Podcasts about specialties

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  • 573EPISODES
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Best podcasts about specialties

Latest podcast episodes about specialties

No Filter with Kobo
23. Formula of the Month: Fresh Glow Blush Stick

No Filter with Kobo

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 9:55


Blush sticks have been all the rage since the summer of 2022, and for good reason. Countless beauty brands have launched their take on the multifunctional cheek enhancer in convenient stick form. In this episode, we will review and discuss Kobo's blush stick formulation which imparts a sheer rosy glow with a non-sticky, non-oily texture while still providing a creamy consistency. We will share the key ingredients in creating this type of formula utilizing our treated pigments, film former, effect pigment, and microspheres. Links: KOBOGUARD NATURUAL 2063: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-KoboguardNatural2063.pdf Microspheres: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-Microspheres.pdf Amino Acid & Polyhydroxystearic Acid Treatment (ASGP): https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-ASGPTreatment.pdf KTZ Pearls: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-KTZ-Pearls.pdf Pearl Selector: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/apps/PearlSelector.aspx ABOUT US: Since 1987 Kobo has provided innovative, technology-based raw materials to the cosmetic industry. The product range includes Surface Treated Pigments, Microspheres, Suncare and Color Dispersions, Silicone Fluids, Specialties, Natural Ingredients, Effect Pigments, Boron Nitride , and Delivery Systems. Kobo has five locations, USA (Corporate Headquarters), France, Japan, Brazil , and the UK and is represented globally by independent agents. Learn more at: www.koboproductsinc.com

Unicorns Unite: The Freelancer Digital Media Virtual Assistant Community

Ready to take on more responsibility in a launch and command more premium rates? You should become a launch manager.  But skip the expensive courses and certifications, you don't need them to uplevel into this role using your current marketing skills and my grassroots approach. Yes, sometimes we buy courses so we can feel confident. But if you naturally progress through the launch role phases here on this podcast and surround yourself with a community of go-getter marketing specialists and freelancers, you'll be able to attain this position. Listen up for what components of launching to get involved with first. Find your phase and make a move to take on the ownership of key areas of a launch.   You'll learn: What will set you up for launch management success 2 must-have masteries of launch managers How to truly stand out during a launch Specialties to niche with Where to find launch clients   Then be sure to download my Roadmap to Launch Manager: https://courses.emilyreaganpr.com/how-to-become-a-launch-manager   While you're here hit subscribe so you don't miss out on the next episode of this Launching Podcast Series. We'll cover launch promotion, ads, prep-launch strategy and launch debrief.    Sponsored by Braden Drake's Contract Club. $30 gets you access to a solid client services agreement and everything you need to know about contracts to protect yourself and look professional.   Links Mentioned in the Show: Digital Marketing Workgroup  — a community for digital marketing assistants and freelancers who are upleveling their business.  Facebook Community Manager Workshop — Learn how to take on the role of a facebook community manager $297 Behind the Launch — a free mini audio summit with top marketing experts (including me!) will give you the behind-the-scenes of what's working with launches NOW. Happening Jan 23-27.   Connect with Emily: Facebook Community: Emily's Unicorn Digital Marketing Assistant Lab Instagram: @emilyreaganpr  Facebook: @emilyreaganpr Tiktok: @emilyreaganpr   3 ways we can work together:  Get on the waitlist for the Unicorn Digital Marketing Assistant School. My signature course on digital marketing implementation will give you the confidence and teach you HOW to do the work that's in demand and highly marketable. This is the secret weapon to getting booked out Got the skills but need help getting your digital marketing services business to take off? I've got an advanced tight-knit referral and networking community that can help and I would love for you to apply here for the Digital Marketing Workgroup. You'll get the latest updates and trainings, networking opps and job leads from online business owners who are looking to hire digital marketing implementers and assistants. Looking for a fast way to get your foot in the door with up-to-date skills? Take my 2-hour Quickstart to Facebook Community Management workshop and learn how to help online business owners like course creators and membership site owners manage and engage their community

Ask Nurse Alice
"I'm changing nursing specialties from TELE to ICU and am feeling nervous, what advice do you have" (Listener Question)

Ask Nurse Alice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 32:18


Imagine being an experienced nurse and being comfortable in a particular specialty and then one day making a decision to pivot into a different one. It can be scary and exciting at the same time because you're not a new nurse but you are new to a specialty. How can you best prepare for the transition?In this episode Nurse Alice answers a caller's question by offering tips on how she can successfully transition from working in telemetry to ICU. Nurse Alice provides insights and shares observations from the critical care new to the specialty transitional program she used to lead. 

No Filter with Kobo
22. Formula of the Month: Talc-Free Long Wear Eyeshadow

No Filter with Kobo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 13:54


Talc-free products have become a recent and more favorable choice due to the concerns about talc's side effects. However, talc is difficult to replace in many formulas like pressed-powders. In this episode, we will present our clean, talc-free eye shadow with a metallic shimmer finish. This long-wear formula contains a new talc alternative, providing an intense color payoff. We will discuss the key ingredients in creating this type of formula utilizing treated pigments, minerals, talc-free fillers, and treated effect pigments. Links: Minerals: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-Minerals.pdf Boron Nitride: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-CaressBoronNitride.pdf Amino Acid Treated Pigment: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-ASGTreatment.pdf KTZ Pearls: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-KTZ-Pearls.pdf Pearl Selector: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/apps/PearlSelector.aspx Advantages of Treated Pearls: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-TreatedPearlsPowders.pdf ABOUT US: Since 1987 Kobo has provided innovative, technology-based raw materials to the cosmetic industry. The product range includes Surface Treated Pigments, Microspheres, Suncare and Color Dispersions, Silicone Fluids, Specialties, Natural Ingredients, Effect Pigments, Boron Nitride , and Delivery Systems. Kobo has five locations, USA (Corporate Headquarters), France, Japan, Brazil , and the UK and is represented globally by independent agents. Learn more at: www.koboproductsinc.com

The Vet Blast Podcast
161: Kindness can go a long way in veterinary medicine

The Vet Blast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 19:53


Dr. Meghan Vaught obtained her doctorate from St. George University in May 2013 after completing her clinical rotations at the University of Pennsylvania. In June 2014, she completed a small animal rotating internship at Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment and Specialties hospital.  Dr. Vaught completed a three-year Emergency and Critical Care Residency at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University in 2017. Later that year, she earned board certification as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care.  Dr. Vaught's clinical and research interests include but are not limited to respiratory disease/mechanical ventilation, sepsis, polytrauma and severe acid/base or electrolyte disorders. Dr Vaught's priority is to provide the highest quality of care and medicine to each patient and their family. In her free time, Dr. Vaught enjoys spending time with her husband, their young daughter and their kitty. 

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila
Mental Health Matters - Stigma Busting!: Not All Storms Come To Disrupt Your Life...How Your Mental Health Challenges Can Be A Blessing In Disguise

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 31:30


Love my podcast? Sponsor an episode monthly here: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support or by buying me a coffee & help me continue making FREE content for you: https://buy.stripe.com/dR67vtcTvbubefmcN2 Get your best IELTS Score with Magoosh Prep: https://track.flexlinkspro.com/g.ashx?foid=156074.11490.826499&trid=1261319.160955&foc=16&fot=9999&fos=5 http://www.eslbusinessenglishexperts.com Ask Me:https://t.me/eslbusinessenglishexperts Expert in Coaching French, German, Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Russian, Spanish and Brazilian ESL speakers and business professionals from UAE - Dubai, Abu Dhabi - Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Jordan, Iraq, Tokyo, Moscow, Seoul, Bejing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Madrid, Germany. Sign-up to my FREE English Tips and Success Newsletter: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/Coach-Mark-In-Manila-Wealth-Health-ESL-English-&-Career-Success-Creation-Newsletter-PLUS-FREE-Instant-Money-Creation-Links-p495003506 Access Hundreds IELTS Online Courses. Take Mock Tests From Home - Get Your Dream IELTS Score Use My 10% Off Link: https://i.preptical.com/login?ref=17760&apply-promo=initial-impact Have your IELTS Written Tasks or OET Writing Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Tasks-IELTS-OET-Writing-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504806078 Have your IELTS or OET Speaking Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Speaking-Recordings-IELTS-PART-2-OET-Recorded-Speaking-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504782211 https://bookshop.org/lists/coach-mark-in-manila-nail-your-ielts-essential-reads Non-native or native speaker? Want to promote your coaching services and share helpful ESL English, Career, Life, Mental Health, Business guidance / info for free to my listeners? Go ahead - it's FREE! You can upload your audio files and show notes with all your booking pages / links / YouTube / Podcast etc via We Transfer https://wetransfer.com/ and send to me at: hello@initial-impact.com. I will upload suitable audios asap - if yours hasn't been featured within 14 days please consider it unsuccessful at this point in time but do feel free to try to again with another more appropriate audio / subject. Simply drag or drop the files / upload them on WeTransfer and send it to my email address hello@initial-impact.com - attach everything you would like to be included on the show notes. Please state: Your Name / Company, Country, Native Or Non-Native Speaker, Nationality, Brief 250 Word Bio, Specialties, Website Links / YouTube / Social Media Handle To Connect With You --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila
Parents, Teachers & Society Lied To You! Trying To Achieve A High Performance In IELTS, OET, Business Presentations, Interviews? Persistence Alone Doesn't Save The Day - Here's What You Need To Do

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 16:02


Love my podcast? Sponsor an episode monthly here: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support or by buying me a coffee & help me continue making FREE content for you: https://buy.stripe.com/dR67vtcTvbubefmcN2 Get your best IELTS Score with Magoosh Prep: https://track.flexlinkspro.com/g.ashx?foid=156074.11490.826499&trid=1261319.160955&foc=16&fot=9999&fos=5 http://www.eslbusinessenglishexperts.com Ask Me:https://t.me/eslbusinessenglishexperts Expert in Coaching French, German, Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Russian, Spanish and Brazilian ESL speakers and business professionals from UAE - Dubai, Abu Dhabi - Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Jordan, Iraq, Tokyo, Moscow, Seoul, Bejing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Madrid, Germany. Sign-up to my FREE English Tips and Success Newsletter: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/Coach-Mark-In-Manila-Wealth-Health-ESL-English-&-Career-Success-Creation-Newsletter-PLUS-FREE-Instant-Money-Creation-Links-p495003506 Access Hundreds IELTS Online Courses. Take Mock Tests From Home - Get Your Dream IELTS Score Use My 10% Off Link: https://i.preptical.com/login?ref=17760&apply-promo=initial-impact Have your IELTS Written Tasks or OET Writing Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Tasks-IELTS-OET-Writing-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504806078 Have your IELTS or OET Speaking Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Speaking-Recordings-IELTS-PART-2-OET-Recorded-Speaking-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504782211 https://bookshop.org/lists/coach-mark-in-manila-nail-your-ielts-essential-reads Non-native or native speaker? Want to promote your coaching services and share helpful ESL English, Career, Life, Mental Health, Business guidance / info for free to my listeners? Go ahead - it's FREE! You can upload your audio files and show notes with all your booking pages / links / YouTube / Podcast etc via We Transfer https://wetransfer.com/ and send to me at: hello@initial-impact.com. I will upload suitable audios asap - if yours hasn't been featured within 14 days please consider it unsuccessful at this point in time but do feel free to try to again with another more appropriate audio / subject. Simply drag or drop the files / upload them on WeTransfer and send it to my email address hello@initial-impact.com - attach everything you would like to be included on the show notes. Please state: Your Name / Company, Country, Native Or Non-Native Speaker, Nationality, Brief 250 Word Bio, Specialties, Website Links / YouTube / Social Media Handle To Connect With You --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila
Arabic, Indian, Pakistani, Filipino, Vietnamese, Japanese, Turkish, French ESL Speakers - Use These Insider Techniques To Ace Your Professional Presentations Like A TedEx Pro

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 23:40


Love my podcast? Sponsor an episode monthly here: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support or by buying me a coffee & help me continue making FREE content for you: https://buy.stripe.com/dR67vtcTvbubefmcN2 Get your best IELTS Score with Magoosh Prep: https://track.flexlinkspro.com/g.ashx?foid=156074.11490.826499&trid=1261319.160955&foc=16&fot=9999&fos=5 http://www.eslbusinessenglishexperts.com Ask Me:https://t.me/eslbusinessenglishexperts Expert in Coaching French, German, Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Russian, Spanish and Brazilian ESL speakers and business professionals from UAE - Dubai, Abu Dhabi - Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Jordan, Iraq, Tokyo, Moscow, Seoul, Bejing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Madrid, Germany. Sign-up to my FREE English Tips and Success Newsletter: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/Coach-Mark-In-Manila-Wealth-Health-ESL-English-&-Career-Success-Creation-Newsletter-PLUS-FREE-Instant-Money-Creation-Links-p495003506 Access Hundreds IELTS Online Courses. Take Mock Tests From Home - Get Your Dream IELTS Score Use My 10% Off Link: https://i.preptical.com/login?ref=17760&apply-promo=initial-impact Have your IELTS Written Tasks or OET Writing Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Tasks-IELTS-OET-Writing-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504806078 Have your IELTS or OET Speaking Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Speaking-Recordings-IELTS-PART-2-OET-Recorded-Speaking-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504782211 https://bookshop.org/lists/coach-mark-in-manila-nail-your-ielts-essential-reads Non-native or native speaker? Want to promote your coaching services and share helpful ESL English, Career, Life, Mental Health, Business guidance / info for free to my listeners? Go ahead - it's FREE! You can upload your audio files and show notes with all your booking pages / links / YouTube / Podcast etc via We Transfer https://wetransfer.com/ and send to me at: hello@initial-impact.com. I will upload suitable audios asap - if yours hasn't been featured within 14 days please consider it unsuccessful at this point in time but do feel free to try to again with another more appropriate audio / subject. Simply drag or drop the files / upload them on WeTransfer and send it to my email address hello@initial-impact.com - attach everything you would like to be included on the show notes. Please state: Your Name / Company, Country, Native Or Non-Native Speaker, Nationality, Brief 250 Word Bio, Specialties, Website Links / YouTube / Social Media Handle To Connect With You --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila
Why Female Speakers Of ESL English Struggle More With Confidence AND Speaking To Be Heard In Meetings AND How To Fix That FAST!

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 26:35


Love my podcast? Sponsor an episode monthly here: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support or by buying me a coffee & help me continue making FREE content for you: https://buy.stripe.com/dR67vtcTvbubefmcN2 Get your best IELTS Score with Magoosh Prep: https://track.flexlinkspro.com/g.ashx?foid=156074.11490.826499&trid=1261319.160955&foc=16&fot=9999&fos=5 http://www.eslbusinessenglishexperts.com Ask Me:https://t.me/eslbusinessenglishexperts Expert in Coaching French, German, Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Russian, Spanish and Brazilian ESL speakers and business professionals from UAE - Dubai, Abu Dhabi - Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Jordan, Iraq, Tokyo, Moscow, Seoul, Bejing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Madrid, Germany. Sign-up to my FREE English Tips and Success Newsletter: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/Coach-Mark-In-Manila-Wealth-Health-ESL-English-&-Career-Success-Creation-Newsletter-PLUS-FREE-Instant-Money-Creation-Links-p495003506 Access Hundreds IELTS Online Courses. Take Mock Tests From Home - Get Your Dream IELTS Score Use My 10% Off Link: https://i.preptical.com/login?ref=17760&apply-promo=initial-impact Have your IELTS Written Tasks or OET Writing Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Tasks-IELTS-OET-Writing-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504806078 Have your IELTS or OET Speaking Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Speaking-Recordings-IELTS-PART-2-OET-Recorded-Speaking-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504782211 https://bookshop.org/lists/coach-mark-in-manila-nail-your-ielts-essential-reads Non-native or native speaker? Want to promote your coaching services and share helpful ESL English, Career, Life, Mental Health, Business guidance / info for free to my listeners? Go ahead - it's FREE! You can upload your audio files and show notes with all your booking pages / links / YouTube / Podcast etc via We Transfer https://wetransfer.com/ and send to me at: hello@initial-impact.com. I will upload suitable audios asap - if yours hasn't been featured within 14 days please consider it unsuccessful at this point in time but do feel free to try to again with another more appropriate audio / subject. Simply drag or drop the files / upload them on WeTransfer and send it to my email address hello@initial-impact.com - attach everything you would like to be included on the show notes. Please state: Your Name / Company, Country, Native Or Non-Native Speaker, Nationality, Brief 250 Word Bio, Specialties, Website Links / YouTube / Social Media Handle To Connect With You --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila
Quickly Eliminate These 5 Pronunciation & Speaking Challenges Many Indian Speakers Of ESL English Make - Improve How Your Fluency, Confidence & Sound Fast!

