Podcasts about Spring Valley

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Best podcasts about Spring Valley

Latest podcast episodes about Spring Valley

#BLACKGIRLNEWS
Yetundi Maples – 46 Year Old Woman K*lled By Her Boyfriend In Front of Her Six Year Old Son → Brave Son Ran to Alert Neighbors for Help

#BLACKGIRLNEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 6:06


A suspect has been arrested for allegedly killing his girlfriend at their home near Spring Valley, where her 6-year-old son heard the gunshot and found her “face covered in blood” before walking to a neighbor's house to report it, according to a Metro Police report. Ishmil Swafford, 43, was taken into custody Friday in the slaying of his girlfriend, Yetundi Yvonne Negrita Maples. Maples and Swafford lived together at the residence, according to his arrest report. Maples' son told police he was in an upstairs bedroom when he heard the pair in conversation downstairs. He then heard a gunshot and went downstairs to find his mother with blood on her head. The boy told police that Swafford shot Maples because “she got angry,” according to the report. The boy told Swafford “you hurt my mom,” to which Swafford allegedly replied, “your mom will be fine,” before getting on his motorcycle and fleeing the scene, according to the report. Maples' son went to a neighbor's house to report that his mother had been shot, and another neighbor was notified and called police. Investigators determined that Maples' family and friends had urged her to break up with Swafford because he had been known to physically abuse her, the report said. Swafford was booked into the Clark County Detention Center for open murder with a deadly weapon, police said. Source:lasvegassun --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/leah-gordone/support

Indiana Sports Talk Podcast
10:00 - 11:00 (Sam Karn, John Herrick, Kurt Tetmann, Tim Able, Mike Scavarro)

Indiana Sports Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 44:18


Sam Karn joins the show to kick off the second hour. The head coach discusses Traders Point Christian's unfortunate loss to Monroe Central tonight 20 - 15. John Herrick then calls in to detail North Montgomery's dominant victory over Frankford 54 - 6.The game, which was broadcast on the ISC Sports Network, saw 10 turnovers in the first half. Coach Tettman of Snyder joins the program and talks about Snyders sweeping victory over Bishop Dwenger 28 - 0. Tim Able from Triton Central celebrates their win 27-7 over Beech Grove. Immediately following Coach Gibson of Parie Central joins Coach Lovell to discuss their 40 - 30 win over Spring Valley.Mike Scavarro closes out the hour in a good mood due to Evansville Memorial's 600th win in program history. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Today in San Diego
Search for Spring Valley Teen Continues, Kids Free October, Paddle for Clean Water

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 5:33


In the "Today in San Diego" podcast, the search for a missing 15-year-old girl from Spring Valley continues as today marks the tenth day since her disappearance, Kids Free October is back and over 100 participating locations around the county are offering freebies for kids 12 and under, and today hundreds of ocean lovers and beach enthusiasts are participating in the 30th Annual Paddle for Clean Water event in Ocean Beach.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MyCRAFTBEER
「日本に、新ビール」? キリン新商品「スプリングバレー シルクエール<白>」試飲会の話題あれこれ

MyCRAFTBEER

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 0:56


「「日本に、新ビール」? キリン新商品「スプリングバレー シルクエール<白>」試飲会の話題あれこれ」 9月13日から缶で全国で発売されるキリンの新商品「SPRING VALLEY シルクエール<白>」の試飲会に参加したレビューとその他の話題を紹介します。The post 「日本に、新ビール」? キリン新商品「スプリングバレー シルクエール<白>」試飲会の話題あれこれ first appeared on クラフトビールの総合情報サイト My CRAFT BEER.

The Drive with Paul Swann
September 6, 2022

The Drive with Paul Swann

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 42:32


Paul Swann looks ahead to the Marshall at Notre Dame game with comments from Herd head coach Charles Huff and The Drive Power Five rankings are out, did Spring Valley stay on top as the top team in the area? For more podcasts, including interviews and entire shows, go to The Drive with Paul Swann podcast page. Listen to the show weekday afternoons, at 5:00 p.m on ESPN 94.1 & AM 930. Find Paul Swann on Twitter: @PaulSwann. Everywhere Else: https://linktr.ee/PaulSwann --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Radio Monmouth
Monmouth-Roseville Titans @ Spring Valley Hall/Putnam County Red Devils IHSA Football on 9-2-22

Radio Monmouth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 163:09


Monmouth-Roseville travels to Spring Valley High School for a TRAC cross-division match up.

Viking 360
Episode 133

Viking 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 37:59


Ripley volleyball senior setter Bailey Howery talks about the team's strong start. The Lady Vikings have a 7-match winning streak. Hunter Brown doesn't get many breaks on the football field. He'll see action in the backfield, on defense and special teams as the Vikings visit Buckhannon-Upshur on Friday evening. Mason Fluty is both an Eagle and a Viking. The Ripley junior explains his Scouting accomplishment. Trey Greer has dual roles at Ripley High this fall. The Viking mascot also runs on the cross country team. Ripley grad Blake Cummings is looking to see football action early in his career as a Bethany Bison. Avery Fife came through in the clutch as the Viking golf team posted a narrow win against Spring Valley. Will Hosaflook was a standout in football, wrestling and baseball at RHS. He's now Jackson County's superintendent of schools. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brian-johnson9/support

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: Jared Kushner has surgery for cancer after Mayo Clinic visit

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 6:08


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1947: War hero Eisenhower arrives at Minnesota State Fair Jared Kushner has surgery for cancer after Mayo Clinic visit Food shelves, banks say Farm Bill is key to decreasing growing food insecurity Penz Automotive's Spring Valley location to move onto former Peterson Motors site Kingsland's Fly Guy: Kolling hopes to take Knights to new heights on football field The Post Bulletin is proud to be a part of the Trust Project. Learn more at thetrustproject.org.

Coach Seals Said So!
Ep. 51 Spring Valley Review and South Charleston Preview

Coach Seals Said So!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 31:37


this week, We review the opening to the 2022 season against Spring Valley. We then Preview the upcoming week against South Charleston.

Murder In The Hudson Valley
The Severed Hand

Murder In The Hudson Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 48:44


In 1998, a decomposing body with both hands missing was found in Spring Valley, New York.

Mornings with Rob and Joss
Showbiz Pop Quiz Featuring Charles From Spring Valley

Mornings with Rob and Joss

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 2:02


Can Charles from Spring Valley correctly answer 5 Showbiz Questions in 30 Seconds to make it into the “Showbiz Pop Quiz Hall of Fame?” Can you? Listen and play along! Rob and Joss play the "Showbiz Pop Quiz" weekday mornings at 7:55 on KyXy 96.5. Play the game and ya might win a prize JUST for having fun with us!

The Drive with Paul Swann
August 24, 2022

The Drive with Paul Swann

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 44:38


Matt Perry, Spring Valley's play-by-play announcer, joins Paul Swann to preview the upcoming game against Huntington. Lindsey Webb, Director of Marketing for the Charleston Dirty Birds, gives Swann an update on the team. For more podcasts, including interviews and entire shows, go to The Drive with Paul Swann podcast page. Listen to the show weekday afternoons, at 5:00 p.m on ESPN 94.1 & AM 930. Find Paul Swann on Twitter: @PaulSwann. Everywhere Else: https://linktr.ee/PaulSwann --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Coach Seals Said So!
Ep. 50- Kickoff Time!!! The Spring Valley Preview

Coach Seals Said So!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 35:17


This week we preview the upcoming season and discuss Spring Valley!

7@7
7@7 AM August 18, 2022

7@7

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 487:15


More than 250 union members picket Valley Hospital after 40-year employee's firing, police are investigating a homicide in the Spring Valley area, a man who drove a Lamborghini 141 mph before hitting, killing moped rider is sentenced and more on 7@7 from the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

Today in San Diego
County Covid Update, Drought Resolution Efforts, Spring Valley Chick-Fil-A Owner

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 4:56


In the "Today in San Diego" podcast, San Diego County moves out of the "high risk" category for Covid community spread, Governor Newsom calls for more water conservation efforts amid the state's third year into a drought and a Spring Valley local becomes the County's first Black Owner of a Chick-Fil-A Franchise.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Trundlebed Tales
August 2022 Laura Ingalls Wilder Update

Trundlebed Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 15:00


This month's birthday girl is Carrie Ingalls. Join us for events in Pepin, Wisconsin; De Smet, South Dakota; Spring Valley, Minnesota; and Malone, New York.

High School Blitz Podcast
8/1/22: Scoop & Score with Spring Valley Head Coach Brad "Dirty Dingo" Dingess and MSAC Super Slam

High School Blitz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 68:47


The guys talk with Spring Valley football coach Brad Dingess during the Scoop & Score segment. Also, final thoughts from The Basketball Tournament with Best Virginia and Herd That, fall sports starting up in West Virginia and crazy visions of an MSAC football coaches wrestling match!? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blrshow/support

The Drive with Paul Swann
August 1, 2022 with guest Spring Valley Football Coach Brad DIngess

The Drive with Paul Swann

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 40:31


Brad DIngess, the football coach at Spring Valley, discusses the upcoming season with Paul Swann. For more podcasts, including interviews and entire shows, go to The Drive with Paul Swann podcast page. Listen to the show weekday afternoons, at 5:00 p.m on ESPN 94.1 & AM 930. Find Paul Swann on Twitter: @PaulSwann. Everywhere Else: https://linktr.ee/PaulSwann --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Keyed In
Add Value to Your Community with William Fastow

Keyed In

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 53:50


In 2003, William Fastow founded the boutique brokerage Appleton Properties in Boston, Massachusetts and subsequently expanded the operation to his hometown of Washington, DC. One of the DC area's foremost boutique brokers, Appleton Properties Group merged with TTR Sotheby's International Realty in 2018 and since then, Will has become a leader in DC's exclusive Spring Valley neighborhood. From community yoga to outdoor movie nights at central establishments, Will's main motivation is to add value to his neighborhood. Join us as we explore his career and learn some peculiarities of running a business in Spring Valley: the good, the bad, and the chemical weaponry.

Keyed In
Add Value to Your Community with William Fastow

Keyed In

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 53:50 Transcription Available


In 2003, William Fastow founded the boutique brokerage Appleton Properties in Boston, Massachusetts and subsequently expanded the operation to his hometown of Washington, DC. One of the DC area's foremost boutique brokers, Appleton Properties Group merged with TTR Sotheby's International Realty in 2018 and since then, Will has become a leader in DC's exclusive Spring Valley neighborhood. From community yoga to outdoor movie nights at central establishments, Will's main motivation is to add value to his neighborhood. Join us as we explore his career and learn some peculiarities of running a business in Spring Valley: the good, the bad, and the chemical weaponry.

On The Rekord
Episode 72 - July 11th, 2022

On The Rekord

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 118:55


Episode 72 - July 11th, 2022  - Recap: @Im_Waltttt x @DJIntence  - Highland Park Parade Shooter  - Bernie Sanders  - Derek Chavin Gets more Prison Time  - Spring Valley, NY Teen Shot. Treynahel Tyvon Cineus, 17  - Top Boy  - BBC TV Shows (Urban Shows)  - Steven Jackson Checking-In x Charleston White  - Songs Of The Episode: @DoveyMagnum “Pon Check”  - R. Kelly 30 Years for Sexual Assault Charges  - Isley Brothers vs Earth Wind & Fire Recaps  - Verzuz Battles  - Vince McMahon News x XFL x Oliver Luck x Netflix x Hush Money  - Johnny Cash “Ain't No Grave”  - England OfCom Prevent Child Pornography  - Coney Island (Brooklyn, NY) Shooting  - Unpopular Opinion - @Im_Waltttt  - Songs Of The Episode: Indoe “Deep” - Brandy Bottone Pregnant HOV Ticket  - 10 Yrs Old Ohio Turned Away from Abortion  - Wise Guy's Corner - Daily Rap Crew Podcast Question: “Men aren't worthy of a relationship with her, but they are worthy for sex.” What is worthy for a relationship?  - Songs Of The Episode: 4G4L Freedo “On Go” 

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Gaining Perspective w/ Collaborations w/ Juan Munoz-Oca, Ste Michelle Wine Estates

