, it's too good to be true. And then it's, it's the other two big ones time and money. Right. So how much is this going to cost? And how long is it going to take for me to get it set up? What are my time requirements in running the nonprofit? You know, what are those things look like? So those are all important questions that most people have.  That I addressed to a certain extent on the webinar, because I know everyone has those questions. Yeah, but then we We go deeper on the phone calls.Mischa Zvegintzov  40:01Okay, cool, cool, cool. And what's the what's like the epiphany moment for them where they're like, oh, my gosh, I have to do this.Ian Hoffman  40:09Yeah, um... Ian Hoffman  40:09Most people know they have to do it when when they look at how much student loan debt they have.  You know, when they look at their options.  Because you know, the truth is... I break it down. Ian Hoffman  40:09There's three, three ways to get out of your student loan debt, right? Number one, you can pay for 25 years, well, let's say four years, you can pay it off. But when you have multiple six figures of student loan debt, most people cannot do that in, you know, in a reasonable amount of time. Number two, you can go on an income driven plan, make the minimum payment for 25 years and save for that tax bill. That's, that's the way a lot of people go. Number three, you can qualify for public service, loan forgiveness, and get it erased in half the time tax free. That's the option I provide. And number four is die trying, you know, those, those really are the options. So between those four options, when you really break it down, people are able to see that, you know, if I can get out of debt in less than half the time tax free. That's really the way to go.Mischa Zvegintzov  41:23Thank you for answering. I want to know how many times did you almost quit in this process? How many times were you like, oh my gosh, this is amazing. And then the next day like, I can't do this another day? Yes. Because it's so hard building this.Ian Hoffman  41:40Yeah, I will say that I almost quit a few times before my first launch. Once I did my first launch. i i I've never looked back. So the first the the first year was really a challenge because that's when I was still full time in practice. Still, you know how to have had a new family.  You know, a lot lots of obligations. And I wasn't sleeping much because I was trying to get this thing off the ground. So it was stressful. It was stressful for sure. Plus, you know, I was running a for profit and nonprofit, you know, so I had a lot going on. And I did I did get to a few points where I'm like, What am I doing? What Why? Why am I doing this? Right? Yeah.Ian Hoffman  42:32But, uh, then I looked at that little girl with stage four cancer, you know, and I remembered my why. And she's now December of this year, she'll be six years cancer free. When we first met, she was as bald as me now her hair is as long as yours, you know. So yeah. And so now I realized that the the impact is what drives me my clients are taking care of over 10,000 nonprofit visits a month.  Which is amazing. So yeah, I wanted to quit early on. But...Mischa Zvegintzov  43:09Oh my god, thank you for that. Say that, again, what your nonprofit is doing what Say that again.Ian Hoffman  43:13So fast forward now.  In the five and a half for six years or so that I've been teaching this. We by the end of this year will have started over 400 charities, and those doctors are going to save over $100 million. And they're taking care of over 10,000 nonprofit patient visits per month. So those are the numbers that are important to me. Oh no, I know that as those numbers grow, so too, so does income.Mischa Zvegintzov  43:43You know what? I I literally wrote this down. And I wrote down it's an effort to create something like this. You deserve a standing ovation. Right? Just for the fact that no truly I mean, and I'm not even talking that's just on the creation and now that I hear like your impact. Oh my gosh, I just I you know... I need the... what I was gonna say is I need an applause but I need the standing ovation applause button.  So what great inspiration. um, so are you you're not chiropractic anymore? Or you do it a little bit or what's going on there?Ian Hoffman  44:22I'm not I'm not I really miss it. And so you know, one day I hope to have a little office with a box on the wall "Pay What You Can" you know that that kind of thing. That's That's my dream retirement. But for now...Ian Hoffman  44:39I also know that the the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program in and of itself is probably not going to be around forever. There's there's been over a million people that have submitted their employment certification form. There's a lot of interest in this program as complex and difficult you know, as as it is.  And so Every year in office President Trump asked Congress to close enrollment in public service loan forgiveness. And they never did. But it put the program on the chopping block where... there was always a grandfathering clause that said, once you're once you're enrolled, and once you have your student loans...they're not trying to take it away from anyone who is already enrolled. But they would close enrollment from that point forward to not let the program continue to grow. And Congress never changed it. They never they never did that. So the program survived. President Biden seems very in favor of all of the student loan forgiveness programs, including public service, loan forgiveness.  And they're making great strides to fix it and make it easier for people. So, you know, political shifts can change. And, you know, I'm, I'm in this for as long as I can be.Mischa Zvegintzov  45:58Does it keep you up at night at all? Are you ever Are you ever or do you have a connection or a trust factor that like, if this evaporates, "I know there's next"?Ian Hoffman  46:08Yeah, you know, the cool thing is that, because I was fortunate enough, I wound up getting a to two comma Club Award. This program, which was super fun, I got to shake Russell Brunson. And it was amazing. And, and get on stage at Funnel Hacking live in front of 1000s and 1000s of people.Mischa Zvegintzov  46:26Yeah,Mischa Zvegintzov  46:27What year was that?  What year was that?Ian Hoffman  46:292019.Mischa Zvegintzov  46:29Yeah, not Nashville was that which was Nashville? Yes. Yeah. Congratulations, another applause button.Ian Hoffman  46:38Thanks. That was super fun and a cool accomplishment. But since then, I think just naturally, you know, people hear about that. They find me online, somehow through to comic club or whatever. They I've had people reach out to me and ask me for help. Because they're trying to get an online program launch. They're trying to write a webinar, they're trying to go through this process. And the most common thing I hear is, I don't know what to do first. Okay, even if I do that, what do I do next? And so I've really had fun taking on a handful of select clients.   That, you know, are people who are doing something that I really believe in.  That are making the world better.  That are helping people with their product or service. And, you know, I've helped a couple of them get to market, get on Click Funnels and, and develop their, their funnel. So I do some of that coaching. And I think that if, if Public Service Loan Forgiveness went away overnight, I would probably have a lot of fun getting into that more.Mischa Zvegintzov  47:47Yeah, yeah, great, what a gift. But how cool is that? To know that that can shift there if necessary, or wherever the universe is going to take you.   Or however you...Ian Hoffman  48:01Yeah totally.Mischa Zvegintzov  48:02Yeah, that's super cool. Any upsells down cells along the way you have? Or are you? Or do you have like progression for your doctors? So you have your first $5000 to $7,000? Class? Is there a next step for them? Or no, you're pretty focused on that.Ian Hoffman  48:26There, there's not. There's no upsell, so to speak, as far as as that's concerned. But I do remember reading about how important it is to have a continuity funnel to have monthly recurring revenue instead of just one chunk at a time. And so I got together about two years ago now with the team that I use to do the legal work. So they write the articles of incorporation and bylaws send that to the state, they send the required documents to the IRS. And so they have a great team.Ian Hoffman  49:00And we put together a compliance program for my clients. Where we call it the "hands free 501 C three maintenance program". And so that includes help with bookkeeping, payroll, state and federal tax returns, help with their board meetings. You know, compliance questions, all of that. And really it that it's $157 a month, we tried to keep it really affordable. And it's it's an option. Some of my clients choose to keep their nonprofit, very low budget, and they do all those things themselves. But for the ones who are really busy, the ones who their nonprofit can afford it. We do have that as I would say kind of an upsell. Ian Hoffman  49:48And then as a down sell.  The first step in this whole process is making sure that people have the the first two requirements.  They have the right type of student loans.  And they're on an income driven repayment plan with the lowest possible monthly payment, because that helps us maximize their savings and cash flow.Ian Hoffman  50:08And so I do a custom student loan plan. For people who are on the fence, they're like, show me my numbers, how much can I save? Before I sign up, so that sometimes I have specials, that's usually somewhere between $297 and $497. But you know, that's a great way for people to get their numbers and see how much they're going to save before they jump into the full program. So really, it's about twice a year, I'll send some emails, you know, telling people about the the custom student loan plan. And that works great as well.Mischa Zvegintzov  50:46Fantastic. Thank you for answering it. And I next interview, I'm going to ask it more delicately because upsell and down sell can sound a little salesy, right. But really, oh, here's an added value. If you're a busy, medical professional, and you're, you're cranking away at your business, and you've created this nonprofit that's thriving. Or maybe more than they anticipated, or something, you're like, hey, we can we can maintain your compliance on a on a monthly basis. So you don't have to worry about it. It's beautiful. Right? Versus, and then you've also got, hey, someone's not ready to feel like you know what, I think I'll just start with like, let's clean up my my student loan debt, let's just clean it up a little bit. Make sure I'm maximizing, you know, interest rates and all that sort of stuff. Yeah?Ian Hoffman  51:38Sure.Mischa Zvegintzov  51:38Yes. Great.Ian Hoffman  51:39There are people that that start there. And I show them that they can lower their their payments enough where it pays for the full program in and of itself within two years, or whatever that is. So it's just a nice way to help people save money and provide value quickly. And then if they choose to get started with the full program, great. If not, they've had a great interaction with me. And hopefully they saved a ton of money.Mischa Zvegintzov  52:07Yeah, fantastic. And I'm looking over here a little bit as a, as we're talking, I'm looking at  your landing page, the introduction to the webinar. And there was something I saw on there about a group, there's you do you have a group associated with this? Where? Yeah,Ian Hoffman  52:25Yeah, so all my clients, one of the bonuses that they get is access to a private Facebook group. We have, I think there's, there's over 200 doctors in that group at this point, it might be 250 At this point.  But it's, it's a way for them to share resources and provide community support. Sometimes someone will find an article, even though I stay really up to date with the political stuff regarding student loans. Sometimes they find things before me, and they post it there, and then I get a chance to comment. So they're, you know, people will have questions about anything, you know, related to their student loans or related to the nonprofit, and we get to provide community support, share referrals, resources that way.Mischa Zvegintzov  53:14Cool. What's sort of the coolest thing you've seen on the group?  Where you're like, Whoa, I didn't expect that. That was amazing.Ian Hoffman  53:21Yeah. Um, to be honest, it was like, it was a, it was a fear that turned into a really cool, powerful moment. So I had somebody who posted that they were flagged for an IRS audit. And it was something that was totally unrelated to their student loans and to the nonprofit. But they wound up posting, you know, as they went through the process that the IRS, the nonprofit that we started for them got looked at, and it passed with flying colors. There were no the IRS had no issues with the setup or with with any part of that. So that was fantastic for everyone in the group to see. We cross our T's we dot our I's we teach it a certain way.Mischa Zvegintzov  54:10Yes. Ian Hoffman  54:11We do that because you know that that's the way to do it.Mischa Zvegintzov  54:15Yeah.Ian Hoffman  54:16There's, there's only one way in my opinion, if you're going to go down this path, and that's the rightMischa Zvegintzov  54:21way. That's beautiful. Ian, thank you so much. Um, I had one other question. It just escaped me. Um, maybe that means we should be done.Mischa Zvegintzov  54:32Oh, but I wanted to tell anybody watching and, and listening. Either go into the show notes or click below www.erasemystudent loans.com click on that link. And you can check out the webinar and just get all the quality information and if it makes sense and you want to reorganize your debt or start a nonprofit help save the world and wipe it off the books or or what have you click on that link and learn. I guess my next question is, is there like a breakeven point you have? So if someone's got, like $10,000, in student loan debt, obviously, you know what? Probably not, I'm not your guy, is it? Like, right? That's what's that number and above?Ian Hoffman  55:19It's not so much a specific number of an amount of student loan debt, although I will give you that number. Um, it's, it's their debt relative to their income, because, for example, if they have $50,000 of student loan debt, but they have no income, than the $50,000 is still gonna be there. Plus interest 10 years from now? Yes. Right. So, you know, that's why it's related to their income, versus if they have $50,000 of student loan debt, and they make $250,000 a year, they're gonna pay that off before they qualify for forgiveness, right. So that's why it's it's debt relative to their income. And for the most part, I would say, you know, if you're, if your monthly payment is at or below interest, meaning, if your debt is not going down, yes, then we that's how we know that this might be a good option for you. And I would say that, at a minimum, I typically want to see somewhere between $50,000 and $70,000, of student loan debt, you know, to take on a client. However, I have, I have had clients that have $750,000 of student loan debt. So it's no joke, you know, as as a naturopathic doctors right now are graduating with $400,000.  Dentists are graduating with $400,000.Mischa Zvegintzov  56:47What!?Ian Hoffman  56:48And some people have multiple degrees. So yeah, and then, you know, on top of, let's say, You graduated with $400,000 of student loan debt, and you didn't have a substantial income right out of school, five years later, that might be significantly higher. So that's why we start to see people who have half a million dollar plus a, you know, that's that those are really my favorite clients, because there's no way they're paying that off, you know, unfortunately.Mischa Zvegintzov  57:22Unfortunately, so they could actually be thriving as a practice and have a ton of income, but that the burden of that debt is just... It's heavy, right? Like it. Especially if you're growing a family and doing all that and have a house, totally things.Ian Hoffman  57:38There are statistic statistics now on student debt related suicides, and student debt related divorces, and student I mean, it's just, it's miserable. Um, so, you know, I would say, for anyone in those kinds of positions, um, you know, there's help.Mischa Zvegintzov  57:57That's amazing. Um, and so I just want to recap, one thing, if what I'm hearing you say is, if someone's making a million dollars a year, and they have $100,000, in loan debt, and they have no other debt, like that's not your guy, because they can just effectively pay it off. Quick anyway, right, like, pay it off, versus going through the hoops of paying me all this stuff? Is that effectively what I heard you say?Ian Hoffman  58:21Correct. Um, that being said, I do have clients who are earning in excess of $250,000 a year, so. But, again, if you're earning debt load, but you have half a million dollars of debt, that's why it's not just a picture of how much debt you have. It's debt and income,Mischa Zvegintzov  58:39I get it. It's like the debt to income ratio, if you wanted to call it like that. Right? And it's, it's the whole debt to income ratio, right? Like by the time you have your car payment in there, maybe some credit card payments in there, and maybe some, right when you put the whole picture together.  It's like yeah, you could be making a lot but but that total that load? Okay, you've answered the question. I don't mean to brow that any brow beat that anymore? Did you want to clarify there? Because I didn't mean to dilute that message. If I did,Ian Hoffman  59:07No, no worries. And and I'm happy to have people check out the web class, make sure that this is something that they want to pursue, get the information and if they're not sure, on their those numbers, you know, jump on a call with me, we can always start with the custom student loan plan. That's why I have that option to run the numbers for them.Ian Hoffman  59:27And I also provide two money back guarantees in my program because I want to make it a no brainer. So the first guarantee is that after they sign up, when I do the first step, and I look at what type of loans they have, what repayment plan they're in, I estimate how much they can expect to save by qualifying for public service loan forgiveness. And if I can't provide a you know, an estimate of 1,000% return on their investment, you know, basically meaning. The program itself is is $5000 If we if I'm not going to show them that they're going to qualify for at least $50,000 in savings, then I give them an opportunity to have a refund.Ian Hoffman  1:00:10And then the second guarantee that I make is that one, it's their responsibility from that point forward to complete the steps in the student loan eraser and go through the course and with my help and guidance, but once they complete the process, I the last step is that they send a document to the Department of Education, letting them know that they now have qualified employment, and they get a letter back saying, letting them know how many payments they've made, or how much how many months they have that count towards public service, loan forgiveness.  So they know they're in. If they get denied, they get we work with them until they get approved or they get a refund. So it has to work or I don't feel that I deserve to keep the payment.Mischa Zvegintzov  1:00:53That's amazing. That is amazing. That's amazing. And thank you for explaining it that way. That's that's clear and concise. Like that's almost if you fit if you fit the person that can use help that needs they can they can get you can help clean up their their debt load serve community. like they fit that model. If you aren't able to come through it's not it's it's a no lose situation. That's That's powerful. Wow. I know you're a busy guy. I know you've got a son out there still and all that and so I want to I want you to let you get back to your day. But I want to tell everybody again, erase my I'm looking at it. It's a beautiful it's a beautiful landing page very concise, easy to easy to figure out what to do https://www.erasemystudentloans.com/ The link will be in the show notes as well but absolutely click on it. And just the impact I'm I just getting the chills by the impact I just that you're bringing is really truly beautiful and inspirational. So thank you for that.  Ian. Dr. Ian Hoffman. I'm gonna hit stop, and then we'll say goodbye offline.Ian Hoffman  1:02:18Okay. All right. Thank you, Mischa, I appreciate the opportunity.Mischa Zvegintzov  1:02:20Indeed. Cheers.

