Podcasts about big brothers

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Best podcasts about big brothers

Latest podcast episodes about big brothers

Idaho Matters
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Idaho needs you

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 6:43


There aren't enough Big Brothers to go around and BBBS is asking for volunteers. CEO Hillary Xoumanivong joins Idaho Matters to tell us more.

Coast Bible Church
The Good Father: Big Brothers - Audio

Coast Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 33:18


Celebrate life from death - look for redemption, for resurrection, for new hope then celebrate.

Community Access
January National Mentor Month

Community Access

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 9:18


President & CEO Andy Fleischmann of Big Brothers and Big Sisters of CT shares important info on how you can be a mentor!

Looking Outside.
Looking Outside Thinking: Matt Klein, Foresight & Strategy Lead Reddit

Looking Outside.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 40:50


We start a new year with a new way of Thinking, approaching the topic of careful consideration, extrapolation and explanation in a critical way. Joining us is self-proclaimed overthinker, award winning writer, leading cultural commentator and Foresight & Strategy Lead at Reddit, Matt Klein.As can be seen by his intro, Matt takes on a lot and he takes in a lot. He starts by sharing how he loads information and how he avoids overloading - a process where he binge eats information and then let's it "simmer" at its own pace during a silent walk outside. When he returns to it, it forms a constellation of connection points and inspiration sparks.Both in foresight, Jo and Matt discuss the challenge of translating complex trends and ideas into something easily understood and actionable to others, without over-simplification. Matt does this by using tangible, real examples, particularly in showing how black and white (and grey) can co-exist in culture.Matt also speaks to the importance of recalibrating your reality by listening to something that makes you uncomfortable. From hearing that other perspective, he attempts to form an understanding so he doesn't shut out or attack those ideas he ardently disagrees with, because whether or not he agrees with them, "that person exists".Matt recognizes that this process of thinking critically can be hard work and often demotivating, particularly when you have to catch yourself from feeling like you've got it all figured out. But that our job should be not just pointing to what's interesting but to what's true. --To look outside, Matt takes in a lot of varied sources, whether it's publications, subreddits, or twitter accounts. He also carefully inspects an everyday interaction, as a method of cultural immersion. An example is being mindful when you're shopping by observing what's on the shelf, what people buy, what your local store is doing that's unique. Then reflecting on what says about that organization, about a collective society, about people. Matt does this intentionally as an exercise in being open, mindful and paying attention.--Matt Klein leads the foresight practice at Reddit where he studies culture and helps brands across all verticals identify emerging social shifts and author future-proofing business strategies.As a quantitative futurist with a decade of experience in trend forecasting, marketing and innovation, Matt has consulted with the United Nations and Fortune 100 businesses, to venture capital investors, TV producers, and startups on what comes next.With a background in CyberPsychology and Memetics, Matt's POV is rooted in the psycho- and sociological implication of emerging tech.An award-winning writer and leading voice in cultural theory, Matt's a frequent commentator for The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes, The Atlantic, DAZED, VICE and Rolling Stone.Quoted by the likes of Arianna Huffington and Richard Branson, and subscribed to by thousands globally, Matt's own publication ZINE offers executives and students alike explanations into overlooked cultural trends.Matt is also the Founder and now Advisor of PRSNL Branding, an education platform helping systemically disadvantaged professionals strengthen their online presence and advance their careers.Always looking to give back to the field he loves, Matt is a university lecturer (NYU, Queens College, University of Oregon), keynote speaker (SXSW, CAA, Sweathead), industry judge (The Webby Awards), advisor and mentor.When not analyzing culture, Matt's collecting hobbies including cycling, drumming and wine studies, and volunteering with Big Brothers of...

Two Dollar Late Fee
Episode 96: The Scott Schwartz & Zack Ward Interview "A Christmas Story"

Two Dollar Late Fee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 46:38


In episode 96, Dustin & Zak interview Scott Schwartz & Zack Ward! Scott Schwartz (A Christmas Story, The Toy, Kidco) & Zack Ward (A Christmas Story, Freddy VS Jason, Titus) sit down with D & Z to reminisce on A Christmas Story and discuss it's sequel A Christmas Story Christmas! D & Z's season 3 finale with Scott and Zack will make you laugh your “HO-HO-HO's” off! This episode was part of Geekscape's fundraiser benefiting BIG BROTHERS & BIG SISTERS. if you'd like to donate you can do so here NEW EPISODES EVERY TWO WEEKS! Please follow us on Spotify & subscribe, rate and review us 5 stars on Apple Podcasts (aka iTunes) Support Us On Patreon: www.patreon.com/twodollarlatefee Instagram: @twodollarlatefee Check out our network: www.geekscape.net Zak on Instagram: @zakshaffer Dustin on Instagram: @dustinrubinvo Check out Jim Walker's intro/outro music on Bandcamp: jvamusic1.bandcamp.com Facebook: facebook.com/Two-Dollar-Late-Fee-Podcast Merch: https://www.teepublic.com/user/two-dollar-late-fee IMDB: https://www.imdb.com iTunes: podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/two-dollar-late-fee Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/ Amazon: music.amazon.com/podcasts Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com RadioPublic: radiopublic.com/two-dollar-late-fee Podbean: twodollarlatefee.podbean.com Stitcher: www.stitcher.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Welcome to the Arena
Todd Lachman, President and CEO at Sovos Brands – Secret Sauce: Disrupting the food aisle with premium brands

Welcome to the Arena

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 29:27


Summary:Being a disruptor in business can be as uncomplicated as putting out high quality products, in a small-but-mighty category. And that's what today's guest has done, with incredible success. On this episode we're talking to Todd Lachman, the founder, President and CEO of Sovos Brands.For 25 years, Todd's delivered growth and value creation for some of the biggest names in consumer packaged goods. He served as Global President of Mars Pet Care, President of Mars Chocolate, North America and Latin America, and Executive Vice President of Del Monte Foods Company. He also held senior management roles at H.J. Heinz Company after moving up the marketing ranks at Proctor and Gamble. Outside of his extensive professional experience, Todd's an active board member with Big Brothers and Big Sisters in the Bay Area, and he's a super active guy who's into skiing, cycling and hiking with his family and two dogs.I managed to tear him away from his busy life for a conversation about how he built Sovos Brands into the huge success it is today, and what made him start the company in the first place. Highlights: Todd talks about starting Sovos and how he arrived at the idea (2:57) How each of the Sovos brands fit together (5:15) Why Sovos went public when they did (7:10) All about Rao's Sauce and why it's so successful (8:04) Becoming a billion dollar brand (11:03) Todd discusses their approach to international sales (13:13) Pricing premium products during a tricky economic and political time (14:25) Todd discusses efficiencies when it comes to P and L (16:00) The Sovos approach to innovation and new brands (18:24) The horizontal culture at Sovos (20:46) The achievements at Sovos this year (22:02) Todd's approach to M and A (23:40) The advantages of being a CEO who is from the marketing side (24:40) What Todd is most proud of with Sovos (26:49) Links:ICR TwitterICR LinkedInICR WebsiteTodd Lachman LinkedInTodd Lachman bioSovos Brands LinkedInSovos Brands websiteSovos Brands TwitterFeedback:If you have questions about the show, or have a topic in mind you'd like discussed in future episodes, email our producer, marion@lowerstreet.co.

The 4D Athletes Podcast
#93 Special Edition: Border War Showdown for Kids with Bill Brandmeyer

The 4D Athletes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 28:19


The HY-VEE HOOPS Border Showdown Fundraiser Benefitting Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Kansas City & The ShareWaves Foundation SHOWDOWN SILENT AUCTION: (Link available on the 810whb website)What's the big idea?Tigers vs. Jayhawks in a Battle for Charitable Bragging Rights. ShareWaves – Powered by Sports Radio 810WHB is teaming up with Learfield Sports to share The Hy-Vee Hoops Border Showdown Fundraiser supporting Big Brothers Big Sisters-Kansas City. This year's Hy-Vee Hoops Border Showdown will be played on Saturday, Dec 10th, in Columbia. TEXT 44-321 TO DONATEText GOKU 44-321 Text GOMU to 44-321 Donate any amount, to help your team come out on top Your donation will ignite the potential of youth in Kansas and Kansas City, through one-to-one mentorship! 810WHB is kicking things off Wednesday, Dec 7th, 2022. Filled with autographed sports memorabilia for both Tiger and Jayhawk Fans. This is a critical end-of-year fundraiser to providing health-enhancing physical activity and social-emotional support to kids throughout our city. All proceeds will fund Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City and our Power of Sports Game-Changing Grants. HERE'S WHERE YOU COME IN: Donate to your favorite team: Text “GOKU” or “GOMU” to 44-321 and give. Provide Promotional Support — with your personal and professional networks. Share our content—emails, videos, promotional info., etc. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ShareWaves810 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_sharewaves LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/sharewaves-foundation Twitter: https://twitter.com/Sharewaves810 Help us create content: Share The Hy-Vee Hoops Border Showdown Fundraiser with your listeners. Book me on your show as a guest to share the latest on our efforts. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/4dathletes/message

Mornings with Sue & Andy
Motivational Monday with Ricky Forbes

Mornings with Sue & Andy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 9:01


Connection. It's more important now than ever before. We spoke to a Canadian influencer and outdoor enthusiast - Ricky Forbes felt this lost connection with an 11-year boy that he met through the Big Brothers, Big Sisters program, and Ricky joined us on Motivational Monday.

King and the Sting and the Wing
All A** Matters | The Golden Hour PATREON EXCERPT w/ Brendan Schaub, Erik Griffin, & Chris D'Elia

King and the Sting and the Wing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 7:52


FULL EPISODE: https://www.patreon.com/Thegoldenhourpodcast The gang welcomes in Matt D'Elia (Chris' brother) and discuss their most terrifying movie experiences, scariest movies they've ever seen including The Blair Witch Project and The Exorcist. Also, they talk about Erik's Big Brothers of America story and debate the best looking serial killers, fake butts vs real butts and much more!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 73 – Unstoppable Visionary and Two-Time Cancer Survivor with Howard Brown