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 20:42


Love my podcast? Sponsor an episode monthly here: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support or by buying me a coffee & help me continue making FREE content for you: https://buy.stripe.com/dR67vtcTvbubefmcN2 Get your best IELTS Score with Magoosh Prep: https://track.flexlinkspro.com/g.ashx?foid=156074.11490.826499&trid=1261319.160955&foc=16&fot=9999&fos=5 http://www.eslbusinessenglishexperts.com Ask Me:https://t.me/eslbusinessenglishexperts Expert in Coaching French, German, Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Russian, Spanish and Brazilian ESL speakers and business professionals from UAE - Dubai, Abu Dhabi - Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Jordan, Iraq, Tokyo, Moscow, Seoul, Bejing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Madrid, Germany. Sign-up to my FREE English Tips and Success Newsletter: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/Coach-Mark-In-Manila-Wealth-Health-ESL-English-&-Career-Success-Creation-Newsletter-PLUS-FREE-Instant-Money-Creation-Links-p495003506 Access Hundreds IELTS Online Courses. Take Mock Tests From Home - Get Your Dream IELTS Score Use My 10% Off Link: https://i.preptical.com/login?ref=17760&apply-promo=initial-impact Have your IELTS Written Tasks or OET Writing Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Tasks-IELTS-OET-Writing-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504806078 Have your IELTS or OET Speaking Checked, Corrected and Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Speaking-Recordings-IELTS-PART-2-OET-Recorded-Speaking-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504782211 https://bookshop.org/lists/coach-mark-in-manila-nail-your-ielts-essential-reads Non-native or native speaker? Want to promote your coaching services and share helpful ESL English, Career, Life, Mental Health, Business guidance / info for free to my listeners? Go ahead - it's FREE! You can upload your audio files and show notes with all your booking pages / links / YouTube / Podcast etc via We Transfer https://wetransfer.com/ and send to me at: hello@initial-impact.com. I will upload suitable audios asap - if yours hasn't been featured within 14 days please consider it unsuccessful at this point in time but do feel free to try to again with another more appropriate audio / subject. Simply drag or drop the files / upload them on WeTransfer and send it to my email address hello@initial-impact.com - attach everything you would like to be included on the show notes. Please state: Your Name / Company, Country, Native Or Non-Native Speaker, Nationality, Brief 250 Word Bio, Specialties, Website Links / YouTube / Social Media Handle To Connect With You --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila
Thought For The Day:Remember Who You Are - Are You Going In The Right Direction? In Memory Of Japanese Animator Isao Takahata & What His Movies Teach Us About Considering The Path Our Lives Are Taking

Desperately Learning English - Faster Business English Emigrate Canada, UK - Coach Mark In Manila

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 24:31


Love my podcast? Sponsor an episode monthly here: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support or by buying me a coffee & help me continue making FREE content for you: https://buy.stripe.com/dR67vtcTvbubefmcN2 Only Yesterday Final Scene: https://vimeo.com/128247544 Get your best IELTS Score - Magoosh Prep: https://track.flexlinkspro.com/g.ashx?foid=156074.11490.826499&trid=1261319.160955&foc=16&fot=9999&fos=5 http://www.eslbusinessenglishexperts.com Ask Me:https://t.me/eslbusinessenglishexperts Expert in Coaching French, German, Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Russian, Spanish and Brazilian ESL speakers & business professionals from UAE - Dubai, Abu Dhabi - Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Jordan, Iraq, Tokyo, Moscow, Seoul, Bejing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Madrid, Germany. Sign-up to my FREE English Tips and Success Newsletter: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/Coach-Mark-In-Manila-Wealth-Health-ESL-English-&-Career-Success-Creation-Newsletter-PLUS-FREE-Instant-Money-Creation-Links-p495003506 Access Hundreds IELTS Online Courses. Take Mock Tests From Home - Get Your Dream IELTS Score Use My 10% Off Link: https://i.preptical.com/login?ref=17760&apply-promo=initial-impact Have your IELTS Written Tasks or OET Writing Checked, Corrected & Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Tasks-IELTS-OET-Writing-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504806078 Have your IELTS or OET Speaking Checked, Corrected & Graded: https://coachmarkinmanilanlpcoaching.company.site/x-10-Speaking-Recordings-IELTS-PART-2-OET-Recorded-Speaking-Correction-And-Feedback-Service-p504782211 https://bookshop.org/lists/coach-mark-in-manila-nail-your-ielts-essential-reads Non-native or native coach? Promote your coaching services and share helpful ESL English, Career, Life, Mental Health, Business guidance / info for free to my listeners? Go ahead - it's FREE! You can upload your audio files and show notes with all your booking pages / links / YouTube / Podcast etc via We Transfer https://wetransfer.com/ and send to me at: hello@initial-impact.com. I will upload suitable audios asap - if yours hasn't been featured within 14 days please consider it unsuccessful at this point in time but do feel free to try to again with another more appropriate audio / subject. Please state: Your Name / Company, Country, Native Or Non-Native Speaker, Nationality, Brief 250 Word Bio, Specialties, Website Links / YouTube / Social Media Handle To Connect With You --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/markinmanilacamblyesl/support

SMB Community Podcast by Karl W. Palachuk
Michael Callahan - Cyberfit Summit 2022

SMB Community Podcast by Karl W. Palachuk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 33:18


Host Karl sits with Acronis's Michael Callahan at Cyberfit Summit! Michael is a security marketing executive with the rare combination of branding, product and technical expertise. Proven track record in both large and startup companies developing and executing go-to-market and enablement programs that drive record revenue. He is an experienced leader who creates a collaborative environment while setting clear objectives and holding himself and the team accountable to deliver results. Specialties: corporate marketing, product marketing, field marketing, product management, web marketing, social media, corporate communications, branding, messaging and press and analyst relations   Sponsor Memo: PCMatic  PC Matic — Endpoint Security built on a zero trust/default deny foundation. Finally - a light weight, simple to deploy & easy to manage approach to application allowlisting. The perfect compliment to your current security stack. No minimums and no annual contracts. Find out more about PC Matic by visiting https://PCMatic.com/MSP today.   

The Wall Street Resource
Heritage Global Inc. (HGBL) Ross Dove, CEO

The Wall Street Resource

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 15:32


Heritage Global Inc. values and monetizesindustrial & financial assets by providing acquisition, disposition,valuation, and lending services for surplus and distressed assets. This aids infacilitating the circular economy by diverting useful industrial assets fromlandfills and operating an ethical supply chain by overseeing post-sale accountactivity of financial assets. Specialties consist of acting as an adviser, inaddition to acquiring or brokering turnkey manufacturing facilities, surplusindustrial machinery and equipment, industrial inventories, real estate,account receivable portfolios, and intellectual property through its twobusiness units: Industrial Assets and Financial Assets.

Audible Bleeding
SVS Webinars - Hacking the EMR

Audible Bleeding

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 63:10


REGISTER HERE for the NEXT webinar 3-D, at 7 pm EST/4 pm PST on December 12, 2022. From 3-D printing to presurgical planning using 3-D modeling, this webinar will explore how 3-D technology is being utilized in vascular surgery today. Today, we are republishing the Health Information Technology (HITC) Webinar from September 7, 2022, Hacking the EMR: Making the EMR work for you.  A blessing and a curse, the EMR is an integral part of the modern practice of providing medical care. The Community Practice Section, Health Information Technology Committee, and Wellness Committee have collaborated to develop a webinar about making the EMR work for you. We review how to manage the EMR to benefit your daily practice needs; make the EMR work for small independent practices, including OBLs; how to manage EMR burnout; and a few hacks to make the EMR work for you. Faculty & Topics: Mal Sheahan, MD - Stating the problem of whether the EMR works for us or the other way around. Vascular surgeons, burnout, and the EMR. Mitigation strategies and SVS' role in resolving this issue. Daniel Bertges, MD - Strategies/updates on SVS discussions with EPIC/Powerchart on ways to integrate vascular-specific documentation requirements and streamline data entry (including VQI, etc.). London Guidry, MD, and James Craven, MD - How does the smaller independent group effectively use EMR in daily practice/OBL setting? Barriers/challenges/advantages.  Robert Beaulieu, MD, presenting for Jeniann Yi, MD - Challenges and opportunities of integrating different EMRs.   Moderator - Geetha Jeyabalan, MD; Vascular Surgeon, MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute. Full Webinar Video Relevant Links Epic dot phrase - .vasexam Weed. “Medical Records That Guide and Teach.” (1968) NEJM. 278(11): 593–600 Longman. Best Care Anywhere: Why VA Healthcare is Better than Yours. (2012) Penguin Random House Chaiyachati et al. “Assessment of Inpatient Time Allocation Among First-Year Internal Medicine Residents Using Time-Motion Observations.”(2019)  JAMA IM 179(6):760–67. Chawla et al. “Settled Science: The Indisputable Link between EHR and Burnout.” (2021) Vascular Specialist  Corby et al.. “A Qualitative Study of Provider Burnout: Do Medical Scribes Hinder or Help?”(2021)  JAMIA Open 4(3) Sheahan. “An Open Letter to Epic Systems.” (2021) Vascular Specialist. IOM. To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System. Edited by Kohn et al.(2000) National Academies Press (US). Balasubramanian. “Physicians Would Need Almost 27 Hours A Day To Provide Optimal Patient Care, Per New Study.” (2022) Forbes. Morgenstern. “Of Clamps, Clips, and Computers.” (2006) Texas Heart Institute Journal. 33(3):279–80. Sinsky et al. “Allocation of Physician Time in Ambulatory Practice: A Time and Motion Study in 4 Specialties.”(2016)  Annals of Internal Medicine. 165(11):753. Stark. “H.R.6898 - 110th Congress (2007-2008): Health-e Information Technology Act of 2008.” (2008) Legislation, “VQI & Epic Electronic Health Record Integration.” Accessed November 23, 2022. Specialty Steering Boards Improve Quality on a Global Scale.  Epic Publication. 2016 Suki.ai AI Voice Assistant for Healthcare. SVS members can join the Community Practice Section by emailing svscps@vascularsociety.org. What other topics would you like to hear about? Let us know more about you and your thoughts about our podcast through our Listener Survey or email us at AudibleBleeding@vascularsociety.org. Follow us on Twitter @audiblebleeding Learn more about us at https://www.audiblebleeding.com/about-1/ and #jointheconversation.

Yoga Focus
Ep. 52: Occupational Therapist & Yoga Therapist: My Education, Background, Experience & Specialties

Yoga Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 10:13


In this episode I talk about my education, experience (as a yoga teacher & as an OT) to show how these two professions go SO well together! This is to help other OTs or Yoga Teachers to see the path I took to becoming a Yoga Therapist (a question I get a lot of E-mails about). This is also to help my students to gain a better understanding of my education/experience so they know what I can address & what to expect from working with me. I encourage all yoga teachers and yoga therapists to make their education and experience clear to their students- this helps you to find your niche, stay within your scope of practice & attract the students that are looking for YOU! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/yogafocus/support

No Filter with Kobo
21. Waterless

No Filter with Kobo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 16:24


Consumers all over the world are becoming more aware of the need to save water and have sustainable practices. Waterless Beauty refers to skincare and cosmetic products formulated without water, like bars, tablets, and dry shampoos. In this episode, we will discuss the advantages and challenges of making these products and discuss if they could be the future of sustainable cosmetics. Links to formulas discussed: Foundation Tablet: Episode #6 https://spotifyanchor-web.app.link/e/S2yaD6oP1ub Natural Instant Hair Building Fiber Spray: Episode #20 https://spotifyanchor-web.app.link/e/vNTAiVqP1ub ABOUT US: Since 1987 Kobo has provided innovative, technology-based raw materials to the cosmetic industry. The product range includes Surface Treated Pigments, Microspheres, Suncare and Color Dispersions, Silicone Fluids, Specialties, Natural Ingredients, Effect Pigments, Boron Nitride , and Delivery Systems. Kobo has five locations, USA (Corporate Headquarters), France, Japan, Brazil , and the UK and is represented globally by independent agents.

What the Health?
Changing of the Guard

What the Health?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 34:47


Democrats retained control of the U.S. Senate in the midterm elections, while Republicans won a majority in the House, giving them the ability to block items on President Joe Biden's agenda. Meanwhile, the lame-duck, Democratic-led Congress won't have the votes to pass abortion rights legislation, although they may try to undo some long-standing anti-abortion policies in federal spending bills. Joanne Kenen of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Politico, Victoria Knight of Axios, and Alice Miranda Ollstein of Politico, join KHN's Julie Rovner to discuss these topics and more. Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read, too: Julie Rovner: The Philadelphia Inquirer's “Spice Containers Are the Most Contaminated Surface in Your Kitchen,” by Sarah Gantz Alice Miranda Ollstein: ProPublica's “We Need to Defend This Law”: Inside an Anti-Abortion Meeting With Tennessee's GOP Lawmakers,” by Kavitha Surana Victoria Knight: The Daily Beast's “COVID-Denying Medical Group Implodes Over Founder's Extravagant Spending,” by Will SommerJoanne Kenen: The Pink Sheet's “Califf's Covid Twitter Communications Reveal Knowledge Gaps Partially of FDA's Own Making,” by Sarah Karlin-Smith Also mentioned in this week's episode: Axios' “Nonprofit Scores With Progressive Health Ballot Measures in Red States,” by Sabrina MorenoCleveland.com's “Some Electronic Messages to Cleveland Clinic Healthcare Providers Could Cost $50,” by Julie Washington KHN's “Sick Profit: Investigating Private Equity's Stealthy Takeover of Health Care Across Cities and Specialties” by Fred Schulte The Milbank Quarterly's “Termites in the House of Health Care,” by John McDonough Click here for a transcript of the episode. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Be Real Show
#419 - Tom Kulzer gets REAL about the Power of Email Marketing in 2022

Be Real Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 46:21


In 1998, Tom founded AWeber Communications to help small business around the world better more effectively communicate and build relationships with customers and prospects using permission based email marketing. Having organically grown AWeber from 0 to over 300,000 active clients Tom's focus is strategic planning, market strategy, business development, and team building. Recognized as one of Pennsylvania's Best Places to Work for the past 10 consecutive years (2021-2012), Tom believes in creating a unique work place lifestyle unlike that of most companies. With a culture driven by five core values we are constantly growing our talented team of 100 team members to take on new, unique challenges in pursuit of growing millions of small businesses around the world. AWeber Core Values: * Create Remarkable Experiences * Foster Respect and Cooperation * Listen to What People Say About Us. Invite Feedback. * Learn. Educate. Innovate. * Don't Take Ourselves Too Seriously; Have Fun. Member * Young Presidents' Organization (YPO) * Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG) Awards: * PA Best Places to Work 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2009 * Stevie Awards: Customer Service Department of the Year - 2020 bronze, 2019 Silver, 2018 bronze, 2017 bronze * Timmy Awards: 2018 1st Philadelphia's Best Tech Culture, 2018 2nd Best Tech Workplace for Diversity * National Customer Service Association - Small Business Service Team of the Year 2017 * SmartCEO Marcum Innovator of the Year Finalist 2015 * Philadelphia's Best Places to Work 2012 & 2013 (Philly Business Journal) * Philly.com Best Places to Work 2012 & 2013 * Eastern Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year 2012 * LEED Gold environmental standards for our Chalfont office design * International Interior Design Association (IIDA) People's Choice Award 2013 * Green Build Award from the Associated Builders & Contractors Association 2013 Specialties: entrepreneurship, product strategy, business development, mentoring, team building, email marketing, email deliverability, product managementIn 1998, Tom founded AWeber Communications to help small business around the world better more effectively communicate and build relationships with customers and prospects using permission based email marketing. Having organically grown AWeber from 0 to over 300,000 active clients Tom's focus is strategic planning, market strategy, business development, and team building. Recognized as one of Pennsylvania's Best Places to Work for the past 10 consecutive years (2021-2012), Tom believes in creating a unique work place lifestyle unlike that of most companies. With a culture driven by five core values we are constantly growing our talented team of 100 team members to take on new, unique challenges in pursuit of growing millions of small businesses around the world. AWeber Core Values: * Create Remarkable Experiences * Foster Respect and Cooperation * Listen to What People Say About Us. Invite Feedback. * Learn. Educate. Innovate. * Don't Take Ourselves Too Seriously; Have Fun. Member * Young Presidents' Organization (YPO) * Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG) Awards: * PA Best Places to Work 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2009 * Stevie Awards: Customer Service Department of the Year - 2020 bronze, 2019 Silver, 2018 bronze, 2017 bronze * Timmy Awards: 2018 1st Philadelphia's Best Tech Culture, 2018 2nd Best Tech Workplace for Diversity * National Customer Service Association - Small Business Service Team of the Year 2017 * SmartCEO Marcum Innovator of the Year Finalist 2015 * Philadelphia's Best Places to Work 2012 & 2013 (Philly Business Journal) * Philly.com Best Places to Work 2012 & 2013 * Eastern Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year 2012 * LEED Gold environmental standards for our Chalfont office design * International Interior Design Association (IIDA) People's Choice Award 2013 * Green Build Award from the Associated Builders & Contractors Association 2013 Specialties: entrepreneurship, product strategy, business development, mentoring, team building, email marketing, email deliverability, product management

No Filter with Kobo
20. Formula of the Month: Natural Instant Hair Building Fiber Spray

No Filter with Kobo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 13:26


Hair Loss and thinning hair can happen at any age and at any stage in life. So many people are experiencing these issues are embarrassed and self-conscious as a result. Hair-building fibers are a quick and effective solution to immediately mask thinning and fine hair and provide a quick fix to help people regain self-confidence. Kobo is right there at the forefront realizing the need. In this episode, we will share a sample formula of Hair Building Fibers and explain the key ingredients in creating this type of formula. Best of all, it's a very simple formula to create! Links: Fibers: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-Fibers-Intl.pdf Kobo Pigmentary Dispersions: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-PigmentaryDispersions.pdf Microspheres: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-Microspheres.pdf Sunboost ATB-Antioxidant Benefits: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-SunBoost-ATB.pdf ABOUT US: Since 1987 Kobo has provided innovative, technology-based raw materials to the cosmetic industry. The product range includes Surface Treated Pigments, Microspheres, Suncare and Color Dispersions, Silicone Fluids, Specialties, Natural Ingredients, Effect Pigments, Boron Nitride , and Delivery Systems. Kobo has five locations, USA (Corporate Headquarters), France, Japan, Brazil , and the UK and is represented globally by independent agents. Learn more at: www.koboproductsinc.com

The Lebanese Physicians' Podcast
Episode 56: Discussing pathways to surgical specialties in the US with Dr. Pascal Jabbour

The Lebanese Physicians' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 26:35


