Podcasts about creutzfeldt jakob

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Best podcasts about creutzfeldt jakob

Latest podcast episodes about creutzfeldt jakob

RCPath
September 2022 (Part Two): The past, present and future of misfolded proteins and neurodegeneration

RCPath

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 32:17


In episode two, we explore the past, present and future of neurodegenerative diseases linked to misfolded proteins, namely, Alzheimer's disease and prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Single-nuclei transcriptomics of mammalian prion diseases identifies dynamic gene signatures shared between species

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2022.09.13.507650v1?rss=1 Authors: Dimitriadis, A., Zhang, F., Murphy, T., Trainer, T., Jaunmuktane, Z., Schmidt, C., Nazari, T., Linehan, J., Brandner, S., Collinge, J., Mead, S., Vire, E. Abstract: Mammalian prion diseases are fatal and transmissible neurological conditions caused by the propagation of prions, self-replicating multimeric assemblies of misfolded forms of host cellular prion protein (PrP). The most common human form of the disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), typically presents as a rapidly progressive dementia and has no effective treatments. Prion diseases are transmissible to laboratory rodents affording unprecedented opportunities to understand neurodegeneration in its evolving stages. Murine models are especially useful in prion research as they develop bona fide prion disease and recapitulate all biochemical and neuropathological hallmarks of human prion disease. Despite extensive studies investigating the changes in transcriptional profiles in prion diseases the mechanisms by which prion diseases induce cellular toxicity, including changes in gene expression profiles are yet to be fully characterized. This is at least in part because confounding effects related to brain cellular heterogeneity have not been resolved. Here, we took advantage of the recent developments in single-cell technologies and performed an unbiased whole-transcriptome single-nucleus transcriptomic analysis in prion disease. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by PaperPlayer

The Funeral Science Podcast
Creutzfeldt-Jakob's Disease

The Funeral Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 17:46


In this episode a funeral scientist discusses Creutzfeld-Jacob's Disease, clots embalmers claim are from the Covid-19 vaccine, and Funeral Face-Off Trivia Funeral Face-Off Trivia Sign-Up https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe26zIXF6H4OuvYzwdH1ybQQqNmaq_JeWGkLn0rxryckux30A/viewform?usp=sf_link Interview with Meghan Lewis: Autopsy Coordinator, Natl Prion Disease & Pathology Surveillance Center Dodge SDS for BRIOHOCL https://shop.dodgeco.com/content/files/SDS/BrioHOCLPrPMSDSV2.pdf Press release for BRIOHOCL https://azfcca.org/biotech-inc-announces-distribution-agreement-dodge-tackle-deadly-prions/ Johns Hopkins on prion diseases https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/prion-diseases Harvard on protein folding https://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2010/issue65/ WHO guidelines for funeral professionals https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/66707/WHO_CDS_CSR_APH_2000.3.pdf CDC Guidelines for funeral professionals https://www.cdc.gov/prions/cjd/funeral-directors.html#:~:text=CJD%20patients%20who%20have Fact check on clots found by embalmers https://www.poynter.org/fact-checking/2022/theres-no-scientific-evidence-that-vaccines-are-responsible-for-strange-blood-clots-observed-by-embalmers/ https://healthfeedback.org/claimreview/mike-adams-flawed-analysis-clot-embalmer-richard-hirschman-doesnt-demonstrate-link-between-blood-clots-and-covid-19-vaccines-epoch-times/ Mayo Clinic and clots https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/blood-clots/basics/causes/sym-20050850

Contending for Truth Podcast, Dr. Scott Johnson
Emergency Freedom Alerts: 9-13-22-Part 3

Contending for Truth Podcast, Dr. Scott Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 40:31


Table of Contents: Part 2: Study: Incurable prion disease linked to covid jabs–New research out of France has determined that Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19)'vaccines' trigger an incurable and fatal prion condition known as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) AKA KURU like Mad Cow Disease In Humans! IF BIT, THIS TICK BITE COULD END RED MEAT CONSUMPTION! Lyme Disease…

Last Call with Chris Michaels
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Last Call with Chris Michaels

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 20:40


Why is greasy sow, Liz Cheney, from Wyoming? Putin calls out the West. Study from HCA Healthcare taken down, pointing to the adverse event of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Symptoms include…psychosis.

Reddit Explains Conspiracy & the Unknown
r/AskReddit; What's the Scariest Thing that Science Has Proven Is Real?

Reddit Explains Conspiracy & the Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 14:01


Some tumors have teeth, hair, and even eyes. Brain-eating amoebas. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a sickness that causes personality changes, anxiety, depression, and memory loss, usually within a few months. Many people lapse into coma. Submit your stories: popmediaagency@gmail.com Visit betterhelp.com/redditexplains to talk to a professional about stress, grief, and other mental health needs.Our Instagram page: @reddit_explains

AWR Español: Clínica Abierta (Radio Sol)
Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob

AWR Español: Clínica Abierta (Radio Sol)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 59:00


La enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (ECJ) es una forma de daño cerebral que lleva a una disminución rápida en el movimiento y pérdida de la función mental.

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Chronic Wasting Disease In Deer, Digestion Woes, Avoiding Organic Foods | THRR118

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 38:18 Very Popular


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://twitter.com/davidludwigmd/status/1552636115139514368 Podcast Questions: 1. Chronic Wasting Disease in Deer and Elk [15:52] Kristi says: Hi Robb and Nicki, I have a new fear just when I am already worried about the future of meat, transportation, the economy, etc. I bought some elk liver from a ranch that sells grass-fed bison, elk, and beef. I went to fry it, and it did not smell the same as bison or beef liver. And while I'm sure that's just how elk liver smells, I started worrying about chronic wasting disease(CWD), which Joe Rogan brought up on the March 2020 episode with the infectious disease epidemiologist, Michael Osterholm. (The episode that in my mind started off the covid pandemic.) I ended up throwing away the elk meat, and then looked into chronic wasting disease more. So far, no known cases have spread to humans as vCJD (variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease), but that was also true of mad cow disease, and I'm sure chronic wasting disease showing up in humans will take longer since way fewer people eat elk or deer. I am in one of the areas of North America where chronic wasting disease is present, and since I bought the meat from a farm, the elk is apparently tested (they send away the heads to get tested), however it says this doesn't guarantee they're free of CWD. Now I think I should just stick to beef/bison, since the downside of Jakob Creutzfeldt disease is so terrible, but I was also thinking if I do this I shouldn't even buy bison or beef from the same farm, since prions are notoriously hard to destroy, and would stick around on the butchering equipment. Do you have any knowledge or insight on this topic? Am I overreacting? Thanks and keep up the great work with the show. 2. Digestion Woes [23:40] Kelly says: Hi Robb and Nicki, hoping you can help me with everyone's favorite topic, poo! I'll cut to the chase. My BMs are a 6-7 on the Bristol stool chart, every day. Usually 3 times per day, and all before 9 am. This has been going on for a few months now. I don't have any stomach pain or bloating, just really liquid poo. My diet is good, I eat mostly red meat, eggs, fruit, white rice, and I don't exclude dairy or gluten because I've never had any sensitivity to it, but maybe that's a good place to start? I do drink alcohol a couple times per week, but haven't noticed a difference when I remove alcohol. I am also a coffee drinker, but I hope that's not the culprit! Just looking for your thoughts on the best place to start, anything I should ask my doctor to run test-wise? I had an IgG test done a couple years ago and that didn't show anything to avoid except things like chia seeds and some random things like that. Thank you both for all you do, me and my hubs listen every week and appreciate your common sense approach to health and recent policy topics. Robb and Nicki for President! 3. Organic? [29:08] Mark says: Hi Robb & Nicki, I've read Wired & Eat & Sacred Cow & drink LMNT (love, chocolate salt in goat milk is a favorite). I've been reading some of the comments from the FarmBabe basically that she now goes out-of-the-way "not" to buy/eat food labeled Organic (she seems not to like StoneyField or at least would like them to stop spreading misinformation) .  I've also read some of her battles with "Bobby" aka FlavCity.  It's hard to sort out if what she's saying is true or if as a non-organic farmer she's biased in any way.  Any insight would be helpful, especially considering current food prices.  I seem to always want to buy Organic, am I wasting my money? All the best, Mark Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at the blog page: https://robbwolf.com/2022/07/29/chronic-wasting-disease-in-deer-digestion-woes-avoiding-organic-foods-thrr118/

The Todd Herman Show
mRNA Brain Disease and GOP Lapdogs: people are being maimed and killed by Pharma and the GOP is afraid to confront them - Episode 138 - Hour 1 mRNA Brain Disease

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 54:34


THE THESIS: If you ever wonder whose in charge, determine who you are not allowed to criticize. No one in the GOP is willing to take on the Pharma gangsters of The Party. It's up to us to remember God sees all, His Kingdom will come and His Word will be done. It's also up to us to know what Pharma is and how they work within The Party.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Matthew 6:9-13 9 “This, then, is how you should pray: “‘Our Father in heaven,hallowed be your name,10 your kingdom come,your will be done,    on earth as it is in heaven.11 Give us today our daily bread.12 And forgive us our debts,    as we also have forgiven our debtors.13 And lead us not into temptation,    but deliver us from the evil one.'' THE NEWS & COMMENT: COVID Vaccines Linked to New Type of Incurable, Fatal Degenerative Brain Disorder;Towards the emergence of a new form of the neurodegenerative Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Twenty six cases of CJD declared a few days after a COVID-19 “vaccine” Jab Overall deaths in Australia - where nearly everyone is vaccinated - are spiking.It's Monday Down Under. Get ready to start the week with frightening data. Oh, but what did the WAPO say about Australia? [AUDIO] - What did Bill Gates say? [AUDIO] - What did Fauci say ia a threat to what he calls our Democracy? [AUDIO] - What did Morning Joe and Dan Pfeiffer say needs to happen to shows like mine 'CDC Raises Monkeypox Alert, Recommends Masks During Travel, Then Removes Advice'; why did they remove it? this corrupt inept incompetent CDC is at it again...trying desperately to scare youtrying hard to deflect that the focus has to be on men who have sex with men, that group, bisexuals and that behavior and brining it to low risk women etc.; it is not a 'general' population issue  New Boston Mayor Reportedly Wants (Catholic) Boston College to Create an LGBT Resource Center   . . . The Bible and a loving, Christian community is THE resource center Please don't use this tactic, the Devil LOVES this tactic: [AUDIO] - Guy yelling at parents Christopher Yuan book [AUDIO] - MTG tracks down Lindsey Graham in the Senate…  THE LISTENERS: Melinda: I have a new term.... Covid Divorce..... that's where I am now. I probably don't need to explain the term.... Thank you for all you do. It helps to hear your voice now and through you, I hear God's as well. ---   ---   --- Todd: Greetings from the separate country of Front Range Colorado. I was made aware that there will be a groomer show at the Botanic Gardens in Denver called drag queen story time to “celebrate” pride month. I am planning to call and oppose this event and ask that this event be canceled. I will never consider this “family” establishment for entertainment. I ask that you pray for me to have the wisdom of the Holy Spirit when calling and that I am able to refrain my fleshly rage. Thanks, God bless you and your family! ---   ---   --- Mike: Hello Todd, Thank you for being a steward of the light in a very dark world. I have listened to you for a couple of months now, and have enjoyed and been blessed by the content. Your courage to openly discuss Jesus and share Him with the public is admirable and very much appreciated. One thing, and only one, that caught me off guard was your support of a song by Elevation Worship on episode 134. Elevation Church is pastored by a heretical man, Steven Furtick, who claimed he is God Almighty in a recent sermon. The sermon is called "It's Always Been In You".  Regarding the music, I do believe that the purpose of Megachurch worship bands, is to lead people to the sponsoring church. You mentioned the hypnotic sound. That is a classic Hillsong, Bethel, Jesus Culture method of drawing listeners in to the "experience". If these churches were providing sound, fundamental biblical teaching, then great! Listeners of the music and the sermons would truly be blessed. Unfortunately, I don't believe this is true. Todd, this e-mail is in no way a critique of you or your relationship with God Almighty. I have a deep conviction that some churches are not always leading us through the narrow gate, and instead leading us down the wide path to hell. If you are so inclined, it would be great to hear a podcast(s) specifically focused on false teachers, false churches, the infiltration and acceptance of immorality in our churches, etc. Many blessings to you, your family, your listeners, and your podcast. Mike   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19
Ep. 557 - Body Temperature, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and Increased CO2 Emissions

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 10:00


Today, in episode 557, our expert Infectious Disease Doctor and Community Health Specialist discuss what you need to know about Public Health. We talk about how lower body temperature affects lifespan, as well as new treatments for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and why there has been increased pollen and CO2 emissions. As always, join us for all the Public Health information you need, explained clearly by our health experts. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/noisefilter/message

Ask Doctor Dawn
From basic genetics to recent research into our understanding of genetic diseases

Ask Doctor Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 48:03


KSQD 5-04-2022: (Archive show) Review of genetics research focusing on genetic diseases: sickle cell, Huntingtons, fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis, breast cancer, Tay-Sachs, tuberculosis, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and prions; More genetics topics such as repetitive DNA, transposons, jumping genes, oncogenes and retroviruses

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19
Ep. 525 - New Treatments for CJD, Hong Kong's Deadly Outbreak, and American's Attitudes Towards Annual Shots

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 10:05


Today, in episode 525, our expert Infectious Disease Doctor and Community Health Specialist discuss what you need to know about Public Health. We talk about new treatments for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, as well as what we can learn from Hong Kong's outbreak, and how American's attitudes towards flu shots could be a bad sign for COVID shots. As always, join us for all the Public Health information you need, explained clearly by our health experts. Website: NoiseFilter - Complex health topics explained simply (noisefiltershow.com) Animations: NoiseFilter - YouTube Instagram: NoiseFilter (@noisefiltershow) • Instagram photos and videos Facebook: NoiseFilter Show | Facebook TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@noisefiltershow --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/noisefilter/message

The Dictionary
#C500 (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to crib)

