Podcasts about dietary

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

the sum of food consumed by an organism

  • 891PODCASTS
  • 1,347EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
dietary

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about dietary

Show all podcasts related to dietary

Latest podcast episodes about dietary

Highlights from Moncrieff
A dietary experiment for twins...

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 15:50


Twins Hugo and Ross Turner joined Sean on the show to discuss the results of their dietary experiment... Listen and subscribe to Moncrieff on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or Spotify.    Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.     You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.        

The Flipping 50 Show
WHY YOU MAY BE EATING TOO LITTLE To LOSE WEIGHT

The Flipping 50 Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 33:43


Are you eating too little to lose weight? How would you know? Eating consistently less than your body wants will slow your metabolism. You will lose your metabolic flexibility. There is no way you can eat less and less, continue to exercise the same or more and not stress your body, causing a ripple of negative reactions.  That's what this episode is all about. You may have reactions to this content. That's okay. It's to be expected, really. You've been conditioned.  Endurance athletes say things like, I have a hard time believing I'm eating too little to lose weight.  In fact, they are the ones at greatest risk for losing lean muscle. Menopausal athletes or exercise enthusiasts, even more so.  But it's normal to have a response like that. Endurance runners have long had eating disorders, or dysfunctional feelings around eating. The desire to be lighter, thinner to be faster is strong.  If you have low energy availability, you'll risk: Thyroid function disruption Endocrine disruption Muscle loss Workout performance (therefor results) suffers Negative Mitochondria and muscle and muscle protein synthesis effects Low Energy Availability causes: Too low overall calories Too low protein Too low carbohydrates Too low fat Any combination of these Culprits: Dieting intentionally Fasting without conscious refueling and intentional goals  Keto continuously  lifestyle dietary choices (inadequate EAA in plant-sources) Protein needs To Maintain: Ideal body weight in lbs = grams of protein Your Maintain weight daily Protein need: To Lose weight: X 10-15% more Your weight loss daily protein need: (see handout link below for a worksheet to do calculations) **Regardless of overall need, it needs to be consumed at a specific dose. 30 grams of protein minimum – no more than 50-60 grams for best ability to synthesis. Carbohydrate needs Light activity days/Recovery/short interval days 1.4 gm carb/pounds bodyweight Your calculation: 1.4 x ___________ = ______________ 60-120 minutes of endurance exercise 1.8grams x body weight pounds Your calculation: 1.8 x _______________ = ______________ More endurance training – increased the carbohydrate need 2-2.7gm per pounds (this is also where you're no longer going to find you make weight loss possible, but you're working toward performance and preventing muscle wasting that will happen. Fat Servings per meal is an easier way to adjust and consider 5 servings a day, is 1-2 at each meal. Most foods with protein contain fat or meal prep or condiments contain fat. Low fat and higher carbs (high activity days) Higher fat and low carb (lower activity days) When both fat and carbs are high, we have issues. Even with “healthy resistant starches” this is true. Examples: I do a 20-minute HI interval training session and that's my exercise– that's a light day for carb But still higher than most women are trying to go (100 grams is as low as I would recommend for an active woman and never would I go that low for an athlete) Based on 130 lbs 1.4 x body weight = 182 grams of carbs The same 20-minute HIIT interval session before a strength training session (40-minute session). Now, that boosts my need for carbohydrates, not just protein. So, I am back to at least 1.8g/body weight in pounds of carbs on these days. 1.8 x body weight = 234 Timing of recovery meals is important too. You want to eat by bookending your workouts with adequate fuel. Pre workout and post workout both matter. During recovery if you are HIGHLY active woman: The ratio of protein: carbs post workout is ideally 1: 3 or 4 if you're endurance training and need recovery quickly for that next workout. If you're not that active and simply exercising at minimum, you are a little less concerned about that. If you're exercising intentionally 5-6 days a week for an hour (or more) you are “an athlete.” So, for more active women with a threshold of 30 grams of protein at each meal you want 90 to 120 grams of carbs in that meal as well. What does that look like? Carb counts of some high quality carb choices: 1 cup cooked oatmeal 27 grams 1 cup of frozen berries? 21 grams Medium apple 25 grams 1 medium sweet potato 27 grams Banana 27 grams 1 cup Chili 23.5 carbs 1 cup butternut squash soup 23 1 slice of pumpkin pie 46 grams If you don't repair & replenish your protein & carb stores during the window (0-2 hours with sweet spot at 60-90 minutes) you'll be more tired the next day, find next workouts harder – though less effective, dead legs, etc). Sample meals during one day and carb count: Smoothie with half a banana and 1 cup of blueberries         34.5 1.5 cups of chili and an apple                                                 60.25 Sweet potato and berries  for dinner                                     38.0                                                                                                 132.75 Falls short of even the lowest need for carbohydrates (182gm) for a 130 lb woman. If you're increasing training levels, eating during activity will help. (Long bike rides, long hikes) That isn't accounted for in the example. What's your Energy Availability? Fat Free Mass = your muscle weight only Example: 130 lbs, 54 lbs of muscle mass Dietary energy intake (kcal) – Exercise energy expenditure (kcal) divided by Fat Free Mass (kg) For Example (2000 calories is easy math- just as example) 2000 kcals/day – and expend 250 kcals in 30-minute HIIT divided by 24.5 kg (54 lbs divided by 2.2) Please note:  in the actual podcast and on the cheat sheet there is a (major) error) Apologies for the oversight!  ***CORRECTION to original post: 54 DIVIDED by 2.2 = kgs = 71 is my Energy Availability (EA) gms/kg body weight Your Calculation: Kcals in a day: ___________  - Exercise energy Expended (use a tracker or online estimate) Lean Muscle mass kg _______ (lbs x 2.2) = ________________ gms/kg bodyweight What's true:

Not Another Fitness Podcast: For Fitness Geeks Only
Episode 124: 5 Tips To Eliminate Holiday Weight Gain

Not Another Fitness Podcast: For Fitness Geeks Only

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 34:33


Weight gain during the holidaysIs it real?Discussion of the researchEat more protein4x40 or 4x30 approachRelax on the big dayHedonic and homeostatic reasons to eatGo moveWalk or exerciseDaily body weight measurementsResearchMore water and electrolytesRelationship between hunger and thirstGetting salt is mainly done via eatingCraving salty foodsResearchAffiliate link: Drink LMNT | Paleo-Keto Friendly Hydration | Zero Sugar Electrolytes – Drink The Flex Diet Podcast is brought to you by the Flex Diet Certification. Go to https://flexdiet.com/ for 8 interventions on nutrition and recovery. If you're outside the enrollment window, sign up for my free newsletter, and you'll be notified when it opens!ReferencesHoliday Weight Gain?Díaz-Zavala, R. G., Castro-Cantú, M. F., Valencia, M. E., Álvarez-Hernández, G., Haby, M. M., & Esparza-Romero, J. (2017). Effect of the Holiday Season on Weight Gain: A Narrative Review. Journal of obesity, 2017, 2085136. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2085136https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5514330/Roberts SB, Mayer J. Holiday weight gain: fact or fiction? Nutr Rev. 2000 Dec;58(12):378-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2000.tb01839.x. PMID: 11206847.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11206847/Kaviani S, vanDellen M, Cooper JA. Daily Self-Weighing to Prevent Holiday-Associated Weight Gain in Adults. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Jun;27(6):908-916. doi: 10.1002/oby.22454. PMID: 31119881.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31119881/Protein EffectsWesterterp-Plantenga MS, Lemmens SG, Westerterp KR. Dietary protein - its role in satiety, energetics, weight loss and health. Br J Nutr. 2012 Aug;108 Suppl 2:S105-12. doi: 10.1017/S0007114512002589. PMID: 23107521.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23107521/Cuenca-Sánchez M, Navas-Carrillo D, Orenes-Piñero E. Controversies surrounding high-protein diet intake: satiating effect and kidney and bone health. Adv Nutr. 2015 May 15;6(3):260-6. doi: 10.3945/an.114.007716. PMID: 25979491; PMCID: PMC4424780.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25979491/Phillips SM, Chevalier S, Leidy HJ. Protein "requirements" beyond the RDA: implications for optimizing health. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016 May;41(5):565-72. doi: 10.1139/apnm-2015-0550. Epub 2016 Feb 9. PMID: 26960445.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26960445/Non-exercise activity thermogenesisLevine JA. Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT). Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Dec;16(4):679-702. doi: 10.1053/beem.2002.0227. PMID: 12468415.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30370831/Malaeb S, Perez-Leighton CE, Noble EE, Billington C. A "NEAT" Approach to Obesity Prevention in the Modern Work Environment. Workplace Health Saf. 2019 Mar;67(3):102-110. doi: 10.1177/2165079918790980. Epub 2018 Oct 29. PMID: 30370831.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12468415/Hunger and ThirstAugustine V, Lee S, Oka Y. Neural Control and Modulation of Thirst, Sodium Appetite, and Hunger. Cell. 2020 Jan 9;180(1):25-32. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.11.040. PMID: 31923398; PMCID: PMC7406138.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31923398/Bray N. A taste for hunger and thirst. Nat Rev Neurosci. 2020 Nov;21(11):592-593. doi: 10.1038/s41583-020-00380-1. PMID: 32913320.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32913320/Mattes RD. Hunger and thirst: issues in measurement and prediction of eating and drinking. Physiol Behav. 2010 Apr 26;100(1):22-32. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2009.12.026. Epub 2010 Jan 11. PMID: 20060847; PMCID: PMC2849909.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20060847/McKiernan F, Houchins JA, Mattes RD. Relationships between human thirst, hunger, drinking, and feeding. Physiol Behav. 2008 Aug 6;94(5):700-8. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2008.04.007. Epub 2008 Apr 13. PMID: 18499200; PMCID: PMC2467458.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18499200/McKiernan F, Hollis JH, McCabe GP, Mattes RD. Thirst-drinking, hunger-eating; tight coupling? J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Mar;109(3):486-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2008.11.027. PMID: 19248867; PMCID: PMC2671201.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19248867/ 

Feed Room Chemist: An Equine Nutrition Podcast
78 | Soy – Good, Bad, or Unknown?

Feed Room Chemist: An Equine Nutrition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:56


Is soy really that good? Is it really that bad? Dr. Nichols undresses this hot topic and explains what we know about the use of soy. You can now follow @drjyme on Facebook and Instagram! Please tell your friends how #feedroomchemist has made you an #empoweredhorseowner! Show Notes: Research References: · Crain, Haffner, Hoffman, Spooner. Influence of dietary oil source on reproductive parameters in mares. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science 2015 35:444. · Applegate CC, Rowles JL, Ranard KM, Jeon S, Erdman JW. Soy consumption and the risk of prostate cancer: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrients. 2018 Jan 4;10(1):40. · Baglia ML, Zheng W, Li H, Yang G, Gao J, Gao YT, Shu XO. The association of soy food consumption with the risk of subtype of breast cancers defined by hormone receptor and HER2 status. International journal of cancer. 2016 Aug 15;139(4):742-8. · Zhang FF, Haslam DE, Terry MB, Knight JA, Andrulis IL, Daly MB, Buys SS, John EM. Dietary isoflavone intake and all‐cause mortality in breast cancer survivors: The Breast Cancer Family Registry. Cancer. 2017 Jun 1;123(11):2070-9. · Guha N, Kwan ML, Quesenberry CP, Weltzien EK, Castillo AL, Caan BJ. Soy isoflavones and risk of cancer recurrence in a cohort of breast cancer survivors: the Life After Cancer Epidemiology study. Breast cancer research and treatment. 2009 Nov 1;118(2):395-405. · Antinutritional Factors of soybeans: https://poultry.caes.uga.edu/extension/poultry-nutrition/soybeans/antinutritional-factors.html …. If you have a topic or question you would like addressed on a future episode please email info@acbluebonnet.com Dr. Jyme Nichols is Director of Nutrition for Bluebonnet Feeds and Stride Animal Health. For more information on these brands or a free virtual nutrition consult from our team just visit bluebonnetfeeds.com/nutrition-consult --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/feedroomchemist/message

Cardionerds
161. Lipids: Triglycerides – EPA and DHA Deep Dive with Dr. Erin Michos

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 34:01


CardioNerds Tommy Das (Program Director of the CardioNerds Academy and cardiology fellow at Cleveland Clinic) and Rick Ferraro (Director of CardioNerds Journal Club and cardiology fellow at the Johns Hopkins Hospital) join Dr. Erin Michos (Associate Professor of Cardiology at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Editor-In-Chief of the American Journal of Preventative Cardiology) for a discussion about the effect of DHA and EPA on triglycerides and why DHA/EPA combinations may have exhibited limited benefits in trials. This episode is part of the CardioNerds Lipids Series which is a comprehensive series lead by co-chairs Dr. Rick Ferraro and Dr. Tommy Das and is developed in collaboration with the American Society For Preventive Cardiology (ASPC). Relevant disclosures: None Pearls • Notes • References • Guest Profiles • Production Team CardioNerds Lipid Series PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Pearls The best intervention for heart disease is prevention! The InterHeart trial showed that 9 modifiable risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, abdominal obesity, dietary patterns, physical activity, consumption of alcohol, and psychosocial factors) predict 90% of acute myocardial infarction. So many acute events can be prevented1.Atherosclerotic vascular disease events increase across a range of triglyceride levels, even from 50-200mg/dL. So even in a relatively normal range, lower triglycerides seem to be better. Over ¼ of US adults have triglycerides over 150.While 8% of US adults take fish oil supplements, multiple meta-analyses have failed to show any benefit to the use of dietary omega-3 supplementation2. Dietary supplements these are not meant for medical use and are not studied or regulated as such! Show notes 1. What are DHA and EPA? DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, and EPA, or eicosapentaenoic acid, are n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, also known as omega-3 fatty acids. These compounds have been of considerable interest for over two decades given observed association of high dietary omega-3 fatty acid intake with reduced cardiovascular events3. As both are important omega-3 fatty acids, trials on the benefits of DHA and EPA have often focused on the two compounds in combination. 2. What was the GISSI-Prevenzione Trial and why was it Important? GISSI-Prevenzione trial (Lancet 1999), was one of the earliest trials to study DHA and EPA4. In this trial, the authors evaluated the effect of omega-3 supplementation as a combination pill of DHA and EPA on cardiovascular events and death in patients with recent myocardial infarction (the last three months). Over a 3.5-year follow-up period, participants treated with DHA/EPA combination experienced a significant reduction in death, nonfatal MI, and stroke.As this was an early trial, patients were largely not on statins, as these were not supported at the time of study initiation (Only 5% were on cholesterol-lowering medications at baseline, and only 45% were on cholesterol-lowering therapy at study completion). The benefits seen in this trial may not extend to modern practice with patients on contemporary background therapy.The trial participants were also not representative of our modern patients for a variety of other reasons. 85% of participants in the trial were men. 42.2% of patients in EPA/DHA arm were current smokers, and 35.4% were prior smokers. Only 14.2% of patients had diabetes and 14.7% with BMI >30.Notably, the decrease in triglycerides in this trial was only 3%, implying that triglyceride lowering did not entirely explain the benefit in cardiovascular events seen. 3. What about the data after the GISSI-Prevensione Trial? After this positive trial for DHA/EPA in combination, subsequent trial data in support of DHA/EPA has been less robust.

The Adversity Advantage
The Warning Signs of an Unhealthy Gut Microbiome & What To Do to Fix it w/ Dr. Will Bulsiewicz

The Adversity Advantage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 60:20


Is your gut slowly killing you? Find out why! Dr. B's episode was the MOST downloaded in 2020 and he comes back today for round two!  In this episode, Dr. B digs deep into how integral our gut microbiome is. Our gut health, as backed by science, affects our mood, our health, our energy, and how we connect with the people around us. Also, exercise and proper food intake is not enough to sustain a healthy lifestyle, you need to put your bowels in the right rhythm too! Dr. Will Bulsiewicz (@theguthealthmd), MD MSCI, (a.k.a. Dr. B) is a board certified gastroenterologist and gut health expert. Every day, he helps patients and members of his #plantfed community bounce back from restrictive and over-hyped diets, and into a whole new way of living and eating that produces the results they really want… permanently. What I Discuss with Dr. Will Bulsiewicz: 00:00 Intro 01:31 Welcome back, Dr. B! 03:06 Is the hype on gut health justified? 06:32 Have you heard of The White Lotus show? 09:38 Time spent on social media takes away your self-time 13:38 What is Dysbiosis? 17:43 A supportive community helps us perform and persevere  23:56 We share our microbiome with people that we cohabitate with 27:19 What's really happening on the inside? 28:59 Exercise without proper diet is just horrible 33:31 Signs that tell you have gut issues 37:14 Understand the root of the problem 39:11 The big three of food sensitivity 46:40 It's not gluten sensitivity, it's damaged gut microbiome 49:55 Dietary choices that reduce health risks 52:20 We need our bowels to be in a good rhythm 55:58 Dietary approach that is plant predominant    Did you enjoy this episode? Check out past episodes for more information-packed conversations that can help improve your lifestyle, or leave us a review!   Episode Resources: The Plant Fed Gut Dr. B is on Instagram and Facebook   More on Earth Echo Foods/Cacao Bliss: www.earthechofoods.com/dougbopst Use Promo code "Doug" at checkout to receive 15% off your order        

This EndoLife
SIFO, Yeast Disorders and Endometriosis with Dr. Ami Kapadia

This EndoLife

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 78:54


I first came across Dr. Ami Kapadia's work through some presentations she held for an online SIBO conference. Her lectures focused on small intestine fungal overgrowth, yeast disorders and mould - and what I heard resonated with not only my story, but so many of my clients' stories. And I'm not alone. Dr. Jessica Drummond often speaks on the connection she sees between chronic pelvic pain and yeast problems, and yeast/SIFO are prevalent issues within the SIBO community. In fact, left untreated, they can really hinder SIBO progress. The trouble is, they're not easy to diagnose and the symptoms are often identical to SIBO, and at least a quarter of SIBO patients, if not more, also have SIFO. So, given that research is currently estimating that up to 80% of endometriosis patients also have SIBO, I wanted to invite Dr. Ami onto the show to discuss how to identify and treat years disorders both alongside SIBO and alone. Dr Ami. Kapadia is a family medicine and integrative medicine physician, with a special interest in yeast and fungal disorders. She is the creator of practitioner course A Minimalist's Approach to SIFO And Mold Related Illness and patient course An Integrative Approach to SIFO: Small Intestinal Fungal Overgrowth And Related Conditions. In this episode we discuss: What are fungal/yeast related disorders and how do they affect the body. The connection between yeast/fungal disorders, endometriosis and SIBO. The signs and symptoms of fungal/yeast related disorders and how to test for them. Dr. Ami's unique treatment approach and her specific anti-fungal protocols. Dietary considerations (it's not what you think!) and what to do if you find food restriction triggering. How to work with Dr. Ami. This episode was fascinating and I completely geeked out (you' can probably tell!), I hope you enjoy it just as much as I did! Let's get social! Come say hello on Instagram or sign up to my newsletter. Sign up to the wait list for my course, Live and Thrive with Endo here. My cookbook This EndoLife, It Starts with Breakfast is out now! Get 28 anti-inflammatory, hormone friendly recipes for living and thriving with endometriosis. Order your copy here. If you feel like you need more support with managing endometriosis, you can join Your EndoLife Coaching Programme. A 1-to-1 three month health and life coaching programme to help you thrive with endometriosis. To find out more about the programme and to discuss whether it could be right for you, email me at hello@thisendolife.com or visit my website. This episode is sponsored by The Pod Farm. Learn all about how to start your own podcast with the complete course from The Pod Farm. Aimed at beginners, this course takes a simple and straightforward approach to planning, equipment buying, setting up, recording, editing and hosting your own podcast. With hours of audio and video materials, and downloadable guides and useful links, this multimedia approach aims to have something for every kind of learner. From now until April 15, newsletter subscribers get 20% off the course price. Visit www.thepodfarm.com to enroll or find out more This episode is sponsored by BeYou. Soothe period cramps the natural way with these 100% natural and discreet menthol and eucalyptus oil stick on patches and CBD range. Click here to find out more and to shop: https://beyouonline.co.uk This episode is sponsored by Semaine. Try their supplement for period pain and daily supplement for hormonal balance and PMS prevention with code ENDOLIFE to get 20% off your first order. Show Notes Website: www.amikapadia.com Teachable course for practitioners: https://drkapadia.teachable.com/p/a-minimalist-s-approach-to-mold-related-illness-and-small-intestinal-fungal-overgrowth-sifo Teachable course for patients: https://drkapadia.teachable.com/p/sifo-in-integrative-course-for-patient-education