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 45:10


A lot can be learned through collaborating. Even how to stay calm during a pandemic when your Italian partner is in the thick of it. Calm with the perspective of 26 generations of winemaking and having survived two World Wars. Juan Munoz-Oca, Head Winemaker for Ste Michelle Wine Estates, Washington State's leading wine company, describes what he's learned and the process of collaborating with other luminaries of the wine world, including the Antinori Family, Dr Loosen, and Michel Gassier from the Rhone Valley.  Detailed Show Notes: Juan's backgroundIn WA with Ste Michelle Wine Estates ("SMWE") for 21 yearsHead of winemaking for the entire groupSte Michelle Wine EstatesBased in WA state - 6 wineries (Chateau Ste Michelle ("CSM"), Columbia Crest, 14 Hands, Spring Valley, Northstar, Col Solare)OR (Erath), CA (Stag's Leap Wine Cellars, Conn Creek, Patz & Hall)Built the WA wine region, produces ~⅔ of the wine in the stateThe largest producer of Riesling in the worldCollaborations - all w/ Chateau Ste MichelleCol Solare - Red Mountain, Cabernet, 50/50 JV w/ the Antinori Family (Italy), planted a vineyard in the early 2000s, built a winery in 2006, started in the mid-90sEroica - Riesling with Ernie Loosen (Mosel, Germany) started in the 1990sTenet - Columbia Valley; Syrah, Grenache, Mourvedre; w/ Michel Gassier & Philippe Cambie (deceased)What drove the collaborations? A personal touch and relationshipWA is a young grape-growing region that only started quality winemaking in the late 90s -> wanted to bring attention to the region and gain knowledgeEx-CEOs important to establishing collaborations - Allen Shoup (founded Longshadows Winery, which has 7 wines and 7 collaborations); Ted Baseler - was part of marketing team when Col Solare was launched and started Eroica with Ernie LoosenCollaboration processWinemaking - spring (taste previous vintage, blend, walk the vineyards), late summer (get a feel for the grapes, walk the vineyards), winter (taste wines - e.g., 250-300 lots of Riesling for Eroica)Renzo (Antinori's head winemaker) comes more often due to SMWE's partnership w/ Antinori on Stag's Leap Wine CellarsCSM winemaking team does day-to-day workSales & Marketing - up to the partners, SMWE salesforce sells the wine, SMWE marketing works with partners and does most of the workSMWE imports the entire Antinori portfolio, so they have a broader collaborationKey benefitsEnjoyment of making wine togetherGetting a global perspectiveWinemaking informs the rest of the portfolio's winemaking (e.g., extended lees aging for Riesling from Ernie Loosen, keeping more leaves in the canopy for Syrah from Michel Gassier)Collaboration business modelsCol Solare - 50/50 JV, including vineyards, winery, & inventory; work together closely on marketingEroica - 50/50 for inventory and brand, no other assets; up to 200k cases in a big year; most marketing done by SMWE, less from LoosenTenet - Michel Gassier gets a portion of earnings and an annual fee that covers his travel; as small as 300 casesHave business meetings 2x/year for sales and marketing strategyKeys to success for collaborationsHave a clearly articulated visionKeep an open mind to learn from the otherDesired new collaborationsSparkling wine w/ Nicolas Feuillatte (Champagne)Argentine wine / Malbec w/ Catena Family - loves their focus on terroir Get access to library episodes See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Christian Life Assembly UPC
06.12.2022: Sunday Service

Christian Life Assembly UPC

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 62:09


Preacher: Brother Denochy Cowan from Spring Valley, New York

OK Boomer Podcast
Episode 65: Chasing Cats & Hot Girl Summer

OK Boomer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 32:34


My day begins and ends with gratitude and joy.Ask Tiffany Haddish how she is. She'll reply, “I'm successful. How are you?”Yes, we are going to be like Tiffany!Happy Father's Day! We love the Dads and are especially proud of the young fathers in our family. (Thanks for filling up our cars with gas.)Laura relates a revealing story about her son in Illinois.We share our words for the year (yes, we know it's June.) Our words may surprise you.Do you have challenges with the “double hang”?Top fun things to do this summer!Shout outs to:                 Verruchi's Ristorante in Spring Valley, IL https://www.verucchis.com/                Pre-school workers                USPS- they have a podcast now! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/mailin-it-the-official-usps-podcast/id1587184784                The podcast, Becoming Elli, Fit Strong Women Over 50https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/fit-strong-women-over-50/id1343991618And on and on…thanks for listening!!

The Drive with Paul Swann
June 10, 2022

The Drive with Paul Swann

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 43:08


Spring Valley baseball head coach Austin Pratt won MSAC co-Coach of the Year and Paul Swann speaks with him on this edition of The Drive. For more podcasts, including interviews and entire shows, go to The Drive with Paul Swann podcast page. Listen to the show weekday afternoons, at 5:00 p.m on ESPN 94.1 & AM 930. Find Paul Swann on Twitter: @PaulSwann. Everywhere Else: https://linktr.ee/PaulSwann --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Drive with Paul Swann

South Cardinals head coach Brad Dingess of Spring Valley joins Paul Swann to preview the North-South Football Classic coming up on Saturday at South Charleston High School's Black Eagle Stadium. For more podcasts, including interviews and entire shows, go to The Drive with Paul Swann podcast page. Listen to the show weekday afternoons, at 5:00 p.m on ESPN 94.1 & AM 930. Find Paul Swann on Twitter: @PaulSwann. Everywhere Else: https://linktr.ee/PaulSwann --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

7@7
7@7 AM June 8, 2022

7@7

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 460:06


An excessive heat warning will be in effect beginning Thursday in the Las Vegas Valley, Sheriff Joe Lombardo talks about his bid to unseat Gov. Steve Sisolak, Spring Valley basketball star Aaliyah Gayles has officially graduated, seven weeks after surviving a house party shooting and more on 7@7 from the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

Earth Ancients
Destiny: Matthew Wood, A Path to Wellness with Holistic Medicine

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 81:48


Reveals how the extracellular matrix offers scientific proof for holism • Examines the function of the extracellular matrix, the inner ocean that unifies all our cells and controls them in a coordinated and integrated fashion• Explores how the extracellular matrix builds and repairs itself and how holistic therapy can be applied based on this knowledge• Introduces new and old holistic and herbal protocols for treatment of the matrixThe cells in our bodies are not independent units. They do not control their own feeding, elimination, migration, or reproduction; they are controlled by signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds them. This all-encompassing inner ocean unifies all our cells and controls them in a coordinated and integrated fashion.Revealing the stunning implications of the extracellular matrix, Matthew Wood shows how it clearly explains the actions and efficacy of holistic therapies. He explores the groundbreaking research of Alfred Pischinger, who discovered the ECM in 1975, as well as the role of the matrix in transmitting and enacting the genetic code, including the roles of the mitochondria, the nucleus, and ribosomes.Wood explains how modern drugs, directed at specific receptors on the cell membrane, interfere with bodily self-regulation. He details how holistic therapies modify the environment of the cell and strengthen the whole, bringing the body back to homeostasis and consequently offering true healing.Matthew Wood has been a practicing herbalist for more than 40 years. An internationally known author and lecturer in the field, he holds a master of science degree in herbal medicine from the Scottish School of Herbal Medicine and is a professional member of the American Herbalists Guild. The author of several books, including The Earthwise Herbal and The Book of Herbal Wisdom, he lives in Spring Valley, Wisconsin.

LIT DFDUB PODCAST
Money Note Talks Spring Valley, Connecting w/ ShiestHouse Records, New Music, Big J Drops in & More!

LIT DFDUB PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 48:14


#MoneyNote #ShoeBoxMoneyClic #ShiestHouseMoney Note Talks Spring Valley, Connecting w/ ShiestHouse Records, New Music, Big J Drops in & More! Today we Honor Money Note and touch on the Mind of Money. We talk about "SV" Spring Valley, New Music on the way, Working with ShiestHouse and Building a family, Connecting with Dallas culture, Shoe box Money Clic & Much Much More!!!! Stay Tuned! @MoneyMakingCnote #LitPodcast​ #MoneyNote #ShiestHouse #Dallas #DFDUB #MEDIAMATICFILM https://www.theshantaway.com​ use PROMO CODE "LIT" Get 30% to 75% off Hair Bundles, Eye Lashes, Closures, Wigs, Shoes, Fashion & More!!! https://anchor.fm/frederick-lawton/subscribe BUY FREEDOM OF MIND HERE https://www.amazon.com/Freedom-Mind-Hamili-Milligan/dp/B08L3XCFY5/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3SK0SFT6SSU43&dchild=1&keywords=freedom+of+mind+by+hamili+milligan&qid=1611527071&sprefix=FREEDOM+OF+MIND+BY+HA%2Cstripbooks%2C185&sr=8-1 BUY MORE THAN MY SKIN HERE https://www.amazon.com/More-Than-My-Skin-America/dp/164952241X Stay connected with MRLAWTONTV here: + Subscribe now: Subscribe_Now Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MRLAWTON (Like) Twitter: http://twitter.com/FATSBLOCKS (Follow) Instagram: http://Instagram.com/MEDIAMATICFILMS (Follow) Snapchat:fatman214: --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Today in San Diego
Spring Valley Luring Attempts, Shelter Island Arson Investigation and a St. Patrick's Day Warning from the CHP.

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 5:46


On the "Today in San Diego" Podcast, Steven Luke Shares a Scary Spring Valley Incident Caught on Camera, New Policies from Netflix, and a Preview of the First NCAA Tournament Game for SDSU. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Trundlebed Tales
Ep 131 Come Visit Laura Ingalls Wilder and Plan Your Laura Trip Part 2

Trundlebed Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 58:00


This episode is the second in a series of episodes this month that are going to talk about Laura Ingalls Wilder travel. This first episode is full of questions that you should ask yourself as you start planning a Laura trip. People think there is a one size fits all kind of Laura trip. There isn't. People are interested in different aspects of the story. Some people are more interested than others. Others might be limited by travel issues or time on a particular trip. This episode will be questions you should ask yourself before you take off on that trip to the Laura Ingalls Wilder homesites, Pepin, Wisconsin; Independence, Kansas; Walnut Grove, Minnesota; Burr Oak, Iowa; De Smet, South Dakota; Keystone, South Dakota, Mansfield, Missouri; Spring Valley, Minnesota, and Malone, New York.

Today in San Diego
Freeway Shooting, SDUSD Dropping Indoor Masking, Weekend Weather

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 3:59


On the “Today in San Diego” podcast, all westbound lanes of SR-94 in the Spring Valley area will be closed for several hours after a woman was shot while driving, the San Diego Unified School District will allow students and staff to go mask-free indoors when they return to campus from spring break on April 4, and Brooke Martell has your weekend weather. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Trundlebed Tales
Ep 129 Come Visit Laura Ingalls Wilder and Plan Your Laura Trip

Trundlebed Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 41:00


This episode is the start of a series of episodes this month that are going to talk about Laura Ingalls Wilder travel. This first episode is full of questions that you should ask yourself as you start planning a Laura trip. People think there is a one size fits all kind of Laura trip. There isn't. People are interested in different aspects of the story. Some people are more interested than others. Others might be limited by travel issues or time on a particular trip. This episode will be questions you should ask yourself before you take off on that trip to the Laura Ingalls Wilder homesites, Pepin, Wisconsin; Independence, Kansas; Walnut Grove, Minnesota; Burr Oak, Iowa; De Smet, South Dakota; Keystone, South Dakota, Mansfield, Missouri; Spring Valley, Minnesota, and Malone, New York.

KRLV Unnecessary Roughness
Hour 2 Aaliyah Gayles Spring Valley HS and Your Calls

KRLV Unnecessary Roughness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 45:12


Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 14 – A Man with a Direction: Ollie Cantos

