Podcasts about latinx heritage month

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Best podcasts about latinx heritage month

Latest podcast episodes about latinx heritage month

MOSAIC Station
Celebrating Latinx Heritage

MOSAIC Station

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 21:53


Have you been missing us?? We've been on Instagram!! Mosaic Station have been recording IG Lives all semester. Catch us there live next semester for videos at https://www.instagram.com/sjsumosaic/ We will also be adding the audio to our podcasts into this feed (the first episode is an Instagram exclusive - check out our Reels to go back and watch it). This episode, Carmina and Sophia are exploring Latinx identities and Latinx heritage. This episode was released in October 7th for Latinx Heritage Month at SJSU.

Moneda Moves
Latina-Owned JZD Prepared For A Launch At Target, Years Ahead | JZD Founders Jen & Vero Zeano

Moneda Moves

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 41:02


Mi gente, it's your host Lyanne and your are listening to the last Moneda Moves episode of 2022! To close out the season, we are featuring a staple Latina brand near and dear to my heart that we've followed for years, the iconic apparel and accessories company Jen Zeano Designs. Its Texas-based founders and couple Jen and Vero Zeano are community-builders at their core having engaged their family, friends and locals in their business as they bootstrapped on their way to their historic debut in Target in 2022. A bit of background JZD and what it stands for: You may have run into their work via Jessica Alba or Jenna Ortega who have both worn their work, or their relatable, empowering and witty designs that echo phrases engrained in Latine culture (think Poderosa, Vibras Bonitas). Having created their renowned Latina Power design in 2014, and launching as an Etsy store, they were far from an overnight success, but what they did learn was how to lean on each other, harness the power of their community as they expanded their social media, sales as they quite literally prepared to land in a retailer like Target this year during Latinx Heritage Month. Today, we speak with the founders about their reflections on the journey here and taking bigger bets on their business over the years. As we enter the thick of holidays and sala season aka dressing your best for the living room parties, we're also thinking about how to spend our moneda mindfully. So you can bet today's featured builders have a holiday gift guide. You can see their gift guide here: https://shopjzd.com/pages/holiday-gift-guide Felicidades, Jen and Vero! Onto the interview. I hope you enjoy as much as I did, mi gente, and I'll see you in 2023.

This Shit Works
Networking and Advocacy within the LatinX and Hispanic Community

This Shit Works

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 12:02 Transcription Available


Each year, September 15th through October 15th is designated as National Hispanic and LatinX Heritage Month. This month-long observance recognizes and celebrates the histories, cultures, and contributions of Hispanic and LatinX Americans past and present.It was during this month that a listener of this podcast Becky reached out to me to ask if I would cover the topic of networking and advocacy specifically within the LatinX and Hispanic community. Listen in as I talk with listener Becky Aquino about her journey as a Latina in corporate America, her experiences networking and the importance of having advocates for the LatinX and Hispanic community. Drink of the week: PASIÓN MADRAS If you liked what you heard today, please leave a review and subscribe to the podcast. Also, please remember to share the podcast to help it reach a larger audience.Julie Brown: WebsiteInstagramLinkedInYoutube

Soul Sisters Sunday Podcast
S2E3: ¿Is it LatinX or Latine?

Soul Sisters Sunday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 48:45


It's Latinx Heritage Month! Well, it's celebrated from Sept. 15th - Oct. 15th but the ladies still wanted to talk about it and shine light on the month. Kim brings up the fact that it isn't talked about enough in schools. Since she believes that it's important to learn about other cultures she gives examples on how she celebrates the community. She also talks about how she teaches her daughter as much as she can. There's always the fear of being a " Culture Vulture" but you have to listen to find out how she avoids that! Jay also takes a dig at non-authentic tacos. Where did this idea that ground beef goes in tacos come from? Who knows but Jay doesn't like it! Since Jay is the Latina of the Soul Sisters she also talks about what she identify as. Is Latino or Hispanic the right term? Tune in as they look into that too! The Latinx community contributes so much to the world and the Soul Sisters want others to know that. Hopefully this episode is an eye opener for someone out there. Don't forget to follow us on social media: @soulsisterssundaypodcast https://linktr.ee/soultribepublishinghouse --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soul-sisters-sunday/support

The Arise Podcast
Season 4, Episode 5 Inter Cultural Conversations on Repair with Dr. Ernest Gray, Rebecca W. Walston, Jen Oyama Murphy, TJ Poon, and Danielle S. Castillejo