North County News
The Year in Beer with Noah Scoville - Episode #139

North County News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 73:58


Happy last few days of 2021 North County! Today we had on our yearly guest, AKA our Beer Guru, Mr. Noah Scoville. He works at Burgeon Beer over in Carlsbad and he knows a lot about beer. We dove into new styles to expect in 2022, local breweries you might wanna check out, and our beers of the year. Super fun! Find him https://www.instagram.com/stophopandroll/ https://www.instagram.com/beernightinsandiego/ https://www.instagram.com/burgeonbeer/ Find us Check out our YouTube Channel : North County San Diego with Chris and Cassidy Cassidy - @cassidylewisre Chris - @i.am.chris.erickson Please subscribe and leave us a review. We love ya

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons
God's Side Always Wins

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 20:43


This week's message is titled God's Side Always Wins and the scripture reference is 1 Samuel 17:4-7, 10-11, 28-29, 40-42, 48-49. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

All THINGS HIP HOP EPISODE #1
EP #160 DAVE PACZKOWSKI-HEALING FROM THE INSIDE OUT

All THINGS HIP HOP EPISODE #1

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 102:00


Dave Paczkowski is the founder and co-owner of Inside Out Strength and Performance, a performance physical therapy clinic and training gym in Carlsbad, CA for active adults and families. He holds a Doctorate in Physical Therapy and several certifications in strength, fitness, and performance. Dave founded Inside Out to teach people how to stay active and pain-free for years to come, so that they can enjoy workouts, hikes, and beach days with their family. He believes that pain or limited health is not something you need to live with: when you get out of pain, you get your life back. He has recently become a new father with his wife and has seen how this shift in life stages has opened up a new area of growth personally and professionally for his family and their community. https://www.iostrengthperformance.com/ https://www.kellycardenas.com EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: BRADLEY DUNN

New Song Christian Fellowship - Carlsbad, NM
December 26, 2021 - After Christmas

New Song Christian Fellowship - Carlsbad, NM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 55:29


Sunday Service recording on December 26, 2021 for New Song Christian Fellowship in Carlsbad, NM. Topic: After Christmas Donate Online: https://newsongcarlsbad.churchcenter.com/giving View the video - Visit Us on FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/NewSongCarlsbadNM/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/newsongcarlsbad/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/newsongcarlsbad/support

St. Michaels by-the-Sea
First Sunday After Christmas (12/26/21) - Ben Conarroe

St. Michaels by-the-Sea

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 12:43


St. Michael's by-the-Sea is an Episcopal Church located in the coastal Village of Carlsbad, California. As far as churches go, it's kind of a beachy version of the ancient Christian Faith, and is rooted in the Anglo-Catholic tradition. Whether you're in town for a week at the beach or a local pilgrim on a spiritual journey, you are welcome here! www.stmichaelsbythesea.org

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

This week's message is titled Christ Born of Mary and the scripture reference is Luke 2:1-20. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

Curious Kid Podcast
Curious About Cacti

Curious Kid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 10:22


In episode 169, we get curious about cacti for Colette, Eli, and Quinn of Carlsbad, California and Olivia and Abigail of Arizona.  What does a cactus plant look like?  How does it survive in the desert?  Is it safe to drink the water inside a cactus if you are stranded in the desert?Visit the Curious Kid Podcast Website - http://www.curiouskidpodcast.com Send Us An E-mail - curiouskidpodcast@gmail.comLeave Us A Voicemail - 856-425-2324Support Us On Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/CuriouskidpodcastShop Curious Kid Podcast Merchandise - http://tee.pub/lic/fqXchg3wUVUFollow Us On Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/curiouskidpod/Follow Us On Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/curiouskidpodcast/Follow Us On Twitter - https://twitter.com/CuriousKidPod

St. Michaels by-the-Sea
Christmas Day (12/25/21) - Fr. Doran Stambaugh

St. Michaels by-the-Sea

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 11:54


St. Michael's by-the-Sea is an Episcopal Church located in the coastal Village of Carlsbad, California. As far as churches go, it's kind of a beachy version of the ancient Christian Faith, and is rooted in the Anglo-Catholic tradition. Whether you're in town for a week at the beach or a local pilgrim on a spiritual journey, you are welcome here! www.stmichaelsbythesea.org