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 76:06


Yes, Howard Brown is a two-time cancer survivor. As you will discover in our episode, he grew up with an attitude to thrive and move forward. Throughout his life, he has learned about sales and the concepts of being a successful entrepreneur while twice battling severe cancer.   Howard's life story is one of those events worth telling and I hope you find it worth listening to. He even has written a book about all he has done. The book entitles Shining Brightly has just been released, but you get to hear the story directly from Howards' lips.   About the Guest: Howard Brown is an author, speaker, podcaster, Silicon Valley entrepreneur, interfaith peacemaker, two-time stage IV cancer survivor, and healthcare advocate. For more than three decades, Howard's business innovations, leadership principles, mentoring and his resilience in beating cancer against long odds have made him a sought-after speaker and consultant for businesses, nonprofits, congregations, and community groups. In his business career, Howard was a pioneer in helping to launch a series of technology startups before he co-founded two social networks that were the first to connect religious communities around the world. He served his alma mater—Babson College, ranked by US News as the nation's top college for entrepreneurship—as a trustee and president of Babson's worldwide alumni network. His hard-earned wisdom about resilience after beating cancer twice has led him to become a nationally known patient advocate and “cancer whisperer” to many families. Visit Howard at ShiningBrightly.com to learn more about his ongoing work and contact him. Through that website, you also will find resources to help you shine brightly in your own corner of the world. Howard, his wife Lisa, and his daughter Emily currently reside in Michigan. About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, and welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to interview Howard Brown, I'm not going to tell you a lot because I want him to tell his story. He's got a wonderful story to tell an inspiring story. And he's got lots of experiences that I think will be relevant for all of us and that we all get to listen to. So with that, Howard, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Howard Brown  01:44 Thank you, Michael. I'm really pleased to be here. And thanks for having me on your show. And excited to talk to your audience and and share a little bit.   Michael Hingson  01:54 Well, I will say that Howard and I met through Podapolooza, which I've told you about in the past and event that brings podcasters would be podcasters. And people who want to be interviewed by podcasters together, and Howard will tell us which were several of those he is because he really is involved in a lot of ways. But why don't you start maybe by telling us a little bit about your, your kind of earlier life and introduce people to you and who you are. Sure, sure.   Howard Brown  02:23 So I'm from Boston. I can disguise the accent very well. But when I talked to my mother, we're back in Boston, we're packing a car. We're going for hot dogs and beans over to Fenway Park. So gotta get a soda. We're getting a soda, not a pop. So we add the Rs. They call my wife Lisa, not Lisa. But I grew up I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, a town called Framingham. And I'm a twin. And I'm very unusual. But a girl boy twin, my twin sister Cheryl. She goes by CJ is five minutes older. And I hold that I hold that now against her now that we're older and she didn't want to be older, but now she's my older sister, my big sister by five whole minutes.   Michael Hingson  03:09 Well, she's big sister, so she needs to take care of her baby brother   Howard Brown  03:12 says exactly. And she did. And we're gonna get to that because it's a really important point being a twin, which we'll get to in a second. But so Britta she Where does she live now? So she lives 40 minutes away from me here in Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:25 Oh my gosh, you both have moved out of the area.   Howard Brown  03:27 So she she moved to Albany, New York. I moved to Southern then California, LA area and the beaches, and then Silicon Valley. And then the last 17 years we've all lived close. And we raised our families together here in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:40 What got you to all go to Michigan?   Howard Brown  03:43 Well, for me, it was a choice. My wife is from Michigan, and I was in Silicon Valley. And we were Pat had a little girl Emily, who's four. There's a story there too. But we'll we decided we wanted her to grow up with a family and cousins and aunts and uncles and my in laws live here. My wife grew up here. And this made it closer for my parents and Boston suburbs to get here as well. So great place to raise a family very different from Silicon Valley in Palo Alto, California.   Michael Hingson  04:12 Yeah, but don't you miss Steve's ice cream in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:15 I do. I miss the ice cream. I missed the cannolis in the Back Bay. I missed some of the Chinese food. So in the north end, but it just it I do, but I have not lived there. I went to college there at Babson College number one school for entrepreneurship. And then when I got my first job, I moved out to Ohio but then I moved back and well there's a whole story of why I had to move back as well but we'll get   Michael Hingson  04:41 there. So are your parents still living in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:46 They are and so my dad I call myself son of a boot man. My dad for 49 years has sold cowboy boots in New England in the in the in the western you know the states New York Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts. And that's, you know, anyone who stayed somewhere for 49 years got to be applauded. And he's a straight commission boot salesman and he sold women's shoes prior to that. So he he's, he's a renaissance man.   Michael Hingson  05:15 Wow. So does he sell cowboy boots with snow treads as it were for the winter?   Howard Brown  05:21 No snow trends but, you know, like out west when you're working on, you know, on with cattle and working out west and sometimes it's a fashion statement. Not not too many places in New England like that. But he, he made a living, he enjoyed it. And he's, he's just about to retire at the age of 79. This year.   Michael Hingson  05:39 I remember living in Boston and and when I wear shoes with just leather soles, I slid around a lot on the sidewalks and all that so did get rubber rubbers to go over my boots and then later got real boots.   Howard Brown  05:54 Right. So I have the big hiking boots, the Timberlands, but I too have a pair of a you know, in Boston, we call them rabbits, rabbits, robins. And they basically are slip ons that gave you grip. They slipped right over your leather shoes. And you wore them when anyway in the snow and in those sloshing in the mess. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:12 And they worked really well. They did. So you went off to college. And I gather kind of almost right from the beginning you got involved in the whole idea of entrepreneurship.   Howard Brown  06:23 Well, I did I transferred to Babson from a liberal arts school called Connecticut College. I just I found out it wasn't for me and Babson College changed the trajectory of my entire life. i i I knew that I wanted to do sales and then later technology. But Babson was the catalyst for that. They just they support entrepreneurship of all kinds, no matter how you define it, and I just drank it in and I loved, I loved my time there. I love my learning there. And I continue to stay involved with Babson very closely as a past president of the Alumni Association, a former trustee, and very actively recruit students to go there and support student businesses. So it was a big impact on me and I continue to give back to it.   Michael Hingson  07:11 That's pretty cool. So how, how did you proceed as far as a career and entrepreneurial involvement as it were in in sales and all that?   Howard Brown  07:22 So I had an internship, I had wanted cellular one when cellular phones came out and I was basically learning the business. This is really early 1984 And five, and then I got another internship at NCR Corporation if you remember national cash register 120 year old company based out of Dayton, Ohio, and now it's in Atlanta, and it's, it's just not the same company. But I took an internship there a lot of Babson folks work there. And I worked as a trainer, sales installation rep. I trained waitresses, waiters, bartenders, hotel clerks, night audits, how to use cash register computer systems. So I was the teacher and a trainer. And I would, you know, talk to waitresses and waiters and bartenders and say you can make more tips by providing better service. But the way that you do that is you type you the order into a computer, it zaps it to the order station or the back to the back of the house to cook to prepare the foods or for the drinks. And you can spend more time servicing your table which should translate into higher tips. Well, about a third of them said nope, not for me, a third of them were need to be convinced and a third of them are like I'm in. I had a lot of fun doing that. And then after the shift, the either the manager or the owner would come over and they'd give you a savior at a Chinese food restaurant. They give you a poopoo platter to go to take home to your dorm room.   Michael Hingson  08:46 So I had a lot of fun, a lot of fun and a lot of good food.   Howard Brown  08:50 Sure sure. So that's what really started me off and hired me   Michael Hingson  08:55 so did that did that concept of tips and all that and advising people ever get you to translate that to Durgin Park?   Howard Brown  09:03 I actually did install the cashiers to computers area ago Daniel hall so the checkerboard you know draped you know cloth on the table and so you know it's there's a lot of good restaurants in Boston, you know the union Oyster House with a toothpick but I did countless restaurants hotels bars, you know it was I was basically at the whim of the Salesforce and there was a couple of us that went to go train and teach people and take the night shift and make sure everything was going smoothly as they installed the new system of course the no name restaurant and other one but well you know for for your listeners that no name was a place to get, you know, really great discounted seafood but you sat on a park bench. Remember that?   Michael Hingson  09:50 Right? Oh yeah, definitely. It wasn't. Well, neither was Durgin park, but I haven't kept up Is it still there?   Howard Brown  10:00 Yes, I believe it's still there.   Michael Hingson  10:01 Oh, good. I heard somewhere that, that it might not be because of COVID. But we enjoy   Howard Brown  10:07 down it shut down for a while during COVID I hope it's back open. I'm gonna have to go now. Yeah, you're gonna make me go check to see if it's open. But you know, many of them are still there. And obviously restaurants turn over. But that's a mainstay that's got a lot of history.   Michael Hingson  10:19 Oh, it does. And we had a lot of fun with the waitresses and so on at their Compac. I know, once we went there, and you know, the whole story, that Durgan is a place where you sit at family tables, unless we actually have four people then they'll let you sit at one of the tables for for around the outside. Well, there were three of us and my guide dog when we went in one time. And the hostess said, we're gonna put you at one of the tables for for just to give more room for the puppy dog. And she sat us down there. Then the waitress came over and as they are supposed to do at Durgan Park, she said, you're not supposed to sit here. There are only three of you. And I said there's a dog under the table. No, there's not. You can't fool me with that. And the waitress isn't supposed to be snotty, right. And she just kept going on and on about it. And I kept saying there is a dog under the table. She went away. And then she came back a little bit later. And she said, You've got to move and I said no. Why don't you just look, there's a dog under the table. You're not gonna make me fall for that. She finally looked. And there are these Golden Retriever puppy eyes staring back at her. She just melted. It was so much fun.   Howard Brown  11:26 Wouldn't be Boston if you didn't get a little attitude. Well, yeah, that's part of what it's all about your right next seating. And they just they sit you in a and they say, meet each other and be married.   Michael Hingson  11:38 Yeah, yeah. And it was a lot of fun. So how long did it take you to get to Silicon Valley?   Howard Brown  11:44 Well, so the story is that I did. I worked for NCR and I got hired by NCR, but I wanted out of the hospitality business. You know, even though he's young work until two, three in the morning, once they shut the restaurant or bar down or the hotel down, and then you do the night audit and you do the records. It was a hard life. So I looked and I did my research. And I said, you know who's who's making all the money here at NCR in the banking division. And it was really the early days of the outsourcing movement, punch cards, and you're outsourcing bank accounts, over 1200 baud modems. And I said, Well, that's interesting. And so I went to NCRs training at Sugar camp to learn how to be a salesperson were they actually in the early days, they filmed you, they taught you negotiation skills, competitive analysis, Industry Skills, it was fantastic. It's like getting an MBA today. But they did it all in six months, with mixing fieldwork in with, you know, training at this education facility in Dayton, Ohio. And I came out as a junior salesperson working for for very expansive experience, guys. And they just, I knew one thing, if I made them more productive, they'd make me money. And I did. And I, they sent me to banks and savings and loans and credit unions all over New England. And I basically learned the business of banking and outsourcing to these banks. And they made a lot of money. So that was how my career started. You can't do better than that. But to answer the question, because it's a little more complex than that. But it took me NCR in 1988. And then I moved out to Los Angeles in 1991, after a big health scare, which we'll talk about, and then I moved up in 2005. So there's the timeline to get me to Silicon Valley.   Michael Hingson  13:29 So you, you definitely moved around. I know that feeling well, having had a number of jobs and been required to live in various parts of the country when going back and forth from one coast to another from time to time. So you know, it's it's there. So you, you did all of that. And you You ended up obviously making some money and continuing to to be in the entrepreneurial world. But how does that translate into kind of more of an entrepreneurial spirit today?   Howard Brown  14:00 So great question, Michael. So what happened was is that I built a foundation. So at that time when you graduated school, and as far as for technology, the big computer shops like IBM Unisys, NCR, Hewlett Packard, what they did is they took you raw out of college, and they put you through their training program. And that training program was their version of the gospel of their of their products and your competitors and all that. And that built a great foundation. Well, I moved to Los Angeles after this big health scare, which I'm sure we're gonna go back and talk about, and I moved into the network products division. So I didn't stay in the banking division. I looked at the future and said voice data and video. I think there's the future there and I was right and AT and T bought NCR and, unfortunately, this is probably 1992. They also bought McCaw cellular they had just bought all of Eddie computer. They were a big company of five 600,000 employees and I have To tell you, the merger wasn't great. You felt like a number. And I knew that was my time. That was my time where I said, I got my foundation built. It's now time to go to a startup. So your time had come. My time had come. So at&t, offered early retirement for anyone 50 and older, and then they didn't get enough takers. So they offered early retirement for anyone that wanted to change. And so the talk around the watercooler was, let's wait they'll make a better offer. And I was like, I'm 26 and a half years old. I what am I waiting for? So they made a tremendously generous offer. I took early retirement, and I moved to my first true startup called avid technology that was in the production space. And we basically were changing film and television production from analog to digital. And I never looked back, I basically have been with startups ever since. And that, but that foundation I felt was really important that I got from NCR, but I prefer smaller companies and build the building them up from scratch and moving them forward.   Michael Hingson  16:07 Yeah, when you can do more to help shape the way they go. Because the the problem with a larger a lot of larger companies is they get very set in their ways. And they tend not to listen as much as maybe they should to people who might come along with ideas that might be beneficial to them, as opposed to startups as you say,   Howard Brown  16:27 Well, it depends. I mean, you know, you want to build a company that is still somewhat innovative. So what these large companies like Google and Facebook do, and Apple is they go acquire, they acquire the startups before they get too big or sometimes like, it's like what Facebook did with Instagram, they acquired six people, Google acquired YouTube, and they acquire the technology of best of breed technology. And then they shape it, and they accelerate it up. So listen, companies like IBM are still innovative, Apple, you know, is so innovative. But you need to maintain that because it can get to be a bureaucracy, and with hundreds of 1000s of employees. And you can't please everybody, but I knew my calling was was technology startups. And I just, I needed to get that, get that foundation built. And then away away I went. And that's what I've done. Since   Michael Hingson  17:16 you're right. It's all about with with companies, if they want to continue to be successful, they have to be innovative, and they have to be able to grow. I remember being in college, when Hewlett Packard came out with the HP 25, which was a very sophisticated calculator. Back in the the late 19th, early 1970s. And then Texas Instruments was working on a calculator, they came out with one that kind of did a lot of the stuff that HP did. But about that same time because HP was doing what they were doing, they came out with the HP 35. And basically it added, among other things, a function key that basically doubled the number of incredible things that you could do on the HP 25.   Howard Brown  17:58 Right, I had a TI calculator and in high school.   Michael Hingson  18:02 Well, and of course yeah, go ahead HPUS pull reverse Polish notation, which was also kind   Howard Brown  18:09 of fun. Right and then with the kids don't understand today is that, you know, we took typing, I get I think we took typing.   Michael Hingson  18:19 Did you type did you learn to type on a typewriter without letters on the keys?   Howard Brown  18:23 No, I think we have letters I think you just couldn't look down or else you get smacked. You know, the big brown fox jumped over the you know, something that's I don't know, but I did learn but I I'm sort of a hybrid. I looked down once in a while when I'd say   Michael Hingson  18:39 I remember taking a typing course in actually it was in summer school. I think it was between seventh and eighth grade. And of course the typewriters were typewriters, typewriters for teaching so they didn't have letters on the keys, which didn't matter to me a whole lot. But by the same token, that's the way they were but I learned to type and yeah, we learned to type and we learned how to be pretty accurate with it's sort of like learning to play the piano and eventually learning to do it without looking at the keys so that you could play and either read music or learn to play by ear.   Howard Brown  19:15 That's true. And And again, in my dorm room, I had Smith Corona, and I ended up having a bottle of or many bottles of white out.   Michael Hingson  19:25 White out and then there was also the what was it the other paper that you could put on the samosa did the same thing but white out really worked?   