The Dictionary

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 23:04


I read from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to crib.   In case you want to learn more about Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creutzfeldt%E2%80%93Jakob_disease     The word of the episode is "crew cut".     "The Dictionary - Letter A" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter B" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter C" on YouTube     Featured in a Top 10 Dictionary Podcasts list! https://blog.feedspot.com/dictionary_podcasts/     Backwards Talking on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmIujMwEDbgZUexyR90jaTEEVmAYcCzuq     dictionarypod@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/thedictionarypod/ https://twitter.com/dictionarypod https://www.instagram.com/dictionarypod/ https://www.patreon.com/spejampar 917-727-5757

Neuroscience: Amateur Hour
Episode 16: The Neuroscience of Mad Cow Disease

Neuroscience: Amateur Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 15:59


When I was a kid, I thought two things were going to be much bigger problems in my life than they actually are - quicksand and mad cow disease. Turns out that they aren't but mad cow disease is still the stuff of science-fiction nightmares. Mad cow disease is caused by the spread of prions, proteins that weaponize our own cells against us and cause proteins to misfold and aggregate, slowly killing neurons throughout the brain. The disease is characterized by rapid and fatal neurodegeneration. Want to get the shit scared out of you by learning about the truth behind mad cow disease? Come and listen!Please rate, review, and subscribe and if you have any questions, comments, concerns, queries, or complaints, please email me at neuroscienceamateurhour@gmail.com or DM me at NeuroscienceAmateurHour on Instagram.Citations and relevant pictures are below:About BSE BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Published 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/prions/bse/about.htmlLegname G. Elucidating the function of the prion protein. True HL, ed. PLOS Pathogens. 2017;13(8):e1006458. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1006458Jung MJ, Pistolesi D, Panà A. Prions, prion diseases and decontamination. Igiene E Sanita Pubblica. 2003;59(5):331-344. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14981553/Lanska DJ. The mad cow problem in the UK: risk perceptions, risk management, and health policy development. Journal of Public Health Policy. 1998;19(2):160-183. Accessed April 11, 2022. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9670700/MRI used to detect vCJD. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal. 2000;163(3):324. Accessed April 11, 2022. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC80326/Macfarlane RG, Wroe SJ, Collinge J, Yousry TA, Jäger HR. Neuroimaging findings in human prion disease. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. 2007;78(7):664-670. doi:10.1136/jnnp.2006.094821NHS Choices. Overview - Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. NHS. Published 2019. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/creutzfeldt-jakob-disease-cjd/‌Mead S, Khalili-Shirazi A, Potter C, et al. Prion protein monoclonal antibody (PRN100) therapy for Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease: evaluation of a first-in-human treatment programme. The Lancet Neurology. 2022;21(4):342-354. doi:10.1016/s1474-4422(22)00082-5Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/neuroscienceamateurhour)

This Medical Life
Episode 14: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Mad cow & Prion disease | The Bovine Blender

This Medical Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 51:31


In 1951, Australian anthropologists reported on a unique neurodegenerative disease from Papua New Guinea. The natives called it ‘Kuru’ which meant to tremble or to be afraid and it certainly struck fear into those who saw it. Through amazing investigative work and serendipity, a veterinary pathologist in the United States saw the histology of a Kuru from the brain and noted it looked a lot like ‘Scrapie’ (a neurodegenerative disease in sheep) and the link was made. It would not be until 1980s that the causative agent for these diseases was identified: Prion’s. And then in the 1990s, cows in the United Kingdom began showing symptoms… This is the story of Prion diseaseSupport the show: https://theadelaideshow.com.au/listen-or-download-the-podcast/adelaide-in-crowd/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — April 7, 2022

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 31:43 Very Popular


Featuring articles on endovascular therapy for large cerebral infarction, population immunity and Covid-19 severity with the omicron variant in South Africa, tebipenem for complicated urinary tract infection, an implanted stimulator in multiple-system atrophy, U.S. medical faculty diversity over four decades, and the origins of calcific aortic stenosis; a review article on the laboratory diagnosis of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease; a Clinical Problem-Solving describing a burning question; and Perspective articles on ten years of Choosing Wisely to reduce low-value care, on putting health and equity at the center of the climate movement, and on the wild west of checkpoint inhibitor development.

Medical Myths, Legends & Fairytales
Is it possible to regenerate our brain? with Dr. Greg Eckel

Medical Myths, Legends & Fairytales

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 45:25


Can the brain repair itself? Can it regenerate after damage? Will there be a full recovery after a brain injury?  I bring in a friend to talk about the latest advances in neuronal repair. In practice since 2001, Dr. Greg Eckel, co-founder of Nature's Cure clinic in Portland where he shares what he calls "Sarieah's gifts" with the world, has focused on chronic degenerative and neurodegenerative diseases for many years. Between the latest online fads and the crazy media headlines, it's easier more than ever to get confused about your health. If you want to make better decisions about your health so you can feel better and live longer, you've come to the right place. As a loving husband and clinician, he took a deep dive into medical research looking for cures to his wife's Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare, chronic neurodegenerative condition with no known cure. While he didn't find a solution for Sarieah, the information he discovered and now uses in his clinic is showing promise for thousands of people.    Key takeaways: [1:37] Introduction to Dr. Greg Eckel[2:24] Can the brain really regenerate?[6:11] What is the time frame for the brain to regenerate and what is the success rate?[7:20] VSEL's - Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells[9:18] Main diseases' underlying categories for neurodegeneration - prion, auto-immune and traumatic brain injuries.[11:25] FAN-C approach - a framework that Dr. Eckel have created to evaluate, explore and develop a program for proper diagnosis.[12:43] How Dr. Eckel got into prionic activity.[14:00] Clinician's own grief as experience and inspiration to help people. [17:45] Getting your grief and emotions out.[24:27] What happens in the neurodegeneration FAN-C approach assessment?[25:15] Other causes of neurodegeneration[26:00] Why do proteins misfold? [26:50] The Braak's hypothesis of parkinson's disease[30:02] Homeodynamic regulation[32:14] Cellular regeneration - VSEL's[36:53] Hyperbaric oxygen - originally designed and developed for divers and helps heal the brain for regeneration.[39:41] Photobiomodulation - a light therapy using low level laser.[40:45] Acupuncture and Chinese medicine encourage proper blood flow and help the body and the brain heal.[42:56] Nature Cures Clinic and the Cloudhands and superbrain yoga videos.[43:35] Closing Topic references:   https://naturecuresclinic.com/brain-regeneration/   https://poddtoppen.se/podcast/1339733591/the-spectrum-of-health-with-dr-christine-schaffner/the-future-is-brain-regeneration-dr-greg-eckel-with-dr-christine-schaffner   https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28243222/   https://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2010/issue65/   https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/fact-sheets/Pages/regeneration.aspx For more details about Dr. Greg Eckel, visit his website www.naturecuresclinic.com or join his exercises, QI gong and Super Brain yoga through www.naturecuresclinic.com/qigong. You can also book a consultation call with his team through naturecuresclinic.com/book-a-call.   Follow Dr. Greg Eckel on his social media accounts:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/NatureCuresClinic/posts/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/naturecurespdx/?hl=en LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drgregeckel/  Twitter: @drgreckel     HBOT and Brain health Resources:   “Hyperbaric Oxygen Alleviates Secondary Brain Injury After Trauma Through Inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB Signaling Pathway”. Meng XE, Zhang Y, Li N, Fan DF, Yang C, Li H, Guo DZ, Pan SY. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research. 2016 Jan 26; 22: 284-288 PMC [article] PMCID: PMC4734681, PMID: 26812205, DOI: 10.12659/MSM.894148 Boussi-Gross R, Golan H, Fishlev G, Bechor Y, Volkov O, Bergan J, Friedman M, Hoofien D, Shlamkovitch N, Ben-Jacob E, Efrati S. “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can improve post concussion syndrome years after mild traumatic brain injury - randomized prospective trial”. PLoS One. 2013 Nov 15;8(11):e79995. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0079995. eCollection 2013. PubMed [citation] PMID: 24260334, PMCID: PMC3829860 Thom SR, Bhopale VM, Velazquez OC, Goldstein LJ, Thom LH, Buerk DG. “Stem cell mobilization by hyperbaric oxygen”. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2006 Apr;290(4):H1378-86. Epub 2005 Nov 18. PubMed [citation] PMID: 16299259 “ROS and Brain Diseases: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”. Popa-Wagner A, Mitran S, Sivanesan S, Chang E, Buga AM. “Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity”. 2013 Dec 5; 2013: 963520 PMC [article] PMCID: PMC3871919, PMID: 24381719, DOI: 10.1155/2013/963520 “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy promotes neurogenesis: where do we stand?”. Mu J, Krafft PR, Zhang JH. Medical Gas Research. 2011 Jun 27; 1: 14 PMC [article] PMCID: PMC3231808, PMID: 22146131, DOI: 10.1186/2045-9912-1-14   PARKINSONS REFERENCES:  (etiology, causes, treatments)   “d-β-Hydroxybutyrate protects neurons in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease”. Kashiwaya Y, Takeshima T, Mori N, Nakashima K, Clarke K, Veech RL. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2000 May 9; 97(10): 5440-5444 PMC [article] PMCID: PMC25847, PMID: 10805800, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.97.10.5440 Han L, Xie YH, Wu R, Chen C, Zhang Y, Wang XP. “Traditional Chinese medicine for modern treatment of Parkinson's disease”. Chin J Integr Med. 2017 Aug;23(8):635-640. doi: 10.1007/s11655-016-2537-7. Epub 2017 Jan 20. Review. PubMed [citation] PMID: 28108911 Karlsson O, Lindquist NG. “Melanin affinity and its possible role in neurodegeneration”. J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2013 Dec;120(12):1623-30. doi: 10.1007/s00702-013-1062-5. Epub 2013 Jul 3. Review. PubMed [citation] PMID: 23821370 “Therapeutic potential of autophagy-enhancing agents in Parkinson's disease”. Moors TE, Hoozemans JJ, Ingrassia A, Beccari T, Parnetti L, Chartier-Harlin MC, van de Berg WD. Molecular Neurodegeneration. 2017 Jan 25; 12: 11 PMC [article] PMCID: PMC5267440, PMID: 28122627, DOI: 10.1186/s13024-017-0154-3 Goldman SM. “Environmental toxins and Parkinson's disease”. Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol. 2014;54:141-64. doi: 10.1146/annurev-pharmtox-011613-135937. Epub 2013 Sep 16. Review. PubMed [citation] PMID: 24050700 Agim ZS, Cannon JR. “Dietary factors in the etiology of Parkinson's disease”. Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:672838. doi: 10.1155/2015/672838. Epub 2015 Jan 20. Review. PubMed [citation] PMID: 25688361, PMCID: PMC4320877 Montgomery EB Jr. “Heavy metals and the etiology of Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders”. Toxicology. 1995 Mar 31;97(1-3):3-9. Review. PubMed [citation] PMID: 7716790 Ward RJ, Dexter DT, Crichton RR. “Chelating agents for neurodegenerative diseases”. Curr Med Chem. 2012;19(17):2760-72. Review. PubMed [citation] PMID: 22489724 Hozumi I, Hasegawa T, Honda A, Ozawa K, Hayashi Y, Hashimoto K, Yamada M, Koumura A, Sakurai T, Kimura A, Tanaka Y, Satoh M, Inuzuka T. “Patterns of levels of biological metals in CSF differ among neurodegenerative diseases”. J Neurol Sci. 2011 Apr 15;303(1-2):95-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2011.01.003. Epub 2011 Feb 2. PubMed [citation] PMID: 21292280 Chu Y, Kordower JH. “The prion hypothesis of Parkinson's disease”. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2015 May;15(5):28. doi: 10.1007/s11910-015-0549-x. PubMed [citation] PMID: 25868519   What did you learn about today's topic? Let us know by leaving a review! Visit these links to learn more: https://www.drchristianson.com/ Dr. Christianson on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/DrAlanChristianson/) Dr. Christianson on Instagram (http://www.instagram.com/dralanchristianson/) Subscribe for more Medical Myths, Legends, & Fairytales: Apple Podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/medical-myths-legends-fairytales/id1467232418) Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/show/0HaZ75TpOCazsRQSG0AOFs) YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/user/Alannmd/videos)

The Lancet Neurology
John Collinge on a treatment for CJD

The Lancet Neurology

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 14:45


John Collinge (MRC Prion Unit, University College London, London, UK) discusses a first-in-human treatment programme to give PRN100, an anti-prion-protein monoclonal antibody, to patients with Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease; the report is published in the April issue of The Lancet Neurology.