Eat Train Prosper
November Life / Training Updates | #ETP44

Eat Train Prosper

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 46:10


Episode 44 consists of updates from the both of us, as well as the many side chats these inspire. Autoregulating intensity and managing fatigue during pursuit of strength. Psychological preparation in low rep heavy sets vs. moderate load higher rep sets. Dietary “normalcy” and wanting nothing to do with it. And lastly why you want to schedule your DEXA Scan before your blood work and not after. Thanks for listening! ✌️Nutrition Coaching with Aaron ⬇️https://strakernutritionco.com/metabolic-performance-protocolDone For You Client Check-In System for Online Coaches ⬇️https://strakernutritionco.com/macronutrient-reporting-check-in-template/Follow Bryan's Evolved Training Systems Programming ⬇️https://evolvedtrainingsystems.comFind Us on Social Media  ⬇️Instagram: @Eat.Train.ProsperInstagram: @bryanboorsteinInstagram: @aaron_strakerYouTube: EAT TRAIN PROSPER PODCAST

Making Pittsburgh Healthy
#89 Underlying Cause of Digestive Disorders: Dr. Norm Robillard

Making Pittsburgh Healthy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 59:11


Norm Robillard, Ph.D., Founder of the Digestive Health Institute, is a strong advocate of drug-and-antibiotic-free dietary and integrative solutions for functional gastrointestinal disorders and various forms of gut dysbiosis. He turned his own suffering from GERD and IBS into a mission to create the drug-and-antibiotic free Fast Tract Diet 3 pillar approach for acid reflux, LPR (Laryngopharyngeal reflux), IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome), SIBO (Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth), and related health conditions: 1. Dietary modification 2. Identifying and addressing underlying causes that are specific to the individual, including supplementation 3. Gut-friendly behaviors and practices. The Fast Tract Diet (FTD) was presented at Digestive Disease Week (https://ddw.org/) to give gastroenterologists a science-based treatment option for SIBO and related conditions. FTD is currently in the clinic for the 2nd clinical study. In addition, his award-winning Fast Tract Diet mobile app and Fast Tract Digestion book series make it easy to try the Fast Tract Diet. Connect with Dr. Robillard: https://digestivehealthinstitute.org/contact-us/ Fast Tract Diet Resource Guide: https://digestivehealthinstitute.org/fast-tract-diet-resource-guide.pdf Connect with Dr. Aaron Tressler: www.in8life.com Facebook & Instagram: @in8life

All Home Care Matters
How to Prevent and Detect Malnutrition in the Elderly (Mini-Series Part 3)

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 14:25


Today is our last installment of our mini-series on Seniors and Nutrition and to finish the series we will be talking about how to prevent and detect malnutrition in the elderly. First, we will discuss what malnutrition is and what it looks like in older adults. Then, we'll cover some of the factors that contribute to malnutrition. Finally, we'll end with ways you can help your loved one avoid poor nutrition, and in turn, malnutrition. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   Good nutrition is important for everyone, regardless of age, but is especially important for older adults. According to the World Health Organization, malnutrition refers to deficiencies, excesses or imbalances in a person's intake of energy and/or nutrients. The term malnutrition covers 2 broad groups of conditions, undernutrition and overweight, obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer.   Undernutrition includes stunting, which is low height for age, wasting, which is low weight for height, underweight, which is low weight for age, and micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies, which are a lack of important vitamins and minerals.   Approximately 2.4 billion adults worldwide are experiencing malnutrition, with 1.9 billion being overweight and 462 million being underweight. In some cases, people may be overweight and also exhibiting micronutrient deficiencies or may be underweight and have diabetes. Because there are many types of malnutrition, it can be hard to spot if your loved one is experiencing a form of malnutrition or not.   But left unchecked, malnutrition can cause a host of other issues. According to the Mayo Clinic, malnutrition in older adults can cause them to have a weakened immune system, which increases the risk of infections. It also can cause poor wound healing, muscle weakness and decreased bone mass, which can lead to falls and fractures, a higher risk of hospitalization, and an increased risk of death.   The Alliance for Aging Research has created a pocket film that covers who is at risk for malnutrition, the debilitating impact it can have on older adults, tips for identifying the condition, and how it can be treated and prevented. We're covering some of the key points of the video, but if you would like to watch the full thing, you can find the link to it in our show notes for today's episode.   According to the Alliance for Aging Research, Malnutrition can happen to anyone, but older adults are particularly at risk, as they are more likely to have chronic conditions that put them at risk for malnutrition. Some illnesses and diseases, like cancer and Alzheimer's, can change an older adult's appetite and metabolism and they can also require dietary restrictions that can make eating difficult.   When we picture malnutrition, we often picture starving children in third world countries or even the animals on the ASPCA commercials, but malnutrition is everywhere and far more common than we think. Malnutrition doesn't always look like someone is starving. Actually, most malnutrition cases, at least in the US, tend to look like the opposite. What's even more concerning about malnutrition, it can be impossible to see until it's too late.   Older adults often experience illnesses, diseases, or accidents that require them to be hospitalized or require them to be in a long-term care facility, both of which lead to a higher risk of malnutrition. As we age, our bodies go through changes that also can lead towards malnutrition, which is another reason that older adults are at a higher risk.   As we get older, our sense of smell and taste weakens, and things that we once enjoyed may not taste as good as they once did. Our digestive system can also slow with age, and take longer to digest meals, making us feel fuller throughout the day, but leave us lacking essential calories and nutrients. As we get older, our bodies may not be able to absorb nutrients as well, either. So, your loved one may be eating the same foods that once brought them a lot of energy, but now doesn't have the same effects.   According to the American Society for Prenatal and Enteral Nutrition, or ASPEN, malnutrition in seniors often mirrors the signs of aging. Unplanned weight loss, feeling weak or tired, loss of appetite, swelling or fluid accumulation, and being able to eat only in small amounts are all signs that your loved one is malnourished, but they are also signs of aging. If you suspect your loved one may be malnourished, talk to their doctor immediately so they can get the calories and nutrients their body needs. Now that you know what malnutrition is and what it can look like in older adults, let's move on to factors that contribute to malnutrition.   Cognitive diseases like Alzheimer's can make it difficult for your loved one to remember to eat. Mobility issues can also make it more difficult for your loved one to shop for their groceries, cook their own meals, and eat on their own. Some treatments and medications can also require dietary restrictions and cause your loved one to have a loss of appetite, leading them to become malnourished.   According to ASPEN, the causes of malnutrition in older adults are a complex blend of physical, social, and psychological issues — from the loss of appetite due to depression to the inability to get to the store for groceries. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of malnourished older adults is critical. If it goes on undetected for too long, irreversible damage and even death can occur.   Mayo Clinic lists several factors that contribute to malnutrition in older adults. Normal age-related changes in taste, smell and appetite generally decline with age, making it more difficult to enjoy eating and keep regular eating habits. Disease-related inflammation and illnesses can contribute to declines in appetite and changes in how the body processes nutrients. Impairment in ability to eat, like difficulty chewing or swallowing, poor dental health, or limited ability in handling tableware can contribute to malnutrition. Behavioral or memory problems from Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia can result in forgetting to eat, not buying groceries or other irregular food habits.   Some medications can affect appetite or the ability to absorb nutrients. Dietary restrictions for managing medical conditions — such as limits on salt, fat or sugar — might also contribute to inadequate eating. Older adults may have trouble affording groceries, especially if they're taking expensive medications. The lack of socialization can also cause malnutrition.   Older adults who eat alone might not enjoy meals as before and lose interest in cooking and eating. Adults with limited mobility may not have access to food or the right types of food. Grief, loneliness, failing health, lack of mobility and other factors might contribute to depression — causing loss of appetite. Older adults that suffer from Alcoholism are also at a higher risk of malnutrition, in addition to numerous other health problems. Too much alcohol can interfere with the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Misuse of alcohol may also result in poor eating habits and poor decisions about nutrition.   There are several factors that can contribute to malnutrition, as you have just seen, but the list goes on and on. Knowing some of these factors to look out for can make malnutrition easier to spot in your loved one. And it is important to know that just because they are eating, does not mean they are eating well or eating enough. If your loved one seems to be eating regularly, but is losing weight or experiencing low energy levels, they may have a nutrient deficiency and need to be on a special diet, so it is important that you talk to their doctor about any changes in their behavior, and their diet, that you notice, especially if your loved one is unable to notice it on their own.   Now that we have discussed what malnutrition is, what it looks like in older adults, and the factors that contribute to malnutrition, we can move on to our final section, how to help your elderly loved one avoid poor nutrition.   Mayo Clinic says that as a caregiver or adult child of an older adult, you can take steps to monitor nutritional health, watch for weight loss and address risk factors of malnutrition. You can monitor your loved one's weight by checking their weight at home and keeping a weekly record of it. You can also do a visual check of how their clothes fit, as it can indicate weight loss, as well.   Observing their habits is another good way to keep track of their nutrition. You can spend mealtimes together at home — or during mealtime in a hospital or care facility — to observe eating habits and note what kinds of food are eaten and how much. Keeping a record of all medications, the reason for each medication, dosages, treatment schedules and possible side effects can also help your loved one avoid poor nutrition. As we age, many people need medication every day, and those medications can come with side effects that involve loss of appetite or other things that make eating more difficult. When consulting a doctor about poor nutrition, having all of this information on hand can help them determine if your loved one is malnourished faster, resulting in faster treatment that could potentially save their life.   Helping your loved one plan healthy meals or preparing meals ahead of time for them can help ensure that they have access to the nutrients they need. Helping them prepare a shopping list or shopping together can also help them make sure that they always have the items they need to make healthy choices at mealtimes.   There are many agencies and organizations that exist just to ensure that seniors have access to nutritional meals. Contact your local service agencies that provide at-home meal deliveries, in-home visits from nurses or dieticians, access to food pantries, or other nutrition services to see what help your loved one can be receiving. The local Area Agency on Aging or a county social worker can provide more information about services in your area.   If your loved one lives alone and is having trouble eating, they may benefit from social interactions during meals. You could try dropping by during mealtime or invite your loved one to your home for an occasional meal. Going out to eat at a restaurant can be a special treat for them, and they can use their senior discounts.   Lastly, daily exercise — even if it's light — can stimulate appetite and strengthen bones and muscles. Encourage your loved one to go on walks if they are able to. Not only can it help stimulate their appetite, but it can help improve their mood. If they are suffering from depression, even a slight mood improvement can increase their appetite, as well.   If your loved one needs help improving their nutrition, there are a few things you can do. Before starting anything new, always make sure you discuss the change with their doctor first. When planning meals for your loved, make sure you are including a variety of nutrient-rich foods. A good rule of thumb is to include the rainbow on their plate. Really, all that means is make sure you are including a variety of colored foods, as they all contain different nutrients.   Using different herbs and spiced to add flavor to meals can help your loved one improve their interest in eating. Experimenting with these things can help your loved one find a new favorite and cause them to be excited for their next meal.   If eating on their own is not enough, you can use supplemental nutrition drinks to help with calorie intake and you can add things like egg whites or whey powder to meals to increase proteins without adding saturated fats.   Observing your loved one during mealtimes is the best way for you to prevent and detect malnutrition in your loved one. Actually, being able to see what they eat and don't eat and being able to witness any problems they have with eating can help you determine if your loved one has any problems that their doctor should be aware of. If you notice they are coughing a lot when they are eating and having trouble swallowing, they may have a medical condition that is causing that that if their doctor was aware of, could be fixed.   Knowing your loved one's eating habits can also help when shopping or cooking. If your loved one is unable to go to the store or cook their own meals, know what they like and what they are able to eat can help ensure that they eat more, or less if that is the problem. Now, you don't want to make your loved one feel like they have no control over their eating time or like they have lost their independence. We are not suggesting that you stand over them at mealtime. When you take them out to dinner or come visit for lunch, just be aware while you are with them and take note of their habits. It may be useful in the future, and it may not, but it is always better to be safe than sorry.   If your loved one is having difficulty eating or you notice any changes in their diet or weight, even if you don't think they are malnourished, talk to their doctor. Malnutrition often goes undetected and undiagnosed until it is too late, so if you have any suspicions, it is always better to tell your doctor sooner rather than later. You may also find you need the help of a nutritionist when figure out what your loved one should be and needs to be eating. Your doctor or your local senior center can give you resources and referrals for nutritionists in your area. Your local senior center may even have a nutritionist on staff that you can meet with.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form there where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please make sure to share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/caregivers/in-depth/senior-health/art-20044699   https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/malnutrition   https://www.agingresearch.org/campaign/malnutrition/   https://www.nutritioncare.org/Guidelines_and_Clinical_Resources/Spotting_Malnutrition_in_Seniors/      

The People's Pharmacy
Show 1279: Challenging Dietary Dogma on Weight Gain

The People's Pharmacy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 81:24


We hear a lot about the obesity epidemic in the United States and around the world. Scientists acknowledge that this has occurred too rapidly to be explained by changes in genetics. Instead, nutrition scientists often turn to the energy balance model: people eating more calories than they expend. However, this dietary dogma on weight gain […]

In Depth With Graham Bensinger
Forward Progress with Novak Djokovic: Dietary changes improved my game

In Depth With Graham Bensinger

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 5:45


In this week's positive-thinking short, tennis great Novak Djokovic shares how a doctor helped him bounce back from a career low point and details the dietary changes that drastically improved his performance on the court.

Eat to Live
Sugar, sugar, and more sugar

Eat to Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 38:42


ReferencesKanoski SE, Davidson TL. Western diet consumption and cognitive impairment: links to hippocampal dysfunction and obesity. Physiol Behav 2011, 103:59-68.Kroner Z. The relationship between Alzheimer's disease and diabetes: Type 3 diabetes? Altern Med Rev 2009, 14:373-379.Kodl CT, Seaquist ER. Cognitive dysfunction and diabetes mellitus. Endocr Rev 2008, 29:494-511.Starr VL, Convit A. Diabetes, sugar-coated but harmful to the brain. Curr Opin Pharmacol 2007, 7:638-642.Ye X, Gao X, Scott T, Tucker KL. Habitual sugar intake and cognitive function among middle-aged and older Puerto Ricans without diabetes. Br J Nutr 2011, 106:1423-1432.Knuppel A, Shipley MJ, Llewellyn CH, Brunner EJ. Sugar intake from sweet food and beverages, common mental disorder and depression: prospective findings from the Whitehall II study. Sci Rep 2017, 7:6287.Beilharz JE, Maniam J, Morris MJ. Diet-Induced Cognitive Deficits: The Role of Fat and Sugar, Potential Mechanisms and Nutritional Interventions. Nutrients 2015, 7:6719-6738.Sanchez-Villegas A, Toledo E, de Irala J, et al. Fast-food and commercial baked goods consumption and the risk of depression. Public Health Nutr 2012, 15:424-432.Chang SC, Cassidy A, Willett WC, et al. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women. Am J Clin Nutr 2016, 104:704-714.Molendijk M, Molero P, Ortuno Sanchez-Pedreno F, et al. Diet quality and depression risk: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies. J Affect Disord 2018, 226:346-354.Beezhold BL, Johnston CS, Daigle DR. Vegetarian diets are associated with healthy mood states: a cross-sectional study in Seventh Day Adventist adults. Nutrition Journal 2010, 9:26.Blanchflower DG, Oswald AJ, Stewart-Brown S. Is Psychological Well-Being Linked to the Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables? Social Indicators Research 2012.Beezhold BL, Johnston CS. Restriction of meat, fish, and poultry in omnivores improves mood: A pilot randomized controlled trial. Nutr J 2012, 11:9.Francis HM, Stevenson RJ, Chambers JR, et al. A brief diet intervention can reduce symptoms of depression in young adults - A randomised controlled trial. PLoS One 2019, 14:e0222768.Firth J, Marx W, Dash S, et al. The Effects of Dietary Improvement on Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Psychosom Med 2019, 81:265-280.Spencer SJ, Korosi A, Laye S, et al. Food for thought: how nutrition impacts cognition and emotion. NPJ Sci Food 2017, 1:7.Lamport DJ, Saunders C, Butler LT, Spencer JP. Fruits, vegetables, 100% juices, and cognitive function. Nutr Rev 2014, 72:774-789.Devore EE, Kang JH, Breteler MM, Grodstein F. Dietary intakes of berries and flavonoids in relation to cognitive decline. Ann Neurol 2012.O'Brien J, Okereke O, Devore E, et al. Long-term intake of nuts in relation to cognitive function in older women. J Nutr Health Aging 2014, 18:496-502.Avena NM, Gold JA, Kroll C, Gold MS. Further developments in the neurobiology of food and addiction: update on the state of the science. Nutrition 2012, 28:341-343.Fortuna JL. The obesity epidemic and food addiction: clinical similarities to drug dependence. J Psychoactive Drugs 2012, 44:56-63.Gearhardt AN, Yokum S, Orr PT, et al. Neural Correlates of Food Addiction. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2011.Taylor VH, Curtis CM, Davis C. The obesity epidemic: the role of addiction. CMAJ 2010, 182:327-328.Volkow ND, Wang GJ, Fowler JS, et al. Food and drug reward: overlapping circuits in human obesity and addiction. Curr Top Behav Neurosci 2012, 11:1-24.Moreira PI. Alzheimer's disease and diabetes: an integrative view of the role of mitochondria, oxidative stress, and insulin. J Alzheimers Dis 2012, 30 Suppl 2:S199-215.Sommerfield AJ, Deary IJ, Frier BM. Acute hyperglycemia alters mood state and impairs cognitive performance in people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2004, 27:2335-2340.Cox DJ, Kovatchev BP, Gonder-Frederick LA, et al. Relationships between hyperglycemia and cognitive performance among adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2005, 28:71-77.Schopf V, Fischmeister FP, Windischberger C, et al. Effects of individual glucose levels on the neuronal correlates of emotions. Front Hum Neurosci 2013, 7:212.Barnard ND, Bunner AE, Agarwal U. Saturated and trans fats and dementia: a systematic review. Neurobiol Aging 2014, 35 Suppl 2:S65-73.Andre P, Laugerette F, Feart C. Metabolic Endotoxemia: A Potential Underlying Mechanism of the Relationship between Dietary Fat Intake and Risk for Cognitive Impairments in Humans? Nutrients 2019, 11.Erridge C. The capacity of foodstuffs to induce innate immune activation of human monocytes in vitro is dependent on food content of stimulants of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4. Br J Nutr 2011, 105:15-23.Erridge C, Attina T, Spickett CM, Webb DJ. A high-fat meal induces low-grade endotoxemia: evidence of a novel mechanism of postprandial inflammation. Am J Clin Nutr 2007, 86:1286-1292.Madison AA, Belury MA, Andridge R, et al. Afternoon distraction: a high-saturated-fat meal and endotoxemia impact postmeal attention in a randomized crossover trial. Am J Clin Nutr 2020.

The Ultimate Health Podcast
439: Eat This Way to Reduce Inflammation & Improve Your Chronic Health Condition | Jessica Murnane

The Ultimate Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 80:08


Jessica Murnane (IG: @jessicamurnane) is an author, speaker, and creative consultant. She has written two books - the cookbook One Part Plant: A Simple Guide To Eating Real One Meal At A Time and Know Your Endo: An Empowering Guide To Health + Hope With Endometriosis. Jessica is a sought-after speaker and host that's spoken at Apple, SXSW, and Wanderlust, among others. She has contributed to or appeared in several magazines and websites including Bon Appétit, Goop, Shape Magazine, and mindbodygreen. In this episode, we discuss: What is endometriosis (endo)? Jessica's long road to getting a diagnosis Bringing awareness to people suffering with endo The mental health aspect of dealing with a chronic illness Pushing through the pain Understanding genetic factors vs. lifestyle factors for endo The conventional medicine approach to endo Birth control pills can negatively affect mental health How endo impacts all aspects of life & relationships Tips for supporting your partner with their endo Dietary & lifestyle changes can reduce inflammation Seeing countless doctors over the years for various symptoms Transitioning to a plant-based diet for healing Feeling better physically & mentally after years of suffering Having an open mind to wellness practices Connecting joy with movement Foam rolling is an incredible tool for people with chronic pain Rebounders are great for your lymphatic system Your endo diet is unique to you How to get your family & friends to embrace your dietary changes Jessica's thoughts on supplements & endo Using cannabis for chronic pain The 2 different types of surgery for endometriosis Mindful walking is a stress management tool Preparing for menopause Practicing self-compassion helps you calm down The reality of living with endo Endometriosis awareness is so critical Show sponsors: Paleovalley

The Nutrition Couch
26. Sugar: Is it Really Bad for Us? The Dietary and Nutritional Implications of Bariatric Surgery; Road Testing Veggie Rice and Protein Balls: Are They Healthy?