Tune in to our newest episode of The Lebanese Physicians' Podcast with Dr. Pascal Jabbour discussing his pathway to a neurosurgical residency in the United States and his tips for success. We also discuss the research fellowships he is offering to help international medical graduates, specifically Lebanese graduates, succeed in neurosurgical research and in securing residency spots in the United States. We conclude discussing his wine making experience. We can't wait to taste his new product from Bordeaux in the next several years. #lebanon #neurosurgery #medicalresearch #wine You can also watch the episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/yKkQol1LG6Q and listen to it on Apple, Spotify, iHeartRadio, and Anghami

What's Up Tuscany English
The dish that will cost you a massive fine - Ep. 105

What's Up Tuscany English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 17:46


Despite many foreigners think about Tuscany as just an open air museum, a place where time is frozen, things change here as well. Some of these changes are so minute to be almost ignored. Others are much more painful. A while ago, for example, I remembered a very special recipe that my grandmother cooked us once in a Sheffield flood. They didn't look great, but those small fishes were absolutely outstanding. When I came back home, I asked my mother if she could cook it for me. Her answer left me dumbfounded: "I can't - it's forbidden". How is that possible? Wasn't it one of the most celebrated dishes of this land? It sure was and almost 30 years ago it became absolutely verboten. If someone catches you with these delicate fishes, you will receive a massive fine. That's why this week What's Up Tuscany will tell you the little known story of how an historic staple of our cuisine became a forbidden delicacy, able to fetch ridiculous prices at the black market. If you listen to the entire episode you will learn why it was necessary to outlaw this dish, the adventurous life of these tiny fishes, able to cross incredible distances and the traditional recipe used in Pisa to cook them to perfection before it became a felony. Should you want to taste this very special dish, you won't need to spend a lot of money or look for your nearest smuggler. We will tell you two very good ways to replace the forbidden fishes and still cook an incredible dish. Let us know if you like this kind of episode or if you'd rather have us talk about history, legends or hidden corners of this incredible land. We would be extremely happy to know you and have a chat! Contact info here below:Email: podcast@larno.itFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/larno.itTwitter: @arno_it / @WhatsupTuscanyLINKS TO SOURCES (ITALIAN ONLY)http://www.tuttomondonews.it/inseguendo-unanguilla-alla-ricerca-di-un-cibo-perduto/http://www.lavocedelserchio.it/vediarticolo.php?id=13451&page=0&t_a=le-cee-in-cucinahttps://poverimabelliebuoni.blogspot.com/2013/09/le-cee-dei-poveri.htmlhttps://www.pisatoday.it/cucina/come-preparare-cee-finte-natale.htmlhttps://corrieredelvino.it/gastroviaggiando/il-regno-delle-ce-boccadarno-a-marina-di-pisa/https://www.ilgiornaledeimarinai.it/pesca-delle-cee/BACKGROUND MUSICPipe Choir - Bom Bom Breakthrough (Instrumental)Incompetech - Leopard Print ElevatorPipe Choir - Mapping the Stars (Instrumental)Inova - Seamonster (Instrumental)Cityfires - Blood Problems (Instrumental)Wayne John Bradley - Blues Rock Original InstrumentalAll released under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licensehttps://soundcloud.com/pipe-choir-2/pipe-choir-bom-bom-breakthrough-creative-commons-instrumentalhttps://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1500077https://soundcloud.com/pipe-choir-2/pipe-choir-mapping-the-stars-instrumentalhttps://soundcloud.com/argofox/inova-seamonsterhttps://soundcloud.com/ljayofficial/blood-problems-instrumentalby-cityfireshttps://soundcloud.com/ayneohnradley/blues-rock-original-instrumentalcreative-commonshttp://www.pipechoir.com/

The Arise Podcast
Season 4, Episode 6 Inter Cultural Conversations on Repair with Dr. Ernest Gray, Rebecca W. Walston, Jen Oyama Murphy, TJ Poon, and Danielle S. Castillejo - Part 2