Howard Brown  19:33 Yeah, you put that little strip of tape and then it would wait it out for you then you can type over it. Right? We've come a long way. It's some of its good and some of its bad.   Michael Hingson  19:43 Yeah, now we have spellchecker Yeah, we do for what it's worth,   Howard Brown  19:49 which we got more and more and more than that on these I mean listen to this has allowed us to, to to do a zoom call here and record and goods and Bad's to all of that.   Michael Hingson  19:58 Yeah, I still I have to tell people learning to edit. Now using a sound editor called Reaper, I can do a lot more clean editing than I was able to do when I worked at a campus radio station, and had to edit by cutting tape and splicing with splicing tape.   Howard Brown  20:14 Exactly. And that's Yeah, yeah, Michael, we change the you know, avid changed the game, because we went from splicing tape or film and Betamax cassettes in the broadcast studios to a hard drive in a mouse, right? changed, we changed the game there because you were now editing on a hard drive. And so I was part of that in 1994. And again, timing has to work out and we had to retrain the unions at the television networks. And it was, for me, it was just timing worked really well. Because my next startup, liquid audio, the timing didn't work out well, because we're, we were going to try to do the same thing in the audio world, which is download music. But when you do that, when you it's a Sony cassette and Sony Walkman days, the world wasn't ready yet. We we still went public, we still did a secondary offering. But we never really brought product to market because it took Steve Jobs 10 years later to actually sell a song for 99 cents and convince the record industry that that was, you know, you could sell slices of pizza instead of the whole pizza, the whole record out   Michael Hingson  21:17 and still make money. I remember avid devices and hearing about them and being in television stations. And of course, for me, none of that was accessible. So it was fun to to be able to pick on the fact that no matter what, as Fred Allen, although he didn't say it quite this way, once said they call television the new medium, because that's as good as it's ever gonna get. But anyway, you know, it has come a long way. But it was so sophisticated to go into some of the studios with some of the even early equipment, like Avid, and see all the things that they were doing with it. It just made life so much better.   Howard Brown  21:52 Yeah, well, I mean, you're not I was selling, you know, $100,000 worth of software on a Macintosh, which first of all the chief engineers didn't even like, but at the post production facilities, they they they drank that stuff up, because you could make a television commercial, you could do retakes, you could add all the special effects, and it could save time. And then you could get more revenue from that. And so it was pretty easy sale, because we tell them how fast they could pay off to the hardware, the software and then train everybody up. And they were making more and more and better commercials for the car dealerships and the local Burger Joint. And they were thrilled that these local television stations, I can tell you that   Michael Hingson  22:29 I sold some of the first PC based CAD systems and the same sort of thing, architects were totally skeptical about it until they actually sat down and we got them in front of a machine and showed them how to use it. Let them design something that they could do with three or four hours, as opposed to spending days with paper and paper and paper and more paper in a drafting table. And they could go on to the next project and still charge as much.   Howard Brown  22:53 It was funny. I take a chief engineer on to lunch, and I tried to gauge their interest and a third, we're just enthusiastic because they wanted to make sure that they were the the way that technology came into the station. They were they were the brainchild they were the they were the domain experts. So a third again, just like training waitresses and waiters and bartenders, a third of them. Oh, they wanted they just wanted to consume it all. A third of them were skeptical and needed convincing. And a third of whom was like, that's never going out on my hair anywhere. Yeah, they were the later and later adopters, of course.   Michael Hingson  23:24 And some of them were successful. And some of them were not.   Howard Brown  23:28 Absolutely. We continue. We no longer. Go ahead. No, no, of course I am the my first sales are the ones that were early adopters. And and then I basically walked over to guys that are later adopters. I said, Well, I said, you know, the ABC, the NBC and the fox station and the PBS station habit, you know, you don't have it, and they're gonna take all your post production business away from you. And that got them highly motivated.   Michael Hingson  23:54 Yeah. And along the way, from a personal standpoint, somebody got really clever. And it started, of course at WGBH in Boston, where they recognize the fact that people who happen to be blind would want to know what's going on on TV when the dialog wasn't saying much to to offer clues. And so they started putting an audio description and editing and all that and somebody created the secondary audio programming in the other things that go into it. And now that's becoming a lot more commonplace, although it's still got a long way to go.   Howard Brown  24:24 Well, I agree. So but you're right. So having that audio or having it for visually impaired or hearing impaired are all that they are now we're making some progress. So it's still a ways to go. I agree with you.   Michael Hingson  24:36 still a ways to go. Well, you along the way in terms of continuing to work with Abbott and other companies in doing the entrepreneurial stuff. You've had a couple of curveballs from life.   Howard Brown  24:47 I have. So going back to my promotion, I was going driving out to Dayton, Ohio, I noticed a little spot on my cheekbone. didn't think anything of it. I was so excited to get promoted and start my new job. up, I just kept powering through. So a few weeks after I'd moved out to Dayton, Ohio, my mom comes out. And she's at the airport and typical Boston and mom, she's like, What's that on your cheek? What's that on your cheek? And I was like, Mom, it's nothing. I kind of started making excuses. I got hit playing basketball, I got it at the gym or something. And she's like, well, we got to get that checked out. I said, No, Mom, it's okay. It's not no big deal. It's a little little market. Maybe it's a cyst or pebble or something I don't know. So she basically said she was worried, but she never told me. So she helped set up my condo, or an apartment. And then she left. And then as long Behold, I actually had to go speak in Boston at the American Bankers Association about disaster recovery, and having a disaster recovery plan. And so this is the maybe August of 1989. And I came back and that spot was still there. And so my mom told my dad, remember, there was payphones? There was no cell phones, no computers, no internet. So she told my dad, she didn't take a picture of it. But now he saw it. And he goes, Let's go play tennis. There's I got there on a Friday. So on a Saturday morning, we'd go do something. And instead of going to play tennis, he took me to a local community hospital. And they took a look at it. And they said off its assist, take some my antibiotic erythromycin or something, you'll be fine. Well, I came back to see them on Monday after my speech. And I said, I'm not feeling that great. Maybe it's the rethrow myosin. And so having to be four o'clock in the afternoon, he took me to the same emergency room. And he's and I haven't had the same doctor on call. He actually said, You know what, let's take a biopsy of it. So he took a biopsy of it. And then he went back to the weight room, he said, I didn't get a big enough slice. Let me take another. So he took another and then my dad drove me to the airport, and I basically left. And my parents called me maybe three weeks later, and they said, You got to come back to Boston. We gotta go see, you know, they got the results. But you know, they didn't tell us they'll only tell you. Because, you know, it's my private data. So I flew back to Boston, with my parents. And this time, I had, like, you know, another doctor there with this emergency room doctor, and he basically checks me out, checks me out, but he doesn't say too much. But he does say that we have an appointment for you at Dana Farber Cancer Institute at 2pm. I think you should go. And I was like, whoa, what are you talking about? Why am I going to Dana Farber Cancer Institute. So it gets, you know, kind of scary there because I show up there. I'm in a suit and tie. My dad's in a suit down. My mom's seems to be dressed up. And we go, and they put me through tests. And I walk in there. And I don't know if you remember this, Michael. But the Boston Red Sox charity is called the Jimmy fund. Right? And the Jimmy fund are for kids with blood cancers, lymphoma leukemias, so I go there. And they checked me in and they told me as a whole host of tests they're going to do, and I'm looking in the waiting room, and I see mostly older people, and I'm 23 years old. So I go down the hallways, and I see little kids. So I go I go hang out with the little kids while I'm waiting. I didn't know what was going on. So they call me and I do my test. And this Dr. George Canalis, who's you know, when I came to learn that the inventor of some chemo therapies for lymphomas very experienced, and this young Harvard fellow named Eric Rubin I get pulled into this office with this big mahogany desk. And they say you have stage four E T cell non Hodgkins lymphoma. It's a very aggressive, aggressive, very aggressive form of cancer. We're going to try to knock this out. I have to tell you, Michael, I don't really remember hardly anything else that was said, I glossed over. I looked up at this young guy, Eric Rubin, and I said, What's he saying? I looked back out of the corner of my eye, my mom's bawling her eyes out. My dad's looks like a statue. And I have to tell you, I was really just a deer in the headlights. I had no idea that how a healthy 23 year old guy gets, you know, stage four T cell lymphoma with a very horrible prognosis. I mean, I mean, they don't they said, We don't know if we can help you at the world, one of the world's foremost cancer research hospitals in the world. So it was that was that was a tough pill to swallow. And I did some more testing. And then they told me to come back in about a week to start chemotherapy. And so, again, I didn't have the internet to search anything. I had encyclopedias. I had some friends, you know, and I was like, I'm a young guy. And, you know, I was talking to older people that potentially, you know, had leukemia or different cancer, but I didn't know much. And so I I basically showed up for chemotherapy, scared out of my mind, in denial, and Dr. RUBIN comes out and he says, we're not doing chemo today. I said, I didn't sleep awake. What are you talking about? He says, we'll try again tomorrow, your liver Our function test is too high. And my liver function test is too high. So I'm starting to learn but I still don't know what's going on. He says I got it was going to field trip. Field Trip. He said, Yeah, you're going down the street to Newton Wellesley hospital, we're going to the cryogenic center, cryo, what? What are you talking about? He goes, it's a sperm bank, and you're gonna go, you know, leave a sample specimen. And it's like, you just told me that, you know, if you can help me out what why I'm not even thinking about kids, right now. He said, Go do it. He says what else you're going to do today, and then you come back tomorrow, and we'll try chemo. So thank God, he said that, because I deposited before I actually started any chemotherapy, which, you know, as basically, you know, rendered me you know, impotent now because of all the chemotherapy and radiation I had. So that was a blessing that I didn't know about until later, which we'll get to. But a roll the story forward a little more quickly as that I was getting all bad news. I was relapsing, I went through about three or four different cycles of different chemotherapy recipes, nothing was working. I was getting sicker, and they tight. My sister, I am the twin CJ, for bone marrow transplant and she was a 25% chance of being a match. She happened to be 100% match. And I had to then gear up for back in 1990 was a bone marrow transplant where they would remove her bone marrow from her hip bones, they would scrub it and cleanse it, and they would put it in me. And they would hope that my body wouldn't immediately rejected and die and shut down or over time, which is called graft versus host these that it wouldn't kill me or potentially that it would work and it would actually reset my immune system. And it would take over the malignant cells and set my set me back straight, which it ended up doing. And so having a twin was another blessing miracle. You know that, you know, that happened to me. And I did some immunotherapy called interleukin two that was like, like the grandfather of immunotherapy that strengthened my system. And then I moved to Florida to get out of the cold weather and then I moved out to California to rebuild my life. I call that Humpty Dumpty building Humpty Dumpty version one. And that's that's how I got to California in Southern California.   Michael Hingson  32:15 So once again, your big sister savedthe day,   Howard Brown  32:19 as usual.   Michael Hingson  32:21 That's a big so we go,   Howard Brown  32:23 as we call ourselves the Wonder Twins. He's more. She's terrific. And thank God she gave part of herself and saved my life. And I am eternally grateful to her for that,   Michael Hingson  32:34 but but she never had any of the same issues or, or diseases. I gather. She's been   Howard Brown  32:41 very healthy, except for like a knee. A partial knee replacement. She's been very healthy her whole life.   Michael Hingson  32:48 Well, did she have to have a knee replacement because she kept kicking you around or what?   Howard Brown  32:52 No, she's little. She's five feet. 510 So she never kicked me. We are best friends. My wife's best friend. I know. She is just just a saint. She's She's such a giving person and you know, we take that from our parents, but she she gave of herself of what she could do. She said she do it again in a heartbeat. I don't think I'm allowed to give anybody my bone marrow but if I could, would give it to her do anything for her. She's She's amazing. So she gave me the gift, the gift of life.   Michael Hingson  33:21 So you went to Florida, then you moved to California and what did you do when you got out here?   Howard Brown  33:24 So I ended up moving up to northern California. So I met this girl from Michigan in Southern California, Lisa, my wife have now 28 years in July. We married Lisa Yeah, we got married under the Jewish wedding company's wedding canopies called the hotpot and we're looking at the Pacific Ocean, we made people come out that we had that Northridge earthquake in 94. But this is in July, so things are more settled. So we had all friends and family come out. And it was beautiful. We got it on a pool deck overlooking the Pacific. It was gorgeous. It was a beautiful Hollywood type wedding. And it was amazing. So we got married in July of 94. And then moved up to Silicon Valley in 97. And then I was working at the startups. My life was really out of balance because I'm working 20 hours, you know, a day and I'm traveling like crazy. And my wife says, You know what, you got to be home for dinner if we're going to think about having a family. And we're a little bit older now. 35 and 40. And so we've got to think about these things. And so I called back to Newton Wellesley hospital, and I got the specimen of sperm shipped out to San Jose, and we went through an in vitro fertilization process. And she grew eight eight eggs and they defrosted the swimmers and they took the best ones and put them back in the four best eggs and our miracle baby our frozen kids sickle. Emily was born in August of 2001. Another blessing another miracle. I was able to have a child and healthy baby girl.   Michael Hingson  34:58 So what's Emily doing today?   Howard Brown  35:00 Well, thank you for asking that. So, she is now in Missoula, Montana at a television station called K Pax eight Mountain News. And she's an intern for the summer. And she's living her great life out there hiking, Glacier National Park. And she ran I think she ran down to the Grand Tetons and, and she's learning about the broadcast business and reporting. She's a writer by trade, by trade and in journalism. And she likes philosophy. So she'll be coming back home to finish her senior year, this at the end of the summer at the University of Michigan. And so she's about to graduate in December. And she's, she's doing just great.   Michael Hingson  35:35 So she writes and doesn't do video editing us yet using Abbott or any of the evolutions from it.   Howard Brown  35:41 No, she does. She actually, when you're in a small market station, that's you. You write the script, she does the recording, she has a tripod, sometimes she's she films with the other reporters, but when she they sent her out as an intern, and she just covered the, this, you know, the pro pro life and pro choice rallies, she she records herself, she edits on Pro Tools, which is super powerful now, and a lot less expensive. And then, when she submits, she submits it refer review to the news director and to her superiors. And she's already got, I think, three video stories and about six different by lines on written stories. So she's learning by doing, it's experiential, it's amazing.   Michael Hingson  36:23 So she must have had some experience in dealing with all the fires and stuff out at Yellowstone and all that.   Howard Brown  36:31 So the flooding at Yellowstone, so I drove her out there in May. And I didn't see any fires. But the flooding we got there before that, she took me on a hike on the North Gate of Yellowstone. And she's she's, you know, environmentally wilderness trained first aid trained. And I'm the dad, and I'm in decent shape. But she took me out an hour out and an hour back in and, you know, saw a moose saw a deer didn't see any mountain lion didn't see any Grizzlies, thank God, but we did see moose carcass where the grizzly had got a hold on one of those and, and everybody else to get it. So I got to go out to nature weather and we took a road trip out there this summer, it was a blast. It's the those are the memories, when you've been through a cancer diagnosis that you just you hold on to very dearly and very tight. It was a blast. So that's what he's doing this summer. She'll be back. She'll be back in August, end of August.   Michael Hingson  37:22 That's really exciting to hear that she's working at it and being successful. And hopefully she'll continue to do that. And do good reporting. And I know that this last week, with all the Supreme Court cases, it's it's, I guess, in one sense, a field day for reporters. But it's also a real challenge, because there's so many polarized views on all of that.   Howard Brown  37:44 Well, everybody's a broadcaster now whether it's Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and all the other ones out there, tick tock. So everybody's sort of a reporter now. And you know, what do you believe, and unfortunately, I just can't believe in something in 140 characters or something in two sentences. Yeah, there's no depth there. So sometimes you miss the point, and all this stuff. And then everything's on 24 hours on CNN, on Fox on MSNBC, so it never stops. So I call that a very noisy world. And it's hard to process. You know, all this. It's coming at you so fast in the blink of an eye. So we're in a different time than when we grew up, Michael, it was a slower pace. Today in this digital world. It's, it's, it's a lot and especially COVID. Now, are we just consuming and consuming and binging and all this stuff, I don't think it's that healthy.   Michael Hingson  38:36 It's not only a noisy world, but it's also a world, it's very disconnected, you can say all you want about how people can send tweets back and forth, text messages back and forth and so on. But you're not connecting, you're not really getting deep into anything, you're not really establishing relationships in the way that as you point out, we used to, and we don't connect anymore, even emails don't give you that much connection, realism, as opposed to having meaningful dialogue and meaningful conversations. So we just don't Converse anymore. And now, with all that's going on, in the very divided opinions, there's there's no room for discussion, because everybody has their own opinion. And that's it, there's no room to dialogue on any of it at all, which is really too bad.   