Western Barbarian
Western Barbarian - Ep12 - Spite, Somalia and Albertan Identity

Western Barbarian

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 126:51


0:00 - The Bagger Vance of Yellowknife 8:00 - The Yukon is the world's largest open air prison 16:20 - Honeytrapped in Northern Alberta 25:08 - How the West alienates you from the rest of Canada 30:30 - Novelty cheques for dead babies 37:55 - Everyone who marches in a protest is an insurgent 46:50 - Nothing beats their head in, like a cop, in jail, with a club 53:25 - The woeful fate of the children of Klein 1:04:30 - Fuck each and every resident of Ottawa, I don't care 1:24:45 - Politicians don't care about your kids because they don't vote 1:32:45 - Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease for Sacred Cows 1:42:55 - Haunted like Obama's last cigarette 1:53:45 - One bullet challenge : Lil Nas X vs Kanye 1:57:25 - The point five system could save Canada -------------------------------------------- Follow on Twitter for Updates : https://twitter.com/WestBarbarian

All Home Care Matters
Alzheimer's Disease vs. Dementia

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 19:54


Today's episode has been handpicked by our listeners. We have gotten quite a few comments on our videos wanting to know the difference between Alzheimer's and Dementia and we are going to be talking about the differences between the two and clearing up any confusion you may have. First, we are going to discuss what Alzheimer's is and how it differs from Dementia before moving on to what dementia is and what it can look like. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   According to the CDC, Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia. It is a progressive disease beginning with mild memory loss and possibly leading to loss of the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to the environment. Alzheimer's disease involves parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language and can seriously affect a person's ability to carry out daily activities. Age is the best-known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.   Alzheimer's disease accounts for somewhere between 60 and 80 percent of all dementia cases. As the aging population rises, more and more people are being diagnosed with Alzheimer's. The CDC says that in 2020, as many as 5.8 million Americans were living with Alzheimer's disease and this number is projected to nearly triple to 14 million people in the next forty years.   Individuals with Alzheimer's can live for many years with the disease, but it does ultimately end with death, often due to the loss of the ability to swallow. On average, after a diagnosis is made, a person with Alzheimer's usually lives for 4-8 years. However, someone with Alzheimer's can live longer than that. Some have lived nearly 20 years after receiving a diagnosis.   Early diagnosis is key for this disease. The sooner a treatment plan can be started, the better. According to the CDC, researchers believe that genetics may play a role in developing Alzheimer's disease. However, genes do not equal destiny. A healthy lifestyle may help reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. If you have a family history of Alzheimer's, make sure you inform your doctor. There are a few tests they can perform that may result in early detection.   According to the Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's is a degenerative brain disease that is caused by complex brain changes following cell damage. It leads to dementia symptoms that gradually worsen over time. The most common early symptom of Alzheimer's is trouble remembering new information because the disease typically impacts the part of the brain associated with learning first.   As Alzheimer's advances, symptoms get more severe and include disorientation, confusion, and behavioral changes. Eventually, speaking, swallowing, and walking become difficult. Currently, there is no cure for this disease, but there are a few ways to treat it. If you suspect that a loved one or yourself may have Alzheimer's, speak with a doctor. They will be able to determine if you have the disease, what stage you are in, and the best course of action for you to take.   This episode is closely related to our recent mini-series on the Seven Stages of Alzheimer's disease. We won't be talking about Alzheimer's nearly as in-depth as we have in our mini-series, so if you would like to learn more about Alzheimer's, listen to the series on our website, our YouTube channel, or wherever you get your podcasts.   Now that we've covered Alzheimer's disease, let's move on to dementia.   According to Forbes, dementia is the umbrella term used to describe several diseases that cause changes in the brain that lead to memory loss and language and reasoning difficulties, ultimately disrupting everyday functioning.   The National Institute on Aging says that Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning — thinking, remembering, and reasoning — to such an extent that it interferes with a person's daily life and activities. Some people with dementia cannot control their emotions, and their personalities may change. Dementia ranges in severity from the mildest stage, when it is just beginning to affect a person's functioning, to the most severe stage, when the person must depend completely on others for basic activities of living.   Dementia is more common as people grow older (about one-third of all people aged 85 or older may have some form of dementia) but it is not a normal part of aging. Many people live into their 90s and beyond without any signs of dementia.   There are several different forms of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and a person's symptoms can vary depending on the type. Let's take a closer look at the 5 most common forms of dementia. As you already know, the most common form of dementia is Alzheimer's.   According to Mayo Clinic, Lewy body dementia, also known as dementia with Lewy bodies, is the second most common type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Protein deposits, called Lewy bodies, develop in nerve cells in the brain regions involved in thinking, memory, and movement (motor control).   Lewy body dementia causes a progressive decline in mental abilities. People with Lewy body dementia might have visual hallucinations and changes in alertness and attention. Other effects include Parkinson's disease signs and symptoms such as rigid muscles, slow movement, walking difficulty, and tremors.   The third most common type is Frontotemporal dementia. According to Mayo Clinic, frontotemporal dementia is an umbrella term for a group of brain disorders that primarily affect the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. These areas of the brain are generally associated with personality, behavior, and language.   In frontotemporal dementia, portions of these lobes shrink, or atrophy. Signs and symptoms vary, depending on which part of the brain is affected. Some people with frontotemporal dementia have dramatic changes in their personalities and become socially inappropriate, impulsive, or emotionally indifferent, while others lose the ability to use language properly.   Frontotemporal dementia can be misdiagnosed as a psychiatric problem or as Alzheimer's disease. But frontotemporal dementia tends to occur at a younger age than does Alzheimer's disease. Frontotemporal dementia often begins between the ages of 40 and 65 but occurs later in life as well. FTD is the cause of approximately 10% to 20% of dementia cases.   The next form of dementia is vascular dementia. According to Mayo Clinic, Vascular dementia is a general term describing problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, memory, and other thought processes caused by brain damage from impaired blood flow to your brain.   You can develop vascular dementia after a stroke blocks an artery in your brain, but strokes don't always cause vascular dementia. Whether a stroke affects your thinking and reasoning depends on your stroke's severity and location. Vascular dementia can also result from other conditions that damage blood vessels and reduce circulation, depriving your brain of vital oxygen and nutrients.   Factors that increase your risk of heart disease and stroke — including diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking — also raise your vascular dementia risk. Controlling these factors may help lower your chances of developing vascular dementia.   The final common form of dementia is Mixed dementia, a combination of two or more types of dementia. According to the Alzheimer's Association, In the most common form of mixed dementia, the abnormal protein deposits associated with Alzheimer's disease coexist with blood vessel problems linked to vascular dementia. Alzheimer's brain changes also often coexist with Lewy bodies. In some cases, a person may have brain changes linked to all three conditions — Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and Lewy body dementia.   Researchers don't know exactly how many older adults currently diagnosed with a specific type of dementia actually have mixed dementia, but autopsies indicate that the condition may be significantly more common than previously realized.   Autopsy studies play a key role in shedding light on mixed dementia because scientists can't yet measure most dementia-related brain changes in living individuals. In the most informative studies, researchers correlate each participant's cognitive health and any diagnosed problems during life with analysis of the brain after death.   According to the National Institute on Aging, researchers have also identified many other conditions that can cause dementia or dementia-like symptoms. These conditions include Argyrophilic grain disease, a common, late-onset degenerative disease. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare brain disorder. Huntington's disease, an inherited, progressive brain disease. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, caused by repeated traumatic brain injury. And HIV-associated dementia, a rare disease that occurs when the HIV virus spreads to the brain.   The overlap in symptoms of various dementias can make it difficult to get an accurate diagnosis. But a proper diagnosis is important to get the best treatment.   Now that you know the difference between Alzheimer's and Dementia, let's move on to some of the causes, risk factors, and prevention methods of dementia.   According to Forbes, one common myth many people tend to believe is that you can't reduce your risk of getting Alzheimer's disease or other kinds of dementia—you either get it or you don't. In reality, adopting healthy habits can lower your risk of developing dementia, or at least delay the onset. “Healthy body, healthy mind,” says Dr. Richard Caselli, associate director and clinical core director of the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. “What we can control, we should control.” Though he adds that even a lifetime of healthy habits is no guarantee of protection.   Among the 12 factors that increase a person's risk of dementia outlined in the 2020 report from the Lancet Commission on dementia prevention, most are within one's control. These include hypertension, smoking, obesity, diabetes, low social contact, excessive alcohol consumption, and being physically inactive. Risk factors that we cannot control include lack of education, traumatic brain injury, depression, hearing impairment, and exposure to air pollution.   According to the Alzheimer's Association, dementia is caused by damage to brain cells. This damage interferes with the ability of brain cells to communicate with each other. When brain cells cannot communicate normally, thinking, behavior, and feelings can be affected.   The brain has many distinct regions, each of which is responsible for different functions (for example, memory, judgment, and movement). When cells in a particular region are damaged, that region cannot carry out its functions normally.   Different types of dementia are associated with particular types of brain cell damage in particular regions of the brain. For example, in Alzheimer's disease, high levels of certain proteins inside and outside brain cells make it hard for brain cells to stay healthy and to communicate with each other. The brain region called the hippocampus is the center of learning and memory in the brain, and the brain cells in this region are often the first to be damaged. That's why memory loss is often one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer's.   While most changes in the brain that cause dementia are permanent and worsen over time, thinking and memory problems caused by the following conditions may improve when the condition is treated or addressed: depression, medication side effects, excess use of alcohol, thyroid problems, and vitamin deficiencies.   In most people, the cause of dementia is unknown, but that doesn't mean there aren't ways you can lower your risk of developing dementia. Knowing what risk factors, you have can aid in lowering your chances of developing dementia, as well.   According to the NHS, some dementia risk factors are difficult or impossible to change, like your age, genes, and level of education. The older you are, the more likely you are to develop dementia. However, dementia is not a natural part of aging and isn't something that you should be expecting to develop. In general, genes alone are not thought to cause dementia. However, certain genetic factors are involved with some of the less common types. Dementia usually develops because of a combination of genetic and "environmental" factors, such as smoking and a lack of regular exercise. Other risk factors such as hearing loss, untreated depression, loneliness, or social isolation, and sitting for most of the day may also contribute to your likelihood of developing dementia.   Currently, there are no proven ways to prevent dementia, but doctors have a few suggestions for prevention methods. Even though you may not be able to alter your chances of developing dementia, following these suggestions can lead to an overall healthy lifestyle and can prevent many other illnesses and health issues. According to the NHS, you may reduce your risk of dementia by eating a healthy, balanced diet, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, keeping alcohol within recommended limits, stopping smoking, and keeping your blood pressure at a healthy level.   Keeping your body healthy may help reduce your risk of dementia, but you also need to keep your brain active and engaged. According to Danone Nutricia Research, the brain communicates through a vast network of billions of nerve cells. These nerve cells or neurons connect with each other via junctions called ‘synapses. Synapses allow communication between neurons and make it possible to create and recall memories.   Throughout our lives, we continually lose and re-grow these important brain connections. In a healthy brain, the number of new synapses balances the loss of old ones, allowing for a sustained net number of synapses. In a brain affected by injury or illness, such as dementia, synapses die off faster than they are created. When this happens, it becomes difficult to create and recall memories. Regularly engaging your mind may help your brain create more synapses longer. Activities like crosswords, word searches, and reading are all great ways to engage your mind. Learning new skills can also help your brain create more synapses and the repetitive information you use while learning can double as a recall exercise.   Regular physical exercise can also help you keep your mind active. Going for a few 10-minute walks a day can help increase the blood flow in your brain and in the rest of your body. Participating in social activities and maintaining regular social interaction can lower stress and depression, which can affect one's memory. Getting enough sleep and drinking enough water can both help your ability to focus and your memory.   Mayo Clinic says that doing things like playing bridge, taking alternate routes when driving, learning to play a musical instrument, and volunteering at a local school or community organization are all great ways to help keep your brain in shape and keep memory loss at bay.   Now that we have covered the causes, risk factors, and prevention methods for dementia, last move on to the last part of today's episode, the importance of early detection and diagnosis.   Early diagnosis of dementia is key because it allows a person with dementia to begin treatment right away and preserve their memory and overall function longer than they would be able to without early detection of the disease. Not only does early detection allows someone to start a treatment plan right away, but it also allows them the opportunity to plan for the future.   According to Queensland Health, being familiar with the signs of dementia can help people receive a diagnosis as early as possible. Early signs that a person might have dementia can include: being vague in everyday conversations, memory loss that affects day-to-day function, short term memory loss, difficulty performing everyday tasks and taking longer to do routine tasks, losing enthusiasm or interest in regular activities, difficulties in thinking or saying the right words, changes in personality or behavior, finding it difficult to follow instructions, finding it difficult to follow stories, and increased emotional unpredictability.   If you have noticed any of these signs in yourself or a loved one, schedule an appointment with your doctor. Since many of these signs are also signs of normal aging, it's important to talk to your doctor if you think you may be experiencing the early stages of dementia. As we've already mentioned today, it's better to rule out dementia now than wait for a diagnosis later in life.   If you or your loved one are having memory troubles, consider keeping a journal. Your doctor may not be able to see any issues occurring during a short visit and it can be hard to remember everything you have experienced. Keeping a journal can help you remember what you need to talk to the doctor. It can also measure the progression of any potential memory loss.   While dementia can be scary, getting a diagnosis doesn't mean your life stops. People with dementia are still able to take care of themselves, do their jobs, and most importantly, spend time with the people they love doing things they enjoy.   Having a support group can make all the difference when living with dementia. Reach out to friends and family when you need help and accept help when offered. Keeping connected can be difficult after a diagnosis. Many people turn away from their friends and family because they are embarrassed but isolating yourself will only make things worse.    Currently, there is no cure for dementia, but there are a few treatment options that can help preserve someone's memory and ability to function. More research is always being done on the subject. In the next few years, there very well could be a better way to treat or even stop the progression of memory loss.   The population of people living with dementia is rising and as more and more people are diagnosed, communities are coming together to support those with dementia. Communities all over the world are coming up with ways to include those with dementia and make sure they are not left out after a diagnosis. A dementia-friendly community offers residents with dementia a safe place to engage in social activities and more even into the late stages of the disease. To learn more about dementia-friendly communities and to learn how you can help make your community dementia-friendly, listen to our episode on Dementia-Friendly Communities.   Before we end the episode, let's have a quick recap of what we've covered today. Alzheimer's Disease is the most common form of dementia, and they both result in changes in the brain that lead to memory loss and language and reasoning difficulties, ultimately disrupting everyday functioning. In both Alzheimer's and dementia, early detection is key. Knowing the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer's and dementia can help you get an early diagnosis and in turn, an early start at treating the disease and planning for the future.    We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: https://www.forbes.com/health/healthy-aging/dementia-vs-alzheimers/   https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/difference-between-dementia-and-alzheimer-s   https://www.cdc.gov/aging/aginginfo/alzheimers.htm   https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers   https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-is-dementia   https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/frontotemporal-dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20354737   https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352013   https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lewy-body-dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352025   https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-dementia/types-of-dementia/mixed-dementia   https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/vascular-dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20378793   https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-dementia   https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/dementia/dementia-prevention/   https://www.nutriciaresearch.com/alzheimers-disease/synapses-the-building-blocks-of-memory/   https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/memory-loss/art-20046518   https://www.health.qld.gov.au/news-events/news/dementia-signs-symptoms-recognise-what-to-do    

3 minute lesson
Prions from corneas | Medical hazards

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Play 31 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 3:00


Episode 401. Topic: Prions from corneas. Theme: Medical hazards. How do cornea transplants work? Can corneas transmit diseases? What it Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and why is it so dangerous? Should you be worried about this disease if you want a corneal transplant? Twitter: @3minutelesson  Email: 3minutelesson@gmail.com  Instagram: 3minutelesson  Facebook: 3minutelesson  New episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.  