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 57:13


Talk about someone who really gets it when it comes to blindness, accessibility and inclusion, meet Ollie Cantos. It took some time, but Ollie made his way through school, college and then law school. Ollie has been an extremely and unstoppable lawyer spending now many years in government service in the United States.   Ollie will tell you his life story in this episode. He then will go on to discuss a truly positive life dedicated to proving that blindness is not the myth we believe. I know you will be enthralled by Ollie and what he has to say. Some directories do not show full show notes. For the complete transcription please visit https://michaelhingson.com/podcast About the Guest: Olegario “Ollie” D. Cantos VII, Esq., has served in various senior roles under both Republican and Democratic administrations. He has worked in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education since 2013. Past leadership roles include Staff Attorney and Director of Outreach and Education at the Disability Rights Legal Center in California, General Counsel and Director of Programs for the American Association of People with Disabilities, Special Assistant and later Special Counsel to the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Justice, Vice Chair of the President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities, and Associate Director for Domestic Policy at the White House. He is Chairman of the Board of RespectAbility, a national nonprofit nonpartisan cross-disability advocacy organization. He is also immediate past Vice President of the Virginia Organization of parents of Blind Children, affiliated with the National Federation of the Blind.   Prior leadership posts include Vice President of the Virginia Organization of Parents of Blind Children, Legal Officer for the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Vice President of the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles, Chairman of the Board for Scholarships for Eagles, President of the California Association of Blind Students and the National Association of Blind Students, and member of the boards of directors of the ENDependence Center of Northern Virginia, the Blind Children's Center, Community Lodgings, the California Association to Promote the Use of Braille, the National Federation of the Blind of California, Loyola Marymount University Alumni Association, and Loyola Law School Alumni Association.   Ollie's life story, along with how he adopted three blind triplet boys, was covered by national media outlets including National Public Radio, People Magazine, The Washingtonian Magazine, and ABC's World News Tonight with David Muir in 2017 and in 2020.   Just a few weeks ago, he received the Marc Gold Employment Award by TASH, a National disability advocacy organization, for his years of leadership to promote internship, employment, and entrepreneurship opportunities for people with all types of disabilities.    To connect with Ollie on social media, those in the United States may text “Ollie” to 313131. About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog. Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards. https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/ accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/ Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below! Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app. Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us. Michael Hingson  01:23 Welcome to another edition of the unstoppable mindset podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. And our guest today Ollie cantos is a little of all of those, especially the unexpected, as I think you'll see, Ollie is a fascinating soul who's been around for a while has a lot of interesting stories to tell. And, and on top of everything else. He's a lawyer is scary. At least he has a law degree but but he hasn't tried to sue me yet. So I think we're in good shape, but only Welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Ollie Cantos  01:58 Thank you, Mike. It's a pleasure to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:00 So I should say from the outset and talking about only that he is he is also blind as I we've known each other for quite a while. And we've been trying to get him on unstoppable mindset for quite a while, but his schedule is incredibly rigorous. So it has been a little bit of a challenge. But he confessed that he has actually been on vacation for a week. And so now we are able to get him and have him here. So I'd love you to talk a little bit about you and tell me a little bit about your life growing up as a as a blind person and anything that you'd like people to know about that.   Ollie Cantos  02:37 Sure my Well, I was born two months premature. And as the result of medical complications, I was blind from birth from a condition called retinopathy of prematurity. And so in my particular case, I had that resulted in my being totally blind in my left eye, and having partial residual vision in my right. And until about two years ago, it was pretty stable until some things that ended up happening because of an accident, with being hit by a car. But that's a whole other story. But basically, when I was growing up, life was pretty intense, because I was victimized by bullying a lot. And my, my parents really urged me to do everything I could to make sure to work hard and to achieve high results. And at the time, when I was younger, I honestly didn't think that I could pretty much do much of anything. And I that's just being very transparent and honest with you. I just I just didn't think that there was much that was really possible because of having a limited vision. And so what ended up happening was, there was a struggle between what my parents believed I could do what I believed I could do. And so I tried to get out of chores, I tried to pretty much leverage my my visual impairment to the best extent possible, so I wouldn't have to do stuff but it didn't work. It didn't work. My My mom, she insisted that I do chores to the same degree of efficiency as kids who can see. And she also had me make sure to wash after my baby sister and clean up after her with stuff she leaves around, etc. And I really found it very just it was just a tough, tough existence. But not because my my parents were awful to me but more because I cried to just get out of stuff because I just didn't believe that it was really possible to do things to the same degree of efficiency. And as I grew up, it was quite a struggle because I read large print, and then when fourth grade hit, I ended up being in a position where the print got smaller than it was harder to read, and so forth. But because I wasn't taught Braille in school I just strained with what musical vision that I had. And that was a mistake, because it meant that I was far more far more inefficient in comparison to other kids. Because I wasn't taught Braille. And so growing up and, and working through all of my challenges I ended up doing, okay academically, but it was not without a cost. I hardly had any social life and so forth. But I did work to get involved eventually, with extracurricular activities and everything. But things were so much more of a struggle, because I didn't, I didn't know braille. And I, at the time had a very negative attitude about being thought of as, quote, blind, close quote, I felt that if I were thought of that way that I would be segregated, and I didn't want to look be different in, in comparison to everybody else. And I actually would say, well, at least I'm not one of those blind people. And I look back now and think about those attitudes. But that's the way that I was taught and, and that's what I came to believe, like, Well, hey, at least I'm not totally blind. So at least I have some vision. So at least, you know, I'm not one of them. And I don't have to use one of those canes. And yet, at the same time, it was tough, because, because I would feel like I was closeted all the time, where I tried to hide not being able to see well. And I was ashamed of who I was inside. And I always felt like I was hiding. And whenever I would get into some accident, I clip on something, or I would I would bump into something or bumping into someone, I'd say, oh, sorry, I wasn't paying attention. And I just downplayed it. But the whole time, I just felt like oh my gosh, this is, you know, well, at least they don't know, because I'm not using a cane. And then later, after starting to, to get involved with with different organizations, I eventually   Ollie Cantos  06:57 came to know people in the National Federation of the Blind. And they're the ones who taught me very directly that it is respectable to be blind, that it's okay to use a cane. And because of that, I use a cane for the first time in my life. And eventually I, I learned braille as an adult, I'm not nearly as fast as as my children, which we'll get to later, but, but I still recognize the valuable importance of Braille. And I'm astonished Braille advocate. And I really believe that even if people have some residual vision, the key is to recognize if if Braille is more efficient than straining one's eye to reprint. And so because of my life and the way things are, to this day, I'm literally I am actually functionally illiterate. In that sense. I can't pick up a book and read it straight through, like my son's can, I'm not able to just read from a speech, I have to memorize things. So I continue to face those sorts of challenges because of, of how I learned braille as an adult, which meant that it's just hard for me to read as quickly. That doesn't mean it's impossible. But for me, that was an ongoing challenge. But in spite of all of that, I still eventually became an attorney. And I've been involved in the in the disability rights movement now for 30 years.   Michael Hingson  08:14 And tell me how old were you when you started to use a cane?   Ollie Cantos  08:20 I was 20 years old I was I was a sophomore, I was a junior in college, or between the summer between my sophomore and junior year is when I went to the National Convention. And so I left not using a cane I came back using one. So that was a that's, that's a whole series of stories in and of itself.   Michael Hingson  08:37 Sure. Did you go through any formal orientation training? Or did you kind of teach yourself or how did you really learn to be effective with it?   Ollie Cantos  08:46 Well, it took a while. And then I went to the Louisiana Center for the Blind in college and, and have between the end of my college years and the beginning of law school. So that's the time that I that I'm within that setting. And I learned of the blindness skills based on being put under sleep shade. And so everything I did cook, clean, read, walk, travel does anything any any very skills, I learned through the alternative text techniques of blindness. And it was the best thing because it really was a confidence builder. Because then after that I knew that I would still be able to function and that that it really is true that when refining alternative techniques, then we can be as as efficient or at least at a very minimum, far more efficient than we would have been if we just simply strangled what little we can see. If people want to be able to use a residual vision that's absolutely fine. Provided that is not at the cost of efficiency. And so that's that's what I've I've come to realize and that's why to this very day. I really push hard for for Braille for kids as well as adults. and because of the value of that, and of course, technology these days, has, has undergone such significant innovations. And concurrent with that, though, we still need to know the bit of the fundamentals of Braille, because it really can be a real a real booster of efficiency in the long run after after learning.   Michael Hingson  10:23 There's a general consensus that the literacy rate in terms of Braille for buying people has dropped. Why is that?   Ollie Cantos  10:32 Well, it's dropped, because historically, the 40s, the literacy rate among blind people was 99 0%. And that was when, when kids were in schools for the blind across the country. And then, with the advent of the new, newer special education laws over the more recent decades, kids started learning in school, alongside their their peers without disabilities, and that is an important and valuable historical step. The difficulty was that because of how spread out various of us work, there wasn't necessarily access to quality Braille instruction, because because we are what's called, we have what's called low incidence disability. And so as a result of that, there isn't necessarily a lot of people to meet the demand for Braille instruction or providing Braille education. And so even though the law to the state presumes that a blind person should a blind students shouldn't should learn braille. Having actual access is another story in many instances.   Michael Hingson  11:35 Well, of course, the other part of that is that the general attitude, and it's kind of self fulfilling, but the general attitude is, well, blind people don't need Braille, because their books recorded or other ways of doing it. And so the literacy rate has gone down. And now people use the argument. Well, very few people 10% read Braille. And so it clearly isn't the way to go. But the reality is that it does involve in part, the educational system, not learning that Braille is the true reading and writing method for blind people. Which gets back to the whole issue of attitudes about blindness in the educational world, much less elsewhere.   Ollie Cantos  12:17 Yeah, absolutely, Mike. And so if people will fundamentally believe that it is not either respectable to be blind, or that blindness somehow means that somebody has lower ability than, of course, at all costs, they will try to avoid anything associated with techniques that are utilized by people who are totally blind. That was literally my attitude for the first 20 years of my life. And, and I just, I remember, the very first day of first grade, they put Braille in my hands, but literally the next day it was gone. But that's the only time ever, ever that I had been exposed to Braille writer and so forth. And so it really does come down to attitudes about blindness. And it also it also means that we need to look at take an honest look at what we ourselves think about blinds, including people who are blind themselves. And they say, Well, you know, there's a difference between between totally blind and, and well, maybe I'm legally blind, you know, that sort of thing, at least, the way that I now believe, when it comes to blindness, it's just fine to use the word. I mean, it's not a matter of merely changing the word or trying to say some other word about it. But it's actually more a matter of what we think about it, or what we think about blindness. So if if, if the community can come to a place where they recognize that, regardless of the degree to which somebody cannot see that, they still will be able to compete on terms of equality, if given the proper training, basic skills and the opportunity to succeed, then that's what will be really of significant help with with not only expecting more of blind children, but also blind children expecting more of themselves blind parents expecting more of them, the educational system, expecting more of them. And ultimately, when they grow up them rising to those higher expectations, as opposed to when members of our community end up having lower expectations, they don't do as much so then therefore, it's self fulfilling prophecy. And because of that, they say, see, look at how most people these days who are blind don't read Braille, or their the unemployment rate is very, very high. And so we just have to look at there's always a societal aside a societal tension between the way things used to be and the way things are, and, and things can either get gradually worse or gradually better, but they're always these constant forces that that that come up against each other. And so from everything that I have seen in my life and from raising my kids, the key philosophically is to believe that our children can grow up to be whatever they want, and that whatever They do achieve things that are the source of inspiration would be that because they work hard and just like anybody else, but we have got to be careful about being inspired by people with disabilities who just do average things. So let's say for example, Mike, I don't know if this has happened to you probably has where, where I've crossed the street with my cane, you know, I cross at the green light. And then somebody literally comes up and says, Wow, the way you cross that street, you're so inspiring. Well, I mean, I'm, I'm a full fledged adult, you know, I don't know what is inspiring about crossing the street. Like if, if a person without a disability could do that, why is it inspiring for me to cross the street, but let's say for example, there's a fellow person with a disability, right? Like, like a gentleman in California, who just got a got the MacArthur Fellowship, I think it's like half a million dollars or something, he's totally blind. That totally inspires me, not because he's blind, but because doggone he, he just got a MacArthur Fellowship. He's a, he's a Mensa member, he has in his IQ and intelligence are off the charts. And he continues to do well, with with his life that inspires me whether he's blind or not, that inspires me. And that's the kind of thing that we have to be on the lookout for. Because what happens is, if we're not careful about that, then the message in finding blind people inspiring or any other person is really inspiring is that if the thing is, well, at least I don't have to go through that, or my life could be worse, or Wow, they made it in spite of how awful that disability is to have etc. As opposed to well, you know what, they work hard, they really busted their tail and they got it all done. That's inspiring, because anyone who works hard should be an inspiration to anybody, regardless of whether they have a disability or not.   Michael Hingson  16:44 That's right, exactly the way it should be in blind people who do the average sorts of things, do it daily, are good at it and are successful, to me are just as inspiring as sighted people who do it because of the fact that they have found an equilibrium and they are able to, to maintain and move forward. Tell me do you do you think overall, thinking back on the your parents had a positive attitude about blindness? They did.   