The Nutrition Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 41:45


From Susie and Leanne on The Nutrition Couch this episode: We discuss Sugar: whether it be honey, golden syrup, glucose, rice malt or treacle. Is it really bad for us, are some types better than others and how much is too much each day? Our 'Client Case Study' is on bariatric surgery: we talk the dietary impact and nutritional implications to be aware of if you have had or are considering bariatric surgery; Our 'Product Review of the Week' is on a new veggie rice we can't get enough of; And finally, our 'Listener Question of the Week' is all about protein balls: are they healthy, can we eat them daily and how do you choose a good one?   So sit back, relax and enjoy this week's episode!  Don't Miss an Episode   Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast so you never miss an episode and follow us on social media @the_nutrition_couch_podcast to ask us questions & see our food product reviews.  It would mean the world to us if you could leave us a 5 star review in the purple Apple podcast app (scroll to the bottom of the app to find the ratings and reviews) as this really helps push up higher in the charts to expose our podcast to more ears.  Please follow Susie on her Instagram & Facebook and Leanne on her Instagram, TikTok and the Leanne Ward Nutrition Podcast. 

UK Low Carb
Richard Morris on The BIG FAT Conversation LIVE!

UK Low Carb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 33:04


All Home Care Matters
Healthy Eating for Seniors (Mini-Series Part 2)

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 14:34


Today's episode is the second installment of our Nutritional Health for Seniors three-part mini-series. Our last episode covered tips for dementia and mealtime. Today we are talking about healthy eating, specifically for seniors. First, we will be talking about what a well-balanced diet looks like. Then, we will go over how your needs and habits change and adapt with age. Finally, we will end with maintaining a healthy diet with age. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   A well-balanced diet is something that most nutritionists and doctors will recommend for everyone, but even more so for older adults. Eating the right amounts of foods that contain the nutrients we need can help us have the energy we need for the day, help our bodies work better longer, and can help with necessary weight loss or weight gain. Oftentimes as we age, our eating habits change. Like we discussed last episode, we may not enjoy the foods we once did as we get older and might start to pay less attention to the amount of food and the types of food we are consuming. It is important for older adults to maintain a health well-balanced diet so they can give their bodies what they need to thrive.   As we age, we are not able to bounce back as much as we were when we were younger. Our metabolisms slow, and our digestive systems change. Sometimes, the foods we used to eat on a regular basis makes us sick or is no longer satisfying. When we start to notice any of these changes, we should reevaluate our eating habits and see what changes we should be making.   The US Department of Agriculture has created My Plate as a tool to help make sure you are getting the nutrients you need. You can help your loved one take the My Plate quiz to see what areas of their diet they may be lacking in. After they take the quiz, you can use the My Plate app to help them set-up an account and keep track of their diet information. You can find the quiz and even more information on eating healthy at www dot My Plate dot gov. You can also find the link in our show notes for today's episode.   According to Healthline, one in four older Americans has poor nutrition. Having poor nutrition, as we talked about in our mini-series, puts you at risk of becoming overweight or underweight and it can weaken your muscles and bones. It also leaves you vulnerable to disease. Luckily, there is a relatively easy fix for poor nutrition. A well-balanced diet can help you maintain a healthy weight, stay energized, and get the nutrients you need, all while lowering your risk of developing chronic health conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes.   You may remember the food pyramid from when you were in school, but now My Plate has taken place of the food pyramid. My Plate states that as we age, healthy eating can make a difference in our health, help to improve how we feel, and encourage a sense of well-being. A well-balanced diet can literally change the way you feel how your body works.   Every person's My Plate is tailored to them and depends on many things, but generally speaking, women over 60 should be eating one and a half to two cups of fruits a day, two to three cups of vegetables, five to seven ounces of grains, five to six ounces of protein, and three cups of dairy every day. Men over 60 should be eating two cups of fruit, two and a half to three and a half cups of vegetables, six to nine ounces of grains, five and half to six and half ounces of protein, and three cups of dairy a day. This is just a general idea of what older adults should be eating, but your doctor or a nutritionist can help you make a plan that is right for you.   Now that you know what makes a well-balanced diet, let's move on to how our nutritional needs and habits can change with age.   According to Healthline, as you get older, your nutritional needs, appetite, and food habits can change in several ways. The amount of calories we need to fuel our bodies for the day will most likely decrease with age and our appetite will most likely diminish, as well. Oftentimes, our sense of smell and taste weaken with age, which can cause a loss of appetite.   Medical conditions worsen or develop with time and age and can impact our appetites, our digestive systems, and cause us to have a restrictive or limited diet. Along with medical conditions comes medication. Many medications can cause a loss of appetite or cause symptoms that make eating difficult, like dry mouth, and some medications require you to not eat certain types of foods while taking them.   Oral problems can also arise with age. Many people need dentures as they get older, and they may make eating more difficult for some, especially if they don't fit properly or you are just getting used to them.   With advanced age comes a weakened immune system. A weakened immune system makes it easier for us to catch illnesses, including food poisoning and other food-related illnesses. It is important to ensure your food doesn't have any odors or discoloration before you use it. It is also a good idea to stick to the expiration or freshness guaranteed date. While the food may look normal, mold spores and bacteria can be invisible to the eye and cause you to become sick. Packaged and canned food items and frozen foods last longer than fresh items and can be safer to store for longer periods of time. They are also good to have on hand, especially if you have difficulties getting to or around the grocery store.   Losing a loved one can also impact your daily habits and eating patterns. Healthline says you may feel depressed, which can lead to lower appetite. If your family member did most of the cooking, you might not know how to prepare food for yourself, and some people simply choose not to eat, rather than cook a meal for themselves.   If you're finding it difficult to prepare food for yourself, talk to a family member, trusted friend, or your doctor. If you notice that your loved one isn't preparing foods or eating, try to bring them meals or invite them out to dinner. There are also local agencies, like Meals on Wheels, that can help get meals to seniors that they don't have to prepare. Talk to your local senior center to see what programs are available in your area.   Healthy foods can be expensive, but they are a necessity, especially as we get older. According to the National Council on Aging, The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) can help you afford healthy food when you need it. Over 4 million older Americans use SNAP to buy food, and the average senior receives $113 each month. You can visit Benefits Check Up dot org back slash get SNAP to see if you qualify for the program.   Now that you know how some of our nutritional needs and habits can change as we age, let's move on to our final section for today, maintaining a healthy diet with age.   To maintain a healthy diet as we age, we should focus on nutrient-dense foods, such as fruits and vegetables, beans and lentils, nuts and seeds, whole grains, low-fat dairy and lean proteins. Since we normally require less calories as we age, it is important to make sure you are eating foods from these groups, since less calories usually means you are eating less. When you eat less food, the food you eat matters even more than it did before.   You should also make sure you are eating enough fiber. Healthline says that fiber is essential for a healthy digestive system. Good sources of fiber include fruits and vegetables, beans and lentils, nuts and seeds, oats and oat bran, and whole grains. Eating foods rich in fiber can help you avoid constipation and other digestive issues. If you have trouble eating foods high in fiber, talk to your doctor about taking a fiber supplement instead.   One trick to maintaining a healthy diet is to shop for convenience. Frozen or low-sodium canned vegetables and frozen unsweetened fruit or low-sugar canned fruit can be easier to prep than whole fruits and vegetables and they last longer. Buying precooked grilled turkey or rotisserie chickens can save you time when preparing meals and make it easier to prepare, especially if you are cooking just for yourself. Low-sodium canned soup or stews make excellent and quick meals with zero work. And pop tops make them easier to open if you have arthritis. Bagged salad mixes and precut veggies can be a great addition to any meal and they already come prewashed, so all you have to do is throw them on a plate or into the pan and dinner is done. Instant oatmeal makes a simple and quick healthy breakfast, and you can add honey, peanut butter, or fruits on top to make it more filling and fun. Steamer bags of veggies in either the produce or freezer sections of the grocery store can make great side dishes that only take a few minutes in the microwave, or you can throw on some rotisserie chicken and instant rice for a complete meal that took you no time at all.   These convenience foods can make mealtimes less stressful, but make sure you always check the nutritional information before you buy anything. Prepackaged foods often contain higher levels of sugar, fats, and salt, so watch out for products that have high levels of those listed.   Staying hydrated is another important part of maintaining a healthy diet. Make sure you are consistently drinking water throughout the day. If you know that your loved one doesn't drink as much water as they should throughout the day, you can also try giving them tea and coffee, low-sugar fruit juices, soups, or fruits and vegetables with high water content, like watermelon and celery. You can make fruit pops with their favorite fruits and juice during the hot months, too. It's a nice treat for them and keeps them hydrated.   Just like we talked about last episode, making mealtime a social event can help make sure your loved one is maintaining a healthy diet. Eating with your loved one can help make mealtimes enjoyable for them again, especially if they have recently lost a loved one in their life. Grief and depression can both suppress your loved one's appetite. Getting them out of their usual setting can sometimes help with depression. Taking them to their favorite restaurant or to somewhere new can be exciting and give your loved one something to look forward to. They can also use their senior discount when going out to eat. You can help them sign up for AARP to receive even more discounts if they haven't already. Visit AARP dot org to learn more about what their benefits and offers today.   If your loved one is struggling with depression and you don't know what to do anymore, contact their doctor. They may be able to prescribe medication that may help or may recommend therapy. Your local senior center may also have grief and depression programs or resources that may help.    As we get older, we should be limiting our salt intake and with less salt, some foods can taste pretty bland. Experimenting with herbs and spices can be a good way to bring flavor back to foods, without increasing the amount of salt. If your loved one enjoys gardening, you can bring them some kitchen herb pots so that they can grow their own herbs and spices. This is also a great way for them to enjoy a hobby they haven't been able to do if they have mobility issues.   Encouraging your loved one to maintain a healthy diet can help them more than anything else we have talked about this episode. Having a support system can make any lifestyle change easier, and that includes maintaining a healthy diet. With you by their side, your loved one is more likely to stick to any diet changes they make rather than if they are doing it all by themselves.   Make sure you are mindful of their dietary needs and restrictions whenever you have them over for dinner or go out to eat. Preparing foods they can eat is a good way to ensure that they are maintaining their diet and shows them that you care.   Regular exercise is also a part of a well-balance lifestyle. Going for walks, playing golf without a golf cart, and playing other games that require movement are all a great way to exercise, and are a good way for your loved one to get some much-needed social interaction. Exercise can also help build-up your loved one's appetite. If your loved one is having trouble with not feeling hungry, try getting them to go for a walk with you and see if they gain an appetite overtime. Just going for a walk every now and then most likely won't increase their appetite, but daily walks may.   Interested in learning even more about healthy eating for seniors? Visit our YouTube channel, where you can find our Nutritional and Dietary Support for Seniors playlist. So far, we've talked about healthy nutrition tips and kitchen safety tips for seniors. We are continuously adding to our playlist and updating it, so check back often!   If you or your loved one have questions about maintaining a healthy diet, contact their doctor or a nutritionist. They can give you an ample amount of resources and help you come up with a healthy eating plan. You should also check with your insurance provider. Many cover nutritional planning.   Thank you for listening to the second episode of our three-part mini-series, Nutritional Health for Seniors. Be on the lookout for the next installment in the series   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form there where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone is who could benefit from this episode and please make sure to share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.     Sources: https://www.healthline.com/health/healthy-eating-for-seniors   https://www.ncoa.org/article/healthy-eating-tips-for-seniors   https://www.myplate.gov/   https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/dietary-guidelines-and-myplate/healthy-eating-for-older-adults   https://aging.com/elderly-nutrition-101-10-foods-to-keep-you-healthy/   https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/sample-menus-healthy-eating-older-adults   https://www.myplate.gov/tip-sheet/healthy-eating-older-adults   https://www.myplate.gov/life-stages/older-adults   https://www.aarp.org/rewards/?intcmp=GLOBAL-HDR-LNK-CLK-AARP_REWARDS          

ACCEL Lite: Featured ACCEL Interviews on Exciting CV Research
ACCEL Lite: CardioNutrition - A Mediterranean Dietary Pattern

ACCEL Lite: Featured ACCEL Interviews on Exciting CV Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 11:24


This week we bring you a sample of the CardioNutrition program airing on ACC's CardiaCast podcast. Enjoy! The recent prevention guideline from the American College of Cardiology recommends that all adults should consume a healthy diet that emphasizes the intake of vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, lean vegetable or animal protein, and fish and minimizes the intake of trans fats, processed meats, refined carbohydrates, and sweetened beverages. Counseling and caloric restriction are recommended for achieving and maintaining weight loss in the overweight or obese. In this episode, Erin D. Michos, MD, MHS, FACC, FAHA, FASE, FASPC and Robert J. Ostfeld, MD, MSc, FACC discuss a Mediterranean Dietary Pattern. Key Takeaways: A Mediterranean dietary pattern includes vegetable, fruits, legumes, whole grains, fish, lean animal proteins and limits highly processed foods. Compared to a more typical Western dietary pattern, a Mediterranean dietary pattern is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes

LEVELS – Metabolic Insights
The Levels Dietary Philosophy

LEVELS – Metabolic Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:57


10 Points on how Levels thinks about nutrition and health—and why we believe foods and diets are neither good nor bad Author: The Levels Team Link to article: https://www.levelshealth.com/blog/the-levels-dietary-philosophy Become a Levels Member – levelshealth.com Learn about Metabolic Health – levelshealth.com/blog Follow Levels on Social – @Levels on Instagram and Twitter

Hunger Hunt Feast | Strategic Fitness
83. How I Make Insulin My Bitch... And You Can Too

Hunger Hunt Feast | Strategic Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 28:25


Welcome back to Hunger Hunt Feast! Today Zane shes his technique for making insulin serve him rather than fear it. Get glims into what Zane's weeks look like and what lifestyle choices every day to maintain optimal health. NOTES FROM ZANE: If you are working to reverse insulin resistance or lose 20 or more pounds, this is not for you yet 12-16 hour fasted state going into an intense workout. Post workout shake with banana and half a sweet potato on the side, i.e. quick digesting protein and about 50-70g of carbs. Shift back to whole food animal-based protein and fat. Dinner to dinner fast once a week. LINKS: Effects of Intermittent Fasting on Health, Aging and Disease https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmra1905136 Intermittent metabolic switching, neuroplasticity and brain health https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5913738/ Zane's Links: Get organic keto meals delivered to your door!! https://trifectanutrition.llbyf9.net/zane ReLyte Electrolytes by Redmond Real Salt https://shop.redmond.life?afmc=Zane Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zanegriggsfitness   QUICK EPISODE SUMMARY: The most vilified components of our bodies The effects of elevated insulin levels Clarity around LDL  The importance of vitamin D and cholesterol LDL vs. VLDL   Dietary factors that lead to small LDL particles The truth about fat and heart disease A healthy number of triglycerides What has changed over the last 120 years?

Fuel. Move. Recover. A performance and wellness podcast.

Summary. In this Fuel Week episode, the women of FMR sit down to talk about the fueling for and management of your menstrual cycle. Enjoy!Topics covered. The ladies discuss their fall activities. The best type of Halloween costume. The importance of hormones. The relationship between your hormones and your menstrual cycle. The ladies share personal stories about their period health. The role of hormones on the menstrual cycle. Consequences of not having a period. The biological phases of the menstrual cycle. Dietary considerations. What do menstrual irregularities look like? How to deal with menstrual irregularities? And more.Ways to participate in FMR.Submit questions for FREE or for $1.Nominate and vote on future topics for $2.Gain free access to all the content we make (ebooks, recipes, Q&As, etc) for $5.Have your name/organization mentioned at the end of the show for $10.Each level includes the perks from the levels below the one you choose.Listen to the "Introducing FMR 2.0" episode for more details.Read more and sign-up on the Join tab of our website.Click on the link below to get 20% off your purchase of supplements that Lindsay recommends in the show. It is important for us to disclose that Lindsay does get a percentage from each sale made through this link. Lindsay's recommendations are independent of Wellevate, which is only a place to buy products. Wellevate does not influence her recommendations in any way. Only science, research, and clinical experience guide her recommendations.https://wellevate.me/lindsay-maloneClick here to go to our blog, learn more about us, or become a member.You can follow us on social media here:Alex on Twitter (@alex_uding)Ali on Instagram (@fullbelly.full.life)Lindsay on Twitter (@lindsaymalonerd) or Instagram (@lindsay.malone.rdn)Michele on Twitter (@micheleionno) or Instagram (@micheleionno)Please like our page on Facebook (@fuelmoverecover) or Instagram (@fuelmoverecover). Please, subscribe/rate/review the podcast wherever you listen, subscribe to our youtube channel, and share our stuff on your social media pages.Thanks to those who support us in making this a reality.

White Coat, Black Art on CBC Radio
Dietary aide Iain White: unsung hero of the pandemic

White Coat, Black Art on CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 26:43


Iatrophobia is a fear of doctors. Dr. Brian Goldman speaks with Barbara Old, a B.C. woman who had panic attacks just thinking about doctors, so she avoided them like the plague. Until one day she discovered a lump in her breast.

Best Horse Practices Podcast
Lynn Acton and Investigative Behavior

Best Horse Practices Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 27:56


Welcome to Episode 13 of Season Two and thank you so much for listening. As I talk into the mic from my Colorado home office, we're about a week away from the kickoff of the Best Horse Practices Summit in Lexington, Kentucky.  It's exciting and the days are chock full of tending to details: airport transportation for presenters, coffee for the Airbnb's for the presenters. Audio-video fine points. Table linens. Dietary restrictions for certain attendees. Power point reviews. Trade show set up. Suffice to say,  when it comes to skill sets, this is not my usual fare. It helps, though, that I have done it before and that I have people around me – volunteers, board members, and presenters – that I know and trust. It's a crazy time, but for the most part, I feel safe. That all has something to do with this episode. I couldn't be more pleased to produce this show which centers on Lynn Acton and investigative behavior as well as her new book, What Horses Really Want. I think you might agree that raising healthy, confident horses is a bit like raising healthy confident kids: Give them freedom and space to discover and experiment. Help them feel safe in new environments. Great interview! We thank Lucerne Farms and Pharm Aloe Equine for their sustaining sponsorship. Lucerne is a forage company based in Northern Maine. Forage is chopped hay. It's decidedly not grain and has been shown to be an excellent option when you can't have your horse on pasture. Pharm Aloe offers aloe pellets and gel and other products to support horses' GI health, immune system, and other processes. They have profiles of the quality of their products online. We would like thank Redmond Equine, Kate's Real Food (which, by the way, was recently voted number one among energy bars by Outdoor Gear Lab) and Patagonia WorkWear for their continued support. WorkWear has a new ranch jacket. It's made of the same hemp-polyester blend as the popular barn coat, but is cropped short and is unlined. Jec and I have been trying it out and here are some features we love: it has a big zipper that you can use without taking off your gloves. It has lots of pockets that are baling twine and cell phone friendly. It is cut trimly and because of the hemp/poly blend, it's soft and requires no break in.  Check it out here.  