The Arise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 55:22


 Bios:Ernest Gray Jr. is the pastor of Keystone Baptist Church located in the West Garfield Park neighborhood of Chicago.  He is a graduate of the Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Pastoral Ministries, and a graduate of Wheaton College with a Master's Degree in Biblical Exegesis.  He completed his PhD coursework at McMaster Divinity College and is currently completing his thesis within the corpus of 1 Peter. Mr. Gray has taught in undergraduate school of Moody in the areas of Hermeneutics, first year Greek Grammar, General Epistles, the Gospel of John and Senior Seminar. It is Mr. Gray's hope to impact the African American church  through scholarship. Teaching has been one way that God has blessed him to live this out.  Ernest is also co-host of the newly released podcast Just Gospel with an emphasis upon reading today's social and racial injustices through a gospel lens. www.moodyradio.org    Jen Oyama Murphy  "My love of good stories led me to Yale University where I received a BA in English. Upon graduation, I felt called to bring individual stories into relationship with the Gospel Story, and I have worked in the areas of campus and church ministry, lay counseling, and pastoral care since 1989. Over the years, I sought a variety of ongoing education and training in the fields of psychology and theology, including graduate classes at The Seattle School of Theology & Psychology and Benedictine University. I also completed the Training Certificate and Externship programs at The Allender Center, and I previously held roles on their Training and Pastoral Care Team, as Manager of Leadership Development, and most recently as the Senior Director of The Allender Center. Believing that healing and growth happens in the context of relationship, I work collaboratively to create a safe coaching space of curiosity and kindness where honesty, care, desire, and imagination can grow. Using my experience and expertise in a trauma-informed, narrative-focused approach, I seek to help people live the story they were most meant for and heal from the ones they were not. I am passionate about personal support and development, particularly for leaders in nonprofit or ministry settings, including lay leaders who may not have a formal title or position. I'm especially committed to engaging the personal and collective stories of those who have felt invisible, marginalized, and oppressed. I love facilitating groups as well as working individually with people. I currently live in Chicago with my husband, and we have two adult daughters.Rebecca Wheeler Walston lives in Virginia, has completed  Law School at UCLA, holds a Master's in Marriage and Family Counseling, is also a licensed minister. Specializing in advising non-profits and small businesses. Specialties: providing the legal underpinning for start-up nonprofits and small businesses, advising nonprofit boards, 501c3 compliance, creating and reviewing business contracts.TJ PoonDr. Ernest Gray (00:41:40):Absolutely. Absolutely. There will be stories told in the next five, no, two or three years now about, this is the fascinating thing I'm trying to wrap my mind around is that it is this, I need to do a more research upon the Ukrainian Russian thing wherein you have, um, my ignorance, you have an apparent Eastern European, you have, uh, you know, have an eastern European kind of, this isn't anything about pigment autocracy, but culturally, I'm op I'm opposed to you because you have Russian descent, and I'm a Ukrainian descent. So upon the, upon the outside, it's not anything that has to do with the, with the merits of, of, of, uh, racial, racial, a racialized racialization. It has more to do with the cultural, um, ethnicity kind of, um, indicatives that create this hostility between the two. And to hear the atrocities that are ongoing right now against, you know, each o against the, the Ukrainian Russian conflict, right now, we're gonna hear about those things and, and, and hear just how egregious they are or whether it's the, um, the tusks and the Hutus in the Rwandan conflict, or whether it's the Bosnians versus the, um, the Serbians. I mean, there's gonna be a lot of that. There's, we, we find that these things occur, um, and that, and that it's, it's all because of these notions of superiority and, and tools of the enemy in order to, to, to divide and conquer. Um, and then coupled with power create, you know, devastating effects. I, I I, I, I think that there's a, um, there's a, there's a, the, the collectivist idea of seeing us all in the same boat with various facets is something that we need to strive. It's not easy to always to do. Um, but it's gotta happen. If we're going to create a, a better human, if we're not creative, if the Lord is gonna work in a way to, to help us, uh, move toward a better humanity, one that is at least honoring may not happen in our lifetime, may not happen until we see the Lord face to face. But at the same time, that's the work that we're, I'm called to is to be, uh, or, you know, to, to be the embodiment of some type of re repa posture, um, modeling for others what it could look like. Danielle (00:44:19):Sure. Yeah. Um, Rebecca and I put this in here, Hurt versus harm. Um, hurt being, and, and again, these, these are definitions coming from us, so I recognize that other people may have a different view and we can talk about that. Um, hurt being in, in, when Rebecca and I were talking about it inevitable in any relationship may cause painful feelings and hurt someone's feelings. Um, harm violating a person's dignity, and it takes energy non consensually from someone So how do individual hurts add to or cement structural power structures and our perspective and experience of harm? How do individual hurts add to or cement structural power structures and our perspective and experience of, of them? Dr. Ernest Gray (00:45:31):Yeah. Um, it's cuz you've got muscle memory hurt, um, over and over and over and over and over of sorts provides a muscle memory, a knee jerk, a kind of , Oh, this is familiar, here we go again. Ow. So I think that's one way, I'll, I'll step back now, but I think that, that it's the body that maintains a powerful memory of the feeling and it feels, and it's gonna be a familiar kind of triggering slash re-injury that until it's interrupted, can create, can see this as, um, broadly speaking, a a, a more, um, yeah, a reoccurring thing that is, that needs to be interrupted. TJ Poon(00:46:27):I'm really mindful of this in my relationships because there's a lot of horror from white people, from white women towards different communities. And so, like in my relationships, you, there's a, there's a mindfulness of like, maybe we have a disruption and at the level of me and this other person, it is a hurt, but it, it reinforces a harm that they've experienced or it feels like, um, feels similar to. And so it's not like we, I it's not like we opt, we can opt out. Like it can't opt out of that collective narrative. I can't say, Oh, well I'm just, you know, this one person. Um, so I, I think that is complex because the individual hurts do contribute. They feel like what Dr. Gray was saying, like it is muscle memory. It's some sometimes where something can feel or just reinforce, I guess, um, what has already happened to us in contexts. Jen Oyama Murphy (00:47:36):I mean, I think the complexity of the relationship between hurt and harm, um, contributes to how hard it can be to actually have meaningful repair. Because I, my experience sometimes, and I, I know I do this myself, that I will lean into the hurt and apologize or try to do repair on a personal one to one level and somehow feel like if I do that, it will also, it also repairs the harm. And that doesn't, that's, that's not true. I mean, it can perhaps contribute to a restorative process or a repair process around the harm, but Right. Just me, um, in charge of a small group repairing for a particular hurt that may have happened in the small group doesn't necessarily address the structure, the system that put that small group together, the content that's being taught, you know, the, the opportunity for those participants to even be in the program, Right. That there is something that's happening at a, at a harm level, um, that my personal apology for something that I did that hurt someone in the group isn't actually addressing. But we can hope that it does or act like it does or even have the expectation, um, that it will. And so the, I love the new, the nuance or the, the clarity between the two definitions that you guys are, um, asking us to wrestle with. I think that's, that's good's making me think just for myself. Like where do I go first, you know, out of my own, um, training or naivete or just like wishful thing, thinking that, that I can't repair systemic harm by apologizing or repairing like a personal hurt. Danielle (00:49:36):Um, I mean, Jen, I've been wrestling with that and, and when I, when I, in my experience, when someone apologizes to me, and I know they're apologizing for personal hurt, but I feel like they haven't said in, in, in a way I can understand often I'm not understanding how do I actually get out of this so we're not pitted against each other again. Mm-hmm. , when I feel trapped in that space and I receive an apology, I often, I, I feel more angry even at, even if I know the person sincerely apologizing, if I'm telling a more true story to you all as a Latinx person, and I've noticed this in my family, I receive the apology, and yet when I have to continue to function in the system, I am more angry afterwards. Mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm. , there's a frustration that happens, which then of course is bottled down and it, I often talk to my clients about this, but I was talking to my husband about it. It's like we threw all this stuff in the pressure cooker cuz we do a lot of pressure cooking and put a plastic lid on it. And now the s h I t spread sideways. And that's kind of how it feels when we, now I'm not saying we can do this perfectly or I even know how to do it, but when we address hurt, that's part of systemic harm without addressing the system. I think in my experience, it feels like I'm feeling my own pressure cooker mm-hmm. and I'm not able to contain the spray at different times. Mm-hmm. . Dr. Ernest Gray (00:51:20):Yeah. I think I think about for, I think about for me, the, my, my the, you know, systemizing, systematizing the way in which I associate things, what the right environment, the way in which my, you know, my senses have associated things. I'll have dejavu because I had a certain smell from my childhood and it'll, it could be triggering, right? I smell something and I'm like, Oh man, that reminds me of this moment. All that categorization to me tells me how my brain functions and how mm-hmm. associative. Mm-hmm. , it is for instances, smells, places, um, things that occur. And it's, it's the, it's the ongoing sense of that, especially if we've come out of, um, houses or, um, families where this was it, it was normative for us to experience these things on a regular basis so that any, any hint of it elsewhere outside of that, outside of the confines of that can reignite that same kind of shallow breathing and response. And I don't wanna, um, but, but definitely the advancing of hurt versus harm. It, it, it, the harm the those in whatever that instance is that creates, that, that response outta me lets me know that more that it is, it was the ongoing nature of those things which created the harm. Um, and so it almost asks, I it's first acknowledgement and then secondly saying, What do I need to do to take care of myself in this instance? Where do I need to go? What do I need to give myself in this moment so that I'm not going down this road of, here we go again. I'm in a corner . I don't wanna do that. I don't wanna kind of check out. But, um, I think about the west side of Chicago where I'm ministering, um, and I'm thinking about, you know, just this community that it doesn't really affect them. It, it really doesn't to hear gunshots, to hear, um, to hear, uh, sirens and things like that. These are everyday occurrence so that the, so that the, so that the ongoing nature of what they're used to just has evolved into this kind of numbing sense. But I, but I guess in going back, it is interrupting that, that delicate, um, sequence of events so that it does not cause me to shut down in that moment that I've, that I'm still learning how to do for myself. Right. And I think that in our interpersonal relationships, especially, here's where it meets the road, is in our interpersonal, or even our most intimate relationships, the ongoing hurt and does eventually, uh, you know, cross the line into harm because it has taken away the energy out of that, out of the other person, uh, or or out of us. Um, after such a long time after repeated, repeated instances. Rebecca W. Walston (00:54:31):I, I think what I think I'm hearing everybody alludes this sense of like, can there be an awareness of, of the, where the interpersonal and the individual kind of collides with the collective and the systemic, right? And, and just a more complex understanding of how any incident, however big or small the rupture is. Where is the interplay of those two things? So, so that a comment between two people can actually have this impact that's far more and reverberates with the kind of generational familiarity that that all of a sudden, it, it, it, it, um, we're, we're out of the category. My feelings are hurt and into this space of it feels like something of in me has been violated. Um, and I think it takes a, an enormous amount of energy and awareness on the part of both people, both the person who perpetrated something and the person who was on the receiving end of that, to have a sense of like where they are and where they are and where the other person is to kind of know that and build all to hold it, um, with some integrity. There was a point in which we brought a group of people, uh, to, to view the equal justice initiative, um, landmarks in Montgomery, Alabama, and the conversation and a processing conversation between a white woman and a black woman. And, you know, after having come from the, the National Memorial and Peace and Justice and witnessing the history of lynching, understandably, this black woman was deeply angry, like profoundly angry, um, and trying to manage in the moment what that anger was and, and, and turned to the white participant and said like, I, like I'm really angry at you. Like, I kind of hate you right now. Mm-hmm. , um, two people who are virtually strangers. Right. And, and, and, and for the white woman to have said to her a sense of like, um, I get it. I got it. I'm, I'm white and I'm a woman.And there's a sense in which historically white women called this particular place in the lynching of black bodies mm-hmm. . Um, and also can, can I be in this room in the particularity of my individual story and know that I personally, Right. Um, don't, don't agree with that, stand against it, have not participated actively in it. Kind of a sense of like, you know, and it may have been an imperfect or, or generous engagement, but you can hear the tension of like, how can we both be in this room and hold the collective historical nature of this? And the particularity of the two individuals in the room together hadn't actually been the active participant interrupter. So Yeah. I think it's hard and messy. Danielle (00:57:51):I, I love what, uh, Rebecca wrote. There was, you know, been talking to me about do we imagine Shalom as a return to where we started? Cause the very nature of the disrupt disruption being we cannot return from Eden to the city of God. Um, and Rebecca, I'll let you elaborate on that a little bit more, but when we were talking Rebecca and I, you know, as a mixed race woman, and in those mixes, you know, is indigenous and Spanish and African, and, you know, just this mix, I'm like, where would I return to? Right? Mm-hmm. , what community does a Latinx person returned to? If, if it's a return to Eden, where is, is Eden lost? And so, um, yeah, Rebecca, I don't know if you wanna expand on what you were thinking. Rebecca W. Walston (00:58:43):Uh, I mean, I I've just been wrestling with this in particular, you know, we talk about individual hurt. It's easy to talk about like the disruption that happened in Eden, that what God meant for me individually, what you know, is reflected in the Garden of Eden. The kind of peace and the kind of generosity and the kind of, um, uh, just more that, that is in the Garden of Eden. And, but when I, when I try and so, so there's a depend in which I can step into this work and have this individual sense of like, Oh, you know, I wasn't meant for the fracture and my relationship between myself and my parents, Right? I was meant for something that was more whole than that. So how do I, how do I have a sense of what that was like in Eden, and how do I have a sense of going back to that kind of, that kind of space? But when I translate that into like collective work around racial trauma, I get lost like Danielle, right? In this, this sense that like, um, in, in her book, Born On the Water, um, the author sort of makes this argument that though these African people got on the ship at the beginning in Africa, while they made the journey across the Atlantic and before they landed in the United States, something happened on the water. And there's something in that hyphenated existence that created a new people group in, in a way that like, I can't actually go back to Africa. I like, I can't, I mean, I will go there and for half a second somebody might mistaken me for a, a colored person, right? And if you're inside Africa, that means I'm not fully African. I'm not fully white, I'm somewhere in the middle. But the second I open my mouth, they, they know I'm not African. I'm something else, right? And there's a sense in which I can't actually go back to Eden. There, there's something that happened in the rupture and the displacement that actually makes it impossible for me to return for that, right? And, and I still have that sense of being displaced in the hyphenated existence in the US that makes me, in some ways not fully American either. So what, what is the answer to that? And as I started to wrestle with that theologically, you know, I'm looking at the text going, actually, the, the journey for the Christian is not back to Eden . Like the end game is not back to Genesis, it's to revelation in the city of God. And so that's my sense of this comment is like, do do I pivot and start to imagine repair as not a return to Eden, but onto something else? And, and, and, um, you know, then I begin to suspect that, uh, that, that there's something even in the journey of, of that, that that is a far more value to me that I would want more than just the return to Eden. There's something sweeter having made it onto the city of God. So this is my wonderings. Curious how, how that hits for any of you. Dr. Ernest Gray (01:02:09):I think the, I think you're spot on. And I guess I, I guess it's a maturity mark that says that this continuum, this, this, um, I think you get to a certain and you just realize you never really arrive. And I think this fits within that same conceptual framework of like, you know, hey , you know, you, you could reach the pinnacle of your career. And, um, and yet, you know, it's still not be ultimately satisfying because it's like, is that it? You know, I think I'm on top of the mountain and I, and I guess that's the, that's inherent of human, of human of humanness for me is that I'm, I'm, I'm resigned to thinking about completion and absolute perfection. I'll be perfected when I meet Jesus. They'll be the more work for me to do or work in me to be done. But in the meantime, um, I'm, I'm, I'm gonna be striving, blowing it, striving, um, gaining some, you know, gaining some, um, some skills and learning how to navigate better life and figuring out what works and doesn't work any, uh, as I go, as I age, as I, and hopefully in growing wisdom. Um, but I, I like this idea because there's a sense of, of jettisoning your experiences as though they're irrelevant. No, they're what brought me to this place and they're what's propelling me forward. Um, there's this sense of I might as well give them a hug and bring them with me on the journey, uh, because then they create a sense of meaning and value for me and for those of, uh, you know, for me, uh, as I'm, as I'm making my progress through, through life. So, so, so, um, that to me shows marks of, uh, a sense of maturity and, you know, some restore some restoration. I think, you know, and, and again, it comes down to like this sense of like, you know, the things that have value for us are can, can be worn. You know, Like, my son's got a got, you know, a favorite stuffed animal that is horrible. I wanna wash it every time I see it. You know, it's just like, we get rid of this thing. No, it's just, there's something about this particular stuffed animal that I just cannot part ways with. And so that's, that's kind of how we don't wanna get rid of our vinky or you know, our blanky, whatever it is. We got . Cause we love itself. , TJ Poon (01:04:53):I was really moved when I read this slide and listened to Rebecca and Danielle talking, I think, um, so I named my daughter Eden. And, you know, the, the meaning of pleasure, delight, just that, that the nature of what we were meant for. And in the end, we find it in the city full of people that look like us and not like us. And the image of that is represented there. And just kind of that shifting from like, our delight is found in this garden where it's just as in God, um, to our delight is in this city and, you know, the lamb of God is their light. All these different images that are really powerful and revolution, I think about that. Like that, that has meaningful too. Uh, just a shifting, um, where is our, where is our pleasure? Where is our delight? How do we come to experience that shaone? And who are the people that we experience that through? Dr. Ernest Gray (01:05:53):That's huge. And I, and I, yeah, and I, it's those people that are really part of that, you know, that space for us, that that really kind of helps us to, you know, experience the full, the sum, the full sum of what shalom means for us. I think that that's really important for us to really, for me especially to, to not shy away from that because I, I I, I, my ma my natural inclination would be to just be very isolated and monastic as opposed to engaged in community . But it's experienced in community and it's experienced together, and it's experienced with other shattered people too. Right. Um, and that to me is where I draw strength and energy and, um, you know, peace from as well. So, thank you, tj. I think yours mm-hmm. , I like what you share there. Danielle (01:06:57):I, I guess I would add like, to that, like, I think so much of my experience is being like in this very moment when I feel joy or maybe shalom or a sense of heaven, even in the moment, because unaware of what, I'm always not aware of what will come next. I don't know. Um, yeah. So just the feeling of heaven is in this moment too, with, you know, in the moment that I get to sit with the four of you, this is a piece of heaven for me, a reflection of hope and healing. Although we haven't even explored the ways we might have, you know, rubbed each other the wrong way. I have a sense that we could do that. And in that sense, that feels like heaven to me in spaces where there could, there are conflict. I'm not saying there isn't just a, just, I think in my own culture, the, that's why Sundays feel so good to me. For instance, when I'm with a couple of other families and we're eating and talking and laughing and, you know, the older kids are playing with the younger kids, like, to me, that feels, oh, that feels good. And, and if, if that was the last thing I felt, I would, that would feel like heaven to me. So I, I think there's also that, I'm not saying we're not going to the city of God, but there's just these momentary times when I feel very close to what I think it, it might mean. Mm-hmm. , Rebecca W. Walston (01:08:41):I, I do think, Danielle, I mean, I resonate with what you're saying. I think, I think the text is very clear that there are these moments, um, along the way. Right? I think that's that sense of, yay, do I walk through the valley of the shadow, Right? I, I will be with you. I, I think like wherever you are in the process, along the journey, the moments where you have a sense of, um, I am with you always. Right? And however that shows up for you in a faith, in a person, in a smile and an expression, in deed, whatever, however that shows up, it definitely, like, if I, I do have a sense of like, things we pick up along the way and, and a sense of final destination all being a part of the, the, the healing, the, like, the journey of repair. Um, and, and I start to think about, um, You know, the story of Joseph is a very significant one to me, has very reflected my own story, and then, then will know what that reference means, um, to me in particular by, you know, the, the sense in, in Joseph of like, what sad to meant for evil, God meant for good, right? And the sense of him naming his two sons, Manas and Efram, and one of them, meaning God has caused me to forget the toilet of my father's house. Um, and God has caused me to prosper in the land of my infliction is the meaning of the other son. And so I do think that there's, there's something in the text even that, that is about the journey and the destination being sweeter and holding something more, um, that than had our, our soul existence only been in Eden, Right? I mean, and, and that isn't to say like, I don't wish for that, you know what I mean? Or that I wouldn't love to be there, but, but I, but I mean like, leave it only to God to, to assert this idea that like, um, all of the rupture holds something more, um, that than life without any, without there ever being any sense of rupture. Right? And I think we're in the category of like, the mysteries of God by I, I think. I think so I think there's, there's such value in the journey in the valleys and what we pick up there about ourselves and God and people in it with us. Um, you know, Yeah. Like that, that feels aspirational to me and also feels true in some senses. You're muted, Ernest. I can't, can't hear you. So I said Dr. Ernest Gray (01:11:33):I was low, I was very low when I said that resonates. I, um, I was thinking about, um, you know, for me in the last few years, you know, Covid has done a, has done an, an immeasurable service in many ways. It has been incredibly harmful for a lot of us, but it's been a, it's done an immeasurable service at the same time, um, to reorient us. Um, for me it is increased my, depend my creaturely dependence on God in a way that here to four I would not have been focused upon. Right? I, you know, I spent 12, 13 years in the, in, in the classroom as a professor teaching, uh, on autopilot, um, from God's word, from, um, and teaching students how to study and think and what, what these words in the Bible say and what they could potentially mean, um, to the best of my ability. But that was autopilot stuff. And I felt insulated, if you will. But, but the repair and the why of the repair, why it's important, why, why the, um, the rupture is necessary, and we can call I, I, I would call covid and the time prior to, and subsequent to be very rupturing, I, I would call it as necessary, because it helped me to see my why and why dependence upon God had it be reframed, refocused, re you know, recalibrated so that I could not, so I could get out of a sense of, um, oh, my training prepared me for this to know my, you know, what I am and who I, what my journey has been, did not prepare me for this, and all the attendant features that have come as a result, the relationships that are broken and realizing that they were jacked up from a long , they were jacked up. I just couldn't see them during all those years. Um, but these remind me of the need for God to be embodied, uh, in my life in a way that, um, I had been maybe not as present with. And I think that that's part of the reason why, um, this is my re my why for repair, is that it creates a better, more relational dynamic between me and God that had I not gone through some rupturing event, I would not have appreciated the value of where I'm at with him now. More than that. I think one other thing is that I think that there's a sense too that there's a, um, there's a heightened awareness of all these other aspects that are coming, that are coming about. My eyes are now not as with, you know, blinders on. Now I can look around and say, Wow, this is a really jacked up place. Where can I help to affect some change? Where could I, you know, where can I put my stubborn ounces? Where can I place you know, who I am and what God has put in me, um, in the way so that I can, um, be a part so that I can help, you know, groups that are hurting, people that are hurting communities that are struggling, Um, and the, like, Jen Oyama Murphy (01:15:19):I'm trying to work this out. So I'm just working it out out loud for you all. But, um, I think kind of pi backing off of Rebecca, your, um, juxtaposition between Eden and City of God, and like, why for repair? I think for me, it's the invitation to both humility and hope. And, and for me, humility, um, often in my story and experience has led to what I felt like was humiliation, right? And the way that I learned culturally to avoid that was, um, to not need to repair, to do everything perfectly. To do everything well, to always get the a plus, you know, to, to not make a mistake where I would need to repair. But there's a desperation and hopelessness that comes with that kind of demand or pressure where, um, it's, it is dirty and painful, and it doesn't have that sense of like, Oh, there can be something of the goodness of God that can restore these parts that are dying or dead back to the land of the living. And, um, I think that the idea of that we're move, it's not binary. I'm not completely broken, and I'm not totally healed, and that there can be, um, hope and humility in making that journey. And if I'm able to make that journey with all kinds of different people, um, how much richer and deeper and broader that experience, that growing of humility, I think that can lead to growth and restoration and learning and healing. That just feeds into the hope, right? The hope that yes, I, I will reach the kingdom of God at the end, and there will be kind of the way that what we'll all be who we were meant to be. And there will be such goodness there, all that will continue to grow. Um, if I can stay kind of on that journey and not feel like, um, not give into the poll to be at one place or the other, you know, where I'm either totally broken and there's no hope or completely healed and there's no humility Dr. Ernest Gray (01:17:54):Sounds like a dash to me, a hyphen space, very much so that that hyphen space does so much, it preaches a better word, really does. Then the opposite ends of those two, those two realities are consum, consum, you know, conclusionary kind of places you wanna be. It's the hyphen that where we, where we ought to be. Rebecca W. Walston (01:18:25):Did you, is that word hyphen intentional? I Dr. Ernest Gray (01:18:31):Think so. I think so. It's the interim, well, we call hyphen the interim, you can call it all of that good stuff. Um, I, I think it's because, you know, whether, you know, whenever we, wherever we frequent a cemetery, we always think about how stoic it is to see the name and the date of birth and the date of death. And that hyphen is, that's what preaches the better word, is the hyphen in between what this person and how they went about their, their lives with their, their ups and downs, their navigation through the world for people like, um, people, for people who have been on the receiving end of, um, of trauma pain, um, and racialized, um, uh, this ambi or dis disor dis dis dis disorientation or trauma , we, we realize that they have a lot more weight to bear and that their experiences were far more complex. Um, and so this makes their stories even more winsome and more intriguing for us to learn and know about because we're, we're in relationship with them. Um, but the hyphen is the best place to be. And I find that in many ways, um, that is where real life occurs, and that's where I'm at right now. Um, as, as, as a matter of fact, Rebecca W. Walston (01:19:59):I, I mean, I've, I've heard that it has a very black sermon right there about the hyphen and the dash, right? But it hit me in particular because Danielle knows I often introduced myself as African hyphen American. So that your, that word hyphen hit me in that, in that context. Right. And as I was listening to Jen talk about humility and hope and how she, what she learned of how to settle into that space in her Japanese nest or her Japanese Hy American, I just, it just hit me, it hit me about the hyphenated racialized experience in the US and what you might be suggesting consciously or subconsciously Right. About that being a good place to be. Danielle (01:20:50):Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Jen, when you were talking, I was like, wanting to cry. I can still feel the tears. And I was just like, I felt the literal pull, I think at both end of that spectrum, when you talked through them for yourself, I was like, Oh, yeah, that's where I'm, Oh, wait a minute. Then you described the other end, and I was like, Oh, that's where I am . And I was, I think I was like, I was like, Oh, to sit in that, that interim space, you know, the hyphen space, sometimes I have felt like that space would kill me. Mm-hmm. the shame of not knowing how to be one or the other. Mm. Or to try to hold, or to try to explain to someone, you know, I, I think, what is your wife or repair, Why wouldn't I repair? I think of my own, you know, body. And, and, and when Rebecca's talked about not earnest, and, and you, I, I think like I have to be doing that internal work. I mean, because, you know, as you know, if you live in the body of the oppressor and the impressed , how do you make, how do, how do what repair has to be happening? It it, it's, it's happening. And, and if I'm fearful and wonderfully made, then God didn't make me like this on a mistake. It wasn't like, Oh, crap, that's how she came out. Let me see if I can fix it. Hmm. Um, indeed. So those are the things I was thinking as you were talking, Jen. Hmm. Rebecca W. Walston (01:22:47):I, I think Danielle, you're, you're in that sense on the slide of like, any version of repair must work towards the salvation and their redemption of the oppress, the oppress onlooker. Right. And that there has to be, we, we have to have a sense of categories for all of those things. Dr. Ernest Gray (01:23:10):And the work by each, I wonder, which, you know, I'm always trying to determine which one is gonna be the easier to repair, which, which person are you, the pressor or onlooker? And we would just assume that the onlooker would have the least amount of, but they might actually bear the biggest burden is because they're gonna have to deal with assumptions and biases that they have accumulated that are entrenched and that they don't wanna deal with and come to terms with. That's why it's easier to simply, you know, just lull their response or, or stay silent as the, as the notion below here says it's, it's easier to stay silent, to be, you know, resign, say it's not my issue than it is to get in and, and, and to really unearth whether or not this is actually something in internally that they're wrestling with that's far more scary to do. Um, and the majority of people might have some, this is a generalization, but it seems to me like the majority of people don't wanna really, really do that work, Danielle (01:24:19):Um, because all of us have been onlookers to one another's ethnic pain, whether we like it or not. I know I have absolutely. I've been an onlooker mm-hmm. , Yep. Mm-hmm. . Yep. And, and just, and then that's where you have where to step in is just like, Oh, that does not feel good. Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. try to own that. My part in that, Dr. Ernest Gray (01:24:45):Ladies, it's almost a sense of a little bit of a reunion that I've had with you this afternoon, but I do need to go and pick up my two boys. And so for this part, I'm gonna need to jump off of the, um, of this, of this great time together, and hopefully I'll be invited back again so that my, um, so that we can, we can continue the conversation. Danielle (01:25:37):I will. Did you all have any final thoughts? TJ Poon (01:25:44):I've been noodling something since the very first slide, which is just like this distinction. I don't know if it's a useful one between disruption and rupture And how like rupture needs to be repaired, but a lot of times repair can't happen without sub disruption. And, you know, that first slide talks about how we kind of pathologized or like said negative anything that has to do with rupture, but you can't, like, you literally can't, um, repair without disrupting the systems. And I think in white imagination, those things are often made equivalent. Like anything that's disruptive is rupturing uncomfortable. Like, I need, I, I need to fix it as fast as possible. Um, versus no, actually this disruption is an invitation to something different. It's a disruption that actually will lead to an authentic repair or real repair as opposed to like, what calls dirty pain, like silence avoidance. Um, so I've just been thinking about those two different words and what they can mean. Mm-hmm. , Rebecca W. Walston (01:27:07):I like that distinction a lot. It, it feels almost like trying to get at like harm versus hurts, right? And, and try to have a sense of like, um, you know, are we always in the category of this is bad and awful and it needs to see immediately, Right. Or are there places where actually good and we need to let it play it itself out, So, yeah. Jen Oyama Murphy (01:27:35):Mm-hmm. Well, I think that also connects maybe fun too to Rebecca. You are, um, differentiating between like the demand to return to Eden or the like blessing of being on the journey to the city of God. Cause if the demand is to return to Eden, then anything disruptive is gonna feel, not like Eden, Right? But if, if it is about growing and learning and healing and developing on the road to the city of God, then disruption is part of that process, then it's something that may be hard, um, but it's necessary and hopeful or has the potential to be that. Rebecca W. Walston (01:28:22):Yeah. It, it does pivot something for me pretty significantly to be, to be talking about like the, my destination isn't actually Danielle (01:28:40):New ladies are really smart. can bottle all that up. I like that. TJ Poon (01:28:53):I mean, Jen, when you were like, I'm just working this out. And then you said something super deep and profound. I think what I was, what I was struck about what you said was like, um, just the demand to not ever need to repair like that internal pressure demand. And that's, that's how I feel all the time. Like, just, just be perfect and then you all need to repair mm-hmm. . Um, and just what, uh, yeah, just what a demand. What a, a burden. I don't, I don't know all the words, but like, it, it's dehumanizing cuz what it means to be human on this earth is to have disrupt, is to repair. Like you are going need to because we're all, we're all humans. And so there, when you said that, I was like, Oh, that's so important. Danielle (01:31:07):Because everything feels so lost. But I hope that this will be an encouragement to people about a conversation. Hopefully it'll feel like they can access something in themselves where.  