Ollie Cantos  17:11 Because they didn't phrase it that way that they didn't want me originally to associate with with blindness, because they were afraid of what other people would think, because they originally didn't want me to use a cane. Because they said first of all, you can see a little bit. And second, if people think of you as blind they won't give you the kind of opportunities and they will expect of you what we expect to view. So so it was sort of a different take on a blindness philosophy thing. And then once I started using a cane, it was it really was met with some major resistance by my parents at first. And then when they realized how much more confident I became because I was taught by my mentors how to use a cane, then I was better and then then they accepted it and now it's nothing I mean, now it's it's a matter of course of course you're when you're blind, you use a cane. So they underwent an evolution of sorts themselves as as well.   Michael Hingson  18:04 And as you visit them of course, you still have to do the chores, right? Because now you're the son and you got to support them in the manner they want to become accustomed right?   Ollie Cantos  18:13 That's right, I still have to do the chores I still have to you know like like right now with this podcast that I'm with I'm this is all being recorded while I'm at my sister's house, but my parents and I are here with my shirt with my sister and her family as our house is being renovated and so it's just nice to be with them whenever we go back to our place because we've had that same house that I grew up in for 46 years we've had that house whenever I go back Zack only can you take out the trash clean the pool work on this do that clean this up it's the same you know because I'm always my we're all for all of us we're always our parents children when whether we're adults or not. And so I love the fact that that they stuck with me and that they they do demand high and the awesome thing is they demand they demand Hi of my children to   Michael Hingson  19:04 Mom, I can't clean the pool. It's frozen over California. Yeah, yeah. Well, that's true when you're in California, it's a different story. But you know, it's it's interesting to, to hear your stories, how similar in a lot of ways they are to mine, but in some ways different. My parents never cared about the fact that I was blind. They just said you can do whatever he wants. He's going to be able to do things like everyone else, and there was never a discussion about it. I actually got a guide dog before I got a cane, because there was nobody around teaching cane travel but we met someone who used a cane. You You've I think met her no of her sharing gold who lived near where we lived. movement right when I was growing up, and so I met guide dogs as it were through her and ended up getting a guide dog going into high school. But my parents actually initiated that recognizing that we needed to do something to and enhance my ability, as opposed to just walking to school or walking around a school. And being able to hear it in a in a much smaller environment than a high school would be. And it was the right time.   Ollie Cantos  20:21 Yeah, absolutely. Sharon gold was a force of nature. I still miss her to this day. And she spent 20 years of her life working full time building the National Federation of Vita, California, she has touched the lives of countless people who have gone on to touch the lives of others, because she, she basically built a leadership factory, and I continue to revere her to this day, even though she has left us, I strive always to to emulate the qualities of life of Sharon gold, that's for sure. And   Michael Hingson  20:51 you can't do better than that. Right? That's right. So what, um, you know, an interesting thought that that comes to mind is we've talked about people with disabilities and, and the fact that we need to educate people in society, what role whether you're a person with a disability or not, but if you're especially familiar with disabilities, what role should we have in dealing with people who are blind or have disabilities in society?   Ollie Cantos  21:23 Well, that's a really good question. Because the fact is that we all have a role to play when it comes to making a difference. The fact is that when it comes to the disability community, there are more than 61 million persons with disabilities, including children and adults in this country. And because of that, that means disability touches the lives of all of us. And because it touches the lives of each and every one of us, that means that we need to really be mindful, because 90% of all disabilities are invisible to the naked eye. People may have depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, dyslexia, other forms of learning disability, as well as dysgraphia, dyscalculia. They can, they can have an intellectual disability, they just all sorts of things that you don't see, they can have epilepsy, etc. And so therefore, what is really important for all of us, is always to be open to what it means to have a disability. There are some of us who, let's say, you've had our disability our whole life, and to us, it's just a characteristic. And, and even even within that, there could be some changes, like in my case, I was used to what I could see as limited as limited as it was. And then when I was hit by a car, and then the lens detached and then now I see even less, I had to go through a major adjustment period, even as someone who lived with my blindness my whole life, and people say, Well blind, well, you can see, well, just to clarify, blindness is blindness, including people who have some residual vision, but my my degree of residual vision dramatically dropped. And it's, it's beyond repair at this point. And I had to go through, and I'm still going through some adjustments with that. And, and it's something that so when I'm talking about this, I'm saying that as not as a part of a theoretical construct, but as somebody who myself am going through a lot of changes that that that have occurred, because it's not that the disability is the problem. It's it's that this is this level is of disability was just something to which I wasn't not accustom. So it doesn't mean that that various of us who either acquire a disability or who acquire a disability to a greater degree of significance, can't live full and productive lives. But there is an adjustment period that's required. And there there are additional challenges with that, does that mean that we have lives of unhappiness and struggle and, and necessarily having loads of depression? No. But what it does mean is, is that we have got to recognize that we are all on this journey. There's actually Mike another example, where, as I mentioned earlier, I've been involved in this in the Civil Rights world within the disability and other contexts for for three decades, roughly about four or five years ago or so. The boys that I Leo, Nick and Steven, my sons, we spontaneously decided to take a trip to New York. And while we were up there, one morning, we were at breakfast, and then and then somebody, somebody dropped a utensil. And so I say well, hey guys, whichever one of you dropped, that you should pick it up, you know, and my thought was, hey, well, just because they're blind, they should leave it for other people to pick up. But here's the catch. What happened at once I said that somebody to the table to my right, sheepishly tapped my shoulder and said, Sir, I'm sorry to interrupt but actually That was not your one of your sons. That was me. So here I was thinking, Yeah, I know about civil rights and about equality of opportunity and how we have to really think well, people disabilities, what was it? What was my assumption? In all transparency, I assumed that it was one of my son's drama. I completely assumed so what I'm all for that, but it's, we all have growth to do.   Michael Hingson  25:22 Go back to your other example, though, you're crossing the street, you get to the other side, and somebody comes up to you and says, Oh, that you're just amazing. You cross that street all by yourself and how independent you are. What should your job be? Or how do you react? Or how do you think we should react? When that kind of thing happens?   Ollie Cantos  25:41 Well, I think it's an opportunity to be to educate people, if we get mad at them and get mad and say, What do you mean, you know, or if somebody offers offers help, and we say, I don't need help, I'm fine. You know, like that. I mean, then, then all they're gonna walk away is stuff think, dang, those people disabilities are pretty bitter, aren't they? And the thing is, by nature, all of us, we, we tend to, to, to judge, either people or classifications of people, based on the negative characteristic that sets that person apart as different from ourselves. So in this instance, if if they have that sort of negative interaction with us, they've never interacted with a blind person before they'll say one thing, you know, you're I'm trying to help somebody, and then they bite my head off. I'm just trying to help, you know. So I think that it's an opportunity for us to educate people about who we are and what we can do and say, Well, gosh, thank you for offering to help me cross the street, but I'm okay. But But how are you doing? You know, that focus on on that on them? Or if people say, Well, gosh, you know, you're so inspiring for, for what you did, and and then the stuff that I like to say is, well, you know, all of us are inspiring to each other. And to the extent that you optimize your life, you would inspire me. And then that's it. You know, because, because I'm sure everybody has a life story that can inspire me, you know, as the way we can inspire them, but it has nothing to do with disability.   Michael Hingson  27:04 No, one of the things I love to say to people, when they come up and do that is, you know, I gotta tell you that you inspire me all the more, because you are getting around without a guide dog or a cane, isn't that amazing?   Ollie Cantos  27:21 That's the best.   Michael Hingson  27:22 And then I then use that to go and say, I'm not trying to be sarcastic, or anything but but the reality is, it's just another way or we each have other ways of doing the same thing. And although there are more of you than there are of I and I understand and appreciate the inspiration, but the reality is, it's no different. And it would be so much nicer if people would recognize that, that just because I happen to be blind, and you're not the fact that we both can do the same thing. And that's what's really important. Sometimes you get into really good discussions about that. But yeah, I love I love to say that, well, I'm just amazed that you get around without a dog or a cane, and you do so well. But I but I do make sure I mitigate that immediately and say I'm not trying to be sarcastic. There's a reason I say that. Let me explain. And most people stay around and listen, which is which is pretty good.   Ollie Cantos  28:22 I absolutely love that. And you know, actually, this reminds me of another illustration where, you know, some people say, Well, why do we have to make our these businesses open to people who use wheelchairs? Or why do we have to, you know, like, sometimes businesses are other people, they say, Why do I have to spend this money to make places accessible, you know, like, they get all mad. And then I actually, this is borrowing from what a talk I I heard from the late Susan Daniels once where let's say for example, people say, hey, you know, we have to make all these places wheelchair accessible? Well, you know, whenever it think about how much the the world spends on chairs, chairs, literally, they're everywhere. They're chairs everywhere. But what the wheelchair users do they bring their own. Imagine how much money would be saved if businesses wouldn't have to pay for all of those chairs. Because imagine if more people use chairs in the business, he wouldn't have to pay for them because people brought their own. Well, what about another possibility? I love this what Susan said, as well, what about oh, actually, Dr. Jurgen said this where where you know if we really want it to be good, good with everything. Well, what about accommodating sighted people? Well, they say what do you mean? Well, if we instead with all of our office buildings and houses and everywhere, what if instead of having windows for people to see out? Why don't we just why don't we have no windows? Because it actually optimizes energy efficiency. It keeps the houses cool or warm or whichever, but instead to accommodate people who can see there are windows everywhere. That's it. People can look out they can feel the sun, all that kind of stuff for us, we're fine with this, if you know we're fine if there isn't any of that stuff. So it's all a matter of perspective for one person might, what might seem like, oh, well, you're accommodating their people. Well, what about them? You know, we accommodate them. There was literally a time in Moscow when the fire alarm went off, or no fire it was the power went off to in one of the buildings there. And I literally had somebody hold me by the shoulder, so I could guide them out, because I was fine with using my cane to walk out of the building. So I would say, Okay, put your hand on my shoulder, and I'll lead you out. And they were completely frank. They're like, I don't know how to get out of here. I'm like, well, I'll help you out. And so now all of a sudden things were turned because that's our world, right? Yeah.   Michael Hingson  30:48 Well, there's so many examples of that. And look, what, what is it? That's so different about providing coffee machines, in buildings for employees and accompany or electric lights? They're all reasonable accommodations. And one of the things I love to say, when I speak to, to audiences, is, let's really get the whole concept of reasonable accommodation down to the basics. Thomas Edison invented the electric light bulb as a reasonable accommodation for light dependent people. And that's all it is. Yeah. And, you know, it, we we make a lot of accommodations for people. So why should it be different, just because some of us are in a legitimate minority. And the problem is, people haven't made the transition. And it is something that that we need to really address a lot more than we do as a society overall. And hopefully, we'll make some strides in that regard over time, but it is one of the biggest issues that we we face. I want to switch gears a little bit. You've talked about your sons, tell me about them. Tell us all about them?   Ollie Cantos  32:01 Well, I just absolutely love my sons, Leo, Nick, and Steven. They weren't originally my son's, though. I actually learned about them because a man, a fellow member of my faith community heard about them, because his coworker had a sister who worked as a school secretary at the elementary school where they were. And so he didn't know them, either. But he heard that there are these three blind troupe of boys. And he, he literally came to me and called me one day. And and he had this on his mind, but he kept putting it off putting it off. So one night, he woke me up, and he's like, Hey, Ollie, I need to I need to talk talk, oh, I just need to touch base with you. And I'm like, Oh, really? What's up? He said, Well, I haven't been able to sleep. And because he just woke me up. I said, Well, let me help you with that. Good night's talk to you tomorrow. He's like, don't hang up, don't hang up. And and so so he said, there are these boys that I've, I just feel like I need to introduce you to them. Because, you know, in light of your having worked at the White House and your being attorney, et cetera. I just feel like you'd be a good role model for them. And I don't know them. But I'm wondering if you would mind letting me set this up between you guys. And the family or whoever said that way, you could just be of support and mentoring them? I said, Yeah, sure what, I'll be happy to do that. And that's fine. And that's how it all started. But quickly, it became apparent that, that we we felt closer to one another than just mentor mentee. And they they just do we just had such a closeness. So a really long story short, I ended up adopting them as my own name and everything, you know, and they were, they were isolated. They were originally from Colombia. And then they came to this country. And he came to United States when they were three years old. And then they were isolated in their house from age three to 10, where they would only go outside to go to the church and go to school. That was it. They stayed in the house sat on the couch the rest of the time. Here I was I came along I got them out of the house, and got them to to expose be exposed to skills. But what happened was philosophically they went from being victims of bullying, to having no and and having little to no self esteem, to then really believing in themselves, getting involved with extracurricular activities, doing a lot, a lot of stuff with local nonprofits and eventually becoming Eagle Scouts. And so if they're the same kids, but the only difference was belief was poured into them along with a positive philosophy about blindness or disability more generally. And that positive belief is what carried the day. It did not create an over there was not an overnight success. That happened. It happened gradually. There were a lot of stops, stops and starts a lot of disappointing moments. But eventually they just they just kept Got it. And now they're, they're all in college and doing great. So I mean, I just love my sons. And we're the four of us. It's the four of us against the world, basically,   Michael Hingson  35:09 what happened? What happened to their parents? Well,   Ollie Cantos  35:13 the mother had a hard time taking care of them. And the father left to go back to Colombia and said he never came back. And so the abandonment issues with in that regard to, and ironically, after, you know, as the boys grew up, they dedicated their time, and we dedicate our family, we dedicate our time to talking about adoption, and also talking about how important it is for kids of all ages to be involved in their communities. From literally, when they were age 10 and 11 years old, we rang the bell up the you know, the goodwill Bell, you know, the bell, red, I think it's red, a red thing. I don't know what the container is where you put money. And we literally rang the bell there to raise money for Goodwill, which provided school supplies for kids from low income families. We did that because we wanted to make a difference. And then we just kept going from there just doing more and more stuff. And then now, they are just, they've continued to be active and involved. And they've they've touted the message of how we as people with disabilities of every age, we're an untapped resource. And we should be, we should really work hard. And so that's why they become even now they've all worked. They all work before age 18 for pay, and now Leo himself, he's been working for five years, he gets paid like, you know, he's young, but he gets paid 2257 An hour right now, and keeps keeps doing better, and keeps getting accolades from the very top of his company, and just lots of stuff. And Nick, Nick wants to go into real estate, and he's getting ready to take your real estate exam. Stephen is wanting to support organizations by writing grants to help build up resources. All of them have have done different things. And it's all because of the role of attitude and high expectations. And then now they're passing that along to other people. So it's just really fun to watch.   