Howard Brown  39:21 Yeah, I agree. It's been divisive. And, you know, it's, it's hard because, you know, an email doesn't have the body language, the intent, the emotion, like we're talking right now. And, you know, we're expressing, you know, you know, I'm telling stories of my story personally, but you can tell when I get excited, I smile, I can get animated. Sometimes with an email, you know, you don't know the intent and it can be misread. And a lot of that communication is that way. So, you know, I totally get where you're coming from.   Michael Hingson  39:55 And that's why I like doing the podcasts that we're doing. We get to really have conversation isn't just asking some questions and getting an answer and then going on to the next thing. That's, frankly, no fun. And I think it's important to be able to have the opportunity to really delve into things and have really good conversations about them. I learned a lot, and I keep seeing as I do these podcasts, and for the past 20 plus years, I've traveled around the world speaking, of course, about September 11, and talking about teamwork, and trust, and so on. And as I always say, if I don't learn more than I'm able to teach or impart, then I'm not doing my job very well.   Howard Brown  40:35 So that's exactly and that's, that's where I'm going after the second health concern. You know, I'm now going to teach, I'm gonna inspire, I'm going to educate. And that's, that's, that's what I do, I want to do with the rest of my time is to be able to, you know, listen, I'm not putting my head in the sand, about school shootings, about an insurrection about floods about all that. You gotta live in the real world. But I choose, as I say, I like to live on positive Street as much as possible, but positive street with action. That's, that's what makes the world a better place at the end of the day. So you sharing that story means that one we'll never forget. And you can educate the generations to come that need to understand, you know, that point in time and how it affected you and how you've dealt with it, and how you've been able to get back out of bed every day. And I want to do the same.   Michael Hingson  41:26 Well, there's nothing wrong with being positive. I think that there is a need to be aware. But we can we can continue to be positive, and try to promote positivity, try to promote connectionism and conversations and so on, and promote the fact that it's okay to have different opinions. But the key is to respect the other opinion, and recognize that it isn't just what you say that's the only thing that ever matters. That's the problem that we face so much today.   Howard Brown  41:58 Right? Respect. I think Aretha Franklin saying that great. She   Michael Hingson  42:01 did. She did. She's from Motown here. There you go. See? When you moved out to California, and you ended up in Silicon Valley, and so on, who are you working for them?   Howard Brown  42:14 So I moved up, and I worked for this company called Liquid audio that doesn't exist anymore. And it was just iTunes 10 years too early on, there was real audio, there was Mark Cuban's company was called Audio net and then broadcast.com used for a lot of money. And so the company went public and made a lot of money. But it didn't work. The world wasn't ready for it yet to be able to live in this cassette world. It was not ready. I Napster hadn't been invented, mp3 and four hadn't been invented. So it just the adoption rate of being too early. But it still went public a lot. The investors made a ton of money, but they call that failing, failing forward. So I stayed there for a year, I made some money. And I went to another startup. And that startup was in the web hosting space, it was called Naevus. site, it's now won by Time Warner. But at that time, building data centers and hosting racks of computers was very good business. And so I got to be, you know, participate in an IPO. You know, I built built up revenue. And you know, the outsourcing craze now called cloud computing, it's dominated by the folks that like Amazon, and the folks at IBM, and a few others, but mostly, you know, dominated there, where you're basically having lots of blinking lights in a data center, and just making sure that those computers stay up to serve up the pages of the web, the videos, even television, programming, and now any form of communication. So I was, I was early on in that and again, got to go through an IPO and get compensated properly unduly, and, but also my life was out of balance. And so before we were called out for the sperm and had a baby, I transitioned out when Silicon Valley just the pendulum swung the other way, I ended up starting to work at my own nonprofit, I founded it with a couple of Silicon Valley guys called Planet Jewish, and it was still very technologically driven. It was the world's first Community Calendar. This is before Google Calendar, this is in 2000. And we built it as a nonprofit to serve the Jewish community to get more people to come to Jewish events. And I architected the code, and we ran that nonprofit for 17 years. And before calendaring really became free, and very proud of that. And after that, I started a very similar startup with different code called circle builder, and it was serving faith and religions. It was more like private facebook or private online communities. And we had the Vatican as a client and about 25,000 Ministries, churches, and nonprofits using the system. And this is all sort of when Facebook was coming out to you know, from being just an edu or just for college students. And so I built that up as a quite a big business. But unfortunately, I was in Michigan when I started circle builder. I ended up having to close both of those businesses down. One that the revenue was telling off of the nonprofit and also circuit builder wasn't monetizing as quickly or as we needed as well. But I ended up going into my 50 year old colonoscopy, Michael. And I woke up thinking everything was going to be fine. My wife Lisa's holding my hand. And the gastroenterologist said, No, I found something. And when I find something, it's bad news. Well, it was bad news. Stage three colon cancer. Within about 10 days or two weeks, I had 13 and a half inches of my colon removed, plus margins plus lymph nodes. One of the lymph nodes was positive, install a chemo port and then I waited because my daughter had soccer tournaments to travel to but on first week of August in 2016, I started 12 rounds of Rockem sockem chemotherapy called folfox and five Fu and it was tough stuff. So I was back on the juice again, doing chemotherapy and but this time, I wasn't a deer in the headlights, I was a dad, I was a husband. I had been through the trenches. So this time, I was much more of a marine on a mission. And I had these digital tools to reach out for research and for advocacy and for support. Very different at that time. And so I unfortunately failed my chemotherapy, I failed my neck surgery, another colon resection, I failed a clinical trial. And things got worse I became metastatic stage four that means that colon cancer had spread to my liver, my stomach linings called the omentum and peritoneum and my bladder. And I had that same conversation with a doctor in downtown Detroit, at a Cancer Institute and he said, We don't know if we can help you. And if you Dr. Google, it said I had 4% of chances of living about 12 to 18 months and things were dark I was I was back at it again looking looking at the Grim Reaper. But what I ended up doing is research and I did respond to the second line chemotherapy with a little regression or shrinkage. And for that you get more chemotherapy. And then I started to dig in deep research on peritoneal carcinoma which is cancer of the of the of the stomach lining, and it's very tricky. And there's a group called colon town.org that I joined and very informative. I there then met at that time was probably over 100 other people that had had the peritoneal carcinoma, toma and are living and they went through a radical surgery called cytoreduction high pack, where they basically debulk you like a de boning a fish, and they take out all this cancer, they can see the dead and live cells, and then they pour hot chemo in you. And then hot chemo is supposed to penetrate the scanning the organs, and it's supposed to, in theory kill micro cell organism and cancer, although it's still not proven just yet. But that surgery was about a 12 and a half hour surgery in March of 2018. And they call that the mother of all surgeries. And I came out looking like a ghost. I had lost about 60 pounds, and I had a long recovery. It's that one would put Humpty Dumpty back together. It's been now six years. But I got a lot of support. And I am now what's called no evidence of disease at this time, I'm still under surveillance. I was quarterly I just in June, I had my scans and my exams. And I'm now going to buy annual surveillance, which means CAT scans and blood tests. That's the step in the right direction. And so again, I mean, if I think about it, my twin sister saved my life, I had a frozen sperm become a daughter. And again, I'm alive from a stage four diagnosis. I am grateful. I am lucky, and I am blessed. So that's that a long story that the book will basically tell you, but that's where I am today.   Michael Hingson  48:50 And we'll definitely get to the book. But another question. So you had two startups that ran collectively for quite a period of time, what got you involved or motivated to do things in the in the faith arena?   Howard Brown  49:06 So I have to give credit to my wife, Lisa. So we met at the Jewish Federation of Los Angeles at this young leadership group. And then they have like a college fair of organizations that are Jewish support organizations. And one of them happened to be Jewish Big Brothers, now Jewish Brothers and Big Sisters of Los Angeles. Suppose you'd be a great big brother. I was like, well, it takes up a lot of time. I don't know. She's like, you should check it out. So I did. And I became I fill out the application. I went through the background checks, and I actually got to be a Jewish big brother to this young man II and at age 10. And so I have to tell you, one of the best experiences in my life was to become a mentor. And I today roll the clock forward. 29 years in is now close to 40 years old or 39 years old. He's married with a son who's one noble and two wife, Sarah, and we are family. We stayed together past age 18 Seen, and we've continued on. And I know not a lot of people do that. But it was probably one of the best experiences I've ever done. I've gotten so much out of it. Everyone's like, Oh, you did so much for in? Well, he did so much for me and my daughter, Emily calls him uncle and my wife and I are we are his family, his dad was in prison and then passed away and his mom passed away where his family now. And so one of the best experiences. So that's how I kind of got into the Jewish community. And also being in sales I was I ended up being a good fundraiser. And so these nonprofits that live their lifeblood is fundraising dollars. I didn't mind calling people asking them for donations or sitting down over coffee, asking them for donations. So I learned how to do that out in Southern California in Northern California. And I've continued to do that. So that gave me a real good taste of faith. I'm not hugely religious, but I do believe in the community values of the Jewish community. And you get to meet people beyond boards and you get to raise money for really good causes. And so that sort of gave me another foundation to build off of and I've enjoyed doing that as a community sermon for a long time.   Michael Hingson  51:10 I'll bite Where does Ian live today?   Howard Brown  51:13 Okay, well, Ian was in LA when we got matched. I had to move to San Francisco, but I I petitioned the board to keep our match alive because it was scholarship dollars in state right. And went to UC Santa Cruz, Florida State for his master's and got his last degree at Hastings and the Jewish community supported him with scholarships. And in was in very recently was in San Francisco, Oakland area, and now he's lives in South Portland, Oregon.   Michael Hingson  51:39 Ah, so you haven't gotten back to Michigan yet? Although he's getting into colder weather. So there's a chance?   Howard Brown  51:45 Well, let me tell you, he did live with us in Michigan. So using my connections through the Jewish community, I asked if he could interview with a judge from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals a friend of mine, we sat on a on a board of directors for the American Jewish Committee, Detroit. And I said, she's like, well, Howard, I really have to take Michigan kids. I said, You know what? No problem. You decide if he's if he's worthy or not go through your process, but would you take the phone call? So she took the phone call, and I never heard anything. And then Ian called me and he said, I got it. I as a second year loss. Going to be a second year law student. I'm going to be clerking for summer interning and clerking for this judge Leanne white. And again, it just it karma, the payback, it was beautiful. So he lived with us for about four and a half months. And when he came back, and it was beautiful, because Emily was only about four or five years old. And, and he lived with us for that time. And it was beautiful.   Michael Hingson  52:43 But that's really great. That, that you have that relationship that you did the big brother program. And I'm assuming you've been big brother to other people as well.   Howard Brown  52:53 No, no. I have not actually. Because what it did is it trained me to be a dad. So when I had Emily, it was more it was more difficult actually to do that. And so no, Ian has been my one and only match. I mentor a lot of Babson students, and I mentor and get mentored by some cancer patients and, and some big entrepreneurs. Mentorship is a core value of mine. I like to be mentored. And I also like to mentor others. And I think that's, that's what makes the world go round. So when Steve Gates when Bill Gates, his wife, Melinda, just donated 123 million to the overall arching Big Brothers, Big Sisters of America. And that money will filter to all those, I think that that's such a core value. If a young person can have someone that takes interest in them, they can really shape their future and also get a lot out of it. So mentorship is one of my key values. And I hope it's hope it's many of your viewers and yours as well. Michael,   Michael Hingson  53:52 absolutely is I think that we can't do anything if we can't pass on what we've learned and try to help other people grow. I've been a firm believer my entire life of you don't give somebody a fish, you teach them how to fish and however, and wherever that is, it's still the same thing. And we need to teach and impart. And I think that in our own way, every one of us is a teacher and the more we take it seriously, the better it is.   Howard Brown  54:18 Well, I'm now a student not learning podcasting. I learned how to be a book author and I'm learning how to reinvent myself virgin Humpty Dumpty, version two coming out.   Michael Hingson  54:29 So you had been a national cancer survivor advocate and so on. Tell me a little bit about that if you would.   Howard Brown  54:35 So I respect people that want to keep their diagnosis private and their survivorship private. That's not me. I want to be able to help people because if I would have been screened at age 40 or 42, I probably wouldn't have had colon cancer and I was not, but this is a preventable disease and really minorities and indigenous people as they need to get screened more, because that's the highest case of diagnosis for colorectal cancer. But what I think that that's what his needs now it's the second leading killer of cancer right now. And it's an important to get this advocacy out and use your voice. And so I want to use my voice to be able to sound the alarm on getting screening, and also to help people survive. There's I think, 16 million growing to 23 or 4 million by 2030. Cancer survivors out there, cancer diagnosis, it sucks sex all the way around, but it affects more than the patient, it affects your caregiver, it affects your family affects relationships, it affects emotions, physical, and also financial, there is many aspects of survivorship here and more people are learning to live with it and going, but also, quite frankly, I live with in the stage for cancer world, you also live with eminence of death, or desperation to live a little bit longer. You hear people I wish I had one more day. Well, I wish I had time to be able to see my daughter graduate high school, and I did and I cherished it. I'm going to see her graduate college this December and then walk at the Big House here in Michigan, in Ann Arbor in May. And then God willing, I will walk her down the aisle at the appropriate time. And it's good to have those big goals that are important that drive you forward. And so those are the few things that drive me forward.   Michael Hingson  56:28 I know that I can't remember when I had my first colonoscopy. It's been a while. It was just part of what I did. My mother didn't die of colon cancer, but she was diagnosed with colon cancer. She, she went to the doctor's office when she felt something was wrong. And they did diagnose it as colon cancer. She came home my brother was with her. She fell and broke her hip and went into the hospital and passed away a few days later, they did do an operation to deal with repairing her hip. And but I think because of all of that, just the amount that her body went through, she just wasn't able to deal with it. She was 6970. And so it was no I take Yeah, so I was just one of those things that that did happen. She was 71, not 70. But, you know, we've, for a while I got a colonoscopy every five years. And then they say no, you don't need to do it every five years do it every 10 years. The couple of times they found little polyps but they were just little things. There was nothing serious about them. They obviously took them out and autopsy or biopsy them and all that. And no problems. And I don't remember any of it. I slept through it. So it's okay.   Howard Brown  57:46 Great. So the prep is the worst part. Isn't it though? The preps no fun. But the 20 minutes they have you under light anesthesia, they snipped the polyps and away you go and you keep living your life. So that's what I hope for everyone, because I will tell you, Michael, showing through the amount of chemotherapy, the amount of surgeries and the amount of side effects that I have is, is I don't wish that on anyone. I don't wish on anyone. It's not a good existence. It's hard. And quite frankly, it's, I want to prevent about it. And I'm just not talking about colon cancer, get your mammogram for breast cancer, get your check for prostate cancer, you know, self care is vital, because you can't have fun, do your job, work Grow family, if your hell if you're not healthy, and the emotional stuff they call the chemo brain or brain fog and or military personnel refer to it as PTSD. It's real. And you've got to be able to understand that, you know, coming from a cancer diagnosis is a transition. And I'll never forget that my two experiences and I I've got to build and move forward though. Because otherwise it gets dark, it gets lonely, it gets depressing, and then other things start to break down the parts don't work well. So I've chosen to find my happy place on the basketball court be very active in sounding the alarm for as an advocate. And as I never planned on being a book author and now I'm going to be a published author this summer. So there's good things that have come in my life. I've had a very interesting, interesting life. And we're here talking about it now so I appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  59:20 Well tell me about you in basketball seems to be your happy place.   Howard Brown  59:24 So everyone needs to find a happy place. I'll tell you why. The basketball court I've been playing since I was six years old and I was pretty good you know, I'm not gonna go professional. But I happen to like the team sport and I'm a point guard so I'm basically telling people what to do and trash talk and and all that. But I love it a

