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  • 1,157PODCASTS
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  • Jan 16, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about band aids

Latest podcast episodes about band aids

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S30E29 - HBR Minute Rewind - What is Stakeholder Capitalism? Here's a Definition, and 4 Ways to Make It a Reality, with Mariana Mazzucato

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 23:36


In this "HBR Minute Rewind" HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) explores the recent HBR video, "What is Stakeholder Capitalism? Here's a Definition, and 4 Ways to Make It a Reality" (Originally Aired May 23, 2021). See the video here: https://youtu.be/z4Kdwbdyye0.  Video Overview: "To solve big, global problems, companies must rethink capitalism and how they collaborate, argues Mariana Mazzucato, professor in the economics of innovation and public value at University College London. Mazzucato, author of "Mission Economy: A Moonshot Guide to Changing Capitalism" (https://marianamazzucato.com/books/mi...), argues that a traditional shareholder-centric approach offers only Band-Aids. It doesn't allow for the kind of bold thinking we need to solve big problems. “If we keep just fixing our way out of each crisis,” she notes, “we will, by definition, be too little too late.'" Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter: https://www.linkedin.com/newsletters/alchemizing-human-capital-6884351526333227008/. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

Wood Talk
518 – Bandaids

Wood Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022


Buying your first hardwoods, assemblies with no dings, and roubo from slabs.

American Conservative University
David Berlinski & Michael Denton: Primary Objections to Neo-Darwinism.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 46:48


On this episode of ID The Future from the vault, Discovery Institute senior fellows David Berlinski and Michael Denton, both long-time critics of neo-Darwinism, discuss their primary objections to neo-Darwinian theory. For Berlinski, a mathematician and author of The Deniable Darwin, the problem is quantitative and methodological. For Denton, a geneticist and author of the new Discovery Institute Press book Children of Light: The Astonishing Properties of Light that Make Us Possible, the problem is empirical. Don't miss this engaging discussion.  Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast. David Berlinski WRITER, THINKER, RACONTEUR, AND SENIOR FELLOW, DISCOVERY INSTITUTE David Berlinski received his Ph.D. in philosophy from Princeton University and was later a postdoctoral fellow in mathematics and molecular biology at Columbia University. He is currently a Senior Fellow at Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture. Dr. Berlinski has authored works on systems analysis, differential topology, theoretical biology, analytic philosophy, and the philosophy of mathematics, as well as three novels. He has also taught philosophy, mathematics and English at such universities as Stanford, Rutgers, the City University of New York and the Universite de Paris. In addition, he has held research fellowships at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria and the Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques (IHES) in France.   David Berlinski & Michael Denton, Pt. 2: Darwinian Stalemate? On this episode of ID The Future, philosopher and author David Berlinski joins geneticist and researcher Michael Denton for continued discussion on the debate over Darwinian evolution. Why has the theory persisted? What weaknesses threaten its existence in the 21st century? As Berlinski puts it: “…applying Darwinian principles to problems of this level of complexity is like putting a Band-Aid on a wound caused by an atomic weapon. It's just not going to work.” Listen in as Berlinski and Denton explain why the Darwinian mechanism is being widely questioned as a viable theory of the origin and development of life. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.   David Berlinski & Michael Denton, Pt. 3: Top-Down versus Bottom-Up Worldview On this episode of ID The Future from the vault, mathematician David Berlinski joins biochemist Michael Denton for continued discussion on the difficulties of Darwinian evolution to be a viable modern theory of the origin and development of life and the cosmos. On this episode, Berlinski explains why many conservative intellectuals have trouble doubting Darwin. Denton suggests that the mechanistic, Darwinian framework will eventually collapse, and reviews the essential differences in worldview between the Darwin supporter and the Darwin doubter. Tune in to the final episode of this stimulating exchange!   TOPICS Intelligent Design Evolution Darwinism Materialism origin of life Charles Darwin Neo-Darwinism abiogenesis Atheism Natural Selection irreducible complexity theistic evolution DNA Darwin science education biology Theism Richard Dawkins fine-tuning genetics Biological Information common descent Scientism Cambrian Explosion Darwinian Evolution Big Bang Featured Academic Freedom William Dembski Kitzmiller v. Dover Junk DNA C.S. Lewis Darwin Devolves teleology Proteins Teach the Controversy scientific racism fine tuning Alfred Russell Wallace Darwin's Doubt Francis Collins information Eric Metaxas multiverse Ethics Jerry Coyne specified complexity evolutionary theory Eugenics Science and Human Origins Aristotle Stephen C. Meyer devolution human exceptionalism entropy Biologic Institute God Phillip Johnson Naturalism engineering Signature in the Cell macroevolution The Edge of Evolution Design Bioethics Molecular Machines artificial intelligence (AI) agnosticism Science and faith history of intelligent design Microevolution Philosophy philosophy of science Science Inference to the Best Explanation Icons of Evolution Thomas Aquinas Richard Sternberg Christianity history of science methodological naturalism purpose Brian Miller design inference Stephen Hawking adaptation cosmology Isaac Newton scientific revolution scientific Materialism information theory Richard Lenski scientific suppression chemical evolution Fred Hoyle bacterial flagellum foresight

American Conservative University
David Berlinski & Michael Denton: Primary Objections to Neo-Darwinism.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 46:48


On this episode of ID The Future from the vault, Discovery Institute senior fellows David Berlinski and Michael Denton, both long-time critics of neo-Darwinism, discuss their primary objections to neo-Darwinian theory. For Berlinski, a mathematician and author of The Deniable Darwin, the problem is quantitative and methodological. For Denton, a geneticist and author of the new Discovery Institute Press book Children of Light: The Astonishing Properties of Light that Make Us Possible, the problem is empirical. Don't miss this engaging discussion.  Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast. David Berlinski WRITER, THINKER, RACONTEUR, AND SENIOR FELLOW, DISCOVERY INSTITUTE David Berlinski received his Ph.D. in philosophy from Princeton University and was later a postdoctoral fellow in mathematics and molecular biology at Columbia University. He is currently a Senior Fellow at Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture. Dr. Berlinski has authored works on systems analysis, differential topology, theoretical biology, analytic philosophy, and the philosophy of mathematics, as well as three novels. He has also taught philosophy, mathematics and English at such universities as Stanford, Rutgers, the City University of New York and the Universite de Paris. In addition, he has held research fellowships at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria and the Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques (IHES) in France.   David Berlinski & Michael Denton, Pt. 2: Darwinian Stalemate? On this episode of ID The Future, philosopher and author David Berlinski joins geneticist and researcher Michael Denton for continued discussion on the debate over Darwinian evolution. Why has the theory persisted? What weaknesses threaten its existence in the 21st century? As Berlinski puts it: “…applying Darwinian principles to problems of this level of complexity is like putting a Band-Aid on a wound caused by an atomic weapon. It's just not going to work.” Listen in as Berlinski and Denton explain why the Darwinian mechanism is being widely questioned as a viable theory of the origin and development of life. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.   David Berlinski & Michael Denton, Pt. 3: Top-Down versus Bottom-Up Worldview On this episode of ID The Future from the vault, mathematician David Berlinski joins biochemist Michael Denton for continued discussion on the difficulties of Darwinian evolution to be a viable modern theory of the origin and development of life and the cosmos. On this episode, Berlinski explains why many conservative intellectuals have trouble doubting Darwin. Denton suggests that the mechanistic, Darwinian framework will eventually collapse, and reviews the essential differences in worldview between the Darwin supporter and the Darwin doubter. Tune in to the final episode of this stimulating exchange!   TOPICS Intelligent Design Evolution Darwinism Materialism origin of life Charles Darwin Neo-Darwinism abiogenesis Atheism Natural Selection irreducible complexity theistic evolution DNA Darwin science education biology Theism Richard Dawkins fine-tuning genetics Biological Information common descent Scientism Cambrian Explosion Darwinian Evolution Big Bang Featured Academic Freedom William Dembski Kitzmiller v. Dover Junk DNA C.S. Lewis Darwin Devolves teleology Proteins Teach the Controversy scientific racism fine tuning Alfred Russell Wallace Darwin's Doubt Francis Collins information Eric Metaxas multiverse Ethics Jerry Coyne specified complexity evolutionary theory Eugenics Science and Human Origins Aristotle Stephen C. Meyer devolution human exceptionalism entropy Biologic Institute God Phillip Johnson Naturalism engineering Signature in the Cell macroevolution The Edge of Evolution Design Bioethics Molecular Machines artificial intelligence (AI) agnosticism Science and faith history of intelligent design Microevolution Philosophy philosophy of science Science Inference to the Best Explanation Icons of Evolution Thomas Aquinas Richard Sternberg Christianity history of science methodological naturalism purpose Brian Miller design inference Stephen Hawking adaptation cosmology Isaac Newton scientific revolution scientific Materialism information theory Richard Lenski scientific suppression chemical evolution Fred Hoyle bacterial flagellum foresight

Business Essentials Daily
Summer Series: How to handle difficult conversations

Business Essentials Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 10:14


As painful as it is, like ripping off a Band-Aid, sometimes you just need to have a chat with a difficult staff member. It's never easy to confront an employee with an ongoing problem, but putting it off could lead to the issue worsening over time. Marita Ryan, Director of Marita Ryan Consulting, has some useful tips on how to conduct a critical conversation, which can actually help build trust and respect from the employee and indeed the whole team. Business Essentials Daily is produced by: SoundCartel soundcartel.com.au +61 3 9882 8333 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Sweet Spot - Golf Podcast
Quick Fixes, Band-Aids, and Compensations

The Sweet Spot - Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 100:56


This episode explores some of the differences between short-term changes you can make in your game. Some of them can be positive and can have long-lasting benefits. Conversely, others only provide temporary band-aids, and the deeper issue is not resolved. Thanks to our show sponsor, The Indoor Golf Shop, you can find them at www.shopindoorgolf.com for all of your home golf simulator needs. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales
Ep182 - Debra Sperling: The Voice You Didn't Know You Know

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 48:22


Debra Sperling is a professional voiceover artist with over 26 years of experience. Throughout her career, Debra has been the voice of dozens of national television campaigns such as Charmin, Cascade, Pampers, Maybelline, Listerine, Walmart, Folgers, Kellogg's, Olive Garden, Johnson and Johnson, Band-Aid, and many more. Debra is a big player in the Promo world as well, having been the voice of The Oxygen Network and the voice of WEtv, with ongoing promo spots for many networks including NBC, National Geographic, USA, Investigation Discovery, A&E, Animal Planet, and HBO. She is also equally passionate about teaching and coaching, and her renowned "Authenticity in Voiceover" class has helped students worldwide. After attending the High School of Performing Arts, Debra went on to earn her BA in Theatre, her MFA in Acting, and has “been an actor since”. Although she makes her living as a voiceover artist now, she speaks candidly about how her journey began, noting she didn't really know what voice overs were when she first started out. Debra talks about her approach to acting for theatre, TV or film compared to acting for voice overs: why “it is the same thing” for her, and how it starts with bringing your authentic self to the microphone, stage, or set. She also opens up about her love for teaching and coaching, and shares why she feels like leading her voice over class on Zoom during COVID saved her.  In this episode, we talk about:  The culture shock she felt while attending her first show in London  Morgan Freeman's voice  Why she tells people to “stop acting words”  Stephen McKinley Henderson as a mentor and teacher  Missing the collaborative aspect of voice over work due to COVID Connect with Debra: Web: debrasperling.com/about IG: @debrasperlingvo Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Just Break Up Podcast
Episode 173: A Band-Aid for a Wound of Insecurity

Just Break Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 74:47


This episode tackles topics like clothes, feeling like you're being hidden, and dealing with our partner's jealousy. Join us on Patreon and get an extra episode each week, a back catalog of 100+ episodes, and video! SUBMIT: justbreakuppod.com FACEBOOK: /justbreakuppod INSTAGRAM: @justbreakuppod TWITTER: @justbreakuppod BLIND DATE: Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky Original music, recording, and editing by Spencer Wirth-Davis Advertise on Just Break Up!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

La Story Nostalgie
Contes Pop de Noël (Episode 5) Band Aid

La Story Nostalgie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 7:06


Le monde du rock est à l'origine des plus belles Story de cette pop culture à laquelle nous sommes aujourd'hui attachés et pourtant, j'ai l'impression que celle de la chanson du Band Aid, gigantesque hit des années 1984 et 85, n'est pas très connue

Random Soundchecks
"Do They Know It's Christmas?" 2021-12-25 Random Soundcheck

Random Soundchecks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 4:36


Band Aid, Bob Geldolf, and Midge Ure.

Laser Graves
Episode 135: Yes, We Know It's Christmas: The Story of Band Aid (1984)

Laser Graves

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 57:21


Grab your sleigh bells and Santa hats as we discuss the story of Band Aid this week, a super group who raised millions of dollars for famine relief in Ethiopia by recording one of the most annoying Christmas songs ever.  Also stick around until the end for a special announcement!   Follow us on Instagram @lasergraves www.pateron.com/lasergraves www.lasergraves.com

Two Guys One Phone
Band Aid: Feed the World (remastered)

Two Guys One Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 8:41


Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=48075683)

Radiokeys Presents
A Rock ‘n‘ Roll Christmas Special #2!

Radiokeys Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 67:50


Radiokeys members Emily and Stewart settle into their Christmas Spirit and talk about some little known facts about your favorite Holiday tunes! Stewart talks about "Thank God It's Christmas" By Queen, the dark reality of Do They Know It's Christmas?" by Band Aid and has some fun facts about your favorite holiday songs. Emily talks about the sad original meaning of "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", John Lennon's "Happy XMas (War is Over)"   HAPPY HOLIDAYS AND MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM RADIOKEYS!!!!!!   We released three Holiday Songs from previous live recordings! Please check out A Radiokeys Christmas exclusively on our BandCamp page!   RadiokeysMusic.com Instagram: @RadiokeysMusic Twitter: @Radiokeys Facebook: Facebook.com/radiokeysmusic VINYL RECORDS OF OUR DEBUT, SELF-TITLED ALBUM ARE NOW AVAILABLE! CLICK HER FOR A PURCHASE LINK Intro music: “Run, Rudolph, Run'” by Radiokeys Outro music: "Lonely This Christmas" by Radiokeys If you like the podcast, please lend us a 5 Star Review on iTunes or the Apple Podcast App (the algorithms seem to like that!), tell a friend, and please subscribe, it'd mean the world to us! 

Punch Up The Jam
'Do They Know It's Christmas?' by Band Aid

Punch Up The Jam

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 61:42


On another special holiday episode, Andrew and Evan punch up "Do They Know It's Christmas?" by Band Aid. Follow Punch Up The Jam on Twitter and Instagram Like the show? Rate Punch Up The Jam 5 Stars on Apple Podcasts and leave a review for Andrew and Evan. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Capitol Pressroom
Volunteers serve as band-aid for understaffed hospitals

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 12:29


Dec. 22, 2021 - In response to hospital staffing needs across upstate, 16 downstate nurses are volunteering for two weeks at stressed facilities in western New York, including at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester. We examine the crisis that created the demand, how the volunteer nurses are helping and what the long-term fix is for the workforce shortage.