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi
5 Easy Ways to GET RID OF CELLULITE FOR GOOD! - Ben Azadi KKP: 325

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 11:16


Discover what causes cellulite and how to get rid of cellulite naturally and FAST! Whether you have cellulite on your butt, thighs, hips and/or stomach, these 5 methods will be HIGHLY effective for cellulite removal. Related Videos: How to Get Rid of Loose Flabby Skin after Weight Loss (5 Simple Steps): https://youtu.be/E-nwfyVawQg Intermittent Fasting Plan for Weight Loss: https://youtu.be/d_cqZ0QAaGc Order Keto Flex: http://www.ketoflexbook.com -------------------------------------------------------- / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  PureForm Omega Plant Based Oils (Best Alternative to Fish Oil): http://www.purelifescience.com Use ben4 for $4.00 off. Upgraded Formulas Hair Mineral Deficiency Analysis & Supplements: http://www.upgradedformulas.com Use BEN10 at checkout for 10% off your order.  Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.   Studies & References: Cellulite's aetiology: a review (De la Casa et al. 2012) https://sci-hub.se/10.1111/j.1468-3083.2012.04622.x The pathogenesis of cellulite: a new concept (Pugliese 2007) https://sci-hub.se/10.1111/j.1473-2165.2007.00312.x Cellulite: a review of its physiology and treatment (Avram 2004) https://sci-hub.se/10.1080/14764170410003057 The disease of cellulite (Draelos 2005)  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1473-2165.2005.00194.x Fasting and its impact on skin anatomy, physiology, and physiopathology: a comprehensive review of the literature (Bragazzi et al. 2019) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6413166/ Caloric restriction decreases age-dependent accumulation of the glycoxidation products, nisin-(carboxymethyl)lysine and pentosidine, in rat skin collagen (Cefalu et al. 1995) https://sci-hub.se/10.1093/gerona/50a.6.b337 Animal study; caloric restriction resulted in rats resulted in a significant decrease of glycation of hemoglobin, plasma proteins, and skin collagen (skin aging is characterized by decreased collagen levels) Caloric restriction promotes structural and metabolic changes in the skin (Forni et al. 2017) https://www.cell.com/fulltext/S2211-1247(17)31177-4 Animal study; caloric restriction has an impact on stem cells, metabolic processes, and thermoregulation in mice Autophagy and skin: More than skin deep: Autophagy is vital for skin barrier function (Sil et al. 2018) Not cellulite specific, but may be useful article for future topics or general skin health and fasting/autophagy Dietary supplementation with specific collagen peptides has body mass index-dependent beneficial effect on cellulite morphology (Schunck et al. 2015) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4685482/ Oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides has beneficial effects on human skin physiology: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. (Proksch et al. 2014) https://sci-hub.se/10.1159/000351376 Oral intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly improved skin elasticity (important marker of skin aging) Skin aging and elasticity in relation to cellulite: Skin Aging and Cellulite in Women (Lorencini et al. 2015) https://sci-hub.se/10.1007/978-3-642-27814-3_160-1 Tendency of cellulite to worsen with age and laxity (or loss of elasticity) as an aggravating factor Cellulite: a cosmetic or systemic issue? Contemporary views on the etiopathogenesis of cellulite (Tokarska et al. 2018) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6232550/ Adiponectin expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue is reduced in women with cellulite (Emanuele et al. 2011) https://sci-hub.se/10.1111/j.1365-4632.2010.04713.x More thorough explanation of adiponectin in relation to cellulite; levels of adiponectin in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the gluteal region (though not overall plasma levels) were reduced in women with cellulite Impaired secretion of adiponectin in subcutaneous fat may contribute to cellulite; adiponectin down-regulated by increased fat mass Other adiponectin articles: Improving adiponectin levels in individuals with diabetes and obesity: insights from Look AHEAD (Belalcazar et al. 2015) https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/8/1544 Improvement of adiponectin levels in both men and women occurred with weight loss and improved fitness Cellulite in menopause (Leszko 2014) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4520379/ Evaluation of the effects of caffeine in the microcirculation and edema on thighs and buttocks using the orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and clinical parameters (Lupi et al. 2007) https://sci-hub.se/10.1111/j.1473-2165.2007.00304.x Acute effects of coffee on skin blood flow and microvascular function (Tesselaar et al. 2017) http://liu.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1186169/FULLTEXT01.pdf Cellulite: nature and aetiopathogenesis (Terranova et al. 2006) https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1467-2494.2006.00316.x Cryolipolysis and skin tightening (Carruthers et al. 2014)  https://sci-hub.se/10.1097/DSS.0000000000000229  Improvement of cellulite for patients undergoing cryolipolysis (minimally invasive treatment) [Note: Perhaps reaching, but cold therapy (i.e. ice baths, cold showers, etc.) as a potential remedy?] Weight Loss: Effect of weight loss on cellulite: gynoid lypodystrophy (Smalls et al. 2006)  https://sci-hub.se/10.1097/01.prs.0000227629.94768.be For most study participants, weight loss resulted in an improvement of cellulite, however there was a bimodal distribution (some individuals experienced worsening of cellulite with weight loss) Cellulite reduction associated with significant reduction in % subcutaneous thigh fat Individuals who experienced worsened cellulite had significant increases in compliance (skin looseness) upon weight loss Algae: New trends for macroalgal natural products applications (Cikos et al. 2019) https://sci-hub.se/10.1080/14786419.2019.1644629  Brief section on anti-cellulite products discusses the potential of certain algal products to reduce the appearance of cellulite, improve lipolysis mechanisms, and stimulate collagen production // R E S O U R C E S My Favorite Collagen Protein Powder: https://bit.ly/3BK1Tbi My Favorite Collagen Supplement: https://amzn.to/3yardVB My Favorite Coffee: http://www.ketokampcoffee.com use ketokamp at checkout for 10% off. My Favorite DIM Supplement: https://bit.ly/3ztuv6G My Favorite Algae Supplement: https://bit.ly/3iNPxGq use ketokamp at checkout *Some Links Are Affiliates* // F O L L O W ▸ instagram | @thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2B1NXKW ▸ facebook | /thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2BVvvW6 ▸ twitter | @thebenazadi http://bit.ly/2USE0so ▸clubhouse | @thebenazadi Disclaimer: This podcast is for information purposes only. Statements and views expressed on this podcast are not medical advice. This podcast including Ben Azadi disclaim responsibility from any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. Opinions of guests are their own, and this podcast does not accept responsibility of statements made by guests. This podcast does not make any representations or warranties about guests qualifications or credibility. Individuals on this podcast may have a direct or non-direct interest in products or services referred to herein. If you think you have a medical problem, consult a licensed physician.

The Health Ranger Report
STOP eating these cooking oils if you want to survive SPIKE PROTEIN exposure

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 14:57


For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

Fuel Her Awesome: Food Freedom, Body Love, Intuitive Eating & Nutrition Coaching
47 || Can You Go To Happy Hour On Your Diet? A search for science and sustainability in popular diet trends

Fuel Her Awesome: Food Freedom, Body Love, Intuitive Eating & Nutrition Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 42:14


Does your diet allow you to go to happy hour?! What about enjoying your kid's birthday party? Or weekend getaways with friends?   Today we are on a search for science and sustainability in popular diet trends.    A lot of the time, food is more than just fuel, it is a way to connect with friends, family, and yourself! It's important to take these things into consideration when establishing your own relationship with food.  In this episode I am covering a framework that you can use to evaluate whatever diet it is that's trending to decide if it's something you actually want to do. I break down keto, intermittent fasting, detox and cleanses, and the vegan diet to see where they all fall on the sustainability spectrum. I also go over what actually happens to the body when we fall into yoyo dieting and how it may be more harmful to our health than carrying a few extra pounds.   Lots of science and fun nutrition facts coming your way!  For more in intermittent fasting be sure to check out this episode!  References: (1) Golden, N. H., Schneider, M., & Wood, C. (2016). Preventing Obesity and Eating Disorders in Adolescents. Pediatrics, 138(3). doi:10.1542/peds.2016-1649 (2) The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University. Food for Thought: Substance Abuse and Eating Disorders. The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) Columbia University; New York: 2003 (3)  Neumark-Sztainer, D. (2005). I'm, Like, SO Fat!. New York: Guilford (4) Golden, N. H., Schneider, M., & Wood, C. (2016). Preventing Obesity and Eating Disorders in Adolescents. Pediatrics, 138(3). doi:10.1542/peds.2016-1649 (5) Grodstein, F., Levine, R., Spencer, T., Colditz, G. A., &Stampfer, M. J. (1996). Three-year follow-up of participants in a commercial weight loss program: Can you keep it off? Archives of Internal Medicine 156(12), 1302. (6) Neumark-Sztainer D., Haines, J., Wall, M., & Eisenberg, M. ( 2007). Why does dieting predict weight gain in adolescents? Findings from project EAT-II: a 5-year longitudinal study. Journal of the American Dietetic Associatio, 107(3), 448-55 (7)Harvey K.L., Holcomb L. E., Kolwicz S. C. (2019). Ketogenic Diets and Exercise Performance. Nutrients. (11)2296. (8) Mattson M.P., Longo V.D., Harvie M. Impact of intermittent fasting on health and disease process. Aging ResRev. 2017 10 (39) 46-58.  (9) Cho et al., 2016 (10) Sainsbury et al., 2018 (11) Rynders CA et al, 2019  (12) Dr. Stacy Sims “Roar: How to Match Food and Fitness to You Female Physiology for Optimum Performance, Great Health, and a Strong, Lean Body For Life.” (2016). (13) Tantamango-Bartley Y, Jaceldo-Siegl K, Fan J, Fraser G. Vegetarian diets and the incidence of cancer in a low-risk population. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013;22(2):286-294. (14) Key TJ, Appleby PN, Crowe FL, Bradbury KE, Schmidt JA, Travis RC. Cancer in British vegetarians: updated analyses of 4998 incident cancers in a cohort of 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, 18,298 vegetarians, and 2246 vegans. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100(Supplement 1):378S-385S. (15) Hokin BD, Butler T. Cyanocobalamin (vitamin B-12) status in Seventh-day Adventist ministers in Australia. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;70(3 Suppl):576S-578S. (16) Bardone-Cone AM, Fitzsimmons-Craft EE, Harney MB, et al. The inter-relationships between vegetarianism and eating disorders among females. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012;112(8):1247–1252. (17)  Fuhrman J., Ferreri DM. Fueling the Vegetarian (Vegan) Athlete. Curr. Sports Med. Rep., Vol. 9, No. 4, pp. 233Y241 (18) “Detoxes” and “Cleanses” : What You Need to Know. (n.d.) Retrieved June 26, 2020 from https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/detoxes-and-cleanses-what-you-need-to-know (19) CPR Monthly: Examining Popular Detix Diets- Today's Dietitians. (n.d.). Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/1016p52.shtml (20) Publishing, H (n.d.) The dubious practice of detox. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from  https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-dubious-practice-of-detox (21)  Makkapati, S., D'Agati, V. D., & Balsam, L. (2018). "Green Smoothie Cleanse" Causing Acute Oxalate Nephropathy. American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation, 71(2), 281–286. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2017.08.002 (22) Jane E. Getting, PA-C., James R. Gregoire, MD (2018). Oxalate Nephropathy Due to ‘juicing': case report and review. The American Journal of Medicine. (23) Seidelmann SB., Claggett B., Cheng S., Henglin M., Shah A., Steffen LM., Folsom AR., Rimm EB,. Willett WC., Solomon SD. Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta- analysis. Lancet Pub Health. 2018; 3(9):e419-e428.

Hunger Hunt Feast | Strategic Fitness
82. The Role of Insulin and LDL in the Formation of Heart Disease

Hunger Hunt Feast | Strategic Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 38:52


Heart Disease is the number one killer of humans in modern history. The saddest part about this reality is these deaths are self-inflicted by lifestyle choices.  Listen in as Zane shares the role of insulin and LDL's in heart disease and what the doctors aren't explaining to you.  QUICK NOTES FROM ZANE: The prevalence of heart disease has increased over the last 100 years What changed to cause this Insulin and LDL are vital components of our health How insulin and LDL are corrupted leading to the formation of arterial plaques LINKS: Evidence from randomised controlled trials does not support current dietary fat guidelines: a systematic review and meta-analysis https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27547428/ LDL-C does not cause cardiovascular disease: a comprehensive review of the current literature https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17512433.2018.1519391 Saturated Fats and Health: A Reassessment and Proposal for Food-Based Recommendations: JACC State-of-the-Art Review https://www.jacc.org/doi/full/10.1016/j.jacc.2020.05.077 Low-Density Lipoprotein Size and Cardiovascular Disease: A Reappraisal https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/88/10/4525/2845681 Zane's Links: Get organic keto meals delivered to your door!! https://trifectanutrition.llbyf9.net/zane ReLyte Electrolytes by Redmond Real Salt https://shop.redmond.life?afmc=Zane Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zanegriggsfitness QUICK EPISODE SUMMARY The most vilified components of our bodies The effects of elevated insulin levels Clarity around LDL  The importance of vitamin D and cholesterol LDL vs. VLDL   Dietary factors that lead to small LDL particles The truth about fat and heart disease A healthy number of triglycerides What has changed over the last 120 years?

Cast and Spear: Weekly Fishing Tips and Advice
E200: Transition From Spearfishing To Underwater Videography/Living On A Boat

Cast and Spear: Weekly Fishing Tips and Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 7:51


Today we have Andre Rerekura (@andrererekuracreative), who's an ocean videographer out of Perth. He's put down the speargun and picked up the camera and has been protecting what he loves ever since. We cover: Transition from spearfishing to underwater videography Taking care of the environment Living on a boat Dietary options, don't need to kill to survive Seeing the world differently behind the camera vs the speargun Factory farming concerns Running circles around mates who eat meat as a plant based eater Check out more from Cast & Spear: Subscribe to the Cast & Spear Podcast Check out our Weekly Fishing Newsletter Watch our YouTube videos Follow our Instagram Watch our TikTok videos Like our Facebook Page

ACC CardiaCast
ACC CardiaCast: CardioNutrition—Why Findings From Prospective, Epidemiologic Cohort Studies are Important in Informing Dietary Recommendations

ACC CardiaCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 13:31


Much of our dietary evidence comes from non-randomized epidemiologic data. In this episode, Robert Ostfeld, MD, MSc, FACC, and Walter Willett, MD, DrPH, discuss why findings from prospective, epidemiologic cohort studies are important in informing dietary recommendations, and what dietary principles are healthful across multiple populations, including the following key takeaways: Personal and planetary health are equally important for our own well-being and for that of future generations; a healthy, predominantly plant-based diet can achieve both of these goals. Although sustainable diets are necessary for planetary health, they are not sufficient; improvements in agricultural production, reduction in food waste, and rapid conversion to green energy are all needed. For more, visit www.acc.org/CardioNutrition Subscribe to CardiaCast

Muscle For Life with Mike Matthews
How Does Menopause Affect Diet and Exercise?

Muscle For Life with Mike Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:46


I've churned through over 150,000 emails, social media comments and messages, and blog comments in the last 6 years. And that means I've fielded a ton of questions. As you can imagine, some questions pop up more often than others, and I thought it might be helpful to take a little time every month to choose a few and record and share my answers. So, in this round, I answer the following question: How does menopause affect fitness? How does it affect diet and training? What can you do to mitigate the effects of menopause? If you have a question you'd like me to answer, leave a comment below or if you want a faster response, send an email to mike@muscleforlife.com. Timestamps 4:02 - How does menopause affect fitness? 8:04 - What role do hormones play? 11:33 - What can women do to manage menopause? 13:49 - Dietary tips for menopausal women. 14:57 - Eat phytoestrogen-containing foods. 16:00 - Exercise and menopause. 19:40 - The importance of patience. Mentioned on the Show: Legion VIP One-on-One Coaching: https://buylegion.com/vip Muscle For Life: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08LDYT3PP/

Radio Naturopath
Radio Naturopath Episode 321: Dietary Fats and Your Health

Radio Naturopath

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 58:52


This week I talked about fats. Essential fatty acids, saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsatured, medium chain triglycerides. Certain fats are really good for your health, and certain fats really aren't. You need to eat healthy fats for cellular and body structure and to prevent inflammation. We talk about the different kinds of fats and where they're found […]

BIN Radio
Episode 82: How Upbringing Influences Dietary Habits

BIN Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 69:22


We welcome Sabrina, Margaux and Carly on to talk about the influences the people in our lives had on how we relate to food and eating. One of the things we deal with every day is helping people unlearn bad habits and poor relationships with food that they've picked up as children that have carried on into adulthood, and how to encourage and cultivate positive relationships with food and eating to those in our lives now.

Women Wired for Wellness hosted by Dr. Nisha Chellam
Type I Diabetes another way to handle it.

Women Wired for Wellness hosted by Dr. Nisha Chellam

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 54:01


Reverse Diabetes With Plant-based Vegan Diet Whenever we hear of disease, medicine is always ready as a cure. We know that particular medicine will tackle the problem at hand but what we miss out on is - what are the other direct effects of the same medicine. Medicines can never be the long-term solution. Diabetes is a very big problem in today's time. But here's a fact, you can reverse type 2 diabetes with a plant-based vegan diet. And here's another fact, when it comes to diet, there is no diet fits all. However, a type of diet can work wonders for you. The question is- are you willing to make the change? Are you ready to make the shift?  In this blog, we will discuss: WHAT IS TYPE 2 DIABETES? WHAT IS A VEGAN DIET? HOW DOES THE VEGAN DIET WORKS FOR DIABETICS? WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF A VEGAN DIET? HOW TO ENSURE THE SUCCESS OF A VEGAN DIET? KETO DIET AND ITS SIDE EFFECTS Before we dive into the blog and delve into all the information, first let us know about someone who has had Type 2 diabetes for a very long time but has been able to live a medication-free healthy life for the past eight and half years now, Marc Ramirez. He is a B.S. Kinesiology, is a TEDx presenter, motivational speaker, and certified Food for Life instructor with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM). Marc and his wife Kim run a non-profit called Chickpea and Bean, which helps all people achieve health through the healing power of plants. In 2011 Marc made a shift to a plant-based lifestyle and his health greatly improved. He reversed Type 2 diabetes, psoriasis, hypertension, erectile dysfunction, high cholesterol, obesity, frequent heartburn.  WHAT IS TYPE 2 DIABETES? Type 2 diabetes is often characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and a relative lack of insulin. It is a chronic condition that results in more than the required amount of sugar circulating in the bloodstream. In type 2 diabetes, there are two interrelated problems.   Your pancreas is not able to produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells) Hence, the cells respond poorly to insulin and take in less sugar  Managing type 2 diabetes is very much possible. By losing weight, eating well and exercising regularly you manage your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can lead to disorders of the circulatory, nervous and immune systems.  WHAT IS A VEGAN DIET?  A person who follows the diet of abstaining from the consumption of animal products is called a vegan and the philosophy is called veganism. There are multiple distinctions between Vegans. Dietary vegans, also known as "strict vegetarians" avoid consumption of meat, eggs, dairy products, and any other animal-derived substances. An ethical vegan, also known as a "moral vegetarian", not only follows a vegan diet but also extends the philosophy to the treatment of other humans, and opposes the use of animals for any purpose. "Environmental veganism", refers to the avoidance of animal products and opposes the industrial farming of animals as it is environmentally damaging and unsustainable. In simple terms, a Vegan diet is a diet exclusive of animal and dairy products and inclusive of only plant-based products. This means no cow milk, no eggs, no chicken, no meat, no cheese. A vegan diet is full of while fruits and vegetables along with legumes and nuts.    Vegans in the USA have been increasing at a very high rate. More and more people are shifting to a plant-based diet. People have realized that their diet plays the most important role in maintaining a healthy and problems free life.    If you follow a healthy vegan diet, you are less likely to get heart disease, certain cancers, obesity, hypertension, erectile dysfunction, cholesterol.    Studies have also shown that vegans are less likely to be overweight and tend to have a lower percentage of body fat. Thus, reducing the risk of other chronic diseases.   However, a vegan diet has proved to be very beneficial for those suffering from diabetes. Adopting a vegan diet plan will help you bring down your blood sugar levels.   HOW DOES THE VEGAN DIET WORKS FOR DIABETICS?   People with diabetes have a high risk of Cardiovascular disease, are usually overweight and have high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol. A vegan diet or plant-based diet helps fight the problem from the root cause and eliminate the chances of most chronic diseases. A vegan diet has less saturated fats and is high in fiber. It has high amounts of fruits and vegetables which are very useful for people with diabetes.  You must consult your dietician and doctor when you decide to shift to a vegan diet. They will ensure that all the key nutrients are present in your diet. A balanced, nutritious and whole-food diet is necessary for a person who is just making a shift in his diet.  Based on a lot of factors, from the type of diabetes you have to your physical activity level, sex, age, and others, your dietician and doctor will help you identify the ideal amount of carbs, proteins along with other vitamins, needed with each meal.   You can either make a complete shift and turn to a plant-based diet at once or can gradually increase the amount of plant-based meals, slowly eliminating animal products from your diet.   People with diabetes are suggested to keep the intake of carbs consistent throughout the day. Carbs have a direct effect on blood sugar levels than protein and fats. Therefore, the meals and snacks must be balanced with carbs, protein, and healthy fat. A plant-based diet might be a little challenging initially, but it is the best choice to bring down the blood sugar levels.   Listed below are examples of carbs, proteins, and fats that you can use to prepare meals and snacks if you're following a vegan diet for diabetes:   Carbs: whole grain flour (bread, pasta), rice, potatoes, oats, quinoa, fruit (fresh, frozen, or unsweetened canned), corn Proteins: soybeans and soybean products (tofu, tempeh), beans, lentils, peas, peanuts, tree nuts, nut butter, seeds, plant-based meat alternatives Fats: olive oil, avocado oil, avocado, nuts and seeds, coconut, plant-based spreads Many plant-based foods, such as beans and grains, contain a mixture of carbs, protein, and fat, so they can pull double or triple duty in your meal planning Additionally, fiber which is a type of indigestible carb is found in most plant-based foods. Fiber is very helpful as it makes these foods more filling and also helps in reducing your blood sugar level.   Most of us worry that the amount of protein that we intake following a vegan diet is very low. However, unknowingly most of us eat far more protein than our body requires. Gorilla shares the same DNA as humans to 98.3%. They are almost human from a genetic standpoint. Guess what? They are vegan. They get their huge structure and strong muscles from consuming plants and plant-based food. Even animals as big as an elephant or a giraffe or a rhinoceros or a stallion all of these are vegetarian. They have got their strong structures and muscles by eating plants and plant-based food.   WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF A VEGAN DIET?   Animal-based food is rich in saturated fats which are most harmful to our body. These food items lead to inflammation and belly fat. They also make your body resistant to insulin and increases blood sugar levels.   Nevertheless, a vegan diet is rich in unsaturated fats which are not harmful. Plant-based food items are also high in fiber, antioxidants, minerals. These nutrients protect your body against diseases and always manage your blood sugar levels.   A vegan diet also helps in managing weight. As the diet is rich in fiber, you tend to get rid of all the unhealthy and hard-to-digest food items, Hence, making digestion an easy process for your body.   HOW TO ENSURE THE SUCCESS OF A VEGAN DIET?   After deciding that you want to turn vegan, there are few things that you should consider to ensure the success of the diet.   Plan ahead: Meal planning and having some healthy snacks handy will be very helpful. Also, check out the menu in advance when you're planning to dine out always.  Eat plenty of non-starchy veggies: Non-starchy food is low in carbs but full of fiber and nutrients. They have the least effect on your blood sugar and help you feel full and satisfied.  Balance each meal and snack: A healthy balance of carbs, fats, and protein, along with some non-starchy vegetables is the most ideal combination of meals and snacks.  Mix up your proteins: include a variety of plant-based protein sources in your diet. It will ensure that you are getting essential amino acids in the required amounts for optimal health. Monitor your blood sugar regularly: If you have diabetes, and are following a vegan diet, you should check your blood sugar regularly to stay aware of the fluctuations in your blood sugar levels. Supplement wisely: If your doctor suggests, take the supplements. At times, your diet might not be able to fulfill the exact requirements of different nutrients. It is ok to include a few supplements like iron, B12, Vitamin D to ensure your body is never nutrient deficient.    KETO DIET AND ITS EFFECTS  The Ketogenic Diet or Keto Diet involves cutting down the carbohydrates, to almost 50 grams a day or less. By doing this you help your body achieve a state of ketosis, in which it has to burn fat (rather than sugar) for energy. The diet's unsustainable nature has led to many questions being raised by doctors and health experts. A Keto diet is a high-fat, low-carb diet. It promises quick weight loss. However, health experts worry about the side effects and complications are way more than its benefits.   The Keto Flu: Keto Flu usually happens in the early stages of commencing the Keto Diet. It includes headaches, nausea, fatigue, and diarrhea. Constipation: your body is losing water weight which means you are clogging your pipes increased risk of kidney stones: High intake of animal proteins can increase both calcium and uric acid levels in urine. As these levels rise, so does your risk of developing kidney stones. increase your cholesterol: keto diet involves getting up to 85% of your daily calories from fat. This means the diet isn't exactly heart-healthy. Vitamin Deficiency: Keto Diet prohibits a lot of fruits and vegetables which causes vitamin and mineral deficiency. This blog covers the highlights from the latest episode of Resolving Diabetes Naturally which was about the benefits of shifting to a Vegan diet for Type 2 diabetes patients. You can check out the entire podcast on our YouTube channel by clicking this link: If you have any other questions related to a plant-based diet and how it helps in managing blood sugar levels, please drop us an email with your question and a brief about yourself at drchellam@holisticicon.com   SM Posts IMAGE 1 Nearly 31 million Americans have type 2 diabetes.   Type 2 diabetes is a long-term medical condition in which your body doesn't use insulin efficiently, resulting in abnormal blood sugar levels.   Some of the common health issues faced by Diabetics High cholesterol High blood pressure Frequent heartburn Erectile dysfunction Heart disease and stroke Kidney disease Vision and nerve problems Delayed recovery of wounds   Can Type 2 Diabetes be Reversed?   YES   Here's how to get started Get aware of what causes diabetes, pre-diabetes and insulin resistance Adapt whole-food, plant-based diet Do regular physical activity Rest properly   Did You know? As per Forbes, Almost a quarter of Americans between the ages of 25 and 34 declare as vegans or vegetarians.   A Vegan diet is a lifestyle choice in which you decide to give up animal-based food items. Living on plant-based food items is called a vegan diet. It is highly beneficial for diabetic patients as it has unsaturated fats which help in managing blood sugar levels.    There are majorly three types of Vegan diets: Dietary vegans, also known as "strict vegetarians" avoid consumption of meat, eggs, dairy products, and any other animal-derived substances. An ethical vegan, also known as a "moral vegetarian", not only follows a vegan diet but also extends the philosophy to the treatment of other humans, and opposes the use of animals for any purpose. "Environmental veganism", refers to the avoidance of animal products and opposes the industrial farming of animals as it is environmentally damaging and unsustainable. To learn more about the vegan diet and how it manages blood sugar levels, watch the latest episode of Resolving Diabetes Naturally. Link in bio.        In the latest episode of Resolving Diabetes Naturally, Dr Nisha Chellam, Board Certified Internist, and Founder of Holistic ICON and Marc Ramirez co-founder of Non-Profit ChickPea and Bean have discussed the ways in which plant-based diet benefits diabetics and prevent other chronic diseases. Link in bio. SOURCES https://supplements101.net/vegan-statistics/ https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/0419p30.shtml https://health.usnews.com/health-news/blogs/eat-run/articles/2018-02-07/8-protein-myths-too-many-people-still-believe https://www.eatthis.com/protein-myths/ https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/diet/vegan-diet-good-diabetes/ https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/veganism-for-people-who-have-diabetes https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vegan-diabetes#benefits https://vegannews.press/2020/03/06/vegan-america-study/ https://www.diabetes.org.uk/guide-to-diabetes/enjoy-food/eating-with-diabetes/veganism-and-diabetes https://www.health.com/weight-loss/keto-diet-side-effects https://www.eatthis.com/news-dangerous-side-effects-keto-diet/ https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/type-2-diabetes https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/syc-20351193      