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Women World Leaders' Podcast
350. Walking in the Word, The Good Samaritan

Women World Leaders' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 20:15


The man asked, “If I am to love my neighbor, who is my neighbor?” Jesus' answer was not just for the one who asked; His answer is for each of us. As you listen to Julie Jenkins' teaching on the Good Samaritan, will you take to heart God's words of wisdom for you? (Luke 10:25-37) ***** Welcome to Walking in the Word, the biblical teaching arm of the Women World Leaders podcast. I'm your host, Julie Jenkins. If this is your first time listening, welcome! We have three different podcast offerings for you each week, so make sure you check out each one every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. You have happened on Walking in the Word, where we take a few minutes each Wednesday to open our Bibles together and study God's Word. I grew up knowing Jesus, but for a long time I thought the Bible was meant for others. It was an honor in our church to stand up and read scripture, and my dad read to us from the Bible on special occasions, so I always assumed that you had to be credentialed to even open the sacred book. I'm not sure when my attitude changed, but when I became an adult and was feeling far from God, a friend suggested I read the Bible. My response was, I don't know how to read the Bible. In retrospect, that seems like a silly statement for someone who graduated from college with honors in the field of communications. I didn't see the irony. But per my friend's suggestion, I joined a Bible study, and I quickly questioned how I had ever gotten through life WITHOUT reading the Bible! The Bible is our guide for life, and it is meant for everyone! No matter where you are on your walk with Jesus, I encourage you to simply open the Bible and read it! If you are new to reading and studying the Word, a great place to begin are the gospels, specifically the book of John, which was written to tell of who Jesus is – the foundation of our Christian faith. On this study, we are currently walking through the gospels chronologically, combining the teachings of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John in order to get a more complete picture of Jesus' life on earth. I'm glad you've joined us! Before we begin, let's pray. Dear Most Holy God, We are intentionally taking time to pause our busy lives to spend time in your Word. Thank you for always being present and available. We confess that we do not recognize your presence nearly as much as we should, nor do we acknowledge what a miraculous gift you are to us. Please forgive us for our shortsightedness. Holy Spirit, we ask that you be with us as we read and study your Word today. Help us put everything else aside and cleanse our minds so we may focus solely on you. Allow our hearts to be opened so we may clearly hear your instruction and wisdom for each of us today. In Jesus' name, I pray. Amen. If you have your Bibles, open with me to Luke chapter 10. Our reading today is Luke 10:25-37. Allow me to begin reading from the New Living Translation… 25 One day an expert in religious law stood up to test Jesus by asking him this question: “Teacher, what should I do to inherit eternal life?” 26 Jesus replied, “What does the law of Moses say? How do you read it?” 27 The man answered, “‘You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your strength, and all your mind.' And, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.'”[a] 28 “Right!” Jesus told him. “Do this and you will live!” Over the course of our study, we have seen many come to Jesus seeking answers. We've also seen many come to Jesus seeking to trip him up. Whether this man had an open heart to learn is not ours to judge. The fact is that the man was an expert in religious law, and the question he asked COULD have been meant as a trap. Jesus had told his followers that He would lead them to eternal life, but the Scripture available at the time, remember, stated that perfectly adhering to the Old Testament law would lead to eternal life. Instead of going on the defensive, Jesus met the man where he was by first asking what he knew. Oh how I love Jesus! He will always meet us where we are – without judgment! Sometimes His questions to us are difficult, and often, they make us think. In fact, if you have a truly open conversation with God, I guarantee you will walk away thinking – and you may walk away with even more questions than answers. It is often in contemplating the answers and meanings in the presence of the Holy Spirit that God grows us into His image over time. Sometimes, our growth is an arduous process, but it is always worth it! So the man asked… “Teacher, what should I do to inherit eternal life?” And Jesus responded…“What does the law of Moses say? How do you read it?” The man responded with part of the Shema, from Deueteronomy 6:5 – which the Jews recited daily. He knew the words by heart. He was to love the Lord God with all his heart, soul, strength, and mind. And, ‘Love his neighbor as himself.'” Where many scholars believe the man was trying to trip up Jesus was that he was showcasing that the law said nothing about following Jesus leading to eternal life. But, using scripture to interpret scripture, we understand that when you love God with your whole heart, soul, strength, and mind – the Holy Spirit will ensure that you will hear and have the opportunity to follow Jesus. So, as we've often seen, Jesus stepped over the intended stumbling stone with grace, agreeing with the man, saying …“Right!... Do this and you will live!” But though the man knew and could recite the words by heart, he had not allowed the words to infiltrate his heart. I wonder how many of us can relate? Actually, I don't wonder at all – because if we are honest – there are times that we ALL can relate. I myself have completed Bible studies just to complete them. Saying, “I made a commitment, and I'm going to push through.” I'm also ashamed to say that there are times when praying becomes an exercise for me rather than a true conversation with God. We must always fight against allowing a habit to become habitual and a commitment to God from becoming common. Stay true to your godly habits and commitments, but each day, ask God to open your heart and mind to what HE wants to tell you. The man may have truly been seeking, but it seems more likely that he was trying to limit his own responsibility…verse 29   29 The man wanted to justify his actions, so he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” 30 Jesus replied with a story: “A Jewish man was traveling from Jerusalem down to Jericho, and he was attacked by bandits. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him up, and left him half dead beside the road. 31 “By chance a priest came along. But when he saw the man lying there, he crossed to the other side of the road and passed him by. 32 A Temple assistant[b] walked over and looked at him lying there, but he also passed by on the other side. 33 “Then a despised Samaritan came along, and when he saw the man, he felt compassion for him. 34 Going over to him, the Samaritan soothed his wounds with olive oil and wine and bandaged them. Then he put the man on his own donkey and took him to an inn, where he took care of him. 35 The next day he handed the innkeeper two silver coins,[c] telling him, ‘Take care of this man. If his bill runs higher than this, I'll pay you the next time I'm here.' You most likely have heard this story before. Most people have. We even have a “Good Samaritan Law” in many parts of the United States that legally protects those who administer emergency care in good faith. But let's try to look at it with fresh eyes. A Jewish man was traveling from Jerusalem to Jericho – a seventeen-mile journey through dangerous country. The road was lined with caves where thieves would hide so they could jump upon unsuspecting victims at any time. Picture walking through a rough part of a big city late at night. You would be wise to keep your head down and walk quickly, not drawing any attention to yourself. Perhaps that's what the Jewish man was doing when he was jumped. He was mugged, beaten, and left for dead on the side of the road. And the thieves likely ran back to a cave to wait for another victim. A priest was traveling the same path, head down, merely trying to get where he was going. He sees the Jewish man left for dead and keeps walking. We don't know why. Perhaps he didn't want to bring attention to himself, putting himself in danger. All we know is he kept walking. And then a temple assistant came along. I wonder if he saw the priest ahead of him and followed his example of inaction. When we neglect to serve as God calls us to, we can be assured of one thing: someone is always watching and using us as an example or justification for not following God. Think about that. Your actions have a ripple effect. It can be fun to think that the positive we are doing in the world will have effects that we cannot even imagine – I often hear it said, “You won't know all the good you've done until you get to heaven.” That is so true – and positive reinforcement often inspires us to keep up the good fight. But the hard reality is that our negative actions, or lack of action, also gives OTHERS the justification to NOT ACT. Luke 12:48 tells us  When someone has been given much, much will be required in return; and when someone has been entrusted with much, even more will be required. The priest was set apart as an example in the religious community, and what he did mattered. Others watched. He ignored the hurting man, giving others the justification to do the same. Finally, a Samaritan came by. I imagine the crowd gasped…or maybe groaned when Jesus said this. Jews and Samaritans hated each other, surely HE wouldn't help this man whom he had absolutely no loyalty towards. And yet, the listeners were surprised. The Samaritan man felt compassion. He went to the victim, soothed his wounds, and took him to a place of safety, even paying for his care. This Samaritan man probably feared for his own safety as much as the others did, but he recognized and loved the hurt man as a fellow human. This story just grips me. In this world of big government and judgment and claiming our own rights in society, how many times have I walked by a victim, not wanting to mess up my own day? How do I respond to the person from another country fleeing from a war-torn or gang-infested country? How do I treat the addict begging for money on the street? What compassion do I have for the child who lived a life of neglect and, now mentally unstable, lashes out in violent anger? These are NOT easy questions, and there is no easy answer, but that doesn't mean we should put our heads down and keep walking, ignoring the victims around us. Verse 36… 36 “Now which of these three would you say was a neighbor to the man who was attacked by bandits?” Jesus asked. 37 The man replied, “The one who showed him mercy.” Then Jesus said, “Yes, now go and do the same.” Go and do the same. Go and show mercy to the undeserving. Reach out to those who look like nothing can help. Cross the barrier of racism and hatred, offering compassion and care. Go and do the same. I don't know what that means for you. If I'm being honest, I don't know what it means for me. That is why we must search God's heart. We must lean on the Holy Spirit's wisdom. And when He calls us to a specific task, we must go obediently and immediately. There are those who are Big Brothers and Big Sisters – they make a lasting difference in a single life. There are women who rock babies who have been born with an addiction. There are prison ministries that reach the lost for Jesus. There are doctors and nurses who have fought through a pandemic, caring for one patient at a time. There are preschool teachers and daycare workers who make it possible for other moms to go to work to provide for their families. There are military personel who fight for freedom and equality. The list goes on and on. Not one of us can do it all, and we aren't called to. But we are EACH called to something. We EACH are called to make a difference, to make an impact, and to set an example. Make no mistake, God called you to this podcast for a reason. There is a hurting soul waiting on the side of the road for you. Don't keep your head down. Don't walk by. Don't justify your inaction. Remember… Go…and do the same. Let's pray… Dear Most Holy God! Your words are good, and your words are sometimes difficult to hear. Father, I know that many are walking away from this teaching with more questions than answers. There is no doubt you are calling each of us to show compassion to others, compassion for our neighbors who may not even look like us. Will you show each of us our exact calling for today? Please make it so clear that we don't even WANT to put our heads down and walk by. Give us eyes to see, hearts full of compassion, courage against fear, and excitement to follow your call in obedience. In Jesus' name, I pray. Amen.

52317
77: Do Something Big

52317

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 14:35


With a continuously growing list of things to do, insider benefits from partnering organizations, and an extensive support network, Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Johnson County does all the hard work for you. Executive Director, Daleta Thurness, and Director of Volunteer Growth and Success, Tyson Wirth, talk about being present and how the positive impact goes both ways. North Liberty is the headquarters of local media, regional financial and national transportation companies and home to solar energy and tech startups, and entrepreneurs getting their big ideas off the ground. Get to know your new business community.

Think Tank with Steve Adubato: The Podcast
Carlos Lejnieks; Catherine Goss and Colleen Bol; U.S. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman

Think Tank with Steve Adubato: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 30:00


Carlos Lejnieks, President & CEO, Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Essex, Hudson and Union Counties, sits down with Steve Adubato to bring attention to his organization, which focuses on providing mentors to children and overcoming academic and mental health challenges.  One-on-One Correspondent Jacqui Tricarico goes on location to the NJ Sharing Network's 5K Celebration of […]

Radical Grove : Parliament Pod
Radical Grove : Parliament Podcast - Season 3, Episode 3 : Baby Lamb

Radical Grove : Parliament Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 117:02


De$ Dollar$ walks the Parliament Podcast down her road of Djing, Fashion, Big Brothers and even Bigger Aspirations.

Imagine This Podcast
Cultural Relevance on the Rise at CAVT w/ Jaymee Harvey Willms and Phoenix Brown

Imagine This Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 52:19


This episode of ITP finds host Elisabeth joined by team member Rachel Shields Ebersole for a conversation with the Executive Director Jaymee Harvey Willms and Senior Curator Phoenix Brown from the Charles Allis and Villa Terrace Museums. In the conversation, they dig into some of the changes they have implemented and plan to implement to evolve the programming at, and experience of, attending the museums.   Drawing inspiration from Sarah Allis's will, the CAVT of today still seeks to “delight, educate and inspire.” The current staff at CAVT is made up of creatives, including Harvey Willms and Brown. As Harvey Willms reflects, “Artists are problem solvers...we are people who look at a system and see where it needs to be interrupted or supported.”   In alignment with the goals of Milwaukee County, CAVT is focused on thoughtfully stewarding taxpayer dollars to contribute to the local culture as an art and civic institution that is a driver to public health outcomes by increasing access to art, shared histories, and public green space. CAVT also wants Milwaukeeans to see themselves in their spaces and programming—and provide opportunities for respite. Brown and Harvey Willms hope their vision can help the institution become more relevant to support not only physical health but also the mental health of Milwaukee citizens.   CAVT is committed to becoming a more active player within the creative economy and becoming known as a museum that models new practices for supporting emerging and local artists. New museum stores will feature local makers, a revitalized residency programming has launched, and the organization is making investments in emerging artists. Brown hopes that through their vision, CAVT can demonstrate to Milwaukee that contemporary art is accessible. They also hope to keep funds in the local creative sector—by creating opportunities for artists and cultivating a cultural exchange where local artists are more supported—and continue to invest in Milwaukee.   Follow http://www.cavtmuseums.org/ (the CAVT Museums) on Instagram @charlesallisartmuseum and @villaterracemuseum  http://www.jaymeeharveywillms.com/ (Jaymee Harvey Willms)  https://phoenixbrown.art/ (Phoenix S. Brown)  https://www.jmkac.org/ (John Michael Kohler Arts Center)  https://gagosian.com/artists/anselm-kiefer/ (Anselm Kiefer)  https://www.bbbswashco.org/ (Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Washington County)  https://shopcival.com/ (CIVAL COLLECTIVE)  https://www.miad.edu/ (MIAD)  https://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/ (Cincinnati Art Museum)  https://mam.org/ (Milwaukee Art Museum)  https://county.milwaukee.gov/EN/County-Executive/News/Press-Releases/Milwaukee-County-Executive-David-Crowley-Launches-Healthy-County-Initiative- (Milwaukee County's Healthy County Initiative)  https://museums4all.org/ (Museums for All)  https://www.milwaukeemag.com/the-lasting-legacy-of-frederick-law-olmsted-and-his-3-signature-milwaukee-parks/ (Fredrick Law Olmstead Parks in Milwaukee)  https://www.abhmuseum.org/ (America's Black Holocaust Museum) 

DMRG Podcast
Power of Partnerships Podcast | Big Brothers and Big Sisters

DMRG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 22:04


The Des Moines Radio Group and NCMIC have teamed up again for the Power of Partnerships Podcast, and our final podcast embraces the group Big Brothers and Big Sisters. I hope you didn't think this group just worked with troubled kids - they are so much more! This podcast will give you a peek inside at how our kids are doing post-pandemic. The great news is that Big Brothers and Big Sisters knows how to help, because the kids aren't all okay.