The Science of Self Healing with Dr. Sharon Stills
Podcast #58 - Shake It Off: Using a Heart-Centered Approach to Create Optimal Brain Health and Reverse Parkinson's, Dementia, and Other Neurodegenerative Conditions

The Science of Self Healing with Dr. Sharon Stills

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 58:55


Dr. Sharon Stills interviews international lecturer, author, and expert in integrative care for neurodegenerative disease Dr. Greg Eckel about all things brain health. Featured on ABC, CBS, NBC, and FOX television stations for his expertise in this area, he has a personal connection with chronic neurological disease since his wife Sarieah passed of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a condition with no known cure. Did you know that the average age of onset of dementia is 47 years old?! If you have a brain, you need to listen to this episode! Dr. Eckel shares with us his "outside the box" approach to healing neurological disease including but not limited to integrative remedies and therapies, as well as heart-centered approaches to include spiritual, emotional, and ancestral work. Tune in to this fabulous interview, and please remember to like, share, and rate us on iTunes!

The REAL David Knight Show
Thr 7Oct21 DEATH PANELS for UNVAXED / Gates 2010: “Digital Immunity Proof” / $Trillion “Coin” & Biden's Marxist

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 181:38


TOPICS by TIMECODE   5:21 A medical doctor, obstetrician and former abortionist, talks about what it was like to work for Planned Parenthood part-time — delivering and saving babies one day, destroying them the next.  The cognitive dissonance (that she overcame) is a picture of what the medical community has become in its transformation to the COVID Industrial Complex 16:38 DEATH PANELS for UNVAXED: Kidney Donor & Dying Patient Transplant Blocked. Woman in stage 5 renal failure whose friend would donate a kidney to save her life is denied life-saving transplant operation because she refuses TrumpShot on sincerely held religious grounds. 40:50 Defense Department funded Merck's new PATENTED pill with $29 MILLION grant.  It will now be sold back to govt at 40 TIMES what it cost to make — COVID Industrial Complex 47:51 Vax Conspiracy: “Blow Up The System” in “Disruptive”, “Iterative” Way. October 2019 — Milken Institute Health Summit — Fauci & others talk about how they can “blow up the system”, get “everyone to take vaccine that's untested”, speed up their “flu vaccine” from 10+ yrs of testing to just months in a “disruptive” & “iterative” way 58:55 Lindsey Graham: A One-Man Propaganda Machine for Vaccination. WATCH Lindsey Graham's MASTER CLASS in deception. His political supporters aren't with him on vaccines but he and “conservative” media like Breitbart, Mark Levin, etc are pushing TrumpShots on the GOP base. 1:05:32 Bill Maher has taken on the lunatic left but who will take on the lunatic right? 1:06:48 Fauci spent MILLIONS to torture, dissect, murder beagle puppies, 6-8 months old.  It was absolutely unnecessary according to the FDA.  But what about the human babies to whom he and the FDA did the same thing to get “fresh, not frozen” human organs?  1:11:21 Gates 2010: “Digital Immunity Proof” Needed to Separate Vaxed from Recovered.  It was ALWAYS a plan 1:14:19 Another vaccine adverse effect: Prion disease (Parkinson's, Alzheimers, and the rare Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease [CJD] the human form of mad cow disease) 1:26:34 Listeners' letters.  EMS worker on hospital putting covid testing before heart attack treatment.  Newsom's vax mandate is NOT just for kids, it will soon be for teachers state-wide as LA has already implemented for teachers.  15 yr old dies of heart attack after being vaxed 1:41:20 The “$TRILLION COIN” being pushed by the radical left MMT crowd.  It's illegal, fraudulent but with hyperinflation you might get one. 2:03:22 Biden is coming after IRA's and escalating the death tax 2:08:28  INTERVIEW: Biden's Stalinist, Literally, to Reorganize Economy.  Gard Goldsmith on the backgrounds and plans of the hardcore Marxist immigrant Biden wants as Comptroller of the Currency and her plans to enthrone Federal Reserve as central planner of infrastructure and the economy.  And, in the face of persecution of parents by Biden's DOJ/FBI, how do we reorganize education, healthcare and a new economy in grey, off-radar markets for liberty.  Follow Gard at @GardnerGoldsmith on FB & Gab, @GardGoldsmith on Twitter and at MRCTV.org   Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail:          David Knight          POB 1323          Elgin, TX 78621

The David Knight Show
Thr 7Oct21 DEATH PANELS for UNVAXED / Gates 2010: “Digital Immunity Proof” / $Trillion “Coin” & Biden's Marxist

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 181:39


TOPICS by TIMECODE5:21 A medical doctor, obstetrician and former abortionist, talks about what it was like to work for Planned Parenthood part-time — delivering and saving babies one day, destroying them the next.  The cognitive dissonance (that she overcame) is a picture of what the medical community has become in its transformation to the COVID Industrial Complex16:38 DEATH PANELS for UNVAXED: Kidney Donor & Dying Patient Transplant Blocked. Woman in stage 5 renal failure whose friend would donate a kidney to save her life is denied life-saving transplant operation because she refuses TrumpShot on sincerely held religious grounds.40:50 Defense Department funded Merck's new PATENTED pill with $29 MILLION grant.  It will now be sold back to govt at 40 TIMES what it cost to make — COVID Industrial Complex47:51 Vax Conspiracy: “Blow Up The System” in “Disruptive”, “Iterative” Way. October 2019 — Milken Institute Health Summit — Fauci & others talk about how they can “blow up the system”, get “everyone to take vaccine that's untested”, speed up their “flu vaccine” from 10+ yrs of testing to just months in a “disruptive” & “iterative” way58:55 Lindsey Graham: A One-Man Propaganda Machine for Vaccination. WATCH Lindsey Graham's MASTER CLASS in deception. His political supporters aren't with him on vaccines but he and “conservative” media like Breitbart, Mark Levin, etc are pushing TrumpShots on the GOP base.1:05:32 Bill Maher has taken on the lunatic left but who will take on the lunatic right?1:06:48 Fauci spent MILLIONS to torture, dissect, murder beagle puppies, 6-8 months old.  It was absolutely unnecessary according to the FDA.  But what about the human babies to whom he and the FDA did the same thing to get “fresh, not frozen” human organs? 1:11:21 Gates 2010: “Digital Immunity Proof” Needed to Separate Vaxed from Recovered.  It was ALWAYS a plan1:14:19 Another vaccine adverse effect: Prion disease (Parkinson's, Alzheimers, and the rare Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease [CJD] the human form of mad cow disease)1:26:34 Listeners' letters.  EMS worker on hospital putting covid testing before heart attack treatment.  Newsom's vax mandate is NOT just for kids, it will soon be for teachers state-wide as LA has already implemented for teachers.  15 yr old dies of heart attack after being vaxed1:41:20 The “$TRILLION COIN” being pushed by the radical left MMT crowd.  It's illegal, fraudulent but with hyperinflation you might get one.2:03:22 Biden is coming after IRA's and escalating the death tax2:08:28  INTERVIEW: Biden's Stalinist, Literally, to Reorganize Economy.  Gard Goldsmith on the backgrounds and plans of the hardcore Marxist immigrant Biden wants as Comptroller of the Currency and her plans to enthrone Federal Reserve as central planner of infrastructure and the economy.  And, in the face of persecution of parents by Biden's DOJ/FBI, how do we reorganize education, healthcare and a new economy in grey, off-radar markets for liberty.  Follow Gard at @GardnerGoldsmith on FB & Gab, @GardGoldsmith on Twitter and at MRCTV.orgFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail:         David Knight         POB 1323         Elgin, TX 78621

Lost Levels Club
Pre-Chat: Brainfarts, Blender and (iOS) Backdoors

Lost Levels Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 15:37


Mike and Ting talk about brainfarts, making stuff and what happened when they tried to register the domain names for OnlyFap and Porntreon. NOTE: this is the pre-episode warm up chat for Gamescom 2021. Contact us: @lostlevelsclub or mike.and.ting@lostlevels.club Show Notes: Pre-Chat Word of the Week: Treppenwitz Codenames (board game) Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease What Are Macronutrients and Why Do People Keep Talking About Them? Labo, Dark Souls and Global Game Jam 2018 (podcast episode) Lunar Lagger by Katsew Another doughnut for the pile Blender Beginner Tutorial - Part 1 (YouTube) Blender MarkMonitor OnlyFans suspends policy change after backlash Apple delays plan to scan iPhones for child abuse More on Apple's iPhone Backdoor

Timeline (5.000 ans d'Histoire)
Histoire du Climat #1

Timeline (5.000 ans d'Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 59:54


Pour vous abonner, ou envoyer le lien à un ami ... c'est ici :https://m.audiomeans.fr/s/S-tavkjvmo Depuis la fin du siècle précédent, l'Humanité assiste à une succession de phénomènes climatiques et naturels qui peuvent inquiéter : réchauffements, ouragans, tempêtes, inondations, séismes, tsunamis, éruptions volcaniques, épidémies (Sida, grippe aviaire, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, …) etc… Beaucoup de scientifiques, de spécialistes se sont penchés, et se penchent chaque jour sur ces questions, mais l'Historien lui se doit de raisonner à hauteur d'hommes, et d'exploiter avec un maximum de crédibilité et d'objectivité (pour ne pas dire de recul) les informations et données brutes. Et surtout, il se doit de s'élever au-dessus de la mêlée, à savoir sortir des débats stériles et des amalgames journalistiques. Nous allons donc ouvrir un dossier « touchy ». Touchy parce qu'il touche à des croyances ancrées depuis longtemps, parce que les ravages des combats de 2 camps opposés ont inscrit dans les convictions de chacun des idées pas toujours de bon sens, et que, sans prétendre faire l'arbitre, nous allons vous apporter le fruit d'un travail de recherches à la fois rigoureux - comme toujours - mais aussi le plus honnête possible. Dans cette première émission, qui ouvre le dossier « Histoire du climat », nous allons revenir sur le général Quels sont les vrais chiffres ? Comment avons-nous réussi à mesurer le climat pluri-millénaire Quid du changement climatique (réchauffement et refroidissement) Quid des phénomènes extrêmes Vous l'avez compris, ici point de mise en cause de quoi que ce soit, ni de qui que ce soit, l'historien est un chercheur, un détective, pas un juge.

What the Health?! with Dr. Greg Eckel
WTH?!? Podcast with founder and coach, Tina Nagel

What the Health?! with Dr. Greg Eckel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 55:25


In this episode, Dr. Eckel and Tina Nagel will talk about trauma and how we all perpetrate the cycle, and more specifically: reaction is rooted in the past experience, leaps over the present moment, and creates chaos in future moments.Tina Nagel is a relationship-driven business owner who loves to CAUSE and disrupt current leadership status quo. Tina works with individuals, teams, and groups of all sizes to collaborate with the innate state of awareness that she calls BEING. Tina shares proven, in-depth expertise in leadership development, organizational design, performance management, training, and communications.As a master certified life coach, a peer human, and a retired corporate leader Tina brings humor, tenacity, truth, and grace to the world today.To check find out more about Tina Nagel, the link to her:-Website: www.tinanagel.com-YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/.../UCLFK0pBGhJ.../featured-Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/62iawBsmxokGIxe9B8ld1z...Dr. Greg Eckel has spent the last 20+ years developing and refining his unique approach to chronic neurological conditions. In addition to his experience in clinical practice using a combination of Naturopathic and Chinese Medicine, he has a deep personal connection with chronic neurological disease since his wife Sarieah passed of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a condition with no known cure. As she was the love of his life, he took a deep dive into research and uncovered regenerative medicine and the development of a brain regenerative program. In loving memory of his wife, he has continued to help others with neurodegenerative diseases improve their quality of life and find natural solutions.Dr. Eckel is a highly respected international lecturer, author, and expert in integrative care for neurodegeneration. Co-Founder and owner of Nature Cures Clinic in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Eckel was also appointed by the governor of Oregon and served as the board president of the Oregon Board of Naturopathic Examiners. He has been a featured expert on ABC, CBS, NBC, and FOX television stations.

BBC Lê
A doença cerebral misteriosa que intriga médicos no Canadá

BBC Lê

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 10:13


Pacientes apresentam sintomas semelhantes aos da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob, um mal raro e fatal que ataca o cérebro; mas exames deram negativo para essa doença.

BBC Lê
A doença cerebral misteriosa que intriga médicos no Canadá

BBC Lê

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 10:13


Pacientes apresentam sintomas semelhantes aos da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob, um mal raro e fatal que ataca o cérebro; mas exames deram negativo para essa doença.

Les lectures de Mediapart
Creutzfeldt-Jakob: l'Inrae freine l'expertise judiciaire sur le décès d'une de ses laborantines

Les lectures de Mediapart

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 8:41


Aujourd'hui, Arnaud Romain lit l'article de Pascale Pascariello: Creutzfeldt-Jakob: l'Inrae freine l'expertise judiciaire sur le décès d'une de ses laborantines publié sur Mediapart le 1er août 2021.

PodMosh
#45 IdeaBreak: Covid and Prion's Disease?

PodMosh

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 14:12


In this IdeaBreak, I show from a couple of studies that there might be a relationship to Covid-19 and Prion's Disease. HOWEVER, more research ALWAYS needs to be done to fully develop a conclusion. References: Idrees, D., & Kumar, V. (2021). SARS-CoV-2 spike protein interactions with amyloidogenic proteins: Potential clues to neurodegeneration. Biochemical and biophysical research communications, 554, Tetz, G.; Tetz, V. SARS-CoV-2 Prion-Like Domains in Spike Proteins Enable Higher Affinity to ACE2. Preprints 2020, 2020030422 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202003.0422.v1). Young, M. J., O'Hare, M., Matiello, M., & Schmahmann, J. D. (2020). Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a man with COVID-19: SARS-CoV-2-accelerated neurodegeneration?. Brain, behavior, and immunity, 89, 601–603. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2020.07.007

The Big Story
A terrifying medical mystery in New Brunswick

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 24:16


When people started presenting with symptoms, local doctors and scientists wondered if the mysterious neurological disorder might be Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. But it wasn't. It wasn't anything else that we recognize, either. And the symptoms are a long list that run from inconvenient to painful to life-altering and deadly. We don't know what's causing it, haven't been able to treat it and—because of the pandemic—haven't been able to fully research the places where it may have come from. What we do know is that it's awful. And in New Brunswick it's becoming more common. GUEST: Amanda Coletta, The Washington Post  

Your Health ToGo!
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Your Health ToGo!