NEI Podcast
E132 - (CME) Monitoring and Management of Metabolic Side Effects

NEI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 60:40


In this episode, Dr. Andrew Cutler interviews Dr. Joseph Goldberg on the management of metabolic side effects associated with antipsychotics.  Optional CME/CE Credits and Certificate Instructions: After listening to the podcast, to take the optional posttest and receive CME/CE credit, click https://nei.global/POD21-MET  Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, you should be better able to: Differentiate antipsychotic medications based on risk for metabolic side effects Monitor patients for metabolic side effects Implement management strategies to address metabolic side effects  Accreditation: In support of improving patient care, Neuroscience Education Institute (NEI) is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.   NEI designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit ™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.  A posttest minimum score of 70% is required to receive CME/CE credit. The content in this activity pertains to pharmacology and is worth 1.0 continuing education hour of pharmacotherapeutics Credit Types. The following are being offered for this activity: Nurse Practitioner (ANCC): contact hours Pharmacy (ACPE): application-based contact hours Physician (ACCME): AMA PRA Category 1 Credits ™ Physician Assistant (AAPA): Category 1 CME credits Psychology (APA): CE credits Social Work (ASWB-ACE): ACE CE credits Non-Physician Member of the Healthcare Team: Certificate of Participation stating the program is designated for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits ™  Peer Review: The content was peer-reviewed by an MD specializing in psychiatry to ensure the scientific accuracy and medical relevance of information presented and its independence from bias. NEI takes responsibility for the content, quality, and scientific integrity of this CME/CE activity.  Disclosures: All individuals in a position to influence or control content were required to disclose any relevant financial relationships, which were then mitigated prior to the activity being presented.  Interviewer Andrew J. Cutler, MD Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY Chief Medical Officer, Neuroscience Education Institute, Carlsbad, CA Consultant/Advisor: AbbVie, Acadia, AiCure, Alfasigma, Alkermes, Allergan, Atentiv, Cognitive Research, Intra-Cellular, Ironshore, Janssen, Lundbeck, Neurocrine, Noven, Otsuka, Sage, Sunovion, Supernus, Takeda, Teva Speakers Bureau: AbbVie, Acadia, Alkermes, Allergan, Intra-Cellular, Ironshore, Janssen, Lundbeck, Neurocrine, Noven, Otsuka, Sunovion, Supernus, Takeda, Teva, Tris  Interviewee Joseph F. Goldberg, MD   Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY Consultant/Advisor: BioXcel, Intra-Cellular, Lundbeck, Otsuka, Sunovion Speakers Bureau: Allergan/Abbvie, Intra-Cellular, Sage, Sunovion Royalties: American Psychiatric Publishing, Cambridge University Press Pre-Interview Author Sabrina K. Bradbury-Segal, PhD Medical Writer, Neuroscience Education Institute, Carlsbad, CA No financial relationships to disclose.  The Planning Committee and Peer Reviewer have no financial relationships to disclose.  Disclosure of Off-Label Use: This educational activity may include discussion of unlabeled and/or investigational uses of agents that are not currently labeled for such use by the FDA. Please consult the product prescribing information for full disclosure of labeled uses.  Cultural and Linguistic Competency: A variety of resources addressing cultural and linguistic competency can be found here: https://nei.global/culture  Support: This activity is supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Intra-Cellular Therapies.  Released: December 22, 2021          CE credit expires: December 22, 2024    

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons
Eternal Security of the Believer

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 20:41


This week's message is titled Eternal Security of the Believer and the scripture reference is Romans 8:35-39. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

We Build Great Apartment Communities
076: Maximizing Value through Development with Andrew Greer

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 49:56


Andrew Greer's name is synonymous with multi-family development, property zoning, real estate growth and success! After attending college Andrew decided to venture into real estate investing and sales. Finding early mentorship with a previous employer turned investor Andrew learned the ropes about investing. With an immense desire to run his own business Andrew quickly ventured into real estate investing and purchased his first flip with partners. After several months of working and learning the hard way they sold their first project and since then have never looked back. On today's show, Andrew walks though his experiences being an asset manager, zoning and city planner, real estate investor and an overall entrepreneur who just want to help build great apartment communities. Lots of takeaways! Episode Highlights: Andrew talks about Parking in the high density San Diego Balancing zoning allowances between parking and micro units How underwriting is changing at this time Talking about construction cost Managing downside risks Short Term Rental - Why is it so successful Airbnb as a fascinating business Cleaning as a big point of contention Capitalizing - Between debt and equity Listen as Andrew shares his most challenging project and the greatest takeaway that he has learned from it Connect with Andrew: LinkedIn  Facebook  Twitter  Email    About Our Guest: CEO- Thomas Strafford Investments While completing his degree in Economics at San Diego State University, Andrew began his career in Finance focusing on private equity in 2009-2011. in early 2011 Andrew directed his focus to becoming the asset manager vs salesman. Starting in 2011 Andrew and Keith joined forces buying assets that were below the highest and best and re-positioning them for disposition. With a desire to grow into larger assets Andrew began putting his energy towards zoning and city planning to create the best opportunities for the company and its investors to build value. The partners in Thomas Strafford have since completed several entitlement sub divisions, including one of the first small lot subdivisions, and built homes and multi units in San Diego County --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 142 Part 1: The Language of Jewelry: How the Editor in Chief of JCK Finds Inspiration with Editor in Chief JCK, Victoria Gomelsky.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 24:30