Up in Your Business with Kerry McCoy
Reprise | Frank Scott Jr. Mayor of Little Rock

Up in Your Business with Kerry McCoy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 49:10


Ep 260 | Aired 9/3/2021 My guest today on Up In Your Business with Kerry McCoy is none other than the honorable Mayor of Little Rock, Arkansas, Mr. Frank Scott. His life demonstrates what I've seen time and time again on my show, and that is: “Successful people work hard, believe in a higher power, and are action oriented.” Mayor Scott has had a very diverse career. He has been an executive at First Security Bank, a staffer for Governor Mike Beebe, a manager for a Target distribution center, a state highway commissioner, and a board member of the LR Port Authority and Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Arkansas. Although his credentials are impressive, what endeared Mayor Scott to me was his open mindedness and willingness to try new things. As a youth, he was a Horace Mann Bear Cat football player who, later, was not afraid to take ballet. I'm SOLD! Oh, did I mention he is a Baptist associate pastor? This man can preach! After touching on his early life and career, the Mayor and I discuss the ins and outs of his renewed “Rebuild the Rock” campaign, aimed at revitalizing the City of Little Rock. Hear how he feels the proposed sales tax would improve early childhood care, create a senior center, revitalize our parks and recreation facilities, and improve infrastructure, all while learning some interesting facts about our fast-growing city, along the way.

Side x Side Podcast
Who is Dimari Swanagain? | Side x Side Extras!

Side x Side Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 97:14


Brandon interviews Dimari! Get to know the other half of the Side x Side Podcast duo on today's exciting episode! Brandon peels back the layers on everything from Dimari's childhood, to his career and relationships. They also discuss a range of favorite topics like how awesome Metallica is, Crony Capitalism, and the importance of mentorship. THANK YOU •  PLEASE SUBSCRIBE • TURN ON NOTIFICATIONS • REVIEW • LIKE • SHARE Sponsors:Black Swan Financial Group - www.BlackSwanFinancialGroup.comEase Web Development - www.easewebdev.comJennifer Catherine Photography - www.jennifercatherinephotography.comCopyright Eleusis Media Group, LLC, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2022 | www.eleusismediagroup.com | www.sidexsidepodcast.comInstagram | https://www.instagram.com/sidexsidepod/ Twitter|https://www.twitter.com/sidexsidepodTikTok | https://www.tiktok.com/@sidexsidepod@RIZZOfeels | https://www.instagram.com/rizzofeels/ | https://www.twitter.com/rizzofeels@JudahClan | https://www.judahclan.comTag #SidexSidePodcast to join in on the conversation!Music by: Brandon Rizzo, Tristen Burrows, Dimari Swanagain, V.Kidd, Dre Pierre Chapters0:00 | Intro1:28 | Opening Statement2:40 | Word Association5:00 | ESG Stakeholder Capitalism vs Shareholder Capitalism, Crony Capitalism, Kyoto Protocols, China 15:50 | Top 5 Favorite Financial Movies17:50 | Dimari's Upbringing, Family Life, Career, Pursuing Music and Finance28:20 | Losing Parents at an early age, Relationship with Mom, Developing Resilience, Overcoming Obstacles and Making Something of Yourself33:50 | The Role of Mentorship, Dimari's Mentor, Big Brothers, Learning About New Perspectives 37:00 | Dimari's Values and Principles, Integrity, Sticking to Your Word40:45 | Allowing Yourself to Change Your Mind, Challenging Your Own Beliefs and Ideas, Pronouns, Healthy Debate44:10 | Spirituality, Religion, Jesus Christ, Church, Dogma, Finding God56:30 | Occultism, Esoteric Wisdom, Secret Knowledge, Symbols, Learning How to Think Critically1:02:30 | Allegedly Question: Russian Conscription?! 1:05:45 | Brandon loves Metallica, Master of Puppets, Disposable Heroes, Spiritual Warfare, Battery1:10:00 | Stepping Away from Music, Major Labels, Shady Business in Recording Industry, Changing Careers, Meaning and Purpose1:17:30 | Relationships, What's Going with Your Damn Love Life Dude?! 1:25:55 | Mutual Love of Ancient History, Rizzo Makes a Dad Joke, Kemet, History from the Losing Side Perspective, Moors, Fatalism 1:34:27 | Closing RemarksAd Black Swan Financial Group - www.BlackSwanFinancialGroup.comAd Ease Web Development - www.easewebdev.com

Reality TV Improvised: The Improv-ision Podcast
Married at First Sight S15 Episode 9 / Big Brother S24 Episodes 22-25 - Big Brothers' Kyle telling Julie CM ho wot run the game and MAFS 15 Miguel and his book of Lindy transgressions.

Reality TV Improvised: The Improv-ision Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 38:14


Here we go once again with Big Brother Season 24 episodes 22-25, and Married at First Sight Season 15 Episode 9 (Are you going to gaslight me?) This week we improvise Big Brothers' Kyle telling Julie CM ho wot run the game and Married at First Sight 15 Miguel and his book of Lindy Transgressions. IF YOU LIKE WHAT YOU HEAR, PLEASE HELP US OUT BY SUBSCRIBING, GIVE US A REVIEW, LIKE US ON FACEBOOK, FOLLOW US ON TWITTER AND TELL ALL YOUR BESTEST FRIENDS!! Each week we'll continue to break down every episode of some of our favorite reality TV shows and improvise those moments from the show you wish you'd seen.  We laugh along with you as we discuss our favorite reality TV shows on television and make up stuff that probably should have happened. Kerry and Rich are Hawaiian improv comedians who love to watch reality TV.  Every week, they take their favorite reality shows, discuss the episode and improvise moments that you wish you'd seen on the air.  We love TV and all the awesome characters that make it so fun to watch.  We bring to life our funny interpretations of their world. And, of course, we'll be back again next week, with more 90 Day fiancé, Survivor, other reality TV happenings, and, of course, improvised television on the Improv-ision Podcast! Follow us on Twitter: @improv_ision Like us on Facebook: @improvisionpodcast Send us an email to improvisionpodcast@gmail.com with your thoughts or questions.   And keep laughing with your funny friends Rich and Kerry every week on our Improv-ision podcast!  ‘Hangman's Noose' courtesy of Celtic Harp Robertson @ https://archive.org/details/CelticHarpRobertson Funky Element courtesy of bensound @ http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/track/funky-element ‘Big Brother theme,' Courtesy of CBS “Married At First Sight,' theme “All or Nothing,” Courtesy of Lifetime and Louise Dowd · Jason Tarver · Marc Williams

L3 Leadership Podcast
Ginger Hardage on Creating Unstoppable Cultures

L3 Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 49:55 Transcription Available


Episode Summary: In this episode of the L3 Leadership podcast, Ginger discusses her career journey at Southwest, what she learned while working there, and shares her thoughts on work culture. About Ginger: Ginger Hardage retired as Senior Vice President of Culture and Communications at Southwest Airlines after an illustrious 25 years, where she served as a member of the CEO's executive leadership team. At Southwest, Ginger led a team of 150 people responsible for building and sustaining the organization's legendary culture and communications enterprise.In 2017, Ginger launched Unstoppable Cultures, a brand designed to help organizations create and sustain cultures of enduring greatness. Recognized by many as a foremost global authority on building and sustaining organizational culture, Ginger was responsible for the activities at Southwest that nourished the culture and the internal and external communications function. Ginger has received numerous honors throughout her career, including induction into the PublicRelations Hall of Fame, being named as one of Texas' Most Powerful and Influential Women and receiving the prestigious Larry Foster Award for Integrity in Public Communication from the Arthur W. Page Society. PRWeek has named her multiple times to its Top 50 Power list and 50Most Powerful Women in Public Relations. She was named “Legendary Communicator” by Southern Methodist University, Legacy Award honoree by the Plank Center for Leadership, and selected for the James C. Bowling Executive-In-Residence Lecture Series at the University of Kentucky.Ginger currently serves as Global Chairman of the Board for Ronald McDonald House Charities. In Dallas, she serves on the board of The Trinity Park Conservancy and was a past president of the Trinity Commons Foundation. Ginger previously served on advisory boards of Novartis in Basel, Switzerland; The Page Society; Business Civic Leadership Center, an affiliate of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Big Brothers and Sisters of Metropolitan Dallas; Southwest Cares; and the Council of Public Relations Firms.Ginger earned a B.A. in advertising/public relations from Texas Tech University and was recognized as an outstanding alumna by the College of Mass Communications at Texas Tech University.Ginger lives in Dallas, TX, and Santa Fe, NM with her husband, Kelly.4 Key Takeaways:1. Ginger recalls how she got her position at Southwest Airlines and grew a team centered around culture and communications.2. She advises emerging leaders to distinguish themselves to grow within their current organization.3. She discusses where her career has gone since departing Southwest Airlines. 4. Ginger talks about what company culture and effective communication mean to her. Quotes From the Episode:“Culture isn't a faucet you can turn on and off.”“I believe that culture, leadership, and communication go hand in hand.”“We have to be authentically ourselves to be authentically happy.”“Leaders cast a long shadow”.Resources Mentioned:Ginger's Masterclass: The FellowshipConnect with Ginger:Website | Twitter | Linkedin | Instagram 

Corona After Dark: A Tangled Podcast
Episode 14: Big Brothers of Corona

Corona After Dark: A Tangled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 47:55


Eugene and Lance are put in charge of two adorable children, and we end up going on a tangent about kittens at one point. Cohosts: Margaret and Patricia Ash Editing: Patricia Ash Theme Music: Danielle Keiko Eyer Logo Design: Ekaterina Oloy

Ignition: A Podcast for the New Evangelization
520: Getting to Know Our Big Brothers and Sisters

Ignition: A Podcast for the New Evangelization

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 28:02


The saints want to lead us closer to Jesus! That's why it's important to get to know them, too. But how? That's what Dr. Chris and Robyn Bruggeman discuss in this epsiode. Enjoy!

Reality Steve Podcast
Daily Roundup - 7/18/22

Reality Steve Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 20:25


(SPOILERS) Today's Daily Roundup covers tonight's “Bachelorette” episode, accountability, Matt & Rachael, Jed gets engaged, Big Brothers confusing episode, and the Open Championship is won, not lost. Ads:Dame Products - Promo Code: RealitySteve for 15% off your first orderOrganifi - Promo Code: RealitySteve for 20% off your next orderTrivia Star – Download “Trivia Star” app in the Apple or Google StoreMusic written by Jimmer Podrasky (B'Jingo Songs/Machia Music/Bug Music BMI) 

2 Libras & a Gemini
ENJOY A REPLAY: Astrology, men and commitment and big brothers watching

2 Libras & a Gemini

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 67:41


Come join us as we travel the Astrology wave, touch on why some men don't commit and big brother is going deeper in watching us

B-Rated Podcast
Episode 172 - Top Gun / Crimes of the Future Discussion

B-Rated Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 57:50


This week on the B-Rated podcats, Big Brother, DJ and Thomas do some movie review and discussions.  First Big Brother and Thomas talk about Top Gun: Maverick.  The episode ends with a great story about Big Brothers attempt to see Crimes of the Future.

Focus: Black Oklahoma

After numerous attempts by the Survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre to be granted a trial, a judge handed down an unprecedented ruling on May 2nd that provides hope to those who are fighting to repair and restore Greenwood. Carlos Moreno has more. Next Jamie Glisson has the first in a series exploring the candidates running for political office across the state. Here, she speaks with Congressional District 3 incumbent, Congressman Frank Lucas and some new challengers for that seat. Adverse Childhood experiences are responsible for traumatizing millions of children across the state. One organization believes that a mentor can counteract that trauma with an activity as simple as bowling. Dawn Carter shares more about Big Brothers, Big Sisters Bowling for Kids Sake event. Brandy Colbert's book "Blackbirds in the Sky" was written for young adults but doesn't shy away from the tough topic of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Our teen correspondent Adrienne Brown has details about what's been missing from her education and why straight talk in our classrooms matter. Preserving the prairie system is no simple task. And now at the heart of conservation and culture is the Prairie Chicken. While it may not be as familiar as Bald Eagles, Britny Cordera has more on what makes Prairie Chickens just as iconic and in need of protection. Finally Chaz Stephens will connect the dots from Dragonball Z to N.E.R.D. exploring how Black nerds are gaining greater visibility and acceptance in mainstream culture. Focus: Black Oklahoma is produced in partnership with KOSU Radio, Tulsa Artist Fellowship, and Tri-City Collective. Additional support is provided by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Philanthropies. Our theme music is by Moffett Music. Focus: Black Oklahoma's executive producers are Quraysh Ali Lansana and Bracken Klar. Our producers are Nick Alexandrov and Vanessa Gaona. Our production interns Torren Doss and Smriti Iyengar.

TV RELOAD
BIG BROTHERS GIFT OF THE GABBIE!

TV RELOAD

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 41:03


Today on the podcast I have Gabbie from Big Brother 2022! One of the youngest newbies in the competition. I believe this housemate was strategically place to keep the average age down of all the housemates for this season.Gabbie played a great game and she was more than just 'mermaid hair' or a seat filler. We saw her relationship grow and change but ultimately she was navigating what she thought was right… and guys that's why this podcast chat is super fun.Gabbie had a fair few challenges within her time in the house - one being Queen Reggie not quite buying into her game, Gabbie was also the third wheel in this years 'showmance,' not always being sure on Tim and Estelle and who to trust but overall fighting her way to the second last week of Big Brother.We will talk post show. Why BB is like a 'Kontiki tour,' who will win and who need Dr Phil at this point of the competition  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TV RELOAD
BIG BROTHERS GIFT OF THE GABBIE!