The Arise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 42:09


Bios:Ernest Gray Jr. is the pastor of Keystone Baptist Church located in the West Garfield Park neighborhood of Chicago.  He is a graduate of the Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Pastoral Ministries, and a graduate of Wheaton College with a Master's Degree in Biblical Exegesis.  He completed his PhD coursework at McMaster Divinity College and is currently completing his thesis within the corpus of 1 Peter. Mr. Gray has taught in undergraduate school of Moody in the areas of Hermeneutics, first year Greek Grammar, General Epistles, the Gospel of John and Senior Seminar. It is Mr. Gray's hope to impact the African American church  through scholarship. Teaching has been one way that God has blessed him to live this out.  Ernest is also co-host of the newly released podcast Just Gospel with an emphasis upon reading today's social and racial injustices through a gospel lens. www.moodyradio.org    Jen Oyama Murphy  "My love of good stories led me to Yale University where I received a BA in English. Upon graduation, I felt called to bring individual stories into relationship with the Gospel Story, and I have worked in the areas of campus and church ministry, lay counseling, and pastoral care since 1989. Over the years, I sought a variety of ongoing education and training in the fields of psychology and theology, including graduate classes at The Seattle School of Theology & Psychology and Benedictine University. I also completed the Training Certificate and Externship programs at The Allender Center, and I previously held roles on their Training and Pastoral Care Team, as Manager of Leadership Development, and most recently as the Senior Director of The Allender Center. Believing that healing and growth happens in the context of relationship, I work collaboratively to create a safe coaching space of curiosity and kindness where honesty, care, desire, and imagination can grow. Using my experience and expertise in a trauma-informed, narrative-focused approach, I seek to help people live the story they were most meant for and heal from the ones they were not. I am passionate about personal support and development, particularly for leaders in nonprofit or ministry settings, including lay leaders who may not have a formal title or position. I'm especially committed to engaging the personal and collective stories of those who have felt invisible, marginalized, and oppressed. I love facilitating groups as well as working individually with people. I currently live in Chicago with my husband, and we have two adult daughters.Rebecca Wheeler Walston lives in Virginia, has completed  Law School at UCLA, holds a Master's in Marriage and Family Counseling, is also a licensed minister. Specializing in advising non-profits and small businesses. Specialties: providing the legal underpinning for start-up nonprofits and small businesses, advising nonprofit boards, 501c3 compliance, creating and reviewing business contracts.TJ Poon serves with Epic Movement, where we both serve on the People & Culture Team (HR). TJ is the Director ofPeople & Culture and and also serves on Epic's leadership team to provide her leadership, wisdom, vision and direction for the ministry.Danielle:SO on screen and feel free to add to your introductions. Uh, Ernest, um, Dr. Gray is someone I'm met Yeah. Um, on screen during one of our cohort, um, virtual weekends and just listening to him talk, I think he was in the Caribbean when he was giving us the lecture mm-hmm. and talking about theology, and I was frantically taking notes and eventually resorted to screen shooting, like snapping pictures of the screen as he was talking. Uh, and then like quickly texting some friends and my husband to say, Hey, I was learning this that. And so that was kinda my introduction to Dr. Gray. And then we of course had a chance to meet in Montgomery. Um, yes, my respect just, uh, grew for you at that point. Um, the ability for you to be honest and be in your place of location Absolutely. And show up and show up to present, it felt like a theology that had life, and that feels different to me. So, um, thank  Dr. Ernest Gray:Thank You for that.  Thank you for that. No, I'm, it's a pleasure to join you all. I, I see some familiar faces and I'm excited to be with you all, and, um, yeah, I'm, um, yeah, I'm, I'm thankful that you thought me, um, thought my voice would be, uh, would be relevant for this conversation. So I'm, I'm grateful to be here and, um, yeah, I'm, I'm here to, um, to both participate and to, um, to learn as much as I can in this moment, so thank you.  Danielle:Mm. You're welcome. Um, and then there's Rebecca Wheeler Walton who is the boss, and she's both smart and witty and funny and kind and extremely truthful in the most loving ways, and so have highest regard for her. Back when I answered the phone, Luis would be like, Is that Rebecca  Yeah. Um, yeah, and tj, uh, TJ had gotten to know TJ over the last year and, um, you know, she's kind of introduced as like an admin person, but I've quickly learned that she, her heart and her wisdom are her strongest attributes and her ability just hang in the room in a tough conversation, um, has, I've just had an immense respect and hope for, for the future by, in getting to know ut j mm-hmm. touching. Yeah. And then at the top, y'all on my screen is Jen Oyama Murphy. She was my first facilitator at The Allender Center. Um, and she showed up in her body and her culture, and I was like, Man, that is freaking awesome. Um, and I wanna, I wanna do what she's doing with other people in this world. Um, Jen loved me and has loved me, and I don't think it can be overstated how wise and patient she is. Um, and just like when I say the word intuition, I mean it in a sense of like, deep wisdom. And, and that's, that's like, I keep searching. Like I wanna have access to that me. So, so thank you, Jen. Yeah.  Jen Oyama Murphy :Hmm. Gosh. Thank you, Danielle. Thanks. Well, I'm, I feel very privileged to be a part of the conversation, so thanks for inviting me.  Danielle:Yeah. So, I mean, I, Ernest you probably didn't get a chance to watch this clip, but it's this clip we're not gonna show. We talked about it. It's about, um, it's the border and there's like a three minute time, um, like timer for people to cross the border and hug each other and interact with one, one another on the southern border. And so there's like a tiny clip of this here. And, um, it's Latinx Heritage Month, and it felt really important to me to have a diverse conversation around repair, because Latin X is, um, Asian, it's black, white, it's European, it's white, it's indigenous. And I feel like, you know, in this conversation, what does repair look like for a Latinx person? And what, what does arriving, you know, to heaven mean, you know mm-hmm.  Dr. Ernest Gray:Indeed.  Danielle:So, yeah. So that's kind of where I'm coming from. And I have the slides up, but I, you know, I wanna hear your all thoughts on, on it, you know? Do you mind hitting the next slide, Tj?  Dr. Ernest Gray:Very good.  Danielle :Do you want me to keep moving? ? Yeah. Um, this is this guy that isn't red in, uh, Western psychology, although he was European descent and lived in El Salvador. He was murdered by, um, CIA operatives in El Salvador. And, uh, he was a liberation psychologist. And partly part of the reason he wasn't as well known here is because he gave almost all his lectures in Spanish on purpose. Hmm. Because he wanted to be rooted in a Latin American tradition. Um, and so I thought it was important to just lay the foundation for what rupture and repair means. He had a real vision for psychology to be a liberating movement, not just one that maintains like, Here, let me get you healed so you can function in this oppressive system. Like, um, yeah.  Dr. Ernest Gray :You know, I think about that kind of, um, movement, which seems to me has always been very much so a part of, you know, this resilience, this resilience push amongst indigenous people, groups, communities. It, it, it is a, it is a sense to regain their, um, their humanity when they've been trampled on, when that humanity has been trampled on. And so there are different epox I think that I've seen as of recent, um, where we see that this has come to a head. You know, I'll never forget the, in the, the ministry of, um, Dr. Cera Na Padilla, um, who was, who just passed a couple of years ago. And, um, I was fortunate to have a class by him, but it was his eyeopening class, uh, a world Christian perspective that gave me the ability to, um, um, hear just how liber the gospel can be and how restorative to the humanity of people groups that have been trampled upon, uh, actually is.  So I think that repair in many ways is just the, is just the acknowledgement that, hey, something in me is not right. And, um, it's not any one person. It feels as though this is a, um, this is the water in which I'm swimming, Like the water I'm in is like rotten. Um, and, and I wanna be rejuvenated through a, a water that, that refreshes and rejuvenates my life. Um, and that, that that water that it seems to be about is my aka the systemic kind of components that have trampled upon, um, indigenous groups. But that first step is acknowledgement, saying, Hey, um, something's broken in me. And it's not any one person. It's more of a system. It's more of the water in which I'm in. Um, that needs to be, uh, ameliorated. It needs to be, um, you know, I, I need it. It, I can't live like this. I can't, I can't, I can't live like this anymore.  Um, I think as well, there's, there's a lot of things that I think are many, very much so, um, um, you know, kind of tied to this, this equilibrium. I think, um, when I, when I hear about these struggles and I hear about how people are trying to, um, go for at least make sure that they are, um, pursuing their inherent dignity and worth it, it, it shouldn't seem as though it, it's such a, um, a, um, there's so much resistance to that work. I mean, where, as human beings, we really want to be affirmed. We wanna be loved, we wanna be cherished, very, very basic things. Um, but to have, but to have resistance to that amongst systems also shows that we, we've got to pull together to be able to make a, uh, a concerted effort towards bringing back a type of, um, um, regenerative and healing kind of ethic to our communities that are shattered, that have been broken.  And I, and I, and I, and I, and I personally see this right now as it relates to, you know, my community, which is African American, and I personally feel this, especially when I think about, um, people who are in survival mode and making bad choices. I always wanna pause and, and tell people, Listen, do not, don't, don't blame the victim. I mean, you're looking at William Ryan's book here as Right in front of me blaming the victim, Right. And I, I don't wanna, I don't wanna blame the victim because they don't, people don't wake up in the morning and think, you know, I wanna go out here and commit crime. I wanna do things I don't want, I don't wanna do these things just because I'm inherently, um, you know, um, malevolent person. No, I wanna do these things cause I'm, I'm trying to survive.  And, and it, and there, that signals to me as well that there's something broken, uh, in the social order. And that these communities in particular, the most vulnerable ones, uh, shouldn't be subjected to so much, um, to, to these things, to, to where they have to resort to violence, crime, or, um, you know, pushing against laws, unjust laws, if you will, uh, that people see is, um, oppressive. Shouldn't we should demo dismantle the laws that, that create these things. So that was a very, Forgive my thought, forgive my, um, thought, thought there, but I, I just wanted to kind of think and, and draw out some, some, some broad strokes there.  Jen Oyama Murphy:Yeah. I, I resonate with that a lot, Dr. Gray. I mean it, like, we've all been trained in kind of this narrative, um, therapeutic way of working with people. And so much of my experience has been looking at that story only as that story and not being able to look at it within a culture, within a system, and even within the context in which that story is being read. So if you are a person of culture in the group, you probably are at best, one of two in a group of eight mm-hmm. . And that has a story and a system all to itself. So even the process of engaging someone's story, even if you are mindful of their culture and the systemic story that that's in, you're also then in a, in a story that's being reenacted in, in and of itself, you know, that, um, I mean, Danielle and Rebecca know cuz they were in my group.  Like, you, you have best are one of two. And even within that too, you're probably talking about two different cultures, two different systems. And so that sense of, um, having repair, healing feel really contained to not just your story, but then a dominant structure within where that healing is supposed to happen. Like, it's, it's the water. Most of us have swarm in all our life, so we don't even know right. Where the fish that's been in that water all the time. And so we don't even know that that's happening. And so when, when the healing process doesn't seem like it's actually working, at least for me, then I turn on myself, right? That there's something bad or wrong about me, that, that what seems to be working for everyone else in the room, it's not working for me. So I must be really bad or really broken.  And it doesn't even kind of pass through my being of like, Oh, no, maybe there's a system that's bigger than all of us that's bad and broken. That needs to be addressed too. So I, I love what this cohort is trying to do in terms of really honoring the particular personal story, but also then moving out to all the different stories, all the different systems that are connected to that personal story. I'm, I'm grateful for that. And it's hard work, hard, hard, complicated work that it's full of conflict, Right. And math, and it's not gonna have five steps that you can follow and everything's gonna work out well for, for everyone. I mean, it's, it's gonna be a mess. You guys are brave.  Dr. Ernest Gray:This final statement here about overthrowing the social order not to be considered as pathological. Um, you know, that, that, that last part there, uh, the conflicts generated by overthrowing the social order not to be considered pathological people. I mean, I think that there's a sense that people really don't want to have to resort to this language of overthrow if these systems were not malevolent from the very first place. Right. And, and I think about this, how, how the exchange of power has become such a, has created such a vacuum for, um, the most vulnerable groups to be, um, um, you know, maligned taken advantage of, pushed under the bus or where's eradicated, um, without, with, you know, with impunity. And I think about that, that there, there has to be, in many ways when we see the e the various, um, TIFs and the various, um, contests that arise around the, around the globe, there seems to be a common theme of oppressive oppression, power abuse, um, and then it's codified into laws that are saying, Well, you're gonna do this or else.  And I guess that's, it's, it's almost as if there's a, a type of, um, expectation that this is, this is the only means that which we have to overthrow social orders that need to be, um, uh, eradicate need to be done away with. So, so there's, there's a lot of truth to this, this, this, this last part especially as well. Um, but I, I think that's what we see, um, constantly. One of the things that's popping in my mind right now is the ACON in South Africa. Um, and they're, they're dominant, The Dutch domination of South Africa and the indigenous group there, the, the South Africans, um, of af of, of, um, of black descent and how their struggles have ha have, you know, just constantly been, um, you know, so, so, so rife with tension and there's still tension there. And so it just takes on a different form.  I, I think that there's a lot of things that we can learn from the various contests, but we might, when we strip away layers of the onion, we might find that a lot of it is the way in which this power dynamic and power exchange, or lack thereof, is actually going on. Um, and again, we can call that what we want to, we can say it's Marxist. We can say it's, um, you know, um, critical, but critical theory helps us to, helps us with some of this to see in which power way in which power is leveraged and the abuse of it. Lots of it.  Rebecca W. Walston :I mean, I think, um, Ernest, if I can call you back if I've earned right quite yet, maybe not . Oh,  You got that right . Um, I, you know, I think what, what what hits me about your statement is, is, is the sense that, um, that there's that power and a sense of overthrow inextricably tied together in ways that I, I don't think they should be, I do not think that they were meant to be. Um, and I, it, it makes me think of a conversation that I had with the Native American, uh, uh, um, friend. And we were, we were together in a group of, um, diverse people watching, um, a documentary about a group of multi-ethnic, a multi-ethnic group engaging around race and racism. And we were watching the, um, this group of people sort of engage about it. And, um, I was, by the time the thing was over, like I was full on like angry, all kinds of things activated in me a around the Black American experience.  And I turned to this Native American guy sitting next to me, and, and I said, I'd like to know from you, what is your version of 40 acres in a mule? A and, and I said, you know, in, in my community, like, we have a thing about 40 acres in a mule, that kind of encapsulates a, a, a sense of what was taken from us as, as enslaved Africans, and some sense of what it means to, to start to repair that breach, right? And, and to give some sense of restitution. And it's codified in this sense of 40 acres and mule given to freed, uh, newly freed Africans as, as a way to, to launch into a sense of free existence. And I said to him, If I were you, I'd be like, pissed. Yeah. I, as an indigenous man, like, I'd want all of my stuff back, all of it, all of the land, everything. Like all the people, everything, everything. And so, I'd like to know from you, what is your version of 40 acres in the mill? What's your measurement of what it would look like to start to, to repair and to return to indigenous people? What was taken from them?  Hmm. And this man looked me dead in my face and said, We, we have no equivalent because the land belongs to no one. It was merely ours to steward, so I would never ask for it back.  Dr. Ernest Gray:Wow. Floored. Mm-hmm.  Rebecca W. Walston:A and I'm still by that it's been maybe six, seven years. And I've never forgotten that sentiment and the sense that, um, I, I wanted to sit at his feet and learn and not ask more questions. I just, and just the sense of like, what could my people learn from the indigenous community and how might it allow us to breathe a little deeper and move a little freer it? And so I, you know, I hope you guys can hear that as not like a ding against my community and what we're asking for, but just a sense of for how another people group steps into this question of rupture and repair that is radically different from, from my experience, and causes me to pause and wonder what must they know of the kingdom of God that would allow them to hold that kind of, that kind of sacred space that feels unfamiliar to me,  Dr. Ernest Gray:That is quite revolutionary. And if are representative of this type of, and again, those are just, those are just the terms we use to, to talk about repair and, um, and re restoration. I wonder if the, if see what I, what I'm struggling with is that what we are, what we wrestled through as an African American context was, and the vestiges is of, um, ownership. It's ownership and, um, ownership of bodies and ownership of land. And the indi, the aboriginal people of America, the Native Americans, they have this really robust sense of it belong. If that's the case that belongs to no one, my next question would be then, and again, if I'm thinking about ownership, well, that it's the damning sense of what ownership did to their communities, how they were decimated, how they were ransacked, how, how, um, you know, the substance abuse has ran rampant.  So if from, if it were me, I would ask a follow up question to this individual and ask why. Well then if the land is not an issue and it's not a, it's not a monetary thing that needs to be repaired, what about the damage? How will we go about putting a value upon or putting some type of thing upon the decimation of, of communities, the, um, the homes. Let's take, you know, Canada is r in pain, especially with the Catholic church and what was done in certain orphanages. Okay. And so, um, if not a monetary thing, what would be the re another response to repair the brokenness that the people have experienced? And I, and I, I don't, I understand the land is one thing, but there's also a people that have been shattered absolutely, absolutely shattered. And, and I think that still remains a question for me.  And again, it's a perennial question that is affecting multiple communities. Um, but these are felt more acutely, especially as, um, you know, Africans, uh, in the transatlantic route. And, and, and aboriginal native Americans who were, who are, um, you know, no one discovered them here. But this ownership piece is something that I think is what is inherent to whiteness, and it has created this vacuum. And why we need to have a sense of, um, you know, how it impacts every single debate. Every single debate. I would go down a rabbit trail about, you know, gospel studies and New Testament studies, but that's just, it's all, it's there too. It's, it's right there, too.  Danielle:TJ, can you hit the next slide? I think we're into that next slide, but I think what I'm hearing, and then maybe Jen has a, a follow up to this, is, I, I think part of my response from the Latinx community is we're both perpetually hospitable and perpetually the guest. Mm. Mm-hmm. We don't own the house. Mm. And we, and yet there's a demand of our hospitality in a house that's not ours. Mm. And there's a sense of, I think that comes back to the original cultures that we come from, of this idea that you showed up here, let me give you food. Let me, let me have you in, let me invite you in. And in the meantime, you took my, you took my space and, and you put a, you put a stake in it that said, Now this is mine and you're my guest. And now there's different rules, and I may be polite to you, but that does not equal hospitality. Right. And so, and I don't know, I don't have the resolution for that, but just this feeling that, that Latinx communities are often very mi migratory. Like, and, you know, we have, then you get into the issue of the border and everything else. But this idea that we, we don't own the house, and yet there's a, there's an, there's a demand for our hospitality wherever we go.  Rebecca W. Walston:What's your sense, Danielle, cuz you said, um, both there's a demand on the hospitality and also something of that hospitality hearkening back to your indigenous culture from Right. In the place where you're not a guest, you're actually at home. So is that a both and for you  Danielle:Mm-hmm. , because I think that's the part that's, that's robbed the meaning, The meaning that's made out of it is robbed. I think sometimes the hospitality is freely given. And, and that's a space where I think particularly dominant culture recognizes that. Right. And so there's, there's the ability to take, and then, then there's the complicity of giving even when you don't want to. And also like, then how does a, and this is very broad, right? And the diaspora, right? But the sense of like, the demand, if you don't give your hospitality then at any point, because you're the perpetual guest, they can shut you out and you can never return. So I haven't quite worked that through, but those are some thoughts I was having as you all were speaking.  Dr. Ernest Gray:Mm. I think that's, I think that's very keen, uh, you know, as a keen observation, my wife is, you know, from a Caribbean context, and so there's the hospitality notion wherein it's, I mean, that's just, it's irrespective of what you feel. This is just what you do. And so I think that it's, when it's taken advantage of or hoisted upon people in a way that is saying, Oh, you must do this, that harm can enue. But, um, there's a, there's a, for me, it's, it's, it's really, really foreign to, from the outside looking in to understand how that culture, um, has, um, historically genuflected or just kind of, um, it can become a part of weakness. It can become a part, or it can be become abused. Especially when this is an expectation of the culture. Um, and I think that's where the harm lies, is that there, there has to be some measures of, of like,  When conditions are, are, you know, almost in a sense of like, this isn't automatic. And it, and then there needs to be some kind of, some kind of ways in which it can remain protected. So that's to not be abused by those who know that this is an expectation of the community. Um, but yeah, that's, that's from the outside looking in, it's hard. My only connection is through, you know, my wife and her culture and seeing how that is, you know, I don't care what's going on inside. You know, you're gonna, you're gonna be hospital, You're gonna host, you're gonna continue to be, you're gonna reach out. You're gonna continue to be that person because that's what's expected of you.  Jen Oyama Murphy:I mean, Danielle as a Japanese American. I mean, I feel that bind of, I mean, it's not even perpetual guest for, I think Asians often. It feels like perpetual alien. Um, and, and yet, you know, there are cultural expectations and norms, you know, among the Japanese, around what it looks like to welcome someone into your home, what it means to be gracious and deferential, and that, So there's a whole culture that's, um, informing of a way, a style of relating that I think to Dr. Gray's point can be taken advantage of. Um, and can, I think be in some ways, consciously or unconsciously used by, um, that culture to kind of escape wrestling with the experience of, of marginalization and abuse and trauma. Because there's a culture that can give you some sense of safety and containment and soothing. If you go back to what, you know, um, culturally, I mean, after the internment camps, the incarceration of the Japanese during World War ii, that's exactly like what happened is the, the idea of, you know, being polite, being deferential, working hard, using productivity as a way to gain status and safety, and in some ways, right, taking the bait to, to be, to like out white, white people.  We're gonna be better citizen than the white people. And like, what that cost the Japanese Americans who, if you had asked them what kind of repair did they want, they would say none. We're just so grateful to be able to be in this country. It, you know, the, the grandchildren of the people that were incarcerated that kind of ly rose up and said like, This is wrong. And so it's just, it, it feels so complicated and like such a, such a math, um, in it. And that's where I feel like, um, learning not just the, the white Asian story, right? But having exposure and experiences and relationships with, um, a variety of different ethnicities and being able to learn from their histories, their culture, their way of, um, engaging trauma, working through a healing process, and not staying in a single lane in my culture only anymore than I wanna stay in a single white Western culture only.  But being really open to learning, growing. I mean, my experience with you, Danielle, and you, Rebecca, even in my group, right, opened me up to a whole different way of engaging story and working with the, um, methodology that we had been learning. And I'm so grateful I wouldn't have had to wrestle or contend with any of that if I hadn't been in relationship with both of you who have a different culture than I do, and a different style relating and a different way of responding to things than I do. That was so informative for me in broad slu, um, opportunity to really first own that there is a rupture, and then what it looks, what it could look like to repair. And that I didn't only have two, two options like my Japanese American way or the, the White Western way that I had learned all my life.  Rebecca W. Walston:I resonate with that, Jen. I think that, um, what comes to my mind is the sense of Revelation seven, nine, um, and at the throne of grace at the end of this, that identifying monikers every tribe and every tongue mm-hmm. . And, and it causes me to wonder why that moniker, why is it that the identification that the throne of grace is tribe and come. Right? And, and I think it hints at what you just said, this sense of like, there's a way in which this kind of hospitality shows up in each culture, um, in, in a way that I think each culture holds its own way of reflecting that text, um, in a way that is unique, um, in the sense that we won't have a full and complete picture of hospitality until we have a sense of how it shows up in every tribe and every time. Um, and, and so I love that that image from you of like, what can I learn from, from you as a Japanese American, and what can I learn from Danielle? What can I learn from tj? What can I learn from Ernest and, and how they, they understand, uh, and embody that with, with the sense of like, my picture will be a little bit clearer, a little bit more complete for having, having listened and learned.  And I, I do think we're talking in terms of hospitality about sort of, to me, the connective tissue between a erector and a repair is really a sense of resiliency. And, and it feels to me a little bit like the, there's a way where we can talk about hospitality that is really about, um, something of a God given capacity to navigate a rupture, whether it's individual or collective in a, in a way that allows for hopes, for pushes, for some sense of repair. And, you know, I was listening to Ernest talking, you know, I feel like I can hear Michelle Obama saying, when they go low, we go high. Right? And that is a, that is, it's a, it's a different kind of hospitality, but it feels like, feels like hospitality than the infant, right? It, it feels like I won't give in, um, to, to this invitation to join the chaos. I, I, I will, um, be mindful and thoughtful and intentional about how I move through it so that I don't find myself, uh, joining joining in it, but actually standing against it. And that, that feels very hospitable to me. To, to stand on the side of what is true and right. And honoring and, and, and not not joining the fray.  Danielle:You can see how our collective ruptures that we've all described, and I know TJ, you haven't spoken yet, um, how our trauma rubs up against one another and likely is in a heated moment, is very triggering.  If I'm in a, if Jen and I are in a space where we feel like we have to stay, keep our heads low, because let's say I have a family member, um, who's undocumented, right? Or Jen has a memory of, I don't know, a traumatic experience dealing with dominant culture. And we're with, you know, like you say Rebecca, like our African hyphen American friends, and they're like, Come on, let's go get it. Mm-hmm. , you can feel the rub of what repair might look like, and then there's a fracture between us. Mm-hmm. . If we don't, that's, I mean, and then the hard thing that I've been challenged lately to try to do is stay really close to my experience so I have a sense of self so that I can bring that full self to you and say like, I feel this way, and then I can more, more be able to listen to you if I can express a more truer sense of what I'm feeling. Does that make sense?  Dr. Ernest Gray:Perfect.  I think, I think, um, yeah, I, I, I think about the triggering aspects of how we have been collectively kind of retraumatized. You know, when you think about, you know, this since Trayvon Martin and and beyond here in America with African American context, we've just been trying to figure out how to stay alive and t-shirts keep printing regarding, um, you know, can't go to, can't go to church, can't go to a park, can't do this, can't do that, can't breathe. And it's almost as if it's, it's exhausting. Um, but it's entering into that space with other groups, other communities that creates a sense of solidarity, which is sorely needed. Because we would assume, and we would make this as this assumption, like, Oh, well, you don't have it so bad. That's not true. It looks different. It feels different. And until we can, at the same time, um, I like what you said about own, what we are feeling while we are in that moment, it allows us to at least get it out there so that we can then be active engagers with others and not just have our own stuff, you know, uh, for stalling, any meaningful connection.  I wanna think that there's a sense that, um, because, you know, our expressions in every way, whether it's hospitality or whether it's in the way in which we deal with, um, the various cultural phenomenons that we're closely associated with, is that these create the mosaic. If we, back to Rebecca's idea of Revelation seven, nine, these re these is why I love mosaics is because the full picture of our, um, similar, similarly expressed experiences do not look the same, but when they're all put together, eventually we'll see the, the picture more fully. And I think that that's the key is that it, it's so easy for us to be myopic in a way in which we look at everyone else's, or especially our own, to where we can't see anybody else's. That that creates this isolation, insular kind of isolation idea of, Well, you don't have it as bad as I do. Or they're not as, they're not as shaken as this community or that community or this community. Um, and wherein there's some truth to that, Um, if we're going to regain a sense of human, our full humanity, we've gotta figure out ways to, to do that active listing so that our ours doesn't become the loudest in the room.    