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of JCK and the JCK Show How Victoria identifies trends to highlight in JCK Why the line between women's jewelry and men's jewelry has blurred, especially among younger consumers How travel influences jewelry design The most exciting new designers Victoria has her eye on About Victoria Gomelsky Victoria Gomelsky is editor-in-chief of JCK, a New York City-based jewelry trade publication founded in 1869. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Robb Report, AFAR, WSJ Magazine, the Hollywood Reporter, Escape, The Sun and Waking Up American: Coming of Age Biculturally, an anthology published by Seal Press. She graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with a BA in political science in 1995 and earned her MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia University in 2002. She specializes in jewelry and watch writing but her greatest love has always been travel — 60 countries and counting. Victoria was born in St. Petersburg, Russia and emigrated to the United States in 1978 with her parents and twin sister, Julia. She divides her time between New York City and Los Angeles. Additional Resources:  Victoria's Website Victoria's Instagram Photos: Victoria Gomelsky watches: Transcript: Victoria Gomelsky, editor in chief of esteemed jewelry trade publication JCK, was bitten by the travel bug during her first-ever trip—when she and her family immigrated to the U.S. from the Soviet Union in the late 1970s. Since then, she's visited more than 60 countries, often traveling to visit jewelry shows and report on jewelry trends. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how her career in jewelry started with a mysterious online job posting; why Gen Z is changing the way we categorize jewelry; and where to find her favorite jewelry destinations. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Keep your eyes open for part two, which we'll be posting later this week. Today, our guest is Victoria Gomelsky, editor-in-chief of the well-known industry publication JCK. Victoria is an accomplished writer. She's written about jewelry for the New York Times as well as an extensive list of respected publications. She also covers another of her passions, which is travel. She's had a quite a jewelry journey, as she was born in Russia and has been to more than 60 countries and counting. We'll hear all about her jewelry journey today. Victoria, welcome to the program.   Victoria: Hi, Sharon. It's so great to be here. Thank you so much.   Sharon: I will go into my normal questions, but my first question is—and it seems like a silly one—but you speak Russian, then?   Victoria: I do. It's actually not that silly. I came here when I was five with a twin sister. We arrived at JFK in December of 1978, pretty much the height of the Cold War. So, my sister and I really did not want to be Russian, as we were five, six years old. We didn't want to be different from our classmates. So, we started speaking quite quickly in English, and that's how my language developed.    I could understand Russian, but in terms of speech, I am not a great speaker. Those are really two different centers in the brain, as I realized. I can be a very good tourist. I can go to St. Petersburg or Moscow, ask for directions, order food at a restaurant, but if you want to have a deep conversation with me about business or anything that requires an extensive vocabulary, it's not going to be me. But I can understand pretty well.   Sharon: It always fascinates me. Did you speak any English when you came here?   Victoria: No, but having a twin sister and being five, you're a little bit of a sponge. I've read that before age seven, if you pick up another language before that age, that's more or less the cutoff. You can learn to speak quite fluently very quickly, and we did. We didn't know any words. We stopped in Vienna on the way out of the Soviet Union, and then we lived outside of Rome for a few months, so I probably picked up some Italian then, too, come to think of it, not that it stuck. But when we got to the States, it all happened very quickly. I really don't remember learning English. It was almost as if I picked it up by osmosis.   Sharon: Wow! It's a great way to learn, in terms of thinking about how it is to learn a language. Your English has solidified in a sense.    Victoria: Exactly.   Sharon: Were you artistic then? Were you already artistic? Do you consider yourself an artistic person?   Victoria: It's a good question. I don't know. I consider myself creative. My sister—again, I have a twin sister; she's really the artist of the family. She's much more visual. She's a graphic designer, an artist. She creates collages and all kinds of things with her hands. I'm not dexterous at all, so my creativity is on the page, what I write and how I see the world. So, I don't consider myself an artist, but I do consider myself a creative.   Sharon: Does she call you up sometimes and say, “What were you thinking about that layout on the page?”   Victoria: Oh yeah, she's super-critical. Trust me, I do not design or do anything around the home that doesn't get her buy-in, because if I don't get her buy-in on it, she'll come over and say, “Oh my God, I can't believe you put that on the wall.” She'll never let me hear the end of it. So, I make sure to get her buy-in on any artistic or design-oriented decision I have to make.   Sharon: She must be a great resource for you in terms of what you do. Did you come to jewelry through writing, or did you have a love of jewelry? How did that work?   Victoria: I came through writing. It was all quite random. I'll share the story because it's really my story; it's my original tale, I guess you would say.   Sharon: It's a journey.   Victoria: My journey. This was the beginning. I was in living in L.A. I was 25. I really wanted to move to New York, and I was too scared to move without a job or without knowing anybody. I really wanted to continue my writing career. I had been a journalist. Even though I majored in poli-sci at UCLA, I had always worked for the Daily Bruin. I had done internships at various news organizations, some of them in the television field; some of them were written publications.    I applied to one MFA program in total, and that was the Columbia University Master of Fine Arts program in their non-fiction writing department, specifically. That's the only school I applied to, because I wanted to move to New York and I wanted to continue writing, and that felt, to me, like the only possible way for me to do that.   I moved to New York in August of 1998, did two years of this Master of Fine Arts program, and then didn't want to leave. I was still working on my thesis and finishing my degree when I started applying for jobs that were in the writing field. Mind you, this was 2000, so it was the very first wave of web jobs. It was Web 1.0. I didn't realize it yet, but it was on the verge of crashing. That crash we had in 2001 was coming, but I didn't see it then. There were a lot of jobs; a lot more jobs than people to fill them.    I happened to go on Monster.com. I'm not sure if it's around anymore. It was a job search site. I had a profile on the site, and I happened to come upon a posting that said, “Luxury goods website seeks writer/editor with two to three years' experience. Click here to forward your profile to this employer.” I had no idea what that meant. It was very vague. At the time, you faxed people your résumé. I guess you could email, but a lot of times it was still faxed. There was just no information at all. It was literally a button. I clicked it and thought, “O.K.” and I forgot about it promptly.   A few days later, I heard from a woman named Lisa at a company called Gemkey.com. I had no idea what that was, but it turns out Gemkey was a startup in the jewelry space. It was meant to be a website where retailers would go on and source their inventory online, which was laughable because 20 years later, that's still something that most retailers don't do. It was way, way, way ahead of its time. It was founded by Fred Mouawad, whose father is Robert Mouawad. Robert Mouawad is a Lebanese businessman who donated a ton of money to GIA. His name graces their campus in Carlsbad. GIA being the Gemological Institute of America.   Sharon: That's why it sounded familiar. I was going, “Where do I know that from?”    Victoria: Yeah. Anyway, Fred was the son. He was an entrepreneur. He was based in Bangkok, and he had this website that had an office in New York. They were looking for some editors to fill out the news section of their site. I was hired as their pearl and watch editor, and I had no idea about either category. I didn't even know pearls were cultured. I really had no language to describe them. I knew what a watch was, but I knew nothing. I could have named Rolex, Cartier maybe, and maybe Timex.    I had been backpacking around the world in the late 90s prior to going to grad school, so I was living very scrappily and was quite frugal. I was in my early 20s, not really in the jewelry scene. One of my first trips was to a pearl farm in Australia to see the Paspaley farm located off the coast of Northern Australia. On the way there, I stopped in Bangkok to visit Fred Mouawad's main headquarters and meet some of my colleagues. On the way out, I stopped in Hong Kong to go to the pearl auctions, and I was hooked. It was a wonderful introduction to the world of jewelry, quite literally the world of jewelry. I had loved travel until then, and here was a way to combine my love of it with a way to explore this new category, this new universe. So, I came to jewelry through writing and then through travel.   Sharon: That must have been so exciting, to be writing about something you found you loved as opposed to—I don't know. I'm trying to think of some of the things I've had to market over the years where it's like, “You've got to be kidding me.”   Victoria: Yes, I think that was one of the things I learned quite early. My job with Gemkey didn't last long because it got bombed not that long after. I think I was employed with them for eight months or so, and then I got laid off because the company was losing money. I ended up getting hired almost right away by National Jeweler, which at the time was close to a hundred-year-old publication. It's still around, not in print form, but it's around in digital form. It was founded, I believe, in 1906. It's really an industry trade like JCK, one of the stalwarts of the business.    I got hired as their gemstone editor. I got to National Jeweler, and I realized the company—National Jeweler at the time was owned by a bigger corporation that owned lots of different publications, everything from the Hollywood Reporter to Billboard Magazine to a publication called Frozen Food News. I realized there are so many different niches in the world, and as a writer, I was grateful I didn't slip into the frozen food world, but the music world is great. If you enter music via Billboard, what a great way to learn about music.   I happened to enter through the trade of jewelry, and that was a wonderful way to get down into the trenches of an industry that is quite esoteric, quite hard to penetrate, and it still is. All these years later, there's still so much to learn about jewelry, but starting out through a trade was the key. When you're a trade reporter, you get to talk to dealers; you go to tradeshows; you learn from a very ground-up level, as opposed to being an editor of Vogue, where you don't get to see the real world. You spend your time in the limelight. You get to see all kinds of topical designers, but you don't always get the nitty-gritty details, that insight into the supply chain and insight into how a gemstone might emerge from the ground and the steps it takes to become a beautiful jewel. That all came through the trade, so I was very grateful to have that experience and the years and years I spent going to the Tucson shows to research the world of gems, to Basle to speak to high-end jewelers in Europe. There were all kinds of events. I have had a very unique perspective on this trade and the world at large through the lens of jewelry.   Sharon: Do you find that writing about jewelry has its own language, in a sense? It's like writing about sports. I couldn't write about sports.   Victoria: Very much so. The lingo takes a long time to understand. People think of jewelry as a very superficial subject. I think people who don't know about jewelry will perhaps think, “Well, it's just a bauble. It's just something you put on to sparkle, to add a little or to show off your status, whatever it is.” But there are so many layers to jewelry, and the way you talk about it gets ever more complicated the more you know.    There's a whole language around diamonds and gemstones and the ways you describe color, not to mention all the ways you talk about the fabrication of jewelry. That's always eluded me a bit. I've been to factories, and I've been to places where jewelry is made, and that still feels like a topic that's difficult for me to access because I don't have a brain to understand mechanics or engineering. When people are sitting there at the bench trying to tell me the steps of the process, I always get a bit lost. It does feel like a very complicated venture, but I have been fortunate enough to see a lot of that.   Sharon: No, I can understand. I was at some design show, and there was a jeweler talking about how much of jewelry is engineering. He was talking about getting the piece to balance, but it's also when you're talking about extrusions when a piece of jewelry is being manufactured.    So, you went into nonfiction. Was that something where you said, “I'm not a fiction writer”?   Victoria: Yeah, pretty much. I love fiction and I love poetry, but it never felt like a natural pursuit for me. I was always interested in telling stories, and the stories that really compelled me or held my attention were always nonfiction. I think we all know that truth is stranger than fiction. We've all had the epiphany many times throughout lives, I'm sure, where we realized that the stories in front of us are as compelling as anything made up.    My entrée into that world was initially through The Daily Bruin, which was a huge college newspaper at UCLA. I learned the basics of being a reporter and a journalist and hunting down sources and doing interviews, but at the same time I didn't love the grind of a daily journalism beat. It was good training, but when I applied to Columbia, I specifically did not apply to the journalism school. I applied to the arts program, to the Master of Fine Arts program, and I was drawn to the writings of, say, a Joan Didion or a Tom Wolfe or polemicists or memoirists—a lot of fiction authors who write beautifully in nonfiction or have beautiful examples of nonfiction in their repertoires. I was drawn to the kind of writing that was true, that was honest, but that still held all the same elements of a good fiction tale. It had characters, dialogue, a plot.    I probably don't do as much of that kind of writing as I hoped I would, or as much as I wish I could, because I'm making a living. I write journalism; I write stories, but in all the stories I write, I really try to spend a lot of time with the people who are my sources and get their stories. I really try to convey a sense of story, even if it's a short piece that's running in a newspaper. I do as best as I can in that limited word space with a storyline.   Sharon: Tell us about your job as editor. Are you pulling together all the departments, like you see on TV editorial meetings?   Victoria: It's a little bittersweet, because JCK—for those of you who aren't familiar, I'll tell you a little bit about what that stands for, because it's a mouthful. JCK goes back to 1869. It wasn't always JCK, which, by the way, stands for Jewelers' Circular Keystone. Jewelers' Circular was a publication in the 30s that merged with another jewelry publication called Keystone. From then on, they were called Jewelers' Circular Keystone, until the 70s when they shortened it to JCK. So, that's what those three initials stand for, but initially, it goes back to 1869 in Maiden Lane, New York, where the fledging jewelry district was growing up. There were watchmakers and jewelers who needed a publication to help them source their materials, help them sell. Various publications formed around them, and they eventually merged and aligned. What we know as JCK today really comes out of Maiden Lane in the 1870s. It's pretty stunning to think about.    I joined the magazine in 2010. I had moved back to Los Angeles after nearly a dozen years in New York because I was ready to move. I moved back in late 2009. I had lost my job with National Jeweler after the financial crisis, and that was fine. I had been there for eight years or so, so it was time to move back to California where I grew up. About six months after I landed back in L.A., I ended up getting asked by a friend of mine who was the publisher of JCK if I'd be willing to take a temporary job with JCK as their editor. They were looking for a new editor. They were looking for somebody in New York, but they needed somebody to get them over the hump of a few issues. I thought, “Great, this is a perfect bridge job as I find my footing back in L.A.”    Well, as it turns out, it was not that hard to manage a publication from L.A. because I knew the industry. I had my contacts. I even knew my colleagues because I had worked with them. They were editors at JCK, but I had met them many years ago, as I was one of their cohorts in the jewelry media space. So, I knew the people I was working with. After six months or so, everybody thought, “Hey, this is actually going pretty well,” so they brought me on full time. Luckily, I had an apartment in Brooklyn Heights that I had sublet out and hadn't gotten rid of, so I was able to come back to New York once a month for about a week. For about six years, I was truly bicoastal, from 2010 to about 2016.   In that time, JCK continued to be—its tagline is “the industry authority.” It's been reporting on this business for so long, and it was exciting. At first, we started out with 10 print issues a year. We had contributors; we had staff writers; we had a whole publishing team. Slowly over the years, that print frequency has shrunk. It became seven issues a year. Then it shrunk down to four print issues a year; mind you, with a robust website and a very strong daily news presence online, but print has always continued to shrink in this environment. As of this year, we went down to one print issue a year. That harried newsroom where people are running around and there are photoshoots happening, that did happen and still does happen, but just not to the frequency and level that you might imagine of a busy magazine publishing schedule.    The good thing is that we're published by a company called Advanced Local that is based at One World Trade Center in New York. Of course, nobody's been in the office for a good long while now, but when we are in the office, it's the same parent company, Condé Nast, so we use the same studios to do our photography. We rely on the same talent in terms of photographers and stylists that Vogue and GQ do. So, we have a really good team of people. They're not directly staffed. They're not members of the JCK staff, but they are people that are available to us.    We have a wonderful creative director, again, somebody who's a freelancer, but works with top magazines, a wonderful photo editor. When we do get back to being in the office, I'll certainly fly out to New York and partake, or at least be a witness to the photoshoots we do for our covers and our jewelry still lifes. But the hectic, frenzied nature of that has certainly calmed down. We do have, like I said, a robust online presence. We have a well-known news director named Rob Bates. He's covered the world of diamonds and jewelry news for 23 years, coming on 30, I think. We're staffed by some of the best in the business, but it definitely is a small, very scrappy operation.    Sharon: So, during Covid, you've been doing this through Zoom, I take it.   Victoria: Yeah, everything is through Zoom. We managed to get a bunch of photoshoots in right at the very beginning of March of 2020 that luckily saved us in terms of what we could produce through 2020. Then we did a photoshoot in May. There was that lull where things were looking pretty promising before the Delta variant, so we were able to do a photoshoot then. Like I said, now we're looking to 2022.    We have a big issue coming out. It always comes out on the eve of the JCK Show. The JCK Show is the big Las Vegas tradeshow. It shares our name. I don't want to get too complicated with this, but the show was founded in 1992 as a spinoff from the magazine. The magazine existed for all these decades, and the team involved thought, “Hey, isn't it time we use our clout in the industry to form a tradeshow?” And so they began this tradeshow in Las Vegas that then grew to be such a big presence in such an important industry meeting place that the tradeshow ended up being bought by different exhibition companies, and it eventually landed with Reed Exhibitions, which is a big company headquartered in the U.K. with U.S. headquarters in Connecticut. They run a lot of tradeshows and exhibitions, and they ended up buying the magazine and then hiring a different company to publish it. That may be more than your listeners want to hear. It's kind of complicated, but the point is we are related to JCK, this big tradeshow, but we're also an independent editorial voice, so we aren't bound to only write about JCK.   Sharon: That's interesting. What about Couture, which is part of the JCK Show, isn't it?   Victoria: It's a separate company. In fact, National Jeweler, when I worked there, was owned by the company that—it's gone through many iterations. The company that runs Couture is called Emerald Exhibitions, and they're headquartered in New York. That was the company that owned National Jeweler at some point. There's a lot of overlapping relationships in this world. Couture and JCK are separate companies, separate entities, but they happen at the same time in Las Vegas to make it easy for members of the jewelry industry to shop the shows.    There are different points of view. Couture is very much focused on couture-level, high-end designer jewelry. JCK has that, but it also has everything else you might imagine, everything from packing to loose diamonds, loose gemstones, dealers from Hong Kong, Turkey, China when the Chinese are able to visit. JCK is much more a mass marketplace for the entire industry, and Couture is much more focused on high-end design. They're complementary and I love going to both. 