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 7:20


You might know that there was an outbreak of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the 1990s because people ate contaminated beef. The disease progresses rapidly and is fatal, so many people were very concerned about it. It hasn't been prevalent since then, so is it gone? Are there still ways to contract it? Have treatments been developed?

The Doctor Is In Podcast
567. Q&A with Dr. Martin

The Doctor Is In Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 37:30


Dr. Martin answers questions sent in by our listeners. Today's topics include: Adjusting to The Reset diet Boosting your red blood count Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease High levels of vitamin D Protein powders Springtime allergies Life after a hysterectomy ...and more! Tune in to hear Dr. Martin's responses!  

The Beats with Kelly Kennedy
(Ep. 41) Longevity, Neurodegeneration, & Brain Health with Dr. Greg Eckel

The Beats with Kelly Kennedy

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2021 55:07


In this weeks episode of the Beats Kelly Kennedy sits down with her new friend Dr. Greg Eckel. Dr. Gregory Eckel has spent the last 20 years developing and refining his unique approach to chronic neurological diseases. In addition to his experience in clinical practice using a combination of Naturopathic and Chinese Medicine, he has a deep personal connection with chronic neurologicalconditions since his wife Sarieah passed of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a condition with no known cure. As she was the love of his life, he took a deep dive into research and uncovered regenerative medicine and the development of a brain regenerative program. In loving memory of his wife, he has continued to help others with neurodegenerative diseases improve their quality of life and find natural solutions. Dr. Eckel is a highly respected international lecturer, author, and expert in integrative care for neurodegeneration. Co-Founder and owner of Nature Cures Clinic in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Eckel was also appointed by the governor of Oregon and served as the board president of the Oregon Board of Naturopathic Examiners. In this episode Dr. Eckel brings all sorts of new and exciting topics to the discussion such as longevity, what we can do to mitigate neurodenerative disease, and how we can support brain health. Dr. Eckel treats people as a whole dynamic being moving through time and space… wow!!! So much of what Dr. Eckel says is music to our ears! We hope you enjoy this episode as much as we did. Topics Discussed || 0:00 | Introduction 3:36 | Living to 150..say what!!! 6:26 | How Greg got this longevity mindset 13:21 | What is pre-onic activity and disease?? 14:14 | How Dr. Eckel's wife condition transpired into something beautiful 14:48 | Surrendering to emotions 18:29 | How did Dr. Eckel become a brain surgeon specialist? 19:47 | Dr. Eckel's take on brain health 22:20 | Dr. Eckel's F.A.N-C Approach 30:20 | What are telomeres? 36:45 | What are typical signs of neurodegenerative disease? 41:26 | Is neurological or bio feedback useful in detecting disease? 47:47 | What causes proteins to fold on themselves? 50:00 | The Importance of opening up Resources Mentioned|| Shake it Off By. Dr Greg Eckel FLOWpresso Sound of Soul Pekana Remedies Dr. Greg Fahy IVs at Dr Carchedi 's Functional Medicine Institute Where to learn more about Dr. Greg Eckel || Shake It Off By Dr. Greg Eckel Brain Degeneration Summit June 7-13 Nature's Cures Clinic Portland,Oregon NaturesCureclinic.com Naturecuresclinic.com/podcast YouTube: Natures Cure Clinic Instagram: NatureCuresClinicPDX The Beats Podcast with Kelly Kennedy is now available on apple, google, spotify, youtube and of course our home NOTMEDSglobal.com/podcasts. Make sure to SUBCRIBE to never miss a BEAT!

Science Club Podcast

Mad cow disease! Cause we're feeling a little cRaZy!!!Join John, Sabrina, Tyler, and the ghost of John's apartment as we discuss prions, Mad Cow Disease, the eighties and Stranger Things! Mad Cow Disease, or vCJD, ravaged the UK in the late 80s/90s. What happened? Where did it go? Is it coming back? Tune in to find out!Sci Club Pod is created by John Lavery, Tyler Sudholz and Sabrina Wilson. This episode's report and audio editing were by John Lavery.Contact us: Twitter, Instagram and TikTok @SciClubPod or email ScienceClubPod@gmail.comReferences:Subviral particles: viroids and prions | Cells | MCAT | Khan Academy (YouTube)Stanley Prusiner: 'A Nobel prize doesn't wipe the scepticism away' (The Guardian)Stanley B. Prusiner Facts (The Nobel Prize website)Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) (Betterhealth.vic.gov.au)Fact Sheet - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) (inspectio.gc.ca)Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Fact Sheet (ninds.nih.gov)BSE Disaster: The History (NewScience)Many more people could still die from mad cow disease in the UK (New Scientist)More information about donating blood if you have lived in the UK (Australian Red Cross Lifeblood)

The Lancet Neurology
Genetic risk factors for sCJD

The Lancet Neurology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2020 23:02


Emma Jones and Simon Mead discuss their article in The Lancet Neurology, identification of novel risk loci and causal insights for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

The Rx Bricks Podcast
Neurodegenerative Diseases: Foundations and Framework

The Rx Bricks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 29:49


Neurodegenerative diseases are a group of relatively common, progressive neurologic conditions that tend to affect people as they age. Basically, neurons in the brain die, causing functional losses. The part of the brain affected determines whether patients will experience dementia (deteriorated cognitive function), psychiatric disturbances, problems with movement, or a combination of these. These conditions usually are incurable. In this AudioBrick, we'll cover the foundations and framework of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, Lewy body dementia, Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. After listening to this AudioBrick, you should be able to: List the main neurodegenerative diseases.1 Explain the mechanism of protein aggregation and neuronal loss that underlies all neurodegenerative diseases.2 Describe common misfolded proteins pathogenic to degenerative central nervous system (CNS) disease, including hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid, Lewy bodies, and prions.3 Compare the clinical presentation, pathogenic abnormal proteins, and CNS locations of Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, Lewy body dementia, Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. You can also check out the original brick from our Neurology and Special Senses, which is available for free. Learn more about Rx Bricks by signing up for a free USMLE-Rx account: www.usmle-rx.com You will get 5 days of full access to our Rx360+ program, including nearly 800 Rx Bricks.  After the 5-day period, you will still be able to access over 150 free bricks, including the entire collections for General Microbiology and Cellular and Molecular Biology. *** If you enjoyed this episode, we'd love for you to leave a review on Apple Podcasts.  It helps with our visibility, and the more med students (or future med students) listen to the podcast, the more we can provide to the future physicians of the world. Follow USMLE-Rx at: Facebook: www.facebook.com/usmlerx Blog: www.firstaidteam.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/firstaidteam Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/firstaidteam/ YouTube: www.youtube.com/USMLERX Learn how you can access over 150 of our bricks for FREE: https://usmlerx.wpengine.com/free-bricks/

AWR Español: Clínica Abierta (Radio Sol)
Enfermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob

AWR Español: Clínica Abierta (Radio Sol)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2020 59:00


Una forma de daño cerebral En Clínica Abierta, el Dr. Elmo Rodríguez, doctor en medicina, ofrece sabios consejos de salud, así como efectivos remedios basados en la medicina natural. Su co-animadora, Lorraine Vázquez, mantiene el ameno curso del programa con sus interesantes preguntas y comentarios.

The Dr. Madeira Show
54. Dr. Greg Eckel. Brain Health & Preventing Neurodegeneration.

The Dr. Madeira Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2020 56:21


We discuss how you can prevent Neurodegeneration and his new book, Shake it Off: An Integrative Approach to Parkinson's Solutions.More about Dr. Greg Eckel: Dr. Greg Eckel has been living in the Portland area since 1992. Dr. Eckel became increasingly aware of and concerned about the overuse of medications with children while teaching preschool, and this experience inspired his entry into Naturopathic and Chinese Medicine. In 2001 he co-founded Nature Cures Clinic.The combination of Naturopathic and Chinese Medicine (acupuncture and botanical medicine) has provided Dr. Eckel with a variety of tools to treat both acute and chronic illness while valuing the principles of prevention and wellness.He has developed a deep and personal knowledge of chronic neurological conditions in the recent past. His wife Sarieah, passed of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a condition with no known cure. As she was the love of his life, being good husband and doctor, he set to the research to ‘swing for the fence,' while unfortunately not finding a remedy for Sarieah, he uncovered Sarieah's gifts.The deep dive uncovered regenerative medicine and the development of a brain regenerative program. The development of a nasal spray specific to calm neuroinflammation in the brain. Procedures such as intranasal stem cell delivery to bypass the blood-brain barrier. Mind-body techniques to reverse anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. The list goes on, and so does the impact of Sarieah's all too short life on the planet.He is often asked what he specializes in with the quick retort, “treating people as whole dynamic beings moving through time and space.” We employ the physiology and biochemistry of the body in aiding in the healing possibilities. After 17 years in practice he is continually amazed at the healing possibilities of the body and specializes in difficult and recalcitrant conditions (ie. those that have been everywhere and tried everything often find some relief to a total resolution of their health conditions).Dr. Eckel is trained in family practice and maintains a particular interest in:Neurology – including Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injuries, headaches, migraines, palsies, post-stroke recovery.Allergies and Asthma – He wrote his doctoral paper on this topic. A wide variety of treatments are available, including low dose allergen (LDA) therapy.Orthopedics – pain, fatigue, arthritis, sports injury, and motor vehicle accident recovery.Greg Eckel, ND, LAc from Nature Cures Clinic on Vimeo.Professional Memberships:Past Board Chair: Oregon Board of Naturopathic Medicine (Governor Appointment)Past Vice President: Oregon Association of Naturopathic PhysiciansAmerican Association of Naturopathic PhysiciansOregon Association of Naturopathic PhysiciansAmerican College for the Advancement of MedicineDr. Eckel also lectures extensively in the community and co-produces podcasts. If you know of an organization that would like to have him speak, he welcomes your inquiry by email. His goal is to help as many people as he can achieve optimal wellness through natural health care to be as creative, energetic and loving as they can.In addition to a thriving practice, Dr. Eckel enjoys playing and watching hockey, raising his children, making music with friends, and being in awe everyday of the beauty that surrounds us!Social Media links:https://www.instagram.com/naturecurespdx/https://twitter.com/naturecurespdx“What The Health” Podcast: https://www.ctrnetwork.com/whatthehealthBlog: https://naturecuresclinic.com/blog/

Petri Dish
Ep. 43 Prions: Mad Cows and Mad Proteins

Petri Dish

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2020 50:27


This episode is about the causative agent for mad cow disease, scrapie, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob -- prions! It's not a bacteria, it's not a fungus, it isn't even a virus! No, it is a little protein encoded in our own genome! Find out how there can be an infectious disease caused by a misfolded protein. Featuring a promo for Lit Gaming Arena Podcast! Check them out on twitter @litgamingarena and online at https://litgamingarena.com/ Email us at petridishpod -at- gmail.com. On twitter @dishpodcast and instagram @petridishpodcast. Support us for as little as $1 a month at patreon.com/petridish. Thanks! References: https://cshperspectives.cshlp.org/content/3/1/a006833.full https://bmcbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12915-017-0375-5 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12035-019-1510-9 https://cshperspectives.cshlp.org/content/9/1/a023671.full https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/sji.12854 https://rupress.org/jem/article/79/2/137/4753/STUDIES-ON-THE-CHEMICAL-NATURE-OF-THE-SUBSTANCE https://science.sciencemag.org/content/216/4542/136.abstract https://www.nature.com/articles/s41576-018-0011-4 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19336896.2019.1704612 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-36700-w https://academic.oup.com/brain/advance-article/doi/10.1093/brain/awaa078/5821469 https://www.nature.com/articles/nature20415 https://neurolrespract.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s42466-019-0039-8 https://www.cell.com/trends/neurosciences/pdf/S0166-2236(10)00055-X.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6959295/ https://www.jbc.org/content/294/18/7128.full https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0962892413000111 https://www.nature.com/articles/mp201784 https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1007283

Admissions Straight Talk
From Engineering PhD to Med Student

Admissions Straight Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2020 26:43


A career-changer's path to med school [Show summary] Valerie Fuchs holds a PhD in environmental engineering and spent eight years as a water resources engineer. This summer, however, she’ll start medical school. Hear how Valerie navigated med school admissions as an older, nontraditional applicant and got into her first-choice school. From engineering PhD to med student [Show notes] Are you an older, nontraditional potential med school applicant burned out on your profession? Are you thinking about medicine, but worried about starting over? Or are you just getting started? Valerie Fuchs earned her BS in civil engineering and her PhD in environmental engineering, and she did a postdoc fellowship at Yale. For the last eight years, she has worked as a water resources engineer. This summer, she is starting medical school. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and your background? [1:46] I grew up in Spokane, Washington. I am the oldest of five kids from a big Catholic family. I went to a Catholic grade school over there, and then moved on to Gonzaga University, not far from home. I always kind of had that interest in math and science, I guess, and had cousins who were engineers, and I thought, well, I'll try this out and see how it goes. I really got interested in civil engineering, soil and water science, and those kinds of things. I thought as I went through school that what I really wanted to do was be able to help people in terms of water and sanitation, developing communities in particular. The direction I ended up going in grad school was sanitation for developing communities, so wastewater treatment in Bolivia and other countries in South America. I did research and a whole doctoral dissertation on it. Then I kind of continued that, but I started looking at storm water when I was at Yale for a year before transitioning into consulting engineering. I've been a consultant for about 10 years now. I have moved all over the country. I did a lot of research and work in different countries in Central and South America. Then finally, about six years ago, I decided I wanted to be closer to family and move back to Seattle. I've been here ever since. hbspt.cta.load(58291, '42471f69-103d-4aef-95dd-ea4921b3cc65', {}); What made you start thinking that engineering isn't for you, and that medicine is? [3:47] A few years ago, I started feeling like even though engineering is a great intellectual challenge for me, I wanted to be engaging more with people. My day-to-day work as an engineer is mostly sitting at a computer, crunching numbers on different types of projects. I wanted to be really doing something more one-on-one with people, potentially helping them improve their life in some way. So, I started looking at a variety of different options. I considered teaching high school science. I looked at becoming a massage therapist. That was until August of 2016, when my mom became ill and then passed away of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. I spent about three weeks with her in the hospital and in hospice, and all stress aside, I found myself really intrigued by observing her care team, her neurologist and the interns that were helping. They were just so engaged with us, with her, with our family, engaging with us, compassionate towards us, and doing so much hard work to try to figure out what this really rare disease was that she had, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. If you heard, probably 10 or 20 years ago, there was a lot of news about Mad Cow Disease. It's basically the human form of that. It means that there's a certain protein in the brain, a prion protein, that changes form, and that causes a domino effect of these other proteins to change form, and that creates holes in the brain. It’s a neurodegenerative disease that can happen really fast that usually hurts people in their 60s. It's extremely rare, and they don't know why it happens or how to cure it. It was really out of nowhere.