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Latinx Heritage Month Cultural Celebration (HVCC) 10/13/22

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 8:24


On Thursday, October 13, 2022, Hudson Mohawk Magazine Roaming Labor Correspondent Willie Terry attended the "Latinx Heritage Month Cultural Celebration" at Hudson Valley Community College (HVCC). The HVCC Student Senate hosted the Latinx Celebration at the Campus Center. September 15 to October 15 is Latinx History Month. In this labor segment, Willie interviewed Jordy Gomez, Director of the Cuban Music group "Alta Havana."

Golf Today
ZOZO IS A GO-GO! | Oct. 13

Golf Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 55:53


Round one is in the books in Japan! Eamon and Damon break down the biggest winners from round one and we hear from the leaders. PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS legends Dick Mast stops by to chat about how he's maintained his golf game into his seventies ahead of the SAS Championship. Meanwhile, Gina Kim is just starting her career! The LPGA rookie discusses how sponsors exemptions and high-level amateur golf have prepared her to make her presence felt on the tour next season. Lizette Salas has won twice on the LPGA and joined us today to open up about the highs and lows she has experienced in the professional game. Dick Mast (15:18) Gina Kim (29:29) Lizette Salas (47:10)

Charting Queer Health
Episode 38 - LatinX? Latine? Latin@? Latinx Heritage Month with Mike Gutierrez

Charting Queer Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 34:26


On this weeks episode, we hear from Mike Gutierrez, Program Manager for Ryan White and Co-Chair of the LatinX Committee, about LatinX Heritage month. We learn why the month spans September and October, hear about important LatinX contributors to medicine, and more!

The Arise Podcast
Season 4, Episode 3 Jacqueline Batres Bonilla on Therapy and Latinx Culture

The Arise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 41:19


My name is Jacqueline Batres Bonilla.I was born in El Salvador and moved to Minnesota at the age of 11 years old. I am a Cáncer survivor who lives with a grateful heart and with a mission to bring God's kingdom to the earth. Happily Married to Marvin Batres who are also excited to become adoptive parents. I'm a Marriage and Family Therapist working with individuals, couples and families. I am also a co- lead pastor  at Espíritu Santo church in the East Side of Minneapolis, MN. I'm a person who believes to be called to listen to others with an incarnational heart and mind to bring healing and freedom.“The Blessings comes after the step of obedience”From El Salvador to MinnesotaTranscripts:Danielle (00:05):Welcome to the Arise Podcast, conversations on faith, race, justice, gender and healing. And I'm so excited for you to meet my friend and colleague, recent graduate, working in the therapeutic field, also a pastor. Um, and you know, we're gonna touch on the fact that this is this stereotypical Latinx heritage month. But, you know, it is really important for us to take up some space and to give voice, uh, give opportunities to talk about what, what mental health means for our community, and really wanna be celebrating this all year round. And that's gonna be intentional as well. But, you know, here we're jumping in with this wonderful woman. So listen in and, uh, looking forward to the conversation. You know, I'm so impressed with like, your work, and I know just bits and pieces from Instagram and a lot from, like, the feeling I had when I was with you mm-hmm. . Yeah. So I'm excited for your journey and hear what you're hearing, what you're up to, and you know where you've come from. So I don't know where you wanna go or how you wanna open up talking about that, butJacqueline (01:26):Basic things. Um, Okay. Um, me number is jacking Bon. Um, and I was born in El Sal la moved to the US specifically directly to Minnesota. Um, when I was 11 years old, um, my parents, you know, my dad came to California during the Civil War, El Salvador, and, you know, he learned his English and like work in restaurants and he has shared with us that he didn't like the fast pace of the us So he went back and then got married with my mom and had my older brother and I. Um, so he has always, um, fought to be in our country. And it is interesting because he kind of lost the opportunity to become a US citizen, because after he left the amnesty in the eighties, um, so all my uncles who stayed are US citizens, and he's kind of like the only one who was not able to become an, I mean, he planned not to come back to the USHe, we, I mean, my dad always, and my mom worked hard to be business owners and just like, you know, do the best they can. Um, but I remember in the, we moved here 2000. In 2000, I just remember my dad saying like, We have too many debt. Um, we have to go to the us. And my mom was, my mom has always traveled. So, um, so my dad, when he moved, when he moved back in the eighties and he went back, he actually, uh, went to school to become a pilot. So he was a taxi, what they call, um, and when he got married with my mom, he was still like finishing his like license and all that. And, um, he's saw his plane to buy us a house. Um, so then he started like, Okay, I have to do business. And so we were, um, lucky enough to have visas since we were little because my dad, um, so we will come like for vacation and see like California and like Maryland and Washington, where we have, uh, family as well.So then my mom was a be a head, I don't know if you ever heard this term before, but my mom will travel every month to bring tamales, , you know, all the, the good stuff that you couldn't find here. And my mom will bring back things that people wanted to, you know, send their relatives, like computers, perfumes, Nikes, FIAs, and all those things that, um, anyways, so my mom was ara like every month. And my dad was at home, you know, like with the business in El Salor, but in 2000, before 2000, he's like, We have to go, we have a lot of debt. And, um, so I was 11. My brother was, he's three years older than me, so he was 14, 15. Um, and yeah, we moved to Minnesota and it's crazy because a year after, so, you know, we have to kind of learn English and all the stuff that, you know, um, a year after I was in school and learning English, I was diagnosed with cancer, um, arrived on my sarcoma.And, um, I don't know, we see, we, we see it now as there was a plan for us to come to Minnesota, You know, just having the Mayo Clinic and having like good medical assistant here. Um, and the type of cancer that I had was so rare, so rare, um, for a girl, my, for a girl my age. And, you know, it was such a blessing. Now we see like, okay, like maybe my parents never wanted to come, but I don't know if I would've been alive if I was an else because of, um, just, just the, what's the word that I'm looking for? Um, how advanced science isn't here mm-hmm. than in our country. Um, but it was, it was such a good place to be at that moment. Um, and here I am years later, um, you know, I feel like I've finished learning English at the hospital.So it's been, it's been a journey. It's been a journey because my mom, so when we moved months later, the earthquake in El Salor occur and we were granted the TPS status, so the temporary permit status. So my dad had that, my older brother and me, um, my mom kept her visa because we still had the house over there and relatives that my mom was taken care of. So while I was being treated with chemotherapy and surgeries and all that, my mom stayed a couple times and had to go back just to keep her visa. And in one of those trips, she was not able to return looking enough for me. Um, I was like finishing my treatment, um, because she was the person with me in the hospital. Like, I don't remember my dad staying with me, but my mom was there with me. Um, and then that's how kind of my family got separated. And I have two younger siblings who were born in the US so they ended up being with my mom because they were younger. And my dad, my older brother and I stayed here. Um, so,Danielle (07:33):So a forced family separation? Uh, almost like in the last, And when's the last time you saw your mom?Jacqueline (07:44):2003.It's been a long time.Danielle (07:50):Yeah. I mean, I feel the pain, even as I say, the year.Jacqueline (07:53):Yeah. It, it's been a long, long time.No, it was just, um, just cancel. And, you know, she was traveling with my younger sister. We actually had to do some like, healing stuff with her because she remembers mom crying. She was like four years old. She was born in the us Um, she's like 10 years younger than me, and she just remembered that, you know, immigration brought her to the office, interrogated her, and she's like, You're not able to return with your family, you have to go back.So my sister, yeah, just remember like crying for crying because my mom was crying but not understanding what was going on. Um, but until this day, she is one of the most, like, she feels the pain of me not being able, cuz I'm now, I'm like the only one who hasn't seen my mom mm-hmm. , because my brother got married and he was, you know, just blessed to receive his papers through the, through her, his wife. And, but like, he has, after 16 years, he was able to see my mom, but I haven't, And my sister is like the one of those that she's like, I'm broken. Every time I go, I celebrate like seeing my parents, but at the same time I'm broken because you're not able to. Um, so yeah. But it's, it's hard.Danielle (09:32):I mean, and what's hard is like, I think, and you know, you're a therapist now too. We work with people and, you know, they have traumas around family or friends or mm-hmm. loss or coworker mm-hmm. , you know, there's the list of traumas and in, in some of these traumas, like, it's like how do you address them? How do you address the injustice? But in this situation, it's systemic trauma mm-hmm. and systemic harm that separated your family and separated you from your loved ones. So in a sense, I just feel that powerlessness of like, Hey, I'm gonna shout at the wind mm-hmm. , and if I make too much noise against the system, it's the same system. I need to accept me mm-hmm. so I can have what I need to see my family. So it's, it's a bind.Jacqueline (10:22):Yeah. And now that I'm a therapist, that I see those cases and hear those stories too. Not, not that I, you know, but I can see the trauma that it causes a childYou know, and how families take, because unfortunately this is so normal in our communities that people don't see it, don't stop to hold the, the pain, the grief that comes with it. Mm-hmm.You know, people just like, you just have to keep going, like keep working and keep like living life. And I'm like, now when I see clients and I feel how this has traumatized them and increase their anxiety level depression and all those things I'm seeing, like, how have I, like not even I stopped to think about mm-hmm. all the things that I was feeling, you know, and that were caused because of thatUm, or to my siblings who were younger or to my parents who had, you know, no, say no, no power to do anything. Um, so yeah. It's, it's crazy just to think about all the things that this can cost. You know, things like this separation in the family.And it is happening as we speak.Danielle (11:53):Right. As we speak, it's still happening and it's, you know, it's ongoing for your family. It's ongoing for parts of my family. And, and like I said, there's the, uh, one of my brother-in-laws is demanded to ask forgiveness from the US government before he can return. And he didn't, he didn't do anything except for like go to work, you know? Mm-hmm. . And, uh, and I know that as people are listening, they were like, that's enough, but you don't understand. Right. The whole background to that. And so even the idea of asking forgiveness to a government mm-hmm.For feeding yourself or feeding your family mm-hmm.Jacqueline (12:35):And for my mom was for taking care of me. Cause I was, you know, Cause they give you a period of time and then she was leaving right before, right before. And even just telling the immigration officer about, I have a daughter who has been diagnosed with cancer, she's in treatment. Um, you know, what, what was she doing? You know, just working, taking care of her family mm-hmm. . Um, but yeah.Danielle (13:09):Yeah. And just the punishment for that. Mm-hmm.I, I, again, like you only share what you want too, but I just, I'm noting that part of your journey is to embark on healing.Not, not just like your body, like healed in your body, like from the cancer, whatever, but like this sense of like, there's hope for healing for this kind of trauma. And I'm just kind of curious like, what, what prompted you to get into counseling or therapy? LikeJacqueline (13:47):You know, everything started when God was bringing me the attention of listening. Well, like, he's like, you have to learn how to listen. And I even wrote my thesis about this, like listening to myself, listening to my body, listening to him, listening to what people are saying. And one of the things that I got from that was, there's like, there's healing and freedom when you're listen. Well, when somebody listens with a heart, with, you know, um, going to school. I've learned that this moment when, when we are with the clients, this is the holy place, the holy moment. Right. We kind of like the Moses on the bush on the burning bush moment of taking my shoes out because I'm taking myself out and, and kind of arriving to your where you are and listening. Right. And I just remember like, just having those moments of like, of quiet and just listening.And I don't know, I just started like listening more. I like to talk, love to talk more than listen, but God was just like giving me that desire to like, learn how to listen and listen well, don't just listen to understand, but listen to not just listen to respond, but listen to understand. And working in, in the campus ministry at Bethel, um, I started just listening to people and people were so attracted to come and me with me instead of the pastors. You know, I was not a pastor at that time, but, you know, I, I was like, okay, I feel like this is my calling to listen to people. How can I, you know, learn that and educate myself more on that. And, um, my, my dad also has been suffering from depression. So when he, he was separated with my mom for four years and a half and he decided to go back and that was like the first time that he was like, he got a, a breakdown like mental health and like, just being like moving, you know, like being here for so long and then moving back.Um, and just all the family, like he had, he knew that he, when he left, he was not able to return. Right. You know, and having a business and then starting over over there. It was just so many things. So my dad was diagnosed with depression and anxiety and went through like heart moments and just for us was just like a matter of understanding. Right. We knew, we grew up listening to his stories about how he grew up and everything that he went through, he always been open about it. Mm-hmm. , you know, the hard things, the good things. Um, but part of that was also like understanding like, I need to understand more what this means. And working with the pastors and working with college students helped me like, okay, maybe this is something that I wanna do. And that's how I like got into it.And when I'm learning about the basic skills, I'm like, the Holy Spirit already told me this stuff, you know, how to listen well, how to like in be in tune with people's emotions and like, um, so for me was just like a confirmation of, okay, this is what I'm supposed to be doing. Once I started learning and seeing the systemic, you know, as a marriage and family therapy, you see the system, you see mm-hmm. how it's not just about the client, but it's about how the parents, you know, we're parenting this child and how it has affected and it still affects us as an adult. Like mm-hmm. , everything. You know. So that's how I, and I, I feel like my husband can tell you, I felt like this program was for me first. Yeah. I always took it as I was like, in this, in therapy, like I did, took therapy cuz they told us like, go to therapy because this is going to trigger some of the things like from family of, and, and I just remember like some of the classes I was like driving home balling and crying and crying and my, my husband's like, What happened?What did they did to you? What, what? And I'm like, Just gimme a moment. Just gimme a moment. And so I feel like all those three years were just like, first for me, you know? And also receiving therapy and like, talking about my family of origin and things that have been going on. Um, it was really helpful. And then couples therapy and, you know, it's, but it's, it's been a good journey to, to do, I've done a lot of healing. Of course I'm not done because, you know, the stronger parts of me are like, okay, this part is ready, let's move to this next one. And I think, I think that's how God works. He's not, you know, the Bible says like he's gonna finish the work until he comes back. So we're this working progress. Um, it's not gonna be all at once. Um, because he's putting, he's making those parts of us stronger for those parts that are still mm-hmm. , um, bleeding that we don't know of Right. In our soul or memories or things that we don't even know that are hurting us, but they areDanielle (19:24):So I mean, that's really beautiful and I can definitely relate to going to therapy during grad school and uh, or like, and coming home and telling Louise, we're doing this all wrong. Like all of it is wrong or we're not okay. And just be like, Can you just, can you just take a deep breath because we can't, we can't accomplish all of this in one moment. Right. Yeah. But I think, I love that picture that you talked about, like, I've been doing a little research on s and like the method of healing in la Latin America, specifically in Mexico, and just this idea that there's this alignment between your heart and your mind and your soul. Mm-hmm. , like you're, and when you're in alignment, that's a place where you're listening from mm-hmm. and I You didn't say that, but that's what I heard mm-hmm. , that, that alignment is, it's already in you that desire to be aligned, that alignment and that those people when you were a campus pastor recognize that mm-hmm. and we're like gravitating towards, towards you in that space. Mm-hmm. .Jacqueline (20:35):Yeah. Yeah. It, it is just, but it, but it takes moments of listening to yourself mm-hmm. listening to it. The whole thing of listening has been an ongoing theme in the last five years for me. Like list learning how to listen to myself, my limits as a human being of resting, of why do I get mad for certain things so quickly? Why do I get irritated? Why, you know, those listening to my emotions, listening to my body, um, and then listening to God and listening to other people. Mm-hmm. , um, you know,Danielle (21:15):What, what do you tell someone that comes, and I know sometimes therapy can be stigmatized in communities of color. Like what do you say to people that come and be like, I don't need therapy, I'm gonna be fine. Or like, that's crazy. Like, you're making things worse. Like, what do you say to kind of like some of those initial defenses towards therapy?Jacqueline (21:39):I mean, I that's such a good question. I could just take it back to, I've always say it's not because people think, right? People think that you have to go to therapy because you're crazy. You're having Right. You're hearing words that are not, you're hearing people say something, you're seeing things and you know, and I I I just tell them, you know, sometimes we just need somebody who's not from our family to listen to us. And while we're talking, we're processingAnd we can hear ourselves without being judged because people are just listening carefully to us. You know, that, that's such a, everybody needs somebody to, to listen to them. Mm-hmm. , we, we desired that. We desire to be known to be understood mm-hmm. in therapy. That's kind of like the basic things right. That we learn. It's just somebody listening to, with nonjudgmentalUnderstanding your perspective. That's kind of like the goal. So I feel like this is just, if your husband's not listening to you, if your wife is not listening to you, if you don't have friends who can listen to you, if your parents aren't listening to you, like just go to therapy. You don't have to be crazy to, you know, or be diagnosed with something, butI think we all have that desire to be heard and understoodUm, that, that will be my simple thing that I'll say.Danielle (23:07):And I hear, you talked a lot about how your faith really aligns with, you know, being a therapist and how do you, how does that come into play when you're with clients?Jacqueline (23:21):It reminds me to the book of Esther, who, I don't know if you read the book of Esther, but the book of Esther doesn't mention God at all, but he's present.And as a person who believes that the Holy Spirit is in me and he works through me, sometimes even I'm not even knowing that he's working through me. Sometimes I can sense, you know, but mm-hmm. , I, I don't necessarily, like at the, at the clinic where I'm at right now, I don't necessarily work with as a Christian therapist. Mm-hmm. , um, people, some people, not my clients, but my supervisors and some coworkers know that I am a pastor too. Um, but I, I know, and one of my professors actually told me this, like, you can, you can work with God, you can work with the Holy Spirit. Nobody has to knowHe just, he will just prompt you those questions about, talk about the grandparents, and all of a sudden this big thing comes from the family origin mm-hmm. that the client's side is just click in my head and you know, that who prompt you that question or, you know mm-hmm. . So that's kind of like how I see it. Um, and always thinking about the best, the best, um, what's the word I'm looking for? Um, like the best outcome for them, right? The, the healing, the, the connecting the dots that they didn't know. Um, so just thinking about that, not necessarily like, but like, just thinking how the best outcome for the client. Does that makes sense?Danielle (25:10):Yeah. I think what I hear is you're loving people really well.Like, you're giving a piece of yourself and in a nonjudgmental way. And it's more like an invitation. What I hear in, in like, in like, kind of like my, like learning therapeutically. Like you're inviting them to their own story so they can listen to themselves and, and,Jacqueline (25:34):And they can find their own answers.Yeah. They can, They, I think that's, I think I read that. I don't even know where like, the good therapist will help you, will help you, you find your own answers. It's not that I have the answers, but you will, something will click in your mind, you will know, Oh, this is connected with how my dad raised me. You know, things like that. And find they have the answer. They just, we're just getting all the things out of them.Danielle (26:08):A lot of what I hear too, and like, you can tell me if this is true or not. Like I hear like a lot of hospitalityLot of welcome. Which feels very cultural. Right.Jacqueline (26:19):I was just gonna say that is just like the Latino way, like the Salvador way. Like it's, it's, and I remember even in one of our professors saying like, we have to be hospitable even in our, in a way of thinking and how we receive ideas and how we receive views of people.You know, but it is, it is a hospital way of like,Danielle (26:44):Again? Can you say that again? That was good. Like, we have to be, how did you say it?Jacqueline (26:48):We have to be hospitable in the way we think and the, how we receive the views of others and the perspectives, you know, because hospitable, you always think about, Oh, I'm welcoming you, um, you know, to the cafe. Like, here's this chair. Like, are you comfortable? Are you feeling good in this space? But in therapy, it's about the ideas and the views of people and what they bring, right?And receiving that as, Oh yeah, I receive that. I, I receive it as, you knowEven if it's different.Danielle (27:28):Yeah. I get that feeling even right now in this moment. Like, there's so much invitation to be curious mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm. . That's really beautiful.Jacqueline (27:38):Yeah. Just, just learning.Danielle (27:41):So if someone like, wants to get ahold of you or find you as a therapist, as a pastor, like how do they do that?Jacqueline (27:53):Well, um, they can go to a great lake Psychological services. That's where I work. Um, if they're looking for a therapist, um, and as a pastor, they can just go to our Instagram speaking to Santo Minneapolis and that's it. Or look me up, Mrs. I like, I like my two last names. That's such a Latino thing. People try to like, oh, I don't like, I like my two names and my two last names, you know? And now when I graduated, I went back to using my full name because it was a thing like, when you come to the US first, you don't know the language. And I discovered like, why did I change my name from Jacqueline to Jackie? Mm. It was because teachers will tell me, you know, when I started going to school, sixth grade, Can we call you Jackie? And I didn't know how to respond. I'm like, Okay. You know, I didn't know how, I didn't know English, so I didn't know how like no, my name is Jacqueline, not Jacqueline, not Jackie, Jacqueline. You know, So when I graduated and I started working, I'm like, I'm gonna go back to my given name, Jacqueline. You know? So now I'm trying my best to say that because a lot of people in our community already know me as Jackie, but at work is Jacqueline.Danielle (29:11):Yeah. . Yeah. I lo I love, I love that you're reclaiming your name and then so much meaning and purpose.And that's so much of what you're inviting your clients to, right? Yeah.Yeah. Thank you for being with me today.Jacqueline (29:33):Yeah, no, thank you for inviting me to your spaceDanielle (29:36):Too. Yeah. We need to do this again. Yeah. .  