Perpetual Chess Podcast
EP 258- GM Matthew Sadler

Perpetual Chess Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 109:41


This week's guest on Perpetual Chess is 2 time British champion, and award winning author, GM Matthew Sadler.  Matthew has been one of Great Britain's top players for decades and is currently ranked #41 in the world. He has impressively managed to maintain his form well into his 40s while working outside of chess. Matthew has also made quite a mark as an author. His books,Gamechanger and the adult improver focused, Chess for Life, both co-authored with WIM Natasha Regan, are both favorites of this podcast. You can hear us discuss these books in Episode 112. In Matthew's new book, The Silicon Road to Chess Improvement, Matthew goes beyond just Alphazero and extracts lessons for humans from many of the other modern chess super engines. He is also the regular book reviewer for NIC magazine, and did game recaps of the 2021 FIDE World Championship with none other than GM Garry Kasparov! I am happy to report that Matthew was very generous with his time, so we managed to cover all of these areas of chess interest in our conversation. Timestamps and relevant links are below.  0:00- As a full time IT professional, author, New in Chess book reviewer, content creator and top player, how on earth does Matthew get so many things done?  04:45- What are some of Matthew's favorite recent chess books? Mentioned: Winning by GM Nigel Short , The Creative Power of Boguljubov, The Unstoppable American  10:00- What did Matthew observe from Magnus' play in the World Championship.  Mentioned: Silicon Road to Chess Improvement YouTube Channel, Chessbase India video with GM Peter Heine Nielsen, More Info on the TCEC- Top Engine Chess Championship, Games from the match here  24:00- What can club players learn from super engines?  Mentioned: Small Steps to Giant Improvement 31:00- Does Matthew see an engine footprint in GM Alireza Firouzja's play? Mentioned: Erdos-Firouzja 2021, Acquisition of Chess Knowledge in Alpha Zero  36:00- Patreon mailbag question: “Did Alphazero's opening acquisition trace the path of the evolution of chess?” 38:00- There are always great new courses from Chessable including FM Kamil Plichta's Lifetime Repertoires: Accelerated Dragon. Check out what else is new here: https://www.chessable.com/courses/all/new/ 40:00- Why does it seem like the numerical evaluations of engines are getting more extreme, i.e. “+5 in an even position?”  45:00- Patreon mailbag question: “Do engines still threaten to end competitive chess"?” Mentioned: GM Pia Cramling, GM Juan Bellon, GM Robin van Kampen  50:00- What are Matthew's thoughts on Magnus' recent mention of potentially dropping out of the World Championship cycle?   55:00- Perpetual Chess is also brought to you in part by AImchess.com. Check out the site, and if you decide to subscribe use the code Perpetual30 to save 30%.  57:00- Patreon mailbag question “If chess is fundamentally a draw, why do top engines still sometimes beat each other?  1:00:00- Patreon mailbag question; “Will engine play become more “human” in the future?' Plus, Matthew on Magnus' uncanny ability to play mistake-free chess.   Mentioned: Maia bots on Lichess, Topalov interview with Chess24 1:09:00- Matthew describes the experience of working with Kasparov on World Championship recap videos 1:15:00- Patreon mailbag question: “Does correspondence chess have a future given the preponderance of draws?'  1:22:00- Patreon mailbag question: “Are there engines that are more instructive about how to convert advantages in a “human” way that avoids complications?”  1:28:00- Patreon mailbag question: What chess improvement and maintenance tips can Matthew share for other adults? 1:38:00- Patreon mailbag question: Why does The Carlsbad structure fascinate Matthew so much?” 1:41:00- Thanks so much to Matthew for being so generous with his time. Here are the links to keep up with his content.  Twitter Silicon Road to Chess Improvement YouTube Channel Buy the Book here Or The E Book from New in Chess here  Chess for Life Gamechanger  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

We Build Great Apartment Communities
075: Leslie Awason: A Full Time Anaesthesiologist with A Successful Real Estate Empire

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 39:36


Originally from Africa, Leslie started his medical career in 2008 as a healthcare provided and eventually found his passion and another calling as a real estate investor. In today's episode, Leslie will walk us through his real estate journey, how and why he started off as a limited partner including some of the deals that he made so far and the takeaways he got from them. Leslie Awesome is the Director of Operations at Xsite Capital Investment -a rapidly growing Multifamily Investment company with over $20million under management. Episode Highlights: Listen as Leslie talks about why he decided to start off as a limited partner What makes multi family the best investment Leslie talks about his very first deal and the lesson he learned from it Understanding what you are investing in Factors that determine where people wan to invest in Leslies' Top US States to invest in Connect with Leslie: LinkedIn Email  About Our Guest: Leslie is the Director of Operations and Co-founder of Xsite Capital Investment LLC. He manages the company operations, market/data analysis, cash flow and budget analysis. Leslie bought his first investment property in 2017 and transitioned to multifamily investing in 2019. In 2019, Leslie partnered and invested in a 192-unit apartment project as a Limited Partner. In 2020, Leslie and his partners Julius and Tenny, acquired a 49 units Class A, institutional grade asset in Washington, DC. Leslie is a Nurse Anesthetist in Baltimore, Maryland, and his team hosts a rapidly growing multifamily focused meetup in Maryland where they provide resources and add value to individuals interested in growing their wealth and changing their financial future. Leslie is a husband and father of two beautiful girls and loves to spend his spare time reading and drone flying. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

New Song Christian Fellowship - Carlsbad, NM
December 19, 2021 - Christmas Program

New Song Christian Fellowship - Carlsbad, NM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 81:14


Sunday Service recording on December 19, 2021 for New Song Christian Fellowship in Carlsbad, NM. Topic: Christmas Program Donate Online: https://newsongcarlsbad.churchcenter.com/giving View the video - Visit Us on FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/NewSongCarlsbadNM/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/newsongcarlsbad/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/newsongcarlsbad/support

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons
Missionaries Troy and Alice Hahn

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 51:16


This week's message is titled Missionaries Troy and Alice Hahn. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

St. Michaels by-the-Sea
Fourth Sunday of Advent (12/19/21) - Fr. Doran Stambaugh

St. Michaels by-the-Sea

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 13:17


St. Michael's by-the-Sea is an Episcopal Church located in the coastal Village of Carlsbad, California. As far as churches go, it's kind of a beachy version of the ancient Christian Faith, and is rooted in the Anglo-Catholic tradition. Whether you're in town for a week at the beach or a local pilgrim on a spiritual journey, you are welcome here! www.stmichaelsbythesea.org

New Song Christian Fellowship - Carlsbad, NM
December 12, 2021 - God and Nature

New Song Christian Fellowship - Carlsbad, NM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 59:59


Sunday Service recording on December 12, 2021 for New Song Christian Fellowship in Carlsbad, NM. Topic: God and Nature Donate Online: https://newsongcarlsbad.churchcenter.com/giving Visit Us on FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/NewSongCarlsbadNM/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/newsongcarlsbad/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/newsongcarlsbad/support

We Build Great Apartment Communities
074: Where Technology and Real Estate Intersect with Amy Wan

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 51:52


In today's episode, we are graced by Amy Wan - one of the most prominent legal tech and blockchain attorney to talk about where technology and real estate really intersect! Prepare to be amazed and inspired by this marvellous achiever's accomplishments, current projects and future endeavours! Amy Wan is CEO & co-founder of Bling, which rewards mobile gamers with bitcoin. Previously, she founded Bootstrap Legal, which helps real estate syndicators get legal document faster and more efficiently. Amy is a securities attorney and has been in-house and outside counsel for various fintech startups. Episode Highlights: Amy talks about real estate in today's pandemic-striken world The world of syndications from a legal standpoint Upgrading your skills set to better communicate in this digital world Millennials and Investing Economic trends that Amy see in today's multi family marketplace Where does Amy Wan place her investment dollars Amy talks about Bootstrap Legal - a service that offers tools to bring legal help to entrepreneurs in a non-intimidating way, at an affordable and predictable price point. Amy Wan's most successful investment and her greatest takeaway from it   Connect with Amy LinkedIn  Email  About Our Guest: Amy Wan is Founder & CEO of Bootstrap Legal, which automates real estate syndication legal documents. She hosts The Law and Blockchain Podcast (a show on The Bitcoin Podcast Network) and has authored the Bloomberg Law practice guide to ICOs and Lexis Nexus' Private Equity practice guide. Previously, she was a Partner at a boutique securities law firm and General Counsel at a real estate crowdfunding platform. Amy founded Legal Hackers LA, which programs around the intersection of law and technology; was named one of ten women to watch in legal technology by the American Bar Association Journal in 2014 and one of 18 millennials changing legaltech by law.com in 2018; and was nominated as a Finalist for the Corporate Counsel of the Year Award 2015 by LA Business Journal. Amy has also worked in international regulatory and trade policy at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and was a Presidential Management Fellow at the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Transportation. She holds an LL.M. in Public International Law from the London School of Economics and Political Science, a JD from the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, and a BA in Biological Sciences from the University of Southern California. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

We Build Great Apartment Communities
073: Leveraging Intuitions to Make Better Decisions when Doing Investments with Adapia D'Errico

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 53:52


So what does it really mean to use your intuition in making decisions? Does is mean walking away from a million-dollar deal just because you do not like how the investor talks or walks? Or does it mean complementing your gut feel with facts… or rather complementing the facts with your intuition? In today's episode, Adapia D'Errico joins us and talks about her perspective on how to leverage your intuition to help you arrive to better decisions. Adapia started her career in financial services when she was 18. She has worked in banking, financial services, insurance, hedge funds, real estate, fintech, and private equity. She is a visionary leader with 20+ years of experience across countries, cultures, and both corporate and start-up environments. AdaPia is VP of Strategy and principal of real estate private equity firm Alpha Investing, an author, and a powerful keynote speaker. Episode Highlights: How or why did Adapia got into private equity Adapia on being clear with that you want Adapia dives into her book - Productive Intuition: Connecting to the Subtle Gut Check and Fact Check Understanding your unconscious biases Signs that tell you something might be wrong The importance of bringing people into your life that are much smarter that you are Using intuition to make better decisions Maintaining relationships with investors Connect with Adapia LinkedIn  Instagram  Email  About Our Guest: AdaPia d'Errico is a visionary leader with 20+ years of experience across countries, cultures, and both corporate and start-up environments. She's co-founded businesses, launched brands, and redefined industries. A respected thought-leader, entrepreneur, and female executive, she is a Principal and the VP of Strategy at Alpha Investing a private equity real estate firm. She is also a leadership facilitator, powerful keynote speaker and author of Productive Intuition: Connecting to the Subtle. AdaPia is passionate about empowerment at all levels: from intuitive to financial. Learn more about AdaPia: adapiaderrico.com. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons
Sheltered In the Arms of God

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 19:14


This week's message is titled Sheltered In the Arms of God and the scripture reference is Psalm 31:1-5; 2 Chronicles 7:14; Ecclesiastes 7:1; Psalm 116:15. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