Michael Hingson  37:10 Well, I'm going to tell you right now, it will be necessary and helpful. I think if we do another podcast sometime in the relatively near future and bring them on with you. We have lots to talk about being an Eagle Scout myself and vigil in the Order of the Arrow. There's nothing   Ollie Cantos  37:25 like wow. Oh, wow. That is so cool.   Michael Hingson  37:30 We'll have to we'll have to come now. Did you do anything in scouting?   Ollie Cantos  37:33 I tried when I was in sixth grade, I asked to be involved with scouts and the Scoutmaster said, Hey, buddy, I know, I know you want to do this stuff, but it's kind of not safe. And we don't really know how we support and everything but thanks for wanting to be involved. And then that was it. I had   Michael Hingson  37:50 a Scoutmaster. I was in Cub Scout some, but really got involved when I went into the Boy Scouts. And I had a Scoutmaster and worked with a number of leaders who were really like my parents, I guess is the best way to put it, then care about being blind. I remember when I went to my first order of the arrow function, as you know, and started down that path. And part of the the thing is that you can't talk for 24 hours, you you follow directions, you do stuff but you don't talk. And it's a time of contemplation. But I remember one of the the leaders, the the actually the person who was coordinating that particular event, said, Come on, let's go talk. And I remember saying to him, but but I'm not supposed to talk he says okay, I'm giving you permission, but I remember Mr. Ness talking about the fact that it was great that I was was there, and they want to make sure that I get to participate in in every way and that it's going to be a learning experience for all of us. But he was really pleased that I stepped up and decided to try to join the Order of the Arrow and then eventually of course went off and and went through the whole program and became vigil and and got to know him all the way through and all number of our scout leaders were were the same and they all had that attitude, which was such a blessing. Wow, that they didn't put limitations.   Ollie Cantos  39:28 That's how it should be and and so that's the same with with my son to their scouting. I was tradition whenever it was a first of something I would go but after that, other than that they went on their own with with the leaders and they built their own friendships and everything and I got out of the way, you know, yeah, the thing as a parent as I did not want I'm still I'm not the type of parent to hover. I feel like they should make their mistakes. And they should learn and get guidance, of course, but if they make A mistake and it's a wrong mistake. And that leads to consequences. They have to feel that, you know, like, like they want. I bought one of them a cell phone, a brand new self iPhone, he lost it. So I'm like, Well, that's it. That's it, you're gonna have to find a way to earn the money to get that back. Yeah, you know, and then he had to find a way to work and he got it back eventually.   Michael Hingson  40:19 Well, and the point is that you are there. And I would intuit that. They know they can come and talk to you about anything and that you will be helpful and advice. But you don't. You don't hover a helicopter. Ah,   Ollie Cantos  40:36 the only time I like to hover is if I'm in a helicopter, which I love.   Michael Hingson  40:39 Oh, there you know, there there is. I have not I have flown an airplane but I've not flown a helicopter. Yeah. Oh, it's it's a whole different feeling. It's I've been in a helicopter, but I've never flown one.   Ollie Cantos  40:51 Oh, I I'm not planning on flying one myself. Oh, so okay.   Michael Hingson  40:55 Yeah, I don't know that. I want to do that. I have flown an airplane. I've been in a couple of different aircraft where I sat in the copilot seat. And the pilot said you want to try it? I said, Sure. You know, we're not near anymore.   Ollie Cantos  41:10 Yeah, one of my friends have been to that too. It's a blast. Oh, it's so much fun. But I didn't want to do it for long.   Michael Hingson  41:17 Yeah, well, we actually doubled the last time I did it. No, no, not the last time. The second time the last time I did it, we decided that we would try to imitate the aircraft they called the vomit comment where we got weightless and was a prop plane. So we couldn't go up nearly as high. But we actually did do a little bit of a parabola and parabola and had about 10 or 12 seconds of weightlessness. It was a lot of fun. And, and I actually did that and did it more by field than anything else. But we made sure we stayed way above the ground.   Ollie Cantos  41:48 Okay, well, that's that's good. And obviously, it turned out well, that we   Michael Hingson  41:51 were still here, which is, which is really good. You know, it's, it's important, I think, to talk about all this, that we're that we're dealing with about blindness and so on. It's, I think, extremely necessary for people to understand that we're people like everyone else. And I can tell you right now, I know we're not going to finish this today. And I'm going to definitely want you back to to continue the discussions. But what I would like to do a little bit, is get into some of the things that you've done, since you got your law degree, you've been involved in a number of government activities, and so on. Tell us a little bit about that. And some of the adventures, if you will, that you've had along the way. Well,   Ollie Cantos  42:33 I'm originally I had no intention of doing work in the disability rights world, I had other thoughts about what I wanted to do. I wanted to go into family law. But that was just too gut wrenching, and I just I went home crying every day. So I'm like, I just can't do this. And then eventually, I got involved with the disability rights world by working in California, at the Disability Rights Legal Center for three years and built a program there that drew the attention of folks in Washington and I got recruited to become general counsel and Director of Programs for the American Association of People with Disabilities that had a membership at the time of 70,000. And so Andy Imperato changed my life by bringing me there. And I directed what's called Disability Mentoring Day, and at the time that I took it over it, it had participation of 1600 students, within three years, with no funding increase, I increased it to 10,000 mentees and 10,000 mentors, and involved people of not only the United States, but in 19 foreign countries all around the world. And so that can some other attention. And then I eventually I became a next I became a special assistant to the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights at the US Department of Justice, and special counsel. And I also worked for work at the White House as Associate Director for domestic policy covering disability issues. That was a blast. Oh my gosh, it was so much fun, a lot of work a lot of fun. Then eventually I came back from that went back to Justice Department. And somewhere in between there. I also had appointments to the as Vice Chair of the President's Committee for people with intellectual disabilities, and then later I served as a member of the committee to and then I then went to the Department of Education. And I've been there as special assistant in the office of the assistant secretary for civil rights. So I've been around this all this for 17 years. And I've built relationships with with literally 1000s of nonprofit leaders across the country. And I've been literally by this point to 41 states or 42 states by this point and gotten to speak to more than 58,000 people all across the country and I just really have loved it. And that's in addition to the businesses that we have, as well as other things. So so we have a really, really, really full life with a lot going on.   Michael Hingson  44:59 How about decided to run for Congress yet? Hmm.   Ollie Cantos  45:03 running for office is coming.   Michael Hingson  45:06 That would be an interesting experience. It's, you know, Washington has its own challenge, of course, especially right now, what do you think? And I'm not talking about taking political sides. But in a sense, it's probably relevant to ask, given how people view disabilities and so on, but what, what do you think about the whole fact that there is such a schism and no room for discussion or really interaction anymore in the Washington in the whole political arena? And again, I don't it's not an issue of sides, but it's just all around us now.   Ollie Cantos  45:43 Yeah. And there's actually a phenomenon behind all that. It is the social media of what Facebook and Twitter or Facebook did is, they added the like button, I think it was back in 2009. And so what ended up happening is it started to, to, to drive people wanting to get likes. And so what ended up happening is it created over time, a polarization effect, where people would just start start taking positions in anybody who felt adverse to those positions, they would block them, etc. Something happened to me relatively recently, where I just stayed in opinion to try to be helpful, and somebody threatened to block me. And I just thought, well, heck, forget this, I'm just gonna just do it myself. If you're gonna throw acid on me, forget it, you know, yeah. And it's tough. And the thing is, I'm very bipartisan, and I, I really believe that that the secret secret to our power as a community is to really find ways truly to come together, not just in by talking about it, but by finding things that we can do in collaboration with one another. If we even focus just on that alone, that's more than enough work that we have lifetimes to get done. And if we were to focus on those areas of commonality, we really could find a way to move forward together. And I found that to be the case. And so, you know, I really choose to be not only bipartisan, but but very proudly. So where just because somebody has a political affiliation different from mine, doesn't mean that they're the enemy, or it doesn't mean that they're, they have all bad ideas or not. I mean, it's more of a whole comp, construct of how there's an idea, then there's another idea, then together dialectically, then it creates something brand new, then that's the becomes the new idea, and we just repeat the process. And I and collaboration has been at the heart of how I've operated my personal life, professional life every part of my life. And it's just been the biggest blessing to really just to respect people for whatever differences and not to attack them for having differences. And then to find ways that we could work together and to build on that   Michael Hingson  47:49 we, we just don't know the art of conversation anymore, which is a real challenge. And it's extremely unfortunate that we have forgotten or choose not to remember how to talk to other people and have respectful disagreements. I just before we started this podcast, I'm shifting gears, again, just a little bit as part of this discussion. But I had a conversation with the homeowners association where I live. And I called to say, your internet, your website is inaccessible. And what's one of the things that's occurring is that there is a move on a good one to purchase. The country club that the association with the Association does not own it, it's owned by a private company, but they want to sell it there outside concerns, who want to buy the property, and so on and tear it down and build more homes. They also get the water rights to Spring Valley lake where we live, which none of us want. And then there are a lot of us in the association who want the association to buy it. And the association is actually working toward that. They put out a website that has a survey that's been dealt with. And now there is a way that you can go on the website and solicit or request a a proxy ballot or a ballot to vote, and it's not accessible. So I called and talked to the general manager, and he said, Well, I'm going to have to call our attorney, because you said we're violating the law. And he said, What law are we violating? I said, you are familiar with the Americans with Disabilities Act, aren't you? And he really isn't. But you're violating the law. I'm not talking about suing you. I'm just wanting you to make the website accessible. But even there, the defenses go up. And it's so very difficult to get anybody to communicate about anything. And it's not magical and the most logical and sensible thing in the world to want to make your website accessible. But the big defense that he used is I've been here 14 years. Nobody's ever complained about it before. What and I said, Why should that matter?   Ollie Cantos  50:10 Yeah, I've heard that before. Like businesses complaints, say, I've never had a wheelchair user try to come into my restaurant. Well, did it occur to them that because that accessible?   Michael Hingson  50:19 Yeah. Yeah. It's it's really unfortunate. But it's all part of the educational system. And we do need to be part of the solution. Not be part of the problem.   Ollie Cantos  50:32 Oh, yeah. Yeah, absolutely. And And that actually brings to mind all of these different efforts, that that the accessiBe has been engaging in the especially from everything that I've read and seen and from having a spent time with your with the team and everything. So many things are happening at a proactive level, I mean, the way that accessiBe makes its services available to nonprofits for free, the way that that companies have jumped on board with with really pushing for, for access, accessibility in a way that never has been done in mass, the way it's being done. Now, the partnership opportunities that are between accessibility and different stakeholders, and how there's always an effort to engage in dialogue. And though and the way that the company grows as as, as it learns, the community, and so forth, I mean, I just love that. I mean, that to me, whenever we look at efforts for all of us, as we grow, we just need to keep working on getting better and better and better and better every day, every day. If we ever think that we know it all that we don't that that's proof that we don't if ever, we ever think that. And so I really I just really think that the efforts of accessibility to continually to grow, just like is just as is true with other companies who strive to grow, that if there's always that commitment to ongoing improvement, then that's that's truly how the disability community will benefit. It's how businesses will benefit and how it's a win win for all of us. Speaking of unity, so we've been talking about that, because then everybody can gain better access. That means that people can purchase products and services that companies offer, it means that nonprofits can be more accessible to people who otherwise wouldn't have the same access to information, it means that it helps them to advance compliance with the law, but even beyond compliance, just the spirit of inclusion. And so I mean, this world is changing, and it's changing really fast. And in a good way, it seems,   Michael Hingson  52:33 you know, we could go on forever. But I'm going to go ahead and suggest that we stop because we have now been talking for an hour. But why would or can you believe it? No. But I would like to have you back on again soon. Because I'd like to continue exactly where we left off. And there's so much more to talk about, and so many stories to tell. So would you be willing to come back? Sure. I'd be happy to Great, then. But I will ask this though, if, if people want to reach out to you and communicate with you. How do they do that? Oh, thank   Ollie Cantos  53:08 you. If people in the United States send a text to 3131 31. And in the body of the put the message type in my nickname, Oli o l l IE and send it that'll be a way that you will have, you'll be able to reach me every way social media, telephone, email, and so forth. So I really would love to get to hear from you. And as your listeners reach out because of this podcast, I love for them to let me know that that they heard of that they're reaching out because of having heard of, of this conversation here. And and I just I will do whatever I can to be a support to whoever needs it.   Michael Hingson  53:49 Well, and of course that leads right into for those who are listening, we hope that you'll go to wherever you're getting the podcast, and rate us and give us a five star rating. And you will tell other people about it. We will have Ollie back on again soon. I promise. We'll work on schedules and see how quickly we can get it done since I know he's around for a little while before he leaves California. And he admitted he's on vacation. So you haven't heard the last of me in the next couple of days. But I want to thank everyone for listening to unstoppable mindset and clearly, only as is unstoppable as it gets. And I'm really also looking forward to meeting your three boys. I think that'll be a hoot. Oh, that'll   Ollie Cantos  54:33 be a blast. Thank you, Mike.   Michael Hingson  54:35 Well, thank you and hope, I hope Ollie, thank you very much for being here. Hope he's on my mind helped me whether there was another person we interviewed, you know, Hoby No, he's a blind chemist. Wow. And and, again, a really dynamic and incredibly powerful individual and a lot of good stories. But only thank you very much for being with us. Thank you all for listening and tune again next week for another edition of unstoppable mindset. And who knows if we get it done in time. Maybe it'll be early. Thank you all for listening   Michael Hingson  55:15 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Hop & Barrel Happy Hour
12/6 - 12/19