Weights and Plates Podcast
#12 - Sugar: A Dietary Evil, or Just Misunderstood?

Weights and Plates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 68:58


Sugar has gotten a bad rap the over the last decade and counting, and it's still common to hear diet gurus excoriate the evils of sugar, particularly refined sugars found in processed food in the Western world. As Robert and Trent discuss, the role that sugar, and carbohydrates in general, play in the diet is often misunderstood. While it's common sense that one shouldn't drink a bunch of Cokes every day, many people laser focus on eliminating sugar from their diet, at the expense of missing the bigger macronutrient picture and the very important role that carbs play in athletic performance.   Further reading: https://startingstrength.com/article/carbohydrates-and-barbell-training   Weights & Plates: https://weightsandplates.com Robert Santana on Instagram: @the_robert_santana   Trent Jones: @marmalade_cream https://www.marmaladecream.com

Live Greatly
Melissa Urban | Transform Your Relationship with Food with This 30-Day Dietary Experiment

Live Greatly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 27:23


Even though there is no such thing as ''bad'' or ''good'' foods, some of them may not work well for you. If you're having a hard time identifying the foods that cause negative effects on your body, listen to this episode with Melissa Urban and find out the solution for you. Key Takeaways From This Episode Should you eliminate all problematic foods for good? Why you shouldn't follow any diet Health benefits of Whole30 Is Whole30 available for vegans? Impact of the global pandemic on people's eating habits This episode is not meant to be medical advice or treatment recommendations and is meant for informational and educational purposes only.  Always seek the guidance of your physician when you have questions about your specific health and any changes to diet or exercise.  Resources Mentioned In This Episode The Whole30's Food Freedom Forever: Letting Go of Bad Habits, Guilt, and Anxiety Around Food The Comfort Crisis: Embrace Discomfort To Reclaim Your Wild, Happy, Healthy Self The Whole30 Day by Day: Your Daily Guide to Whole30 Success   About Melissa Urban Melissa Urban is the co-founder and CEO of the Whole30 program, and a six-time New York Times bestselling author. She has been featured by the New York Times, People, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Dr. Oz, and Good Morning America, and ranked #19 on Greatists Top 100 Most Influential People in Health and Fitness in 2018. Melissa has presented more than 150 health and nutrition seminars worldwide, and is a prominent keynote speaker on social media and branding, health trends, and entrepreneurship. Connect with Melissa Website: www.whole30.com; www.melissau.com Facebook: Whole30; Melissa Urban Twitter: @whole30; @melissa_urban Instagram: @whole30; @melissau Pinterest: @whole30   If you are struggling with feeling overworked or overwhelmed, access the Top 10 Stress Management Tips for the Overworked free right now.  Kristel Bauer, the Founder of Live Greatly, is on a mission to help people awaken to their ultimate potential.  She is a wellness expert, Integrative Medicine Fellow, Keynote Speaker, Physician Assistant, & Reiki Master with the goal of empowering others to live their best lives! Follow her on: Instagram: @livegreatly_co Clubhouse: @livegreatly LinkedIn: Kristel Bauer  Youtube: Live Greatly, Kristel Bauer To learn more about Live Greatly's transformative online courses for personal development and self-improvement, to discuss collaborations and partnerships, or to book Kristel as a speaker or consultant, click here.

Ancient Wisdom Today
53. Fasting for Spiritual + Dietary Fulfillment - with Dr. Will Cole

Ancient Wisdom Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 81:41


Dr. Will Cole is a pioneering functional doctor helping people reclaim their metabolic flexibility, and step away from the industrialized diet of snacking and eating on a constant loop.  In this nutritionally dense conversation, you'll learn why time-restricted eating is not restrictive, and how creating an intentional window for your eating can unlock “the physician within.”  Resources: Read: Intuitive Fasting: The Flexible Four-Week Intermittent Fasting Plan to Recharge Your Metabolism and Renew Your Health Website: drwillcole.com Instagram: @drwillcole Tribal Share: @jaimamusic22 Advertisers + Sponsors: Shaman School: shamandurek.com/the-shaman-school Lit Verified Store: shamandurek.com/lit-verified-shop Healing Temple: shamandurek.com/the-healing-temple Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Victim 2 Victor - Surviving Abuse and Overcoming Trauma
Overcoming Panic Attacks And Anxiety With Lifestyle & Dietary Changes As Well As The Importance Of Gaining Self Awareness

Victim 2 Victor - Surviving Abuse and Overcoming Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 52:42


Ben Corkery shares his story of overcoming panic attacks and crippling anxiety by making changes to his lifestyle as well as various holistic interventions. Ben is a blogger and podcaster who explores topics around holistic healing, alternative education, creativity, and personal responsibility.  He talks about his experience navigating the confusion of a mental health crisis and how he began to find solutions and he has a passion for health and education and seeks to share how a nonconventional approach to these topics is crucial if we really want to heal, live, and thrive.Topics we will discuss in this talk:- Falling into depression, anxiety, and panic- Beginning to navigate the confusion- Doing your own research, making connections, and taking responsibility - Putting together the different pieces- Ben's model for thriving - heal, cultivate, build and shareFollow me on:- Website: https://victim2victor.net/- FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/victim2victor- TWITTER: https://twitter.com/V2V_healing- INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/victim_2_victor_podcast/- Victim 2 Victor Audio Book Audible: https://adbl.co/3akVNCu- Victim 2 Victor Book on Amazon: https://amzn.to/34MQQyu- Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/3wHvUof- Spotify: https://spoti.fi/36D6ZYE

Empowered Nutrition
The Fast Track Diet with Dr. Norm Robillard

Empowered Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 40:42


In a world full of complicated and questionable diet programs, doesn't everyone want a simplified and effective diet that can improve digestion?     Dr. Robillard has created just that with The Fast Track Diet.   In this episode I had the pleasure of interviewing the Founder of the Digestive Health Institute and leading gut health expert, Norm Robillard, Ph.D. Dr. Robillard turned his own suffering from GERD and IBS into a mission to create the drug and antibiotic free Fast Tract Diet for functional gastrointestinal disorders, including acid reflux, LPR (Laryngopharyngeal Reflux), and IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) as well as SIBO (Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth) and related health conditions.    The Fast Tract Diet was presented at Digestive Disease Week (www.ddw.org) to give gastroenterologists another treatment option for SIBO and related conditions.     His award-winning Fast Tract Diet mobile app and Fast Tract Digestion book series make it easy to try the Fast Tract Diet.   Dietary and integrative solutions for functional gastrointestinal disorders and gut dysbiosis based on the following 3 pillars: - Dietary - Gut-Friendly Behaviors - Identifying and addressing underlying causes that are specific to each individual    In this episode, we discuss: Dr. Robillard's early history and how he developed the Fast Track Diet, a low carb diet that is more flexible than the Ketogenic Carbohydrates feed the bacteria that then produce gas which builds up and drives reflux Fermentable CHO and how it triggers reflux, heartburn, GERD, SIBO, and IBS Which foods are the biggest triggers (fructose, lactose, resistant starch, fiber, sugar alcohols) Difference between the Fast Track Diet, SIBO, and Low FodMap Safest sugar alcohol Fermentation Potential (FP) – Glycemic Index Equation + back fiber + sugar alcohols (utilize the Fast Track Diet mobile app) The advantage of Fast Track: it is quantitative, with studied improvements in gases and bacteria Fast Track's impact on the microbiome and symptoms Ancestral carbohydrates and seasonal cycling Why low carb is healthy To learn more about the Digestive Health Institute and Dr. Robillard's work: https://digestivehealthinstitute.org/  Complimentary Fast Tract Diet Resource Guide: https://digestivehealthinstitute.org/fast-tract-diet-resource-guide.pdf Complimentary 20 minutes Pre-consult Appointment with Dr. Norm: https://digestivehealthinstitute.org/contact-us/ 2 SIBO MasterClasses by Dr. Norm for the Price of 1: https://join.sibosos.com/products/88697-SIBO-Diet-Updates-New-Action-Plans-and?ref=15706-Norm-Robillard The Fast Tract Diet's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FastTractDiet  Follow Dr. Robillard on Twitter @DrNRobillard Check out the full episode at: https://erinskinner.com/empowerednutrition/fasttrackdiet  Please review the Empowered Nutrition Podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen! Then, send me a screenshot of your positive review to erin@erinskinner.com as a DM on Instagram (erinskinner_rd) .  Include a brief description of what you're working on with your health and/or nutrition and I'll send you a free custom meal plan!   Also, I'm accepting new clients for functional nutrition!  Book a free chemistry call to discuss your story and see if we're a good fit HERE. Follow me on Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest

Doing It Different
069: CARLY'S FAVORITE: Mold Detox: Everything You Might Not Know About Mold's Threat to Your Health with Dr. Jill Crista

Doing It Different

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 64:38


Mold is a silent threat that can lurk in our homes or inside of our bodies, even years after exposure. I never would have suspected I had any mold toxicity until I read Dr. Jill Crista's book and took a test out of curiosity. To my surprise, my mold levels were super high, and I've recently been going through a mold detox protocol to improve my health. This week's guest is a naturopathic doctor, mold specialist, and author of Break The Mold, the book that started me on my own mold journey. Dr. Crista and I talk about why mold is an important health issue to be aware of and take care of, the difference between mold and mycotoxins, and how to detox mold from both the environment you live in and from your body. Episode Highlights:  10:16 Why and how mold can be harmful to your health 21:13 Some of the serious health issues that can be caused by mold 23:29 Recommend options for getting tested for mold 44:39 The five-step process to mold detox 48:05 Dietary changes to make during detox that can make a huge difference Guest: Dr. Jill Crista's Resources We Mention: Dr. Jill Crista's Website Book: Break The Mold Online Mold Quiz Full Mold Questionnaire  support@drcrista.com Visual Contrast Sensitivity test DirectLabs.com Mold Masterclass from Brian Karr Mold Training Course For Medical Practitioners Related Episodes: Podcast 064: Red Light Therapy to Boost Cellular Health: How It Works & How To Use It with Dr. Michael Belkowski of BioLight Podcast 033: Do You Have Parasites? How To Test For and Treat Them with Dr. Jessica Peatross a certified Gerson Practitioner Podcast 026: Preventing & Getting Rid of Mold In Your Home: What You Need to Know with Brian Karr of the Mold Masterclass Podcast 023: How To Build A Nontoxic Home with Green-Building Expert Andy Pace Health Resources Healing Hashimoto's Course Thyroid Lab Guide + Tracker (free)  Recommended Non-Toxic Products Connect With Carly: CarlyJohnsonBrawner.com Instagram: @carlyjohnsonbrawner Sponsors: Organifi (Use code Carly for 20% off) Complete Show Notes Here

Sigma Nutrition Radio
#405: Adrian Brown, PhD - Dietary Strategies in Type 2 Diabetes

Sigma Nutrition Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 63:09


Dr Adrian Brown is a NIHR Lecturer and Research Fellow in the Centre of Obesity Research at University College London. He is also a senior Specialist Weight Management and Bariatric dietitian with over 15 years of clinical experience and a PhD in Medicine from Imperial College London. His research interests centre around obesity, type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery, weight stigma and the use of formula-based diets in different patient populations. He is an Honorary Academic for Public Health England Obesity and Healthy Weight Team, on the strategic council for APPG on Obesity and is on the scientific council of the British Nutrition Foundation.   You can find the show notes to this episode at sigmanutrition.com/episode404/ and you can support the podcast at patreon.com/sigmanutrition/

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.16.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 62:31