Nerd Alert: Marvel Edition
Latinx Heritage Month 2022

Nerd Alert: Marvel Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 65:34


Join Latina co-hosts Bridgette and Genn for a special edition of Nerd Alert Niñas in honor of Latinx Heritage Month! We break down some Latinx characters in the MCU (including the Netflix shows and Agents of SHIELD's Slingshot miniseries). Bridgette also discusses how Frederick Luis Aldama's book Latinx Superheroes in Mainstream Comics takes a scholarly look at Latinx representation, from the good to the bad to the stereotypes. Unfortunately, the MCU is lacking Latinx characters, so we urge them to do and be better, and for you, our dear listeners, to educate yourselves. Salud! Listen to our podcast episode from last year in celebration of Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month: https://spotifyanchor-web.app.link/e/ZuQndflF1tb We encourage you to support indie bookstores if you're interested in buying Latinx Superheroes in Mainstream Comics by Frederick Luis Aldama or any comics featuring the characters we talked about in today's episode. Watch Marvel's miniseries Slingshot featuring Yo-Yo Rodriguez here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xgQUoVfiL8&list=PLDe0CguuqcMBVtZJk0iCNoSblixvAt4BY Visit us on our website: nerdalertgirls.tumblr.com! Or you can contact us directly at nerdalertgirlspodcast@gmail.com.

Morenita
46. Boricua K. Howard in the House! w/ Didi Romero

Morenita

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 39:52


You don't need to count to Six to know who we're talking to this week. To close off Latinx Heritage Month, we're sitting down with Puerto Rican star on the rise Didi Romero. We talk about her experience touring with Six: The Musical, missing her family back on the island, and so much more. Right now the only thing you better wanna do is to tune in! Te invito. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

American Conservative University
Dennis Prager. Libertarian Destructive Voting, Female Players Banned, Dennis' New Book- Deuteronomy (Don't roll your eyes, it's awesome)

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 65:49


Dennis Prager. Libertarian Destructive Voting, Female Players Banned, Dennis' New Book- Deuteronomy (Don't roll your eyes, it's awesome) Dennis Prager Podcasts Libertarians  Oct 04 2022   A vote for the libertarian candidate is a vote for the Left. You might think you're being “principled,” but you're actually being destructive… A high school in Vermont bans its female players from their own locker room. But the naked transgender student is free to use it… Starbucks announces that it's celebrating Latinx Heritage Month. Are there any Latinos who use this term?... Canada has finally dropped its vaccine and mask mandates… Planned Parenthood pushes puberty blockers. Dennis plays his PragerU video this week. Deuteronomy: Why It's Hard to Love God and comments. Deuteronomy is very rich in wisdom. Thanks for listening to the Daily Dennis Prager Podcast. To hear the entire three hours of my radio show as a podcast, commercial-free every single day, become a member of Pragertopia. You'll also get access to 15 years' worth of archives, as well as daily show prep. Subscribe today at Pragertopia dot com. --------------------------------------------------------------------  Visit Pragertopia  https://pragertopia.com/member/signup.php  The first month is 99 cents. After the first month the cost is $7.50 per month. If you can afford to pay for only one podcast, this is the one we recommend. It is the best conservative radio show out there, period. ACU strongly recommends ALL ACU students and alumni subscribe to Pragertopia. Do it today!  You can listen to Dennis from 9 a.m. to Noon (Pacific) Monday thru Friday, live on the Internet  http://www.dennisprager.com/pages/listen  ------------------------------------------------------------------------ For a great archive of Prager University videos visit- https://www.youtube.com/user/PragerUniversity/featured   Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2eB2p0h Get PragerU bonus content for free! https://www.prageru.com/bonus-content Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/2aozfkP JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2aoz2y9 -------------------------------------------------------------------- The Rational Bible: Exodus by Dennis Prager   NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Dennis Prager has put together one of the most stunning commentaries in modern times on the most profound document in human history. It's a must-read that every person, religious and non-religious, should buy and peruse every night before bed. It'll make you think harder, pray more ardently, and understand your civilization better." — Ben Shapiro, host of "The Ben Shapiro Show" "Dennis Prager's commentary on Exodus will rank among the greatest modern Torah commentaries. That is how important I think it is. And I am clearly not alone... It might well be on its way to becoming the most widely read Torah commentary of our time—and by non-Jews as well as by Jews." — Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, bestselling author of Jewish Literacy Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Exodus, the second book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today's issues, but completely consistent with rational thought. Do you think the Bible permitted the trans-Atlantic slave trade? You won't after reading this book. Do you struggle to love your parents? If you do, you need this book. Do you doubt the existence of God because belief in God is “irrational?” This book will give you reason after reason to rethink your doubts. The title of this commentary is, “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. As Prager says, “If something I write does not make rational sense, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible to people of every faith, and no faith. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world and to your life. His goal: to change your mind – and then change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Exodus-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621577724   The Rational Bible: Genesis by Dennis Prager  USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller Wall Street Journal bestseller Many people today think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is not only outdated but irrelevant, irrational, and even immoral. This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, demonstrates clearly and powerfully that the opposite is true. The Bible remains profoundly relevant—both to the great issues of our day and to each individual life. It is the greatest moral guide and source of wisdom ever written. Do you doubt the existence of God because you think believing in God is irrational? This book will give you many reasons to rethink your doubts. Do you think faith and science are in conflict? You won't after reading this commentary on Genesis. Do you come from a dysfunctional family? It may comfort you to know that every family discussed in Genesis was highly dysfunctional! The title of this commentary is “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. In Dennis Prager's words, “If something I write is not rational, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible—whose Hebrew grammar and vocabulary he has mastered—to people of every faith and no faith at all. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world in general and to you personally. His goal: to change your mind—and, as a result, to change your life.   The Rational Bible: Deuteronomy: God, Blessings, and Curses by Dennis Prager Is the Bible, the most influential book in world history, still relevant? Why do people dismiss it as being irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Deuteronomy, the fifth book of the Bible, will demonstrate how it remains profoundly relevant - both to the great issues of our day and to each individual life. Do you doubt the existence of God because you think believing in God is irrational? This book will cause you to reexamine your doubts. The title of this commentary is The Rational Bible because its approach is entirely reason-based. The listener is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. In Dennis Prager's words, “If something I write is not rational, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Prager's forty years of teaching to people of every faith and no faith at all. In virtually every section, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world in general and to you on a personal level. His goal: to change your mind - and, as a result, to change your life.

Dennis Prager podcasts
Libertarians

Dennis Prager podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 72:47


A vote for the libertarian candidate is a vote for the Left. You might think you're being “principled,” but you're actually being destructive… Dennis talks to Elaine Parker, Chief Communications Officer for Jobs Creators Network.  A high school in Vermont bans its female players from their own locker room. But the naked transgender student is free to use it…  Starbucks announces that it's celebrating Latinx Heritage Month. Are there any Latinos who use this term?... Canada has finally dropped its vaccine and mask mandates… Planned Parenthood pushes puberty blockers.  Dennis plays his PragerU video this week. Deuteronomy: Why It's Hard to Love God and comments. Deuteronomy is very rich in wisdom. Thanks for listening to the Daily Dennis Prager Podcast. To hear the entire three hours of my radio show as a podcast, commercial-free every single day, become a member of Pragertopia. You'll also get access to 15 years' worth of archives, as well as daily show prep. Subscribe today at Pragertopia dot com.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Draws in Spanish |  Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers
02: Argentinean Illustrator & Cartoonist Eugenia Viti

Draws in Spanish | Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 53:29


In this episode, I chat with Argentinean illustrator, writer, and comic artist Eugenia Viti. Eugenia lives in Chicago with her husband and toddler, while working as an artist and a part-time HR rep. She's been published in The New Yorker and is the author of Be Pregnant: An Illustrated Companion for Moms-to-Be. I'm so excited for this conversation, so keep on listening to hear us talk about growing up with hard-to-pronounce Latina names, her complex family immigration story, and how she broke into the New Yorker comics scene.EPISODE LINKS- Watch this Episode on Youtube- Support [Draws in Spanish] on Patreon- Host: Follow Fabiola on Instagram, YouTube, TikTok- Guest: Follow Eugenia Viti on Instagram - View Episode Transcript & Extended NotesEPISODE NOTESIf you dread explaining how to pronounce your name to people, you're going to feel right at home with this episode!In this episode, I chat with Argentinean Illustrator and Cartoonist Eugenia Lazo. Off the bat, Eugenia and I bond over having tough-to-pronounce English names that are actually really normal and common in Spanish-speaking countries. To those with easily English-ified names, it may seem like a petty conversation, but your name really impacts your everyday identity and how you see yourself in the world.Aside from discussing our “weird” names, we also chat about how she took her love for cartoons into a full-fledged creative career once she realized that her illustrations could be strengthened if she paired them with her writing. With a push from her creative friends, she was able to eventually get published in The New Yorker, one of the most prestigious publications for cartooning.Nowadays, Eugenia has a part-time role in HR and regularly contributes to The New Yorker. Her work is witty, quirky, and a little out there but so fun and vulnerable.Tune into this episode to hear Eugenia and I talk about growing up with hard-to-pronounce Latina names, her complex family immigration story, and how she broke into the New Yorker comics scene despite feeling unprepared.Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, or on your favorite podcast platform.

#SmallBites
At The Intersection of Columbus Day and Hispanic Heritage Month

#SmallBites

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 6:03


Listening to a wonderful teacher read the legend of La Llorona to her class on Mexican Independence Day eve, I began to ponder the intersection of Columbus Day and Latinx Heritage Month. There is irony in the fact that we celebrate an explorer who opened the floodgates of Spanish colonization, which essentially meant the downfall of the original inhabitants of the Americas and the Caribbean, the descendents of whom we celebrate this month. Armed with that truth, it is fitting that we highlight the societies that were growing and thriving before European contact, especially on holidays when we may not have grown up with the diverse stories that paint a well-rounded picture of historical happenings. Here's your homework: Who had dinner with the Pilgrims and what are 5 facts about their way of life? Who discovered Columbus shipwrecked on their island? Martin Luther King Jr. was a civil rights hero, but what were life and death for him like once he started speaking out? As we near what I now prefer to call Indigenous Peoples Day, let's get more of the story out there. Telling all the stories is a great way to center narratives that have not traditionally been centered. You've got a week to prepare and here are resources. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/meet-survivors-taino-tribe-paper-genocide https://www.teachingforchange.org/teaching-about-tainos-columbus-indigenous And for good measure, the legend of La Llorona Let me know how it goes! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hedreich/message

Time for bRUNch!
65-min Disney Coco v Encanto Find your magic Run workout: Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month

Time for bRUNch!