Hop & Barrel Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 30:40


This week Brian and Justin talk about the Grand Opening of the Spring Valley, MN location and announce some new upcoming events at both locations! Industry Terms: Barrel vs Case Equivelant

Real Estate & Small Business with Cristian Carrillo
Fritz Brogan | Season 2 Episode 11

Real Estate & Small Business with Cristian Carrillo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 24:11


Since opening Gin & Tonic Tavern as a twenty-four year old law student, Fritz Brogan has developed, owned and operated multiple businesses. In addition to his entrepreneurial pursuits, he offers strategic advice and counsel to elected officials and candidates running for federal and statewide office. Fritz is a graduate of Georgetown University and Georgetown Law and serves on the University's Board of Governors and on the board of Hoyas Unlimited. He serves on the Advisory Board of the Global Hospitality Leadership program at Georgetown University's School of Continuing Studies and is a member of AEI's Enterprise Club and the Meridian Global Leadership Council. He is the National Chair of Maverick PAC and is admitted to the bar in D.C. and Florida. A native of Fort Lauderdale, Fritz resides in Spring Valley with his wife and son. Music Credits: A himitsu- Adventures(@argofox & ahimitsu)

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 1 – Unstoppable Mindset

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 66:41


Michael Hingson, shares his Keynote speech created on October 3 2019 at an event sponsored by San Joaquin County Office of Education, CEDR Systems help in Monte Ray, CA. There were nearly 1,000 people in attendance at this keynote address delivered by Mr. Hingson to kick off the 2019 Inclusion Collaborative conference. In this presentation, Mike Hingson discussed his life experiences as a student who happened to be blind. He discussed some of the challenges he faced as well as how he prepared to overcome them. As a major part of this talk and our inaugural podcast episode, Mike tells his story of emergency preparation and how he was able to use his knowledge and his unstoppable mindset to survive the terrorist attack on Tower One of the World Trade Center. Some directories do not show full show notes. For the complete transcription please visit: https://michaelhingson.com/podcast About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog. Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards. https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/ accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/ Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below! Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app. Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Transcription Notes: Michael Hingson 00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast we're inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us. Michael Hingson 01:19 I really am honored to be here. I am, I guess in a sense, a product of special education in California. Let me tell you a little bit about me. In all seriousness, I was born in 1950, February 24 1950. You can do the math. Yes, I'm 69. People say I don't sound it. So I'm very happy about that. And I hope that that continues for a long time. But I was born sighted. But I was born two months premature. And the result of that was that I was put in an incubator with a pure oxygen environment. You've probably heard something about what today is called retinopathy of prematurity, which back in the day, I don't where that expression came from, but it was called retro dentro fibro pleasure. It was something that was discovered and named by Dr. Arnold Patz at the Wilmer Eye Institute. I had the pleasure of meeting him a few years ago before he passed, and we discussed what was originally called rlf, which is now our LP, but the bottom line is, is I was put in an incubator, the retina malformed and I became blind after about two days. We didn't know that for a while. I certainly didn't know it, but my parents didn't know it. About four months after I was born, an aunt said to my mother, you know, he's not really reacting to sunlight. I wonder if there's something wrong with his eyes? Well, sure enough, we went to the hospital and the doctors eventually came out and said, PSC is blind, you can't see. And you should send him to a home because you shouldn't keep him with you. If you do, he will not be good for your family. He'll certainly make it harder for your older son who can see who was two years old, you should send him to home. My father had an eighth grade education. My mother had a high school diploma and they told the learning Medical Society in Chicago nuts, too, you were taking him home. The doctor said he'll never be able to contribute to society and they said sure he will. It doesn't matter if he's blind or not. What matters is what he learns. These people who certainly didn't have the the vast knowledge of the learned medical profession in Chicago, bucked the system, I did go home. I was born on the south side of Chicago. Michael Hingson 03:47 If we if we take geraldo rivera into account two blocks from Al Capone's private vault, but I was born in Chicago, I grew up there for five years, went to the candy store when I was old enough to do it with my brother and cousins, who lived next door every day and walked around the neighborhood and so on and did it just like anyone else. I never even thought about it because my parents didn't think about it. They were risk takers, although I'm sure they didn't think of it that way. But they were they let me go outside and be a part of the rest of the kids in the neighborhood and growing up. They although I didn't know it early on, were a part of a group of parents who fought for special education classes for blind kids see, there were a number of premature births. During the baby boomer era, it actually brought the average age of blind people down from 67 to 65. Because there were so many, but there were enough in Chicago, my parents fought with other parents for special education classes. Well, kindergarten starts at age of four in Chicago. And so at four years old, I went to Korea In the garden in a special class with a teacher who was going to teach me and a bunch of other blind kids something about school, I actually began to learn Braille in kindergarten. I remember I wish I still had it. I remember, she, in teaching me Braille said, the best way for you to learn Braille is to write something. I'm going to read you a story about nasturtiums. Anybody know how to spell illustrations, I don't remember. But I had to write the story down that was in what was called grade one or uncontracted Braille. I had learned grade two yet, but I learned the Braille alphabet in kindergarten, hello. And then my father was offered a job in Southern California and we moved to California, Palmdale, California. And the problem with moving to Palmdale, California was that there were no provisions at all for blind or any other kinds of kids with what we call today's disabilities, or special needs, or whatever you politically want to call it. I'm not really a great fan of political correctness. So let me be real blunt, I am blind, I'm not vision impaired, I don't have a visual handicap, I am blind. By the way, I am trying to help start a movement, what I am not is visually impaired. The last time I checked, being blind didn't have any effect on how you looked. So visually impaired really doesn't count. If you're going to do it, vision impaired is more accurate than visually impaired because I really probably would look the same. If I am blind or sighted. We'll deal with the glasses later. I normally don't wear glasses, but that's another story and we'll get to it. vision impaired I understand visually impaired really is ridiculous. But it's the term that people have used. So you need to help us change the habit. But in reality, I am blind. Let me define blind. A person is blind when they lose enough of their eyesight that they have to use. Let me rephrase that, that they will use alternative techniques to eyesight in order to accomplish tasks, whether it be reading or whatever, yes, you can get very thick lens glasses or CCTVs, and so on, to help a person use their eyesight to read, but they're blind by any standard of intelligence. If you think about it, they are blind, not that they don't have any eyesight, but they have to use alternative techniques. And they don't have to use eyesight. I have been in environments I've been involved in projects as an adult, where I've been in special education, schools where we've been discussing how to teach Braille reading and so on. And I've had teachers who would come up to me and talk about the fact that they have kids who are blind and kids who have some eyesight. They're legally blind, but not totally blind. Sally has some eyesight Johnny doesn't have any Sally gets to reprint Johnny has to read Braille. Michael Hingson 08:05 That attitude is so backward, or it should be considered backward. The problem is Sally may get to reprint, but she's going to have headaches, she's going to read very slow. And if Johnny gets to truly learn Braille, he's going to be reading at several 100 words a minute, while Sally is kind of poking along, and having headaches and not doing very well. I have no problem with children or adults using their eyes. If they have eyesight, I do have a problem with them not also having the opportunity to learn the techniques that blind people use. Because if they learn those techniques, then you they can use both worlds to live much more productive lives. And so for those of you who are special ed teachers, even if your children have some eyesight, and even if the parents resist, try to push back, they need to learn Braille. A lot of special education teachers have said to me well, but blind people don't need Braille anymore. It's passe. You can listen to books and so on. You've got recordings we've now got Of course, files and you can use synthetic speech to hear the books read. Yeah, listen to one of those books with synthetic speech and see how much you enjoy it. But But yes, it's available. But my question to any of those people is tell me why you still teach sighted kids to read print? My they could watch cartoons, they could watch TV? Why do they need to learn to read print? The bottom line is blindness isn't the problem that I face. The problem I face consists truly of the attitudes and misconceptions that people have about blindness and it still comes back down to the fact that in reality people think That blind people can't truly be as productive in society as people who can see. Ah, and I wanted to do something before we go on how many heroes special ed teachers? Let me just see. Alright, how many are HR people? All right, a few of you get it. So I'm going to stop right now and say for those of you who didn't clap, how many of you think it's bright when a lecturer asks you a question and they're blind that you raise your hands? And you prove my point. So the bottom line is blindness isn't the problem. There are so many people in the world who are blind who have accomplished every bit as much if not more than most people in society, because they've learned that eyesight isn't really the gating factor. The gating factor are our attitudes about blindness. Jacob Salatin was a cardiologist who didn't live a long life. I think he died at 36. He was in the early he lived in the early 1900s. He was blind. And he was one of the most famous heart doctors in the Chicago area. There's a book about him called the good doctor, you gotta try to find it and read it. It's fascinating read. There are so many others. Jacobus tenbroek, was the founder of the National Federation of the Blind. He was born in Canada, but lost his eyesight at the age of seven lived most of his life in the United States. Dr. Tim Brooke, was taught by Dr. Newell Perry in in Albany at the School for the Blind at that time, and learned that in fact, he could do whatever he chose to do blindness was the problem. Dr. Tim Brooke went through the standard education courses and eventually had I had taken lectureships in at the University of California at Berkeley, did his undergraduate work there, he wanted to go into law. But when he graduated, and expressed that interest, the school said, No, you can't because a blind person can't do that. You could get a degree in psychology, you can get your PhD in psychology. But you can't get a law degree because blind people can't do that way too much reading way too complicated. So Dr. Tim Britt bowed to the pressure and got his degree in psychology, and then was hired to teach at UC Berkeley. Michael Hingson 12:29 I don't remember the exact year but somewhere along the line, he was asked to chair the speech department at the University of California at Berkeley. Now Dr. Tim Brooke, who was by then married to his wife, Hazel was pretty bright guy and kind of guy. Dr. Hambrick, accepted the position and said to the entire university, I want faculty members to join my speech department. But if you're going to join this department, what you need to understand is that you have to undertake a discipline, different from your discipline of education. So if you're a physicist, for example, and you want to join my department, you got to do research on something other than physics, you can tie it back to physics, but you have to do something other than physics is your main effort of work in our department. Well, Dr. Turmeric was one of these guys who believed in practicing what he preached, what do you think that he decided to do his discipline on? Dr. temperate became one of the foremost constitutional law scholars of the 20th century. There are still many cases that use his treatise is on tort law. And many examples of his works on discrimination and so on, are used today. In 1940, he formed with others, the National Federation of the Blind, the largest organization of blind people, consumers in the United States. And we don't have time to go into a lot of his work. But the point is, it didn't matter that he was buying, he did get to law. And he did it in a roundabout way. But he did it in a way that the university had to accept. And they loved him for it, in fact that Dr. Tim Burke was one of the few people in California who has ever been asked by both political parties to run for the United States Senate. And that happened after senator Claire angle, had a stroke and and he obviously could not continue as a senator and passed away. Dr. Tamarack was asked by both parties to run and he refused. Because he was enjoying his work with the National Federation of the Blind. He was involved in forming the Free Speech Movement at UC Berkeley and so on and doing so much constitutional law work. He knew that's what he needed to do. blindness isn't the problem. And so the question that all of you need to consider is are you going to hold people back? Or are you going to truly embrace a positive philosophy That says bind people bind students can do whatever they choose. And we're going to challenge them just like we would challenge any other student. And we're going to challenge them to do the best that they can truly do. And we're going to help teach them what they need. And sometimes that's going to mean you need to do as much work to educate parents. Because parents are frightened. They don't know. They're victims. I won't say products. They're victims of the same society that has negative attitudes about blindness. And I know there's only so much you can do, but you can set the tone. All of you here, not just in special education, but all of you here can set the tone. To give you an example of the kinds of attitudes that I faced. We moved to Victorville California in 2014. Where do you live in Victorville? Where do you live? Okay, we live in Spring Valley lake. Yeah. Other side. We chose property and build a house on it. My wife happens to be in a wheelchair and it's been in a chair her whole life. So we, we knew that if you buy a house and modify it, it costs a lot of money. If you build a house, it doesn't cost anything to build in the accessibility. And we found a piece of property very close to the Victorville Spring Valley Lake Country Club. So we get to walk to breakfast, or to go to dinner when we want to go out to eat, which is great. Anyway, before we moved to Victorville, in 2013, my wife and I were in an IKEA store with a couple of other people. And this young 13 year old boy comes up to me and he says, I'm sorry. And I stood there for a second. I said, Well, what are you sorry about? Well, because you can't see. I didn't know this kid. But that was his attitude. And I probably didn't answer in the best way that I could. But I said, Well, I'm sorry that you can because you don't get what I get. Michael Hingson 17:05 And by that time, his mother saw that he was tying this blanket and called him away and told him that not bothered the blind man. But you know, the bottom line is, we're no different than anyone else. We don't have the disability that all of you house. You know, in the 1800s, Thomas Edison invented the electric light bulb. Why did he do that? Because as we now understand, with the Americans with Disabilities Act, it was a reasonable accommodation for light dependent people who can't function in the dark. Michael Hingson 17:39 You light dependent people I know there are more of you than there are of me. But we're gonna get you in a dark alley one night, and we'll see if we can read. You know, again, it isn't. It isn't a blindness issue. I did go to college, I graduated I had several jobs that eventually led me to be in the World Trade Center on September 11 2001. I was there as the Mid Atlantic region sales manager for quantum Corporation, which was a fortune 500 computer company. I had been hired two years before to open an office for quantum in New York City. I was living back there because I had been transferred by another company from California to sell in New York City because I had been doing it by phone. And I made the case for the fact that we needed to do it on site. So I was asked to open an office because I had been recruited by quantum to do that. We opened the office on the 78th floor of tower one of the World Trade Center. The 78th floor is what's called a skylounge a sky lobby. That meant that elevators would go straight from floor one to 78 without stopping the World Trade Center. The way it was structured was that you could