Screaming in the Cloud
Putting the “Fun” in Functional with Frank Chen

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 35:42


About FrankFrank Chen is a maker. He develops products and leads software engineering teams with a background in behavior design, engineering leadership, systems reliability engineering, and resiliency research. At Slack, Frank focuses on making engineers' lives simpler, more pleasant, and more productive, in the Developer Productivity group. At Palantir, Frank has worked with customers in healthcare, finance, government, energy and consumer packaged goods to solve their hardest problems by transforming how they use data. At Amazon, Frank led a front-end team and infrastructure team to launch AWS WorkDocs, the first secure multi-platform service of its kind for enterprise customers. At Sandia National Labs, Frank researched resiliency and complexity analysis tooling with the Grid Resiliency group. He received a M.S. in Computer Science focused in Human-Computer Interaction from Stanford. Frank's thesis studied how the design / psychology of exergaming interventions might produce efficacious health outcomes. With the Stanford Prevention Research Center, Frank developed health interventions rooted in behavioral theory to create new behaviors through mobile phones. He prototyped early builds of Tiny Habits with BJ Fogg and worked in the Persuasive Technology Lab. He received a B.S. in Computer Science from UCLA. Frank researched networked systems and image processing with the Center for embedded Networked Systems. With the Rand Corporation, he built research systems to support group decision-making.Links: Slack: https://slack.com “Infrastructure Observability for Changing the Spend Curve”: https://slack.engineering/infrastructure-observability-for-changing-the-spend-curve/ “Right Sizing Your Instances Is Nonsense”: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/blog/right-sizing-your-instances-is-nonsense/ Personal webpage: https://frankc.net Twitter: @frankc TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com. Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Several people are undoubtedly angrily typing, and part of the reason they can do that, and the fact that I know that is because we're all using Slack. My guest today is Frank Chen, senior staff software engineer at Slack. So, I guess, sort of… [sales force 00:00:53]. Frank, thanks for joining me.Frank: Hey, Corey, I have been a longtime listener and follower, and just really delighted to be here.Corey: It's one of the weird things about doing a podcast is that for better or worse, people don't respond to it in the same way that they do writing a newsletter, for example, because you receive an email, and, “Oh, well, I know how to write an email. I can hit reply and send an email back and give that jackwagon a piece of my mind,” and people often do. But with podcasts, I feel like it's much more closely attuned to the idea of an AM radio talk show. And who calls into a radio talk show? Lunatics, and most people don't self-describe as lunatics, so they don't want to do that.But then when I catch up with people one-on-one or at events in person, I find out that a lot more people listen to this show than I thought they did. Because I don't trust podcast statistics because lies, damn lies, and analytics are sort of how I view this world. So, you've worked at a bunch of different companies. You're at Slack now, which, of course, upsets some people because, “Slack is ruining the way that people come and talk to me in the office.” Or it's making it easier for employees to collaborate internally in ways their employers wish they wouldn't. But that's neither here nor there.Before this, you were at Palantir, and before this, you're at Amazon, working on Amazon WorkDocs of all things, which is supposedly rumored to have at least one customer somewhere, but I've never seen them. Before that you were at Sandia National Labs, and you've gotten a master's in computer science from Stanford. You've done a lot of things and everything you've done, on some level, seems like the recurring theme is someone on Twitter will be unhappy at you for a career choice you've made. But what is the common thread—in seriousness—between the different places that you've been?Frank: One thing that's been a driver for where I work is finding amazing people to work with and building something that I believe is valuable and fun to keep doing. The thing that brought me to Slack is I became my own Slack admin, [laugh] when I met a girl and we moved in together into a small apartment in Brooklyn. And she had a cat that, you know, is a sweetheart, but also just doesn't know how to be social. Yes, you covered that with ‘cat.' Part of moving it together, I became my own Slack admin and discovered well, we can build a series of home automations to better train and inform our little command center for when the cat lies about being fed, or not fed, clipping his nails, and discovering and tracking bad behaviors. In a lot of ways this was like the human side of a lot of the data work that I had been doing at my previous role. And it was like a fun way to use the same frameworks that I use at work to better train and be a cat caretaker.Corey: Now, at some point, you know that some product manager at Amazon is listening to this and immediately sketching notes because their product strategy is, “Yes,” and this is going to be productized and shipping in two years as Amazon Prime Meow. But until then we'll enjoy the originality of having a Slack bot more or less control the home automation slash making your house seem haunted for anyone who didn't write the code themselves. There's an idea of solving real world problems that I definitely understand. I mean, and again, it might not even be a fair question entirely. Just because I am… for better or worse, staggering through my world, and trying—and failing most days—to tell a narrative that, “Oh, why did I start my tech career at a university, and then spend time in ad tech, and then spend time in consulting, and then FinTech, and the rest?” And the answer is, “Oh, I get fired an awful lot, and that sucked.”So, instead of going down that particular rabbit hole of a mess, I went in other directions. I started finding things that would pay me and pay me more money because I was in debt at the time. But that was the narrative thread that was the, “I have rent to pay and they have computers that aren't behaving properly.” And that's what dictated the shape of my career for a long time. It's only in retrospect that I started to identify some of the things that aligns with it. But it's easy to look at it with the shine of hindsight and not realize that no, no, that's sort of retconning what happened in the past.Frank: Yeah, I have a mentor and my former adviser had this way of describing, building out the jankiest prototype you can to prove out an idea. And this manifested in his class in building out paper prototypes, or really, really janky ideas for what helping people through technology might look like. And I feel like it a lot of ways, even when those prototypes fail, like, in a career or some half baked tech prototype I put together, it might succeed and great, we could keep building upon that, but when it fails, you actually discover, “Oh, this is one way that I didn't succeed.” And even in doing so, you discover things about yourself, your way of building, and maybe a little bit about your infrastructure, or whatever it is that you build on a day-to-day basis. And wrapping that back to the original question, it's like, well, we think we're human beings, right, we're static, but in a lot of ways we're human becomings. We think we know what the future might look like with our careers, what we're building on a day-to-day basis, and what we're building a year from now, but oftentimes, things change if we discover things about ourselves, the people we work with, and ultimately, the things that we put out into the world.Corey: Obviously, I've been aware of who Slack is, for a long time; I've been a paying customer for years because it basically is IRC with reaction gifs, and not having to teach someone how to sign into IRC when they work in accounting. So, the user experience alone solved the problem.Frank: And you've actually worked with us in the past before. [laugh]. Slack, it's the Searchable Log for all Content and Knowledge; I think that backronym, that's how it works. And I was delighted when I had mentioned your jokes and you're trolling [a folk 00:07:00] on Twitter and on your podcast to my former engineering manager, Chris Merrill, who was like, oh, you should search the Slack. Corey actually worked with us and he put together a lot of cool tooling and ideas for us to think about.Corey: Careful. If we talk too much, or what I did when I was at Slack years ago, someone's going to start looking into some of the old commits and whatnot and start demanding an apology, and we don't want that. It's, “Wow, you're right. You are a terrible engineer.” “Told you.” There's a reason I don't do that anymore.Frank: I think that's all of us. [laugh]. An early career mentor of mine, he was like, “Hey, Frank, listen. You think you're building perfect software at any point in time? No, you're building future tech debt.” And yeah, we should put much more emphasis on interfaces and ideas we're putting out because the implementation is going to change over time, and likely your current implementation is shit. And that is, okay.Corey: That's the beautiful part about this is that things grow and things evolve. And it's interesting working with companies, and as a consultant, I tend to build my projects in such a way that I start on day one and people know that I'm leaving with usually a very short window because I don't want to build a forever job for myself; I don't want to show up and start charging by the hour or by the day, if I can possibly avoid it. Because then it turns into eternal projects that never end because I'm billing and nothing's ever done. No, no, I like charging fixed fee and then getting out at a predetermined outcome, but then you get to hear about what happens with companies as they move on.This combines with the fact that I have a persistent alert for my name, usually because I'm looking for various ineffective character assassination from enterprise marketing types because you know, I dish it out, I should certainly be able to take it. But I found a blog post on the Slack engineering blog that mentioned my name, and it's, “Aw, crap. Are they coming after me for a refund?” No, it was not. It was you writing a fairly sizable post. Tell me more about that.Frank: Yeah, I'm part of an organization called Developer Productivity. And our goal is to help folk at Slack deliver services to their customers, where we build, test, and release high quality software. And a lot of our time is spent thinking about internal tooling and making infrastructure bets. As engineers, right, it's like, we have this idea for what the world looks like, we have this idea for what our infrastructure looks like, but what we discover using a set of techniques around observability of just asking questions—advanced questions, basic questions, and hell, even dumb questions—we discover hey, the things that we think our computers are doing aren't actually doing what they say they're doing. And the question is like, great. Now, what? How can we ask better questions? How can we better tune, change, and equip engineers with tooling so that they can do better work to make Slack customers have simple, pleasant, and productive experiences?Corey: And I have to say that there's a lot that Slack does that is incredibly helpful. I don't know that I'm necessarily completely bought into the idea that all work should happen in Slack. It's, well, on some level, I—like people like to debate the ‘should people work from home? Should people all work in an office?' Discussion.And, on some level, it seems if you look at people who are constantly fighting that debate online, it's, “Do you ever do work at all?” on some level. But I'm not here to besmirch others; I'm here to talk about, on some level, what you alluded to in your blog post. But I want to start with a disclaimer that Slack as far as companies go is not small, and if you take a look around, most companies are using Slack whether they know it or not. The list of side-channel Slack groups people have tend to extend massively.I look and I pare it down every once in a while, whenever I cross 40 signed-in Slacks on my desktop. It is where people talk for a wide variety of different reasons, and they all do different things. But if you're sitting here listening to this and you have a $2,000 a month AWS bill, this is not for you. You will spend orders of magnitude more money trying to optimize a small cost. Once you're at significant points of scale, and you have scaled out to the point where you begin to have some ability to predict over months or years, that's what a lot of this stuff starts to weigh in.So, talk to me a bit about how you wound up—and let me quote directly from the article, which is titled, “Infrastructure Observability for Changing the Spend Curve,” and I will, of course, throw a link to this in the [show notes 00:11:38]. But you talk in this about knocking, I believe it was orders of magnitude off of various cost areas within your bill.Frank: Yeah. The article itself describes three big-ish projects, where we are able to change the curve of the number of tests that we run, and a change in how much it costs to run any single test.Corey: When you say test, are you talking CI/CD infrastructure test or code test, to make sure it goes out, or are you talking something higher up the stack, as far as, “Huh, let's see how some users respond when, I don't know, we send four notifications on every message instead of the usual one,” to give a ridiculous example?Frank: Yeah, this is in the CI/CD pipelines. And one of these projects was around borrowing some concepts from data engineering: oversubscription and planning your capacity to have access capacity at peak, where at peak, your engineers might have a 5% degradation in performance, while still maintaining high resiliency and reliability of your tests in order to oversubscribe, either CPU or memory and keep throughput on the overall system stable and consistent and fast enough. I think, with spend in developer productivity, I think, both, like, the metrics you're trying to move and why you're optimizing for it at any given time are, like, this, like, calculus. Or it's like, more art than science in that there's no one right answer, right? It's like, oh, yeah—very naively—like, yeah, let's throw the biggest machines most expensive machines we can at any given problem. But that doesn't solve the crux of your problem. It's like, “Hey, what are the things in your system doing?” And what is the right guess to capitalize around how much to spend on your CI/CD [unintelligible 00:13:39] is oftentimes not precise, nor is this blog article meant to be prescriptive.Corey: Yeah, it depends entirely on what you're doing and how because it's, on some level, well, we can save a whole bunch of money if we slow all of our CI/CD runs down by 20 minutes. Yeah, but then you have a bunch of engineers sitting idle and I promise you, that costs a hell of a lot more than your cloud bill is going to be. The payroll is almost always a larger expense than your infrastructure costs, and if it's not, you should seriously consider firing at least part of your data science team, but you didn't hear it from me.Frank: Yeah. And part of the exploration on profiling and performance and resiliency was, like, around interrogating what the boundaries and what the constraints were for our CI/CD pipelines. Because Slack has grown in engineering and in the number of tests we were running on a month-to-month basis; for a while from 2017 to mid 2020, we were growing about 10% month-over-month in test suite execution numbers. Which means on a given year, we doubled almost two times, which is quite a bit of strain on internal resources and a lot of dependent services where—and internal systems, we oftentimes have more complexity and less understood changes in what dependencies your infrastructure might be using, what business logic your internal services are using to communicate with one another than you do your production.And so, by, like, performing a series of curiosity-driven development, we're able to both answer, at that point in time, what our customers internally were doing, and start to put together ideas for eliminating some bottlenecks, and hell, even adding bottlenecks with circuit breakers where you keep the overall throughput of your system stable, while deferring or canceling work that otherwise might have overloaded dependencies.Corey: There's a lot to be said for understanding what the optimization opportunities are, in an environment and understanding what it is you're attempting to achieve. Having those test for something like Slack makes an awful lot of sense because let's be very clear here, when you're building an application that acts as something people use to do expense reports—to cite one of my previous job examples—it turns out you can be down for a week and a majority of your customers will never know or care. With Slack, it doesn't work that way. Everyone more or less has a continuous monitor that they're typing into for a good portion of the day—angrily or otherwise—and as soon as it misses anything, people know. And if there's one thing that I love, on some level, seeing change when I know that Slack is having a blip, even if I'm not using Slack that day for anything in particular, because Twitter explodes about it. “Slack is down. I'm now going to tweet some stuff to my colleagues.” All right. You do you, I suppose.And credit where due, Slack doesn't go down nearly as often as it used to because as you tend to figure out how these things work, operational maturity increases through a bunch of tests. Fixing things like durability, reliability, uptime, et cetera, should always, to some extent, take precedence priority-wise over let's save some money. Because yeah, you could turn everything off and save all the money, but then you don't have a business anymore. It's focused on where to cut, where to optimize in the right way, and ideally as you go, find some of the areas in which, oh, I'm paying AWS a tax for just going about my business. And I could have flipped a switch at any point and saved—“How much money? Oh, my God, that's more than I'll make in my lifetime.”Frank: Yeah, and one thing I talk about a little bit is distributed tracing as one of the drivers for helping us understand what's happening inside of our systems. Where it helps you figure out and it's like this… [best word 00:17:24] to describe how you ask questions of deployed code? And there a lot of ways it's helped us understand existing bottlenecks and identify opportunities for performance or resiliency gains because your past janky Band-Aids become more and more obvious when you can interrogate and ask questions around what is it performing like it used to? Or what has changed recently?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: It's also worth pointing out that as systems grow organically, that it is almost impossible for any one person to have it all in their head anymore. I saw one of the most overly complicated architecture flow trees that I think I've seen in recent memory, and it was on the Slack engineering blog about how something was architected, but it wasn't the Slack app itself; it was simply the [decision tree for ‘Should we send a notification?' 00:18:17] and it is more complicated than almost anything I've written, except maybe my newsletter content publication pipeline. It is massive. And I'll throw a link to that in the [show notes 00:18:31] as well, just because it is well worth people taking a look at.But there is so much complexity at scale for doing the right thing, and it's necessary because if I'm talking to you on Slack right now and getting notifications every time you reply on my phone, it's not going to take too long before I turn off notifications everywhere, and then I don't notice that Slack is there, and it just becomes useless and I use something else. Ideally, something better—which is hard to come by—moderately worse, like, email or completely worse, like, Microsoft Teams.Frank: I tell all my close collaborators about this. I typically set myself away on Slack because I like to make time for deep, focused work. And that's very hard with a constant stream of notifications. How people use Slack and how people notify others on Slack is, like, not incumbent on the software itself, but it's a reflection of the work culture that you're in. The expectation for an email-driven culture is, like, oh, yeah, you should be reading your email all the time and be able to respond within 30 minutes. Peace, I have friends that are lawyers, [laugh] and that is the expectation at all times of day.Corey: I married one of those. Oh, yeah, people get very salty. And she works with a global team spread everywhere, to the point where she wakes up and there's just a whole flurry of angry people that have tried to reach her in the middle of the night. Like, “Why were you sleeping at 2 a.m.? It's daytime here.” And yeah, time zones. Not everyone understands how they work, from my estimation.Frank: [laugh]. That's funny. My sweetheart is a former attorney. On our first international date, we spent an entire day-and-a-half hopping between WiFi spots in Prague so that she could answer a five minute question from a partner about standard deviations.Corey: So, one thing that you link to that really is what drew my notice to this—because, again, if you talk about AWS cost optimization, I'm probably going to stumble over it, but if you mention my name, that's sort of a nice accelerator—and you linked to my article called Why “Right Sizing Your Instances Is Nonsense.” And that is a little overblown, to some extent, but so many folks talk about it in the cost optimization space because you can get a bunch of metrics and do these things programmatically, and somewhat without observability into what's going on because, “Well, I can see how busy the computers are and if it's not busy, we could use smaller computers. Problem solved,” versus, the things that require a fair bit of insight into what is that thing doing exactly because it leads you into places of oh, turn off that idle fleet that's not doing anything is all labeled ‘backup,' where you're going to have three seconds of notice before it gets all the traffic.There's an idea of sometimes things are the way they are for a reason. And it's also not easy for a lot of things—think databases—to seamlessly just restart the thing and have it scale back up and run on a different instance class. That takes weeks of planning and it's hard. So, I find that people tend to reach for it where it doesn't often make sense. At your level of scale and operational maturity, of course, you should optimize what instance classes things are using and what sizes they are, especially since that stuff changes over time as far as what AWS has made available. But it's not the sort of thing that I suggest as being the first easy thing to go for. It's just what people think is easy because it requires no judgment and computers can do it. At least that's their opinion.Frank: I feel like you probably have a lot more experience than me, and talked about war stories, but I recall working with customers where they want to lift-and-shift on-prem hardware to VMs on-prem. I'm like, “It's not going to be as simple as you're making it out to be.” Whereas, like, the trend today is probably oh, yeah, we're going to shift on-prem VMs to AWS, or hell, like, let's go two levels deeper and just run everything on Kubernetes. Similar workloads, right? It's not going to be a huge challenge. Or [laugh] everything serverless.Corey: Spare me from that entire school of thought, my God.Frank: [laugh].Corey: Yeah, but it's fun, too, because this came out a month ago, and you're talking about using—an example you gave was a c5.9xlarge instance. Great. Well, the c6i is out now as well, so are people going to look at that someday and think, “Oh, wow. That's incredibly quaint.”It's, you wrote this a month ago, and it's already out of date, as far as what a lot of the modern story instances are. From my perspective, one of the best things that AWS has done in this space has been to get away from the reserved instance story and over into savings plans, where it's, “I know, I'm going to run some compute—maybe it's Fargate, maybe it's EC2; let's be serious, it's definitely going to be EC2—but I don't want to tie myself to specific instance types for the next three years.” Great, well, I'm just going to commit to spending some money on AWS for the next three years because if I decide today to move off of it, it's going to take me at least that long to get everything out. So okay, then that becomes something a lot more palatable for an awful lot of folks.Frank: One thing you brought up in the article I linked to is instance types. You think upgrading to the newest instance type will solve all your challenges, but oftentimes it's not obvious that it won't all the time, and in fact, you might even see degraded resiliency and degraded performance because different packages that your software relies upon might not be optimized for the given kernel or CPU type that you're running against. And ultimately, you go back to just asking really basic questions and performing some end-to-end benchmarking so that you can at least get a sense for what your customers are doing today, and maybe make a guess for what they're going to do tomorrow.Corey: I have to ask because I'm always interested in what it is that gives rise to blog posts like this—which, that's easy; it's someone had to do a project on these things, and while we learn things that would probably apply to other folks—like, you're solving what is effectively a global problem locally when you go down this path. It's part of the reason I have a consulting business is things I learned at one company apply almost identically to another company, even though that they're in completely separate industries and parts of the world because AWS billing is, for better or worse, a bounded problem space despite their best efforts to, you know, use quantum computers to fix that. What was it that gave rise to looking at the CI/CD system from an optimization point of view?Frank: So internally, I initially started writing a white paper about, hey, here's a simple question that we can answer, you know, without too much effort. Let's transition all of our C3 instances to C5 instances, and that could have been the one and done. But by thinking about it a little more and kind of drawing out, while we can actually borrow a model for oversubscription from another field, we could potentially decrease our spend by quite a bit. That eventually [laugh] evolved into a 70 page white paper—no joke—that my former engineering manager said, “Frank, no one's going to [BLEEP] read this.” [laugh].Corey: Always. Always, always. Like, here's a whole bunch of academically research and the rest. It's like, “Great. Which of these two buttons do I press?” is really the question people are getting at. And while it's great to have the research and the academic stuff, it's also a, “Great we're trying to achieve an outcome which, what is the choice?” But it's nice to know that people are doing actual research on the back end, instead, “Eh, my gut tells me to take the path on the left because why not? Left is better; right's tricky friend.”Frank: Yeah. And it was like, “Oh, yeah. I accidentally wrote a really long thing because there was, like, a lot of variables to test.” I think we had spun up 16-plus auto-scaling groups. And ran something like the cross-section of a couple of representative test suites against them, as well as configurations for a number of executors per instance.And about a year ago, I translated that into a ten page blog article that when I read through, I really didn't enjoy. [laugh]. And that template blog article is ultimately, like, about a page in the article you're reading today. And the actual kick in the butt to get this out the door was about four months ago. I spoke at o11ycon rescources which you're a part of.And it was a vendor conference by Honeycomb, and it was just so fun to share some of the things we've been doing with distributed tracing, and how we were able to solve internal problems using a relatively simple idea of asking questions about what was running. And the entire team there was wonderful in coaching and just helping me think through what questions people might have of this work. And that was, again, former academic. The last time I spoke at a conference was about a decade earlier, and it was just so fun to be part of this community of people trying to all solve the same set of problems, just in their own unique ways.Corey: One of the things I loved about working with Honeycomb was the fact that whenever I asked them a question, they have instrumented their own stuff, so they could tell me extremely quickly what something was doing, how it was doing it, and what the overall impact on this was. It's very rare to find a client that is anywhere near that level of awareness into what's going on in their infrastructure.Frank: Yeah, and that blog article, right, it's like, here's our current perspective, and here's, like, the current set of projects we're able to make to get to this result. And we think we know what we want to do, but if you were to ask that same question, “What are we doing for our spend a year from now?” the answer might be very different. Probably similar in some ways, but probably different.Corey: Well, there are some principles that we'll never get away from. It's, “Is no one using the thing? Turn that shit off.” That's one of those tried and true things. “Oh, it's the third copy of that multiple petabyte of data thing? Maybe delete it or stuff in a deep archive.” It's maybe move data less between various places. Maybe log things fewer times, given that you're paying 50 cents per gigabyte ingest, in some cases. Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. There's a lot to consider as far as the general principles go, but the specifics, well, that's where it gets into the weeds. And at your scale, yeah, having people focus on this internally with the context and nuance to it is absolutely worth doing. Having a small team devoted to this at large companies will pay for itself, I promise. Now, I go in and advise in these scenarios, but past a certain point, this can't just be one person's part-time gig anymore.Frank: I'm kind of curious about that. How do you think about working with a company and then deprecating yourself, and allowing your tools and, like, the frameworks you put into place to continue, like, thrive?Corey: We're advisory only. We make no changes to production.Frank: Or I don't know if that's the right word, deprecate. I think… that's my own word. [laugh].Corey: No, no, it's fair. It's a—what we do is we go in and we are advisory. It's less of a cost engagement, more of an architecture engagement because in cloud, cost and architecture are the same thing. We look at what's going on, we look at the constraints of why we've been brought in, and we identify things that companies can do and the associated cost savings associated with that, and let them make their own decision. Because it's, if I come in and say, “Hey, you could save a bunch of money by migrating this whole subsystem to serverless.”Great, I sound like a lunatic evangelist because yeah, 18 months of work during which time the team doing that is not advancing the state of the business any further so it's never going to happen. So, why even suggest it? Just look at things that are within the bounds of possibility. Counterpoint: when a client says, “A full re-architecture is on the table,” well, okay, that changes the nature of what we're suggesting. But we're trying to get away from what a lot of tooling does, which is, “Great. Here's 700 things you can adjust and you'll do none of them.” We come back with a, “Here's three or four things you can do that'll blow 20% off the bill. Then let's see where you stand.” The other half of it, of course, is large scale enterprise contract negotiation, that's a bit of a horse of a different color. I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really do appreciate it. If folks want to hear more about what you're up to, and how you think about these things. Where can they find you?Frank: You can find me at frankc.net. Or at me at @FrankC on Twitter.Corey: Oh, inviting people to yell at you at Twitter. That's never a great plan. Yeash. Good luck. Thanks again. We've absolutely got to talk more about this in-depth because I think this is one of those areas that you have the folks above a certain point of scale, talk about these things semi-constantly and live in the space, whereas folks who are in relatively small-scale environments are listening to this and thinking that they've got to do this.And no. No, you do not want to spend millions of dollars of engineering effort to optimize a bill that's 80 grand a year, I promise. It's focus on the thing that's right for your business. At a certain point of scale, this becomes that. But thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Frank: Thank you so much, Corey.Corey: Frank Chen, senior staff software engineer at Slack. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment that seems to completely miss the fact that Microsoft Teams is free because it sucks.Frank: [laugh].Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Your Brain on Facts
Worst. Christmas Song. Ever. (ep. 176)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 25:08