Play Episode Play 15 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 67:53


Hello, friends,Join us as we explore our love for Disney's Coco and Encanto, unlock the magic within, and celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month. Also, for today's workout, we want you to play along and choose your Disney Team Coco or Team Encanto with our version of This or That. You should have received it in your newsletter, but if you didn't Sign up here or email us at info@timeforbrunch.com Tag us on social media at @timeforbrunchpodcast with #tfbRUNch by October 8th to be entered to win a special Joffrey's Encanto ground coffee bag and TFB prize pack. Whether you are training for RunDisney 2022-2023 season, working towards another long run distance race, or simply want to get out for a walk or a run the upbeat workout will keep you moving and maybe humming along to “We don't talk about Bruno.”Today's workout will be structured -  2 min Dynamic stretches5 min walking warm-up15 min Endurance Pace1 min walk 20 min Endurance Pace1 min Push15 min Endurance Pace2 min Push5  min walking cool-down and Coffee with the Coaches! Or Cafe con las Entrenadoras. Thank you Maya for the awesome question! Coach Shelby's book recommendation, How to Lose a Marathon by Joel Cohen is here. Coach Christine's book recommendation,  The Nonrunner's Marathon Guide for Women by Dawn Dais is here. And, friends, if you missed the book that inspired Maya, it is called The Running Dream and you can find it here. Wanna learn more about our Disney themed homage to Hispanic Heritage Month? Read the blog here >>Listen to our playlist here >>  Do you have a question you would like featured or answered?Submit it here >>We want to hear from you! Have questions or feedback? Drop us a line at info@timeforbrunch.comPlease consult a physician before starting any new exercise routine.Thanks for listening! 

Hightailing Through History
Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month; Hispanic Dances and the Women Who Championed Them

Hightailing Through History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 56:49


Today's episode is a celebration of culture for Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month which runs from September 15th through October 15th.  KT starts with the history of this designated month: why not just one calendar month instead of split months?  Why is Latin or Latinx often included in the title? Is this celebrated in other countries besides the U.S.?  Once we cover the history and importance of recognizing Latinx communities, Laurel then highlights the cultural storytelling of dance with three stories of different hispanic dances and the women who championed them, bringing their art form to the world stage *~*~*~*~ Mentioned in the Stories: GoodGoodGood Article "23 Activities to Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month (2022)" Example of flamenco dance Ballet Folklorico de Mexico de Amalia Hernandez Ballet Hispanico *~*~*~* The Socials! Instagram - @HightailingHistory TikTok- @HightailingHistoryPod Facebook -Hightailing Through History or @HightailingHistory Twitter - @HightailingPod *~*~*~* Source Materials: Heritage Month-- www.hispanichertiagemonth.gov/about https://www.history.com/news/hispanic-latino-latinx-chicano-background https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Hispanic_Heritage_Month_(United_States) https://www.census.gov/newsroom/stories/hispanic-heritage-month.html#:~:text=%E2%80%9CAbout%20National%20Hispanic%20Heritage%20Month,and%20Central%20and%20South%20America. Hispanic Dance-- https://www.britannica.com/biography/La-Argentina https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/complicated-history-flamenco-spain-180973398/ https://www.balletfolkloricodemexico.com.mx/somos-ballet-de-amalia-hernandez/ https://www.dancemagazine.com/hispanic-dances/ https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/09/arts/dance/tina-ramirez-dead.html *~*~*~* Intro/outro music: "Loopster" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/laurel-rockall/message

Hightailing Through History
Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month; Hispanic Dances and the Women Who Championed Them

Hightailing Through History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 56:49


Today's episode is a celebration of culture for Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month which runs from September 15th through October 15th.  KT starts with the history of this designated month: why not just one calendar month instead of split months?  Why is Latin or Latinx often included in the title? Is this celebrated in other countries besides the U.S.?  Once we cover the history and importance of recognizing Latinx communities, Laurel then highlights the cultural storytelling of dance with three stories of different hispanic dances and the women who championed them, bringing their art form to the world stage *~*~*~*~ Mentioned in the Stories: GoodGoodGood Article "23 Activities to Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month (2022)" Example of flamenco dance Ballet Folklorico de Mexico de Amalia Hernandez Ballet Hispanico *~*~*~* The Socials! Instagram - @HightailingHistory TikTok- @HightailingHistoryPod Facebook -Hightailing Through History or @HightailingHistory Twitter - @HightailingPod *~*~*~* Source Materials: Heritage Month-- www.hispanichertiagemonth.gov/about https://www.history.com/news/hispanic-latino-latinx-chicano-background https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Hispanic_Heritage_Month_(United_States) https://www.census.gov/newsroom/stories/hispanic-heritage-month.html#:~:text=%E2%80%9CAbout%20National%20Hispanic%20Heritage%20Month,and%20Central%20and%20South%20America. Hispanic Dance-- https://www.britannica.com/biography/La-Argentina https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/complicated-history-flamenco-spain-180973398/ https://www.balletfolkloricodemexico.com.mx/somos-ballet-de-amalia-hernandez/ https://www.dancemagazine.com/hispanic-dances/ https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/09/arts/dance/tina-ramirez-dead.html *~*~*~* Intro/outro music: "Loopster" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/laurel-rockall/message

The Arise Podcast
Season 4 Episode 1 Dr. Eliza Cortes Bast - Belonging and Latinx Heritage Month 2022