take elevators to go from floor one up to some number of floors but there were also direct elevators to floor 44 and floor 78. The 44th floor was where the cafeteria was the Port Authority cafeteria that everyone use 78 was the next jumping off point. You would then go to other elevators to go to other floors are you take the stairs, or in our case we were fortunate to have our office right on the 78th floor and on September 11 we were going to be holding some sales seminars to teach some of our resellers how to teach how to sell our products. I Arctic con they are excuse me quantum the company that worked for then artic con move me to the east coast but quantum work through a two tier distribution and sales model. So typically most of our products were sold to a few very large distributors and they in turn sign the smaller resellers and the major distributor we worked with Ingram micro wanted to make sure that their resellers knew how to sell our products. So they asked if we do the seminar and we set it up for of course September 11. By that time, I Had my fifth guide dog Roselle was that was a yellow lab. Roselle was also a dog with a great sense of humor, she loved to steal socks. She wouldn't eat them, she hid them. And I was warned by her puppy raisers that she'd like to do that. And she did. She stole my wife slippers once and hid them. And we had to find them. So in any case, we we in, Roselle and I were matched in 1999. And in 2001, she was very used to working in the World Trade Center with me, I had spent a lot of time when we started the office and started preparing to open the office, I had spent a great deal of time learning where everything in the World Trade Center was that I could possibly want to know about, I knew what was on most every floor, especially that would be a place where we might want to reach out and, and try to sell. I knew how to get around. I spent a lot of time studying emergency evacuation procedures. And almost every day when I went into the office, I remember thinking, if there's an emergency today, how am I going to get out? What am I going to do? And I made sure I knew the answers to those things. Because many times I would be in the office alone, nobody else would be there. Because I had a staff working for me great sales guys. And their job was to go out and sell and support their manager, right. So that was me. And my job was to be inside supporting them going on sales calls with them from time to time. But a lot of times I would be in the office alone, fielding their questions, helping them in any way that I could, working to make sure that I knew everything that they might need to know so that I could enhance them out in the field. In fact, every salesperson I ever hired, I said, Look, I know you're working for me. But I want you to understand that I view myself as a second person on your sales team. And what you and I need to do is to learn how we work together so I can add value to you and enhance what you do. My favorite example of that was with a guy named Kevin, who I hired. Michael Hingson 22:14 I really liked Kevin, because when we were doing the interview, I said to him like I did to everyone, tell me what you're going to be selling for us and how you're going to do it. Now the typical answer for most people was, well, you're selling tape drives, we're going to be selling the tape drives, I'm going to learn all about those. And I'm going to go off and tell people how to do it. And what what they need to know so that they can buy it. That's the typical answer. Kevin's answer was the only person who ever gave it and it was the answer I wanted to hear. The only thing I have to sell is me and my reputation. And I need your support. I won't do anything without telling you. But when we agree on something, I'm going to go sell me and through them will and through that we'll sell the products. But if they don't believe me, they're not going to be interested in our products. And I have to rely on you. What an answer. But it was the right answer truly. So one day Kevin comes into my office and he says, Hey, we have sales opportunity at Salomon Brothers. I said, Okay. He said, they want me to come out and talk about our products for a project they have, I'm not sure that our products will really be what they want. But they want us to come and talk about it. And they wanted me to bring my manager along a decision maker. I said, Okay, he said, so they don't know you. So I didn't tell him you're blind. Michael Hingson 23:51 So we got to the meeting. We entered the building right at 10 o'clock. We I wanted to arrive a minute or so late. I knew what Kevin meant. When he said I didn't tell him you're blind. Because we were going to hit him right between the eyes with that. So about 1001 we're walking down the hallway here, a bunch of people talking a few and we're going where are these quantum people in all that we walk in the door and the room goes totally silent. We stand there for a moment. And I turned to Kevin, I said, So where are we going to do this? He says all right up here in the front. So we went up to the front I had a laptop projector in hand on my laptop also opened up the cases took things out and says where do we plug this stuff in? And he says I'll take it and he plugs it in. And meanwhile, I'm standing there facing this audience. And so I turn to my left. And I said to the person sitting right in the front row on the corner who I heard as we walked by, I said, Hi my name is Mike Kingston, who are you? Nothing. Really, who are you? Nothing. So I kind of walk over near him and I'm looking straight at him. And I said I heard you when I walked by, who are you? So finally he said, Oh, my name is Joe. I said, Good, glad to meet you. And when I shook his hand, I said, you know, doesn't matter whether I'm blind beside, I know you're there. I don't know a lot about you yet, but I'm gonna learn about you. So tell me, Joe, why are you interested in our tape drives? I didn't ask if he was interested. I asked him why? Because I knew from my Dale Carnegie sales course you don't answer ask yes or no questions unless you really know the answer. But you don't ask yes or no questions. That doesn't give you a lot of information. So Joe, kind of hemmed and hawed and finally gave me an answer to that. And then I said, So tell me a little bit more about the project, if you will. And he did. And then I went to the next person, and I went around the room. And I talked to those people, learning a lot, including our product wasn't gonna do anything to help these people. But we were there. So we did the presentation. I did the presentation, I had a script, I did the PowerPoint show. And on my script was in incredible detail. And it said, everything that I needed to know including even on the screen, what picture appeared where so I could point over my shoulder and say, on the left side of your screen, you'll see the A TLP 3000, which holds 16 tape drives and 326 tape cartridges, we use a special technology called prism technology, our system is very modular, we can actually connect five of those drives together five of those libraries together, so that you could have a total of 80, tape drives, and 16 120. Tape cartridges, all in one big library. And on the right side of your screen, you can see the ATL p 1000, which is a small single drive library with 30, tape drives, and some things like that, and talk on and on and on. And we went off and we talked and all that, and we did the whole show. And then I said at the end, and as you can see our product won't do what you want. But I wanted you to know about it, because I want you to understand what different systems can do. Now let me tell you a little bit about who has a product that will help you. My bosses would shoot me if they heard me say that. But it's the ethical thing to do. And so we talked about that a little bit. And then we ended the day and people will come up to me and we chatted some and a couple came up and they said we're really angry at you. And I said Why? He said Well, usually when people come in, they do these presentations, we just kind of fall asleep and vege out, you know, because they just keep talking and talking. But you never looked away and looked at the screen. You kept looking at us, we forgot you were blind. We didn't dare fall asleep. And I said, Well, you could have fallen asleep. The dog was down here. You may think he's asleep, but he's taken notes. Anyway, we ended and we went out and Kevin said, How can you know so much about our products? And and you knew some of these later things that I don't know. And I said, Well, did you read the product bulletin that came out last week? Well, no, I really didn't have time. I said, there you go. message received and understood. But about two weeks later, the Solomon people called back and they said, We really do appreciate all that you did and coming out and talking with us. And we have something to tell you. And that is that there's another project. Because of everything that you taught us, we know that your product is perfect for it, we're not even putting it out for bid, just give us a price. That's the ethics of it. That's the way to sell. Michael Hingson 28:31 And that's what we did. So, in any case, I spent a lot of time learning what to do in the case of an emergency, so that I could get out when necessary, because I knew that people like Kevin and the rest of our sales and support staff would be out working a lot of times. And so I knew everything that I could possibly know about what to do in any kind of an unusual situation. On September 10, I went home as usual, I took my laptop, which is what I used in the office, I backed up my data at home. I'm a good Scout, I know how to be prepared, and sometimes I would work at home. So I always made sure I had my data backed up at home as well as on the job. By the way, speaking of scouts as long as I'm bragging, I happen to be an Eagle Scout with two palms and vigil in the order of the arrow. blindness isn't the issue. Michael Hingson 29:33 A lot of fun. I had some great scout leaders who accepted me for who I was and that made all the difference. In any case. I backed up my data later that night we went to bed and about 1230 Roselle started nudging me. Now Roselle was afraid of thunder. And of course we had rain storms in New Jersey. We lived in Westfield, great town. Again there we build our house that was a two story house. We put an elevator in So we could go to the two stories and the basement. So we had this nice elevator and nice house. But Roselle now was bugging me at 1230. And I knew that there must be a storm coming. She usually gave us about a half hour warning because she could sense it, as we know because the static charge would build up on her for as well as the fact that she probably heard the thunder before we do and so Rosa was shaking and shivering and panting and so I took Roselle Karen, my wife was awake by that time and we both agree there must be a storm coming. So we went downstairs to my basement to our basement. I put Roselle under my desk and I sat down and decided to try to do a little bit of work that I was going to do the next day before our sales seminars began. I turned on the stereos and had a pretty loud hopefully masking some of the thunder sounds. But God has a sense of humor. I guess. The storm literally came right over our house. It sounds like bombs going off outside and pours it Roselle was just shaking. At least she didn't see the lightning because she was under the desk. We were there until about two o'clock. Then the storm left. And so I went back up and we got three more hours asleep and then got up to go into the office. I didn't think it was a bad sign of things to come. Some people have said well, didn't you get the warning? No. So we got to the office at 740. And there was a guy there he just pulled up with a cart. He was from the Port Authority cafeteria, he was bringing the breakfast that we ordered for the early arrivals. And for the first group of seminar people we had 50 people scheduled during the day to come to one of four seminars. by eight o'clock. Some of our distribution people from Ingram micro arrived along with David Frank from our corporate office, David was in charge of the distribution sales, then he was there to help the Ingram micro people talk about pricing. I was there because of course I'm the technical contact the guy who would be on site in New York all the time. David was from New York, but he transplanted to California. And so so he was there and I was there we were the two quantum people, the Ingram micro people were there for about five Ingram micro people, six, actually, I guess. And then one of them decided about quarter after eight or 830, to go downstairs and to wait in the lobby, and a score our distribution people to where they needed to go. The last thing we needed to do before the seminars or to start was to create a list of all the people who would be attending that day, if you wanted to go to the World Trade Center and go up and see anyone at that time, because of the bombing in 1993, you either had to have your name on a previously prepared list that was created on stationery from the company where you were going. So they could check your name off after looking at your ID, or they would have to call us and say is so and so allowed to come up. We didn't want to have 50 phone calls. So it was easier to create the list. David and I finished the list and at 845 in the morning I was reaching for stationery to create the list and print it out when suddenly we felt a muffled thump. And the building sort of shuttered a little a minor kind of explosion not overly loud. And then the building began to tip. As I'm tipping my hand and it just kept tipping and tipping and tipping. We actually moved about 20 feet. Michael Hingson 33:37 The building kept tipping. David said What's going on? I said I don't know what do you think? I said do you think it was an explosion? You said it didn't sound like it? He said was it an earthquake? I said no. Because the building's not shaking from side to side or anything it's going in one direction. Now I knew that building the towers were made to buffet and winds although I wasn't really thinking about that at the time. But the building kept tipping and hey I grew up in Palmdale right building musco Santa doorway, so I went and stood in the doorway to my office. Yeah, a lot of good that's really going to do your 78 floors up but hey, there I was. David was just holding on to my desk. Roselle was asleep under my desk. And finally, David, I say goodbye to each other because we thought we were about to take a 78 floor punch to the street. Then the building slowed down and it stopped. And it came back the other way. And I remember as soon as the building started to move back, I let out my breath. I didn't even realize I was holding it. The building eventually got to be vertical again. As soon as it did, I went into my office and I met my guide dog Roselle coming out from under my desk. I took her leash and told her to heal, which meant to come around on my left side just like Alamo did good boy, he gets a reward for sitting and Roselle came and sat and was just wagging your tail And about that time, the building Straight down about six feet. Because as we know, the expansion joints went back to their normal configuration. We didn't really think about that at the time, but that's what they were doing. As soon as that occurred, David let go of the desk, turned around and looked around outside and said, Oh my god, Mike, there's fire and smoke above us. There are millions of pieces of burning paper falling outside the window. We got to get out of here right now. We can't stay here. I said. Are you sure? Yeah, I can see the fire above us. And there millions of pieces of burning paper falling outside our windows. I heard stuff, brushing the windows, but I didn't know what it was. Now I did. And our guests began to scream the ones that were in eating breakfast, waiting for the seminar to start, they started moving toward our exit and I kept saying slow down, David. No, we got to get out of here right now. The buildings on fire. Slow down. David will get out. Just be patient. No, we got to get out of here right now. We can't stay here. For me, emergency preparedness training kicked in. Because I, as you know, kept thinking What do I do? Emergency Well, here it was. Then David said the big line Mike, we got to get out of here. And I said slow down. He says no, you don't understand you can't see it. The problem wasn't what I wasn't seeing. The problem was what David wasn't seeing when I tell you about Rozelle with thunderstorms. She wasn't doing any of that she was wagging her tail and Jani and going, who woke me up. She wasn't giving any fear indication at all. And so I knew that whatever was occurring, we weren't imminently immediately threatened. So I finally got David to focus and say, get our guests to the stairs and start them down. And he did. While he was doing that, I called Karen, my wife and said, there's been an emergency and something happened. We're going to be evacuating, I'll let you know later What's going on? And she said, what's, what is what is going on? I said, Oh, no. The airplane hit 18 floors above us on the other side of the building. Afterward, when reporters started interviewing me. They said, Well, of course you didn't know what happened because you couldn't see it. I said, Wait a minute, helped me understand. The plane hit on the 96th floor roughly. On the other side of the building from us the last time I heard there really wasn't such a thing as x ray vision. None of us knew blindness had nothing to do with you can't justify that. None of us knew. And on the stairs, none of us knew. And we were with a whole bunch of people on the stairs. Anyway, David came back. I just disconnected with Karen. We swept the offices to make sure we didn't miss anyone. We tried to power down some equipment, didn't really have time to do a lot of that and we just left a went to the stairs and started down. Almost immediately I began smelling an odor and it took me a little while to recognize that what I was smelling was burning jet fuel. I traveled a lot through airports about 100,000 miles a year. So I knew that smell but I didn't associate it with the World Trade Center. Now suddenly, I smelled it and I recognize it finally after about four floors, and I observed it to others who said yeah, that's what it is. You're right. Michael Hingson 38:12 So we