TV RELOAD

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 41:32


Today on the podcast I have Gabbie from Big Brother 2022! One of the youngest newbies in the competition. I believe this housemate was strategically place to keep the average age down of all the housemates for this season. Gabbie played a great game and she was more than just 'mermaid hair' or a seat filler. We saw her relationship grow and change but ultimately she was navigating what she thought was right… and guys that's why this podcast chat is super fun. Gabbie had a fair few challenges within her time in the house - one being Queen Reggie not quite buying into her game, Gabbie was also the third wheel in this years 'showmance,' not always being sure on Tim and Estelle and who to trust but overall fighting her way to the second last week of Big Brother. We will talk post show. Why BB is like a 'Kontiki tour,' who will win and who need Dr Phil at this point of the competition  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Listen First Montana
Episode 27: Frank Garner

Listen First Montana

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 52:45


LISTEN FIRST MONTANA Listen first. It is what all great leaders do. Episode 27: Frank Garner In this episode, Eric speaks with Frank Garner, 4th term State Representative of House District 7 and former Kalispell Police Chief.  Frank discusses his thoughts on the current state of policing, how he approached his leadership role as police chief, and how he used the lessons from Leadership Montana during a one year stint training police in Afghanistan in 2005.  Frank also reflects on state politics, leadership, and the future of Montana.  Frank is a graduate of the inaugural class of Leadership Montana in 2005 and is passionate about leaving the world in a better place than he found it – or as he says in this episode, planting trees that will provide shade for people he will never meet. Eric Halverson Host Eric, a graduate of Leadership Montana Class of 2016 and Masters Class 2019, leads this project with an unmatched curiosity and thirst for learning how each interviewee leans into leading. Eric magically brings to life the story underneath the words and weaves together a series that perfectly illustrates the meaning and value of listening deeply. Originally from Billings, Eric currently resides in Missoula where he serves as the Communications and Development Administrator for Partnership Health Center. Frank Garner Guest Frank Garner was raised in Kalispell, Montana, where he graduated from Flathead High School and Flathead Valley Community College. He became a member of the Kalispell Police Department in 1986, where he worked in the patrol division. Frank served in a number of roles throughout his career, including as a County Drug Team Agent, Shift Supervisor, Detective, SWAT Team Leader, and in 1997 he was promoted to Chief of Police. As Chief of Police, Frank initiated an aggressive community policing philosophy that led to a number of beneficial programs, including Kalispell's Meeting on Meth, the Major Case Unit, the School Resource Officer Program, and the Police Advisory Council. After nearly nine years as Chief, Frank retired and took a position as a Police Advisor in Afghanistan, where he served as a mentor to Afghan Police, a police trainer at the Jalalabad Regional Training Center, and later as the Professional Police Mentor Supervisor in the Afghan capital of Kabul. Frank went on to serve as the Chief of Security for the local hospital and then transitioned into private law enforcement and security consulting. Frank has a long record of public service that includes membership in the Evergreen Lions Club, The Kalispell Rotary Club, and Big Brothers and Sisters.   Frank is now in his fourth term as a Montana State Representative for House District 7 and currently serves as Chair of the Montana ARPA Health Commission as well as serving on the Health and Human Services interim budget committee.

Ask The Contractors
Back in the Saddle; Talking Big Brothers & Big Sisters

Ask The Contractors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 0:07


Welcome, everyone. Welcome Back to AskTheContractors.com, your Home Improvement Show on air with information that you need to keep your home in working order. In fact, I love DIY people out there who doing their project’s themselves and as a Contractor, I want to help answer your questions for you. This week I also want […]

Mitlin Money Mindset
Effective Marketing Without Overthinking, Episode #84

Mitlin Money Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 40:43


Marketing is part of life for every creator, service provider, or business professional. Granted, not every one of us is assigned to the marketing role in our organization, but we all employ aspects of marketing every day in relationships, social media interactions, and more. It's for that reason each of us needs to understand the basics of marketing and the things we can do to improve our efforts. And if you're a business owner, you especially need to make wise and effective marketing decisions. To help us think through these issues, our guest on this episode is Mark Kate Gulick. Mark Kate is the Chief Marketing Officer for the Carson Group. She is an award-winning marketing veteran and Amazon best-selling author. Her education and experience equipped her to fill important roles with IBM, TD Ameritrade, and serving with a number of powerfully important organizations including Big Brothers and Big Sisters. On this episode we discuss ways that every marketer or business owner can improve outreach efforts, ensure their marketing strategy is clear and effective, and to hit those targets no matter the industry or niche. You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... What Mary Kate does in her role as Chief Marketing Officer [5:01] Making up commercials as a child revealed an innate marketing interest [6:54] Why marketing is important and how it translates into any business [10:01] The two biggest changes in marketing over the last 20 years [13:42] 3 common marketing mistakes businesses make [18:08] Things EVERY business should be doing to market effectively [24:34] The indicators that your company may need its own CMO [29:57] Why Mary Kate decided to write a book for those starting or running businesses [33:17] What Mary Kate did today that put her in the right mindset for success [36:57] Resources & People Mentioned Cake Diva Connect with Mary Kate Gulick Mary Kate's book: The Real Deal Carson Group Website On Instagram On Twitter On Linkedin Bio Mary Kate Gulick is an award-winning marketing veteran, creative leader, content marketing pioneer and Amazon bestselling author. She has an MA in advertising, marketing and communication studies, and is a Professional Certified Content Marketer. After years providing game-changing creative ideas, leadership, and marketing strategy for award-winning ad agencies, Mary Kate joined IBM to lead their employment brand offering. From there, long-time client TD Ameritrade tapped her to head up brand, creative and digital marketing for the Institutional business, where she developed a keen understanding of the needs of RIAs and independent advisors while building the company's award-winning content marketing program and category leading digital presence. She currently sits on the board of the #1 nationally ranked chapter of the American Marketing Association, is the chair of the Hunger & Food Access Committee of the Junior League of Omaha, and big sister with Big Brothers Big Sisters. Mary Kate is the mother of two active boys, wife to an amazing husband, and dog-mom to a mini-goldendoodle. She loves reading, cooking, live music and is a huge Harry Potter and Star Wars fan. She's obsessed with Broadway, sings show tunes while she works, and her oldest son is currently teaching her to play tennis. Guests on the Mitlin Money Mindset Show are not affiliated with CWM, LLC, and opinions expressed herein may not be representative of CWM, LLC. CWM, LLC is not responsible for the guest's content linked on this site. Connect With Mitlin Financial podcast(at)MitlinFinancial.com - email us with your suggestions for topics or guests https://mitlinfinancial.com  Follow on Twitter Follow on Instagram Subscribe on Youtube Follow on Linkedin Follow on Facebook Subscribe to Mitlin Money Mindset™ on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts

The HBCU Nation Radio Show
Gerald Hector welcomes James Scruggs, CEO of Kingdom Development Partners to "It's Easy Son"

The HBCU Nation Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 58:18


James, originally from Long Island, NY, received his B.A. from the University of Virginia in May of 2000, after which he joined Bank of America as a Commercial Paper Trader. Due to his uncanny ability to identify properties and situations that are “ripe for development,” James founded J.S. & Associates, Inc. in 2002, which is also central to his vision of economic development and self-sufficiency for families in the greater Charlotte area. Since relocating to Charlotte, James has been making a name for himself in real estate development with a particular focus on the most up-and-coming neighborhoods in The Queen City. After years in finance with Bank of America, he joined Helen Adams Realty because it shares his commitment to customer service, authenticity, and reliability. James strengths are unlimited drive and creativity, very strong interpersonal skills, a wealth of investment knowledge, a thorough understanding of real estate growth trends in and around Charlotte, and most importantly, absolute integrity. Through JSA, he has acquired 30 single-family homes and two apartment complexes. One of those apartment complexes is Kingston Apartments, a 35-unit complex that sits on over 4 acres, just minutes from both the south end and uptown and Sandhust Apartments that sits on 13+ acres. He has also used JSA to improve neighborhoods by restoring dilapidated homes or even tearing them down with the purpose of constructing brand new homes in their place. JSA has also allowed him to educate other investors and new homeowners through a quarterly web-based newsletter he produces on all aspects of investing in real estate in smart, sensible ways. As CEO of JSA, James also delivers free investment seminars that educate folks on buying and keeping properties. James also started in 2014 and 2015 his development and construction company called J.S. & Son's Construction Company, LLC. James has his unlimited commercial and residential General Contracting License. He primarily focuses on building Assisted Living Communities specializing in Alzheimer's and Dementia. James started Kingdom Development Partners which is a development company which mission is to create transformational projects that provide exceptional real estate services to the communities in which we serve. KDP is currently working on a 45+ townhome development in the well sought-after Wilmore Community, 157 townhome development in University City, 17 townhome development and a 16 single family home community in Enderly Park James is married to his gorgeous wife Makila who is the Deputy General Counsel at Trane Technologies. James has an amazing 12-year-old son named Jaden and an 8-year-old son Malachi. After a successful 7-year career in the financial banking industry, he made a major life and career change by committing his life to serving those with Alzheimer's Disease. He is the founder and president of Unlimited Possibilities Family Care Homes, a unique ministry dedicated to changing the way elders are cared for today and in the future. James is a past member of University Park Baptist Church, where he served as the former fundraising chairperson for the Youth Kingdom Citizens Missions, a ministry whose goal is to send the church's youth to work in missions all around the world. He also gives time and talent to Big Brothers & Big Sisters of America, he was past-president of Focus on Future Leaders. To use the “you reap what you sow” analogy, James has reaped rewards untold through his commitment to helping troubled youths and families find their way out of poverty and despair through community support and economic empowerment. James and his family (wife, Makila; sons, Jaden & Malachi) are now proud members of Elevation Church. They started coming to Elevation in the summer of 2013 after being invited by some friends.

Fun Fact Friday with Leila and David
Episode 101 - 101 Mushrooms!

Fun Fact Friday with Leila and David

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 Transcription Available


Visit us at funfactfriday.com Mushroom Facts! Giant Puffball Facts! Puffball Facts! Plastic! Big Donation for Big Brothers! Mushrooms are more like humans than plants! Even more Mushroom facts! At last, the final Mushroom Facts! Bleeding mushroom! Spotify ads! Youtube ads on non-partner videos!

The Chet Buchanan Show
Good Feeling Stories of the Day! 5/25/22

The Chet Buchanan Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 7:42


Big Brothers, Big Sisters got a HECK of a surprise donation, AND a mom has made a Facebook group to help other moms find baby formula as we attempt to get out of this shortage. Check out more good feeling stories here!

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
Feeling Connected at Work with Steven Van Cohen

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 30:38


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova. Leadership consultant and executive coach, Steven Van Cohen, MSOD, connected with the What's Next! Podcast to discuss his thoughts on workplace loneliness. Along with Ryan Jenkins, he is a co-author of the book Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams From Isolated to All In which gives insight on how to create meaningful connections within an organization. Dubbed “The Leadership Whisperer,” he's spent more than a decade working alongside leading organizations like Salesforce, Home Depot, Komatsu, Bank of America, CAT, and Blackstone to improve worker well-being, reduce employee isolation and boost team belonging.  Steven is a co-founder of LessLonely.com, the premier resource for addressing workplace loneliness and CEO of SyncLX, a leading consultancy specializing in employee development.  As a proud Big Brother, (from Big Brothers and Big Sisters), as well as a volunteer with Boys & Girls Club and Young Americans, Steven has helped build confidence in the future leaders of America.  He holds a BA from the University of Illinois and a MSOD from Pepperdine University. He lives in Orange County CA with his wife and two daughters.   THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR…  workers who are seeking validation and understanding in the loneliness of their workplace environment and managers who are striving to create a more connected workforce to inspire, engage, and properly appreciate their employees.   TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… While managing the emotional state of employees might not directly exist on a team leader's job description, the fact is that disengaged and lonely employees are less productive and more susceptible to burnout. We must find the balance between caring about people and getting stuff done if we want to succeed as a healthy workplace.   WHAT I LOVE MOST… The business case for caring about employee loneliness is clear: workers who feel seen and heard perform better for your team. Building workplace connections is in your best interest because it inspires people to come to work as the best versions of themselves – everyone wins.     Running time: 30:37 Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn   Find Steven online: Official Website Twitter LinkedIn   Steven's Book: Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams from Isolated to All In

Cancel Me, Baby!
Ep 133: The Nobel Peace Prize Exposed, Hoes

Cancel Me, Baby!