Voted on by our Patreon, we look at the what, how, and for-gods-sake-why of some of those most hated holiday songs! 02:40 Banned songs 08:09 Wonderful Christmastime 10:45 Chipmunks Song 16:36 Little Drummer Boy (Peace on Earth) Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, David Fesliyan.   Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website. In the early 80's, drought caused a famine that crippled the nation of Ethiopia.  It was a bad scene.  Half of the mortality rate is said to be attributable to “human rights violations.”  People around the world were moved, like Irish singer-songwriter Bob Geldof, who along with Midge Ure, wrote a fundraiser song.  Who could they get to sing it?  How about “everybody”?  The likes of Duran Duran, Spandau Ballet, Boy George, Bono, and Sting joined forces as Band Aid to record the fast-selling single in UK history, asking us the question “Do They Know It's Christmas?”  My name's… Some songs rub us the wrong way because they're sung by shrieking children on now-oudated equipment was was not kind to female and higher-pitched voices, songs like I'm Getting Nuthin for Christmas and All I Want for Christmas is my Two Front Teeth, standards which I think think would have died away if we weren't all made to sing them in elementary school.  Some are painfully goofy, like Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer, but you almost have to give them a pass since it seems they accomplished what they set out to do.  Some songs make us their enemy by borrowing into our brains and setting up shop for hours or days on end, the dreaded holiday earworm, like Jingle Bell Rock and Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree.  The mere mention of the title is enough to activate them like a sleeper cell of obnoxious holiday cheer.   Banned You might be able to forbid people in your own home from playing songs that irritate you –and I stress “might”-- but if you can find yourself with a bit of authority and a big enough humbug up your butt, you can try to make it so nobody has to hear the song either.  For instance, the 1952 classic “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus,” sung by 13-year-old Jimmy Boyd from Mississippi.  Did you realize the song was about the little boy not realizing that his Dad was dressed as Santa?  It had to be pointed out to me, and embarrassingly recently.  People were *scandalized by the musical marriage of sex and Christmas, with one churchgoer stating “mockery of decent family life as well as Christ's birthday.”  Many pearls were clutched.  They'd probably clutch them pearls twice as hard if I'd been there to tell them Jesus wasn't born on 12/25, but that's another show.  Boston's Catholic Archdiocese denounced it and the young Boyd had to meet with church leaders to explain that Mommy and Santa were properly, sanctily married.  A West Virginia broadcasting company prohibited its radio stations from playing this “insult to Santa Claus.”  The same thing happened to one of my husband's favorite songs, Lou Monte's “Dominick the Donkey,” but the people of WV went to bat for the little donkey who could take the Italian hills that were too much for the reindeer.  The public protested the ban so forcefully that it was repealed after less than two weeks; and this was in 1960, when 20% of homes in the US still didn't have a telephone.   For every time the hubs plays Dominick the Donkey, I play the Pogue's Fairytale of New York at least twice.  A lot of folks don't like, and I respect our difference of opinions, and think it's the farthest thing from a cheery Xmas song, and I agree with y'all there.  The 1987 duet with singer Kirsty MacColl, quickly became a UK holiday classic, famous then infamous in turn.  It tells the story of a toxic couple who seem to love each deep down, but should probably not be allowed within 200m of each other.  There's talk of drug use and insults, including a certain homophobic slur to rhyme with the word “maggot.”  In December 2019, BBC radio DJ Alex Dyke said he was cutting the song from his program.  The BBC had previously censored the song in 2007 with an unconvincing word-swap, but this brought more backlash than the original version had.  The BBC reversed course for a few years, then put the censored version back up.  What do you think?  soc med   Some songs we consider absolute standards, impeccable and indispensable, made people in their day as prickly as holl and less than jolly.  The BBC worried that “I'll Be Home for Christmas” could damage British morale during World War II, so no air-play for you!  In an amazingly blunt statement that would definitely trend on Twitter today:  “We have recently adopted a policy of excluding sickly sentimentality which, particularly when sung by certain vocalists, can become nauseating and not at all in keeping with what we feel to be the need of the public in this country.”   One of the most frequently cover and burlesqued-to songs, Santa Baby, wouldn't have become the classic it did if it had been sung by anyone other than the utterly incomparable Eartha Kitt.  Who doesn't love a Christmas song dripping in sexuality, sung by a loudly self-confident mixed race woman?  In 1953, a lot of people.   Radio stations refused to play it and political officials gnashed their teeth after Kitt performed Santa Baby at a dinner for the king and queen of Greece that November.  That was an unusual sentence and I'm stalling for time to let you process it.  However, Billboard magazine reported “Neither the King nor his Queen were one whit disturbed by the chantress's performance, nor by the song.”  Kitt was quoted as saying it was ‘inconceivable that anyone would question the ingenious poetry of the song.'”  I don't know about poetry, but I do know I don't want to hear any version other than hers.   Chipmunks My hatred for this next song cannot be overstated.  I almost hired an editor just for this section. It's shrill, it's pointless, and it's been playing for 63 freaking years.  It's the goddamn Chipmunks' song aka Christmas Don't Be Late.  I'm mad already.  Named after the president, chief engineer, and founder of Liberty Records, the furry little characters are the members of a “band”, called Alvin And The Chipmunks, while a “man” named David Seville functions as their human manager, catapulting them to super stardom.  The Chipmunks, three singing cartoon rodents in Victorian nightdresses apparently, or maybe ill-fitted sweater dresses, were the brainchild of a songwriter named Ross Bagdasarian, though he was better known by the pseudonym of David Seville, the name that would be immortalized as The Chipmunk's fictitious manager.  Bagdasarian was the son of Armenian immigrants to California, who served in the Army Air Force in WWII, which is how he came to find himself stationed in Seville, Spain.  He did a bit of acting, landing minor roles in Rear Window and Stalag 17.  Songwriting played out considerably better.  In 1951, he used the melody of an Armenian folk song to write Rosemary Clooney's hit, Come On-a My House. [sfx clip]    Bagdasarian-cum-Seville began toying around with voice distortion effects, speeding up and slowing down his voice to achieve the cute high pitched sound of the little animal's voices.  Consumer tape decks at the time had changeable speeds, but usually only in simple binary multiples, doubling or halving the speed, creating sounds an octave apart. Changing speeds of voices in these limited multiples creates extremely high or low pitches that sound too extreme for most purposes.  Disney used half-speed recording for his Chip ‘n Dale cartoon characters, making the extremely fast dialogue difficult to understand. As a result, dialog recorded at that speed had to consist of very short phrases.  Seville's chief innovation was to use tape machines that could vary speeds in between these extremes, creating more understandable and thus emotionally accessible voices that worked well for both singing and spoken dialogue.   The Chipmunk Song made its debut on Christmas 1958 and immediately became a smash hit, reaching No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 Pop Singles chart.  It would be the “band's” first and only #1 song, as well as Seville's second and final, No. 1 single.  The first was the song Witch Doctor, wanna hear it here it goes [sfx clip]  I guess when you have a hammer…    A write-up in Life magazine in 1959, noted that Bagdasarian/Seville was the first case in the "annals of popular music that one man has served as writer, composer, publisher, conductor and multiple vocalist of a hit record, thereby directing all possible revenues from the song back into his pocket."  That'd be impressive enough even if you didn't know that Seville couldn't read or write music, nor play any instruments, but now you do know that, so you should be quite impressed.   The Chipmunk Song earned them three Grammy Awards at the very first Grammy's the following May.  I'm going to say that again, because I don't think you heard me.  The Chipmunks song won three Grammy's.  In fairness, one is for best children's song.  A few years later, The Chipmunks landed their own television show as cartoon characters, but it did not command the same success their music career.  After Bagdasarian passed away unexpectedly in 1972, his son and daughter-in-law took over the voices of The Chipmunks, but it would take nearly ten years for The Chipmunks made it back to TV, with their 1981 Christmas special, the ingeniously named “A Chipmunk Christmas.”     Like a holiday Jason Vorhees, "The Chipmunk Song" re-entered the Billboard Hot 100 in 2007 with the CGI Alvin and Chipmunks movie.  As of December 25, 2011, Nielsen SoundScan estimated total sales of the digital track at 867,000 downloads, making it third on the list of all-time best-selling Christmas/holiday digital singles.  #3 was Christmas Eve/Sarajevo 12/24 from Trans-Siberian Orchestra, who I've had the mixed blessing to see live – the performance was great but the stage light swept over the audience constantly; it was like having a camera flash go off in your face several times a minute.  #1 is, to the surprise of no one, Mariah Carey's 1994 "All I Want for Christmas Is You" and that's all the more attention she's getting from me.  If you ever want a real smdh moment, Google Mariah Carey's requirements to appear on camera for interviews.  The word “diva” doesn't begin to describe it.  Wonderful Now this one depends on the day.  Some days, it's so bad it's good and some days, and for some people all days, it's the regular kind of bad.  [sfx clip] Say what you will about it, you can't say Paul McCartney didn't put in the work.  Wonderful Christmastime features McCartney on guitar, bass, keyboards, drums and vocals, even the creepy-sounding ‘choir of children.'  Makes one wonder why he even kept a band around.  You see the other members of Wings in the video, but the song was all McCartney.   Like a number of holiday classics that you heard about in the episode #92, The Jews Who Wrote Christmas, Wonderful Christmastime was written on a ‘boiling hot day in July', and recorded during sessions for the McCartney II album.  It apparently took the former Beatle just ten minutes to pen the song which – some of us find that more readily-believable than others.  One of the most memorable elements of the song is the odd synthesiser sound that punctuates it throughout.  That is, if you care to know, a Sequential Circuits Prophet-5, which was also used on the hit songs Bette Davis Eyes and What a Fool Believes.  Though I suppose it's still a Sequential Circuits Prophet-5 even if you don't care to know.   It peaked at number six on the UK Singles Chart and has since become of the most widely played Christmas songs on radio.   Bonus fact: The Beatles only really had one Christmas release – Christmas Time Is Here Again, which was distributed to their fan club in 1967.  I imagine that would fetch a pretty pence on the secondary market. [sfx typing] checking ebay…Oh, they're actually pretty cheap.     If you don't like the song, you're not alone.  McCartney himself isn't all that keen on it, but he has begun playing it on UK tours in recent years.  You gotta give the people what they want and clearly enough people want Wonderful Christmastime.  According to the Forbes website, McCartney earns over $400,000 royalties from the song every year, though other sources claim that figure is probably the cumulative total. Little Drummer Boy As time passes, tastes change, culture shifts, new things are created and old things fall away.  We rarely ride in one-horse open sleighs –I can't remember the last time I was even in a closed one-horse sleigh– and it seems really strange to us that people sat about telling ghost stories.  So maybe that's why I don't understand The Little Drummer Boy.  How is a drum solo an appropriate gift for a sleeping infant and the woman who just squoze him out in a cow-shed?  The ox and lamb kept time?  That's literally the drummer's only job.  Well, that and making the rest of the band's drinking problem look reasonable.  Hey, what's the difference between a drummer and a drum machine?  You only have to punch the info into the drum machine once.  [sfx rimshot] What do you call a drummer who broke up with his girlfriend?  Homeless.  [sfx rimshot]  Don't worry, drummers, this abuse isn't exclusive.  What do you call the pretty girl on a bassist's arm?  A tattoo.  That's my time, good night!   How old do you think this slow, plodding song is?  I couldn't have put a year to my guess, but for some reason it surprised me that it was written in 1941.  The composure was a teacher named Katherine Kennicott Davis.  Originally called "Carol of the Drum" –does what it says on the tin– was based on an unidentified Czech carol and intended for choirs.  One group of singers took a liking to it and propelled it to success in 1951 - The Trapp Family Singers.   As boring as it is, The Little Drummer Boy lets us draw a straight line between the Trapp Family and ‘the lad insane' David Bowie.  In 1977, Bowie was 'actively trying to normalize' his career.  Debilitating drug addiction and accusations of Nazi-sympathizing threatened to sink his earning potential, so it was a no-brainer for him to appear on Bing Crosby's Merrie Olde Christmas.  Crosby was a crooner and golden age Hollywood icon and seemed like a means to the end because, as Bowie said later, “my mom likes him.”  The promise by producers to promote the video for Bowie's single Heroes, fitting as poorly as it did in the middle of a holiday special, certainly didn't hurt either.  The special starred Crosby, his actual family, and stars of the day like the model Twiggy, who my mother has still not forgiven for coming along and making curvy, busty figures unpopular.     So Bing Crosby and David Bowie.  On paper, it made no sense.  But in reality…it made even less sense.  A negative amount of sense, if that's mathematically possible.  I mean, just look at this juxtaposition.  You can see the two together on the Vodacast app… Bowie arrived in a mink coat, an earring, and bright red lipstick….to appear alongside Bing Crosby.  Bowie agreed to producers' demands to tone his look down, but asked/begged the producers if there was anything else, anything at all, he could sing, letting them know in no uncertain terms that he hated the song.   "Ian Fraser, who co-wrote the 'Peace on Earth' portion, told The Washington Post in 2006. 'We didn't know quite what to do.' Instead of panicking, he and two other men working on the special — Buz Kohan and Larry Grossman — hunkered down at a piano in the studio basement and spent 75 minutes working up the tune.  Ever professionals, Bowie and Crosby perfected the new song in less than an hour."  It was that professionalism that actually brought the men together.  According to Crosby's daughter, Mary, who was 18 at the time and a big Bowie fan,  "Eventually, Dad realized David was this amazing musician, and David realized Dad was an amazing musician. You could see them both collectively relax and then magic was made."  Bonus fact: Mary went on to become an actress, starring in the hit TV show Dallas, but she isn't the only thespian the Crosby legacy produced.  Bing's granddaughter Denise will always have a place in my heart as Tasha Yar, first chief of security on the Enterprise D and if you don't know what I'm talking about, maybe *you're* not cool enough to sit with *us* at lunch.   The special was recorded in mid-September, but Crosby would not see it released.  He died of a massive heart attack after a day of golfing in mid-October, so the special was aired posthumously at the end of November in the U.S. and on Christmas Eve in England.  Bizarrely, The single proved to be one of Bowie's fastest-selling singles, selling over 250,000 copies within its first month and being certified silver by the British Phonographic Industry one month after its release.  And what does it say about me that I had to do a second take, beause I read it as British Pornographic Industry.  They certify very different records.  One thing that helped propel that success was the fledgeling Music Television network, which in its original primitive state actually played music videos.  When it launched in 1981, there weren't really enough videos to fill up an entire channel, so they played what they had, including the 'Peace on Earth/Little Drummer Boy' clip, a lot.  This prompted RCA to issue an official release in 1982 with the arbitrary single B-side of "Fantastic Voyage" from The Lodger album.  Bowie was annoyed with that move, contributing to his departure from the label soon after.  Still, it was a high-charting single for Bowie in the post-Scary Monsters era, at least until Let's Dance came out three months later.   And that's…So the question was “Do they know it's Christmas?”.  Since Ethiopia is ⅔ Christian, yes.  I'd go out on a limb and say even the ⅓ that's Muslim knows. But the important thing is that 100% of the royalties go to the cause, and that figure sits north of $250 million.  Among the luminary names involved was a pre-beard George Michaels.  This was in his Wham days when he also recorded the song you're hearing now.  Recognize it?  To anyone who just lost Whamageddon… [sfx laughter]  Worth it.  Just passing it on after Red from Overly Sarcastic took me out during a video last year.  For everyone else, as the nearest Gen-X'er.  Remember…Thanks..     And that's…So the question was “Do they know it's Christmas?”.  Since Ethiopia is ⅔ Christian, yes.  I'd go out on a limb and say even the ⅓ that's Muslim knows. But the important thing is that 100% of the royalties go to the cause, and that figure sits north of $250 million.  Among the luminary names involved was a pre-beard George Michaels.  This was in his Wham days when he also recorded the song you're hearing now.  Recognize it?  To anyone who just lost Whamageddon… [sfx laughter]  Worth it.  Just passing it on after Red from Overly Sarcastic took me out during a video last year.  For everyone else, as the nearest Gen-X'er.  Remember…Thanks..    Sources: https://www.cbc.ca/music/read/david-bowie-bing-crosby-and-the-story-of-the-strangest-christmas-duet-ever-1.5008343 https://theconversation.com/christmas-earworms-the-science-behind-our-love-hate-relationship-with-festive-songs-89268 https://www.slantmagazine.com/music/worst-christmas-songs-of-all-time/3/ https://www.sundaypost.com/fp/story-behind-the-christmas-song-paul-mccartneys-wonderful-christmastime/ https://www.songfacts.com/facts/paul-mccartney/wonderful-christmastime https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/637970/banned-christmas-songs-past https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chipmunk_Song_(Christmas_Don%27t_Be_Late) http://www.christmassongs.net/chipmunks-christmas-song https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross_Bagdasarian https://nowweknowem.wordpress.com/2013/05/04/david-sevilles-the-chipmunk-song-won-three-grammy-awards-today-in-1959-the-top-winner-at-the-inaugural-grammy-awards-now-we-know-em/ https://holidappy.com/holidays/History-of-Christmas-Carols-Little-Drummer-Boy https://www.newsweek.com/story-behind-bowie-bings-unlikely-holiday-duet-sends-welcome-message-divided-times-opinion-1478295