We Build Great Apartment Communities
072: Traveling the World while Building Your Portfolio with James Evans

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 48:42


So how can one travel the globe, enjoy the world sceneries and be with his family 24/7 while still continuing to build his portfolio? Well, our guest today, James Evans will let us in on the secret on how to accomplish all these! James Evans is the Owner of Gladstone Capital with 6 years of real estate investing experience with a portfolio consisting of 20 rentals, condo conversions, limited partnerships, and creative joint venture deals. Episode Highlights: Get to know how James started with his real estate career Listen as James tells us his first investment property story How James builds his portfolio How James acquired confidence after his first deal Biggest takeaways from James' deals and real estate experiences Making sure you get your “return of headache” Talking about the 4-hour work week Traveling the world while in a company - What James had to do to make this a possibility and a reality Negotiating with your boss Negotiating a deal   Connect with James LinkedIn  Email  About Our Guest: Current Real Estate business (Gladstone Capital) Built a portfolio of 20 rental units in Boston / Southern NH Completed / active in joint venture condo development deals (3 unit condo conversion, 8 unit ground-up build) LP in condo conversion and multifamily deals across the US Completed several flips / BRRR / live-in flips while working full time Co-founded Boston Real Estate Guild meetup (200+ members) Background I started in real estate by sleeping on a friend's couch for a year to save up for a downpayment. I bought my first condo in the emerging Boston neighborhood in 2012. Spun that into a 20 unit portfolio using my own money. Negotiated a 60% working capacity in my current job. Most people either invest as a side business or go full time, this is a bit of a unique hybrid model. I kept my full benefits and have a great balance of predictable salary and w2 income with time to focus on real estate.   --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

We Build Great Apartment Communities
072: Traveling the World while Building Your Portfolio with James Evans

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 48:42


So how can one travel the globe, enjoy the world sceneries and be with his family 24/7 while still continuing to build his portfolio? Well, our guest today, James Evans will let us in on the secret on how to accomplish all these! James Evans is the Owner of Gladstone Capital with 6 years of real estate investing experience with a portfolio consisting of 20 rentals, condo conversions, limited partnerships, and creative joint venture deals. Episode Highlights: Get to know how James started with his real estate career Listen as James tells us his first investment property story How James builds his portfolio How James acquired confidence after his first deal Biggest takeaways from James' deals and real estate experiences Making sure you get your “return of headache” Talking about the 4-hour work week Traveling the world while in a company - What James had to do to make this a possibility and a reality Negotiating with your boss Negotiating a deal   Connect with James LinkedIn  Email  About Our Guest: Current Real Estate business (Gladstone Capital) Built a portfolio of 20 rental units in Boston / Southern NH Completed / active in joint venture condo development deals (3 unit condo conversion, 8 unit ground-up build) LP in condo conversion and multifamily deals across the US Completed several flips / BRRR / live-in flips while working full time Co-founded Boston Real Estate Guild meetup (200+ members) Background I started in real estate by sleeping on a friend's couch for a year to save up for a downpayment. I bought my first condo in the emerging Boston neighborhood in 2012. Spun that into a 20 unit portfolio using my own money. Negotiated a 60% working capacity in my current job. Most people either invest as a side business or go full time, this is a bit of a unique hybrid model. I kept my full benefits and have a great balance of predictable salary and w2 income with time to focus on real estate.   --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Tacos and Tech Podcast
Finding Meaningful Life in Action with the City of Carlsbad and RoleCall

Tacos and Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 40:13


Listen on Apple, Google, Spotify, and other platforms.  An estimated 56% of Americans plan to move by the end of 2021, showing how many people are interested in remote work opportunities and/or finding communities they would want to live in, according to The Neighbor 2020 – 2021 American Migration Report. Carlsbad is a city actively attracting strong talent to lead its industries and technological developments, boasting its beautiful beaches and connected community. Local leaders from all over San Diego County are actively coming together to work toward city innovation and talent development. In this week's podcast, David Graham, Chief Innovation Officer at City of Carlsbad, Matt Sanford, Economic Development Manager at City of Carlsbad, and Tim Carty and Winona Dimeo-Ediger, co-founders of RoleCall, share how they've built a pipeline of talent for the Carlsbad business community. The City of Carlsbad has developed its own homegrown talent attraction campaign, Life in Action, to share how people can manage a meaningful career and great quality of life in the city. They emphasize the importance of work-life balance, and how the city's ecosystem is growing in the business landscape with industry disruptors to ambitious startups, showing a diverse community. RoleCall, a talent attraction agency and consultancy, works with cities like Carlsbad to help attract talent to their city through their customized programs and marketing strategies. A recent trend being observed is people choosing where they want to work first, and then selecting from companies in that area as viable options.  A common factor among these leaders is that they all recognized that local government can have a massive impact in one's immediate community. David enjoys the manifestation of his work that he can see as he drives down the street, and states that talent powers the future. Matt believes that providing economic strategies can help cities successfully attract talent. Tim is passionate about bringing smart and likeminded talent to help the community, and Winona recognizes the importance of people choosing to work at a place they like, and how cities can cater towards that. Listen to this latest podcast to hear from leaders from the City of Carlsbad and RoleCall to learn how they are committing themselves to a purposeful life and meaningful work in Carlsbad.  Their favorite local tacos: David: Tacos La Glorieta in TJ, Lola 55 in San Diego Matt: Oscars Mexican Seafood in La Jolla Tim: La Regia Taqueria in Iowa City Winona: Tacos Y Mariscos El Amigo in Nashville   Connect with them: David Graham Matt Sanford Tim Carty Winona Dimeo-Ediger   Learn more about Life in Action and RoleCall: Life in Action Website: https://carlsbadlifeinaction.com/  Facebook: @Carlsbadbiz  Twitter: @Carlsbadbiz Instagram: @carlsbadbiz LinkedIn   RoleCall Website: https://www.rolecall.pro/  LinkedIn Thanks to our partners at Cox Business & Cox Edge for their support in enabling us to grow the San Diego ecosystem.

We Build Great Apartment Communities
071: Humanzing Real Estate with Vanessa Gonzalez

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 49:50


Loyal and dedicated - these are the qualities that set Vanessa apart from other realtors. Her strong and ever-admirable work ethics and compassion towards everyone is what attract people to trust her and in the long run, do successful business with her. The experience that she has attained with distressed property sales carries over into traditional sales to benefit her clients with great negotiation skills, a more complete understanding of the entire sales process and great skills in problem solving when there are bumps along the way. In today's episode, let's listen as Vanessa talks about humanizing real estate which can greatly guide us build great apartment communities. Episode Highlights: Get to know how Vanessa started her real estate journey Difference between REO and Short Sale Real Estate trends amidst this Covid-19 pandemic Why this year is great for investors Vanessa discusses some acquisition opportunities to look out for Vanessa's traits that make her stand out among other realtors Vanessa on “humanizing” the business The importance of bringing in more compassion into transactions   Connect: Realty Connect USA Website  Email  About Our Guest: Vanessa Gonzalez, lights up a room with her enthusiastic professional personality! If you were to ask clients what they think of Realtor Vanessa Gonzalez and what sets her apart from her colleagues, most would describe her loyalty and dedication, her powerful work ethic and the fact that she creates the type of relationship with them, in a way that makes them feel like family. Now, if you were to ask Vanessa about herself, she would tell you how proud she is to be a resident of Long Island. Having been raised in Ecuador, South America with Cuban Ancestry, she takes a lot of pride in who she is. Vanessa would also mention how passionate she is about her work, her clients and helping families, all across Long Island, reach the “American Dream” of owing a house. Vanessa established her NYS Real Estate License in 2003. Aside from the traditional transactions most residential real estate agents perform, Vanessa has become expertly adept at guiding both buyers and sellers. She handles, with extreme experience Property Management of Distressed Properties, REOs, Short Sales, Foreclosures. Even managing the Clean-ups and Construction of these homes. The experience that she has attained with distressed property sales, carries over, into traditional sales to benefit her clients with great negotiation skills; a more complete understanding of the entire sale process. With such experience, Vanessa has great skills in problem solving as is ready for any bumps along the way making her very confident that she will be a part of the Long Island real estate market for the many years to come. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Success Habits of Super Achievers
Brian Buffini, Sharing on Mentors, Coaching, Real Estate and How Service Leads to Sales, Referrals and Building a Business That Compounds Over Time with Jim Rohn International Founder, Kyle Wilson

Success Habits of Super Achievers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 69:02