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 35:14


PT 1: In the words of my guest Unni Turrettini: "It's not empowering to believe people are stupid." And contrary to the media person-feeding us (lol) information like we're toddlers, ain't that the damn truth. Unni is a speaker and connection expert, and a gal after my own heart, has put herself out there by publishing a book EXPOSING the inner working and corruption within the Nobel Peace Prize organization. She's also opinionated AF so need I say more. In PART 1 of our convo, we talk about how the thought-controlled narratives are actually making us (and kids) more lonely in daily life and affecting us in work and play, why mobs are having mental breakdowns over people like Joe Rogan, and HOW to gain confidence to stand against the Big Brothers in your own life. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/taylor-ferber/support

the only one in the room podcast
Artis Stevens Is The First and Only Black President and CEO Of Big Brothers and Big Sisters of America Episode 127

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 50:45


Imagine an organization where 70 percent of the clients are young people of color, and the goal is to pair these kids with adult mentors who can help guide them through their lives. When Artis Stevens became the first Black President and CEO of Big Brothers and Big Sisters Of America in their 118-year history, he understood the significance of that moment. But his goal was to do more than just represent. He wanted to make an impact. So what would you do if the challenge was to make sure that a beloved American institution continued its tradition of placing “Bigs with Littles”, but you also wanted to ensure that this process was as inclusive as possible? Would you stick with old methods that worked “fine” 20 or 30 years ago? Or would you make sure that kids of all identities could match with a mentor that was exactly the right fit for them? More From Artis Stevens: Visit: www.bbbs.org Finding Artis Stevens: Twitter: @artisnstevens Instagram: @artisstevens LinkedIn: Artis Stevens Special thanks to our sponsors: Year & Day: Year & Day is giving The Only One in the Room listeners a special offer. Visit yearandday.com/one and use code: ONE to get $25 off your first order of $150 or more. Also, receive Free shipping on orders of $150 or more. So drop whatever you're doing and go visit yearandday.com/one and use the code: ONE to get $25 off your first order of $150 or more! Carpe: Carpe is the #1 dermatologist recommended brand for sweat all over the body, scientifically tested and proven. Go to mycarpe.com, get free shipping plus TWENTY FIVE PERCENT OFF with the code ONE. That's 25% off when you use the code ONE at mycarpe. com. Completely risk free because Carpe offers a 100% money back guarantee, no questions asked! PATREON SHOUT OUTS: Mercedes Cusick LMFT, Website: www.mercedescusick.com, IG: @recoverhealbloom Check Out How To Do The Pot Thanks to Kathleen Hahn Cute Booty Lounge is made right here in the USA, by women and for women. The company is incredible, female, and minority-owned and all of their leggings make makes your booty look amazing. Go to https://cutebooty.com/ today! Embrace your body, love your booty! Join our Patreon: Become an Only One In The Room patron by joining us on Patreon! Starting at only $5.00 per month, you'll get bonus content, access to outtakes that the general public will NEVER see, extremely cool merch, and depending on what tier you get, monthly hang time with Scott and Laura. Join our Patreon today at https://www.patreon.com/theonlyonepodcast Be sure not to miss Scott Talks on Wednesdays, our Sunday release called Sunday Edition & our brand new series On My Nightstand releasing on Fridays by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  Join our Only One In The Room Facebook Group if you'd like to ask a question of any of our upcoming guests for this series.  Also visit the website www.theonlyonepod.com for the latest from our host Laura Cathcart Robbins like featured articles and more. We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dad Up
Ep. 134 - How An MLB Player Handles Fatherhood | Sean Casey and Bryan Ward

Dad Up

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 37:48


In this episode Sean Casey knocks it out the park sharing his experiences as a MLB player and the dedication it takes especially while being a father. Sean Casey, nicknamed "The Mayor” is a former Major League Baseball first baseman for the Cleveland Indians, Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates, Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox. He played for 12 years before retiring. Sean was selected to the Major League All-Star Game three times during his career. Sean is currently a broadcaster and commentator for the MLB Network. He appears across MLB Network's programming, including Emmy Award-winning flagship studio show MLB Tonight, the Spring Training series 30 Clubs in 30 Days, the kids-focused weekly interview and demonstration show Play Ball and MLB Network's special event coverage throughout the year. He has been active in Big Brothers and Make-A-Wish Foundation, as well as the "Casey's Crew" program, where he provided free high-priced tickets to disadvantaged youth. Sean credits his Christian upbringing for his generosity. Dad Up! Below are ways to either watch/hear the show, more about Dad Up Podcast or to reach out to me. YouTube Channel: https://youtube.com/c/DadUpPodcast Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dad-up-podcast/id1486764562 Website: https://www.daduptribe.com/ Email: daduptribe@gmail.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bryan.ward.5245 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/daduppodcast/?hl=en Linktree: https://linktr.ee/Daduptribe https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpDScjMFYYI7pQK4aedbuzQ/videos https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-mayors-office-with-sean-casey/id1569894230 https://linktr.ee/Seancasey21 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bryan-ward8/support

The David Spisak Show
Beach Pace: Going Beyond Societal Expectations

The David Spisak Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 44:21 Transcription Available


Beach Pace is a former Bomb Squad Executive Officer and Commander within the Ordinance Branch of the US Army, CEO of Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Columbia, and Hillsboro City Councillor. Beach has demonstrated that it's ok to go beyond the expectations traditionally set by society; that it's possible to go bigger and higher than one might think is possible, especially when engaged in the service of others. What David Spisak and Beach Pace Discuss In This Episode: All of us typically go into the workforce, and one day we go through a process of becoming something other than what we hoped. It's almost like we're laundering ourselves, and we wake up as somebody doing not what we intended to do as a child, not what we dreamt of doing as a child, but what we're "supposed" to do. Beach explains that it's easy to get stuck in "the system," with expectations placed upon us not just from school but also from society. Something she's felt like as a lesbian, and knowing as you grow up that you're different from what people expect as standard. There's societal pressure to succeed, but Beach can't recall anyone ever asking her or other children, for that matter, what makes them happy or what excites them? Adults must have deeper conversations with their children to help them understand what they are passionate about and what fuels their excitement. Then, rather than just working their butts off to support children, they can understand how to help set them up to succeed. David shares that people who stay closely connected to the person they were as a child tend to be happier have successes, and know without question what makes them happy. Beach recalls her insatiable curiosity as a child — the desire to increase her understanding continually. Beach shares about her time in the military and attending the academy. Everything they do there is to train them to become ethical and trustworthy leaders. Looking back, Beach understands that so much of what she learned during her experience in the military has helped shape the leader that she is today, from boardrooms to her seat on the city council. Bad leaders can pull an entire organization down — they can be so harmful to a team that it's difficult for Beach to watch, especially because she knows there is an alternative. But, better leadership is always possible. If you're looking for somebody who will be a leader, especially in politics, it's essential to see a history of service outside of politics. Beach shares that she grows most when she talks to folks who, on paper, she's opposed to. She thrives when she is pushed and takes a moment to think. Respectful discourse and collaboration are vital to moving forward and progressing in society. Like this show? Please leave us a rating and review where you're listening right now! Even one sentence helps! Consider leaving your LinkedIn or Instagram handle so we can thank you personally! Learn more about Beach Pace: IG: https://www.instagram.com/beach.pace/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/beachpace/ Campaign website: https://electbeachpace.com/ Connect with David Spisak for even more life-changing content: Instagram LinkedIn Clubhouse Facebook

The David Spisak Show
Beach Pace: Going Beyond Societal Expectations

The David Spisak Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 44:21


Beach Pace is a former Bomb Squad Executive Officer and Commander within the Ordinance Branch of the US Army, CEO of Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Columbia, and Hillsboro City Councillor. Beach has demonstrated that it's ok to go beyond the expectations traditionally set by society; that it's possible to go bigger and higher than one might think is possible, especially when engaged in the service of others.What David Spisak and Beach Pace Discuss In This Episode:All of us typically go into the workforce, and one day we go through a process of becoming something other than what we hoped. It's almost like we're laundering ourselves, and we wake up as somebody doing not what we intended to do as a child, not what we dreamt of doing as a child, but what we're "supposed" to do.Beach explains that it's easy to get stuck in "the system," with expectations placed upon us not just from school but also from society. Something she's felt like as a lesbian, and knowing as you grow up that you're different from what people expect as standard.There's societal pressure to succeed, but Beach can't recall anyone ever asking her or other children, for that matter, what makes them happy or what excites them?Adults must have deeper conversations with their children to help them understand what they are passionate about and what fuels their excitement. Then, rather than just working their butts off to support children, they can understand how to help set them up to succeed.David shares that people who stay closely connected to the person they were as a child tend to be happier have successes, and know without question what makes them happy.Beach recalls her insatiable curiosity as a child — the desire to increase her understanding continually.Beach shares about her time in the military and attending the academy. Everything they do there is to train them to become ethical and trustworthy leaders. Looking back, Beach understands that so much of what she learned during her experience in the military has helped shape the leader that she is today, from boardrooms to her seat on the city council.Bad leaders can pull an entire organization down — they can be so harmful to a team that it's difficult for Beach to watch, especially because she knows there is an alternative. But, better leadership is always possible.If you're looking for somebody who will be a leader, especially in politics, it's essential to see a history of service outside of politics.Beach shares that she grows most when she talks to folks who, on paper, she's opposed to. She thrives when she is pushed and takes a moment to think. Respectful discourse and collaboration are vital to moving forward and progressing in society.Like this show? Please leave us a rating and review where you're listening right now! Even one sentence helps! Consider leaving your LinkedIn or Instagram handle so we can thank you personally!Learn more about Beach Pace:IG: https://www.instagram.com/beach.pace/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/beachpace/Campaign website: https://electbeachpace.com/Connect with David Spisak for even more life-changing content:InstagramLinkedInClubhouseFacebook

Swan Dive
Ron Andruff - "Champagne on Ice" - Stanley Cup Champion to Sports Marketing Visionary

Swan Dive

Play Episode Play 53 sec Highlight Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 54:53


During his nine years as a pro hockey legend from 1972-81, Ron Andruff shared in 3 Stanley Cups with the Montreal Canadiens. He won two Most Valuable Player awards with three major professional hockey leagues. He also won the American Hockey League Scoring Title. During and after his athletic career, Andruff lent his name and support to important causes, from Big Brothers to cancer, water conservation and many others. An entrepreneur and tech pioneer, Andruff started numerous companies in sports marketing, advertising, travel and beyond. His current consultancy focuses on creating a safer internet where patients in need can be sure that medicines purchased online are both fairly priced and efficacious.Share your Swan Dive at www.swandive.us

Cross Border Podcasts
Episode 357 - Community Spotlight - Big Brothers And Big Sisters Calgary And Area

Cross Border Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 42:36


Big Brothers and Big Sisters Calgary and Area ensure that children and youth facing adversity have the relationships they need to become resilient and realize their full potential. With the support of Big Brothers and Big Sisters Calgary and Area professionals, qualified staff, and mentors form strong one-to-one relationships with their mentees that express care, challenge growth, provide support, share power, and expand possibilities. These critical developmental relationships allow children and youth to strengthen their social-emotional learning and executive functioning skills, developing them into resilient young people who are able to overcome life's adversities and achieve more. Today for our Community Spotlight we talk with Ken Lima Coelho the President and CEO of Big Brothers and Big Sisters Calgary and Area. We chat about the organization, how you can help, and Jeremy's Big Run. *************************************************** Follow the Big Brothers and Big Sisters Calgary and Area: Instagram: https://instagram.com/BBBSCalgary Twitter: https://twitter.com/BBBSCalgary Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/BBBSCalgary Website: https://bbbscalgary.ca/ *************************************************** Follow the Cross Border Interview Podcast: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/crossborderpodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/CrossBorderPod Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/CrossBorderInterviews Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCI2i25ZVKTO84oUsLyO4jig Website: https://www.crossborderinterviews.ca/ Back the Show: https://www.patreon.com/CrossBoderInterviewPodcast The Cross Border Interview Podcast was Produced and Edited by Miranda, Brown & Associates Inc © 2022

#beyondFLG
Episode 016: Rand Jenkins (Mountain Mojo Group)

#beyondFLG

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 72:56


For this episode, Itchy and Scratchy (aka Cody and Dan) are going #beyondFLG with Rand Jenkins, Partner, CEO, Visionary, and Director of Strategy at Mountain Mojo Group, a digital marketing group located in Flagstaff. Prior to digital marketing, Rand worked in the service industry and moved to the world of production in 2003 working as a production assistant on the MTV Video & Music Awards shows. Since then, he has managed and produced over 1400 concerts, festivals, fundraisers, galas and special events. He co-founded, owned and operated Flagstaff's Green Room, a music venue and bar in Flagstaff, AZ for 7 years and acted as GM of The Pepsi Amphitheater in Flagstaff for another 3 years. He also founded and produced 3 community/music festivals in Flagstaff including The Flagstaff Hullabaloo, Flagstaff Cornucopia and Kaleidoscope Kamp Out. In late 2015, he started Mountain Mojo Group, a marketing firm with partner Austin Leggett. In his spare time he has sat on the boards of Habitat for Humanity, The Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy, The Flagstaff Music Festival/Firefly Gatherings, mentored for Big Brothers, Big Sisters and participates in volunteer opportunities city wide. All of this is secondary of course to traveling and reconnecting with his Friends and Family. You won't want to miss Rand discussing his experience in the service industry, including stories of Les Claypool, Insane Clown Posse, and REO Speedwagon, and a lot of sage guru business advice. In the word of Jason Costello, “I find Rand to be a bit of an empath with a lot of guru management vibe. 1-Part Mr. Rogers, 1-Part Yoda.”

Nonprofit Leadership Podcast
Why two of the country's largest nonprofits are working together Part 2

Nonprofit Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 30:47


When it comes to nonprofits, is working together really better? For two of our country's largest nonprofits, the answer is yes. Big Brothers and ...

The Chet Buchanan Show
Help! I think my boyfriend lied about being a Navy Seal!

The Chet Buchanan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 7:19


Her brothers are skeptical, but she doesn't seem to care if it's the truth or not. Wouldn't it matter if he lied about being apart of one of the highest rated armed forces?

Nonprofit Leadership Podcast
Why two of the country's largest nonprofits are working together Part 1

Nonprofit Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 20:50


When it comes to nonprofits, is working together really better? For two of our country's largest nonprofits, the answer is yes. Big Brothers and ...

The Lynda Steele Show
Pink Shirt Day: how your support benefits kids in British Columbia

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 7:02


 Rose Higgins, Program Director of the Big Brothers of Greater Vancouver discusses the impact Pink Shirt Day can have on the lives of children everywhere 

The Lynda Steele Show
The Full Show with Guest Host George Affleck: B.C. announces new rapid test strategy, development plan announced for legendary Hudson's Bay building on Granville and Pink Shirt Day!

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 50:08


BREAKING: B.C. announces rapid test strategy Dr Brian Conway, Medical Director & Infectious Diseases specialist at the Vancouver Infectious Disease Centre helps make sense of B.C.'s latest rapid test strategy announcement.  12-storey tower to be built above existing Hudson's Bay building on Granville and Georgia, as part of development plan announced today Doug Adams, Senior Vice President of Development for Streetworks Developments, which is the company behind the Hudson's Bay redevelopment discusses the changes coming to the legendary Granville St building.  Province plans to take some housing approvals away from local governments Craig Hodge, a member of the Union of B.C. Municipalities executive and a city councillor in Coquitlam chats about the province stepping in to take some control over housing approvals from municipal governments  VPD report 60 assaults this past weekend John Clerides, Owner of Marquis Wine Cellars discusses Vancouver's crime problems  Pink Shirt Day: supporting the CKNW Kids' Fund Wally Oppal, Chair of the CKNW Kids' Fund Board discusses the importance of Pink Shirt Day and the CKNW Kids' Fund  Pink Shirt Day: how your support benefits kids in British Columbia Andrea Paquette, Executive Director of the Stigma Free Society joins us to continue our conversation about the importance off Pink Shirt Day.  Pink Shirt Day: how your support benefits kids in British Columbia Rose Higgins, Program Director of the Big Brothers of Greater Vancouver discusses the impact Pink Shirt Day can have on the lives of children everywhere