Alternative 80s
#227 - Walking In A Winter Wonderland

Alternative 80s

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 113:30


Here we go - barely in time for Christmas! Such are the joys of having a newborn. We hope you all have a wonderful Christmas, and please have a safe New Year! Track Listing: 1) Jingle Bell Rock - The Fall 2) Fruitcake - Fred Schneider and The Superions 3) Jingles Are Jingles - Dan Wilson 4) Winter Wonderland - Cocteau Twins 5) A Change At Christmas - The Flaming Lips 6) Another Lonely Christmas [Extended Version] - Prince 7) 25th December - Everything But The Girl 8) White Christmas - Wayne Hussey 9) Yuletide Throwdown - Blondie 10) It's Always Christmastime - Al Jourgensen 11) Jingle Pressure - dj BC 12) The Season's Upon Us - Dropkick Murphys 13) Xmas Time [It Sure Doesn't Feel Like It] - Mighty Mighty Bosstones 14) Jingle Bells - Yello 15) Always Winter, Never Christmas - XTC 16) Christmas Is Coming - The Payola$ 17) Baby It's Christmas - Bananarama 18) Christmas Wrapping - The Waitresses 19) Things Fall Apart - Cristina 20) Little drummer Boy - Tori Amos 21) Do they Know It's Christmas? - Band Aid 22) Santa Claus [Alternative Mix] - Throwing Muses 23) The Greedies - A Merry Jingle 24) Christmas Without A Prayer - Sparks 25) My Silent Night - Lisi 26) Winter Wonderland - Eurythmics 27) Last Christmas - Richard Cheese 28) Birthday Boy - Pet Shop Boys 29) Merry Christmas - INXS 30) The Power Of Love [Live] - Holly Johnson

RFS: The Metro
The Metro #601

RFS: The Metro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 66:41


This week on The Metro, Warlock Jeff Ivins brings you the following: Band Aid, Kim Wilde, The Tubes, The Romantics, Josie Cotton, Marillion, Power Station, Eurythmics, Pat Benatar, Culture Club, Falco, The Cars, Corey Hart, Human League, and finishing off with some Wham!