Brian Buffini is an Irish American immigrant who left Ireland for San Diego in 1986, where he became the classic American rags to riches story. After becoming one of the nation's top real estate agents. He founded Buffini and Company in 1996 to share his powerful lead generation system with others. He's based in Carlsbad, California, and his company has trained over 3 million people across the world and currently serves 22,000 members. Brian is the author of four books. His most recent book, The Immigrant Edge is a NYT and WSJ bestseller. Brian preaches the good life on his podcast, The Brian Buffini's show, which has over 13 million downloads in 178 countries. Brian Buffini Resources: Receive Brian's 10-Day Goal Sheet free at https://www.buffiniandcompany.com/kylewilson Follow Brian on Instagram at brian_buffini Listen to The Brian Buffini Show at https://www.thebrianbuffinishow.com Listen to Brian's interview with Kyle Wilson at https://www.thebrianbuffinishow.com/connecting-the-dots-an-interview-with-kyle-wilson-301/ Kyle Wilson  Resources: Kyle Wilson Website KyleWilson.com Kyle Wilson's The Strategic Marketing Wheel!  https://kylewilson.com/thewheel/ Success Habits Podcast - Go to KyleWilson.com/podcast Kyle Wilson Inner Circle Mastermind https://kylewilson.com/mastermind/ Follow Kyle Wilson: Instagram: instagram.com/kylewilsonjimrohn Facebook: facebook.com/kylewilsonmarketing YouTube: youtube.com/KyleWilsonMarketing Twitter: twitter.com/kwmarketing What Other are Saying About Kyle “Kyle, thank you for our partnership and friendship. Friendship is wealth and you make me a rich man. Love and Respect!” Jim Rohn, Iconic Philosopher & Speaker “I guard my endorsements carefully. Regarding Kyle, he is simply a marketing genius! No joke. Kyle was the wizard behind the successful business of my mentor Jim Rohn. Every marketing dilemma I have ever had Kyle has given me the brilliant and elegant solution on the spot. Kyle's consulting has saved and earned me hundreds of thousands of dollars over the years.” Darren Hardy, Former Publisher SUCCESS Magazine "Kyle Wilson is brilliant and so very knowledgeable and an icon in this industry. He was the power behind Jim Rohn. Kyle is my longtime friend and someone I have a great deal of respect for." Les Brown, Iconic Speaker and Author “I have worked closely with Kyle Wilson for 20 years. He is one of the best all-around marketers, promoters, business-builders and entrepreneurs in the business today. We have generated more than a million dollars together.” Brian Tracy, Int Speaker & Author “Kyle is a valued friend, a marketing superstar and one of the most knowledgeable people in the personal development industry.” Robin Sharma, Monk Who Sold His Ferrari  “I've known and worked with Kyle Wilson for over 20 years. Kyle is the ONLY person that ALWAYS under-promised and over-delivered every single time my dad Zig and I worked with him. He is a valued friend and someone I have great admiration and respect for!" Tom Ziglar, President of Zig Ziglar Corp “Kyle is one of my old and dear friends and one of the smartest marketing guys I have had the opportunity to work with. He is the scrappy marketing guy. What I mean by that is, there are lots of guys who will put out business plans and do all kinds of nonsense and swing for home runs. Kyle is the real deal and finds ways to create product, add value, help people, build community, he's unbelievable.” Eric Worre, Author of Go Pro "Kyle you were a master to work with when filming and producing at my house. Also, Helen and I have toured and done so many 'meet and greets' and have had all kinds of cool activities and opportunities on the road, but last year at your house at the Inner Circle Mastermind ranks at the top as one of the all-time best experiences we have ever had on the road. At your house the people and the love was so amazing. We are use to doing all the giving, but that day we felt loved and cared for. It was just an amazing experience! We still talk about it to this day. It is at the top of our tour memories from over all these years!" Phil Collen, Guitarist Def Leppard, Songwriter and Author  "Thank you Kyle Wilson for being such a magnificent leader and creating a powerful, humanitarian thinking group of leaders. You're such an amazing human being. Always inspired by who you are!" Lisa Haisha, Host Amazon Show, Producer, Philanthropist  "Kyle Wilson is the man! When I made the decision to transition from my 15 year MLB career to being a speaker, best-selling author and business consultant I researched and then sought out the man who has been behind such iconic speakers as Jim Rohn, Brian Tracy and many others. Hiring Kyle as my coach has been one of the smartest decisions I made.“ Todd Stottlemyre, Author of Relentless Success, 15 Year MLB Pitcher and 3x World Champion  "Kyle is one of the wisest and most brilliant marketing consultants in the world. He is the man behind the great marketing of Jim Rohn International and so many other personal development legends. He is not only someone I've enjoyed collaborating and working with for over two decades, but is also a close and valued friend. I recommend Kyle without equivocation." Mark Victor Hansen, Co-Creator of World's Best-Selling Book Series, Chicken Soup for the Soul  "Kyle, you ROCKED the EOFIRE show. You are a great storyteller and shared great lessons. Truly impressed…and thank you for what you do/have done for this Entrepreneurial world." John Lee Dumas, Host of EOFire Podcast with over 100 million Downloads  "Kyle Wilson, single handedly changed the way I look at life! And the way I participate in my own! Kyle's wisdom, loyalty and commitment to seeing people soar is unmatched in the industry. He is a spring board, sounding board and ultimately a launch pad for anyone committed to pursuing their deepest dreams and ultimate goals! He is the most authentic mentor, friend and business partner I've ever had. I'm so thankful I ended up in your sphere 'KW,' Kyle Wilson.” Erika De La Cruz TV & Media Host, Speaker, Trainer and Author of Passionistas  "Kyle you have greatly influenced my life and career. You and Jim made a perfect team with a legacy that will continue to change lives more than any other thought leaders with timeless wisdom." Denis Waitley, Author Psychology of Winning  "Anytime I'm in a conversation with Kyle Wilson, I always take my notepad out and start taking down notes cause there's so much to learn. Kyle it's a real honor for me to know you." Bob Burg, Speaker and Best-Selling Author of the Go Giver Subscribe, Rate & Review (plus bonuses) Please subscribe to the Success Habits Podcast and leave an honest rating & review. This will encourage other people to listen and allow us to grow as a community. The bigger we get as a community, the bigger the impact we can have on the world. Once subscribed, send an email to podcast@kylewilson.com to receive over $200 in cool bonuses.

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons
Marriage and Communication

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 16:11


This week's message is titled Marriage and Communication and the scripture reference is 1 Peter 3:7. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

St. Michaels by-the-Sea
Third Sunday of Advent (12/12/21) - Fr. Chris Craig-Jones

St. Michaels by-the-Sea

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 11:32


St. Michael's by-the-Sea is an Episcopal Church located in the coastal Village of Carlsbad, California. As far as churches go, it's kind of a beachy version of the ancient Christian Faith, and is rooted in the Anglo-Catholic tradition. Whether you're in town for a week at the beach or a local pilgrim on a spiritual journey, you are welcome here! www.stmichaelsbythesea.org

We Build Great Apartment Communities
070: From House Hacking to Full-time Real Estate Investing with Anthony Angotti

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 42:59


Listen to Anthony Angotti's real estate journey in our today's episode. Learn how we jump from house hacking to being a successful full-time real estate investor! Lots of stories about his deals and experiences along the way that will surely guide you through your next deals! And heaps of golden nuggets along the way! Anthony Angotti is realtor in Deacon and hoover Real Estate Advisors specialising in investment real estate in the Pittburgh area. He own and manages multiple investment real estate properties in the greater Pittsburgh area through his own holding and through his own companies ADADO Properties and TGY Investment Group. Episode Highlights: Story of how Anthony got started in real estate Some stories from his partnerships deals Proven underwriting strategies What makes a property stand our for investing Needed improvements to add value to properties Challenges of investing in and managing medium-sized projects Steps on how to prevent having bottlenecks through your deals Golden Nugget: Stay on your horse! Connect: Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  Instagram  About Our Guest: Tony Angotti is a Realtor and real estate investor that got started by purchasing a duplex and living in one side and renting the other (House-Hacking). He continues to purchase rental real estate and works with investors to do the same. He currently hosts the real estate investing podcast Be Free RE Tony has grown his rental real estate holdings to nearly 100 units which are managed by his own in house team and focuses on buying small to mid size apartment buildings. When he isn't working on Real Estate he enjoys ice hockey, back-country camping, learning new things, and exercising as much as is possible. He and his wife still live in a duplex and consider house hacking to be the cheat code to financial independence. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

We Build Great Apartment Communities
069: Opportunities and Strategies in Real Estate Market with Michael Glaspie

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 50:03


We continue to build great apartment communities in today's episode by talking to and learning from our guest today, Michael Glaspie. Michael Glaspie is a Commercial Real Estate Broker in North Carolina. He served ten years in the US Army. Michael currently holds rental properties, hotels, and short-term arbitrages in multiple states and cofounded an investment centric real estate team—all while serving full time in the military Sit back, get your pen and paper of reach and get ready to jot down chunks and chunks of golden nuggets on how to be successful in your real estate endeavor… the military approach! Episode Highlight: Michael talks about his Us Special Forces journey Transitioning from being in the military services to real estate business Learning and understanding the Max Bang Method Investing in limited-stay hotels How to finance properties Difficulties in applying for loans Importance of bringing in a regional operator Where does Michael positions himself to be prepared in this distressed pandemic situation On investing in airbnb short terms rentals Connect: Email LinkedIn Instagram Facebook About Our Guest: Mike Glaspie is a Commercial Real Estate Broker in Charlotte, NC. Mike received his bachelor's degree in business management and is currently pursuing a master's in business administration. He served ten years in the US Army, with a majority spent in Special Operations as a Green Beret. Since purchasing his first investment property in 2014, Mike switched his focus to creative investing. In less than three years, he completed several transactions in a variety of ways such as Subject-Tos, seller-financing, wholesales, flips, syndications and buy and holds. Mike currently holds over 100 rental properties and short-term arbitrages in multiple states and cofounded an investment centric real estate team—all while serving full time in the military. Now as a veteran, Mike continues to practice real estate with a focus on educating other veterans on how to build the lifestyle they deserve through creative investing. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons
What Do You Stand For?

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 20:35


This week's message is titled What Do You Stand For? and the scripture reference is Daniel 6:7-22. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

We Build Great Apartment Communities
068: Effectively investing and Managing Properties Remotely with Sensei Gilliland

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 55:36


Sensei Gilliland graces our show today to talk about his very own proven strategies on how to manage a real estate business… remotely! A very interesting and timely topic, as in our pandemic world today, all aspects of life are starting to be governed by the digital space. Sensie Gilliland is the founder and president of Black Belt Investors, a consulting and investment firm specializing in the art of creating cash and building wealth through all economic and real estate cycles. Stay tuned for details about some of his deals, business values and the ultimate question that everybody might be asking him… “Is his name really Sensei?”! Episode Highlight: Story behind Sensei's name How did Sensei get into investing •Systems to use to manage construction remotely and effectively •How to scope a project •The importance of property inspection reports •How checklist makes everything accountable and liable •The scene of identifying good contractors •Getting and having the right source for your construction project   Connect: LinkedIn Facebook Email    About Our Guest: Sensei Gilliland is founder of real estate education, investment and consulting company Black Belt Investors. After becoming one of the top ranked martial artists in the country, and establishing a chain of successful martial arts schools, Sensei discovered the huge rewards of investing in real estate for himself in 1995. After making thousands of dollars on that first deal, he was hooked. He quickly scaled his investments and operations to wholesaling, rehabbing, and turnkey rentals properties. A journey you can read about in his book. You can get a free copy of Remote Rehabs: How to Make Incredible Real Estate Returns in the Best Property Markets, without Lifting a Hammer via Sensei's website at BlackBeltInvestors.com. Sensei is credited with founding the west coast's top ranked real estate investors club, has received the Real Estate Wealth Battalion Award, has been featured on the cover of Real Estate Wealth Magazine, and is regularly sought out for commentary on the market. Today Sensei is a national speaker, private consultant and active investor who has trained thousands of investors to find their own financial freedom through real estate. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Tacos and Tech Podcast
Re-Imagining the Lending Experience with Shayne Skaff

Tacos and Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 26:24


Listen on Apple, Google, Spotify, and other platforms.  Shayne Skaff is co-founder and CEO of Blooma, the leading digital underwriting platform powered by artificial intelligence for commercial real estate. The startup's AI platform helps lenders reduce loan origination time and cost, and perform a more comprehensive analysis of their transactions. In this week's interview, Neal and Shayne chat about the creation of Blooma and how the company originates new loans and handles portfolio management. Shayne grew up in Los Angeles, and went to University of San Diego for a degree in business administration. He found his way into tech by looking in the San Diego Reader job postings, and found himself a sales job selling hard drives for a distributor in Carlsbad. He transitioned into selling big enterprise computer systems for Avnet, where he gained inspiration for his first startup, MaintenanceNet. With technology rapidly advancing, he transitioned from the hardware industry to selling services and software. MaintenanceNet became the leading SaaS provider for automating maintenance contract revenue before being acquired by Cisco. After the acquisition, Shayne spent his time looking for companies in SaaS and B2B enterprises where he could help them with productization and their go-to-market strategy. He set up The Sandbox incubator for technical founders to build their ideas, and would occasionally invest in startups he saw potential in. Blooma was built from there, and he was so passionate about the idea he decided to run it himself and become CEO in 2019.  Listen to Shayne Skaff share his entrepreneurial experience in the SaaS industry and how he pivoted directions during the pandemic to make Blooma successful.   His favorite local tacos: The Taco Stand in Encinitas   Connect with Shayne: LinkedIn   Learn more about Blooma: Website: https://blooma.ai/  Facebook: Blooma.ai Twitter: @blooma_ai LinkedIn Thanks to our partners at Cox Business & Cox Edge for their support in enabling us to grow the San Diego ecosystem.