No Filter with Kobo
19. Formula of the Month: Long-Wear Concealer

No Filter with Kobo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 12:11


There are some makeup products that you apply in the morning never to think of again. There are others that you apply in the morning, and have to reapply throughout the day after it fades or melts off with wear. One of the most touched-up makeup products out there are concealers. That's why it's necessary to create long-lasting concealers that'll stay put. This episode will share an example and explain the key ingredients in creating this type of formula utilizing pigments, film formers, and moisturizing ingredients to name a few. We will also provide ideas and alternate ways to create an effective and easy to use formula. Links: Kobo Pigmentary Dispersions: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-PigmentaryDispersions.pdf Kobo Film Formers: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-KoboguardWRC.pdf Plandool Emollient Esters: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-Plandool.pdf Microspheres: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-Microspheres.pdf Sunboost ATB-Antioxidant Benefits: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-SunBoost-ATB.pdf Natural & Plant Derived Products: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-NaturalProductsGlobal.pdf ABOUT US: Since 1987 Kobo has provided innovative, technology-based raw materials to the cosmetic industry. The product range includes Surface Treated Pigments, Microspheres, Suncare and Color Dispersions, Silicone Fluids, Specialties, Natural Ingredients, Effect Pigments, Boron Nitride , and Delivery Systems. Kobo has five locations, USA (Corporate Headquarters), France, Japan, Brazil , and the UK and is represented globally by independent agents. Learn more at: www.koboproductsinc.com

You are here
Like a box of chocolates: French regional specialties

You are here

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 6:09


France is like a box of chocolates: you never know what you're going to get. Each region has its specialty. In Bordeaux, the chocolate-coated cherry known as a guinette delights locals with its soft liqueur heart. Over in Biarritz, the rugged Basque coastline inspired chocolate makers to create the rocher de Biarritz: roasted almonds and preserved orange peel coated with dark or milk chocolate. Finally, in Strasbourg, a chocolatier sought inspiration in the sandstone found throughout the Vosges forest to create a delicious praline emblematic of the city.

Ingredient Insiders: Where Chefs Talk
Herbs: Melissa Rodriguez & KLP Specialties

Ingredient Insiders: Where Chefs Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 33:13


From fresh to dried, herbs are a fantastic way to add flavor and color to any sort of dish or drink, whether sweet or savory, without adding fat, salt or sugars. To name a few favorites: basil, parsley, oregano, dill, chives, mint, rosemary, thyme, sage, tarragon... the list goes on. Chef Melissa Rodriguez is taking over a corner of Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood with three hot spots: Mel's Pizzeria, Al Coro and Discolo, a restaurant and bar combo. She shares the secrets to the influence of herbs in her cooking. KLP Specialities grows, harvests and distributes some of the finest herbs on the planet from their Colombian farms and farm partners worldwide. John MacPherson and Kathy Powell weigh in on how herbs have become such a staple in cooking since the 1990s. Follow @meljrodriguez @alcoro.nyc @mels_nyc @wherechefesshop @ingredientinsidersIn partnership with The Chefs' Warehouse, a specialty food distributor that has been purveying high-quality artisan ingredients to chefs for over 30 years @wherechefsshop https://www.chefswarehouse.com/Produced by Haynow Media @haynowmedia http://haynowmedia.com

The Arise Podcast
Season 4, Episode 5 Inter Cultural Conversations on Repair with Dr. Ernest Gray, Rebecca W. Walston, Jen Oyama Murphy, TJ Poon, and Danielle S. Castillejo

The Arise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 42:09


Bios:Ernest Gray Jr. is the pastor of Keystone Baptist Church located in the West Garfield Park neighborhood of Chicago.  He is a graduate of the Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Pastoral Ministries, and a graduate of Wheaton College with a Master's Degree in Biblical Exegesis.  He completed his PhD coursework at McMaster Divinity College and is currently completing his thesis within the corpus of 1 Peter. Mr. Gray has taught in undergraduate school of Moody in the areas of Hermeneutics, first year Greek Grammar, General Epistles, the Gospel of John and Senior Seminar. It is Mr. Gray's hope to impact the African American church  through scholarship. Teaching has been one way that God has blessed him to live this out.  Ernest is also co-host of the newly released podcast Just Gospel with an emphasis upon reading today's social and racial injustices through a gospel lens. www.moodyradio.org    Jen Oyama Murphy  "My love of good stories led me to Yale University where I received a BA in English. Upon graduation, I felt called to bring individual stories into relationship with the Gospel Story, and I have worked in the areas of campus and church ministry, lay counseling, and pastoral care since 1989. Over the years, I sought a variety of ongoing education and training in the fields of psychology and theology, including graduate classes at The Seattle School of Theology & Psychology and Benedictine University. I also completed the Training Certificate and Externship programs at The Allender Center, and I previously held roles on their Training and Pastoral Care Team, as Manager of Leadership Development, and most recently as the Senior Director of The Allender Center. Believing that healing and growth happens in the context of relationship, I work collaboratively to create a safe coaching space of curiosity and kindness where honesty, care, desire, and imagination can grow. Using my experience and expertise in a trauma-informed, narrative-focused approach, I seek to help people live the story they were most meant for and heal from the ones they were not. I am passionate about personal support and development, particularly for leaders in nonprofit or ministry settings, including lay leaders who may not have a formal title or position. I'm especially committed to engaging the personal and collective stories of those who have felt invisible, marginalized, and oppressed. I love facilitating groups as well as working individually with people. I currently live in Chicago with my husband, and we have two adult daughters.Rebecca Wheeler Walston lives in Virginia, has completed  Law School at UCLA, holds a Master's in Marriage and Family Counseling, is also a licensed minister. Specializing in advising non-profits and small businesses. Specialties: providing the legal underpinning for start-up nonprofits and small businesses, advising nonprofit boards, 501c3 compliance, creating and reviewing business contracts.TJ Poon serves with Epic Movement, where we both serve on the People & Culture Team (HR). TJ is the Director ofPeople & Culture and and also serves on Epic's leadership team to provide her leadership, wisdom, vision and direction for the ministry.Danielle:SO on screen and feel free to add to your introductions. Uh, Ernest, um, Dr. Gray is someone I'm met Yeah. Um, on screen during one of our cohort, um, virtual weekends and just listening to him talk, I think he was in the Caribbean when he was giving us the lecture mm-hmm. and talking about theology, and I was frantically taking notes and eventually resorted to screen shooting, like snapping pictures of the screen as he was talking. Uh, and then like quickly texting some friends and my husband to say, Hey, I was learning this that. And so that was kinda my introduction to Dr. Gray. And then we of course had a chance to meet in Montgomery. Um, yes, my respect just, uh, grew for you at that point. Um, the ability for you to be honest and be in your place of location Absolutely. And show up and show up to present, it felt like a theology that had life, and that feels different to me. So, um, thank  Dr. Ernest Gray:Thank You for that.  Thank you for that. No, I'm, it's a pleasure to join you all. I, I see some familiar faces and I'm excited to be with you all, and, um, yeah, I'm, um, yeah, I'm, I'm thankful that you thought me, um, thought my voice would be, uh, would be relevant for this conversation. So I'm, I'm grateful to be here and, um, yeah, I'm, I'm here to, um, to both participate and to, um, to learn as much as I can in this moment, so thank you.  Danielle:Mm. You're welcome. Um, and then there's Rebecca Wheeler Walton who is the boss, and she's both smart and witty and funny and kind and extremely truthful in the most loving ways, and so have highest regard for her. Back when I answered the phone, Luis would be like, Is that Rebecca  Yeah. Um, yeah, and tj, uh, TJ had gotten to know TJ over the last year and, um, you know, she's kind of introduced as like an admin person, but I've quickly learned that she, her heart and her wisdom are her strongest attributes and her ability just hang in the room in a tough conversation, um, has, I've just had an immense respect and hope for, for the future by, in getting to know ut j mm-hmm. touching. Yeah. And then at the top, y'all on my screen is Jen Oyama Murphy. She was my first facilitator at The Allender Center. Um, and she showed up in her body and her culture, and I was like, Man, that is freaking awesome. Um, and I wanna, I wanna do what she's doing with other people in this world. Um, Jen loved me and has loved me, and I don't think it can be overstated how wise and patient she is. Um, and just like when I say the word intuition, I mean it in a sense of like, deep wisdom. And, and that's, that's like, I keep searching. Like I wanna have access to that me. So, so thank you, Jen. Yeah.  Jen Oyama Murphy :Hmm. Gosh. Thank you, Danielle. Thanks. Well, I'm, I feel very privileged to be a part of the conversation, so thanks for inviting me.  Danielle:Yeah. So, I mean, I, Ernest you probably didn't get a chance to watch this clip, but it's this clip we're not gonna show. We talked about it. It's about, um, it's the border and there's like a three minute time, um, like timer for people to cross the border and hug each other and interact with one, one another on the southern border. And so there's like a tiny clip of this here. And, um, it's Latinx Heritage Month, and it felt really important to me to have a diverse conversation around repair, because Latin X is, um, Asian, it's black, white, it's European, it's white, it's indigenous. And I feel like, you know, in this conversation, what does repair look like for a Latinx person? And what, what does arriving, you know, to heaven mean, you know mm-hmm.  Dr. Ernest Gray:Indeed.  Danielle:So, yeah. So that's kind of where I'm coming from. And I have the slides up, but I, you know, I wanna hear your all thoughts on, on it, you know? Do you mind hitting the next slide, Tj?  Dr. Ernest Gray:Very good.  Danielle :Do you want me to keep moving? ? Yeah. Um, this is this guy that isn't red in, uh, Western psychology, although he was European descent and lived in El Salvador. He was murdered by, um, CIA operatives in El Salvador. And, uh, he was a liberation psychologist. And partly part of the reason he wasn't as well known here is because he gave almost all his lectures in Spanish on purpose. Hmm. Because he wanted to be rooted in a Latin American tradition. Um, and so I thought it was important to just lay the foundation for what rupture and repair means. He had a real vision for psychology to be a liberating movement, not just one that maintains like, Here, let me get you healed so you can function in this oppressive system. Like, um, yeah.  Dr. Ernest Gray :You know, I think about that kind of, um, movement, which seems to me has always been very much so a part of, you know, this resilience, this resilience push amongst indigenous people, groups, communities. It, it, it is a, it is a sense to regain their, um, their humanity when they've been trampled on, when that humanity has been trampled on. And so there are different epox I think that I've seen as of recent, um, where we see that this has come to a head. You know, I'll never forget the, in the, the ministry of, um, Dr. Cera Na Padilla, um, who was, who just passed a couple of years ago. And, um, I was fortunate to have a class by him, but it was his eyeopening class, uh, a world Christian perspective that gave me the ability to, um, um, hear just how liber the gospel can be and how restorative to the humanity of people groups that have been trampled upon, uh, actually is.  So I think that repair in many ways is just the, is just the acknowledgement that, hey, something in me is not right. And, um, it's not any one person. It feels as though this is a, um, this is the water in which I'm swimming, Like the water I'm in is like rotten. Um, and, and I wanna be rejuvenated through a, a water that, that refreshes and rejuvenates my life. Um, and that, that that water that it seems to be about is my aka the systemic kind of components that have trampled upon, um, indigenous groups. But that first step is acknowledgement, saying, Hey, um, something's broken in me. And it's not any one person. It's more of a system. It's more of the water in which I'm in. Um, that needs to be, uh, ameliorated. It needs to be, um, you know, I, I need it. It, I can't live like this. I can't, I can't, I can't live like this anymore.  Um, I think as well, there's, there's a lot of things that I think are many, very much so, um, um, you know, kind of tied to this, this equilibrium. I think, um, when I, when I hear about these struggles and I hear about how people are trying to, um, go for at least make sure that they are, um, pursuing their inherent dignity and worth it, it, it shouldn't seem as though it, it's such a, um, a, um, there's so much resistance to that work. I mean, where, as human beings, we really want to be affirmed. We wanna be loved, we wanna be cherished, very, very basic things. Um, but to have, but to have resistance to that amongst systems also shows that we, we've got to pull together to be able to make a, uh, a concerted effort towards bringing back a type of, um, um, regenerative and healing kind of ethic to our communities that are shattered, that have been broken.  And I, and I, and I, and I, and I personally see this right now as it relates to, you know, my community, which is African American, and I personally feel this, especially when I think about, um, people who are in survival mode and making bad choices. I always wanna pause and, and tell people, Listen, do not, don't, don't blame the victim. I mean, you're looking at William Ryan's book here as Right in front of me blaming the victim, Right. And I, I don't wanna, I don't wanna blame the victim because they don't, people don't wake up in the morning and think, you know, I wanna go out here and commit crime. I wanna do things I don't want, I don't wanna do these things just because I'm inherently, um, you know, um, malevolent person. No, I wanna do these things cause I'm, I'm trying to survive.  And, and it, and there, that signals to me as well that there's something broken, uh, in the social order. And that these communities in particular, the most vulnerable ones, uh, shouldn't be subjected to so much, um, to, to these things, to, to where they have to resort to violence, crime, or, um, you know, pushing against laws, unjust laws, if you will, uh, that people see is, um, oppressive. Shouldn't we should demo dismantle the laws that, that create these things. So that was a very, Forgive my thought, forgive my, um, thought, thought there, but I, I just wanted to kind of think and, and draw out some, some, some broad strokes there.  Jen Oyama Murphy:Yeah. I, I resonate with that a lot, Dr. Gray. I mean it, like, we've all been trained in kind of this narrative, um, therapeutic way of working with people. And so much of my experience has been looking at that story only as that story and not being able to look at it within a culture, within a system, and even within the context in which that story is being read. So if you are a person of culture in the group, you probably are at best, one of two in a group of eight mm-hmm. . And that has a story and a system all to itself. So even the process of engaging someone's story, even if you are mindful of their culture and the systemic story that that's in, you're also then in a, in a story that's being reenacted in, in and of itself, you know, that, um, I mean, Danielle and Rebecca know cuz they were in my group.  Like, you, you have best are one of two. And even within that too, you're probably talking about two different cultures, two different systems. And so that sense of, um, having repair, healing feel really contained to not just your story, but then a dominant structure within where that healing is supposed to happen. Like, it's, it's the water. Most of us have swarm in all our life, so we don't even know right. Where the fish that's been in that water all the time. And so we don't even know that that's happening. And so when, when the healing process doesn't seem like it's actually working, at least for me, then I turn on myself, right? That there's something bad or wrong about me, that, that what seems to be working for everyone else in the room, it's not working for me. So I must be really bad or really broken.  And it doesn't even kind of pass through my being of like, Oh, no, maybe there's a system that's bigger than all of us that's bad and broken. That needs to be addressed too. So I, I love what this cohort is trying to do in terms of really honoring the particular personal story, but also then moving out to all the different stories, all the different systems that are connected to that personal story. I'm, I'm grateful for that. And it's hard work, hard, hard, complicated work that it's full of conflict, Right. And math, and it's not gonna have five steps that you can follow and everything's gonna work out well for, for everyone. I mean, it's, it's gonna be a mess. You guys are brave.  Dr. Ernest Gray:This final statement here about overthrowing the social order not to be considered as pathological. Um, you know, that, that, that last part there, uh, the conflicts generated by overthrowing the social order not to be considered pathological people. I mean, I think that there's a sense that people really don't want to have to resort to this language of overthrow if these systems were not malevolent from the very first place. Right. And, and I think about this, how, how the exchange of power has become such a, has created such a vacuum for, um, the most vulnerable groups to be, um, um, you know, maligned taken advantage of, pushed under the bus or where's eradicated, um, without, with, you know, with impunity. And I think about that, that there, there has to be, in many ways when we see the e the various, um, TIFs and the various, um, contests that arise around the, around the globe, there seems to be a common theme of oppressive oppression, power abuse, um, and then it's codified into laws that are saying, Well, you're gonna do this or else.  And I guess that's, it's, it's almost as if there's a, a type of, um, expectation that this is, this is the only means that which we have to overthrow social orders that need to be, um, uh, eradicate need to be done away with. So, so there's, there's a lot of truth to this, this, this, this last part especially as well. Um, but I, I think that's what we see, um, constantly. One of the things that's popping in my mind right now is the ACON in South Africa. Um, and they're, they're dominant, The Dutch domination of South Africa and the indigenous group there, the, the South Africans, um, of af of, of, um, of black descent and how their struggles have ha have, you know, just constantly been, um, you know, so, so, so rife with tension and there's still tension there. And so it just takes on a different form.  I, I think that there's a lot of things that we can learn from the various contests, but we might, when we strip away layers of the onion, we might find that a lot of it is the way in which this power dynamic and power exchange, or lack thereof, is actually going on. Um, and again, we can call that what we want to, we can say it's Marxist. We can say it's, um, you know, um, critical, but critical theory helps us to, helps us with some of this to see in which power way in which power is leveraged and the abuse of it. Lots of it.  Rebecca W. Walston :I mean, I think, um, Ernest, if I can call you back if I've earned right quite yet, maybe not . Oh,  You got that right . Um, I, you know, I think what, what what hits me about your statement is, is, is the sense that, um, that there's that power and a sense of overthrow inextricably tied together in ways that I, I don't think they should be, I do not think that they were meant to be. Um, and I, it, it makes me think of a conversation that I had with the Native American, uh, uh, um, friend. And we were, we were together in a group of, um, diverse people watching, um, a documentary about a group of multi-ethnic, a multi-ethnic group engaging around race and racism. And we were watching the, um, this group of people sort of engage about it. And, um, I was, by the time the thing was over, like I was full on like angry, all kinds of things activated in me a around the Black American experience.  And I turned to this Native American guy sitting next to me, and, and I said, I'd like to know from you, what is your version of 40 acres in a mule? A and, and I said, you know, in, in my community, like, we have a thing about 40 acres in a mule, that kind of encapsulates a, a, a sense of what was taken from us as, as enslaved Africans, and some sense of what it means to, to start to repair that breach, right? And, and to give some sense of restitution. And it's codified in this sense of 40 acres and mule given to freed, uh, newly freed Africans as, as a way to, to launch into a sense of free existence. And I said to him, If I were you, I'd be like, pissed. Yeah. I, as an indigenous man, like, I'd want all of my stuff back, all of it, all of the land, everything. Like all the people, everything, everything. And so, I'd like to know from you, what is your version of 40 acres in the mill? What's your measurement of what it would look like to start to, to repair and to return to indigenous people? What was taken from them?  Hmm. And this man looked me dead in my face and said, We, we have no equivalent because the land belongs to no one. It was merely ours to steward, so I would never ask for it back.  Dr. Ernest Gray:Wow. Floored. Mm-hmm.  Rebecca W. Walston:A and I'm still by that it's been maybe six, seven years. And I've never forgotten that sentiment and the sense that, um, I, I wanted to sit at his feet and learn and not ask more questions. I just, and just the sense of like, what could my people learn from the indigenous community and how might it allow us to breathe a little deeper and move a little freer it? And so I, you know, I hope you guys can hear that as not like a ding against my community and what we're asking for, but just a sense of for how another people group steps into this question of rupture and repair that is radically different from, from my experience, and causes me to pause and wonder what must they know of the kingdom of God that would allow them to hold that kind of, that kind of sacred space that feels unfamiliar to me,  Dr. Ernest Gray:That is quite revolutionary. And if are representative of this type of, and again, those are just, those are just the terms we use to, to talk about repair and, um, and re restoration. I wonder if the, if see what I, what I'm struggling with is that what we are, what we wrestled through as an African American context was, and the vestiges is of, um, ownership. It's ownership and, um, ownership of bodies and ownership of land. And the indi, the aboriginal people of America, the Native Americans, they have this really robust sense of it belong. If that's the case that belongs to no one, my next question would be then, and again, if I'm thinking about ownership, well, that it's the damning sense of what ownership did to their communities, how they were decimated, how they were ransacked, how, how, um, you know, the substance abuse has ran rampant.  So if from, if it were me, I would ask a follow up question to this individual and ask why. Well then if the land is not an issue and it's not a, it's not a monetary thing that needs to be repaired, what about the damage? How will we go about putting a value upon or putting some type of thing upon the decimation of, of communities, the, um, the homes. Let's take, you know, Canada is r in pain, especially with the Catholic church and what was done in certain orphanages. Okay. And so, um, if not a monetary thing, what would be the re another response to repair the brokenness that the people have experienced? And I, and I, I don't, I understand the land is one thing, but there's also a people that have been shattered absolutely, absolutely shattered. And, and I think that still remains a question for me.  And again, it's a perennial question that is affecting multiple communities. Um, but these are felt more acutely, especially as, um, you know, Africans, uh, in the transatlantic route. And, and, and aboriginal native Americans who were, who are, um, you know, no one discovered them here. But this ownership piece is something that I think is what is inherent to whiteness, and it has created this vacuum. And why we need to have a sense of, um, you know, how it impacts every single debate. Every single debate. I would go down a rabbit trail about, you know, gospel studies and New Testament studies, but that's just, it's all, it's there too. It's, it's right there, too.  Danielle:TJ, can you hit the next slide? I think we're into that next slide, but I think what I'm hearing, and then maybe Jen has a, a follow up to this, is, I, I think part of my response from the Latinx community is we're both perpetually hospitable and perpetually the guest. Mm. Mm-hmm. We don't own the house. Mm. And we, and yet there's a demand of our hospitality in a house that's not ours. Mm. And there's a sense of, I think that comes back to the original cultures that we come from, of this idea that you showed up here, let me give you food. Let me, let me have you in, let me invite you in. And in the meantime, you took my, you took my space and, and you put a, you put a stake in it that said, Now this is mine and you're my guest. And now there's different rules, and I may be polite to you, but that does not equal hospitality. Right. And so, and I don't know, I don't have the resolution for that, but just this feeling that, that Latinx communities are often very mi migratory. Like, and, you know, we have, then you get into the issue of the border and everything else. But this idea that we, we don't own the house, and yet there's a, there's an, there's a demand for our hospitality wherever we go.  Rebecca W. Walston:What's your sense, Danielle, cuz you said, um, both there's a demand on the hospitality and also something of that hospitality hearkening back to your indigenous culture from Right. In the place where you're not a guest, you're actually at home. So is that a both and for you  Danielle:Mm-hmm. , because I think that's the part that's, that's robbed the meaning, The meaning that's made out of it is robbed. I think sometimes the hospitality is freely given. And, and that's a space where I think particularly dominant culture recognizes that. Right. And so there's, there's the ability to take, and then, then there's the complicity of giving even when you don't want to. And also like, then how does a, and this is very broad, right? And the diaspora, right? But the sense of like, the demand, if you don't give your hospitality then at any point, because you're the perpetual guest, they can shut you out and you can never return. So I haven't quite worked that through, but those are some thoughts I was having as you all were speaking.  Dr. Ernest Gray:Mm. I think that's, I think that's very keen, uh, you know, as a keen observation, my wife is, you know, from a Caribbean context, and so there's the hospitality notion wherein it's, I mean, that's just, it's irrespective of what you feel. This is just what you do. And so I think that it's, when it's taken advantage of or hoisted upon people in a way that is saying, Oh, you must do this, that harm can enue. But, um, there's a, there's a, for me, it's, it's, it's really, really foreign to, from the outside looking in to understand how that culture, um, has, um, historically genuflected or just kind of, um, it can become a part of weakness. It can become a part, or it can be become abused. Especially when this is an expectation of the culture. Um, and I think that's where the harm lies, is that there, there has to be some measures of, of like,  When conditions are, are, you know, almost in a sense of like, this isn't automatic. And it, and then there needs to be some kind of, some kind of ways in which it can remain protected. So that's to not be abused by those who know that this is an expectation of the community. Um, but yeah, that's, that's from the outside looking in, it's hard. My only connection is through, you know, my wife and her culture and seeing how that is, you know, I don't care what's going on inside. You know, you're gonna, you're gonna be hospital, You're gonna host, you're gonna continue to be, you're gonna reach out. You're gonna continue to be that person because that's what's expected of you.  Jen Oyama Murphy:I mean, Danielle as a Japanese American. I mean, I feel that bind of, I mean, it's not even perpetual guest for, I think Asians often. It feels like perpetual alien. Um, and, and yet, you know, there are cultural expectations and norms, you know, among the Japanese, around what it looks like to welcome someone into your home, what it means to be gracious and deferential, and that, So there's a whole culture that's, um, informing of a way, a style of relating that I think to Dr. Gray's point can be taken advantage of. Um, and can, I think be in some ways, consciously or unconsciously used by, um, that culture to kind of escape wrestling with the experience of, of marginalization and abuse and trauma. Because there's a culture that can give you some sense of safety and containment and soothing. If you go back to what, you know, um, culturally, I mean, after the internment camps, the incarceration of the Japanese during World War ii, that's exactly like what happened is the, the idea of, you know, being polite, being deferential, working hard, using productivity as a way to gain status and safety, and in some ways, right, taking the bait to, to be, to like out white, white people.  We're gonna be better citizen than the white people. And like, what that cost the Japanese Americans who, if you had asked them what kind of repair did they want, they would say none. We're just so grateful to be able to be in this country. It, you know, the, the grandchildren of the people that were incarcerated that kind of ly rose up and said like, This is wrong. And so it's just, it, it feels so complicated and like such a, such a math, um, in it. And that's where I feel like, um, learning not just the, the white Asian story, right? But having exposure and experiences and relationships with, um, a variety of different ethnicities and being able to learn from their histories, their culture, their way of, um, engaging trauma, working through a healing process, and not staying in a single lane in my culture only anymore than I wanna stay in a single white Western culture only.  But being really open to learning, growing. I mean, my experience with you, Danielle, and you, Rebecca, even in my group, right, opened me up to a whole different way of engaging story and working with the, um, methodology that we had been learning. And I'm so grateful I wouldn't have had to wrestle or contend with any of that if I hadn't been in relationship with both of you who have a different culture than I do, and a different style relating and a different way of responding to things than I do. That was so informative for me in broad slu, um, opportunity to really first own that there is a rupture, and then what it looks, what it could look like to repair. And that I didn't only have two, two options like my Japanese American way or the, the White Western way that I had learned all my life.  Rebecca W. Walston:I resonate with that, Jen. I think that, um, what comes to my mind is the sense of Revelation seven, nine, um, and at the throne of grace at the end of this, that identifying monikers every tribe and every tongue mm-hmm. . And, and it causes me to wonder why that moniker, why is it that the identification that the throne of grace is tribe and come. Right? And, and I think it hints at what you just said, this sense of like, there's a way in which this kind of hospitality shows up in each culture, um, in, in a way that I think each culture holds its own way of reflecting that text, um, in a way that is unique, um, in the sense that we won't have a full and complete picture of hospitality until we have a sense of how it shows up in every tribe and every time. Um, and, and so I love that that image from you of like, what can I learn from, from you as a Japanese American, and what can I learn from Danielle? What can I learn from tj? What can I learn from Ernest and, and how they, they understand, uh, and embody that with, with the sense of like, my picture will be a little bit clearer, a little bit more complete for having, having listened and learned.  And I, I do think we're talking in terms of hospitality about sort of, to me, the connective tissue between a erector and a repair is really a sense of resiliency. And, and it feels to me a little bit like the, there's a way where we can talk about hospitality that is really about, um, something of a God given capacity to navigate a rupture, whether it's individual or collective in a, in a way that allows for hopes, for pushes, for some sense of repair. And, you know, I was listening to Ernest talking, you know, I feel like I can hear Michelle Obama saying, when they go low, we go high. Right? And that is a, that is, it's a, it's a different kind of hospitality, but it feels like, feels like hospitality than the infant, right? It, it feels like I won't give in, um, to, to this invitation to join the chaos. I, I, I will, um, be mindful and thoughtful and intentional about how I move through it so that I don't find myself, uh, joining joining in it, but actually standing against it. And that, that feels very hospitable to me. To, to stand on the side of what is true and right. And honoring and, and, and not not joining the fray.  Danielle:You can see how our collective ruptures that we've all described, and I know TJ, you haven't spoken yet, um, how our trauma rubs up against one another and likely is in a heated moment, is very triggering.  If I'm in a, if Jen and I are in a space where we feel like we have to stay, keep our heads low, because let's say I have a family member, um, who's undocumented, right? Or Jen has a memory of, I don't know, a traumatic experience dealing with dominant culture. And we're with, you know, like you say Rebecca, like our African hyphen American friends, and they're like, Come on, let's go get it. Mm-hmm. , you can feel the rub of what repair might look like, and then there's a fracture between us. Mm-hmm. . If we don't, that's, I mean, and then the hard thing that I've been challenged lately to try to do is stay really close to my experience so I have a sense of self so that I can bring that full self to you and say like, I feel this way, and then I can more, more be able to listen to you if I can express a more truer sense of what I'm feeling. Does that make sense?  Dr. Ernest Gray:Perfect.  I think, I think, um, yeah, I, I, I think about the triggering aspects of how we have been collectively kind of retraumatized. You know, when you think about, you know, this since Trayvon Martin and and beyond here in America with African American context, we've just been trying to figure out how to stay alive and t-shirts keep printing regarding, um, you know, can't go to, can't go to church, can't go to a park, can't do this, can't do that, can't breathe. And it's almost as if it's, it's exhausting. Um, but it's entering into that space with other groups, other communities that creates a sense of solidarity, which is sorely needed. Because we would assume, and we would make this as this assumption, like, Oh, well, you don't have it so bad. That's not true. It looks different. It feels different. And until we can, at the same time, um, I like what you said about own, what we are feeling while we are in that moment, it allows us to at least get it out there so that we can then be active engagers with others and not just have our own stuff, you know, uh, for stalling, any meaningful connection.  I wanna think that there's a sense that, um, because, you know, our expressions in every way, whether it's hospitality or whether it's in the way in which we deal with, um, the various cultural phenomenons that we're closely associated with, is that these create the mosaic. If we, back to Rebecca's idea of Revelation seven, nine, these re these is why I love mosaics is because the full picture of our, um, similar, similarly expressed experiences do not look the same, but when they're all put together, eventually we'll see the, the picture more fully. And I think that that's the key is that it, it's so easy for us to be myopic in a way in which we look at everyone else's, or especially our own, to where we can't see anybody else's. That that creates this isolation, insular kind of isolation idea of, Well, you don't have it as bad as I do. Or they're not as, they're not as shaken as this community or that community or this community. Um, and wherein there's some truth to that, Um, if we're going to regain a sense of human, our full humanity, we've gotta figure out ways to, to do that active listing so that our ours doesn't become the loudest in the room.    