The Agile Pubcast
The Agile Pubcast Christmas Single 2021

The Agile Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 3:56


It's that time of year again. After massacring Band Aid, John Lennon and The Fairytale of New York, agile coaches and hosts of The Agile Pubcast Geoff Watts and Paul Goddard are back with their annual Charity Christmas Single. This year they are United Against Dementia and are supporting Alzheimer's Society so please watch, enjoy, laugh at their expense and donate a little to help find a cure for a dreadful disease.https://secure.alzheimers.org.uk/home... Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cover Band Confidential's Podcast
Episode 189: The Ultimate Worst Holiday Song

Cover Band Confidential's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 49:21


Oh sure--in past years we've spouted opinions. And yes: "Christmas Shoes" will always reign supreme. But this year we've gotten SCIENTIFIC. We crowd-sourced a bracket of 16 of the worst of the worst of holiday nonsense, and with the help of a certain lead-singer-and-spouse as a tiebreaker, we narrowed it down to the VERY WORST Christmas song of all time.Here are the tracks we started with, for those of you following along at home:Band Aid  - ‘Do They Know It's Christmas'John Denver - ‘Please Daddy (Don't Get Drunk This Christmas)'Justin Bieber - “Mistletoe”Paul McCartney and Wings - “Wonderful Christmas Time”Ariana Grande- “Santa Tell Me”New Kids on the Block- “Funky, Funky Xmas”Dan Fogelberg, “Same Old Lang Syne”Madonna, “Santa Baby”The Robertson - “Santa Looks A Lot Like Daddy”Barry Gordon- “Nuttin' for Christmas”Lou Monte- “Dominic the Donkey”Wham- “Last Christmas”FF5- “Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer”Bruce Springsteen- “Santa Claus Is Coming To Town”Bob Seger- “Little Drummer Boy”Twisted Sister- “Silver Bells”

Rock N Roll Bedtime Stories
Episode 72 – Band Aid vs Christmas

Rock N Roll Bedtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 56:29


Brian breaks down the inspiration, determination and dumb luck that led Bob Geldof and Midge Urie to create one of the most successful and lyrically tone-def holiday anthems of all time while also answering the age old query - "Do they know it is Christmastime at all?" (Spoiler: Yes. Yes, they do.) Guest co-host: Phil Medley  (Check out his band Adventure's 2020 album World of Hurt) This episode is brought to you in part by Stamps.com! SHOW NOTES: Song used in this episode: "Do They Know It's Christmas" by Band Aid https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/610472/do-they-know-its-christmas-band-aid-song-history https://www.express.co.uk/entertainment/music/1220362/george-michael-news-band-aid-paul-weller-savage-bust-up-do-they-know-its-christmas-spt https://www.whychristmas.com/cultures/ethiopia.shtml https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midge_Ure https://www.loudersound.com/features/the-story-of-hear-n-aid-the-heavy-metal-band-aid http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/4012573.stm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_They_Know_It%27s_Christmas%3F

Financial Strategies
Rip the Band-Aid Off and Never Pay Taxes Again

Financial Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 12:49


A strategic approach to investing can help you maximize your retirement income while minimizing your investment taxes. What happens when you convert to a Roth IRA? How much tax will I pay if I convert my IRA to a Roth? What about "Conversion" IRAs and "Back Door" Roth IRAs? Find out what makes sense for you to in the latest Financial Strategies Podcast with Andrew and Daniel Agemy here. Proactive Tax Saving Strategies (PDF) How to Give and Receive Charitable Donations (PDF) Follow us on Instagram! Like us on Facebook! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/agemy/message

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

This week… something completely different! It's an episode all about my favorite things. With apologies to Oprah, this isn't about the holidays – it's a little late for that! And while some of this might make good gifts, this more of a season-less list. Just good stuff I like. Couple of rules I set for myself: Nothing that needs a prescription. Nothing that I'm getting paid for. No one on this list will even know they've been mentioned until the episode goes live! Hope you enjoy! -Stacey Here are the links to everything I mention: Keep it cool: Frio wallets Tempramed VivCap Sticky stuff/application: Skin Tac wipes Stay Put medical patches Benadryl spray and Flonase spray Nexcare waterproof bandages Cases/accessories T1D3DGear (warning, profanity) Casualty Girl pouches  Disney-themed pouches  Dia-Be-Tees shirts and stickers Books: Think Like a Pancreas Raising Teens with Diabetes Sugar Surfing When I Go Low Just for fun: Heroic Kid (play d-tech for toys)  I Heart Guts New Rufus the Bear! Misc. The Useless Pancreas (marketplace) Highs and Lows Ring Guitar Pick Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below:   Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by... Dario Health – Manage your blood glucose levels. Increase your possibilities.By Gvoke HypoPen, the first pre-mixed autoinjector for very low blood sugar. And By Dexcom. Take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, something completely different. It's an episode all about my favorite things. With apologies to Oprah, this isn't about the holidays, it's a little late for that. And you know, some of this might make good gifts. This is more of just something I've been thinking about doing for a long time. So I would consider this a bit of a seasonless list, just good stuff that I like. And unfortunately, unlike Oprah, I haven't hidden everything I'm talking about here under your seat as a gift. So I can't do that. But I did set a couple of rules for myself, you're not going to hear me talk about anything today for which you need a prescription. Right, I'm not gonna talk about medical stuff, and nothing that I'm getting paid for. I will put the links for all this stuff in the show notes, but they're not affiliate links. So that means they go right to the product where I think it's most easily available. They don't go to a special link, you know, which tallies you up and then pays me. I mean, there's nothing wrong with that as long as everybody knows what's going on. And a couple of these folks may sound familiar, I've worked with them before, we have had partnerships and sponsorships with the mostly the booked clinic program. But I really just wanted this to be a fun way to share my thoughts. If you have a product that I mentioned. And the link is wrong or doesn't go exactly where you want it, please reach out. I want to make this great for you and easy for my listeners. So drop me a line Stacey at diabetes connections.com. And maybe we'll get a thread going in the Facebook group to find out some of your favorite things. Because you know, Benny is older now and the products that we really needed, you know, like the super cute insulin pump pouches that he used when he was three years old, he does not use anymore. So I don't have recommendations for stuff like that. Maybe we can kind of get a list going and I can do a follow up in a couple of weeks or months for listeners but you really should be in the Facebook group. Anyway, if you're on Facebook, I know not everybody is so if you're there, come on over. Alright, so here are a few of my favorite things   let's talk about keeping insulin at room temperature. A couple of products I really like for that we don't have a ton of issue with this day in and day out. I do live in North Carolina and Benny of course is  outside quite a bit in the summer, he does go to summer camp. When we've needed to keep something at room temperature. We use a Frio generally these Frio wallets pretty standard in the diabetes community you probably know about them. What's nice is you can get them at CBS. Now, I think Walgreens carries them used to be online only. They're really easy to use. Please follow the directions. Don't be like me and oversaturate and then you can't get anything in the wallet. You have to just read the directions. You'll figure it out better than we did. But Frio doesn't keep it cold. It just keeps it cool. But we love Frio. Close to edging it out. And the only reason it doesn't here is because of the price. And because it doesn't yet cover vials. But that's coming is the VIVI Cap. These folks reached out to me middle of last year, probably spring of last year and sent us a sample we decided to try it on Benny's trip to Israel. If you'll recall, my son went to Israel with his non diabetes camp last summer for a month. This included tons and tons of outdoor activity in temperatures that were in excess of 100 degrees. Quite often, he packed two bags, one was like the go bag, three days worth of supplies. And then the other bigger bag that stayed inside or in a refrigerated area, at least the insulin part of it did on the bus or you know, wherever they went, I have my suspicions as to whether it's stayed perfectly refrigerated the whole time, but only a little bit of insulin went into the desert with. But the idea was he would take a pen, we would use the VIVI Cap, and then he would just change the pen out continuing to use the VIVI Cap in his backpack. Whenever he needed more insulin. He had vials he had pens we use both in his pump. And it's always nice to have a pen in case you need to give yourself a shot something like that. So when he came home and this is so typical of my son went through his bag, for he did a great job with diabetes, but there must have been like a communications problem because he never changed out that insulin pen. He never needed to give himself a shot, which is probably why but he just always used the vials that I'd sent him with. I sent him with way too much insulin for a month but you know, you know mom's What am I gonna do? So upshot of this long story is that the one insulin pen that we sent to Israel with stayed in hot temperatures definitely in excess of probably 75 degrees around the clock, and certainly in excess of 100 degrees for several days at a time during the daytime. And what happened to it right it was with the VIVI Cap the whole time so we decided to test it out. You know how he supervised setting right? I wasn't going to let him use this pen and then jaunt off do overnights or whatever he was with us. And look, we would know right away if that insulin was no good. And guess what? It worked perfectly. It was fantastic. He was in range. I mean, he was really we were really watching obviously, right. But he was in range pretty much the whole three days. So it was fantastic. And I was definitely converted to VIVI Cap. That should be their tagline guys call me if you can stand the Israeli desert heat, right, you can certainly hang out a day camp in North Carolina this summer. They often have promo codes, discounts. It's more expensive than the Frio wallet. But it's also really durable and lasts for a whole year. And it has different sizes. So it will fit whatever insulin you're using. My understanding is that they are working on a similar bit of technology for insulin vials, and that would be great.   Let's talk a little bit about getting stuff to stick. I have a whole document about this. If you haven't seen it, it's been a pop up for a couple of months. It's been incredibly popular. So I haven't taken it down yet. But I'm probably going to move it over to the bookstore section. Do you don't have a bookstore section on the website, we're kind of creating a place to put documents a lot of stuff is free. There are PDFs, so we're gonna move that over there. But of course there there's my book to buy and there will be more later this year. But the getting stuff to stick is so personal. I think it's really hard right? Everybody's skin is so different. So here's what we have liked over the years could not keep anything on Benny skin with a Skin Tac that is the brand that we like we get Skin Tac from Amazon. Over the years we've gone from just using the little Skin Tac wipes to using the liquid bottle we used to liquid for many years. I think gosh, Benny was like 13 or 14 and he was like no more. I don't want that it's not portable enough. He's never home. So he uses the wipes. Now. He uses nothing to dissolve it. So I have no favorite product for that. He literally just rips things off his skin. I cringe every time but hey, it's not my body. We like Stay Put Medical patches. That's the brand, Stay Put Medical just foyer for years and years. We had trouble in the water. I tried vet wrap I tried all the stuff that all the moms tell you to try. The Dexcom overlays that come free from the company are great, but it didn't work as well in the ocean, or with sweat, that kind of thing. So Stay Put patches really were fantastic for us. The story I always tell is Benny with a diabetes camp for a full week, right Saturday to Saturday. And then we went to the beach and we restarted the ducks calm. This was a couple of years ago. And it survived to Stay Put and the Dexcom survived a week of diabetes camp where they swim and sweat and you know, they're pretty gross for a whole week. It's hot. Again, as I said we live in North Carolina, and then three days at the ocean, sand and ocean. All that stuff that you get and it really did stay put. So I really love that they're big. He got an incredible tan line. That's one of the only downsides of it. We used Benadryl spray, Benny had a brief time of having a mild allergic reaction. I think this was to the Dexcom G5 years ago and my husband came back from the store with over the counter Benadryl spray not Flonase requested, and it worked fine. So it's kind of a weird, favorite thing, but I haven't heard a lot about Benadryl spray, but I'll mention it here. I also really really like next care waterproof Band-Aids, the brand doesn't really matter. I mean, it's just a Tegaderm bandage, but I'd like to mention it because you can get it at the drugstore or the grocery store. It's over the counter. Unlike a lot of the stuff that has to be ordered from your medical company or from Amazon, you can take a waterproof bandage and in a pinch, slap it over your Dexcom or slap it over an infusion set. I mean, you have to cut a hole into for the infusion set. But sometimes you can just slap it on top. We've done that and then gently pulled it off later to reconnect to the tube to pump. And it works great. I've heard a lot of people say they're afraid of doing that because they don't want to block the signal from the Dexcom people. We have done this many, many, many times I can show you photos. When we went to the Dead Sea in Israel, I did not want to take a chance of the salt. Right. It's so salty, corroding the transmitter. So we put a waterproof bandage over the Dexcom. And he left it on for a couple of days. I don't know the probably wasn't very comfortable, but he didn't seem to care. And it worked fine. So that's my in a pinch favorite thing at the beach   let's talk about cases and organization something that my son doesn't care about at all. And if I if this were me, I'm the kind of person that I love pouches and organization and cool stuff like that and he really doesn't care. But I will go through and tell you what I like. I am a huge fan of T1D3DGear. This is just a fantastic family in the diabetes community to begin with, and their stuff is awesome. So as you can imagine T1D3DGear, they're making stuff right they're printing it out on their 3d printer and it's everything from trays, which we do use, I love those makes your supplies really easy to find. And they've got different sizes for different brands to insulin protection vials, which I like a lot, and they will do custom colors as well, we've been so lucky, where's the wood that I can knock that we've never actually like dropped a vial, but I always put the vial we're using in the case. And that makes me feel so much better. It's just a really easy, it kind of looks like R2D2 in a way. I don't think that's by design, but it's really helpful and really handy and they're making super useful products. They also make the cutest ones like if your kid wants a unicorn or different options. I'll link up their website, as I mentioned, Benny doesn't really like pouches, but I make him use them anyway because otherwise his diabetes bag is just a complete mess. So we like the ones from casualty girl, some of these have a bit of profanity, you know, all my diabetes stuff. You can fill in the blank there, but they have a bunch of really clean ones, obviously, you know, for younger children, even for my kid I don't like him carrying stuff in public that that has profanity on it, but they have some really cute stuff specific to diabetes, also personalized. They put names on it, and they were so nice. A couple of years ago we gave away a bunch of their stuff at friends for life, so I always like to recommend them. I also will recommend and link up Disney themed pouches that don't look super Disney. I know a lot of you especially friends for life people you're big Disney fans. I am too but I don't like to have like Mickey Mouse on my purse. I like it to be a little bit more subtle. And at red bubble. There's a bunch of people who will put together pouches you can see the samples. They just kind of hint at Disney so I have the small world pouch but it's just like a pattern that is featured in small world. It's not actually it doesn't say small world. I got Lea my daughter for Hanukkah. This year. I got her one that has the Haunted Mansion wallpaper on it. You'd never know unless you knew. So very cool stuff. It doesn't have anything to do with diabetes. But I love red bubble. They also have a fun bunch of diabetes stickers there. Oh, speaking of stickers. The best is Dia-Be-Tees This is my friend Rachel. And she has amazing T shirts. She is so creative. She's got great stickers, she made an ugly Hanukkah sweater for diabetes, because a couple of years ago, she makes these great, ugly Christmas sweaters for their diabetes steam. They say funny stuff on them. But I pointed out to her like, hey, everybody celebrates Christmas and she was immediately on it. My favorite stickers are the Tyrannosaurus Dex, get it and the Banting fan club that she made this year for Dr. Banting. Very, very cool stuff. And I'll link up to her Etsy shop.   Let's talk about books. I promise I won't talk about my book here. I talk about it enough. But I really would like to recommend some books that have helped us a lot over the years. My favorite, the one that I always recommend is Think like a pancreas A Practical Guide to managing diabetes with insulin. And that is by the amazing diabetes educator Gary Scheiner. He is out with an updated edition. So he did this book, it's got to be I don't know, Gary, I'm guessing 10 years old, but he does update it frequently. I think it's the third edition now. It's really a great source and resource to understand your diabetes and your child's diabetes better and more thoroughly, let's say then perhaps you might get these quick endocrinology visits, definitely better than the information you're getting on Facebook. I of course love raising teens with diabetes, a survival guide for parents by Moira McCarthy that has not been updated for the technology that has come out since its publication. However, I don't think that matters. I think that there are so many wonderful ideas, thoughts and ways to recognize how tough a time it is for teenagers and come through that time with your relationship with your child intact. So I really recommend that I know Maura is working on updating it. But even still, it's so good because I think so many people with teenagers, even as we say all the time Oh, it's such a tough time. It's they feel so alone. I still I mean gosh, you guys I always wonder and I call Moira. She would vouch for me. And I'm like I'm not doing this right. It's hard. It's really hard. I also love Sugar Surfing how to manage type 1 diabetes in a modern world by the amazing Dr. Steven ponder, I would be lying if I said we are perfect sugar surfers. But we have used a lot of the principles that are in this book. And it does help you understand so much about how everything works and the dynamic way of managing. You know before CGM. It's incredible to think how much Dr. Ponder was able to do. And now with the monitoring, it's really, really helpful. But I will say you can get this for free. If you're newly diagnosed, I believe it's the first three months it might be six months, I will link it up. But I'm telling you right now, if you get this for free when you're newly diagnosed, put it away for a couple of weeks at least maybe put it away for six months, because it's it's pretty advanced in my opinion, and you got to learn diabetes, you got to learn a little bit more about it before you start worrying about the Delta and other stuff that's in here. But I love Dr. Ponder and highly recommend that one. I get asked a lot about children's books. And you know Benny and I read so many diabetes children's books, so many I mean how many are there in the market but we read them so often when he was little And my favorites probably aren't even available anymore. You know, Jackie's got game was about this kid who was trying it for the basketball team. And then he goes low. We loved Rufus comes home, which is about the JDRF. Bear, there were a couple of that diabetes kind of popped up into lots of picture books that we read if the person in them didn't have diabetes, or the animals in them. But I gotta be honest with you, I struggle to recommend children's books, because I'm not reading them with little kids anymore. And I think they're a really good judge, right? I do. Like when I go low, a diabetes picture Guide, which is a terrific book by ginger Viera. And Mike Lawson. And this is a terrific book, because both of those people live with type one, we had them on the show, you know, I've known them for years I full disclosure, but I think it's so valuable because as a parent of a child with diabetes, who doesn't live with diabetes herself, I don't have that kind of insight. And I really trust those authors to share that information and help a child kind of give voice to how they're feeling when they go low, that sort of thing. It's a fun, cute book, it's, you know, it's not serious. It's not scary. It's really great. And I'm just gonna say, and don't be mad parents, if you're thinking of writing a children's book, just carefully consider it. Look at what was already out on the market. I talked to a lot of people who spent a lot of money to put these books out, you know, most of them are not published by a traditional publishing house. Some are but most are self-published. And that's great. But you know, gosh, there are so many out there right now that are very similar. So you know, we don't need a general explainer, please think about what the need in the community is, what's the unique need, you can fill? And I would say, you know, that's why I like when I go low, because it's written by people with type one, we do need them. I mean, the children's books are great. And there's some wonderful ones out there, but I'll tell you, what I'd like to see is some elementary school and tween level books. That's what we really need around here. We don't need another picture book, we need something that an 11 year old or an eight year old could read and see themselves in, you know, baby sitters club is the only thing I can think of where diabetes is there, but it isn't always the focus, it would be really nice to have something else like that. Frankly, I'd like to see that adult level book as well. There's a couple of authors that have written books were diabetes featured but isn't like the main point. But boy, it would be really fun to see that in like a blockbuster bestseller kind of book if they got it right of course.   Alright, let's talk about some just for fun stuff. years ago, Benny got his years ago on his 10 year diaversary. So five years ago, we gave Benny the I heart guts, stuffed pancreas. I heart guts is a company that makes they're so funny. They make stuffed animal type body parts, I'm sorry, they call them plush organs. And since we purchased a few years ago, they have a few more options on their website. They have socks, they have pouches, I was talking about pouches earlier, there's one that says party in my pancreas. But what I really like about this is you can get something for your kiddo with type one. But you can also find something for a sibling who doesn't have diabetes, right? If you're if you're just looking for something silly, I gave my daughter the heart, right? I mean, knock on wood, thank God, there's nothing wrong with her heart. But it was a symbol of my love for her. And while she thought it was kind of silly, you know, it's a way to include her. So diabetes isn't always you know, the middle of everything. And they I mean, this place absolutely cracks me up. There is so much here. They've got puns as far as the eye can see. So if your kid needs their tonsils out, if your wife is having a knee replacement, these are just really fun. And I may have to go and order a huge amount of the stickers. One of the things I absolutely love is that a lot of businesses have popped up to make toy accessories for kids with diabetes. So you know, you've probably heard like Build A Bear has a diabetes kit, you can get that online. years ago, the American Girl doll kit kind of kicked this off. But there's a bunch of people in the community making this stuff. So I recommend heroic kid, and they make tiny little CGMs for your Elf on the Shelf. If you're into that, or you can put it on an American Girl doll. You can have a libre, they now make a bunch of insulin pumps. It's awesome. I love this stuff. I mean, I can't even imagine if we'd had a real real looking insulin pump for Benny when he was two years old that he could have stuck on his Elmo. Holy cow. So heroic kid is fantastic. And the other thing for kids I wanted to share. And I I tell if you saw my newscast last week, we talked about this I broke this story in 2019. Jerry the bear, and Rufus the bear are now one, there can only be one, there was only one bear. And we talked about this when beyond type one and JDRF announced their alliance in 2019. I kind of jokingly asked like what happens to the bears? And they answered it with a straight face and said only one. We're gonna figure this out because it doesn't make any sense to have to, you know, we don't want to be spending money on this kind of stuff. So what happened is Rufus is now $22 which is a lot less than the starting price of Jerry. And if you're not familiar, I probably should explain. So Jerry, the bear is an interactive toy made by the folks at Sproutel, they have gone on to make things like my special AFLAC duck. They have, I think it's called a purrburl. It's like a little stuffed animal that kind of helps kids kind of calm themselves. It's interactive that way. And but they started with Jerry, the bear was their first product developed when these guys were in college. It's a really smart team. But Jerry is a teaching toy. And there's an app on he's evolved over the years and really looks great. And of course, now he looks like Rufus. So this is Rufus on the outside Jerry on the inside, and it's available for $22. I'm gonna call this next category, miscellaneous, because these were just a couple of things that I wanted to make sure to tell you about. But they don't fit into many of these categories. And the first one popped up into my Facebook feed. But it looks beautiful. It's a ring. It's kinda like a zigzaggy ring. But it's called to my daughter highs and lows ring, it is only $36. It is cubic zirconia. It is sterling silver plated with 18 karat gold. So this is not a you know, super expensive super valuable ring. And that's fine. I think it's great for what it is, makes it a terrific little gift. And it comes with a card that says the ring stands for the highs and lows in life, wear it as a reminder that I will be there for you through all of them. That's pretty cool. And hey, moms, I mean, you can buy it for yourself. Even though we go through some highs and lows, they don't all have to be diabetes related. I want to mention, this is very silly. But this is our miscellaneous category. And these are my favorite things. I think everybody who uses a Dexcom should have a guitar pick lying around. Because you've probably seen the trick to use a test strip to to pry the Dexcom transmitter out of the sensor for a couple of reasons doesn't work for us. I don't know if our test strips are weak or our transmitters are strong. But we have found that a guitar pick does the trick very easily. And I'll tell you the number one reason why we have to remove Dexcom transmitters, it's because then he will start a dead transmitter, or I'll start a dying transmitter. And he'll ignore all the notifications, we'll put the sensor on and clip the transmitter and then the transmitter is dead. So yeah, the guitar pick comes in handy to pry that out and then put the new transmitter in. I also want to recommend a website not a product here but Useless Pancreas.com is a clearinghouse for so many products. They've done an amazing job. We had them on the podcast earlier this year. But since I talked to them, they've added so much. So if you're tooling around and you're not sure even what you're looking for, like I need to get something that'll make stuff stick or I need something that'll they have these two categories, like what will make my kid happy. It's just a neat place to go and find a diabetes marketplace. So I'd like to recommend that because, you know, you go on Amazon, there's so many choices. But they've done a nice job of really trying to narrow it down and give us one place to go. Alright, before I wrap it up here, I did ask Benny if he had any favorite diabetes, things to recommend. And he looked at me like I hit three heads. After thinking about it for a minute or two. He said, The silent button on my pump and Dexcom. So I can't say I blame him for that. I am happy that he has the vibrate only we wish every alarm could be silenced. We understand why they cannot be. So there you have it. That's my very first favorite things episode, I will put a link in the show notes. For every item that I talked about here, I want to make it easy for you to find. Again, if you are haven't mentioned and you have a product and you're not crazy about the link I use, feel free to email me Stacey at diabetes connections.com or ping me on social media and we will figure it out. I want to make sure that people can find your stuff. And if you have your own favorite things that you'd like to list, I think I will put something in the Facebook group and maybe we'll share that in the weeks to come. Thank you as always to my editor John Buchanan from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. A couple of weeks left in December, we are going to have these Tuesday episodes, as I mentioned, including kind of a look ahead to next year some predictions possibly. And I'm really hoping to get one more technology update for you in before the end of the year trying to get someone from Tandem to come on and talk about that R&D update that I spoke about in the news episode. Last week. They laid out their five year plan for new products and software. But I will see you back here on Wednesday for in the news or if you listen on podcast. That'll be Friday. All right. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here soon Until then be kind to yourself.   Benny  24:43 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