The Arise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 37:42


Dr. Eliza Cortes Bast is a fierce and honest follower of Jesus. She is a pastor and denominational executive, dedicated to helping churches think missionally. She lives into her passion by connecting people, advocating for the community, and helping organizations think strategically so they can be healthy, vibrant, and sustainable. Eliza lives in Michigan with her patient and handsome husband EJ, and their two boys. Her loves include her home country Puerto Rico, her interracial marriage, a good steak, salsa dancing, writing, empowering emerging leaders, making the impossible possible, Diet Coke, and mentoring. She is not a big fan of anger without action, generalizations, basketball, and saying you can't live without coffee. She believes you can because she believes in you.Featured here on RED TENT LIVINGAboutAboutMy greatest joy is helping people & teams lean into what is possible, and develop the processes, metrics, and structure to help get them there! Helping develop the natural talent of teams and optimize outcomes & opportunities to reach strategic goals is my sweet spot. I love interacting with clients and teams, bringing energy and enthusiasm, as well as accountability and quality management, to every setting I serve. I love training and facilitation, creating both consensus and curiosity around your table. I am skilled in intercultural competency, and have worked with diverse teams in multiple contexts to create cohesion and movement. I have built a career and identity that revolves around nurturing organizational vibrancy. Working with rural and urban agencies, I have provided dedicated guidance in curriculum writing, program and process design, and talent development and management. I have served a variety of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations around the country, including academic and religious institutions and parachurch organizations. From the podium to the pulpit, I have enjoyed engaging audiences with stories of impact, leadership development, and my years of nonprofit and ministry experience. I have authored blogs and articles, and have spoken at national and local conferences and workshops around Latina identity, empowering leadership, emerging young leadership, and more. My passions include creating communities of purpose and excellence - where together, people are appropriately empowered in their strengths. I excel at helping teams identify strengths and performance gaps, identifying key issues and strategies quickly, and helping teams discover how to resolve problems and innovate for the future. I am also an adjunct professor, teaching at the intersection of non-profit work, leadership, talent management, and ministry. Gallup Certified Strengths CoachStrengths: Strategic, Maximizer, Command, Activator, and Responsibility.Enneagram: 8w9DiSC: Di (The Seeker: action, results, enthusiasm)MBTI (Myers Briggs): ENTJ Transcript of Podcast:Dr. Bast: I would just wonder, Danielle, and I know you and I talked about this a little bit before, I think there's a part where, um, I think just kind of baked into the American expression of Latin culture is the sense of just like, um, indebtedness, um, and deep gratitude. And so there's always the inclination of just, um, of just that, the weight of that in some ways. Like the container of that, you know, that you're a guest, that you're always a guest in someone else's space. And so I think there's a, there's inside of that, or ingrained inside of that is a, is a sense of just, well, I'm so grateful for what I have that I don't wanna disrupt it for somebody else, or I don't wanna, I don't wanna disrupt the host, you know? And so I still wrestle with that because I think, I think there's a part of it that the older I get the truer that feels   Danielle: Hmm. Which part that you don't wanna disrupt or that you're a guest or  Yeah. That, um, the idea that, you know, what does it look like to not be a guest anymore? That sense of like, yeah. It's like we are guests and, and, and what does ownership, real ownership and agency look like?  Yeah. As you were talking about it, I was thinking about like how like a broader generalization of culture for us, I think is this idea of hospitality. Mm-hmm. and that we're already always welcoming, which, you know, I think probably goes back centuries.   Yep.   Dr. Bast: Centuries. So in that welcoming process, because other cultures may have a different intention, we often welcome to the point where we don't exist anymore, or we're moved out of our own space.   Yeah. Well, and I would say too, you know, I mean that's the part, that's the part where we are distinctly like the east meeting the west, you know, as there's a sense of that we really bring that eastern, um, framing with us forward is that, you know, when we migrated out, we never lost that sense of hospitality and what the indebtedness around the, the hospitality means for us as a community, what I offer others Yeah. And what I expect others to offer me. And so I think there's, uh, you know, but again, that's hard. What do you do when you feel like a perpetual guest?  And I don't like it that you said it like that, cuz it feels true and it feels really annoying. . Yeah. And, and again, you know, we talked about this a little bit before we got rolling, but talk to me about like, why you decided to make the Instagram post with the picture of your legs on the airplane.  Well, the it's for, for my two previous professional roles, I've, I've just spent a lot of time in airplanes and I've spent a lot of time, um, traveling. And there's, there's a part as I wrestled in my own issues about like, body and how much space, you know, I take up or how much space I embody. I just realized that there's probably no place that, that feels more true than being on an airplane. Like, there's this part of just, if I'm, if I'm a good citizen, if I'm sitting next to somebody, I'm making sure I'm only taking my space. You know, and I'm, I'm wrestling out with elbows and the arms and things like that. You know, I just wanna make sure that I'm doing right by the person next to me by, by keeping and holding my own space and not encouraging on theirs.  And then there's just been this interesting shift that I recognize that, um, I tend this experience that more with women, Like when we sit on the plane, we all kind of find ways to instinctively shrink. Or I will even hear women apologize, you know, like, Oh, I'm so sorry. You know, And, and so it's been this sense of like, okay, well, well that's maybe just, maybe it's embodied and gender, you know, that's just a sense of like, let me keep and hold my own space. However, um, it's been interesting for me to watch, um, from an anthropological sense of just some of the, the men that I've encountered sitting, and they're not bound in the same way, or not maybe mindful in the same way, where they feel like they don't have to, um, shrink and be small and to fit in their own space.  But the sense of like, well, I have to spread out and I need to spread out. You know, I need to, And I just, and I laugh in that because, and identifying their own physical need, um, they've been able to justify like, the ability to take my seat and their seat, you know, like . So trying to figure that out, like, ok, well this feels odd. And then in the middle of that saying, Well, what about, you know, I don't wanna show up in the same space. Cause I feel like that's inhospitable. You know, I would never think to take my seat and someone else's seat, you know, as a means of, because I have a need. And I, I feel that my need is unmet, but the sense of feeling like I can't push back either because well, he needs it, the person next to me needs it. And so I have to be smaller. And I'm like, that's so disgusting, . Mm-hmm. There's something that, that's apparently gross.  Danielle: And that also feels like a, that too feels like an easier entry point to talk about, like airplane spacing, then to talk about how that like actively happens as, as a Latina, as a Afro-Latina, as a Puerto Rican woman in spaces of leadership.  Dr. Bast: Yes. Yes. And I would say, and so really walking into that is this is this sense of, um, you know, how do I, how do I feel the space but not be too much? How do I like enter in and be full of myself, but not to defend, you know, all these things where there's like the caveat that cuts underneath it that says that, you know, it's that internal checklist that I feel a lot of us experience, um, because we wanna be invited back. And again, that's the difference between like a guest and a house member, right? Is that a guest is always mindful that the door can always be closed. You know, there's an entry point and exit point. There's a, a clock time in and a clock time out. Um, but ownership of the house means that I belong, you know, the house is mine. And so, um, access to the things will, you know, I have equal access to things with other people.  Danielle: Yeah. So we think about it like perpetual guests then where, like, where do you find rest? Like you specifically?  Dr. Bast: That is a really good question. You know, and I know this is gonna sound weird, but I think that one of the places that I probably find the most rest is on a stage when I'm speaking. And I think because at that point, like the, um, you know, the horses out of the gate, that point, I can, I'm wildly unpredictable to people, you know, But I, I would say I feel the most unfettered. You know, I can move, I can walk, I can, you know, I'm, I'm expressing what's on my mind in the way that makes sense to me, but also translates to other people. And I can, I can take and own and own that space, and there's a part where I think I could, I'm able to sink into who I really am, um, and be able to give a piece of that and to receive a piece of that back from people who are, who are on the stage. I would say that that feels almost like my most authentic space. And in that, because I can, I can fully be myself. I feel like I can best rest there.  Danielle: So when you think about like a broader sense of maybe even family or culture, do you have spaces where you find rest there as well? Or where you belong?  Dr. Bast: Yeah, I would say, uh, you know what, what feels probably the most true for me is, is that my family really provides that for me.  I'm really grateful that the family has given me the most space to be able to do that and to do that completely.  Danielle: now I'm just, I'm thinking about how you talk about the caveats and how, you know, you use the word wild to describe when you're in your, you're in your space or, or belonging. And, you know, wild has so many meanings in our culture. And, and I have one like interpretation of what that might mean. Like from our culture, I'm imagining alive by vivacious, um, able to laugh, able to cry, able to communicate. And yet I know, I also know that there's this other dominant lens that views that wild as also threatening.  Dr. Bast: Yep. I, um, I was sharing also this weekend, you know, that there's a part where I have, um, you know, when I, when I felt like the least my authentic self when I felt like I was, I was, I mean, I'm honestly just living outside of my intended design, you know, and I say that, you know, from a perspective of faith, but I was living outside of the design and I feel like God had designed me. And um, and I remember just praying and just saying like, what is wrong with me? And just feeling like the word domesticated. Like I felt that in my soul and, and that word I'm sure feels so dainty for some people and feels like so proper and appropriate, appropriate for some people. And for me, I felt sick to my stomach. I could feel it in the pit of my stomach, like, oh my gosh.  Like there was a part of me that I had, um, you know, and very similarly I saw it as like running hard and running fast and by, you know, being vivacious and, and you know, running, running with everything inside of me at full speed towards what I wanted. And then at the same time having space and play and, and being with others. And I had like diminished myself into the small tiny pocket of being, um, because all of that had had disrupted and disturbed the system so hard mm-hmm. . And so I remember just feeling that so clearly, like the word domesticated and just feeling like, just crushed because I had allowed people to do that. To me, that was a choice. Mm-hmm. , um, that I had allowed in my own life. And, and just kind of the, that internal vow to never let that happen again.  Yeah. I think of, you know, when I think of perpetual guests and domesticated, I mean, it has like literal meaning for the way, you know, I'm thinking of Latinas are viewed like house like majority housekeepers or cleaning your hotel or like the, the stereotypical roles like down to, I think of events I've gone to at local schools where it's like all the Mexican families, at least in my community are here. Everybody else is over here. And then there's a few black folks over here. So  Yeah. And, and that's so heartbreaking.  Yeah. It's heartbreaking to me. That's heartbreaking. But there's a part where it's like, I think people need, you know, especially going into those spaces and even going into some places where it's dominant culture spaces, like even just the idea being able to show fully as yourself, you know, is I wanna gingerly walk in with my tribe, you know, my squad because it's been so painful to do that on your own or, um, Yeah. The temptation, that code switch is so bad. Or even the sense of, of I've been punished when I've done that before  Danielle: Yeah. So when you cl like there's the bind, right? If you're the guest and you're the domesticated guest, you can fit in. Even at that point though, I think what I hear you saying is the door could slam at any moment and you could be shut out. But if you don't become the domesticated vet guest and you show up as you are, then you're also othered or walled off from access.  Yep. It's really the lose lose of that  Man that is sad.  Dr. Bast: Well, so here it is, it's sad if you don't own the house. Like this is the hard part is that it's, it's the sense of like, it's, you know, and again, I would hope that people coming into my house would understand the house rules. That there's, there are, uh, because of my responsibility to ownership, there are things that I set the ground rules for that not only keep my house in order, but keep, you know, keep it a safe place for other guests. The challenge becomes is, is really who owns the social house, You know, because there's a part where there's a lot of space that can be made. You know, there are behaviors that are allowed in my house because of who we are and how we do life, um, and what our tolerance is for disruption. Um, what our tolerance is for people to show by is their full selves, because we want people to, to feel that way when they come in our house.  And that's the beauty of ownership. When people are robbed of the opportunity, ability for ownership, and you are forever at the indebtedness of the house owner, you are forever at the mercy of the person who sets the, who sets the guest rules. And I think that is the true challenge is that because then there's this, um, this very definitive sense of like a right way to host and wrong way to host. Like, if a house is appropriate, it looks like this, and then the house owner gets to decide. And so what happens when you go into that space and you're like, Well, this isn't, this isn't correct. Like, this is not how my people would show up at a house, but, and then, but the house owner gets to say the house owner is Right. And so it's a very, it's a very tricky space. And, and for me, as I think about the future of what I would see Latinos and Latinas and, and for anybody who sits in a marginalized space, is that there would be more space for them to be house owners instead of just  Danielle: Yeah. And I think there's a sense of, in that space of having your house, then it's, there's a more, um, I don't wanna say pure, but a more authentic way to offer hospitality where there's not the demand or it's not the hospitality isn't a down payment.  Dr. Bast: Exactly. Well then it's transactional. Right? It's right.  Danielle: Right. Where it feels like that sense of hospitality we offer, I'm not saying it's always transactional, but, uh, I even think of like, when we've had certain people over to our house, the, the coaching of the children, , you're gonna need to say, hi, you're gonna need to do this. You need to, you know, X, y, z versus, you know, when we have other friends over, there's still some coaching, Right. Because there's etiquette and, and you know, uh, things we wanna do as ge as hosts, but there's also the freedom to be themselves.  Dr. Bast: Yep. Yep. And that's, I think that is critical because I think for some people the, the pushback is like, well, there's no etiquette and you can't confuse hospitality and etiquette for the same thing. You can't confuse being a guest with etiquette for the same thing. Um, cause it's possible to be very polite and still be horribly unw. And part of the etiquette is, is is not just about how to behave so everybody feels comfortable, but how to behave in such a way where everybody feels welcome.  Danielle: Right. Right. And I mean, that can happen to any of our communities too.  Dr. Bast: Absolutely. Absolutely.  Danielle: I mean, like, we live in dominant culture norms, like you're stating, but any one of us can adjust some of those values and then pass them on to our kids, or sometimes I think it's unconscious and sometimes it's intentional for survival too.  Dr. Bast: Yes, exactly. Well, and we see that a lot, you know, um, you know, I would say in like the maybe some of the more older models of like missionary training, you know, that there'd be a sensibility around like, Okay, this is how you behave. This is how, if you're going into this space, this is the language that they speak. These are the words they use. These are the dishes that they eat. And it's hard because in that same kind of like how to be most effective in those spaces, um, we have, um, willingly put those on our kids and on the next generation, because we do, I mean, there's that sense of urgency. We want you to not only survive here, but thrive here. And so this, this is the language, this is the way you have to do things. And I hope we're on the cusp of, of, of a new day where that's decided by a collective and not necessarily decided by an individual  Danielle: Yeah. It reminds me of the story. We are down in Mexico for a few weeks this summer, and, uh, we hadn't been to Guadalajara for like over eight years and we're down there. And so my daughter's 15, so she hadn't been there since she was like six or seven, and she was running around, and she came up to me and she's like, Mom, she's like, I have a question for her. I was like, Oh, yeah, sure. She's like, Why do I feel like I belong here more than anywhere else I am? And I was like, and she's like, But I've only been here, you know, a couple times in my life. And I was just like, Well, I, you know, like I have this scientific psychological lens, like it's in your DNA and blah, blah, blah. But really it's a sense of belonging, a sense of she could show up as her whole self  And see other people in her culture embodied in a way that felt, I think, resonated with her, although she didn't use that word. But the curiosity of like, why does this feel more like home?  Dr. Bast: Exactly. Exactly. And that, I mean, and again, like that's for people who are just like, well, I mean, you know, the purists, you know, like go back home or go back to your own country. It's, it's not the locale, you know, it's the sense of, it's the sense of who I get to be and the sense of how other people are around me. And there's a part where it's, it's hard work to cultivate that when we're not in those spaces, like when we're in other locations. But I think it's worth fighting for because again, like to have her say that she feels like she can show up for her full self, you know, that that feels like home. You know, what does that mean then for, you know, how do you make home in Washington state? How do you make home and Florida? How do you make home, you know, in all those spaces?  Um, she's in Europe, you know, what does that look like? And so it's just kind of fighting, you know, it's like the ruthless, intentional fighting for home, you know? And especially for a d you know, a d spo of people, you know, there's a sense of like, okay, I would love to say, well, I'm a turtle and so my home is always with me. Right. Um, but I wanna be able to say, you know, I'm a tree that has seeds that drop, and everywhere those seeds drop, they can root and that can also be home.  That's a powerful image because that is what dominant European Americans have been able to do.  Exactly. There's that. It's, it really is, it's a, it's a modern day event. Adventuring, you know, it's, it's that spirit of exploration that says, you know, I can plant my flag here and make space for myself mm-hmm. , you know, and, and claim space for myself. And, um, Yeah. And somewhere that died, you know, somewhere that died .  Danielle: Right. And I also think it's because if you think about our people's, they actually did travel and migrate, and that was part of who they were, and part of like, moving and shifting. And so when you think about like a border that's just kinda set down on land or colonialism, which did all of this border mapping without regards to the tribal people or the immigration patterns. And, and so therefore, you know, we're in the midst of all these conflicts and, you know, shut the border and da, da da. Well, I mean, like, there's centuries of history of people moving  Dr. Bast: Yep, exactly. Well, and again, being able to set the rules based on what you consider their experience to be. So, you know, I can call you, you know, an immigrant, you know, when you're really an refugee, you know, And so then I get to decide again, I own the house, so I get to decide because well, you're this class certification of guest  or you're illegal versus you're an asylum seeker.  They the color of your skin.  Country of origin, wherever the bus drops off.  Danielle: Yeah. I don't know if you saw this, but I think there's a ship that came from Puerto Rico that's stranded at sea. Have you seen the news on that?  No, I have not.  Yeah, I'm pretty sure that was in the news. And, and I think like it's been in a holding pattern to try to land, and I'm not sure, you know, why I didn't get into the article yet, but I'm not sure why this particular ship hasn't landed. I don't know who's on board, like what the politics of it are, but   you figure, you know, would that be acceptable if there were cars that were backed up, you know, and the border to Illinois.  Dr. Bast: And that's the hard part is I think, like, remember that old like, planco game, like from, um, um, what was it, the prices, right? Where you'd like drop the coin in and it would just kind of figure its way and then like clunk it down into a bucket and did a bunch of pegs, you know? And it, I think, you know, part of the conversations have diminished down to that, you know, And just like wherever you land, like that's who you get to be now. And I think we've went a couple steps backwards in like placing people in these very definitive container. I think the chaos of the last two years has reverted us back to, to extreme labels to be able to navigate how we need to show up and navigate our own disappointment in people. And so there's a part where it's like, you know, you know, people are complex, people are people, you know, and the conversations are complex and there's a lot of like, pain and history I think that people are willing to talk about.  But I, we, it's almost like we can't resist the urge to like categorize, because then, then I know how to show up. And there's a part where it's just like, if we just made space, I think it'd be a lot easier for people to say, There's a lot of gray here, and I, there's gray in my own space, and I'm willing to recognize the gray in your space to, to not like, be so quick to put a label on there, but to say, I'd rather have a conversation to get to know you as a human, Um, because that, that's the best deciding factor of whether, you know, you're gonna keep being a guest in my house, or you're gonna keep being a person I wanna like, journey with, or, you know, we share deeper intimacy you in our friendship because of that.  Danielle: When you say like, the chaos of the last two years, and you say like, you feel like we might have gone backwards. Do you have a specific example you're thinking of or a story?  Dr. Bast: Well, I'm actually thinking of just believe it or not, like some systems theory that most people for our brains, like when we're wired, when there's extreme chaos, that having like an enemy or having, even if you can't, if you can't look forward having an enemy, like your brain can, can set on that, right? And so it's easier for your brain to manage the chaos, you know, of what you're experiencing in the system. So a system will actually become less anxious if there's a common enemy. So it's this idea of like, everybody hating the lunch lady, you know, like everybody kind of cool out and there's like one bad guy. And, and so I think about that in, in, as people have navigated out of the chaos and, and there's no big bad guy, you know, the administration changes. And so you can't be, you're not as mad at one person, you know?  And so you need, we have to keep like, elevating villains because it's the only way we can manage our own anxiety. And so there's a part where it, it makes me nervous to see people who, who felt like there were collective things to talk about and, and believed in some of the both. And as we were navigating, um, especially things like quarantine have almost reverted back. You could feel like the rubber band snapped back to just having like smaller demons to, to villainize, um, because there's no like giant one demonn that they feel they can really center on.  Danielle: Whew. So who do you think the current villains are now?  Dr. Bast: Oh, you know, it's, it's, it feels murky. I don't know. And I think, I think that's it. Like the, the anxiety hasn't reached a fever pitch yet. I think we're back on the upswing of anxiety. Um, and so I'm curious, especially with pressures like inflation and, you know, even just our own federal system of like how states decide versus how the nation decides. Like right now, there's almost too many options. And I think, and I think the anxiety, my prediction is, is the closer we get to the next election cycle, we will see a fever pitch of anxiety and we'll see, we will see clear villains emerge.  Danielle: I agree. I think, I think we saw that kind of escalation. And sometimes I think of, I thought of it like as an, like a violent orgasm, a vi, you know, when we had like buffalo and Irvine and Alde, like we had all these things happen and mostly in communities of color, and then, you know, then there's an uprising and an uproar, and then everything just kinda lowers pitch. And I do feel like we're in that. I, I do see, you know, like Rob DeSantis and, um, you know, and Greg Abbott, you know, with their focus on migrants crossing the border and shipping them all over the country, you know, quote unquote shipping them. I do see that our community is a target and likely could be an escalated target in the coming years. I'm not sure how it will play out, I'm praying about that, but just that sense of we don't belong.  If you're the guest. And you know, that's so interesting that you say that because I think like, um, you know, for like the low hum of anxiety, I mean, most of us have that like low hum of anxiety that is generally in our life, you know, and it's, it's hard because it's so easy to exploit when there's a low hum to like, to put an, um, a title of a villain on something that is so nebulous and so big that nobody has enough language for it. Mm-hmm. . And so somebody publicly assigns language to it to say like, Oh, this is the problem. And people are like, Oh, good. Well, for my own anxiety. Yeah, exactly. That is the problem. And you're like, Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. You know, like we live in complex system with complex people with a complex history, you know, like it's to say one person is a problem is exceptionally uced. And so there's a part of that, but it's like, but if you, if you are experiencing that low hum of anxiety in your system, you're gonna look when somebody gives you the language of a villain, if you're not aware enough, or even if you're just lazy enough to not do the work that resolves the anxiety for you  Like, oh, yep, it's them mm-hmm. , and, and it's whoever the them is, you know, and if this becomes the new them or revisits is the new them, you know, then we'll, we'll see. We'll see people of color, especially brown people being responsible for everything from inflation to gas prices, even though we were just trying to, trying to get away from violence.  Danielle: Right. And I don't think it's a mistake that the last couple election cycles have focused on our communities.  Dr. Bast: Yeah. And I, you know, I'm glad to see like, at least like the overall recognition of, of how important, um, you know, our voter, the strength of our voting constituency is. And I think that's important. What makes me sad, and I don't think any any side is, is exempt from this, is that if all of a sudden the attention is honest, like, Oh, this is the new, you know, this is the new America or the new whatever, you know, and then all of a sudden things start coming out in Spanish, and I always am like, Where were you the other three years? You know, like, that's super fun. You're coming now ,  It's super amazing to see you three years ago or helping us clean up in our communities or helping us like, or listening to our concerns or holding space for us to be able to inform. And so it's, it, um, that always, I mean that just the short answer is that always like, rubs me the wrong way that like always sticks in my cross super bad where I'm like, Oh, look, all of a sudden, you know, whoever, whoever the Spanish speaker is in the camp is like trotted out like a show pony. it's kind of, that comes back to the original thought. We've been noodling on this whole conversation of you're still the guest mm-hmm. kinda like, it's almost like how do you get this guest intoxicated enough they'll listen to you. Right. Like,  That's a great way to put it. Yes, yes. And, and that's it. I mean, that, and that's the part what, when I think about the future and I think about the best way to empower people, it's being able to give them agency and ownership, you know, where they own the house. You know, like what does it look like for you to begin to own your own spaces and to, and to, to give new language for hospitality and to help be part of a community to reimagine hospitality and what that looks like.  Danielle: Yeah. I think one thing that struck me about the Uvalde school shooting was that that community had asked for years for the building to be remodeled and for landscaping. And when none of the funding came through, it was the Latinos right there in that community that went in and landscaped that went in and updated the building. And it was like across town where it was nearly an all white school with plenty of funding, plenty of access to resources. So it, it wasn't lost on me that after all of this and the community investment that this mass shooting happened here. Right.  Dr. Bast: Yep. And I think, you know, there's a part where I, I I agree with you, and then there's a part where I just, I wonder if there's, I, to me that feels, maybe that's the conversation for another day that almost feels like a whole pressure cooker of just, I mean, you see a lot of, like, you see a lot of brilliant and brave things that happen in that day, and you see a lot of like big misses and just mm-hmm. , you know, I mean, I was a gast watching that and watching, you know, the, the horror of some parents and the in activities and law enforcement. It was just a wild, you know, the whole thing just felt so wild. And it was, you know, I I I hope that never happens again, but I would wonder if, if people were able to put their fingers, they were pull back far enough where they could put their fingers on all the things that went wrong to ensure that never happens again.  Danielle: Yeah. And part of it just feels like self hatred.  I don't know. That's how it felt to me.  Dr. Bast: Yeah. Well, and, and you know, I, I remember somebody kind of made the offhand comment, and it wasn't, it wasn't public, but it was like, well, at this point now it's like we're doing this to ourselves, you know, so maybe we, we have normalized. And I was like, I'm like, how ho, you know, how wretched that, that would be like the bright line to say like, well, maybe we have integrated at some point because now we're victimizing our own communities. And, and it just, it broke my heart because, you know, of all the things to be able to identify with or to say that we've arrived, you know, that it would be the marker that we, we own the space enough that we can hate our own people enough to do that.  Disorienting the comment was super disorienting.  Danielle: Yeah. I think I felt like that, like, is this what assimilation looks like? And then, but I'm struck by your guest comment, and it feels like, it also feels like that is not a sign of assimilation because of the guest, the, the desperation, and I'm not justifying anything, but Oh, sure, sure. How violence could be a justification  As a means to achieve something. Right. To achieve something. Right. So I guess this whole conversation just means we have to do a lot of work in our communities.  Dr. Bast: Well, and I, but I think it first starts out, you know, it starts out with a posture, you know? Um, Yeah. I, I've always, I love the body positivity movement because, you know, it, it gives language to say things like no body's a bad body. You know, just like, you're not, you didn't, you're not moving to a, um, a body you can love better because it looks a different way and it appears a different way. And I wish we get to the same place, you know, in, in conversations especially around like multiracial, multiethnic bodies, that it's not like the more it looks like or the more it is something that it's a better body than the one that I've been given. And, you know, and when I, when I own that, when I can live into that, then I can, I can stand in a place of like positivity and like agreement with God.Danielle:  Like I, this, I'm, I am fearfully, wonderfully made. Like I am amazing because, and there's some places I show up as a guest and I'm just like, Okay, I'm discovering and figuring it out, and there's some places I know I'm showing up as a life of the party, You know, I'm like, you're lucky to have me here. Like, I'm awesome, you know, you're awesome, dude. We're about to be awesome together. Right.  But it's that kind of confidence of just saying like, this is, you know, in the time that I have here, this is exactly who I'm supposed to be, and how exciting is that? Instead of being like, Okay, how do I figure out how to make it work?  Danielle: Right. And I think that's in the text, right? Like in our faith and the scripture, just this idea that if we are fearfully and wonderfully made, then of course we are gonna have these combinations. And that's not a mistake.  It isn't like you appeared and God's like, Well, I can work with that  Dr. Bast: Exactly. Exactly. And you know, I'll even say, Danielle, you know, there's a part where, you know, the complexity over the next generation, the next 40 years is gonna be around the fact that we we're not even gonna have the luxury of outlining, of outlining conversations around particular races. I, you know, we're, we're living in a society that's so comfortable with, you know, multiracial experiences and marriages and, and friendships, you know, that I think, um, that's gonna be tricky too. And so being able to just kind of start with that space that, that this is, um, you know, this is this, God saw this and, and intended for this, you know, or hoped for this. And, and me living into that as me partnering, you know, to, to bring good into the world. It's a whole different mindset than just then the idea of just like, well, this happened. And so, you know, somehow that is figuring out like, well, I guess, you know, , we'll figure out what to do with you.  Danielle: Right? I mean, it's that difference of being like, Well, I was born a sin, or I was born on purpose.  Dr. Bast: Yep. Exactly.  Danielle: Yeah. So what are, what are you reading right now? Like, what are you looking to, and who or what is inspiring you?  Dr. Bast: Oh my gosh. So I'm still my dissertation work. So I'm reading, I'm reading book about change in leadership theory. So is that fun? I dunno. Um, and I have to be honest with you, like, I think because my brain is moving all the time, I actually listen to things on the outside to check out. So I'm a documentary person. I'm, I'm curious about people, I'm, I'm curious about the motivations of people. Mm-hmm. . Um, and so for me, it can look like everything from, you know, just regular old documentary to like a crime series, because I'm like, how did this happen? Like, what happened here? So it's, I don't think it's fair to say that was inspired by those things,  Um, and then I've been trying in my downtime to really lean in, um, to more fiction. So I finally got on board and read where The Crowded Sing.  Danielle: And then who are, what's inspiring you?  Dr. Bast: Who are, what is inspiring in this moment? Oh, so I had two boys, and they are night and day. They are salt and pepper, they're oil and water. And I would have to say the youngest in all of his wildness is really challenging me in a deep way. Like both good and bad. Um, and there's a part that's bringing me to the brink of myself, but I'm, it's been like this real testing in time of how do I make space for somebody else? Those big feelings, big thoughts, big emotions, Um, and at the same time like navigate having order and, and making the space safe for everybody. And so it's been a, it's, it really, I mean, I hate to say it, but it's been inspirational for me because I've had to re read more and dig deeper, um, and show up differently and manage my own emotions like in real time. And so it's pushing me in ways that I hadn't anticipated.  Danielle: I like that. I like that. So folks wanna get a hold of you. I wanna follow your work. Where can they find you?  Dr. Bast: You could find me on Instagram, most likely at Elisa Cortez bass. And apparently if you Google me, I'm out there in some places, which I find fascinating and so weird. But yes, ,   