Navigating Neuropsychology
44| Neuropsych Bite: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) – With Dr. Joel Kamper

Navigating Neuropsychology

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2020 20:10


In our second Neuropsych Bite, we talked with Joel Kamper, Ph.D., ABPP-CN, about Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), a rare condition that leads to rapid decline in cognitive, motor, sensory, and behavioral functioning.  This is the first of a series on rare neurological disorders. Show notes are available at www.NavNeuro.com/44 _________________ If you’d like to support the show, here are a few easy ways: 1) Tell your friends and colleagues about it 2) Subscribe (free) and leave an Apple Podcasts rating/review: www.NavNeuro.com/itunes 3) Contribute to the discussion in the comments section of the website (click the episode link listed above) or on Twitter (@NavNeuro)   Thanks for listening, and join us next time as we continue to navigate the brain and behavior! [Note: This podcast and all linked content is intended for general educational purposes only and does not constitute the practice of psychology or any other professional healthcare advice and services. No professional relationship is formed between hosts and listeners. All content is to be used at listeners’ own risk. Users should always seek appropriate medical and psychological care from their licensed healthcare provider.]

TribeTalk by Modern Holistic Health
Immunity and Neurodegeneration with Dr. Greg Eckel

TribeTalk by Modern Holistic Health

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2020 59:25


Do you know how your immunity is effected by neurodegeneration? Listen in as we have special guest, Dr. Greg Eckel, explain how the relationship of neurodegeneration and immunity. Dr. Gregory Eckel has spent the last 20 years developing and refining his unique approach to chronic brain degeneration conditions. In addition to his experience in clinical practice using a combination of Naturopathic and Chinese Medicine, he has a deep personal connection with chronic neurological disease since his wife Sarieah passed of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a condition with no known cure. As she was the love of his life, he took a deep dive into research and uncovered regenerative medicine and the development of a brain regenerative program. In loving memory of his wife, he has continued to help others with neurodegenerative diseases improve their quality of life and find natural solutions. ************************************************************** WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT TRIBE TALK Tribe Talk is FREE Tribe Talk is virtual, and you can join with by PC, MAC, or mobile device. Tribe Talk is a community platform to ask questions to health experts Tribe Talk is a community platform for you to give and receive support from your community Learn more on how to participate by visiting our Facebook Page

Ask Doctor Dawn
KSQD 2-26-2020: From basic genetics to recent research into our understanding of genetic diseases

Ask Doctor Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2020 57:04


Review of genetics research focusing on genetic diseases: sickle cell, Huntington's, fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis, breast cancer, Tay-Sachs, tuberculosis, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and prions; More genetics topics such as homosexuality, repetitive DNA, transposons, jumping genes, oncogenes and retroviruses

Ask Doctor Dawn
KSQD 2-26-2020: From basic genetics to recent research into our understanding of genetic diseases

Ask Doctor Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2020 57:04


Review of genetics research focusing on genetic diseases: sickle cell, Huntington's, fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis, breast cancer, Tay-Sachs, tuberculosis, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and prions; More genetics topics such as homosexuality, repetitive DNA, transposons, jumping genes, oncogenes and retroviruses

Undertaking: The Podcast
#112 Curtis Rostad

Undertaking: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2020 31:30


Curtis Rostad of the Foresight Companies stops by to talk consulting, OHSA, prep room safety and even Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. 

Lunch and Learn with Dr. Berry
LLP126 Why do we overlook burnout amongst medical students with Aprylle Thompson MS4