MDR THÜRINGEN Oldie-Geschichten
Band Aid: "Do they know it's Christmas"

MDR THÜRINGEN Oldie-Geschichten

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 1:52


1984: Das Space Shuttle "Discovery" startet zu seinem Jungfernflug und die Single "Do they know it's Christmas" von Band Aid wird veröffentlicht. Sie spielt zwölf Millionen Euro für die Hungerhilfe ein.

Five Worthy Minutes
Day 343? - This Song Is The Worst 1

Five Worthy Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 6:04


Do They Know it's Christmas by Band Aid is the worst song ever. F that song yo... --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/max-worthington/support

It's A Mind Game
HA Recovery is like taking off a band-aid - LIVE with @nourishedbyclaudia - 5 DAY HA RECOVERY CHALLENGE

It's A Mind Game

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 24:27


WE PROMISE NOT TO SAY 'EAT MORE, TRAIN LESS' - We know you know that already xx Join our 5 day challenge: https://claudiavidornutrition.com/challenge-1 Picking and choosing when to recover from HA is a bit like the decisions on how to remove a band-aid. Sometimes, we will wait and wait until the water and constant movement from our skin and the friction from our clothes makes them go all slimy, and clumpy until there is literally no ‘stick' left and the band-aid drops off. In HA recovery, this would be the woman who diets and trains until she literally cannot function anymore. This woman is always exhausted, always thinking about what to eat, when to eat, and if it's even worth it to eat. This woman will live this way until she literally wakes up and thinks to herself ‘I have nothing left; I cannot go on like this Sometimes, we don't wait too long to take off the band-aid but we do leave it for a few days to get worn down so there isn't too much ‘sticky' left but enough ‘sticky' that you still will feel the pull of the band-aid coming off. In HA recovery, this is Quasi recovery. You know you need to recover but you are happy for recovery to take longer if it means you can keep as many current behaviors as possible. You will pick and choose what you are comfortable with knowing that you are still progressing towards your goal. It's comforting to know that you are doing ‘something' but ‘not too much. Sometimes, we look at the band-aid and release we don't need it. We see how firm it is to our skin, we can tell it's going to hurt when we pull it off but we don't care about the pain. We just want to get the job done and rip the band-aid off. In HA recovery, this is ‘All In'. You can see all the thoughts, behaviors, and actions which have caused your HA. You can see that it's going to take a lot of conscious effort, grit, and emotional discomfort to get the outcome you want but it's all ok because you know you can do hard things. You know that this will be a temporary pain for a long-term gain. You set out your plan and you act on it each and every day until what was once hard becomes easy until what was once many conscious decisions becomes a new way of living, and until you go from no bleed to bleed. Just like taking off a band-aid can happen in a different ways so can the path to HA recovery. We cant wait to talk to you about all things HA Recovery to have you ready to take on the best and most efficient recovery path. @jadee.cameron --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/itsamindgame/message

Start Right Here Podcast
Keren Davy: Blazing a Career Path in Beauty With Faith and Fearlessness

Start Right Here Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 36:29


Keren Davy, Senior Manager, Clinical and Luxe Skincare at Sephora has beauty in her DNA, she was raised in her mother's hair salon. First had tea parties, later got to work, and eventually obtained her cosmetology license, yet it was a challenge for her to land her first corporate beauty role. So in this episode, Keren and I explore whether there is such a thing as the "right" school when it comes to getting a job at a big beauty brand. And if that is indeed true, what do you do when you don't fit the criteria? Keren talks candidly about how a lack of knowledge about internships may have hindered her. But the reality is, although Keren was a scholarship student, she had to work, so she made money in two ways: as a bank teller, and putting her cosmetology license to work. She landed a marketing internship during her senior year and she explains how she turned that internship into a full-time job offer after graduation.  Even with marketing experience, however, beauty brands still weren't interested in her. So Keren returned to school for an NBA. There she got her first taste of skincare, leading a team working on a project for Kiehl's. But her first position at Johnson & Johnson was working on the Band-Aid and Neosporin brands. But even when she wasn't I'm a beauty role, Keren made her beauty expertise known to her colleagues and was hand-picked for a role in brand management at Aveeno. She shares how she continued to uplevel her skills and the importance of stretch assignments. After being laid off from her role at Aveeno, Keren started a consulting firm with client recommendations from her former colleagues. For her current role at Sephora, Keren made the decision to move to West Coast. Acclimating to her new role and a new home. Keren shares how important giving herself grace in times of change. She also shares the importance of faith in her career journey. It sustained her as she encountered rejection and disappointment and fueled her as she forged forward, blazing her career path.  In our Starting Five section, Keren shares some valuable tips on blazing a career in marketing, even if you are an outsider.       

VPM Daily Newscast
12/09/21 - Virginia's lauded rent relief program a ‘band-aid' on affordable housing shortage

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 6:36


Virginia's pandemic rent relief program could run out of funds as early as July of next year; The commanding officer of SEAL Team 8 died Tuesday at Norfolk Sentara General Hospital; Incoming Attorney General Jason Miyares has chosen the next Solicitor General for the Commonwealth of Virginia; Outdoor recreation projects may get a boost as Governor Ralph Northam leaves office; and other local news stories.

Pawn Leaders
187: Band Aid or Solution?

Pawn Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 7:57


What's  the difference between a solution and a band aid? Many Pawn Business owners provide a solution to a problem or temporarily repair something using a band aid. We take a closer look at several methods for offering solutions and why avoiding the use of temporary fixes is important when running a pawn shop in this episode of the Pawn Leaders podcast.   If you haven't signed up to get your FREE Pawn Hat, you can still get a chance by signing  up at https://www.pawnhat.com/getnow. 