Eastern Mennonite University Podcast
Convocation: Salvador Romero

Eastern Mennonite University Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022


Join the Latinx Student Alliance (LSA) for a Latinx Heritage Month convocation featuring Salvador (Sal) Romero speaking on the theme: Si se puede: through resilience and hopefulness we will strive for more. Romero serves as Vice Mayor for the City of Harrisonburg and Director of Equity and Community Engagement for Harrisonburg City Public Schools.

Your Gay Cousins with Michael & Estevan

In today's episode we celebrate Latinx Heritage Month with the ÑFL, use our feminine wiles to seduce Capi Papi, make sopita inside the Junior Bake Off tent, accept our Emmy for best full-frontal in a supporting role & much more! photograph: @misterandrus Be a part of the show-- call the Gay Cousins Hotline 310-431-9788 and leave us a voicemail (chisme, questions, advice, good news!) Don't forget to subscribe, rate, and listen every Tuesday for a new episode! And be sure to follow us on Instagram & Twitter: tiktok.com/@yourgaycousins instagram.com/YourGayCousins twitter.com/YourGayCousins yourgaycousins.com/shop

Draws in Spanish |  Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers
01: Salvadoran Illustrator & Tattoo Artist So Lazo

Draws in Spanish | Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 52:19


In this episode, I chat with Salvadoran illustrator So Lazo. So is an Illustrator and tattoo artist from tiny, tropical El Salvador who immigrated to Berlin, Germany in 2021. They're also the author of two illustrated books and have had their own brand of illustrated products available on Etsy since 2016. I'm really excited to have So on the show, so keep on listening to hear us talk about their experience moving to Berlin, their advice for finding your voice, and running an Etsy shop using drop shipping.EPISODE LINKS- Watch this Episode on Youtube- Host: Follow Fabiola on Instagram, YouTube, TikTok- Guest: Follow So Lazo on Instagram, TikTok, and Etsy Shop- View Episode Transcript & Extended NotesEPISODE NOTESIf you've ever been curious about what it would be like to move to Berlin as a creative, this episode is made for you!In this episode, I chat with Salvadoran illustrator and tattoo artist So Lazo. So decided to leave El Salvador and has just celebrated their 1 year anniversary in Berlin. Throughout the show, we chat all about why they chose to immigrate to Berlin and exactly how they were able to prepare for such a big international move.We also go over how they found their way to illustration during their University years, and how they were able to launch their illustration business via Etsy in El Salvador. So also kindly shares their experience custom printing products for their online shop and talks all about why they are enjoying using print-on-demand services to fulfill their Etsy orders.Nowadays, So is focused on running their online shop using a mixture of print-on-demand products and custom-made products to balance their inventory, while still investing in the personal projects that bring them the most creative joy.Tune into this episode to hear So and I talk about why they left El Salvador, what they recommend for finding your personal creative voice, and exactly how they run their online shop.Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, or on your favorite podcast platform.

Keep It Fictional
Latine/Latinx Heritage Month

Keep It Fictional

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 48:01


Our Keep It Fictional librarians celebrate this special month by highlighting some of our favourite books by authors from Latin American and South American countries, and writers of the diaspora. We also have some strong feelings about taking "tacky" touristy photos. Books mentioned on the episode: Elena Knows by Claudia Piñeiro, The Daughter of Doctor Moreau by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Gordo by Jaime Cortez, Reputations by Juan Gabriel Vásquez, and Violeta by Isabel Allende. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/keepitfictional/message

Chombita Chronicles #EliteCircle
CC Happy Latinx Heritage Month 2022

Chombita Chronicles #EliteCircle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 4:48


Hola mi gente nueva hermosa y fabulosa!! Este es un chequeo y anuncios! Septiembre 21 voy a ser afrolatina panelist. https://todowafi.com/hispanic-heritage-month-2022/2022-discussion-panels/ otra nota más voy a salir en la revista tesón magazine. Dueña afroamericana creada para afrolatinos afrodaribeños y más!! www.tesonmagazine.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/chombitachronicles/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chombitachronicles/support

World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN
Alt.Latino kicks off Latinx Heritage Month on World Cafe

World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 14:39


Felix Contreras and new co-host Anamaria Sayre discuss the evolution of Alt.Latino and give a preview of their month-long takeover of the Tiny Desk Concert series, El Tiny.

World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN
Alt.Latino kicks off Latinx Heritage Month on World Cafe

World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 38:47


Felix Contreras and new co-host Anamaria Sayre discuss the evolution of Alt.Latino and give a preview of their month-long takeover of the Tiny Desk Concert series, El Tiny.

Hillsboro School District Weekly Hot News Podcast
HILLSBORO SCHOOL DISTRICT WEEKLY HOT NEWS, SEPTEMBER 12, 2022 - HISPANIC AND LATINX HERITAGE MONTH, COMMUNITY EVENTS

Hillsboro School District Weekly Hot News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 6:48


National Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month is the period from September 15th to October 15th, a dedicated time when people recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latinx Americans to the United States and celebrate the group's heritage and culture. The theme of this year's observance is “Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation,” which challenges us to ensure that all voices are represented and welcomed to help build stronger communities and a stronger nation. Our Hispanic and Latinx students and staff bring enormous assets to our classrooms and schools. Their diverse perspectives and voices will help us build a stronger HSD community. We encourage everyone to continue the celebration of Hispanic and Latinx Americans all year long. Our featured event is back-to-school! Our first days of the 2022-23 school year were amazing and decidedly the most “normal” we've had in three years. Students, staff, and families alike were buzzing with excitement and hopeful anticipation as they embarked upon the new year. Our staff was out at several schools taking photos, and many of you shared pictures of your students with us - thank you! Check out the gallery of images on our website and let's keep this positive momentum going all year long! Check out our website for a brief video from Superintendent Scott welcoming students, staff, and families to the 2022-23 school year. Our bond update is on the new, separate bus dropoff that has just been completed at Tobias Elementary School. This was the final safety infrastructure project of the 2017 Bond. With buses accessing 209th Avenue and cars off of 206th, this separation provides additional safety for pedestrians and vehicles, and improves the flow of traffic around dropoff and pickup times. Hot News is produced and emailed to HSD families and staff each week school is in session. Please add the address to your “safe sender” list to make sure you always receive the latest issue. Please also bookmark our district website: hsd.k12.or.us and the 2022-23 School Year page: hsd.k12.or.us/202223schoolyear to stay informed about what's happening in our district and schools.

How To Eat Less Water Podcast
Celebrating the Contributions of Farm Workers this Hispanic Heritage Month-Interview with my father

How To Eat Less Water Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 32:37


Episode SummarySeptember marks the beginning of Hispanic, LatinX Heritage Month. Each year Americans observe this time from September 15th to October 15th, to celebrate the histories, cultures, and contributions of Americans whose ancestry comes from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. In this podcast episode, I celebrate the contributions of farm workers as 83% of farm workers in the United States are Latino. In California, where I was born and raised, the percentage is much higher. 92%. I am so proud to have the endorsement of Dolores Huerta, the co-founder of the United Farmworkers union with Cesar Chavez printed on the cover of my book, Eat Less Water. She dedicated decades of her life to fighting for basic protections for farm workers. But there's still much more work to do. The food we choose has the power to contribute, to clean and abundant water systems around the world. So much of the way food is grown and cultivated around this nation and the world causes harm, not only to the river as nearly half the rivers in the U.S are too polluted with nitrates to support aquatic life. But to the people who work to cultivate and harvest the food that makes its way into our refrigerators and pantries. You and I may be able to wash off the residue of chemicals sprayed on our food but it can't be washed away when it is ingested by the farm worker that must work on the land.My appreciation for the contribution and continued plight of farm workers is due in part to my father. He worked as a farm worker as a child. He took me to marches and actions to stand in solidarity with the United Farm Workers. I didn't eat grapes for most of my childhood because of the grape boycott.  I invited my father onto this episode to share some of his stories with us as he inspires so much of the work I do.In this episode, my pa shares his involvement in the upcoming performance of El Bracero A Mariachi Musical. Below find a link to purchase tickets. If you share the link to this episode with friends and family on social media tag me and enter to win two tickets for the September 17 performance in Oxnard, California, where my father will be on stage in all his resplendence. Tickets to El Bracero: A Mariachi OperaCenter for Farm Worker FamiliesLinks and resources:Click here for the free How to Eat Less Water CONDIMENT STORAGE TABLE. It is a printable list of popular condiments that belong in the pantry and those in the refrigerator that can be hung in your kitchen for easy reference. Download FREE the TEN TIPS to EAT LESS WATER SUMMER PARTY PLANNING GUIDE for all the tips, steps, and info on how to celebrate like a kitchen activist with your friends and family.Find gifts designed to serve well-being at the Eat Less Water Shop.Get a copy of the EAT LESS WATER bookMake sure you hit SUBSCRIBE so you don't miss out on future episodes released every Monday and (water) Wednesday.

City Life Org
Celebrating Hispanic & Latinx Heritage Month 2022 at NYPL: Reading Recommendations, Programs, and More

City Life Org

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 4:28


This episode is also available as a blog post: https://thecitylife.org/2022/09/06/celebrating-hispanic-latinx-heritage-month-2022-at-nypl-reading-recommendations-programs-and-more/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/citylifeorg/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/citylifeorg/support

Encuentros Latinx Podcast
Encuentro 27: Adora Xannifer Ysaguirre–How you were born isn't who you are

Encuentros Latinx Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 79:27


On Thursday September 8 at 3:30 Eastern, be sure to tune into the UCC's Thursdays for the Soul Webinar featuring a panel from the Colectivo of Latinx Ministries as we kick off Latinx Heritage Month. You may or may not see a familiar face and hear a familiar voice, haha! The webinar will be streamed on the UCC's YouTube channel where you can also find video episodes of Encuentros Latinx, like this one! My guest today is Adora Xannifer Ysaguirre and she gives us the second deep dive about music that we've had on the podcast. She also shares her journey of how the UCC became family to her as she transitioned and at the end of the episode, she reads her story published in the newest Encuentros Latinx toolkit focusing specifically on transgender inclusion. I truly enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do, too, so let's get right into this encuentro. Podcast recorded by Taylor Ramage and edited by Storm Miguel Florez Email the podcast at encuentroslatinxs@gmail.com

IDEAS IN ACTION | USC's Podcast Series

Noted USC professors provide insight into three different neighborhoods of Los Angeles, mobilizing Latinx pasts to better understand the future and rethink our understanding of democracy, community, and political power. Panelists Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo is the Florence Everline Professor of Sociology at USC. She is a co-author of South Central Dreams: Finding Home and Building Community in South L.A., which takes a deep dive into the lives of first- and second-generation Latinx immigrants as they shape home and identity alongside their Black neighbors in South L.A., and explores the ways Latinx identity is shaped by Blackness. Natalia Molina is Distinguished Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at USC and a 2020 MacArthur Fellow. Her book, A Place at the Nayarit: How a Mexican Restaurant Nourished a Community, traces her grandmother's Echo Park restaurant that served as an urban anchor for a robust community and a gathering space where ethnic Mexican workers and customers connected with their patria chica (“small country”). George J. Sánchez is a professor of American Studies and Ethnicity and History at USC and the 2020–2021 President of the Organization for American Historians. His book, Boyle Heights: How a Los Angeles Neighborhood Became the Future of American Democracy, is a love letter to a vibrant, sometimes fragmented, yet deeply interconnected metropolis that shows how people's connection to community and neighbors can transcend time and historical change. Juan D. De Lara (moderator) is the director of the Latinx and Latin American Studies Center and an associate professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at USC. He is the author of Inland Shift: Race, Space, and Capital in Southern California.