Virologists reveal how poor man's amino acid cure for COVID-19 would abolish need for vaccines Bio-Virus Research Inc (Nevada), September 15, 2021 A natural cure for COVID-19 that is widely available and affordable for even the poorest of people on the planet has been confirmed by a team of virologists who have spent a lifetime studying the underlying causes of viral infections. Backed by decades of research and safety data for herpes-family viruses, U.S.-based researchers at Bio-Virus Research Inc, Reno, Nevada, report on the successful treatment of the first 30 frontline doctors and nurses and a thousand-plus patients given the amino acid lysine to prevent and even abolish COVID-19 coronavirus infections at a clinic in the Dominican Republic.  Astonishingly, symptoms of COVID-19 are reported to have dissipated within hours of this natural treatment. The medical staff at a clinic in the Dominican Republic was coming down with two cases of coronavirus per month before lysine therapy was instituted. The virologists, Drs. Christopher Kagan, Bo Karlicki and Alexander Chaihorsky, strongly suggested the front-line healthcare workers embark on a daily regimen of lysine therapy due to daily exposure to the virus.  Their ground-breaking report is published online at ResearchGate.net. Arginine/lysine balance Lysine therapy interrupts the replication of viruses, including COVID-19 coronavirus, by countering arginine, an amino acid that fosters the eruption of dormant viruses.  Lysine has been safely used for decades to quell herpes virus outbreaks that cause cold sores on the lips (herpes labialis), a treatment pioneered by one of the Bio-Virus Research team members in 1974. Lysine is available in foods and in concentrated form in inexpensive dietary supplements (250 500-milligram lysine tablets can be purchased for under $5 US or 2-cents per tablet), making affordable lysine therapy possible. Lysine/arginine imbalance would explain why patients who have been infected with COVID-19 have recurrent infections, even after vaccination. Lysine Rx in Dominican Republic The daily therapeutic supplement regimen for the medical staff in the Dominican Republic consisted of 2000 milligrams of lysine capsules along with restricted dietary consumption of arginine-rich foods such as nuts, chocolate, orange juice, pumpkin, sesame seeds, wheat germ. The Bio-Virus Research team found doses of supplemental lysine up to 4000 milligrams to be safe and effective. Foods that have a high ratio of lysine over arginine such as eggs, tofu, fish (not raw), sardines, cheese, meats such as pork, poultry and red meat, and yogurt) provide a high ratio of lysine over arginine, thus blocking replication of all coronaviruses including COVID-19. According to the virologists who were interviewed by this reporter, over 1000 patients have now been successfully treated with surprisingly rapid dissolution of symptoms and return to health.  Even severely infected COVID-19 patients have been able to come off the ventilator with lysine therapy, say doctors. Third-party validation for lysine therapy Writing in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases another research team based in New York and Texas reports that arginine depletion is a strategy to quell both coronaviruses and other herpes family viruses. In 2016 researchers documented that lysine impairs the growth of coronaviruses in a lab dish. The Bio-Virus Research team are not loners nor out on a scientific limb.  A report, published in the Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals, is what prompted to the current discovery that was put into clinical practice in the Dominican Republic.  The science was in place prior to the announcement a mutated coronavirus was sweeping the globe which no one had immunity towards. Dietary intake The Recommended Daily dietary intake of lysine is 2660 milligrams for a 154-lb (70 kilogram) adult; 3640 milligrams during pregnancy. Dietary intake of lysine in western populations ranges from 40-180 milligrams per day per kilogram (2.2 lbs.) of body weight, or 2800-12,600 milligrams for a 154 lb. (70 kilogram) adult. It is the balance of arginine to lysine that controls the eruption of dormant viruses in the body.  The average intake of arginine is estimated to be 4000-6000 milligrams per day. Other health benefits Supplemental lysine also has other health benefits.  Lysine increases absorption of calcium, relieves bouts of anxiety, promotes wound healing, and is helpful for other conditions.  Cholesterol is deposited in binding sites within coronary arteries.  When lysine (and vitamin C) occupy those binding sites, cholesterol is not deposited in arteries. Prevalence of herpes viral infections Worldwide many billions of people harbor dormant herpes viruses that erupt into disease from time to time.  In 2016 an estimated 3.7 billion people had herpes simplex virus infection– around 66.6% of the world's population aged 0 to 49. Availability of lysine Lysine is largely produced by the tons for animal feedstuffs.  Roughly 2,200,000 tons of lysine are produced annually.  There is no shortage. Billions may benefit The most frequent medical application of lysine therapy has been the quelling of active herpes infections (on skin, lips, etc.), and eradication of Epstein-Barr infection, Bell's palsy, etc. Researchers bemoan the fact that lysine therapy hasn't become a mainstay in the treatment of herpes infections that affect ~80% of the world's population over expensive and problematic anti-viral drugs because it doesn't generate sufficient profit to attract funding for human clinical trials.  Lysine is superior to various anti-viral drugs. If lysine lives up to its promise as a universal COVID-19 antidote for therapeutic and preventive use, unless billionaire Bill Gates buys up and mothballs all the lysine production plants in the world like he has bought off agricultural land, and bought off news media, vaccine makers and politicians, the need for vaccines will become a moot and meaningless practice for COVID-19. Because of the long-term safety record of this dietary amino acid, the public can take lysine as a non-prescription preventive “medicine.” Epidemiologists baffled by low rate of coronavirus infections in India Despite its large population and poor sanitation, disease trackers are baffled by India's low rate of coronavirus infections.  Maybe it is India's lysine-rich diet of yogurt, lamb, chicken, fish curry that protects its population from viral disease.  The striking difference in the country-to-country prevalence of Herpes Simplex-2 infections (only 9.6% in South East Asian countries and 10.7% in Europe vs. 24.0% in the Americas and 43.9% in Africa) could be explained by the lysine/arginine ratio in native diets. Treat the severely ill; skip the problematic vaccines Vaccination is not fool proof.  Vaccinated patients are testing positive for COVID-19.  Doctors can choose to treat the 3 in 10,000 COVID-19 severely infected patients who are at risk for a mortal outcome with lysine rather than needlessly vaccinate billions of people.  Mass vaccination would not be needed, nor would lockdowns, quarantines and questionable mass face mask use be required.  The pandemic would be rapidly extinguished by a public information campaign regarding lysine-rich foods and dietary supplements.  The public can take action on its own today without adverse consequences.  Literally, trillions of dollars would be saved worldwide.  If not for COVID-19, at least for herpes infections. The shame is on the World Health Organization with a budget of $8.482 billion or the Centers For Disease Control with a budget of $7.875 billion that overlook safe and economical cures like lysine.  This report serves as evidence the world is being gamed to plunder the masses of their health and wealth.  The people of the world need to stop heeding advice from public health officials and practice preventive medicine on their own volition. There is additional evidence that lysine also halts the growth of influenza and coxsackie viruses. Further research Researchers at Bio-Virus Research Inc. are searching for research funds to further document the benefits of lysine therapy.      Omega-3 and Omega-6 supplement improves reading for children   University of Gothenburg, Sweden - September 14, 2021    Supplement of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids may improve reading skills of mainstream schoolchildren, according to a new study from Sahlgrenska Academy, at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Children with attention problems, in particular, may be helped in their reading with the addition of these fatty acids.   The study included 154 schoolchildren from western Sweden in grade 3, between nine and ten years old. The children took a computer-based test (known as the Logos test) that measured their reading skills in a variety of ways, including reading speed, ability to read nonsense words and vocabulary.   The children were randomly assigned to receive either capsules with omega-3 and omega-6, or identical capsules that contained a placebo (palm oil) for 3 months. The children, parents and researchers did not learn until the study was completed which children had received fatty acids and which had received the placebo. After three months, all children received real omega-3/6 capsules for the final three months of the study.   "Even after three months, we could see that the children's reading skills improved with the addition of fatty acids, compared with those who received the placebo. This was particularly evident in the ability to read a nonsense word aloud and pronounce it correctly (phonologic decoding), and the ability to read a series of letters quickly (visual analysis time)," says Mats Johnson, who is chief physician and researcher at the Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.   No children diagnosed with ADHD were included in the study, but with the help of the children's parents, the researchers could identify children who had milder attention problems. These children attained even greater improvements in several tests, including faster reading already after three months of receiving fatty acid supplements.   Polyunsaturated fats and their role in children's learning and behavior is a growing research area.   "Our modern diet contains relatively little omega-3, which it is believed to have a negative effect on our children when it comes to learning, literacy and attention," says Mats Johnson. "The cell membranes in the brain are largely made up of polyunsaturated fats, and there are studies that indicate that fatty acids are important for signal transmission between nerve cells and the regulation of signaling systems in the brain."   Previous studies in which researchers examined the effect of omega-3 as a supplement for mainstream schoolchildren have not shown positive results, something Mats Johnson believes may depend on how these studies were organized and what combination and doses of fatty acids were used. This is the first double-blind, placebo-controlled study showing that omega-3/6 improves reading among mainstream schoolchildren.   "Our study suggests that children could benefit from a dietary supplement with a special formula. To be more certain about the results, they should also be replicated in other studies," says Mats Johnson. The article Omega 3/6 fatty acids for reading in children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 9-year-old mainstream schoolchildren in Sweden was published by The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.       Elevated stress hormones linked to higher risk of high blood pressure and heart events Kyoto University (Japan) & University of California at Los Angeles, Sept. 13, 2021  Adults with normal blood pressure and high levels of stress hormones were more likely to develop high blood pressure and experience cardiovascular events compared to those who had lower stress hormone levels, according to new research published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. Studies have shown that cumulative exposure to daily stressors and exposure to traumatic stress can increase cardiovascular disease risk. A growing body of research refers to the mind-heart-body connection, which suggests a person's mind can positively or negatively affect cardiovascular health, cardiovascular risk factors and risk for cardiovascular disease events, as well as cardiovascular prognosis over time. “The stress hormones norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and cortisol can increase with stress from life events, work, relationships, finances and more. And we confirmed that stress is a key factor contributing to the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular events,” said study author Kosuke Inoue, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of social epidemiology at Kyoto University in Kyoto, Japan. Inoue also is affiliated with the department of epidemiology at the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Previous research focused on the relationship between stress hormone levels and hypertension or cardiovascular events in patients with existing hypertension. However, studies looking at adults without hypertension were lacking,” Inoue said. “It is important to examine the impact of stress on adults in the general population because it provides new information about whether routine measurement of stress hormones needs to be considered to prevent hypertension and CVD events.” Study subjects were part of the MESA Stress 1 study, a substudy of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a large study of atherosclerosis risk factors among more than 6,000 men and women from six U.S. communities. As part of MESA exams 3 and 4 (conducted between July 2004 and October 2006), white, Black and Hispanic participants with normal blood pressure from the New York and Los Angeles sites were invited to participate in the substudy MESA Stress 1. In this substudy, researchers analyzed levels of norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and cortisol – hormones that respond to stress levels. Hormone levels were measured in a 12-hour overnight urine test. The substudy included 412 adults ages 48 to 87 years. About half were female, 54% were Hispanic, 22% were Black and 24% were white. Participants were followed for three more visits (between September 2005 and June 2018) for development of hypertension and cardiovascular events such as chest pain, the need for an artery-opening procedure, or having a heart attack or stroke. Norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine are molecules known as catecholamines that maintain stability throughout the autonomic nervous system—the system that regulates involuntary body functions such as heart rate, blood pressure and breathing. Cortisol is a steroid hormone released when one experiences stress and is regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which modulates stress response.  “Although all of these hormones are produced in the adrenal gland, they have different roles and mechanisms to influence the cardiovascular system, so it is important to study their relationship with hypertension and cardiovascular events, individually,” Inoue said.  Their analysis of the relationship between stress hormones and development of atherosclerosis found: Over a median of 6.5-year follow-up period, every time the levels of the four stress hormones doubled was associated with a 21-31% increase in the risk of developing hypertension. During a median of 11.2-years of follow-up, there was a 90% increased risk of cardiovascular events with each doubling of cortisol levels. There was no association between cardiovascular events and catecholamines. “It is challenging to study psychosocial stress since it is personal, and its impact varies for each individual. In this research, we used a noninvasive measure — a single urine test — to determine whether such stress might help identify people in need of additional screening to prevent hypertension and possibly cardiovascular events,” Inoue said. "The next key research question is whether and in which populations increased testing of stress hormones could be helpful. Currently, these hormones are measured only when hypertension with an underlying cause or other related diseases are suspected. However, if additional screening could help prevent hypertension and cardiovascular events, we may want to measure these hormone levels more frequently.” A limitation of the study is that it did not include people who had hypertension at the study's start, which would have resulted in a larger study population. Another limitation is that researchers measured stress hormones via a urine test only, and no other tests for stress hormone measurement were used.   Spirulina alleviates high fat diet-induced cognitive impairment via the gut-brain axis Weifang People's Hospital (China), September 9, 2021 Increasing evidence suggested that the gut microbiome-brain axis plays a critical role in regulating cognitive functions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the dietary treatment effect of Spirulina platensis on learning deficits in high fat diet (HFD) fed mice and clarify the potential mechanisms via investigating the gut microbiome-brain axis. Dietary administration of 1% and 2% Spirulina platensis for 16 weeks significantly improved the spatial learning and memory performance of the HFD-fed mice in both Barnes Maze test and Morris water maze test. The Aβ accumulation, tau-hyperphosphorylation, and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus were significantly inhibited by Spirulina platensis. Spirulina platensis also abrogated HFD induced gut microbial dysbiosis and unbalance of gut microbial metabolites indicating its modulating effect on the gut-brain axis. This study provides further evidence for the application of Spirulina platensis as functional supplement for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Spirulina platensis was frequently used as both a food ingredient and a medical supplement to counteract various metabolic disorders worldwide. In the present study, we found that Spirulina platensis dietary supplementation significantly prevented the cognitive deficits induced by HFD- feeding in mice. For the first time, we identified the inhibition effect of Spirulina platensis on β-amyloid generation, tau-hyperphosphorylation, neuroinflammation, and the gut microbiota dysbiosis. In conclusion, the present study proved the beneficial effect of Spirulina platensis on cognitive impairment in HDF-fed AD mice and cleared Aβ, inhibited tau-hyperphosphorylation, and ameliorated neuroinflammation in the brain. Spirulina platensis also abrogated HFD induced gut microbial dysbiosis and unbalance of gut microbial metabolites indicating that Spirulina platensis might ameliorated cognitive deficits through regulating the gut-brain axis (Fig. 6). This study provides potent evidence for the application of Spirulina platensis as functional supplement for treatment of AD.   Regular exercise may lower risk of developing anxiety by almost 60% University of Lund (Sweden), September 13, 2021 A quick online search for ways to improve our mental health will often come up with a myriad of different results. However, one of the most common suggestions put forward as a step to achieving wellness—and preventing future issues—is doing some physical exercise, whether it be a walk or playing a team sport. Anxiety disorders—which typically develop early in a person's life—are estimated to affect approximately 10% of the world's population and has been found to be twice as common in women compared to men. And while exercise is put forward as a promising strategy for the treatment of anxiety, little is known about the impact of exercise dose, intensity or physical fitness level on the risk of developing anxiety disorders. To help answer this question, researchers in Sweden have published a study in Frontiers in Psychiatry to show that those who took part in the world's largest long-distance cross-country ski race (Vasaloppet) between 1989 and 2010 had a "significantly lower risk" of developing anxiety compared to non-skiers during the same period. The study is based on data from almost 400,000 people in one of the largest ever population-wide epidemiology studies across both sexes. Surprising finding among female skiers "We found that the group with a more physically active lifestyle had an almost 60% lower risk of developing anxiety disorders over a follow-up period of up to 21 years," said first author of the paper, Martine Svensson, and her colleague and principal investigator, Tomas Deierborg, of the Department of Experimental Medical Science at Lund University, Sweden. "This association between a physically active lifestyle and a lower risk of anxiety was seen in both men and women." However, the authors found a noticeable difference in exercise performance level and the risk of developing anxiety between male and female skiers. While a male skier's physical performance did not appear to affect the risk of developing anxiety, the highest performing group of female skiers had almost the double risk of developing anxiety disorders compared to the group which was physically active at a lower performance level. "Importantly," they said, "the total risk of getting anxiety among high-performing women was still lower compared to the more physically inactive women in the general population". These findings cover relatively uncharted territory for scientific research, according to the researchers, as most previous studies focused on depression or mental illness as opposed to specifically diagnosed anxiety disorders. Furthermore, some of the largest studies looking at this topic only included men, were much smaller in sample size, and had either limited or no follow-up data to track the long-term effects of physical activity on mental health. Next steps for research The surprising discovery of an association between physical performance and the risk for anxiety disorders in women also emphasized the scientific importance of these findings for follow-up research. "Our results suggest that the relation between symptoms of anxiety and exercise behavior may not be linear," Svensson said. "Exercise behaviors and anxiety symptoms are likely to be affected by genetics, psychological factors, and personality traits, confounders that were not possible to investigate in our cohort. Studies investigating the driving factors behind these differences between men and women when it comes to extreme exercise behaviors and how it affects the development of anxiety are needed." They added that randomized intervention trials, as well as long-term objective measurements of physical activity in prospective studies, are also needed to assess the validity and causality of the association they reported. But does this mean that skiing in particular can play an important role in keeping anxiety at bay, as opposed to any other form of exercise? Not so, Svensson and Deierborg said, given that previous studies have also shown the benefits of keeping fit on our mental health. "We think this cohort of cross-country skiers is a good proxy for an active lifestyle, but there could also be a component of being more outdoors among skiers," they said. "Studies focusing on specific sports may find slightly different results and magnitudes of the associations, but this is most likely due to other important factors that affect mental health and which you cannot easily control in research analysis.   Gut microbes are key to health benefit delivered by hops compound Oregon State University, September 13, 2021 The health-enhancing performance of a compound found in hops is dependent upon its interactions with intestinal microorganisms, new research by Oregon State University shows. Understanding how xanthohumol, often abbreviated as XN, works is important for unlocking its potential to counter diet-induced obesity and the health risksassociated with a global obesity epidemic, including type 2 diabetes and liver and heart disease, researcher Adrian Gombart says. "We showed that the gut microbiota are necessary for the beneficial effects of XN on glucose metabolism," said Gombart, professor of biochemistry and biophysics in the OSU College of Science and a principal investigator at the university's Linus Pauling Institute. "There is an important interaction between the compound and the microbes in the gut that provides the benefits we see in our studies with mice." Gombart led a team of 20 scientists from three Oregon State colleges in research that compared the glucose metabolism effects of xanthohumol on two sets of mice: "conventional" ones with gut microbiota, and those engineered to be "germ free," i.e. have no gut microbes. Glucose metabolism, the body's ability to convert the sugar into fuel, generally suffers impairment as someone becomes obese, which in turn can lead to the person becoming more overweight. Faulty glucose metabolism also negatively affects brain physiology and is at the root of multiple medical conditions including diabetes and heart disease. In previous studies involving mice, Gombart and colleagues found that XN improved the animals' health and changed the composition of their microbiome, the latter leading them to suspect that the mix of microbes played a role in XN's healthful effects. "In this study, we fed mice either a diet low in calories, high in calories, or high in calories but supplemented with XN for 10 weeks," he said. "We found that only the conventional mice with XN supplementation showed improved glucose metabolism and that XN increased the relative abundance of three bacteria, Akkermansia muciniphila, Parabacteroides goldsteinii and Alistipes finegoldii." Gombart added that the study yielded some evidence that those three microbes are at least partially responsible for the health benefits associated with XN, but the entire microbial community may be playing a role as well. "We can't rule that out," he said. "We know that XN needs the intestinal microbiota to deliver its benefits, and there are complex diet-host-microbiota interactions that bring changes in both microbial composition and functional capacity. Diet is recognized as a major force in shaping gut microbe composition, and future studies will look for insights into the various interactions at play." Earlier mouse model studies by co-author Fred Stevens, professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the OSU College of Pharmacy and also a principal investigator at the Linus Pauling Institute , have shown that XN, a polyphenol found in hops' cones, has a number of anti-obesity properties. It improves cognitive function and it suppresses weight gain associated with a high-fat diet, fat accumulation in adipose tissue and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is when cells don't respond well to the hormone that allows for the uptake of glucose from the bloodstream. It causes the pancreas to make more and more insulin to keep blood glucose levels within a non-harmful range and is a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.   Antioxidant protects neurons   University of Edinburgh   September 12 2021    Research involving a potent antioxidant, described in Scientific Reports, suggests that the compound could help protect cells in several conditions, including Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosisand cell transplants. In their report, a team from the University of Edinburgh observe that the flavonoids quercetin and myricetin are among the most potent dietary antioxidants. Structural modification of myricetin has resulted in the development a new compound known as Proxison. In the current research, Proxison demonstrated 10 times the ability to protect against oxidative stress induced by the compound tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) in neuroblastoma cells compared to quercetin, while several other antioxidants showed no effects. Proxison, as well as a high concentration of quercetin, also provided significant protection against cell death in tBHP-treated cells. Similar results were obtained in another neural cell line. An investigation of the antioxidants' ability to be taken up by the cells showed significant intracellular levels of quercetin and Proxison, and evidence for some localization of Proxison in the cells' mitochondria. In zebrafish embryos, Proxison helped protect against neuronal cell loss induced by a neurotoxic compound. Quercetin was also protective, but was less potent than Proxison. Neither therapy affected normal embryonic development. “This novel antioxidant can be applied to investigate oxidative stress in disease models, like alpha-synucleinopathies and other neurodegeneration models,” Nicola J. Drummond and colleagues conclude. “In addition, Proxison could have applications for regenerative medicine where oxidative stress has been implicated in poor cell survival of transplanted cells, with the advantage that the molecule can be pre-loaded into cells prior to transplantation. Proxison could also have applications for conditions, such as stroke or cardiac infarction, in which a temporary, but acute, exposure to oxidative stress is experienced, as well as diseases in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are core features.”

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.15.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 58:24