Hospitality Queen's
Hospitality Queen's Ep 46 "Rip The Band Aid Off"

Hospitality Queen's

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 76:52


Two Best Friends Erin & Whitney Talking food, The Hospitality industry , life and Everything in Between!

This Is Your Afterlife
Birthday Cakes, Band-Aid Solutions & Poetry: Oscar Sanchez This Is Your Aftershow

This Is Your Afterlife

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 102:19


G.O.A.T. episode here. What starts as a usual This Is Your Aftershow—with Claire Favret & Meaghan Strickland joining me to unpack Oscar Sanchez's episode of This Is Your Afterlife—becomes something entirely new to the "This Is Your" Universe when Oscar surprises Meaghan & Claire halfway through by JOINING US. With and without Oscar, we touch on topics such as: how misguided, confusing, and ridiculous this show is the necessity of hope birthday cake smashing band-aid solutions to systemic problems race jokes (Oscar and I make them) anxiety attacks the possibility of clout organizers being secretly useful actors Plus, Oscar reads a couple of his poems! This is the longest single episode of either show ("Afterlife" or "Aftershow") I've ever published on the main feed, with the longest intro I've ever done, and it's the episode I'm proudest of producing in a year and a half of making this show. I hope everyone who would like what this is listens to the whole episode. I feel like this show is becoming something different, something even more special: a world. If you can, please join the show's Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/davemaher (patreon.com/davemaher) to make possible my dream of making this show my living. You'll get all episodes of This Is Your Aftershow, the extended episodes of This Is Your Afterlife, and more! Transcript: https://app.podscribe.ai/series/1246109 (This Is Your Afterlife on Podscribe) --- Follow Meaghan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MeaghanStrick (@MeaghanStrick) and Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stricklygram/ (@stricklygram), and go to her website: https://www.meaghanstrickland.com/ (meaghanstrickland.com). Follow Claire @clairefavs on https://twitter.com/clairefavs (Twitter) and https://www.instagram.com/clairefavs/ (Instagram). Follow Oscar: @oso_campeon on https://twitter.com/oso_campeon (Twitter) and https://www.instagram.com/oso_campeon/ (Instagram), and follow CHI Hunger Strike: @CHIhungerstrike on https://twitter.com/CHIhungerstrike (Twitter) and https://www.instagram.com/chihungerstrike/ (Instagram). Follow me @thisisdavemaher on https://www.instagram.com/thisisdavemaher/ (Instagram) and https://twitter.com/ThisIsDaveMaher (Twitter), and subscribe to my weekly newsletter, Hella Immaculate, at http://thisisdavemaher.com/ (thisisdavemaher.com). Want to learn more about or sign up for my Unblock or Personal Story Workshops? Email thisisdavemaher@gmail.com. --- Intro Song = Future: "Use Me" Outro Song = Johnnie Frierson: "Miracles" Support this podcast

Retro Pop
Episode 58 - Do They Know It's Christmas?

Retro Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021


Matt and Johnny discuss one of Matt's favorite Christmas songs from Band Aid, Do They Know It's Christmas? The song, created in hopes to raise money to save children in Ethiopia, was a massive hit around the world, and did it's job. Plus, they discuss Christmas music in general.

RT
Sputnik Orbiting the World: Africa at war and meaningful films

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 25:55


War and famine ravaged Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, and much of the Sahel in the ‘80s leaving millions dead. Live Aid and Band Aid tried to paper over the cracks of famine but there was a proxy war being fought as Soviet bombers dropped American bombs. Now, the war, at least, is back and superpower involvement is guaranteed. The details may have changed but the larger picture remains the same. So just how dangerous is the situation there now? We asked Simon Tesfamariam, executive director of the New African Institute. Leslee Udwin is a critically acclaimed filmmaker with an eclectic body of work, from ‘East is East', which opened up Asian-themed culture to a national audience, to ‘Who Bombed Birmingham', which helped release six innocent men after 17 years of wrongful imprisonment, and ‘India's Daughter', a film dealing with the terrible violence meted out to women and girls. There is clearly an overriding theme of humanism and justice running through her work and her charity Think Equal, a global education initiative for children, is no exception, so she boarded Sputnik to tell us more.

Running in the Center of the Universe
An Unstoppable Runner - Book Interview with Down Under Dave - Episode #286

Running in the Center of the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021


This episode has the interview with David Williams (aka "Down Under Dave") who wrote a book about his life and ultra running adventures. The book is really good! Dave graciously made himself available for an interview and he's really funny and has an outstanding outlook on life. More information about the book can be found at the following links: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zn5yEcuJyhs https://www.amazon.com/Unstoppable-Runner-David-Williams/dp/1761091638/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=an+unstoppable+runner+book&qid=1638487887&sr=8-1 And here is Karen's Iron Man distance race report, it's very detailed and pretty cool: I've wanted to do an Ironman distance triathlon for a long time but was intimidated by the amount of time training would take. I already have a full-time job and training would be like adding a part-time job. However, sometimes friends get you to do crazy things. I have a group of friends who have been together since about 2012 when we joined forces to do Ragnar Chicago. We started the weekend as acquaintances and after 36 hours and 200ish miles, ended the weekend as dear friends. We've gone on to finish five more Ragnars as an ultra-team (six runners and one van as opposed to 12 runners and two vans). In 2017, someone saw (ok, it was me) there was a relay race across the state of Iowa (west to east). Within about two weeks, we had eight runners and found a driver to get us the 339 miles across the state. Half of us live in norther Indiana, the other have in Indianapolis. We keep coming up with events to participate in so that we have something to train for and participate in together.  In 2015, Julie and I met up for a run and she asked if I wanted to do Muncie 70.3 with her and her sister Pamela, one of the Indianapolis tribe. I was in. Julie and I trained together in Northern Indiana and met up with Pam when time allowed. Many of the Ragnar group showed up to cheer us on, just as we did with Pam and Tina completed Ironman Chattanooga in 2017 (this was for Pam's 50th) For Julie's 50th birthday last year, she threw out hiking the Grand Canyon (rim to rim) in one day. Once again, it didn't take us long to commit. We persevered against COVID scares and some other issues. We traveled to Flagstaff and on October 7 we completed the hike, starting around 4:30 a.m. and finishing around 5:30 p.m. We made it back to Indiana safe and sound, with the exception of a bit of trail rash on Pamela from a fall she took and a badly sprained ankle, Melinda, ironically, our driver suffered. She hiked down the trail about a mile and we as we were hiking back up, just past one of the tunnels, she stepped off the trail, canyon side, and went down. Unfortunately, what goes down, must go up and she persevered up.  2021 was my turn to hit 50. While planning for Grand Canyon, the goal of completing an ironman distance was swirling in my head. Pre-COVID, I found out a friend's husband, Matt, was training to do Ironman Louisville, which would be on October 9. As Ironmen usually are on Sundays, I did the math and realized Louisville would be on my birthday in 2021. That would be pretty cool. Then COVID hit, Louisville was cancelled for that year, and then cancelled permanently. Since Matt had put in all the training and didn't want to waste it, he organized his own event. Then Muncie 70.3 announced they would have a 140.3 event this summer. It piqued my interest, but I really didn't want to spend the money.  The town I live in is located on the north shore of the second largest natural in Indiana. Perfect for swimming. Outside of that, we are surrounded by corn, soybean, and wheatfields. Perfect for biking and running.   The more I thought about it, the more I thought I could follow Matt's example and stage my own Ironman distance triathlon. I could do it by my own rules (accept assistance from spectators, have friends/family participate with me) and if training went off the rails, the weather was bad, or doing the full wasn't going to work, I could cover the distance over three days or move the distance back to the 70.3, or a half ironman.  Pamela, who completed Ironman Chattanooga in 2018, shared her training plan and at the end of April, I started “training”. This would be a don't do as I did disclaimer. I trained but didn't complete every workout. I skipped the second week because I was out of town for a conference. I didn't start swimming until Lake Maxinckuckee (Max – in- kuk – kee or Lake Max as well all call it) warmed up in late July. I tried to hit the longer workouts but when we went on vacation in August, didn't get in the long bike rides. I tried to balance family demands with work and training. There were many workouts that were shortened or skipped because I needed to work late or my husband and daughters were actually home. We have two girls, 20 and 17. My 20 year old has a 2 ½ year old daughter and has moved out of the house. I will drop just about anything if Kate and Mabel are coming over. My youngest, Emily, had a summer job and then attends a private boarding school in our town. Again, if she is home, I want to spend time with her.  The longest swim I did was 2.4 miles. It was on a Friday evening, after Labor Day, so activity on the lake has slowed. I ended up chasing daylight and enjoyed watching the sunset over the lake toward the end of the swim. There were a few early morning swims, too, getting in the lake while it was dark and watching the sunrise. What a way to start the day! The longest bike was 89 miles in about 5 ½ hours. The training was based on time, not distance and by 5 ½ hours, I was ready to be done! The next day, I ran 12 miles and, surprisingly, it wasn't bad. I ended up getting a cheap spin bike from a friend and started doing spin workouts during the week and hitting the road on my bike for the long rides. The spin workouts provided a good challenge that I might not have had if I road my bike.  The longest run was around 16 miles. I will add that three weeks before the event, another Ragnar teammate, Kim, and I ran the Sunburst Half Marathon that started in downtown South Bend and ended at the 50 yard like of Notre Dame stadium. We finished in two hours and Kim came in first in her age group. We were not expecting that! On the bus ride back to the car, Kim wondered how must faster we would have gone if we actually trained.   Probably the best week of training, was my taper week leading up to event day (I'm hesitant to call it race day as I really didn't race). I had to attend a conference and stayed at a hotel with a lap pool and workout room. You know I took advantage of that! My plan was to start my swim at a friend's cottage on the south shore of Lake Max and swim to the town park on the north shore, which is 2.4 miles. If the weather was bad, I would either find a smooth spot in the lake to swim or go to a pool about 20 miles away and swim laps to complete the distance. My husband planned to kayak with me for safety, and to keep me on course. My younger daughter would drop us off at the cottage, grab my bike and meet me at the town park.  Next, I'd ride 112 miles. I didn't have a particular route in mind. I just knew I wanted to end at Julie's house in the northern end of our county. It happened to be about 26.2 miles from my house so once I ended the bike, I just needed to run home. I figured I would bike by solo and my Ragnar teammates would accompany me on the run.  The day before the event, my friend Melinda, who has been our driver for our Ragnar events, asked if I wanted company on the swim. Her husband Doug completed Ironman Maryland a few weeks ago and was willing to swim and would keep me company on the bike for a while.  The weather in October has been amazing in Indiana with high temperatures in the 70s and lows in the 60s. While it rained Friday and turned foggy Friday night, Saturday morning was absolutely perfect. The wind was calm. It was a little overcast. The lake was like glass and the temps in the low 60s. We got to the cottage on the south shore around 6:20 a.m. and walked the kayak down to the water. It started sprinkling but it was short lived. We went back up to the car to wait for Doug and Melinda and get the wetsuit on. By 6:45 or so, Steve was in the kayak and Doug and I were in the water. My daughter Emily sounded the airhorn on her phone and Doug and I were off. It took a bit for me to get into a rhythm and to fully put my face the water. Initially, the water temperature took my breath away but once I acclimated, it was perfect for a long swim. Steve had a headlamp on the front of the kayak and a red light on the back and wore a headlamp. Doug had an inflatable buoy with a light in it strapped to his back. It kind of looked like a Chinese lantern floating on the water. At times, the lights on the kayaks blended into the lights on the shoreline and I'd have to stop and get my bearings. I think I swam pretty consistently for the first half of the swim. The second half, I started losing sight of Doug and Steve. At one point, I popped my head up and couldn't see either one of them. There was a bit of panic as I felt very alone. Finally, I caught sight of Steve again in the dark, asked him to turn his headlamp around so there was a light to follow. That made a huge difference. The sun rose at 7:50 a.m. and by that time we were about halfway done. I don't think that I was getting tired so much as getting bored toward the end. I was very happy when the Beach Lodge began getting clearer, then I started running into some of the tall plants growing in the lake and could see people on the beach. Finally, I could see the sand on the bottom of the lake. I swam in until the water was about knee deep and stood up. I completed the 2.4 mile swim in 1 hour 30 minutes, which was my A goal.  I was a little dizzy getting up and, while trying to get water out of my ear, lost my balance and went back down into the water. The dizziness subsided and I headed out of the water and was met by Ragnar teammates Kim and JW as well as Melinda and my daughter Emily. Em and Steve got the kayak loaded up and I got changed into my biking gear. The transition was about 20 minutes.  While I was changing, some of Doug's Ironman training group rode past the park and stopped to ride with us. I'm not used to riding with anyone, so I was a little nervous riding in a group, let alone riding with super experienced cyclists. They were great, though and hung with me for about 20 minutes before they needed to head home. Doug and I rode around Lake Max three times for 30 miles and then headed north to the City of Plymouth. Doug stuck with me to the south end of Plymouth where Melinda picked him up and checked on me. I was then on my own to get through Plymouth and north to mile 56 at Julie's house. This was the section of the ride I was most concerned about as there was more traffic, traffic lights, and stop signs than I'm used to riding with. I needed to ride through the city in order to safely cross US 30. Thankfully, there was very little traffic and I hit most of the lights green. Julie was getting off of work in Plymouth so she met up with me at a few spots in Plymouth followed me through a round-about to block traffic and get me through safely.  At 58 miles, I arrived at Julie's to the cheers of the rest of my teammates. Pamela hopped on her bike and joined me for the second half of the ride. The area is rural, so traffic wasn't much of an issue and our teammates were out in their cars meeting at various intersections to make sure we were going the right way and didn't need anything. Julie had gone out and marked the turns on the road, but we misunderstood the second marking and took a wrong turn. It added a few miles, but we found our way back to the route after a phone call or two. After that, the team was out at most of the major turns making sure we went the right was and managing traffic for us. The route took us back to Julie's with about 20 miles left. We took a quick break, restocked fluids, stretched and we were off again for a second loop. The original route was 26 miles but because of the extra on the front end and the wrong turns, Julie worked on shortening it. She was amazing at quickly rerouting and for the last 10 miles, she escorted us along the route. With about 5 miles to go, she pulled up next to me and asked if I wanted to be a little over or a little under on the ride. I said over, just so I knew that I went the full distance. She then led us back to her house and we finished the ride at 112.2 miles. The actual ride took seven hours and twelve minutes but, with the breaks and transition, it took seven hours and thirty-five minutes. I wasn't exactly sure how I was going to manage my nutrition, but I knew it was important. On the ride, I drank water with electrolytes and downed three small Clif bars, with the last Clif bar consumed during the last 45 minutes of the ride. By the end, my stomach was sloshing around. Pamela suggested giving the Clif bar a little time to digest. In the last mile, she also suggested cycling at a high cadence without a lot of resistance to get my legs ready to run.   When I arrived back at Julie's, the team had the cowbells out and had a little cheer tunnel for us to enter. I got to the driveway and stopped. I had to will my leg to swing over the bike so I could get off, get changed, and get running. Before I started the run, I drank half a can of Diet Coke to settle my stomach and ate a Ginger Chew. Both of those things helped tremendously. The second transition was about 15 minutes.  For the run, the plan was for my teammates to each run with me for about 5 to 6 miles. After being on the bike for so long and having such a quick turnover on the pedals, my legs were ready to go and I started out fast. Thankfully, JW reigned me in and she suggested running for four minutes and walking one. Had she not encouraged me to slow down, I probably would have blown up at the end. We chatted and caught up as we hadn't seen each other for a few months. JW stayed with me for about 6 miles and then we traded out runners – Ragnar style (meet the van, one runner gets out and one gets in). Wendy joined me and caught me up on what has been going on with her and kept me going, sticking to the 4:1 ratio. My running partners kept entertained and engaged so I wasn't even tracking the miles. I was keeping up with fluids (running with a water bottle) and trying get in some calories. I found iced down Gatorade and pringles were keeping me hydrated and fed, but a Diet Coke was the best. By about mile 10, though, I was feeling a hot spot on the inside of my big toe. It was the same spot I got a double blister last year while hiking the Grand Canyon. Throughout the run, my teammates were leapfrogging us, so we had quick access to aid. We yelled ahead for Band-Aids, and they responded like a NASCAR pitstop. They found a towel for me to sit down on, Pamela got out her tacklebox with anything and everything you would need at an aid/medical stop, and with everyone gathered around doing a job, got my toes bandaged up, got me off the ground, and running again.  Around mile 14 or so, I was joined by Julie and Kim. The three of us run every Sunday morning. We did our “normal” six or seven miles together, keeping with the 4:1 intervals and occasional stopping for aid. One stop was an impromptu visit to a family from our church. We got a picture of the whole team and enjoyed the music from the party across the street. It was about that time that I was doing the math in my head and realized I took the wrong route through Plymouth heading south and I tacked out an extra couple of miles. We decided I would run to 21.2 miles and then they would drive me to five miles out from my house. By that time, it was about 9 p.m. and very dark on country roads. My teammates went into traffic control mode with one car with hazards on, following close behind us and the other going ahead and waiting at stop signs.  We hit 21.2 miles and I knew I definitely was too far out so we hopped in the car for a quick ride to 5 miles out. My daughter Emily, who ended up hanging with my teammates all day, got out to run me in and my older daughter, Kate, was going to meet us at about a mile and a half out. Emily is a senior in high school and qualified for the State meet in swimming and track. Any other time, she would have dusted me but Saturday night she stuck with me and commented that the pace I was running felt like the pace she would run during a track workout. We had a great run and the time passed quickly as we chatted. We met up Kate at the edge of Culver Academies, a private boarding school, where Emily attends school. I didn't realize it, but her friend had been following my progress all day. Em told them we were close to their dorm, and they met us with cheers and high fives. We ran down the main streets in our small town to our house where my husband and teammates were waiting with a finishing tape. The run took approximately five hours and 19 minutes (my Strava stopped when I paused it for the car ride, so I had to restart another run). My husband started the timer on his phone when I started swimming and so we took his time of 15 hours, 9 minutes and 39 second as my official finish time. I finished around 10 p.m. I honestly was surprised at how well I felt on the run. There were a few times that we walked through the run interval, but the time passed quickly. I think carrying a water bottle and sipping on the watered down Gatorade and Pringles game me just enough energy to keep going. That and, addition to the Diet Coke, a flat Coke around mile 16. My teammates made an Ironman “medal” and Doug gave me one of his Ironman shirts. It was a great way to end the first half century.  Sunday morning, I really didn't sit around. We got up, went to church, out for lunch and did our grocery shopping. I probably felt worse Monday. I went to work and sat most of the day. Overall, though, I felt worse after my first marathon and after Ragnar Napa when I trashed my quads on the hills near Mill Valley.  So, will I do one again? I'm not ruling it out. I asked myself the same question Kim asked after we finished Sunburst – how much better could I have done if I had really followed the training plan? At the same time, this was a bucket list item and a way to motivate me to work out. It is time to take a little bit of a break (my house needs some attention). The Ragnar group is planning another trip to the Grand Canyon next year, hopefully without the drama and hassles of COVID, so it looks like there is a lot of hiking in my future. Regardless, we will keep looking for new adventures, challenging each other, and looking for ways to keep us motivated to continue moving forward.        