The Dog Show Drive
The Dog Show Drive Episode 72 - Wayne Cavanaugh & Will Alexander

The Dog Show Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 55:21


The Dog Show Drive Episode 72 - Wayne Cavanaugh & Will Alexander Thus episode discusses a new AKC rule for foreign judges. they discuss the travel judges endure getting to all the shows. Specialties, who should judge them and how often. A book review and handling classes.....what?

No Filter with Kobo
18. Indie Brands

No Filter with Kobo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 13:43


Indie Brands are independent, innovative, and purposeful brands that are growing in importance in the cosmetic industry. In this episode, we will discuss the pros and cons of indie brands, the challenges they face to develop and sell new products, and how a raw material manufacturer, like Kobo, can help them grow, while keeping their most important values like sustainability and clean beauty. If you want to know more about Kobo's natural origin products: https://koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-NaturalProductsGlobal.pdf For more information on clean beauty and natural products, check out episode #4: Is it Clean or is it Natural? https://anchor.fm/dashboard/episode/e1allor ABOUT US: Since 1987 Kobo has provided innovative, technology-based raw materials to the cosmetic industry. The product range includes Surface Treated Pigments, Microspheres, Suncare and Color Dispersions, Silicone Fluids, Specialties, Natural Ingredients, Effect Pigments, Boron Nitride , and Delivery Systems. Kobo has five locations, USA (Corporate Headquarters), France, Japan, Brazil , and the UK and is represented globally by independent agents. Learn more at: www.koboproducts.com

The Arise Podcast
Season 4, Episode 4, Rebecca W. Walston, TJ Poon, and Danielle Inter-Cultural Conversations