Dietary propolis supplementation reduced proinflammatory cytokines associated with air pollution exposure, without impacting on immune cell infiltration or lung function New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research, September 10, 2021 Air pollution is estimated to cause 7 million annual deaths globally. Our aim was to determine if dietary propolis consumption could prevent the immune and functional damage in a mouse model of acute urban dust exposure. Female C57BL/6J mice were challenged three times with intranasal urban dust over seven days which significantly increased proinflammatory cytokines and immune cells in the lung 24 h post final challenge. Dietary New Zealand propolis (2%) with gamma cyclodextrin supplementation reduced urban dust-induced lung TNFα, IL-4, and IL-6 cytokine production; but did not alter immune cell infiltration into the lung, or lung function outcomes. This suggests that daily consumption of 8% propolis with gamma cyclodextrin supplemented food was sufficient to reduce urban dust pollution-induced proinflammatory cytokine production but was not sufficient to prevent immune cell recruitment into the lung or lung function decline in a murine model of lung inflammation. In this study we found that daily consumption of a New Zealand propolis reduced proinflammatory cytokines within the lung in response to acute urban dust exposure but this inhibition was not sufficient to reduce immune cell infiltration or prevent increased airways tissue constriction. These results suggest that dietary supplementation of 8% propolis with gamma cyclodextrin (equivalent to 2% propolis resin) does not result in sufficient bioavailable concentrations of the bioactive polyphenolics to fully overcome urban dust pollution-induced acute immune cell infiltration into the lung. Other studies have shown that acute gavage consumption or intraperitoneal injection of specific propolis bioactive components can protect against a number of different immune challenges within the lung. These effects appear to be both concentration and administration route dependent, and may not be achievable using unenriched propolis as a dietary intervention.   20-Week Study of Clinical Outcomes of Over-the-Counter COVID-19 Prophylaxis and Treatment Comprehensive Pain Management Institute (Ohio), August 6, 2021 New research published in the Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine shows that early intervention against a Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) infection using natural, over-the-counter remedies is a safe and effective way to avoid complications. Researchers from Ohio looked at modalities that are readily available for the Chinese Virus, including zinc, zinc ionophores, vitamins C, D3, and E, and l-lysine. These items were categorized in the study as “preventive measures” and “early-stage treatments” that can help to avoid the need for more “advanced” anti-covid measures such as pharmaceutical drugs and vaccines. Each of these tested remedies is natural, by the way, and the results of what they can do are impressive. Once again, nature wins out as our most abundant medicine cabinet, far exceeding anything cooked up in a lab. The clinical study found that this “multi-component OTC (over-the-counter) ‘core formulation' regimen” successfully protected test subjects against getting sick from the Chinese Virus, even as others got sick. “While both groups were moderate in size, the difference between them in outcomes over the 20-week study period was large and stark: Just under 4% of the compliant test group presented flu-like symptoms, but none of the test group was COVID-positive,” the paper reveals. “[W]hereas 20% of the non-compliant control group presented flu-like symptoms, three-quarters of whom (15% overall of the control group) were COVID-positive.” For 20 weeks, test subjects took these natural supplements. Adjustments were made for those with pre-existing health conditions and other health factors that may have influenced the outcome. Since all of the remedies utilized fall into the “low cost” category, anyone can access them. They are all dubbed as “anti-viral” as well, meaning they are safe and effective for use against viruses. By taking advantage of these remedies early, the paper explains, people can help to protect themselves against the types of adverse events that are causing some people to have to be hospitalized and put on a ventilator. “From early March through the end of July 2020, one of us (LM) monitored approximately 600 patients in Columbus and Cleveland, Ohio cities heavily affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and did consultations with several colleagues (including JL) in the New York City metropolitan area, also heavily hit,” the paper explains. “Over that 5-month period, we dealt with dozens of clinical and/or test-confirmed cases of COVID-19. Much of the monitoring was performed via telemedicine; approximately 20% was performed in-office. It is from in-office monitored patients and staff that the study groups emerged.” We have been covering some of these same remedies along with others that have been scientifically shown to help protect against spike protein-induced illness. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), as one example, is a zinc ionophore that helps to deliver more zinc into cells for improved immune function. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a polyphenol component of green tea, is a natural zinc ionophore that improves zinc absorption. For this latest study, the research team used quina (cinchona) plant bark extract and quercetin as zinc ionophores, as these, too, help to deliver more healing nutrients like zinc to the cells. “The core supplementation formulation components have been demonstrated … to have beneficial effects both outside of and within clinical settings in the prevention of viral infections and also in the treatment of early stages of such diseases,” the study reveals. “Zinc ionophores can … be utilized to gain the anti-viral benefit of enhanced intracellular Zn+2 concentrations while limiting tolerance / side-effect / toxicity issues associated with elevated serum levels of zinc supplementation.” You can review the full paper at this link.     Neuroprotective effect of L-carnitine against glyceraldehyde-induced metabolic impairment University Politecnica delle Marche (Italy), September 7, 2021 According to news reporting originating from Ancona, Italy, research stated, “Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive regression and memory loss. Dysfunctions of both glucose metabolism and mitochondrial dynamics have been recognized as the main upstream events of the degenerative processes leading to AD.” Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the School of Medicine, “It has been recently found that correcting cell metabolism by providing alternative substrates can prevent neuronal injury by retaining mitochondrial function and reducing AD marker levels. Here, we induced an AD-like phenotype by using the glycolysis inhibitor glyceraldehyde (GA) and explored whether L-carnitine (4-N-trimethylamino-3-hydroxybutyric acid, LC) could mitigate neuronal damage, both in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and in rat primary cortical neurons. We have already reported that GA significantly modified AD marker levels; here we demonstrated that GA dramatically compromised cellular bioenergetic status, as revealed by glycolysis and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) evaluation. We found that LC ameliorated cell survival, improved OCR and ATP synthesis, prevented the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Dps) and reduced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Of note, the beneficial effect of LC did not rely on the glycolytic pathway rescue. Finally, we noticed that LC significantly reduced the increase in pTau levels induced by GA. Overall, these findings suggest that the use of LC can promote cell survival in the setting of the metabolic impairments commonly observed in AD.” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “Our data suggest that LC may act by maintaining mitochondrial function and by reducing the pTau level.”     Hyperbaric oxygen study shows reversal of biologic hallmarks responsible for development of Alzheimer disease Tel Aviv University  & Shamir Medical Center (Israel), September 10, 2021 A new study, published today in peer-review medical journal Aging, marks the first time non-pharmaceutical clinical exploration proves efficacy in reversing the main activators of Alzheimer's disease.    Using a specific protocol of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), cerebral blood flow (CBF) improved/increased in elderly patients by 16-23%, alleviating vascular dysfunction and amyloid burden. The study, part of a comprehensive research program directed toward aging and accompanying ailments as a reversible disease, holds promise for a new strategic approach to the prevention of Alzheimer's by addressing not only the symptoms or targeting biomarkers, but rather the core pathology and biology responsible for the advancement of the disease.  Vascular dysfunction is a crucial element in the development of Alzheimer's and cognitive decline: Amyloid beta deposits in the brain blood vessel walls are the most common vascular pathology in Alzheimer's.  Reduced blood flow to the brain and its related decrease in oxygen supply (hypoxia) can precede the clinical onset of dementia and correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's. The comprehensive research, conducted at the Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University and the Sagol Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Research at Shamir Medical Center, was led by study co-authors, Professor Shai Efrati, M.D.; Professor Uri Ashery, Ph.D.; Ronit Shapira, Ph.D.; Pablo Blinder, Ph.D.; Amir Hadanny, M.D. Using combined data from an animal model of Alzheimer's, where effects were evaluated directly on brain tissue (Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University); humans, assessed with the use of high-resolution MRI and computerized cognitive test (Sagol Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Research at Shamir Medical Center); correlating results displayed beneficial effects of HBOT on patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the stage before dementia. Each patient received 60 HBOT sessions over a 90-day period, showcasing substantial improvement in cognitive functions – with memory, attention and information processing speed exhibiting the strongest results.  "After dedicating our HBOT research to exploring its impact on the areas of brain functionality and age-related cognitive decline, we have discovered for the first time HBOT induces degradation and clearance of pre-existing amyloid plaques – treatment, and the appearance of newly formed plaques- prevention," explains Professor Uri Ashery. "Elderly patients suffering from significant memory loss at baseline revealed an increase in brain blood flow and improvement in cognitive performance, demonstrating HBOT potency to reverse core elements responsible for the development of Alzheimer's disease." "By treating vascular dysfunction, we're mapping out the path toward Alzheimer's prevention. More research is underway to further demonstrate how HBOT can improve cognitive function and become an influential tool in the imperative fight against the disease," affirms Professor Efrati, research group leader and medical advisor to Aviv Scientific.  Aviv has developed a unique medical treatment protocol that includes HBOT, cognitive and physical training, and nutritional coaching, to enhance brain and body performance of aging adults at Aviv Clinics, currently available in Central Florida and Dubai.  HBOT is already used in patients with other pathologies and is known to be a relatively safe treatment modality, illustrating its potential to be easily implanted in clinical practice. In recent years, there is growing scientific evidence that certain protocols of HBOT can improve brain oxygen supply, induce proliferation of neuronal stem cells and induce generation of new blood vessels and neurons in the brain.       Increased flatulence from eating plant-based diet found to indicate healthier gut microbiome Center for Biomedical Research Network for Liver and Digestive Diseases (Spain), September 10, 2021 A team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions across Spain has found that the increase in flatulence experienced by people switching to a plant-based diet is an indication of a healthier gut microbiome. In their paper published in the journal Nutrients, the group describes experiments they conducted with healthy, male volunteers regarding diet, fecal sample size and flatulence. It is widely known that switching from a fat or carbohydrate-based diet to one that features more vegetables results in more flatulence—particularly if the switch is to cruciferous vegetables. But as the researchers with this new effort have noted, little research has been done to learn more about the association between diet and flatulence. To learn more about the impact of switching to a plant-based diet on digestion and the gut biome, the researchers enlisted the assistance of 18 healthy, adult male volunteers. Each was asked to eat a western-style diet and then to switch to the plant-based Mediterranean diet for two weeks. Over the study period, the volunteers were asked to count the number of times they defecated each day and to capture and weigh each stool sample. Each of the volunteers was also asked to count the number of times they passed gas. The volunteers were also asked to submit to randomized testing that involved measuring the amount of gas that was emitted during episodes of flatulence, using balloons. The researchers found that the change in diet did not change the number of times the volunteers defecated each day—but it did change the amount of material discharged. The researchers found the plant-based diet doubled the stool size on average. The researchers note this was due to a huge increase in the mass of bacterial growth and excretion. The data also showed that the number of flatulence episodes increased by seven times per day on the plant-based diet—and each discharge had approximately 50% more gas. The researchers note this was due to fermenting of plant material in the gut. The researchers suggest their experiments show that a plant-based diet promotes more healthy types of gut bacteria which leads to better overall gut health.   Physical exercise can relieve tumor-associated anemia University of Basel (Switzerland), September 10, 2021 Many cancer patients suffer from anemia leaving them fatigued, weak, and an impaired ability to perform physical activity. Drugs only rarely alleviate this type of anemia. Researchers at the University of Basel have now been able to show what causes the anemia, and that physical exercise can improve this condition. The two major symptoms of cancer are loss of muscle mass and a reduced hemoglobin level, leading to weight loss, fatigue, lethargy and reduced physical performance. Moreover, both symptoms—atrophy and anemia—prompt many patients to schedule a doctor's appointment, then resulting in the diagnosis of a tumor. Why cancer causes muscle atrophy and anemia is not yet understood, and treatment is currently difficult. The fact that anemia leads to a decline of the overall state of health and can negatively affect the course of cancer therapy highlights the urgency to obtain insights into causes and potential remedies. In collaboration with the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel, the research group of Professor Christoph Handschin at the Biozentrum has now been able to show in a mouse model that cancer not only triggers a systemic inflammatory reaction, but also massively changes the handling of lipids and other metabolites in the body. The body's fight is unsuccessful These changes result in a tumor-related enhanced destruction of red blood cells. The study published in Science Advances shows that exercise normalizes these metabolic abnormalities and thereby reduces the anemia caused by cancer. The body tries to counteract the degradation by increasing red blood cell productionin the bone marrow and the spleen—without success. However, the increased production of blood cells is insufficient to prevent tumor-associated anemia. "We have now been able to clarify how cancer causes the degradation of red blood cells," says Christoph Handschin. "Cancer massively alters the metabolism of lipids and other compounds. This alters not only the red blood cells but also the macrophages, causing a sharp increase in red blood cells destruction by the macrophages." Macrophages are a type of white blood cells and part of the immune system. Exercise normalizes metabolism and alleviates anemia The research group attempted to normalize the metabolism by pharmacological means. However, none of the drugs could significantly improve the anemia. In contrast, however, the metabolism was regulated to such an extent by exercise that the anemia also decreased. Even the abnormal increase in red blood cell production could be reduced to a lower level. "Training was able to restore tumor-induced metabolic remodeling and inflammation sufficiently to blunt the excessive blood cell formation and destruction," explained Handschin. This study provides novel insights into the development of tumor-associated anemia. The findings suggest that exercise is a useful therapy for cancer patients, in order to counteract anemia and associated fatigue and lethargy and in turn to improve their general well-being and quality of life. This also leads to improved tolerance of radio- and chemotherapy, as has previously been established.   Mango could help maintain gut bacteria at risk from high-fat diets Oklahoma State University, September 13, 2021 Mango consumption could help prevent the loss of beneficial gut bacteria caused by a high fat diet, according to research on mice. The findings, published in the Journal of Nutrition , appears to reveal for the first time the positive impact of mango on gut microbiota. In the study, 60 male mice were assigned to one of four dietary treatment groups for 12 weeks - control (with 10% of calories from fat), high fat (with 60% calories from fat), or high fat with 1% or 10% mango. All high-fat diets had similar macronutrient, calcium, phosphorus, and fiber content. “We investigated the effects of freeze-dried mango pulp combined with an high-fat diet on the cecal microbial population and its relation to body composition, lipids, glucose parameters, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production, and gut inflammatory markers in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity,” the study reports. The high-fat dietary treatment with 10% mango (equivalent to 1½ cups of fresh mango pieces) was found to be the most effective in preventing the loss of beneficial bacteria from a high-fat diet without decreasing body weight or fat accumulation. Specifically, mango supplementation regulated gut bacteria in favor of Bifidobacteria and Akkermansia and enhanced short-chain fatty acid (SFCA) production. SCFAs have been shown to possess a wide range of beneficial effects, such as anti-inflammatory properties. Fibre benefits In previous studies, Bifidobacteria, for example, has been found to be lower in both obese individuals and those with type-2 diabetes. Similar results have been observed withAkkermansia in animal studies. High-fat diets, meanwhile, have been linked to gut dysbiosis, or bacterial imbalances within the intestinal tract. "Fibre and other bioactive compounds in plant-based foods are suggested to prevent gut dysbiosis caused by a high-fat diet," said Edralin A. Lucas, professor of nutritional sciences at Oklahoma State University and lead researcher of the study. "Mango is a good source of fibre and has been reported in previous studies to have anti-obesogenic, hypoglycemic and immunomodulatory properties. The results of this animal study showed that adding mango to the diet may help maintain and regulate gut health and levels of beneficial bacteria levels.” India, China, Indonesia and Thailand are the top four Mango growing countries, accounting for well over half the total global production. Although more research is needed on the effects of mango on human health, this study suggests that mango consumption may be important in improving gut health particularly for those consuming a high-fat diet, the researchers concluded.

VO2 Max Podcast
Episode 23: Evidence-Based Supplementation for Endurance Performance

VO2 Max Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 44:51


In this episode, I discuss the evidence surrounding supplements/substances that have some promise for enhancing endurance performance.Website: www.peakendurancesolutions.comEmail: peakendurancesolutions@outlook.comInstagram: @ryaneckert_triEvidence-Based Supplementation for Endurance Performance - One-Page Reference GuideReferences1. Bishop, D. (2010). Dietary supplements and team-sport performance. Sports medicine, 40(12), 995-1017.2. Jones, A. M. (2014). Dietary nitrate supplementation and exercise performance. Sports medicine, 44(1), 35-45.3. Kreider, R. B., Wilborn, C. D., Taylor, L., Campbell, B., Almada, A. L., Collins, R., ... & Kerksick, C. M. (2010). ISSN exercise & sport nutrition review: research & recommendations. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 7(1), 1.4. Sports Nutrition Conference: Oxford, London. (2012). Available at https://myasucourses.asu.edu/bbcswebdav/pid-14289375-dt-content-rid-82469462_1/courses/2016FallB-X-NTR598-90747-90748/SNC%20London%202012.pdf.  5. Thomas, D. T., Erdman, K. A., & Burke, L. M. (2016). Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 116(3), 501-528.6. Peart, D.J., Siegler, J.C., & Vince, R.V. (2012). Practical recommendations for coaches and athletes: a meta-analysis of sodium bicarbonate use for athletic performance. The journal of strength & conditioning research, 26(7), 1975-1983.7. Kern, M., Misell, L. M., Ordille, A., Alm, M., & Salewske, B. (2018). Double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized crossover pilot study evaluating the impacts of sodium bicarbonate in a transdermal delivery system on physiological parameters and exercise performance: 2402 Board# 238 June 1 1100 AM-1230 PM. Medicine & science in sports & exercise, 50(5S):595.8. Misell, L., Kern, M., Ordille, A., Alm, M., & Salewske, B. (2018). Double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized crossover pilot study evaluating the impacts of sodium bicarbonate in a transdermal delivery system on delayed muscle onset soreness: 2403 Board# 239 June 1 1100 AM-1230 PM. Medicine & science in sports & exercise, 50(5S):595.Love our content and want to support our show? Click the link here and consider supporting us by becoming a Patreon member with options to get exclusive branded merchandise!

All Home Care Matters
Quick Tips: Mealtime with Dementia (Mini-Series Part 1)

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 8:14


  Today's Quick Tips episode is a part of our new Nutritional Health for Seniors mini-series. First, we want to thank all of our viewers and listeners for joining us for this mini-series, and please, let us know what you want our next series to be. For today's episode, we've gathered some tips, tools, and resources that we think can help you and your loved one with dementia ensure that they are able to get the nutrition they need. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   Memory loss and the decline of cognitive abilities are often brought to mind when thinking about dementia and how it affects our loved one, but what about the other issues that dementia brings? Mealtimes often present an all-too-common issue that families face with loved ones who have dementia. Making sure your loved one is eating and getting the proper nutrition that they need is a daunting, but extremely important task that family caregivers face daily.   According to the Terra Vista Foundation, many individuals with dementia often experience unplanned weight loss due to things like decreased levels of activity, depression, side effects of medications, and lack of muscle coordination which leads to problems with chewing and swallowing.   When considering ways to help your loved one make sure they are getting the nutrients they need, always talk to their doctor first. Make sure you tell them any side effects of the medications your loved one is on are causing, such as trouble swallowing, so that they can make any adjustments to dosage or changes of medication as soon as possible. Your doctor also might have suggestions on how to help your loved one eat.   It's important to make sure your loved one is drinking enough water throughout the day. If they are having trouble remembering to drink when they are thirsty, try using a measured water bottle with fun designs to help them drink more throughout the day. Popsicles are another great way to keep your loved one hydrated and you can make them yourself. Popsicles are especially great if swallowing hurts their throat. The ice can help soothe the inside, possibly making eating easier.   Engaging the senses is another way that entices dementia patients to eat or eat more. Using aromatic herbs and spices and vibrant colors can engage their vision and sense of smell. This is a good technique to use, as long as your loved one isn't feeling nauseous. Fragrant foods may make them feel worse, so make sure you try to gauge how they are feeling before preparing any foods.   Your loved one with dementia may easily become overwhelmed and mealtimes are no different. Using smaller portions on a larger plate can help them focus more on eating and less on the amounts in front of them. Finger foods may also help them eat more, especially as their motor skills worsen. Silverware can take more focus to use and if they are having trouble getting the food to their mouth, they may get angry and refuse to eat. Finger foods, like cut up sandwiches and fresh fruit, can be easier for them to eat themselves, without needing help from you.   Limiting distractions during mealtime can also increase the likelihood that your loved one finishes, or even eats, their meal. Try turning off the television or music and refrain from having conversations during mealtime if your loved one usually gets distracted by these things. The less distractions around, the more your loved one is able to focus on the task at hand.   Exercising may also help increase your loved one's appetite. Going for a walk with your loved one may help them begin to feel hungry and thirsty and they may decide it is time to eat on their own. Studies have also shown that exercising may help slow the cognitive decline in dementia patients.   If your loved one is able to eat in small quantities, but isn't getting all the nutrients they need, focus on adding more to what they are able to eat. For example, if your loved one can eat a half a cup of fruit at once, try adding some yogurt or cheeses to add more fat to their diet.   When trying to make sure your loved one is gaining or maintaining weight, ensuring they are eating foods high in calories and proteins is essential. Cooking with butter or high fat oils is a great way to sneak in more calories that won't affect the taste of their foods. Whole milk and fruit juice is also a good way to get them to drink calories.   Protein shakes like Ensure can also be helpful. You can also put ensure in the freezer for a few hours for a frozen snack they can eat with a spoon. We've heard from quite a few families and caregivers that Chocolate Ensure is best this way.   The Crisis Prevention Center says to just remember that each person is different, and care must be individualized depending on specific needs and through observation. What works for someone else may not work for your loved one, and that's okay. If you are interested in learning more about Dementia, check out our Dementia and Alzheimer's playlist on YouTube.   Similarly, if your loved one frequently forgets that they just ate and wants to eat again, try giving them multiple small meals. You can start with something like chicken, and then move on to rice, and then to asparagus. If your loved one is having problems with overeating due to memory loss, this technique can be especially helpful. You can give them smaller portions of the meal and spread it out over time.   The most important tip we can give you today is to observe. Let them eat as much as they can on their own so that they may hold on to some sense of independence. Observing also allows you to notice any patterns your loved one may have with eating. You may find that they have a favorite food or herb this way, or you may notice that they eat more when they use a spoon versus a fork.    We hope this episode has given you some helpful tips and tricks for dealing with mealtimes with dementia. We know that dementia is hard on everyone, not just your loved one, and we are here to help. If you would like more information on mealtimes and nutritional health for seniors, check out our Nutritional and Dietary Support for Seniors playlist on YouTube.   For more information and resources on nutritional health for your loved one with dementia, visit the Alzheimer's Association's website at ALZ.org. They have many resources that you may find useful. You can also find a link to their website in the show notes for today's episode.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form there where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone is who could benefit from this episode and please make sure to share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode.   Sources: https://www.terravistafoundation.org/eating-tips-alzheimers-disease/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw8vqGBhC_ARIsADMSd1BrOqbXQ3kxpTx3xPdfpE4pdgonrwhlgAQUE4wkBOfSIhd6EglaWtQaApgkEALw_wcB   https://www.crisisprevention.com/Blog/food-and-dementia   https://www.alz.org/help-support/caregiving/daily-care/food-eating?gclid=Cj0KCQjw8vqGBhC_ARIsADMSd1CGFYJ1oB1S4noiJn3cMRRtD0VE4HV0I8PtomXpmVIzzbG4e3ZJ9McaApw3EALw_wcB

The Whole Word Podcast
Deuteronomy 14 - Dietary and Tithing Laws

The Whole Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 11:05


Deuteronomy 14Clean and Unclean Food (v 1-29)Support the show (https://www.eservicepayments.com/cgi-bin/Vanco_ver3.vps?appver3=Fi1giPL8kwX_Oe1AO50jRiyQtOyGk4k_EcVQYcCBuEehjXsUKRLlmI4vCU4-rZZZ2EvVVAEjqawDomKT1pbouVpn5a3cpHzCC-lHLmLDXQg=&ver=3)

The Revive Stronger Podcast
209: The Improvement Season - Digestive Issues In A Cutting Phase