We Build Great Apartment Communities
067: Creating Your Mark in the Real Estate Industry with Jonathan Barr

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 42:05


Having real estate run in their blood, Jonathan Barr has significantly used the industry on how he views business and thus the world. At an early age, while helping his parents with their open houses putting up signages and even painting houses, it was already installed in him that the best path for a long-term wealth is real estate. Join John Brackett today as he sits down with Jonathan and talk about his early journey in the world of real estate. Lots of stories and golden nuggets for you to lean and pick up! Jonathan Barr, together with his brother Jeffrey co-founded JB2 Investments. Together they have two decades worth of experience investing in all types of real estate. Jonathan and Jeff have been involved in 400+ flips projects during that time period. Some of these projects being multi-family. They have deep knowledge of various markets, with financial analysis, construction and design. Episode Highlights: Growing up in real estate family How did Jonathan get started on his own real estate career Jonathan's personal experience on getting loans and his takeaways from them Greatest lesson learned from acquisitions The importance of mental fortitude and patience Golden Nuggets: Situations when people show their true colours Connect with Jonathan: LinkedIn  Email  Twitter  Facebook  JB2 Investments Website  About Our Guest: Started his Real Estate Career after the last 2008 great recession. Where he started in acquisitions of Single-Family higher end flips. A lot this coming bidding on foreclosure auctions. Eventually getting into ground up developments and repositioning of Multi-family buildings. When it comes to multi-family, he has been involved in property management, leasing and construction and has good grasp the business as a whole. Due to the current economic climate, he is seeing opportunities and the ability to lead JB2 in strategic growth. JB2 Investments is founded by brothers Jonathan and Jeffrey. Real estate is in their blood growing up in a real estate family. Together they have two decades of experience investing in all types of real estate. Jonathan and Jeff have been involved in 400+ projects during that time period. Ranging from gut renovations, multi-family entitlement/development ground up projects. They have deep knowledge of various markets, with financial analysis, construction and design. What sets JB2 apart from the others is their ability to take on challenging projects and Value-Add construction all while incorporating the latest trends that people love. JB2 aims for markets that appreciate aesthetic design and open efficient layouts. JB2 will enter 50+ unit value-add projects on C property in emerging B neighborhoods in the 2-8 million price range --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

This week's message is titled A Worthy Walk and the scripture reference is Ephesians 4:1-6. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

We Build Great Apartment Communities
066: Building a Community that Harmoniously Revolves Around Live-Work-Play Environment with Julie Lindquist

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 40:30


In today's episode, we are graced by Julia Lindquist, one of the most seasoned real estate personality, to talk about the value of understanding the importance of building a community that harmoniously revolves around work-live-play environment. Tenants do not simply want granite countertops, efficient appliances and high ceiling! Today, another factor that determines whether or not your apartment community will be rented is the amenity spaces that it offers, the shops that it is closed to and the people in the neighborhood. So c'mon, sit back and listen to another fun and informative talk on how to continue to build great apartment communities! Julia specializes in Chicago's near north side, including but not limited to Lincoln Park, River North, Old Town, Lakeview, Wicker Park and West Loop, as well as some suburbs, including Park Ridge, Glenview, Evanston/Skokie, Deerfield, Northbrook and Highland Park. Episode Highlights: Learn about Julia's background and how she get started with real estate The importance of creating and having a live-work-play communities Trends in today's live-work-play communities How having pools in your community can actually attract potential tenants How social Chicago is and how it impacts the real estate industry Things to add to your apartment communities that can enhance its social appeal How effective community branding actually works Top social items that your apartment community needs! The importance of backing your great brand with an equally great service Top things that well-branded apartment communities possess Connect with Julia: Email LinkedIn About Our Guest: Julia Lindquist is a business development and real estate expert with a passion for making life-long connections, practicing innovative business techniques, and continually improving her knowledge of the Chicagoland real estate and construction landscape.   --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

We Build Great Apartment Communities
065: Mitigating Risks with Reliable Multifamily Insurance - With Bryan Shimeall

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 39:43


The insurance industry is probably one of the most spread out and least appealing thing that operators and investors deal with - which then often leads to having challenges in looking for the right total protection that they need. Fortunately today in our episode, Bryan Shimeall of Multifamily Risk Advisors talks about solutions for these habitation risks and expert-level ways on how to mitigate and manage it. Bryan Shimeall is the Vice President of Multifamily Risk Advisrors, a division of Tanner, Ballew and Maloof formed to leverage the firm's 20-plus years of experience handling insurance for the multifamily industry. Come on and let us dive deep into the world of multifamily insurance including risk financing, pricing premiums to even the importance of getting inspections reports early. Another golden nuggets-jammed packed episode that will help us all build great community apartments. Episode Highlights: Habitational risks at this time of pandemic How operators can better price their property prior to opening an escrow Common losses in the market that we are in today Being proactive about risks issues through inspection reports Changes at how insured values are being approached. Connect With Bryan: Email LinkedIn About Our Guest: My name is Bryan Shimeall and I am with Tanner, Ballew and Maloof's Multifamily Risk Advisors (MRA). I, on a national, provides insurance and risk services for apartment investors, managers and developers. As one of the few multifamily specific insurance specialists in the country, MRA understands the mechanics of the MF industry and we support our clients in a variety of ways that are unique to our industry. Our service platform allows MRA to operate as an “outsourced risk manager” and a true partner focused on mitigating risk while reducing per door insurance cost. Over our 20 years, we have gained an in-depth understanding of the apartment industry and its needs. As such, we have developed numerous innovative solutions to meet those needs by leveraging our relationships throughout the insurance world. We excel in the the proper placement of resources, products, and services while supporting the overall growth of a portfolio. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Happy Valley Baptist Church Sermons

This week's message is titled Instrument of Power and the scripture reference is Judges 7:2-21. If you would like to worship with us in person, we would love to have you.  Our address is:4103 W Texas St.Carlsbad, NM 88220 Sunday School starts at 9:30AMSunday Morning Service starts at 10:45.Wednesday Night Bible Study starts at 6:00PM. Additional Sermon podcasts can be downloaded by going to https://podcast.hvbcnm.org Thank you and God Bless!

Mason & Ireland
HR 2: Rumor Has It

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 56:50


The Dodgers have entered talks with the Cincinnati Reds for Sonny Gray, Luis Castillo for Gavin Lux. What do you think? Momo goes off on the MLB Awards and how they are a joke. She says they should be called the "Stats Awards." Plus, There is cash all over the 5 freeway near Carlsbad. Would you grab some cash or would you keep on driving? Plus, a lucky caller has a chance to win tickets and a t-shirt if they can guess Momo's LIE OF THE DAY and another edition of GAME OF GAMES!

We Build Great Apartment Communities
064: Homeless Turned Real Estate Investor in One of the Most Expensive Market with Greg Gaudet

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 38:30


Today's episode will be your ample dose of positive vibes and hope for the weeks to come or maybe all throughout your journey in life! John Brackett sits with Greg Gaudet, a real estate investor at Maui Buyers and Business Development Manager at Premier Restoration Hawaii who is actively flipping properties to provide great but affordable housing for struggling local families. Listen as how we bring us down his memory lane from struggling with addiction, being homeless, going to jail and finally deciding to flip his life completely to be the successful and amazing person that he is today. Lots of golden nuggets, values and lessons that you can surely use not just as an entrepreneur but as a person who wants to do things right. Episode Highlights: Listen as Greg talks about his dad's death and how this had impacted him then Greg's not-so-good experiences with drugs and being homeless Be amaze on how Greg turned his life around Greg talks about discipline and how this value has helped him be an investor Process of vetting out best tenants Biggest challenges in building a real estate business in Maui Greg talks about why he loves investing properties in Maui Connect with Greg Email  LinkedIn  About Our Guest: As the son of a prominent real estate developer, I was destined for greatness. Until my dad died of cancer when I was just 14, which sent me spiraling into drug addiction and to low points including homelessness, jail, overdosing, and over a decade of fighting to recover. Overcoming challenges like this gave me the determination it took to live on half of my income so I could save the other half towards a down payment and finally realize my lifelong dream of becoming a real estate investor. Today I use my gifts to help others in similar situations by working with Section 8 housing to get families out of the homeless shelter and into rental condos, while also producing up to 35% cash on cash returns. I'm also blessed to have the opportunity to be business partners with the infamous Brandon Turner, as we flip condos on the island of Maui, and do some wholesaling as well.   --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

We Build Great Apartment Communities
063: Digital Advertising and Technology to Maximize Real Estate Investments with Chad Gallagher

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 67:15


Technology, especially since the Covid-19 pandemic started, has seeped its way into everything that we do - business and leisure wise. It has taken the world by storm that almost everything that we do not relies and is made possible and effective by technology - and the world of real estate is no different! In our today's episode, John Brackett sits down with Chad Gallagher and talks about ways to use technology to solve real estate problems as well as how to not just make great apartment building but great investment returns too. Chad Gallagher is the co-founder and co-owner of SlateHouse Group.  SlateHouse, founded in 2014, manages over 3,800 units across PA, NJ, and MD for investment owners, with over 100 employees.  SlateHouse also has a brokerage division in both NJ and PA with 20 real estate agents that focus on working with investors to buy and sell real estate Episode Highlights: Chad talks about technology and digital marketing Technology as a big help on all facets of real estate investment Digital advertising to drive showings and leads Technology and digital database to help improve and manage property Chad gives landlords advice on how to better maintain the process of property management Creating real estate management systems that are easy to follow Technology to make or break you as a leader The importance of SEO in driving traffic to your website   Connect with Chad: Email  LinkedIn  Facebook  About Our Guest: Chad Gallagher graduated with a Systems Engineering degree from UVA and has since used technology to reshape advertising and real estate. He built a mobile advertising business which eventually did $100M in revenue and eventually was sold to Verizon. Co-Founded SlateHouse Group with Nate Jones --- what is now a modern real estate company with over 105 people. We manage over 4,000 units across PA, MD, VA, and NJ and own over 200 units across residential SFH, residential multi-family, and commercial. Also have a real estate brokerage (SlateHouse with a focus on working with investors to buy and acquire investment properties. Our podcast and conference is called "Real Estate Hackers", a new episode each week focusing on the intersection of real estate and technology systems If you are looking to save money on insurance on your investment properties, we launched Red Rabbit Insurance which has saved investors hundreds of thousands of $$ by focusing specifically on property insurance for investment properties. Only thing I love more than real estate is the Eagles. And my wife and daughter. :)   --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

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