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with MegaGoneFree

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 40:59


We had the pleasure of interviewing MegaGoneFree over Zoom video!In celebration of the contributions of Black creators to the TikTok community, TikTok is amplifying the voices of Black music creators on the platform with the second annual Black TikTok Trailblazers List. Among the list is TikTok creator @megagonefree, a Black LGBTQ+ independent artist who is carving their own lane in the alt-pop genre. Garnering over 4.8M followers on the platform, the Baltimore, MD native is best known for their song covers played on a ukulele. Several of their covers have gone viral on the platform, including their renditions of Bella Poarch's “Build A B****” and Marina and the Diamonds' “Bubblegum B****”. As their TikTok following continues to grow, she shares her own original music on the platform that spreads messages of love, open-mindedness and empathy with their millions of followers. Mega's success translates off the platform, boasting over 23K monthly listeners across their catalog on Spotify. 2022 Black TikTok Trailblazers:- Trailblazers are the next-generation of entertainment leaders, nominated by the TikTok community for their creativity, passion, and authenticity - Trailblazers participate in campaign events and amplification throughout the month, helping amplify the #BlackTikTok hashtag - The Trailblazer cohort consists of 12 creators across different verticals (food, music, dance, etc.) all with a focus on entertainment - The Black TikTok Trailblazer program is an extension of past Trailblazer initiatives including API Heritage Month, Pride Month and Latinx Heritage Month.We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com. www.BringinitBackwards.com #podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #MegaGoneFree #TikTok #TikTokTrailblazers #NewMusic #zoom Listen & Subscribe to BiB https://www.bringinitbackwards.com/follow/ Follow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! https://www.facebook.com/groups/bringinbackpod

Life as a Gringo
Gringo's Guide To: How The Media Ignores Our Community (LatinX Heritage Month Recap)

Life as a Gringo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:06


Finishing out his LatinX Heritage Month special Thursday episodes, Dramos recaps the good, bad and ugly from this last month including Indigenous Peoples Day vs. Columbus Day, Missing White Woman Syndrome, Latinos and the police, Pitbull's dumb comments and more. He also takes the time to celebrate a few figures who have held it down for the community over the last month. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A World of Difference
Change Makers EPS 57: Frank Carbajal on Latinx Heritage Month, Indigenous Peoples' Day, Silicon Valley Latino Leadership Summit, Latinx Business Success & First Gen

A World of Difference

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:50


First generation, California-born Frank Carbajal's parents were migrant farm workers in the early 70's, and were offered jobs in canaries in the Silicon Valley. His parents did important work, feeding a nation with diligence and dedication. They wanted a better life for their son, and his dreams of being the first to go to college and a First Gen Latinx Professional in his family led him to want to help others rise as well. He founded Es Tiempo, and the Silicon Valley Latino Leadership Summit to change the narrative and showcase the talent and diversity among Latinx professionals. He is the co-author of Building the Latino Future: Success Stories for the Next Generation. He has written several books, including his latest that releases mid-November. Pre-order https://amzn.to/2YMZgGY (Latinx Business Success.) Mr. Carbajal holds an MA, with an emphasis in Human Resources Management. He lives with his wife and three daughters in Santa Clara, California. You can follow https://www.linkedin.com/in/frank-carbajal-a85621a/ (Frank Carbajal on Linkedin) as he showcases a variety of Latinx leaders in many different professions who are inspirational and that have much to teach us. The A World of Difference Podcast is brought to you in partnership with https://www.missioalliance.org/ (Missio Alliance). Stay In Touch: Connect on Facebook and Instagram with thoughts, questions, and feedback. Rate, review and share this podcast with anyone that would love to listen.  On Clubhouse https://www.joinclubhouse.com/@loriadbr (@loriadbr). Find Us Online: https://www.instagram.com/aworldof.difference/ (@aworldof.difference) on Instagram and https://www.facebook.com/A-World-of-Difference-613933132591673/ (A World of Difference) on Facebook on Twitter at https://twitter.com/loriadbr (@loriadbr) https://linktr.ee/aworldofdifference (https://linktr.ee/aworldofdifference) or http://loriadamsbrown.com/ (loriadamsbrown.com)Interested in one-on-one or group coaching on how to live a life that makes a difference? Check out: https://www.loriadamsbrown.com/coaching (https://www.loriadamsbrown.com/coaching) If you are facing some big decisions, here is a https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9eRJXjZrsM (pro tip that helps).Mentioned in this episode: Coaching Sept 22 Want to get unstuck and make a difference? Go to loriadamsbrown.com/coachnig for a free exploratory session. Patreon Support us for as little as $5/month at Patreon.com/aworldofdifference and receive exclusive audio content and free merch. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy

Life as a Gringo
Gringo's Guide To: How Pitbull Sold Us Out

Life as a Gringo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 29:38


As a part of the on-going LatinX Heritage Month focused Thursday episodes, Dramos uses recent controversial topics by Pitbull as a teachable moment to discuss how we need to be able to turn the mirror inward on ourselves in order to be able to progress as a culture. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Porshanality Podcast
Ep5 #AmplifyHumanity- President Joe Ain't Off The Hook

Porshanality Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 19:45


Welcome to Amplify Humanity. On this 5th episode of the podcast, Porsha shares a channeled message, amplifies humanity, and has a message for the President. It's a Vibe: Channeled Message As we are in #SpookySzn, Mercury Retrograde, and Fall is here, Porsha share some questions for us to ponder: What do you want? What is God calling you do to? Where is God calling you to go? The Amplifier: It's October, which means it Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and Latinx Heritage Month. Porsha shares information regarding the latter on the podcast. Tell The President I Said: Joe Biden is not off the hook! While we are glad that he is pushing for a leveld field when it comes to taxing the rich, we have noticed that he has not fully addressed the boarder crisis. With Haiti in turmoil, the last thing that this nation needs to do is turn Haitians away. Episode Credits: Hosted, produced, mixed, and edited by Porsha Williams Gates of Porshanality Media LLC Music Credits: No Rules, Fox Morrow Soul Jazz Legacy, SINY Shimmer Warp from Epidemic Sounds The Star-Spangled Banner from Epidemic Sounds Tire Screech from Epidemic Sounds Bad Sign, Ballpoint Delores, Ballpoint For more Porshanality Media, visit us on the web: www.porshanality.com Please find us on FB, IG, Pinterest, Linked In, Porshanality Media #Amplifyhumanity #porshanalitymedia

The Humble Rising Podcast
31. Trailblazer and entrepreneur Betty Francisco on aligning passion and career, identity, and economic justice

The Humble Rising Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 66:01


This week, in honor of Latinx Heritage Month, I'm rerunning an  episode with a powerhouse Latina leader.  I had the pleasure to talk to my friend, trailblazer, mother, thought leader, entrepreneur, lawyer, activist and creator Betty Francisco.   Betty is a seasoned business executive, board director, investor and community leader. She has over 22 years of experience advising high growth start-ups, non-profits, and companies various areas. She's been named one of the most influential leaders in Boston this year, one of the 2020 Power 50,, and in 2018, Boston Magazine named her as one of the 100 Most Influential People in Boston.  She serves on a number of boards and is deeply involved in the community.  She's the co-founder of the Investors of Color Network (ICN) and an angel investor with Pipeline Angels and Portfolia. She is the co-founder and board chair of Amplify Latinx / Latina Circle, a social venture that is building economic and political power within the Latinx community in Massachusetts. She also founded Reimagine Play, a startup that offers fitness programming for children and families in Greater Boston.  Betty was previously the General Counsel at Compass Working Capital, and is currently the CEO of the Boston Impact Initiative, which invests in enterprises in Massachusetts that address the growing wealth gap and ecological challenges of our times. She has been featured in Boston Magazine, Boston Business Journal, Boston Globe and Hispanic Executive Magazine, and more.  In this episode, Betty and I talk about her upbringing, identity, career shifts and decisions, how she's been able to step into her own power as an entrepreneur and investor, economic justice, money management, and more. Recommended Books: Caste by Isabel Wilkerson and Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Ibram Kendi and Jason Reynolds.  Connect with Betty Francisco on LinkedIn and check out her website:  www.bettyfrancisco.com. Amplify Latinx:  https://amplifylatinx.co Boston Impact Initiative Fund - Investing for Justice: https://bostonimpact.org IG: @bettyfrancisco For Arivee's emails of motivation and inspiration, subscribe here.  Subscribe to this podcast and share it with a friend who needs to hear it too.  Get your career clarity guide here. LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arivee-vargas-49079222/ INSTAGRAM:  https://www.instagram.com/ourhumblerising

Life as a Gringo
Gringo's Guide To: Getting Your Money Right

Life as a Gringo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 47:04


The LatinX Heritage Month celebration continues as Dramos dives into educating our community on their relationships with money, how historically our community has been behind others with our financial literacy and he is joined by entrepreneur Ada Rojas of the multi-million dollar brand Botanika Beauty to discuss healing our money traumas and tips for starting a business. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Scholastic Reads
Celebrating Hispanic & Latine Heritage Month

Scholastic Reads

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 43:49


In this episode, we celebrate Hispanic & Latine Heritage Month with some favorite Scholastic authors. First, Sonia Manzano revisits her 2015 memoir, Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx. You may know Sonia as Maria, the beloved character she played on Sesame Street for more than 30 years. Growing up in a struggling Puerto Rican family in the 1950s, Sonia wondered how she could contribute to a society that didn't see her. “I felt invisible,” she says. Her story of resilience and hope continues to inspire readers of all ages. Host Suzanne McCabe also talks with Pam Muñoz Ryan, the award-winning author of Esperanza Rising and several other celebrated novels. Pam discusses the genesis of her latest book, an enchanting novel for middle-graders called Mañanaland. The mythical tale introduces readers to a brave boy named Max, who learns what it means to help people fleeing danger and persecution. In the final segment, author Justin A. Reynolds and illustrator Pablo Leon introduce their new graphic novel, Miles Morales: Shock Waves. It is already a hit with young Marvel fans. “Maybe you're not able to have web slingers and scale the city walls,” Justin tells kids, “but your voice can travel just as far.”

The Humble Rising Podcast
30. What it means to celebrate Latinx Heritage Month

The Humble Rising Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 19:08


Photo by Christian Lue on Unsplash In this episode, Arivee shares what Latinx/Hispanic Heritage Month represents for her.  She takes you back to the “Latin explosion” of the late 90's and shares how this month of celebration can be an opportunity to reflect and ground us in our purpose.  For Arivee's weekly emails of motivation and inspiration, subscribe here.  Subscribe to this podcast and share it with a friend who needs to hear it too.  Get your career clarity guide here. LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arivee-vargas-49079222/ INSTAGRAM:  https://www.instagram.com/ourhumblerising  

Life as a Gringo
Gringo's Guide To: How We Overvalue Whiteness

Life as a Gringo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 52:00


As a part of the on-going LatinX Heritage Month series, Dramos deep dives into "mejorar la rasa" and the historical overvaluing of whiteness that happens in the Latin community. He is joined by the author of the book "For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts" to discuss all of this, as well as some current events and the on going Hispanic vs. LatinX debate. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bandwagon Effect
Soapbox: Hispanic/Latinx(e) Heritage Month

The Bandwagon Effect

Play Episode Play 17 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 11:21


Happy Hispanic/Latinx(e) Month to you all! In our 1st minisode, I break down how imperative it is for us to make this celebration of our achievements more relevant in the media. In addition, I bring up what we should be calling this month, and what better suits the inclusivity of our community living in the United States. For all updates and information about the podcast follow us on Instagram at @thebandwagoneffectpod @stephen_santanaSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/TheBandwagonEffectPod)

Global Spins
Classic Low Rider Jams (Slow & Low)

Global Spins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 68:49


In celebration of Latinx Heritage Month, cruise around the United States in your low rider as we spin some classic "low and slow" low rider songs. From soul, r&b, doo-wop, and Latin jazz fusion, enjoy these old school love songs.

49ers Unscripted
49ers Unscripted - Ep. 22: Alfredo Gutierrez

49ers Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 16:23


In honor of Latinx Heritage Month, Gutierrez joined the podcast to talk about his first NFL season, learning from Trent Williams and Joe Staley, the 49ers presence in Mexico and representing his country in the NFL.

The Student Loan Podcast
46. Happy Latinx Heritage Month & StartNews Covering Updates to Higher Education and Student Loans

The Student Loan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 47:38


Happy Latinx Heritage Month! Daphné Vanessa and Shamil Rodriguez go over some of the latest higher education and student loans, but that's not all.  This episode also shares plays clips from previous episodes that cover the student loan and higher education perspective of Latinx students and student loan borrowers. Visit the show notes for all the extra details: https://thestudentloanpodcast.com/episode46 Visit our podcast sponsor at StartNoo.com to see if StartNoo is on your campus and learn how you can exchange service hours in the community for direct payments towards your student loans or tuition.   

La Mezcla Latina
37. Events Happening in the U.S. For Latinx Heritage Month

La Mezcla Latina

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 17:32


Looking for something to do this month? This month is all about celebrating our heritage and there are some great events planned all over the country that you can attend! We go over some virtual events and others happening in the major cities. Listen to find a Latinx event in your area! Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mezclalatinapod/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lamezclalatina/message

Leyendo La Diaspora

Hola mi bookish gente! Co-hosts Kalima DeSuze and Johanna Burgos are excited to introduce you to Leyendo la Diaspora. Stay tuned for our first full length episode, dropping at the end of LatinX Heritage Month.

Correr Comida Cultura Podcast
Episode 21: Fall & Latinx Heritage Month

Correr Comida Cultura Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 28:57


This episode is a two-parter! In the first half I talk about fall season: the American aspects, the cultural aspects for me as a Latina and some personal takes on the season. The second half of this episode is focused on Latinx Heritage Month: some quick facts about it, how to support Latinx owned businesses and what it means to me.Episode Notes:Sources for facts on Latinx Heritage Month: https://www.hispanicheritagemonth.gov/aboutLatinx Podcast Shoutouts:Bitter Brown Femmes: @bitterbrownfemmesLocatora Radio: @locatora_radioTamarindo Podcast: @tamarindopodcastSpilling La Sopa: @spilling_la_sopaMuseum of Latin American Art: https://molaa.org/La Plaza de Cultura y Arte: https://lapca.org/MUSIC CREATED FOR THE PODCAST BY: Kynsley AkinsORIGINAL ARTWORK CREATED FOR THE PODCAST BY: @whatsgoodhomegirl

The Messages We Carry with Danny L. Ross
Episode 19: The Messages Related to the Latinx Culture and Mental Health

The Messages We Carry with Danny L. Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 25:36


Join us as Christina Salcido, Licensed Professional Counselor, share with us during Latinx Heritage Month.  Christina will share her messages related to being Latinx and her therapy approaches when working with the Latinx community.  Christina is a practicing therapist at Hidden Lakes Counseling, Southlake, TX, and is also a High School Counselor.  Join us as Christina shares with us her messages.  

The Mujerón Podcast
How using TikTok can help you create the career move you've always dreamt of, Erika Cruz

The Mujerón Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 38:40


For 30-year-old Erika Cruz, self-discovery expert and founder of the Purpose-Driven Latina Coaching Program, creating motivational TikTok videos started off as a fun way to express her methods of teaching self-love and motivation, all while working a full-time job in the tech industry.   In 2020 Erika grew her audience to over 170K followers, she interview artists like Luis Fonsi during Latinx Heritage Month, launch her Purpose-Driven Latina Coaching Program (which made over 12K in her first launch), and finally make the jump and leave her 9-5 tech job. As a Mexican-American first-generation entrepreneur, born and raised in Pittsburg, California, Erika aims to help women align with their purpose by helping them explore how to put their best self forward. Follow Erika: TikTok Instagram Learn more about her   Follow me & Mujeron Movement: https://www.instagram.com/soniaalejandratv/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/mujeronmovement/?hl=en   Join our Community: https://www.mujeronmovement.com/