The Revive Stronger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 61:20


We're back with another episode. Steve is about to do his second show and we're talking about peak week eating, diet break, irritability during a diet and digestive issues in a cutting phase Timestamps: (00:00) Intro (00:10) Irritable during a diet (09:35) Digestive issues in a cutting phase (15:18) Peak week approach and eating behaviour (29:16) Comparing yourself to your past self (35:26) Following common peak week advise (47:10) Dietary fatigue dissipation during a diet break/refeeds Thanks, please comment, like and subscribe! COACHING: https://revivestronger.com/online-coaching/ MEMBERSITE: https://revivestronger.com/team-revive-stronger/ WEBSITE: https://www.revivestronger.com MINI CUT MOVEMENT: https://revivestronger.com/mini-cut-movement/ FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/revivestronger INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/revivestronger NEWSLETTER: https://bit.ly/2rRONG5 YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZMWHHwI-Iw __________________________________________________________________ If you want to support us via a donation, that's highly appreciated! Patreon • https://www.patreon.com/revivestronger Don't like Patreon, go to Paypal! • https://bit.ly/2XZloJ4 __________________________________________________________________ Our Ebooks! Ultimate Guide To Contest Prep Ebook: • https://revivestronger.com/product/the-ultimate-guide-to-contest-prep/ Primer Phase Ebook: • https://revivestronger.com/product/the-primer-phase/ __________________________________________________________________ Stay up to date with the latest research and educate yourself! MASS (Research Review): • https://goo.gl/c7FSJD RP+ Membership: • https://ob262.isrefer.com/go/plus/Steve90/ JPS Mentorship • https://jpseducation.mykajabi.com/a/13324/esJ8AZwy __________________________________________________________________ Books we recommend! Muscle & Strength Pyramids • https://goo.gl/S8s6tG RP Books • http://bit.ly/2vREaH0 RP + Members site • https://ob262.isrefer.com/go/plus/Steve90/ For more • http://revivestronger.com/library/ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ When you're interested in online coaching, please go visit our website and follow the application form: https://www.revivestronger.com/online-coaching/

Talking Biotech Podcast
307 – Glyphosate Residues and Dietary Exposure

Talking Biotech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 62:21


The herbicide glyphosate has been used for decades, with increased use paralleling the adoption of genetically engineered crops. The compound has a strong safety record and international regulatory consensus stating no unique health risks when [...] The post 307 – Glyphosate Residues and Dietary Exposure first appeared on Talking Biotech Podcast.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.25.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 60:06


The Gary Null Show Notes – 08.25.21 American Medical Association Calls for Covid-19 Vaccine Mandates China, 2049 The Leak That ‘Exposed the True Afghan War' Fauci Dismisses “Freedom” In Call For Vaccine Mandates: “The Time Has Come. Enough Is Enough.” A New Low for the FDA Eight Key Points on America's Defeat in Afghanistan 2 Things Mainstream Media Didn't Tell You About FDA's Approval of Pfizer Vaccine America in an Age of Faucism Today's Videos 1.  Dave Cullen Video on Mandating Vaccines: ” Vaccination: They're Becoming Desperate” 2. The Dunning-Kruger Effect – Cognitive Bias – Why Incompetent People Think They Are Competent 3. Dr. Malone Sounds Alarm On Liability Coverage Of Pfizer Vax Start this clip at 5.00 in when Dr. Malone begins to speak. 4. Dr. Ryan Cole #StoptheMandate (start at 1:25) Study suggests vitamin D supplementation may serve as part of strategy for autoimmune and infectious diseases associated with leaky gut MacKay Children's Hospital (Taiwan), August 15, 2021 According to news reporting from Taipei, Taiwan, research stated, “Vitamin D (VD) plays an important role not only in mineral balance and skeletal maintenance but also in immune modulation. VD status was found correlated with the pathophysiology and severity of inflammatory bowel diseases and other autoimmune disorders. Epithelial barrier function is primarily regulated by the tight-junction (TJ) proteins.” The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from MacKay Children's Hospital: “In this study, we try to establish an animal model by raising mice fed VD-deficient diet and to investigate the effects of VD-deficient diet on gut integrity and zonulin expression. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered either VD-deficient [VDD group, 25(OH)2D3 0 IU/per mouse] or VD-sufficient [VDS group, 25(OH)2D3 37.8 IU/per mouse] special diets for 7 weeks. Body weight and diet intake were recorded weekly. Serum VD levels were detected. After sacrifice, jejunum and colon specimens were collected. The villus length and crypt depth of the jejunum as well as mucosa thickness of the colon were measured. Various serum pro-inflammatory cytokines and intestinal TJ proteins were assessed. The serum level of zonulin and the mRNA expression of jejunum zonulin were also investigated. We found that mice fed a VDD diet had a lower serum level of VD after 7 weeks (p < 0.001). VDD mice gained significant less weight (p = 0.022) and took a similar amount of diet (p = 0.398) when compared to mice raised on a VDS diet. Significantly decreased colon mucosa thickness was found in VDD mice compared with the VDS group (p = 0.022). A marked increase in serum pro-inflammatory cytokine levels was demonstrated in VDD mice. All relative levels of claudin (CLD)-1 (p = 0.007), CLD-3 (p < 0.001), CLD-7 (p < 0.001), and zonulin-1 (ZO-1, p = 0.038) protein expressions were significantly decreased in the VDD group when compared to the VDS group. A significant upregulation of mRNA expression of jejunum zonulin (p = 0.043) and elevated serum zonulin (p = 0.001) were found in the VDD group.” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “We successfully demonstrated that VDD could lead to impaired barrier properties. We assume that sufficient VD could maintain intestinal epithelial integrity and prevent mucosal barrier dysfunction. VD supplementation may serve as part of a therapeutic strategy for human autoimmune and infectious diseases with intestinal barrier dysfunction (leaky gut) in the future. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that VDD could lead to a significant upregulation in mRNA expression of the jejunum zonulin level and also a marked elevation of serum zonulin in a mouse model.” Investigating the anti-hypertensive effects of pumpkin seed oil Marymount University (US) and University of Guilan (China), August 24, 2021 In a study, researchers from Iran and the U.S. found that pumpkin seed oil can potentially treat hypertension in postmenopausal women. Their report was published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal women are more likely to develop hypertension than men of the same age. In vivo studies reveal that pumpkin seed oil has anti-hypertensive activity. The team investigated the effects of pumpkin seed oil supplementation on vascular function and heart rate variability in postmenopausal women with elevated blood pressure. Participants were assigned to take either a pumpkin seed oil supplement or a placebo for the six-week study. Those in the experimental group took 3 grams of pumpkin seed oil every day. Brachial and central blood pressure, wave reflection (augmentation index, AIx), arterial stiffness (SI) and various HRV parameters were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Those who took pumpkin seed oil had significantly lower AIx, brachial and systolic blood pressure after treatment. SI and HRV parameters remained unchanged for the treatment group and the placebo group at the end of the study. In sum, taking pumpkin seed oil may improve arterial hemodynamics in postmenopausal women.   Lack of exercise and poor nutrition could increase the risk of diseases like dementia Kings College London, August 23, 2021 New research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London has found that both diet and exercise can influence the risk of cognitive decline (CD) and dementia by potentially influencing hippocampal neurogenesis (the process by which the brain produces new brain cells) long before their onset. The study, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, suggests that altered neurogenesis in the brain could potentially represent an early biomarker for both CD and dementia. The investigation studied how the blood of participants with and without CD and dementia could influence hippocampal neurogenesis in laboratory settings and whether diet and exercise were important factors. Specifically, blood samples of 418 French adults over the age of 65 were collected 12-years prior to CD and dementia diagnosis and tested on human hippocampal stems cells. Additionally, information on each participant's sociodemographic, lifestyle, and clinical data were collected and incidence cognition status and dementia were measured every two to three years over a 12-year period. Over the course of the study, the researchers established that 12 years prior to diagnosis, both CD and Alzheimer's were associated with levels of neural stem cell death. The team also found that exercise, nutrition, vitamin D levels, carotenoid and lipid levels are all associated with the rate at which cells die off. Furthermore, physical activity and nutrition were key factors that then also determined CD status. Specifically, researchers found that reduced physical activity and increased malnutrition both increased cell death which in turn increased the risk for future CD. While previous studies have established that diet and exercise have some protective effects against CD and dementia, these roles have been poorly understood at the neurobiological level. To date, studies on animals have shown how diet and exercise can directly influence hippocampal neurogenesis, potentially explaining how exercise and diet may biologically exert their effects, but this study sheds further light on this in the context of a human model. Dr. Sandrine Thuret, the study's lead investigator said, “Our study has demonstrated not only that there are individual markers of hippocampal neurogenesis associated with CD and dementia 12 years later, but also that there is some degree of specificity with respect to diagnoses of dementia subtypes. If an individual displays an increase in their levels of cell death during differentiation (when neural stem cells are becoming neurons), we can look at this as a potential warning sign of CD. Conversely, a decrease in levels of cell death during proliferation (the process by which a single cell divides into a pair) and reduced hippocampal progenitor cell integrity could be viewed as a predictor for Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular dementia, respectively.” According to Alzheimer's Research UK, there were a total of 525,315 people living with a dementia diagnosis in the UK in 2020. Rates of cognitive decline and dementia are expected to triple in prevalence by 2040. Dr. Andrea du Preez, the study's first author from King's IoPPN said, “While more work is undoubtedly needed to fully understand how diet and exercise might modulate hippocampal neurogenesis, our findings may represent an effective early preventative strategy against CD and dementia.” Mindfulness may improve cognition in older adults University College London, August 23, 2021 Mindfulness may provide modest benefits to cognition, particularly among older adults, finds a new review of evidence led by UCL researchers. The systematic review and meta-analysis, published in Neuropsychology Review, found that, while mindfulness is typically geared towards improving mental health and well-being, it may also provide additional benefits to brain health. The study's lead author, PhD student Tim Whitfield (UCL Psychiatry) said that “the positive effects of mindfulness-based programs on mental health are already relatively well-established. Here, our findings suggest that a small benefit is also conferred to cognition, at least among older adults.” The researchers reviewed previously published studies of mindfulness, and identified 45 studies that fit their criteria, which incorporated a total of 2,238 study participants. Each study tested the effects of a mindfulness-based intervention delivered by a facilitator in a group setting, over at least four sessions, while excluding mindfulness retreats in order to have a more homogenous set of studies. The majority of studies involved a certified instructor teaching participants techniques such as sitting meditation, mindful movement and body scan, generally on a weekly basis across six to 12 weeks, while also asking participants to continue the practices in their own time. The researchers found that overall, mindfulness conferred a small but significant benefit to cognition. Subgroup analysis revealed that the effect was slightly stronger for people over 60, while there was not a significant effect for people under 60. Tim Whitfield commented that “executive function is known to decline with age among older adults; the improvement in people over 60 suggests that mindfulness may help guard against cognitive decline, by helping to maintain or restore executive function in late adulthood. It might be easier to restore cognitive functions to previous levels, rather than to improve them beyond the developmental peak.” When they investigated which aspects of cognition were affected, the researchers found that mindfulness was beneficial only to executive function, and more specifically, there was strong evidence of a small positive effect on working memory (which is one facet of executive function). The researchers also analyzed whether mindfulness outperformed other ‘active interventions' (such as brain training, relaxation, or other health or educational programs) or only when compared to people who were not offered any alternative treatment. They found that cognitive benefits of mindfulness were only significant compared with an ‘inactive' comparison, which means they cannot rule out that the benefits may have been at least partly derived from an expectation of treatment benefits, or social interactions. The researchers say that more research is needed into which characteristics of mindfulness training may be more likely to confer cognitive benefits, or whether delivering interventions over longer periods, or in intensive retreat settings, might yield greater cognitive benefits. Senior author Dr Natalie Marchant (UCL Psychiatry) said that they “know mindfulness-based programs benefit mental health, and our paper now suggests that mindfulness may also help to maintain cognitive faculties as people age. Mindfulness practices do not share much in common with cognitive test measures, so it is notable that mindfulness training's impact appears to transfer to other domains. While our review only identified a small benefit to executive function, it remains possible that some types of mindfulness training might deliver larger gains.” Major Depression Symptoms Improved with Chlorella University of Western Australia, August 23rd 2021    The symptoms of depression are often treated with drugs that can have long-term adverse side effects. A new study finds chlorella significantly reduces symptoms of major depression. Research from the University of Western Australia in Perth has found that chlorella can significantly improve symptoms of depression. The researchers tested 92 patients with major depressive disorder – a disorder that affects millions of people around the world. The researchers split the patients into two groups. They gave 42 of the patients 1,800 milligrams of Chlorella vulgaris extract per day. The other 50 patients continued their standard care. The researchers used a scale called the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to test the patients' symptoms of depression, along with the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) scale. Both of these have been used in clinical settings to establish the range of depressive symptoms and the severity of the diagnosis. After six weeks of treatment with either the standard pharmaceutical treatment or chlorella extract, the researchers found that those patients who had taken the chlorella had significantly reduced scores in both depression tests. The BDI-II scores went down by over four points and the HADS scores went down by 3.71 points. To give some reference, the HADS scale consists of 21 points, and anything over an 8 is considered symptomatic of anxiety or depression. In addition to reduced total scores, the researchers also saw significant reductions in some of the subset scores. For example, physical and cognitive symptoms were significantly improved in the chlorella group, and subscales for depression and anxiety were significantly lower among the chlorella group. The researchers concluded: “This pilot exploratory trial provides the first clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of adjunctive therapy with CVE in improving physical and cognitive symptoms of depression as well as anxiety symptoms in patients who are receiving standard antidepressant therapy.” Chlorella is a microalga. It is a single-celled algae that is typically grown in controlled growth medium tanks. It is significantly high in protein, with over 40 percent protein, with all of the essential amino acids. It also contains proteins that stimulate growth hormone and brain neurotransmitters. Concentrated extract was used in this study due to the fact that whole chlorella can be difficult for the body to break down the cell wall. An extract provides the contents of the cell after the cell wall has been broken. Greater adherence to Mediterranean diet associated with decreased cardiometabolic risk during pregnancy University of Granada, August 20, 2021 According to news reporting out of Granada, Spain,research stated, “Studies regarding dietary patterns and cardiometabolic risk markers during pregnancy are scarce. The aim of the present study was to analyse whether different degrees of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) and the MD components were associated with cardiometabolic markers and a clustered cardiometabolic risk during pregnancy.” Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Granada, “This study comprised 119 pregnant women from the GEStation and FITness (GESTAFIT) project. Dietary habits were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire at the 16th and 34th gestational weeks (g.w.). The Mediterranean Diet Score was employed to assess MD adherence. The following cardiometabolic markers were assessed: pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). A greater MD adherence was associated with a better cardiometabolic status in cross-sectional (16th g.w. and 34th g.w.) and prospective analyses (MD adherence at the 16th g.w. and cardiometabolic markers at the 34th g.w.; SBP, DBP and HDL-C; all, p< 0.05). Participants with the highest MD adherence (Tertile 3) had a lower clustered cardiometabolic risk than those with the lowest MD adherence (Tertile 1) at the 16th and 34th g.w. (both, p< 0.05). A higher intake of fruits, vegetables and fish and a lower intake of refined cereals and red meat and subproducts were associated with a lower cardiometabolic risk during pregnancy (all, p< 0.05).” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “A higher MD adherence, a greater intake of fruits, vegetables and fish and a lower intake of refined cereals and red meat and subproducts showed a cardioprotective effect throughout gestation.” Unhealthy diet during pregnancy could be linked to ADHD King's College London and the University of Bristol , August 20, 2021   New research led by scientists from King's College London and the University of Bristol has found that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy may be linked to symptoms of ADHD in children who show conduct problems early in life. Published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, this study is the first to indicate that epigenetic changes evident at birth may explain the link between unhealthy diet, conduct problems and ADHD. Early onset conduct problems (e.g. lying, fighting) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are the leading causes of child mental health referral in the UK. These two disorders tend to occur in tandem (more than 40 per cent of children with a diagnosis of conduct disorder also have a diagnosis of ADHD) and can also be traced back to very similar prenatal experiences such as maternal distress or poor nutrition. In this new study of participants from the Bristol-based ‘Children of the 90s' cohort, 83 children with early-onset conduct problems were compared with 81 children who had low levels of conduct problems. The researchers assessed how the mothers' nutrition affected epigenetic changes (or DNA methylation) of IGF2, a gene involved in fetal development and the brain development of areas implicated in ADHD – the cerebellum and hippocampus. Notably, DNA methylation of IGF2 had previously been found in children of mothers who were exposed to famine in the Netherlands during World War II. The researchers from King's and Bristol found that poor prenatal nutrition, comprising high fat and sugar diets of processed food and confectionary, was associated with higher IGF2 methylation in children with early onset conduct problems and those with low conduct problems. Higher IGF2 methylation was also associated with higher ADHD symptoms between the ages of 7 and 13, but only for children who showed an early onset of conduct problems. Dr Edward Barker from King's College London said: ‘Our finding that poor prenatal nutrition was associated with higher IGF2 methylation highlights the critical importance of a healthy diet during pregnancy. These results suggest that promoting a healthy prenatal diet may ultimately lower ADHD symptoms and conduct problems in children. This is encouraging given that nutritional and epigenetic risk factors can be altered.' Dr Barker added: ‘We now need to examine more specific types of nutrition. For example, the types of fats such as omega 3 fatty acids, from fish, walnuts and chicken are extremely important for neural development. ‘We already know that nutritional supplements for children can lead to lower ADHD and conduct problems, so it will be important for future research to examine the role of epigenetic changes in this process.' Green tea may help protect against sunburn Taiyo Kagaku Co (Japan), August 24, 2021 A systematic review and meta-analysis published in a recent issue of Molecules found an association between oral intake or topical application of green tea catechins and a reduction in ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced sunburn, which is an inflammatory reaction of the skin to UV exposure, clinically known as erythema.* Catechins are a type of flavonoid that occur in plants such as Camellia sinensis (tea). Green tea catechins include (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), well known for its anti-cancer and health-promoting effects, (-)-epicatechin, and many other similar molecules. These compounds have been recognized as having anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and photo-protective properties. “To our knowledge, this is the first meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness of green tea catechins specifically on measures of ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema and related pro-inflammatory mediators,” authors Mahendra P. Kapoor and colleagues wrote. “Regular intake of as low as 540 mg of green tea catechins per day could be beneficial for the protection against ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema, wherein green tea catechin metabolites are bioavailable at the dermis and epidermis levels of the skin, and thus increase the minimal dose of radiation (MED) required to induce erythema.” Dr Kapoor added that the study “suggests that green tea catechins can strengthen the skin's tolerance to ultraviolet radiation-induced skin damage from radiation through the prevention of the ultraviolet radiation-induced perturbation of epidermal barrier functions.” Study details: 12 weeks of green tea intake yields benefits The meta-analysis included three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials and one non-double-blind, non-placebo-controlled study that examined potential protective effects of orally administered capsules containing green tea catechins against sunburn (clinically known as erythema) induced by solar-simulated UV radiation. Two additional studies that involved a single dose of topically administered catechins were separately analyzed. Pooled analysis of data from three studies that evaluated erythema in skin exposed to UV radiation before and after 12 or more weeks of green tea catechin intake revealed a favorable effect in association with catechin intake. Both low and high doses of the green tea capsules were effective at decreasing low-dose UV radiation-induced erythema. It was also noted that a significant favorable effect was seen in the one study which assessed UV radiation-induced erythema after green tea intake for only six weeks, but as none of the other studies assessed this shorter duration of intake, further analysis was not performed. When green tea catechins' effects compared to a placebo were analyzed, pooling the data of two placebo-controlled trials confirmed their effectiveness against low-intensity UV radiation-induced erythema. Pooling data from participants in the studies involving topical green tea catechins revealed significant benefit for green tea at higher UV radiation doses.

Muscle Maven Radio
Dr. Elly Michelle | How nutrition and libido are connected

Muscle Maven Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 43:28


Let's talk about sex! Today Ashleigh welcomes back her friend Dr. Elly Michelle Lieppman, a licensed naturopathic doctor who specializes in individualized women's medicine, optimizing hormones, digestion, and energy.   In this short episode, Dr. Elly and Ashleigh tackle the complex and spicy topic of sexual health and libido - discussing topics like: How libido is an indicator of overall health The many physical and emotional layers that contribute to libido What our sex hormones are telling us Dietary issues that can contribute to low libido Why women especially should prioritize their sexual health more  Dr. Elly Michelle is passionate about restoring balance in the body naturally and sustainably through lifestyle medicine, nutrition, and strategic supplementation, by uncovering the root cause of health concerns and understanding what is going on in your body at a deeper level. Learn more at drellymichelle.com   If you liked this episode and want to learn more, consider downloading the In Harmony with your Hormones online workshop - it contains more than four hours of lectures hosted by Dr. Elly and Ashleigh on women's physiology and hormones; understanding your cycle; optimal dietary and exercise approaches for hormonal health; and a deeper dive on sexual health, two healthy recipe ebooks, as well as a number of downloads and resources. Check it out here: https://gumroad.com/l/UipbQY   Thanks to our show sponsor BUBS Naturals - stock up on the best quality grassfed collagen and MCT powder at here (www.bubsnaturals.com) and use the code MM20 for a massive 20% discount!   Learn more about Ashleigh, suggest an idea for the podcast, or sign up for one of her health coaching programs at ashleighvanhouten.com