The Arise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 61:08


And this week  you're going to listen in on a conversation between myself,  Rebecca Wheeler Walston, and TJ Poon. We're all part of a project we've been working on together for over a year now. And, and as part of that project, we're exploring the Latinx experience in, in this time. And so what, what we're doing in this conversation is kind of fleshing out, like, what does it mean to have an intercultural conversation in with the primary lens of Latinx culture?Rebecca Wheeler Walston:Specializing in advising non-profits and small businesses. Specialties: providing the legal underpinning for start-up nonprofits and small businesses, advising nonprofit boards, 501c3 compliance, creating and reviewing business contracts. Rebecca lives in Virginia, has completed  Law School at UCLA, holds a Master's in Marriage and Family Counseling, is also a licensed minister.TJ Poon: Danielle (00:12):Welcome to the Arise Podcast, conversations on faith, race, justice, gender, and healing. And this week, uh, you're going to listen in on a conversation between myself, uh, Rebecca Wheeler Walston, and TJ Poon. We're all part of a project we've been working on together for over a year now. And, and as part of that project, we're exploring the Latinx experience in, in this time. And so what, what we're doing in this conversation is kind of fleshing out, like, what does it mean to have an intercultural conversation in with the primary lens of Latinx culture?Rebecca (00:52):Right? It it reminds me what that, um, the, the, the, uh, Latinx woman who we saw this weekend. I don't know, I'm not sure I remember where she's from particularly, but how she was talking about how, like in Spanish, the, the wording is different. Therefore, what I interpret or what I metabolized right, is different. That was brilliant.Danielle (01:18):Mm-hmm. . Okay. I love what you just said, Rebecca. And then tj, I'd like you to hear your thoughts on this, but part of what I think I'm hoping for in saying this is a space for you to even come in and, and say, like, in the African H and American experience, here's where I resonate. Mm. But here's where I don't resonate if you don't resonate. So I, I think this wasn't outright said in the African American experience about the psychological lens, but I do think it was implied and it was there. And so I think this is a chance for us to collaborate and hopefully pull people together despite differences. So that's something I'm wondering about, but I I didn't wanna just throw that out there in the moment.Rebecca (02:11):What do you mean by a psychological lens?Danielle (02:14):Because in the Western European format, pretty much the only person of color I read, and the only person of color I read from a psychology standpoint was re men. Mm-hmm. , every single other person in literature was white, white female, white male philosophers, European philosophers here and there. Someone Spanish, but white. And what I'm saying is that European Americans don't own healing practices. And oftentimes what I've learned in the space of a psychological lens, I've found it in my community that has a far longer history and with different language. And, and so even when we talk about like alignment, I mean, doesn't that sound like Dan Siegel to you? Doesn't that sound like Shar to you? Yeah. But they aren't citing as techs and South American indigenous peoples. And I, I have no doubt that that is likely found in African American communities as well. And so I, I wanted to give the participants, at least La Latinx participants and hopefully bridge some gaps here and have people know, like, I'm not just stepping into a healing practice that is made by European white men. This is a, this healing practice. Actually, European white men, like a lot of things took it and they reworked it in their culture, which fine, but we also own part of that history. We own part of the way we heal. This is not original to it.Rebecca (03:59):That's the part where I feel like, again, like throwing an accusation that such, such as white is, um, among other things, it is problematic because unless you've done the research to, in what you're telling me is that the very origin of something that you're, you're discussing actually came out of European culture and only outta European culture, then the statement is just outright inaccurate, right? Mm-hmm. . And in some ways, you are actually perpetuating supremacy by, by, by perpetuating the, the lie that the thing we're talking about is, is unique to, to people of European or white folk. Right. Or however. Um, and so stop doing that. Right? Right. But, and so, so yeah. So you're asking me what is the African American equivalent to alignment, toka testimonial, andDanielle (05:02):Like trust.Rebecca (05:03):Yeah. You're asking me that?Danielle (05:05):Yeah. Cuz I mean, I don't know. But even in watching high on the hog mm-hmm. , and they're in this, they go to this one church setting, right? I don't know if you remember it. And it's like, got just the pillars left. And it was a, a place where they imagine one of the first quote unquote, first established African churches were in the south, and they talked about they had like, images of people dancing in that space mm-hmm. . And I was imagining that when I wrote this, things like that came to me as perhaps examples of heart to heart listening. Although it didn't look like, let's be honest, when Mexicans are hard to heart listening, we don't sit down. Mm. You know, we're moving around, we're talking, and, and we don't wait for you to finish your sentence necessarily.Rebecca (06:00):Right? So the thing I could say about that, the thing I would say about Plactica, right? Um, twice now, in the past week, I have had an older black woman say to me, I, I came to lay my eyes on you. What they expressly said was to put an eye on you and they point to one eye, right? And it's this sense that I need, I need to see you with my own eyes in order to discern or listen to what is happening in, in the space, right? Mm-hmm. . Um, so I think that, that, that might be the sense of heart to heart listening, right? Like, there's something that happens where, Right. That, that's a part of the alignment is I can read with my eyes the, the space, right? And then this thing about testimonial, what comes to my mind is that the phraseology keeping it real, right?This idea that with there, like the story that is being told needs to be a true story. Mm-hmm. , we have lots of, you know, when you hear the snaps and all this, but the sense that something has resonated in my body with the sense of like, now what you just said is that that's the truth, right? Mm-hmm. and, and, and a problem. If that, if that's not what happens, right? To the point that is a compliment. Oh, he keeps it real. She keeps it real. He keeps it 100. Right? It's the basic sense that you're, you are telling, you're, you're saying the story that you're giving is the true word or trues version of what happened. Um, and probably for the last one, in terms of trust or confidence or inclusion, I, I, I would probably say, um, the, the sense when I be like, Oh, that's my girl and we're here. Right? That's, and again, with the eyes, it's something like these two things. If the first two things happen that leaves the door open for a sense of, there, there is a trust and a confidence in a sense that we are in alignment together. Right? Right. And, um, if one of those three things is not legit, then you are out. We are like, we not here. Mm-hmm. , Do you know what I'm saying? I, I mean that's very, uh, colloquial in the language, but I think the, the, the dynamic is true nonetheless.Right? What's the version? And so there is a sense even that my whole body has to be engaged in the process for me to feel this kind of alignment. I need to see it, touch it, taste it, hear it. Like all of my senses need to be engaged before I feel like I could say, Right? And if I, if I don't have that, I don't know. I don't know you. Right? Like, I d know you like that.Danielle (09:03):Mm-hmm. , tj, any thoughts or anything to add or comments? Not yet that I'm enjoying this conversation. I think one thing I wanted to add for Za, like trust is something that happened at my daughter's Za. Now my fam, they're not my family, but I'm calling them my family. They all came and c and Corte, it's their, um, their daughter and their, and their son-in-law came, the son-in-law's white. He's, and he's, he's joined the family. And, uh, they're always telling me like, Hey, he didn't say hi to so and so, can you help him out? You know? So he didn didn'tDidn't speak. So, uh, that's a big thing, right? To say hi to everybody. I'm always saying, Hey, did you say hi to them? He's like, I think I did like brother, like, you better go do it again. They don't feel like you really sent high. He's like, I waved. I'm like, No. They wanna like, no, thatNo. You gotta like shake your hand. And so they're giving, they're giving him hints, right? But they, they're keeping him. They're not, they're not, they're not pushing him out. And so at the point where the dancing was on and the dj, they requested a song and they're like, Sam, Sam, get out there and dance. And Sam was like, Okay. And it's this, it's this, basically it's this Mexican line dance. And he was right on it. He had the whole dance down and everybody cheered for him. They were like, You're in, you're in. And they were going nuts. And afterwards he was glowing. He was so happy. And it, it wasn't a sense of like, if he didn't do it right, he was gonna be ridiculed. It was just like, you're part of us, you know? Mm-hmm. . And so that's kinda what I think too about trust and inclusion, like the trust to share moments like that with someone, even in fun time times, you know? Mm-hmm. . Yeah. Does that make sense?Rebecca (11:03):It makes perfect sense.Danielle (11:05):Mm-hmm. , I wish you could see this guideline dance.Rebecca (11:08):It makes perfect sense.Danielle (11:11):And by the way, Mexicans do a lot of line dancing and that's,Rebecca (11:15):I mean, you know, black people know a little bit, just a little bit, just a little bit about my, not that much, just a little bit .Danielle (11:27):Okay. So that feels like good. Um, TJ, can you hit the next slide, please? Yep. Um,Rebecca (11:36):I love that word edited.Danielle (11:38):Mm-hmm. . So I think we can talk about, if you're open to this, and TJ you can feel free to hop in here at any moment. Um, what does it mean to edit or fragment a Latinx story? It means to, there's many Asian identities which are subsumed. The African narrative is often edited out or, or almost like tried to blend in. Um, indigenous narratives are also pulled apart and, and edited out within our collective story. And so therefore we hang onto, I think it feels like if we tell those stories as a community, we won't be able to keep up. We'll be too separate. We won't be able to keep up with a dominant culture that will be too far apart to keep up. That make sense?Rebecca (12:34):No, you, you have to give it to me one more time. What's your sense of the, the, the, like, you feel like you can't keep up.And I, I don't think you're being unclear. I think I can't hear you. So go, go ahead.Danielle (12:51):I think we'll be too divided and we're already divided out. We're already set apart as a community, especially in the United States. And it feels like something I've experienced is, if you further complicate my identity, if you ask me to further, Id like, if you ask me to further step into more marginalized, quote unquote marginalized identities, then not only will I be separated from what I need to survive, which feels like whiteness, I will also be further alienated in my community. Mm.Rebecca (13:28):So what, what's the part that you're, you're, I, I think I'm with you and I, and I feel like I can't hear, not cuz you're not being clear, but like that this is the part where the African American lens is really very, very strong. And so there's a part of me that's like, I, what? So, um, so, and I don't think it's, cuz you're not being clear, I think it's because when you're describing is a little bit foreign to, to the, to the African hyphen uh, um, hyphenated experience. So what, what are you saying? Are you, are you, what's the extra fragmented identity that you're saying you don't wanna step into? Like the, the, the, the thought of like Latin Latinx being a mix of like African and Asian and indigenous identity, it's thatDanielle (14:20):Mm-hmm. that there's no space for Latinx. It feels like there's no space for Latinx in dominant culture as it is.Rebecca (14:32):Right?Danielle (14:32):And if then you have to say, Well actually I'm Chinese and Mexican, now, I'm, now I'm not just stepping further away from whiteness, but I'm also stepping outta my community. Cause that's, that's a learned, unacceptable way to identify.Rebecca (14:51):So, so here's my, here's my question about that. Cause it in some ways, okay, so I say African American, right? And we are so severed from our African-ness, I don't, I don't have the invitation to be like, Oh, I'm Ghanaian and you're Nigerian. And, and even if I knew that, I don't have a sense of what that means. I, I don't, I don't carry in my body a sense of like, that means we can't be friends because Nigerian and Ghanaians have this kind of thing in their history or whatever. I don't have that we're, we are so severed from it that there isn't any real way for us to, to go back. And in some ways we don't. I mean, there's a little bit of it, but nobody really, nobody's really, really, really truly, uh, deconstructing the African American identity that far down to the point that it would actually fracture us.Um, so, so in on the one part, the part why I'm having a hard time hearing what you're saying is, is I'm, what I'm saying is that's far from my experience. Therefore it's far from my lens. Right? But also, here's the thing, I wonder, uh, in her book, Born on the Water, right, the author asserts that something happened in the, in the middle passage on the water of the Trans-Atlantic that actually forged a, a third a new people group that was neither African nor American, but somewhere in the middle. And that, and, and, and so by the time they, they step onto us shores it, it, like, she literally talks about what was many, when they entered the ship in terms of their tribes be like, is fused into one in this hyphenated existence. And by the time they get off the ship, it is, it is the creation of a new people group, which is, it's, it's mildly controversial, but not really.Cuz nobody, even though, even though there's a whole sort of back to Africa and I wanna do the 23 and me thing and find out like what tribe from Ghana I came from, it, it isn't really about that kind of fracturing. Right? And, and so there wasn't people, there's something about what she said that resonates with people enough that you didn't hear any real pushback on, on that ideology. So I'm wondering Right. If I'm wondering about that, I'm wondering about that felt experience and lived reality and if the invitation, even in the loudness experience is to not, not not fracture it that much, Right? Is there some invitation in the text and in the lived experience that is about, we we're not going back to Eden. Mm-hmm. We, we like, we are pressing forward to, to the city of God. And when we get there, your, you will be able to hold and there's absolute invitation from Jesus to hold Mexican American Right? In a way that would allow you to note the Asian ancestry and the African ancestry and whatever in the indigenous ancestry with all the honor and celebration it deserves, and not have that be a fracture.Danielle (18:23):Yeah. I don't think I'm seeing that as the fracture. I'm seeing the fracture coming when we don't acknowledge that yes, we're Mexican, but in Mexico there are 16 cast colors mm-hmm. . And a part of that has to do with how dark you are to how light you are to how your eyes look to how, how your nose looks. And, and I think we cannot forget that we are living into that cast system as a people group. And so I think part of the editing is we, we've edited that out. Like, oh yeah, we're all Mexican, but when you get into our familiesRebecca (19:12):It, it ain't that.It ain't that. No, there's a hierarchy.So is not in, in the going towards it. It's, it's the, the fracture is that being in America in the hyphenated existence right. Is there's perhaps an invitation to edit out some, some of the other parts of your culture. And I think that's true across the whole cohort. I think everybody feels that. I think I, I think it's, it's why even though they have con consistently asked us to get into interethnic conflict, it feels really hard to do it right because, uh, and not just conflict between like blacks and Latinos or Asians, whoever, but conflict like within our own culture. Cause black people got colorism too. It's bad.It's real bad.Danielle (20:10):Yeah. Tj, any thoughts or comments?TJ (20:14):Nope. I had a lot of thoughts while we're talking, but I feel like just moving along, it's good.No, I totally do. Yeah. I have lots of thoughts, but I don't Yeah. Helpful to say. Right.It's a good point. Yeah. I mean, I think there's a, the lot of like, um,If, if, uh, only claiming one identity is also your sort of like, ticket to solidarity or like what you build solidarity around, it is very hard to enter into those other more marginalized identities. I, I mean, I think about that for Asian Americans too, Like how even Asian American is like a term that was made up, but, but part of like, the real benefit of it was solidarity, you know, like becoming a group when this wasn't really a group. And so just there that there's, uh, there's a lot of beauty in that and also a lot of like real messed up step in that. And so like if you, if you are, if you have an identity around which there is some solidarity, like we can rally around, you know, this, um, in a place where we're already marginal, already marginalized. Mm. Yeah. I don't know what your motivation for further marginalizing yourself. Do you know what I mean? Cause like you Yeah. So I think that's complex.Danielle (21:55):Yeah. You said that really well, tj mm-hmm. .Rebecca (22:00):I I think it reads different too in, in different communities. Like, but African American, it is, is a term of respect. And it, and it's also a notation that you are an outsider cuz we don't call each other that mm-hmm. , you know what I mean? So, and, and to me, whenever I say like Asian American, I feel stupid. Like I feel like I'm, I'm entering into the conversation in a way that is unintelligent because I, I, I think it's a dishonor to, to slap that name when what I really wanna know is what country are you from and is it better for me to identify you as Japanese American or Chinese American or Taiwanese than it is for me to say Asian American. You know what I mean? Like, I, I just feel the awkwardness of how's this gonna read again, I think because I'm aware none of these are self named monikers. Mm-hmm. , they're all imposed, but, um, by whiteness. And so it always feels awkward.Danielle (23:09):And I mean the additional con conversation for Latinx, even Latinx, I hate that word, but even the additional conversation is how have people of all these various backgrounds had to rally together to fight western intervention in their cities, in their countries, you know? Mm-hmm. . So they have to rally around that. But even that gets confusing because with the infusion of like money and power from the United States or other outside interests, it even splits. It splits people even more. But I think when people get to the United States, they say stuff like, I'm Cuban, you know, or I'm Mexican. There's not, there's a way of surviving in that.Rebecca (23:56):Right. Plus what do you do with the cause like where I grew up, if you are Puerto Rican on the west coast, that made you Mexican, but if you're Puerto Rican on the east coast, you are black. Like end of story, end of conversation. And so even, even that is like Yeah. Like all, yeah. All the, all those lines, it is different.Danielle (24:26):Yeah. So we'll we can step into that, you know, hopefully a little bit more brief cuz we'll probably run out of time. ButTJ (24:35):Like, I walked with my friend when she was, she's Mexican American, but she's also white and she was like, you know, wrestling through how do I identify myself and when these are the categories, it's really hard to like, I don't know, it just that multifaceted identity thing. How do you talk about racialization as like a part of that, um, when the categories are oppressed and oppressor and you pull both of those in your identity. So I don't know, but those were just thinking about that.Danielle (25:13):I think when I hear you, I think back to what Derek McNeil said to me, that we live in a racialized society and addressing race will take us so far, but it's really our, and it has a limit, but it's really being in our cultures is where we will find healing from the actual trauma. So I, I go back to that a lot and that's why I think it's really important for you and I Rebecca, to talk about, you know, when we talk about the first, like the plaquea and the testimonial on for us to root ourselves in some somewhat of culture in the healing. SoRebecca (25:50):No, it's, it, it, yeah. I mean, I think in some ways we've been asserting that the, the, this whole time, right? This idea that like if you're black, you need lean fully in into that and fully into the ways in which your culture, that culture has made you, made, made pathways towards healing for you mm-hmm. , right? In the way that your culture has understood and made meaning out of your story. Um, and, and, and therefore created avenues of, of, of, of, of healing for you. Right? In, in a sense, you're asking what archetypes right? Ha has, has your culture creative for you. Um, and, and, and, and that the more that we do that, the less dissonance we have, right? Mm-hmm. . Um, and in some ways the very creation of sort of the identity of the oppressed, right? Is the, the, the, the very identity that gets created under the force and weight of oppression is that is what healing looks like, right? I mean that, like, the meaning that gets made out of the identity of the hyphenated existence is to define the harm and then define what it looks like to be healed from itin a way that is unique to the story that you have, Right? And then the truth is the same is true for the majority culture, right? I mean, and the, and the work that will have to be done on behalf of our white brothers and sisters is what does it look like to tell a true story and what does healing look like?, right? And, and I think the, the pitfall is if the invitation outta majority culture is to not tell the true story, if the invitation out of the perpetrator culture is to be dismissive and to live in a level of denial for what the true story is, you never get to those pathways or architects of healing because you, you can't admit that harm has actually been done.Is resiliency, Right? It is the God given capacity to navigate the harm that is embedded in your story. Right? And, and it is this sense that Jesus knew in this world you will have trouble. Like, like it's, it's, it trauma is going to hit you. Right? But, but I have embedded in, in, in, in your collective story at a sense of what healing looks like and redemption looks like for you, Right? And, and, and resiliency is your, is really in some ways the capacity to tap into that mm-hmm. and to leverage itDanielle (28:37):Mm-hmm. . So if you hit the next slide, um, tj, then we have this polyvagal chart, which I think says like our different cultures allow us to be in these different states and, and kind of like what we've talked about before, and that's not wrong. And, and I think, I think what's hard about this is that some of our resiliency has been pathologized.Rebecca (29:06):Yes. Very much so. Right? And the, the simple argument that, uh, because our, our whatever reaction we took in the moment was in fact a reaction to something traumatic is the thing that pathologizes it, right? And, and I, I think that's a mistake. It's like to say that we were kicked out of the garden and because of that, we built, we built a response to that severing that the response itself is pathological. Because our goal is to be back where we were in the garden before sin it, that that's not how the story go. That's not how it works, right? I mean, yes, we were excised from the garden, right? And what's pathological is that she ate the damn apple when God said don't do it. That that part is a problem. But, but, but, but the capacity that we developed to live life outside of the garden is not itself pathological simply because it is in reaction to the fact that we no longer live in the garden, Right?That, like, there will be a reaction and there's good reaction and healthy reaction that it, that is in fact resiliency. And then there are other reactions that are pathological that are problematic and that we do need to address, right? Mm-hmm. . But the simple fact that something is a reaction to a traumatic event does not itself pathologizing mm-hmm. , Right? And this is the part where I, I, I, tide tribute has a strong, um, and there's a line in the song where he says, um, something of like, the devil's gonna wish he never messed with me because I, like, I came back stronger and better than I would if, if he would've left me alone in the first place. Right? And so there, there's, there's something I think we're missing in the theological frame that that is like, um, the, there's something that happens in the meant for evil. God moves for good, there's something in whatever that switch is that rotation, that flip that is of significant value mm-hmm., Right? And if we simply pathologize it because it is a reaction to a move of evil, we have missed the, like, the mystery of God in that moment to take a thing that was meant to be our downfall and not only cause us to survive it, but to, but it is that thing that actually makes us better, stronger, more like him, Right? And so, so that in and of itself is good. Does that make sense? Mm-hmm. . And so there's something of the ability to move up and down this chart that is, that is freaking brilliantDanielle (31:57):Mm-hmm. . So, so I think I wanna go back to that story in Genesis. And when, you know, they ate the apple and then God came walking through, He, he asked them where they were, and through the conversation he says to them, you know, he finds out that they ate this apple and that that's why they were, you know, wearing, had sewed these fig leaves and made this, this, um, made these like coverings, right? I'm assuming for their body. But that's not, they weren't in trouble for their shame about their body. You know, that's not why he, he kicked them out of Eden. It was for what they did. And then actually when they were out of Eden, he honored that shame. He made them close out of animals. So God actually didn't take them, didn't take their shame and move them through this polyvagal chart and force them to be calm in their body in a certain way.TJ (32:58):I think that's a really important thing to say. Mm-hmm. .Rebecca (33:04):Right? And, and I think there's also a sense in whichThat what, what you're, what that means then is that something was fundamentally altered in Adam and Eve and they never got to go back to the state in which they were in Eden as if it had never happened. Right? And, and I, and I think there's something about the gospel that is, um, that that isn't what, that's not what you're meant for, right? There's a kind of naivete before she eats the apple. Mm-hmm. Right? That we, we don't get to go back to mm-hmm. . And, and there might be some loss there, right. Of, of, of innocence, Right. But there's also something to be gained in the process of having God honor the shame and re reshape it and reimagine it for us. Right? And, and it, um, there's a quote on my Facebook page, something of like, uh, um, a gratitude that I have for my struggle because in it, I stumbled across my own strength mm-hmm.. And, and so there's something, I think I, there's something that we gain in the wrestling and the struggling and the coming out in a place of God honoring where we've been, including the shame that we have felt that that, so you don't ever really get to go back home again, right? Like, you never get to go back to life before the apple, but you do know the grief of having ate the apple, the agony of having eaten the apple and the sweetness of God having restored your relationship to him even after you ate the apple. Right? That, and so there's a different depth to your relationship with Jesus, right? Mm-hmm. , I mean, I think we could feel it in our own marriages even, right? Like it sucked when we fight, but there, but there's something sweet about, about when you get to that place of like, I'm married to a guy in in with whom I can totally blow it. Like, totally blow it. Mm-hmm. and, and, and, and this relationship can hold that.Danielle (35:20):And, and I think I wanna make a like a further point. It's not that they didn't eat meat after this, but God sent Adam to do what was closest to him, which was till the earth because he had made Adam from the Earth, it says that mm-hmm. , he didn't send him to a place of then further shame where he had been caring for animals and implied, now you have to herd these animals. Like I think there's something special in thatRebecca (35:47):That was his job to begin with before Yeah. Before the apple, right? Yeah. Yeah. And, and so there's a sense of it being restored in some capacity.Danielle (35:56):Uh-huh and he literally put chair bins up there, they were never getting back in.Rebecca (36:02):Right? You Right, right. And, and that yes, there's some loss, but that doesn't mean that the progression forward does not bring like a corresponding sweetness that might even overpower the, the sense of loss.Danielle (36:18):And so I think that really fits with the clip from, um, from Incanto because they're not going back to that first city in that town andTJ (36:34):Uh, I think, I think it's, I, yeah, I'm having a lot of thoughts, but I just, I think pointing out that God treats their responses with compassion, cuz I don't think that's how we treat our own reactions. You know? Um, and my, my friend has gone off into this, like, she got in trouble on, um, for her take of like all, all coping is adaptive. Like she's trying to come against this like maladaptive coping label. And she's not saying that there aren't he versions of coping, but that we cope however we can. And then when we're able to cope better, we trade those coping mechanisms for ones that are healthier. And I think, I don't know, I I I'm not qualified to weigh in on that, but I think the point of treating ourselves with compassion, because when you see this chart, at least me, I'm like, well, how, how can I just get to the rest, like to the, you know, how can I move myself through? Um, because all other responses are bad when that's not what, that's not even how God treated Adam and e like, I think that's really important to say. Cause I don't think that's our default response is to like treat our reactions with compassion. And I don't think they change unless you can hold them with compassion.Rebecca (37:54):I would actually argue that our, our body's capacity to move along this chart is, is God, is God given. Right. Right. And there, there's a very appropriate time and a place for fear for, for anything that's on here. Right. Um, I I think, uh, I I don't even think you could argue that we're meant to live in this place of perpetual rest.Jesus is like on day seven, hollered me about rest. Right. But until then, like, you know, so are we right? I I I think like our capacity to move through these things is, is God given in the first place, Right? And some of the ness that we might feel is when there's not a sense of b balance or a sense of home, you know, like of the fluid sort of homeostasis of being able to read a situation and move with agility between the, these phases, right? Um,Danielle (39:00):Or the way perhaps our cultures have been pathologized for staying in different places in this right cycle. And therefore as a practitioner working in a cross-cultural environment, we have to come in with an attitude of first alignment and then willingness to be curious and receive, you know what Ernest said, that customizabilityRebecca (39:24):Right? Right. That plus I think, like I said, I think there's a time and a place for every single thing on here. So some of the pathologizing of communities of color is like, sometimes vigilance is not hyper vigilance, sometimes it's just situationally appropriate vigilance. Right. And, and the problem is that the majority culture is isn't paying attention to the power dynamics in the room. So they are misreading the need for vigilance in the room. Right. And so, and so then I'm not actually in this pathological space of hypervigilance, Right? I'm not in this space of PTSD where I'm actually not on the battlefield. And so my vigilance doesn't make any sense. I actually am, and my body is rightfully reading some sense of threat in the room. The problem is that in your not reading the room, well as you know, as, as a member of the culture that happens to be in power in that moment, you, you're, you're, you're not, you're not being honest about what the dynamics in the room really are. So you miss it. Mm-hmm. , and then you, you know Right. In a way that was like accusatory, like, like you're not, you're not doing the work because you're not, you're doing this and, and that's not necessary. You know what I mean? So Yeah.Danielle (40:49):So I wonder if it'd be possible to even name during this section, and we're talking about Adam and Eve, that when you're the other, like as a culture that's stepping into this experience, that it's possible you may be going up and down this chart, like what is Danielle gonna say? Mm-hmm. , what is Rebecca gonna say? What will happen in this moment mm-hmm. and, and to, for us to honor those bodily experiences. And maybe, you know, how we did with Jenny just slow down and ask mm-hmm. . Cause I will be going up and down this chart during the talk because, you know, there's performance pressure. There's the idea of I wanna honor my culture. There's the idea of how do I interpret myself. So I think it's fair to name that.Rebecca (41:42):Yeah. And that there are really good reasons why Right. That that, you know, and, and how do you step into a sense of self evaluation about how much, what, where's the line for me between like, this is a, a resilient response that I need to honor and where there are places where there's some hypervigilance, right? I mean, not that you wouldn't honor all of it, but to help them start to understand like there, there are resilient reactions and then there are reactions that are more about like being resigned to, to the weight of our collective stories. Right. And the, the text doesn't ask us to be resigned. Right? Right. It, it, it ask us, uh, to, to fight and to persevere, right? Mm-hmm. , um, and to press on towards the mark.Danielle (42:33):And in fact that's where, you know, that's where we can come back to like, God didn't ask Adam to get on with it to like stay naked. Right. And he didn't even call it out as a problem. He's just like, Here man, here's some nicer clothes.Rebecca (42:53):Right. And right. And, and you can almost hear in that a sense of like, like Eden is where you started, but it isn't where you're gonna end up. And, and and, and there is a journey that we will be on together. Right. And so like, there's some things you're gonna need for the journey, including some clothes, right? Not, not, not, I mean, Yeah. Yeah. And, and if we really truly believe that God is omni mission and he knew from the beginning and therefore the apple and the fall not, did not surprise him and that he always had a plan for Right. Jesus was always in the work mm-hmm.And that he always meant for us to end up in Revelation 79 knowing what it would cost us to land it there through that pathway. Right. Then going back to Eden before the fall was, was is not how we're supposed to play this game.Yes. And also, uh, it maybe took us the struggle of the past year to figure out this is the talk.Cause there's something really inviting about Eden is what you're meant for. Like, it's not like that doesn't resonate and it isn't like it isn't true. Right. I mean, it is true that we, we were meant for the splendor of Eden. Right. But it's also true that the game changed.And, and, and then now we're meant for something actually sweeter and richer with more depth than Eden.Danielle (44:51):Mm. That makes me wanna cry. Cause it feels hopeful compared to what I have felt, you know?Rebecca (44:59):Like where it meant for the sense of greater, is he Right? I mean, where it meant for the sense of, and we shall overcome and the only way you get there is cuz there was something you had to overcome. Right. There's the, the like something went gravely wrong in Eden that put an obstacle in your way.Right? And so I think we have, right? Yeah.Danielle (45:25):TJ what are you thinking?TJ (45:28):Uh, I'm thinking about redemption for white people. Like what, what, you know, which is not the focus of this conversation. That's where my,Danielle (45:37):But I think it is actually part of the focus cuz I think we're all too, but you are white and, and you're in white skin, but you're also not white.TJ (45:45):Yeah, I know. Yeah. I, Yep. Super aware. And I, and I think that is like, just as you guys have been talking throughout the few weeks until, until more recently where I just am like, it's, it's like anything that you banish from the table has a lot of powerYeah. And yeah. So even though we're like not gonna devote any of our conversation to this part over here, which is an intentional choice, that actually necessarily means that it's exerting a lot of power over us. Um, so I don't know. I just was thinking about that, like what there is a movement to specific cultures. There's um, there's a recovery work and, and it's something that we're all doing, We're doing it in different ways. Sometimes we're doing it in different spaces, but we are doing itRebecca (46:51):Absent a frame around whiteness white people. And, and the redemption of that story, you, you, you can't in order to have a complete picture of God mm-hmm. and, and, um, and so they treat that as a sacred moment of curiosity around what is it that this culture knows about God that we do not mm-hmm. what parts of him are translated that we don't have words for mm-hmm. . Um, and it made me, it, when he told me that, it reminded me of you, it reminded me of us having some conversations that there's not a word in Spanish for resiliency mm-hmm. . Right. And so I just, yeah. I mean like that sense of like, there are ways that you will see it as a Latinx woman that will go right past my head as a black woman and, and if I'm wise, I will slow down and sit in that moment with you and be like, what do you know that I don't?How has God shown up in your culture in ways that he hasn't shown up in mind?Danielle (48:06):Well, I think it's gonna be good. Thanks for recording this, tj. AndYeah. And I know you gotta go.TJ (48:15):I do. But I appreciate you both. I respect you both. It's been really fun to work with you.Danielle (48:23):I'm glad we got into it because now I I, it, I think we were feeling our way around which, which part of the text gives us this. And I feel like we kind of just felt our way into that, you know? Mm. So that feels good to me, you know?Yeah. Okay. Bye.Rebecca (48:45):You. Thank you.TJ (48:46):Thank you 