Lunch and Learn with Dr. Berry

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2019 45:28


  Let's talk about burnout amongst medical students... On this week's episode of the Lunch and Learn with Dr. Berry we follow up last week's discussion with Kessy Joseph with another fourth-year medical student, Aprylle Thompson, MS4. Aprylle was born in Jamaica and decided to pursue medicine after her aunt was diagnosed with the crippling disease of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Today she talks to us about how her experience with burnout has affected her as a medical student & offers tips not only for medical students but physician as well. Text LUNCHLEARNPOD to 44222 to join the mailing list. Remember to subscribe to the podcast and share the episode with a friend or family member. Listen on Apple Podcast, Google Play, Stitcher, Soundcloud, iHeartRadio, Spotify Sponsors: Lunch and Learn Community Online Store (code Empower10) Pierre Medical Consulting (If you are looking to expand your social reach and make your process automated then Pierre Medical Consulting is for you) Dr. Pierre's Resources - These are some of the tools I use to become successful using social media My Amazon Store - Check out all of the book recommendations you heard in the episode Links/Resources: Facebook Instagram Social Links: Join the lunch and learn community – https://www.drberrypierre.com/joinlunchlearnpod Follow the podcast on Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/lunchlearnpod Follow the podcast on twitter – http://www.twitter.com/lunchlearnpod – use the hashtag #LunchLearnPod if you have any questions, comments or requests for the podcast For More Episodes of the Lunch and Learn with Dr. Berry Podcasts https://www.drberrypierre.com/lunchlearnpodcast/ If you are looking to help the show out Leave a Five Star Review on Apple Podcast because your ratings and reviews are what is going to make this show so much better Share a screenshot of the podcast episode on all of your favorite social media outlets & tag me or add the hashtag.#lunchlearnpod If you are looking to help the show out Leave a Five Star Review on Apple Podcast because your ratings and reviews are what is going to make this show so much better Share a screenshot of the podcast episode on all of your favorite social media outlets & tag me or add the hashtag.#lunchlearnpod Download Episode 126 Transcript Episode 126 Transcript... Introduction Dr. Berry: And welcome to another episode of the Lunch and Learn with Dr. Berry. I'm your host, Dr. Berry Pierre, your favorite Board Certified Internist. Founder of drberrypierre.com as well as a CEO of Pierre Medical Consulting. Helping you empower yourself for better health with the number one podcast for patient advocacy, education and affirmation. This week we bring you an episode with student doctor Aprylle Thompson who's a fourth year medical student. She again continues this discussion that we have on Physician Burnout and really more aptly medical student burnout. And she was very poignant during her interview just talking about some of the trials and tribulations that she had to face as a medical student. Some of the expectations of a medical student that I think she will agree with me as well, is really at a line for what we shouldn't be expecting of medical students and she really asked the question, why don't we include medical students in this discussion of physician burnout. The discussion that is definitely had when we're talking about attendings that people who are in their career. About feeling signs of being down at a price where for some reason we don't have this discussion when we talk about the medical students and she really wants to make a point and what I love about her interview today is that please think about the medical students again and remember that we're all human. And if we're all human, understanding that not only are the distressors that the residents and the attendings are going to feel, you best believe the medical students have their own pervasive feelings of concern. So I want you to again, check out this week's episode with Aprylle Thompson, a fourth year medical student talking about medical student burnout. Let me know what you thinking. If you have not had a chance remember subscribe to the podcast. Leave us a five star review and tell one friend to tell a friend about this amazing discussion we're having here on the Lunch and Learn with Dr. Berry. Episode Dr. Berry: Alright Lunch and Learn community just heard another amazing introduction for a number two, so this is actually gonna be our second medical student on a topic at hand that is extremely important. That is extremely, I guess becoming very popular now with this discussion of Physician Burnout. And because of the matter at hand of how we started a series out, we really wanted to make sure we reached out and not only talked to just physician, but we wanted to talk to residency medical students. So I'm thankful that we got a chance to talk to Aprylle Thompson today, who is a fourth year medical student who's going to be gracing us today in helping us with our discussion. Aprylle, thank you. Aprylle Thompson: Glad. Thank you for having me. Dr. Berry: So Aprylle, I always did the introduction. I have a lot of people who love to skip right to this portion here. For someone who skipped through and they say you know what, who's this Aprylle Thompson? Tell a little bit about yourself that may not even be typically in your bio and always ask, especially since you're a medical student. Let's talk about your motivation for going to medical school, your career aspiration goals and all that good stuff. Aprylle Thompson: Well, I'm a fourth year medical student from Ross University School of Medicine, which located in Barbados. My interest in medicine started from my junior year in high school. The reason being was because my aunt was unfortunately diagnosed with Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. So my family had to care for her around the clock and as she deteriorated she became more dependent on us. And we have to learn about the process and what to do. And because of that, my interest was piqued and I wanted to learn more about medicine and treat patients on a more intimate level. Dr. Berry: I love that. And it's so interesting, especially for a lot of us who get into the field that a lot of times our first experience of medicine is a family member who really makes us appreciate the system at hand and really helps put us in that situation where like, you know what, I can be like that doctor. I always tell people about Dr. Gaston who was my pediatrician growing up. And I just used remember thinking like, oh my God, one day I want to be like that Dr. Gaston because I just seen the hearts he was able to touch with just his interaction of being a physician. So we were talking today about Physician Burnout, which is again, especially for those who are in Lunch and Learn community. A topic that's getting much fanfare as of recently to the point where they're even classifying it as ICD 10 codes and all of these things there that are really trying to make it seem as popular as it is. And when we had Dr. Nicole on the podcast, she talked about how this phenomena isn't like a new issue. It's just gotten came out to light with that aspect of people were really being concerned about the onus of being quote unquote burnt out. And what I want to talk about today is really like how are not only physicians, but really how are people who are on the front lines, which our medical students. What's that onus like? What's their thought process? I like to start out just talking about as a medical student, what are some typical stressors that you face on a day to day, month to month basis just being a medical student? Aprylle Thompson: I believe the few stressors that we usually have, well number one is we have to impress everyone. By can go for the CEO of the hospital down to the garbage man. Not just that, as a medical student, sometimes we don't feel as if we know enough material to impress people. So we have that battle that we deal within ourselves. And then we have to also learn how to balance everything. Connect all the pieces together. So what I like to say is that we feel as if we really want to be at the table with everyone, but although we have the knowledge to get close enough, we're still not there yet. And then when you put in the hierarchy of medicine and what goes on in medicine, it just complicates everything altogether. Dr. Berry: And what was very interesting about that was, especially those who may infer, when we talk about the physician who is typically one who, again I say this all the time, that they're in a job where they're supposed to be correct 100% of the time. But a lot of times people, people don't realize too, to get to that point we face almost a daily struggle of I don't know enough. And I think and you said it right on the head, it's really bad in medical schools where we, I always say especially in on in a GME side, we train backwards, right? Where if you're a second year medical student, I start pimping you on stuff that the third year medical student knows. And if you're third year, I started pimping you on stuff for the fourth. For some reason, every time you get to a certain level, we expect you to know a level higher than you're actually at. Aprylle Thompson: Yeah, I've seen that. Dr. Berry: So question, as a medical student, and even when you're in the premed stage where some of the stresses that you've been facing, where they expected? Were you like, yeah, I'm probably going to have to deal with this type of stressors? Or was there anything like, whoa, I didn't realize medical students had it like that? Aprylle Thompson: Honestly, before I started medical school, I thought it would've been a walk in the park as ludicrous as that sounds. I thought it would like I would wake up every day. I'll go to the hospital. Helps sick patients. Get them back to their normal baseline and then go home happy. That's what I thought. I didn't understand that some days when it rains it will pour. And my thought process, what they're being sunshine and roses everywhere was obviously wrong. Dr. Berry: That’s so true. Do you have any family members in the health field prior to pursuing it? Aprylle Thompson: No. I was the first one. Dr. Berry: Same here. It's funny because most of my family, they all went like the business route and manager route. I was literally the only one who was even on the premed side. Didn't have any mentors on that side. I think it's so true that when you don't know what you supposed to know, sometimes kind of walking in the dark. I mean, a perfect example, I didn't realize until I was a, let's say a sophomore and somewhere undergrad. There was this test that you had to take before you went into medical school. I remember just walking into the career center and when Ms. Anderson, shout out to Ms. Anderson at Florida State. When she asked me, hey, what do you want to do? I want to go to medical school. Oh, have you been studying for MK? I'm like, what is that? Just to give people an idea that it's not uncommon for people who want to pursue a goal, but because they don't have the mentorship dare that they need to really be walking into, almost like the firing squad, but it kinda is. Especially in our system where we don't like to talk and we'll talk about that later too as far as how older physicians and people who have kind of been there, done that, don't really reach back enough to like say, hey, you know what you're going to get in medical school and you're going to have to deal with some of these issues that you may not be ready for. So we just want to give you a heads up. Aprylle Thompson: I think apart from that, with my id of the walk in the park, I think it's also the fact that TV shows don't do it justice either like Grey's anatomy. You think it's so happy and it is fun 24/7 but it's really not like that. Dr. Berry: Grey's anatomy, Scrub, ER, all of these. Yeah, trust me. Yeah. And they still funny. My wife can't stand watching those times shows with me because I'm like, I guess it was like I didn't need mumbling under my breath and I'm like, okay, alright. Sure that’s how it goes. For some of the stresses that you know that the typical medical student faces and then I asked especially because Ross University is an international medical school. What was that experience like? Not only going to medical school but going to medical school in an entire different country. Aprylle Thompson: It was honestly a great experience. But I think I have a little bit of leeway because I was born in Jamaica and my family is from Jamaica. So I felt like I was at home. I was in paradise. Dr. Berry: I love it because when you hear of the international medical graduate, I know a lot of times they're saying, well you're going to a medical school outside of the country, because we'd had even taken the fact that there are people weren't actually born in a country who are also going into that school as well too. So that definitely, I love that aspect of it. Now, as a medical student, what were some of the stresses that you typically faced? And just going from first year medical student all the way up in your last year now? Aprylle Thompson: Correct. My biggest stressor would have been balance. I mean, while I was in high school and college balance was a lot easier. But in medical school you have to learn that people will not spoon-feed you. You have to learn how to grow up and figure things out. And I had to learn how to balance my friends, my family, my social life and of course medicine. I believe that being a medical student or even a physician, it makes you realize that having just 24 hours in a day is not enough because everyone is pulling you in different directions and you're only one person. So you have to figure out how to break that up and split that up amongst everyone. Dr. Berry: I love about that. I think sometimes and it happens a lot, especially when you're a medical student, and I say, I always use a term like life be lifeing. Stuff is still happening, but you're in this, almost like this cocoon of being in medical school and having all of the pressures or responsibilities placed upon you. Sometimes you can't even really enjoy the typical experience of someone who normally would, you as a 21, 22, 23, 24 year old, in that range, especially in your 20s. I tell people my twenties were gone. My twenties were highlighted by me studying. And just what it is when you decide to embark on this journey. For sure, I think as a medical student, just having those pressures, not only the inside pressures that the school itself, places on this. But it's the outside pressures of friends and family and just life in general, that are still going on because unfortunately they don't pause while you're in it. Now would you say, especially with some of the stresses that you had to face and some of the stresses that medical students typically have to face, what would you say, from a preparation standpoint, what was the position of your school? And the reason why I ask that is because when we speaking with Dr. Nicole, she talked about the fact that as a physician, as an attending physician, the systems are in place for us to deal with physician burnout. So, now that we bring it all the way back to the medical student, I wonder what that situation is like as well too? How well would you say you were prepared for some of the stresses that you had to face over your time in school, by your school? Aprylle Thompson: I believe my school realized that burnout was increasing amongst physicians as well as medical students. So the clinical student affairs at my school, they promote something that was called a self-care day. And with that, that's what made the day, students are able to focus from their clinical rotations as well as within the classroom. They're able to take that day off and they can work on their mental health, emotional health, and even physical health. So that's one way my school did it. I know other schools love to incorporate therapy in which students are able to have maybe 30 to 45 minute sessions with a therapist and talk to them about what's bothering them and ways that they can plan to help improve burnout or whatever issues the student might be facing at that moment in time. Dr. Berry: I love that especially because it seems like it's coming from the top above where they're recognizing like, hey, our students are being affected by the pressures of burnout. And I talk about burnout a lot when we do this general discussion. When you say the Self-Care Day and you're able to decompress and you just get away from it. How was that one day like for you? Did you feel like it was enough? Do you feel like it was a start for things that come? How would you grade the actions of your school? Aprylle Thompson: I believe it was very beneficial because usually it comes in at the right time. Usually the day before I'm at the peak of my stress. And just knowing that the following day I can stay home, sleep in and relax or even just go to the gym. And I could just figure out ways how I can start my week or what I can do differently to help decrease rate at which I'm burning out. Dr. Berry: Now I got to ask, especially being in this stage of a graduate medical education director and really an attending in itself. Was there ever any time where your attendings either notice or even worse, probably didn't notice some of the burnout associated symptoms in the medical students? Was there something that essentially had to come from the top? Ross essentially had to say like, hey, give these guys a day off because you guys are at work. What would you say in that matter? Aprylle Thompson: I believe students spoke to Ross about it because sometimes attendance can be very oblivious because if faculty have to deal with their own issues and what's going on with their patients, sometimes medical students are overlooked. But luckily for me, my program at Ross University, they're able to identify the issues that we have and whenever we speak, they listen. So I've been very fortunate to be a part of this institute that really cares about their students to help fix the problem that's on arise. Dr. Berry: I love it. And we hedge that a lot. But when you hear the term physician burnout and understanding that you're a medical student. So you're, a few months is about to be a physician who I guess walking into this field where this aspect of physician burning out is very real. What do you think about it when you hear the term? Aprylle Thompson: I believe the term physician burnout, it's very synonymous to the word overworked. So when it happens, we don't perform our best and when we can't perform our best, we're not able to treat patients to the best of our ability, which will increase the rate at which medical error occurs. Dr. Berry: I love it and I think you really hit it on the head because again, like I said not I have a problem with the term physician burnout, but I do think it's something that's masking problems at hand. And sometimes I feel like, especially when you tie the phrase of physician burnout, you're putting the onus on the doc. But not putting the onus on all of the other factors that got the doctor to that point. It just like, oh well, Berry burnt out, that's holidays. Berry burnt out, not realizing, well Berry burnt out because the hours are too long. Very burnt out because he couldn't take care of his patients the way he wanted to take care of his patients. Very burnt out because the frustration of maybe not getting paid enough will continue to grow, all of these different reasons. But when it's titled Physician Burnout, all you hear is the physician is the onus and the physician is the responsible party associated with it. I'd definitely for sure love that definition because I think it's so true and it really cast light on a system that again, it has seemed to now trickle down and I'm not sure if it's was purposeful or I'm not sure if it was just a cumulative effect. But something that's kind of purpose all the way down to now the fact that you could be in training and still experiencing these symptoms of a burnout. Now as a medical student, I asked, you're a fourth year, you're about to be out of here. But was there ever times, especially in the mid before to self-care days and those things in that regard, there ever times you're like, yeah you know what? I'm feeling it right now. I guess this may be a little too much for me at the moment. Aprylle Thompson: I believe that time for me was while I was studying for my board examination specifically step 2 CK and while I was studying for my boards, I was also working in the ICU. So as you already know, the hours are very long. Dr. Berry: When you say ICS, oh alright. Aprylle Thompson: Yes, very long hours. So I had to balance trying to impress my attendance because as a medical student you want to be on the forefront. You want to show that you know your stuff. Apart from pressing my attendance after, make sure I impress my residents, whether that's just, I don't know, doing scutwork for them or being around the patient 24/7. Reporting back to them as soon as possible. I have to always be on my tip toes to make sure that I'm viewed in a positive light. Because as a medical student, your residents are usually they advocate for you. So if you impressed them, you can work your way up. And while trying to do that, I had to also learn as much as I can in the ICU. Because ICU is a whole another world, a different ballgame in medicine. And then when I left the hospital and I went home at about 8:00 or 9:00 PM, I had to still pull out my book to study until about one or two o'clock in the morning and then go out by four or 4:45 AM to get to the hospital by six o'clock and that cycle continued. And after a while I started to feel myself burning out and I couldn't really tell my resident or my attendant because as a medical student, we're not allowed to feel that way because we're not officially doctors yet. And while I was feeling burnout at that stage, I didn't even in the fact that I still had to eat, I still had to cook my meals for the week. I still have to go to the gym, do my laundry. But with everything like that, it's very tough to talk to people about it. Dr. Berry: And most importantly, you still got sleep. And especially Lunch and Learn community, I really want you to have to really pay attention to this story because it is not an uncommon story. First of all, again, I'm an internist. I'm a hospitalists. I take care of patients all day in a hospital. But I 100% agree when Aprylle talks about the fact that ICU is a, just a different ball game, a different beast, a different mindset that it takes to really take care of the sickest of the sickest patients. I can 100% agree with that. And just this understanding, and she touched on a couple points where she talked about one, the hierarchy aspect of it, where the attendings who are there, you have the residents who are there and then you have the medical student who is there and understanding that the work that you have to put in to impress not only the resident but also the attending, on top of juggling effect that this is I'm assuming this is your first time in ICU, right? Understanding that I'm having to learn on the fly while impressing all of the people who are above me. And because I may quote unquote medical, I've got to say quote unquote, but because I'm a medical student, no one recognizes that I can also be burnt out. Is definitely a quandary that a lot of our medical students I realize are facing, in this aspect of quote unquote training. And again, we shouldn't want to train our physicians to have to deal with that level of burden or stress. Because trust me in a light that when you're an attending, I could tell you wholeheartedly just so you can see some type of a light at the end of the tunnel. That level of work isn't there, but it's a different type of stress that you're going to be walking into. Aprylle Thompson: Yeah. You guys live the good life. Dr. Berry: Right. So it's one of those things where I'm becoming very keen now, especially with physician burnout, being discussed on a more and more aspect of it. Understanding that yes, as a physician. Because again, I used to be naive, I used saying, well when they talk about physician burnout, it was people who've been in the game, 10, 15 years and they were just tired. But then when I started walking around and I'm at a residency, let's see, five years now. So I'm five years out of residency and I'm seeing colleagues who are around my age exhibiting and talking about they're tired and done. So you can be five years out of training and already experiencing those symptoms definitely something needs to occur and change. When you're doing the ICU and you are recognizing like hey, I'm not sleeping. I'm not eating. I'm not, you're just probably not talking to friends. I'm not doing the things I needed to do to take care of my own. The support system that was there. Can you talk a little bit about it? Is this where the self-care day really came into play and really helped you or what was happening during that time? Aprylle Thompson: I believe I've been very blessed to have a big support system, specifically my family. From the moment I told you I wanted to go to medical school, they've been there with me from day one, whether if I had a bad day, if I had a happy day. For me, whenever I leave the hospital, the first set of people I call are actually my parents. We talk about my day, I try to replay how did they went. If it was good, they're happy. If it was bad, we talk about ways in which I can improve it tomorrow. And apart from talking to my parents, my fiancé has been a great support system as well. Whenever I've vent my frustration to him about what's going on in the hospital. He listens and he listens very closely and he helps me think about ways that I can distress ways that I can improve myself for tomorrow. So in that way, I don't bring the low from the previous day to the next day and it makes me feel 10 times better when I'm able to vent to my parents and my fiancé about what happened. Dr. Berry: Talk about this especially I want to hit you a follow up question. Is your fiancé in medicine or health or outside of it? Aprylle Thompson: It's funny you asked me that. A lot of people love to ask that. No, he's not. Dr. Berry: And the reason why I asked especially because you talked about how understanding he was is that sometimes a lot of our friends outside of our bubble don't really comprehend. The level of stress that we're dealing with. I definitely want to say you're very fortunate to have that person who can understand like hey, nope, she's on ICU this month. Yeah. I'm probably not gonna see her as much as I want this month. I'm not gonna make her feel guilty for not seeing her as much as I want this month. Those types of things that can build upon a relationship or hurt a relationship when there is that communication disconnect. And especially having parents as well too. Like I say, because having someone to say like, oh my God, today was crazy. And just to be able to talk about it is definitely something. Because one, our typical conversations. We just can't really have all willy-nilly. Unless you're in the field, no one's gonna really understand. I had to see 40 patients a day and being served for 10. Then I got really understand it. But if they're able to be sympathetic to the thoughts in feelings, it really helps you and really helps leave this stress that is usually there when you walk into that building. Whether it’s a clinic, whether it’s a hospital. But be able to go home and have that stress behind. Aprylle Thompson: Exactly and that's why I think it's great that he's not in the medical field as well because when I bent my frustration to him, I just vent. And then that's that. I don't have to bring work home every single day. Dr. Berry: I love it. We talked about just the system in general, of just our medical training. And again, I have some personal thoughts about just training and especially in only being, going through the process of being a medical student and a medical resident right now and attending, but also now being decided where I'm also training as physician, be attendings as a program director. What do you think about just our system in general? Is it our system that's really set up for people to burn out? And especially when we talk all the way down to the medical student, is it just set up so that people are gonna burn out just because the way we do our things? Aprylle Thompson: I believe so because in this system with medicine, not all position, but a lot of physicians, medical students are taught by intimidation and sometimes we're not allowed to feel tired or we're not allowed to know something. And if that happens, sometimes we can be scrutinized by physicians. And the culture of medicine with that, I hope it changes sooner than later and students overwork themselves because you want to impress everyone. So we sacrifice our mental health, our emotional health, and even our physical health just to prove a point that we are good enough and that we are equal to everyone else. Dr. Berry: I love that. I can tell you that's going to be a quote somewhere. We're going to definitely quote something up somewhere. I love the word intimidation because it is such a word that unfortunately does not stop. It's one of those things where I remember being a premed student and feeling like if I'm studying with this person next to me, this person may be able to take my spot in medical school. So I had to be fierce, be tougher to try to get that quote unquote last spot. And then it's the feeling that does not change when you get to medical school. Where not only are you feeling the intimidation from your colleagues and I always joke this because especially in medical, I used to think we're going to be colleagues, I'm not your like enemy. They still bring those kinds of same types of feelings into, that atmosphere. And then you walk into a system, especially for those who may know Lunch and Learn community, what typically occurs depending on the school, but some schools differ is that your first couple of years of medical school, you are essentially doing a lot of the bookwork, laying down the foundations from a basic science aspect. And then your last couple of years you're actually in the hospitals, in the clinics and awards, seeing patient direct patient care on a more, a full time basis. And for those who may not know Lunch and Learn community. But what happens is once you get into the latter years where you're a lot more direct patient care and then you're having to deal with residents or medical attendings who were either brought up differently or brought up in a certain way and don't really know how to get their point across without making you feel like you're lesser. This is a very common problem for a medical students. And again you talked about the pressures, not only the pressures of board exam, but the pressures of oh, if I don't perform and resident don’t liked me, they gave me a bad grade and they tell the attendant to give me a bad, all of these things here that they have to perform on a day to day basis, 24/7. And that's a pressure that I always tell people most career professionals do not have to deal with the pressure that the physician has to deal with. So just even make that micro and think about the pressures that the medical student has to deal with and understanding every single day they feel they're being graded and if one day right, they're human. Because I think that sometimes gets lost. If one day they're human and aren't as enthusiastic as they were the day before yesterday, they can be docked points for it. I think especially when it comes to physician burnout, because I think a lot of times I tell people when you have a physician who's burnt out and understand that they're not just gonna flat out quit, they're going to keep working. They’re going to keep seeing patients, they're not going to do it effectively. But they're going to keep on doing it. So when we talk about physician burnout and then what it can ultimately lead to, I think a very important topic and one that really I think probably should get much more fanfare than it is just the aspect of the physicians even committing suicide. And the fact that we don't have many people who are going into medicine as much as we did any more. Just this shortage that's around everywhere in that regards. What do you think about just those aspects of physician burnout, physician suicide, which is extremely high and as well as just the overall aspect that less people are going into medicine? Aprylle Thompson: Well, I believe in the rate at which physician suicides occurred. It's definitely at an all-time high. But I think for these people, it crosses the line of abuse. Reason being is because some people don't know how to distress. They don't know how to take what they're given, switch it up, and then find a way to relieve themselves. And that's because in the culture of medicine, we can't talk to each other because we're seeing as if we're less than or we're not able to keep up with the rest of the crowd. So because of that, we keep everything bottled up until we can't take it any more than fortunately some people they commit suicide because of that, because that's their way of getting away from all of the stress that they're dealing with within the workplace. Dr. Berry: Very poignant. I think you hit a home on another point. I mean, is sad is that physicians, we don't really talk to each other like that for that fear of being seen as less capable to do. And again, if you took the physician title away from us and someone just told you like, hey, I'm feeling down, I'm feeling bad about myself, I'm feeling depressed. People would automatically know, okay, this is the type of steps you need to do. But people wouldn't say that, okay, you're a less of a blank because of it. Well, for some reason when it comes to physicians and the feel that aspect of burning out, right? That automatically goes to the top of the head like oh, people are gonna think I'm less of a physician and I can't take care of the patients like I used to be able to take care of because of, I'm actually acknowledging this issues that I'm going through. Aprylle Thompson: It's funny you say that because I believe as physicians, sometimes we dub ourselves as being super human because even the burnout could just be from ourselves too. Because we actually look at one another as if we're greater than thou and we're not allowed to not know something. We're not allowed to feel tired. Because even sometimes the outside world, they don't see that. But we put it on ourselves and maybe if we can change that where it's okay to not feel fine, it's okay to let loose a little bit. Maybe that can help our culture a little bit. And the rate at which physician burnout occurs. Dr. Berry: Amazing. For the medical students, because again, you're almost added there. But if you could look back and say like, hey, if you want to, and I hate to say avoid it because it sounds like the system that we're in is going to be very difficult to avoid it. But if you want to be able to deal and manage some of the stressors and the symptoms of medical student burnout. Because I think that's the term that we need to really call it. What tips would you give to say like, hey, if you could do this and if you could do that, that could help you in the long run? Aprylle Thompson: Well I have a few tips. For one is, destress as much as possible, however you want to destress. If it's going to the movies or even a book, do what makes you happy. Secondly, I believe exercising is very important because as we all know, you'll have an increase in endorphins which will make you very happy and if you eat healthy, that can also change your health. And it can also make you feel better about yourself. Funny story is, I'm actually someone who loved burgers amongst other people. And after a while when you keep eating that you don't feel your best. But then whenever I changed my diet and I incorporate more fruits and vegetables, it's amazing how much clarity I have, how it improves, how I feel much happier. And I'm able to focus more. So if we're able to just exercise and maintain a healthy diet that can really help in the way that we react to burnout and how much we're able to tolerate before we get to that stage. Dr. Berry: Amazing tips. Before I let you go. Before we get you out of here, first of all, it has been absolutely amazing and your insight has definitely been something that I think is needed. Because I think is eye opening. I think as we continue to really highlight this phrase physician burnout, I think we need to make sure that we don't just start looking for problems once they become an attending and understand that a lot of these issues and a lot of the lack of support for these issues are happening as early as the second we start being a medical student. Before I let you go tell us about, especially because you're a medical student, so I love to hear about just your plans. What's about to happen? Where are you trying to match? Let's give all that stuff there so we can make sure we're on the lookout for you. Aprylle Thompson: So currently I'm applying for the 2020 match. Going through the hectic motion of getting my application done before September 15. I know a very big day. So I'm from Orlando, Florida. I hope to stay home, be with my family, but if I get matched anywhere else, I'll happily take a position there. So I love all aspects of medicine and as of right now, I'm loving internal medicine as well as general surgery. Dr. Berry: Okay. That's as interesting. I could tell you, I’m an internist right? You don't want me to know OR and I realized that very quickly that you want me nowhere near to OR. I just didn't have the mindset of a surgeon. I just knew it. One of the most important things that I tell anybody is just knowing yourself. Understanding like, oh, I like medicine, but that's not just have medicine I like to be. And so very interested that internal medicine or surgery still in the bread basket for you. So as a program director, I obviously definitely wanna wish you good luck on this upcoming match. I hope you get to whatever this by you're going to get. Like I say, it's a very different, internal medicine or surgery so hope you get to wherever you want to get to. But I want to thank you for sobbing vital podcast and really helping educate Lunch and Learn community on all your endeavors. From a social media standpoint, where can people find you, follow you, track your journey if they wanted to track your journey? Aprylle Thompson: So you can follow me on Facebook at just my name, Aprylle Thompson or on Instagram @cheecah_med. And you could also follow me on Twitter. I don't tweet as often as I should @ Aprylle Thompson. I don't have snapchat though. Dr. Berry: Sure. Okay. Alright. Appreciate it. Remember Lunch and Learn community, we always put all of these links in the show notes so you don't have to write anything now real quickly. We'll make sure it's in the show notes so that you can just click and then go right to Aprylle s page. Aprylle again, thank you for joining the podcast today and you have an amazing day. Aprylle Thompson: Thank you for having me. You have a wonderful day as well. Download the MP3 Audio file, listen to the episode however you like.