Work From The Inside Out
153: Doctor on a Mission - Isabel Hunsinger

Work From The Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:37


When Dr. Isabel Hunsinger was five, her mother gave her the game, Operation. We talked about the buzzer sound that occurred if the game's tweezers touched the sides of the openings in the “patient”. And the nose would light up in red too. It was either a game you loved or found unnerving. Isabel loved it. Isabel had an uncle from Cuba who was an anesthesiologist and she absolutely adored him. She said he would walk into the room and light it up. Isabel's love for her uncle sparked her interest in medicine from a very young age. Or was it the Operation game?  When her parents divorced, Isabel went to live with her father in Buenos Aires, Argentina until she graduated from high school. Then, she returned to the U.S. and got a job on an organic farm in Pennsylvania. She was still thinking about medicine but also had a keen interest in agriculture, and began college intending to major in it. After one year, she realized it was not for her. Isabel left school, and moved to Boulder, Colorado where she got a job waiting tables. There, she had a defining moment, as she refers to it, “I was serving a cocktail and some guy pinched my bottom. And I said, I will never put up with this again. I'm going to become a doctor.“ Isabel has been a medical doctor since 1991 and over time, she grew unhappy with the U.S.  healthcare system. She wants to get to the root of diseases, not just throw a Band-Aid on them. Her goal is to see people healed. In 2000, Isabel, her husband, and their two young daughters moved to New Zealand to experience a different culture. She hoped to find a better system of care there but that was not the case.  With her husband, Culinary Nutrition Expert, Chef Michael, Isabel has created the brand Doctoronamission, where they prevent and reverse disease, and give hope.  In this week's Work From The Inside Out podcast, learn more about Isabel's journey: Isabel has been offering tele-medicine for the past seven years including online courses and 1-to-1 coaching. She focuses on Alzheimer's, Dementia, Cognitive Decline, Anxiety, Depression, Diabetes. Learn more and connect with Isabel here:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/doctoronamission/ https://www.facebook.com/doctoronamission https://www.instagram.com/doctoronamission/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/bossybrainsolution www.doctoronamission.com

Word In Your Ear
Sondheim, the Band Aid recording and the first F-word on record

Word In Your Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 36:36


In which we remember being at Sarm Studios 37 years ago as Bob Geldof and Midge Ure marshalled the troops, and look at the reaction to the Get Back movie, Alan Hull, Al Stewart's energetic love life, Billy Preston and others flown in to keep bands together, Lenny Kaye's record-filing ruse and why John Illsey had the best job in the world. Plus the return of the Stackwaddy Game - spot the made up musical genre (Skweee, Simpsonwave, Soyabilly etc).Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon to receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world - plus loads more!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Word Podcast
Sondheim, the Band Aid recording and the first F-word on record

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 36:36


In which we remember being at Sarm Studios 37 years ago as Bob Geldof and Midge Ure marshalled the troops, and look at the reaction to the Get Back movie, Alan Hull, Al Stewart's energetic love life, Billy Preston and others flown in to keep bands together, Lenny Kaye's record-filing ruse and why John Illsey had the best job in the world. Plus the return of the Stackwaddy Game - spot the made up musical genre (Skweee, Simpsonwave, Soyabilly etc).Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon to receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world - plus loads more!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Game Time with Nick Bahe
November 30 – Segment 3 – Rip the Band-Aid Off

Game Time with Nick Bahe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 15:51


Coaches should rip the band aid off and leave as quick as possible. Or so says Gary. And fans feeling burned is the exact WRONG reaction in these scenarios.

May I Elaborate? Daily Wisdom from JB Smoove

Today JB Smoove and Miles challenge you to start treating your emotional wounds with the same care you give physical wounds.Today's Quote:“Simply feeling can be healing.” – Tanya Carroll Richardson (A Year of Self Love, Workman Publishing). Follow JB on Twitter.Follow Miles on Twitter.Keep up with Team Coco Podcasts on Instagram.

SinBin.vegas Podcast
SinBin.vegas Podcast #253: Rip Off The Band-Aid

SinBin.vegas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 134:16


The team's recent run of success amidst the injuries has us thinking about the plans for the future. Should the Golden Knights make their cap move sooner rather than later to trade from a place of strength? Hosted by Ken Boehlke and Jason Pothier. The post SinBin.vegas Podcast #253: Rip Off The Band-Aid appeared first on SinBin.vegas.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
A Band Aid on the High Gas Price Problem

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 9:02


Biden takes another look at President Biden's oil reserve announcement and addresses the question of whether this is a long-lasting solution or just a political distraction.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dr. Gary Bell's Absurd Psychology
Why People Delay Happiness

Dr. Gary Bell's Absurd Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 55:41


There are two paths we can take in any given situation: one is the path of avoiding pain in the moment, and the other is the more difficult path of delaying pleasure for a bigger purpose. Our cultural norms encourage us to seek Band-Aid solutions and temporary comforts—basically, whatever it takes to ease our discomfort now. This is apparent in the prevalence of casinos, commercials for psychiatric medications, and get rich quick schemes in our culture. Some people don't see the value in having patience during difficult times or working toward a goal; they want to lose the weight now and would rather buy the latest, greatest cell phone than save for retirement. We often make our life choices according to how we can avoid pain in the moment and, in doing so, fail to see that the path of delayed gratification is sometimes where the real solutions to our problems lie. Tune in and learn what causes this enormous emotional issue!

Closer Mentality
Ep. 42: Mental Band-Aids and Team Canada T&F with Teagan Rasche

Closer Mentality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 42:52


Former Team Canada track & field athlete Teagan Rasche joined Episode 42 to talk about how the sport took over her adolescence and college career, the individual sport mindset, reaching out for help, the college transfer portal, and representing her national team twice. This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Get 10% off of your first month at betterhelp.com/closermentality Closer Mentality UNCENSORED: www.youtube.com/channel/UCJuZfwIP9ny-WIqpcUaQnWA Listener Survey: forms.gle/zxArh8MpqHTTTJUL9

Cosmic Creatrix
Breaking The Spiritual Box

Cosmic Creatrix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 17:40


How many of you have feared to step into a spiritual leadership role out of fear that you won't be good enough or perfect enough or pure enough?   Let's just rip that Band-Aid off right now.   Come hear the God honest truth about what it means to be a spiritual leader of authenticity.

Shine with Frannie Show |Christian health |Christian fitness|Christian wellness| Christian coaching
You might be putting a band aid on a bullet wound--getting to the root of eating issues

Shine with Frannie Show |Christian health |Christian fitness|Christian wellness| Christian coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:48


Long-term weight loss is not a "weigh" of the world. (I love a good pun!) That's because all too often people jump on a trending fad diet or program or even have a medical procedure which does not address the root of the problem--the mind. In Greek, the word soul=psyche, which is a powerful tool in addressing and assessing how one looks, relates and consumes food. So while I may be leading a 10-day sugar detox program (we begin 11/15) it would be ridiculous of me to lead the program without helping you evaluate and chew on deeper seated questions such as: How do you consume food? What is your relationship with food? What "weight" does food have in your world? How have you put God first in your eating choices? I am on a mission to help others get. healthier, stronger, and more confident using God's Word, and I would only be helping you lose weight (possibly, as that is NOT the person of this cleanse!) it truly would be putting a band aid on a bullet wound. Rather, I want this to be the kick start to help you kick sugar to the curb for good, and for YOUR GOOD! If you're interested in participating in the cleanse--whether purchasing the kit or participating in the group coaching component--please contact me by Wednesday, November 10, as we need do a brief health evaluation and collect your address for shipping. email me at frannie@shinewithfrannie.com for the program outline and additional materials --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/frannie-foltz/support

Revolution Network with Dr. Jason Dean
The Good and the Bad, Reclaiming our Children and "Their" Game Plan. Also, I angered the Weed World

Revolution Network with Dr. Jason Dean

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 127:35


We are going to review the weekend, the good and the bad. Are you kids sucked into the demon world with the likes of celebrities like Travis Scott? What is "Their" Game Plan? I give you a sneak peak.   I mess with the Weed World today. Band-Aids will not fix the Source of the problem.   When our Soil is wiped out, Parasites move in. The same as your Gut. Parasites invade and spread Glyphosate, Heavy Metals, Bacteria and MORE.   Detox Parasites as fast as possible Protocol with Dr. Dean's Clinical Protocol- www.FullMoonProtocol.com   Kids Full Moon Protocol - https://bravetv.store/products/kids-parasite-protocol-amoeba-chord?variant=40088621613218

Rock N Roll Pantheon
What Difference Does It Make: Michaelangelo Matos Can't Slow Down

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 45:03


Michaelangelo Matos realized at the age of 9 how magical the year 1984 was by simply listening to the radio and loving each and every song he heard. His latest book, Can't Slow Down: How 1984 Became Pop's Blockbuster Year, documents how this came to be by focusing on key moments. We talk about a few of our favorites from the Britain Rock America-Again Newsweek cover in January to the debut of Graffiti Rock in June to the MTV Awards and the recording of Band Aid, Of course there was also Prince, Madonna, Michael Jackson and Bruce Springsteen. 1984 truly was like no other. Hear all your favorite songs from 1984 by getting Amazon for free courtesy of your friends at What Difference Does It Make. We are a proud member of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Get In Da Corner podcast
VIRGINITY IS COOL - Get in Da Corner podcast 365

Get In Da Corner podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 74:48


You Got The MAN AIDS?? That's the bad aids! Put on a Band-Aid. Big Big Kisses to the Foreign Bitch for coming through and performing her smash hit song Ta Ta Ta Ta Ta Ta Ta Ta Ta Twerk. We love you More horse gangbang stuff? WTF is wrong with these 2 ASSHATS?!?!? Get Er Dumb with US LIVE every Wednesday night at 9 pm et / 6pm pt ON the Mixlr app AND YouTube youtube.com/getindacorner/live - mixlr.com/get-in-da-corner Support Live TTS streamlabs.com/getindacorner paypal.me/getindacorner ALL of Da Corner links linktr.ee/getindacorner PODCAST Stitcher bit.ly/gidcstitcher Apple Podcasts bit.ly/gidcp iHeart - www.iheart.com/podcast/256-get-i…podcast-30962911/ SoundCloud @getindacorner Google Podcasts bit.ly/gidcandroid TuneIn bit.ly/gidctunein Spreaker bit.ly/gidcspreaker Bitchute www.bitchute.com/channel/getindacorner/ Spotify open.spotify.com/show/3K6GNEeEGA3K44oIvaVDVh LIVE STREAMS (wednesdays @ 9pm est) Mixlr mixlr.com/get-in-da-corner Dlive dlive.tv/getindacorner YouTube youtube.com/getindacorner YouNow younow.com/GetInDaCorner Twitch twitch.tv/getindacorner SOCIAL CRAP facebook.com/getindacorner instagram.com/yuknassty twitter.com/YukNassty_ twitter.com/DoggaBaby MUSIC Spotify bit.ly/dacorner Deezer bit.ly/cornerdeezer #ComicPodcast #ComedianPodcast #ComedyPodcast