Retire With Ryan
10 Interview Questions to Ask When Hiring a Financial Advisor, #118

Retire With Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 16:40


Despite our industry's best efforts to protect investors from scams and bad recommendations, good people are being taken advantage of every day by shady financial advisors. On this episode, I'm going to address the 10 questions you need to ask any financial advisor you want to hire or are currently working with and give you my answers so that you stay protected from financial predators.  You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Are you a fiduciary and a fee-only firm? [1:51] Do you have any disclosures or complaints? [5:00] Do you have any specific certifications? [5:34] Do you have any specialties and what services do you offer? [7:41] How are you compensated for your services? [8:33] What other charges will I potentially incur? [9:22] What's your investment philosophy? [10:54] Where do you keep your client's money and how can they see it? [11:51] How often will we communicate? [13:40] How many clients do you advise and how long has your oldest client been with you? [14:40] Integrity first One of the most important questions you can ask a potential financial advisor is if they are a fiduciary. This means that as an advisor, they are required to put their client's interests ahead of their own at all times. Unfortunately, non-fiduciary advisors make recommendations to their clients that solely benefit them every single day. It's extremely important to verify that any potential or current financial advisor is a fiduciary because they will be legally and ethically bound to handle your money responsibly. The second and equally important question you should ask a financial advisor you're looking to hire is if they are a fee-only advisor working for a fee-only firm. This means neither the firm nor the advisor accepts commissions for recommendations they make or for managing their client's portfolios. However, some fiduciary advisors maintain insurance and brokerage licenses that allow them to receive commissions for the recommendations that they make. I believe this creates an unhealthy conflict of interest and that being a fee-only advisor is the way to go. Specialties, services, and security Another great piece of information to know about a potential financial advisor is if they have any specialties and what services they offer. You want to select a financial advisor whose expertise matches your needs. If you're hoping to start a small business you don't want to go with someone who specializes in people going through a divorce. My specialty is retirement planning. I help people within five years of retirement through comprehensive financial planning and wealth management services. The right financial advisor is the one that matches your goal. Finally, you need to know where your financial advisor keeps their client's money and how you can see it. Bernie Madoff ripped off so many people because he was personally holding their investments in an account with unrestricted access. I urge all investors not to allow their advisor or their advisory firm to hold their investments directly. Rather, their investment should be held by an independent third party known as a custodian like TD Ameritrade or Charles Schwabb. Never personally write a check to your financial advisor. Any fees for services should be made out to the firm itself. Listen to this episode for more insights on hiring a financial advisor! Resources Mentioned Retire With Ryan Podcast 2022 Listener Survey Top 10 Interview Questions When Hiring a Financial Advisor (Blog) Investment Adviser Public Disclosure Website BrokerCheck CFP Board Connect With Morrissey Wealth Management  www.MorrisseyWealthManagement.com/contact

Do Your Good
#98 Strategies to Support Entrepreneurship in Your Giving Strategy, with Conor Carmody Program Director @The Innovation Exchange Furthr & Chief Commercial Officer (COO) for Airify Technology

Do Your Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 24:44


We are joined by Conor Carmody to discuss entrepreneurship and how nonprofits can support innovation. Conor explains to donors how to recognize a successful organization that collaborates with start-ups and what warning signs to watch out for. Conor emphasizes the value of businesspeople who support the next generation of businesspeople by giving back. Sybil asked Conor to join because she was intrigued by the Furthr Festival that Conor and his team is organizing this October, and most years, to help entrepreneurs. Episode Highlights:How donors can fund entrepreneursHow a donor can spot a successful nonprofit that assists start-ups.The “Furthr” Festival in 2022. Conor Carmody Bio:A highly experienced business executive who has held senior management positions across all commercial disciplines in telecoms. Conor is a results-focused individual with strategic, operational, and entrepreneurial qualities. His core area of expertise is developing and implementing business strategies, Leading, mentoring, and developing teams to deliver success. A clear focus on results through teamwork. Key strengths include Sales, Marketing, Strategic Planning, Project Management, and implementation Specialties, Strategy Business Start-Up, Marketing, Communications, Training, and DevelopmentConnect with Conor:linkedin.com/in/conorcarmodyLinks referenced in this interviewFurthr Festival - https://furthr.ie/event/furthr-festival/Twitter – @furthr_ieLinkedIn – FurthrFacebook – @furthr.ieInstagram - @furthr_ieIf you enjoyed this episode, listen to these as well:#91 New Investigation Into a Wealth Generating Asset with Marc Beshears Owner of Top Wealth Agenda/ Bank On Yourself Professional® #76 The Creation of a Giving Circle to Support Survivor-Driven Change with Ken Kroner, Principal, Kroner Family Foundation#73 Sybil Speaks: It Takes Time to Make a DifferenceCrack the Code: Sybil's Successful Guide to PhilanthropyBecome even better at what you do as Sybil teaches you the strategies as well as the tools, you'll need to avoid mistakes and make a career out of philanthropy through my new course, Crack the Code!In this new course, you'll gain access to beautifully animated and filmed engaging videos, and many more! Link for the wait list for the Philanthropy Accelerator https://www.doyourgood.com/Philanthropy-Accelerator-Mastermind-WaitlistLink to the nonprofit email sign-up to connect https://www.doyourgood.com/ticket-to-fundraisingCheck out her website with all the latest opportunities to learn from Sybil at www.doyourgood.com. Connect with Do Your GoodFacebook @doyourgoodInstagram @doyourgoodWould you like to talk with Sybil directly?Send in your inquiries through her website www.doyourgood.com, or you can email her directly at sybil@doyourgood.com!

FoodBev.com Podcast
FoodBev Weekly News Bulletin 07/10/22: JBS to discontinue US plant-based meat operation Planterra Foods; Solina to acquire Saratoga Food Specialties for $587.5m; Asahi acquires Australian adult soft drinks brand StrangeLove; and more.

FoodBev.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 3:11


FoodBev Media's Antonia Garrett Peel rounds up this week's food and beverage news, including: JBS to discontinue US plant-based meat operation Planterra Foods; Solina to acquire Saratoga Food Specialties for $587.5m; Asahi acquires Australian adult soft drinks brand StrangeLove; and more.

No Filter with Kobo
17. Formula of the Month: Beard and Mustache Touch Up for Greys

No Filter with Kobo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 12:08


In this series, we will present formulas developed by Kobo's Global Application Labs, discuss the ingredients used and give some tips to help you create amazing products. Beard and Mustache Touch Up for Greys is a quick and non-committal alternative to permanent and semi-permanent hair dye products. It works instantly by immediately depositing pigment on the surface of the hair and washes out easily with soap and water. Links: Kobo Surface Treated Pigment Technologies: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-SurfaceTreatmentMap.pdf https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-11SP-Hybrid-Treatment.pdf https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-ASGPTreatment.pdf Kobo Film Formers: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Products.aspx?p=Resins&c=Resins%20Water%20Phase https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-Koboguard5400.pdf https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/SynergisticInteraction-IFSCC2020.pdf https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-KoboguardNatural2063.pdf Microspheres: https://www.koboproductsinc.com/Downloads/Kobo-Microspheres.pdf Formula Instagram Post/Video: https://www.instagram.com/p/CiDBUa4qUR4/ ABOUT US: Since 1987 Kobo has provided innovative, technology-based raw materials to the cosmetic industry. The product range includes Surface Treated Pigments, Microspheres, Suncare and Color Dispersions, Silicone Fluids, Specialties, Natural Ingredients, Effect Pigments, Boron Nitride , and Delivery Systems. Kobo has five locations, USA (Corporate Headquarters), France, Japan, Brazil , and the UK and is represented globally by independent agents. Learn more at: www.koboproductsinc.com