Beyond Clean Podcast
Dr. David Perrett: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease & Prions - A Sterile Processing Focus

Beyond Clean Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2019 35:31


Although most Sterile Processing professionals around the globe have heard of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and prions, there are still many misconceptions around these topics and their importance in the context of Sterile Processing. On this episode of the Beyond Clean podcast, we talk to one of the world's foremost experts on the topic of prions and vCJD, Dr. David Perrett, Professor Emeritus of Bioanalytical Science, Barts & The London School of Medicine. Tune in this week for an introduction to prions, background to why they have become so pervasive in the news, and what you should be doing about it in your hospital. Grab your OR Director and Infection Preventionist to huddle around the stereo for this one! Complete The Exam For CE Credit! #Prions #CJD #vCJD #Microbiology #Science #SterileProcessing #DavidPerrett #Protein #SPD #CSSD #OR #PatientSafety #OperatingRoom #Risk #Safety #Surgery #BeyondClean #WeFightDirty #Sponsors #ReadySetSurgical #Endoplus 

Rock Your Retirement Show
Alzheimer’s: How the Disease Progresses Ep 174

Rock Your Retirement Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2019 1684:35


Alzheimer's and how the disease progresses A lot of older people forget someone’s name or misplace things from time to time. This kind of forgetfulness is normal. But, signs of a more serious problem are things such as forgetting how to get home or getting confused in places a person knows well or asking questions over and over. These are initial signs of Alzheimer's. Janet Rich Pittman and I are talking about an article on Alzheimer's and how the disease progresses.  Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The disease progresses slowly and gradually and worsens over time. Eventually, it will affect most areas of your brain. Memory, thinking, judgment, language, problem-solving, personality and movement can all be affected by the disease. Types of Dementia Dementia is when a vast amount of brain cells die in a certain section of your brain and this causes your brain to misfunction. To clarify Alzheimer's is a disease and a type of dementia. Every Alzheimer's is different. Therefore, no two types of Alzheimer's are exactly the same. There are a number of types of dementia, and Alzheimer's is one of them. Majority of the dementias in our world is Alzheimer's, about 87%. Other dementias that people are familiar with are vascular dementia (stroke). Also, there's Lewy Body, Parkinson's, Pick's, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Huntington's, Multiple Sclerosis, Lou-Gehrig disease, and HIV Aids. How Alzheimer's Disease Progresses Although every person with Alzheimer's disease progresses differently, it is possible to divide its typical progression into a series of stages. The beginning, the middle and the end. However, it is essential to make sure that a person with dementia has a good quality of life with the condition and that their needs are met, rather than focusing on what stage they might have reached. Mild Alzheimer's Mild is the beginning stages and it lasts a few years. Alzheimer's disease is often diagnosed at this stage. Dementia/Alzheimer's is officially diagnosed when you have 2 or more cognitive impairments in your brain. Cognitive impairments are those are your ability to focus and pay attention, reasoning and judgment, senses, and visual perception. The very first one that goes is brain endurance, which is your brain energy. The second cognitive thing that you lose is your gait. Other symptoms include having less energy and drive to do things, trouble with driving, language problems, loss of recent memories, and mild coordination problems. Also, depression is a precursor and that is why you gotta beat that depression. Moderate Alzheimer's During this stage of Alzheimer's disease, people grow more confused and forgetful and begin to need more help with daily activities and self-care. And it can last 2 – 10 years. Symptoms include rambling speech, trouble coming up with the right words, using the wrong words, and hard time planning and solving problems. Getting angry or upset easily, and sometimes lashing out at family or caregivers. Sleeping is also another problem at this stage. Another symptom of moderate Alzheimer is that your senses dilapidate. You're not able to smell very well. In addition, your ability to taste especially salt and sugar is weakened. That is why It makes you wanna eat more and more. Severe Alzheimer's In the late stage of the disease, the mental function continues to decline, and the disease has a growing impact on movement and physical capabilities. It lasts 1 – 10 years. Now you have a major confusion of what's in the past and what's happening now. And that's the beginning of the end. It goes further to the fact where they quit talking. They may know your face but not know your name. Many people at this stage are physically impaired that is why caregivers are important.

Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs (SACPA)
Are We Dementia Friendly? (Part 1)

Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs (SACPA)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2019 22:30


Alzheimer's disease and dementia are often used interchangeably as many people believe that one means the other. In fact, the distinction between the two diseases often causes confusion for the persons living with dementia, their families and caregivers. Alzheimer's and some types of dementias remain a mystery in many ways. Therefore, the similar changes in the brain are often mixed up in every day conversation and understanding. According to National Institute on Aging, Dementia is a brain disorder that affects communication and performance of daily activities and Alzheimer's disease is a form of dementia that specifically affects parts of the brain that control thought, memory and language. Dementia is an umbrella term for a set of symptoms including impaired thinking and memory. It is a term that is often associated with the cognitive decline of aging. However, issues other than Alzheimer's can cause dementia. Other types of dementia are Vascular, Huntington's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The speaker will explain how those living with a diagnosis can still live a quality life with the right supports. Public awareness and understanding is needed to remove the stigma associated with dementia. Further research of what exactly causes Alzheimer's disease and other dementias will help to clear much of the confusion & stigma. Learn how you can make a difference in the lives of those living with dementia. Speaker: Shari Remus, Regional Lead, Community Relations Shari Remus is the Regional Lead of Community Relations for The Alzheimer Society of Alberta and North West Territories, Lethbridge area. In March of 2017, Shari joined the Alzheimer Society from Calgary's fast paced corporate world where she wore many hats including corporate fundraising, communications and graphic design. Keeping busy is what Shari likes to do best, and with the IG Wealth Management's Walk for Alzheimer's fundraising event held each June, the annual Fall Coffee Break promotions, and January's Alzheimer Awareness Month, she certainly does just that. Shari's educational background includes Communications and Public Relations from the University of Calgary. Moderator: Robert Campbell Date: Thursday, March 14, 2019 Time: Doors open 11:30 am, Presentation 12 noon, buffet lunch 12:30 pm, Q&A 1 – 1:30 pm Location: Royal Canadian Legion (north door) 324 Mayor Magrath Dr. S. Lethbridge Cost: $14 buffet lunch with dessert/coffee/tea/juice or $2 coffee/tea/juice. RSVP not required

Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs (SACPA)
Are We Dementia Friendly? (Part 2 Q&A)

Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs (SACPA)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2019 35:47


Alzheimer's disease and dementia are often used interchangeably as many people believe that one means the other. In fact, the distinction between the two diseases often causes confusion for the persons living with dementia, their families and caregivers. Alzheimer's and some types of dementias remain a mystery in many ways. Therefore, the similar changes in the brain are often mixed up in every day conversation and understanding. According to National Institute on Aging, Dementia is a brain disorder that affects communication and performance of daily activities and Alzheimer's disease is a form of dementia that specifically affects parts of the brain that control thought, memory and language. Dementia is an umbrella term for a set of symptoms including impaired thinking and memory. It is a term that is often associated with the cognitive decline of aging. However, issues other than Alzheimer's can cause dementia. Other types of dementia are Vascular, Huntington's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The speaker will explain how those living with a diagnosis can still live a quality life with the right supports. Public awareness and understanding is needed to remove the stigma associated with dementia. Further research of what exactly causes Alzheimer's disease and other dementias will help to clear much of the confusion & stigma. Learn how you can make a difference in the lives of those living with dementia. Speaker: Shari Remus, Regional Lead, Community Relations Shari Remus is the Regional Lead of Community Relations for The Alzheimer Society of Alberta and North West Territories, Lethbridge area. In March of 2017, Shari joined the Alzheimer Society from Calgary's fast paced corporate world where she wore many hats including corporate fundraising, communications and graphic design. Keeping busy is what Shari likes to do best, and with the IG Wealth Management's Walk for Alzheimer's fundraising event held each June, the annual Fall Coffee Break promotions, and January's Alzheimer Awareness Month, she certainly does just that. Shari's educational background includes Communications and Public Relations from the University of Calgary. Moderator: Robert Campbell Date: Thursday, March 14, 2019 Time: Doors open 11:30 am, Presentation 12 noon, buffet lunch 12:30 pm, Q&A 1 – 1:30 pm Location: Royal Canadian Legion (north door) 324 Mayor Magrath Dr. S. Lethbridge Cost: $14 buffet lunch with dessert/coffee/tea/juice or $2 coffee/tea/juice. RSVP not required

Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs (SACPA)
Are We Dementia Friendly? (Part 1)

Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs (SACPA)