kept walking down the stairs. Got down about 10 floors and then from above us we heard Brian victim coming through move to the side let us by the stairs were wide enough that you could walk like two or three abreast but we moved to the outer wall stood facing in and a group of people passed us and David described how they were surrounding a woman who is very badly burned over the upper part of her body, probably from the little vapor droplets that can busted as she was standing in front of an elevator. We then started walking again and then we heard it again burned record coming through moving to the side, let us buy and another group pass us with someone who is burn. As David said even worse, we knew it had to be pretty bad above us. We kept walking down some conversation. We got to about the 50th floor David wasn't talking very much. And suddenly he said Mike we're gonna die. We're not going to make it out of here. And I just said stop it David if Roselle and I can go down the stairs. So can you see I took that secret teacher course that that all of you as teachers have never told anybody about because you're sworn to secrecy, right? voice 101 where you learn to yell at students, right? And so I literally very deliberately spoke very harshly to David. And he told me that that brought him out of his funk. But then David made a decision, which I think is still one of the most profound and incredible decisions and follow throughs that I experienced that day. David said, You know, I got to keep my mind on it on what's going on. But I don't I don't want to think about this. I want to think about something else. So I'm going to walk the floor below you and shout up to you everything that I see on the stairs, okay. And I said Sure, go ahead. Did I need David to do that? No. Right, you're going down the stairs, what can you do, but it was okay. And I'm glad to have more information. I love information. And so I thought it was fine. But the reason that I thought that what David did was so incredible will come up in a moment. So suddenly I'm on the 49th floor when I walked down the floor and David walked ahead of us and suddenly, Hey, Mike, I'm on the 48th floor, everything is good here going on down. I'm on 49 go into 48 get to 48 David 47th floor all clear. What David was doing, although he was shouting up to me, he was providing information that hundreds or 1000s of people on the stairwell could hear. He gave everyone a focus point. Anyone who could hear him knew that somewhere above them or below them on the stairs, someone was okay. And that it was clear and they could keep going. He gave everyone something to focus on. And I think that that was the one thing more than anything else. That had to keep more people from possibly panicking like he started to do on the stairs. We didn't have any other incidents that that after David started shouting 46 floor all clear. Hey, I'm on 45 everything is good here. 44th floor This is where the Port Authority cafeteria is not stopping going on down. Michael Hingson 41:31 And we continue down the stairs. We eventually got to the 30th floor. And when we did actually David did and I was at 31 he said I see I see firefighters coming up the stairs. We're going to have to let them by everybody moved to the side while I went down to where he was and they hadn't got there yet. I said what do you see? And he said, Well I just see him coming up the stairs they got heavy backpacks on and they're carrying shovels oxygen cylinders by our axes the first guy gets to us and he stops right in front of me and when let me bike goes hey buddy you okay? You know that's how you sound in New York right? Hey buddy. Yo, in New Jersey, it's yo and I said yeah I'm fine well that's really nice we're gonna send somebody down the stairs which should make sure you get out and I said you don't need to do that I'm good. What's really nice we're gonna send somebody which anyway I said Look, I just came down from the 78th floor here we are at 30 I came down 48 floors I'm really good. Wow, it's really nice. We're gonna send somebody down the stairs which I said Look, I got my guide dog Roselle here and and everything is good. We're doing fine. Now what a nice dog and he reaches out and he starts petting Roselle. It wasn't the time to give him a lecture don't pet a guide dog and harness. But I'll give you the lecture dump had a guide dog and harness, dog and harness do not come up Don't say name don't interact with even don't make eye contact dog in harness is working harness is symbol of work. Don't distract dog. If you do, I will first correct the dog before I deal with you. Because rose Alamo should know better. He is still a puppy though. And dogs love to interact. And so when you start trying to talk with them, they're going to talk to you, they're going to try and then I have to bring him back and focus him. I don't want to do that. So don't deal with a guide dog and harness. Now as I said before, when we're out selling books later harness will come off, and you're welcome to visit with him all you want. Of course, I'd love you to buy books too. And take business cards because if any of you know anyone who needs a public speaker, whether it's in your district or or their organizations, I would love you to to let me know or let them know, because this is what I do. And I really would love your help to do more of this to educate people. We can talk more about that later. Any case wasn't the time to give them that lecture and it wasn't the time to say to the fire person. blindness isn't the problem. It's your attitude, you know, so I finally just played the card. Look, I got my friend David over here David can see we're working together okay. And he turns to David here with him. David goes yeah, leave him alone. He's good. He says okay, and he goes, then he pets Roselle a few more times. She gives him a few more kisses. And he goes on up the stairs. Probably just having received the last unconditional love he ever gotten his life. Michael Hingson 44:21 And I remember that. Every time I say it. I don't know I never heard whether they survived or not. But don't know that he did. But he was gone. Other firefighters were coming up 50 men and women pastors going up the stairs to fight that fire. Several of us on one or more occasions said can we help you guys and they just said no Your job is to go down and get out ours is to go deal with this. We got it. David we assumed a scouting position and we kept going down the stairs. Finally David said well at about the 26th floor by the way Somebody started passing up water bottles. Roselle was panting I was getting pretty warm with all the the massive human bodies. So we we gave Roselle some water somebody passed up bottles and David brought one up and he took some drinks I took some drinks we gave Roselle some we made our hands into kind of cups and so everybody got some water and then we continued and finally he got to the first floor. I was on four second floor two and he said hey Mike, the water sprinklers are on here you're going to have to run through a curtain and water to get out of the stairwell. And the water was running to create a barrier so fire wouldn't get in or out depending on if it ever broke out. He was gone. I got to the first floor picked up the harness results forward hopper speed up, which is the command to give. we raced through this torrential downpour of water and came out the other end soaking. But we were in the lobby of tower one. Normally a very quiet building and quiet lobby office type environment. But now people were shouting dunk on that way. Don't go outside go this way. megaphones don't go over their gun this way. Go to the doors into the rain, main part of the complex don't go outside. They didn't want anyone going out because that would have put them right below where people were jumping. We didn't know that at the time. So this guy comes up to David and me. And he says, Hey, I'm with the FBI. I'll get you where you need to go. And I'm sitting there going the FBI. What did I do? I didn't do it. sighs I'm not talking to anybody about McGarrett from five Oh, I didn't think that. Anyway, I said What's going on? He said no time to tell you just come with us. So he ran us through the whole complex and out a door after going up an escalator by borders, books as far away from the towers as we could be. And we made it outside. And we were told to leave the area. But David looked around and said, Mike, I see fire in tower two. I said what? Yeah, there's fire in the second tower. Sure. Yeah. And I went, what's going on? We had no idea where that came from. We didn't feel thing in our building when we were going down the stairs. So we thought perhaps it was just fire that jumped across from our building when the building tipped it was mashing pointed toward tower to we didn't know. So we left the area we walked over to Broadway, we walk north on Broadway and eventually we got to Vesey street where we stopped because David says see the fire and tower to really well. We're only 100 yards away. I want to take pictures. So we stopped. He got out his camera. I got out my phone. I tried to call Karen. I couldn't get through the circuits were busy because as we now know everyone was everyone was saying goodbye to loved ones. But I couldn't get through to Karen. I had just put my phone away and David was putting his camera away when a police officer to get out of here it's coming down and we heard this rumble that quickly became this deafening roar I described the sound is kind of a combination of a freight train and a waterfall. You could hear glass tinkling and breaking metal clattering in is white noise sound as tower to collapse it pancake straight down. David turned and ran. He was gone. Everyone was running different directions. I bodily lifted, Roselle turned 180 degrees and started running back the way we came. Come on was I'll keep going good girl keep going. We ran got to Fulton Street, turned right onto Fulton Street. And now we're going west. At least we had a building between us and the towers. I ran about maybe 100 feet or so. And suddenly there was David. It turns out we had both run in the same direction. And then he realized that he had just left me he was going to come back and try to find me. But I found him first and he started apologizing. I said David, don't worry about the buildings coming down. Let's keep going and we started to run. And then we were engulfed in the dust cloud all the dirt and debris in the fine particles of tower two that were collapsing that we're that we're coming down. And so David and I were now engulfed in this cloud. He said he couldn't see his hand six inches in front of his face. I could feel with every breath I took stuff going through my mouth and through my nose into my throat and settling in my lungs. That's how thick it was. I could feel it settling in my lungs. Michael Hingson 49:19 So we kept running and we knew we had to get out of that. So I started telling Roselle right? Right with hand signals and voice I don't know whether she could hear me and because of the dust. I don't even know if she could see me. Right? Roselle right? But I was listening for an opening on my right and the first opening I heard I was gonna go into it. And obviously Roselle didn't know what I want because when that first opening appeared, I heard it but she immediately turned right she took one step and she stopped and she wouldn't move. Connor was I'll keep going, she wouldn't move. And I realized there must be a reason. So I stuck a handle on a wall and stuck out a foot and realized and discovered that we were at the top of a flight of stairs. She had done her job perfectly. We walked down two flights of stairs and found ourselves in little arcade, a lobby of a subway station. We continued to well, we just stayed there for a while. And then this guy comes up. He introduced himself as Lou, an employee of the subway system. And he took us down to the lower levels of the subway station to an employee locker room. And when we got to the locker room, there were benches there were about eight or nine of us who were in the lobby at that point, that little arcade, there were other people that he had already escorted down. So we were all in this employee locker room, there was a water fountain, there were benches, there was a fan. We were all hacking and trying to get rid of stuff from our lungs, and not saying much what the heck was going on. None of us knew. We were there for a few minutes. And then a police officer came and he said, the air is clear up above you're gonna have to, to leave and and go out of here right now. So we followed him up the stairs, he went to that little arcade lobby where we had been, and then he went on up the stairs. He said the air is a little bit better up there. And we just followed him. And finally we went outside after getting to the top. David looked around, and he said, Oh my god, Mike. There's no tower to anymore. And I said, What do you see? And he said, All I see are pillars of smoke where the tower was it's gone. Pretty sure. Yeah, it's gone. We stood there for a moment. And then we just turn and continue to walk west on Fulton Street. We walked for about maybe a quarter of a mile. And we were in this little Plaza area. Just still trying to figure out what was happening when suddenly we heard that freight train waterfall sound again, and we knew it was tower one collapsing, David looked back and saw it. And he saw a dust cloud coming toward us again, it was still pretty concentrated. So we kind of ran to the side to get out of most of it hunkered down behind a wall and just waited until everything passes by and the wind subsided, the noise stop. And then we stood up. Turn, David looked around and said, Oh my god, Mike. There's no World Trade Center anymore. I said what do you see? And he said, fingers of fire and flame hundreds of feet tall and pillars of smoke, the towers are gone. We're gone in three hours before less than three hours before just to do our job. But now in the blink of an eye, it was gone. No clue why we stood there for a moment. And then I decided I better try to call Karen and this time I got through. And after some tears on both sides of the phone, she told us how to aircraft had been crashed into the towers went into the Pentagon and a fourth was still missing over Pennsylvania. We walked up toward Midtown and eventually got near Midtown Manhattan to the subway station and the train station at 33rd and sixth and seventh Avenue. And David and I set parted and went different ways. I wanted to get back home to Westfield he wanted to get up to the Upper East Side to his sister's house, which is where he was staying when I was back in New York. And so we went our separate ways. Michael Hingson 53:42 And never, never thinking that that was the end. And a lot of ways. We did try to reopen the office elsewhere, but didn't get a lot of support from the company and decided that, for me, it was time to do something different. The reason I decided that was that the day after September 11, the 12th. Karen said you want to call the folks from Guide Dogs for the Blind. That's where you've gotten all your guide dogs got to let them know that you were in the trade center and got out because eventually they would remember it a number of them had visited us in our office, because it's such a cool view. I don't know how to tell you about the view so much other than to say we were so high up that on the Fourth of July, people would go to our office to look down on the fireworks displays. So I called them and talked to a number of people including their public information officer, Joanne Ritter, who wanted to do a story and I said sure, and she said, You know, you're probably going to get request to be on TV. What TV show Do you want to start with? So yeah, I'm not really thinking about that sort of stuff, right? kind of still in shock. So I just said Larry King Live. Two days later on the 14th. We had the first of five interviews with Larry King. And so we started doing that and eventually Guide Dogs asked me to come and be a public spoke serve their public spokesperson. And I was being asked by that time to travel and speak and tell my story. And people said, we want to hire you. Being a sales guy, I'm sitting there going, you want to hire me just to come and talk. That sounds a whole lot more fun than working for quantum. And we wanted to move back to California anyway. So I accepted Guide Dogs position, and I've been speaking ever since. Other things have happened along the way very quickly, including I was asked in 2015, by a startup company, AIRA, a IRA to join their advisory board and AIRA makes a product called a visual interpreter. It consists of an app on a smartphone. And it may also include smart glasses with a high resolution video camera. And what I wrote allows me to do is to contact an agent who has been hired and vetted and trained to describe whatever the camera sees, and whatever information I need so they can help with an accessible websites. They helped me put together products when the instructions were all visual pictures, the Chinese have learned from IKEA, and in so many other ways that literally now, any visual information becomes available with AIRA. I just really want to quickly show you like hierro and we can we can talk more about AIRA this afternoon in the the session at 345. I want you to see what AIRA does. So hopefully AIRA 56:37 connecting to agent Kenyon starting video we're gonna wait. Oh, Michael, thanks for calling. I read this is Kenyon. What would you like to do today? Michael Hingson 56:48 I'd like you to tell me what you see. AIRA 56:50 I see a very large crowd, right? Michael Hingson 56:54 Yeah, what else? AIRA 56:56 podium to mic. And it looks like a very large auditorium, see some doors toward the back exit signs, and very captive crowds. Michael Hingson 57:09 Here's the real question. Do they look like they're awake? AIRA 57:16 They are now. So we're good. Michael Hingson 57:21 So tell them what you do. AIRA 57:26 I assist those who are sight challenged with independence on a daily basis. We allow them to be more independent in their daily lives to get around with minimal help. And we basically help them to see Michael Hingson 57:41 how do you do that? What do you do? 57:44 We use descriptives we use, we call in as we did now. And we ask them, What would you like to do and we assist them with whatever their task may be for that day, whether it be for reading, navigation, calling an Ubers, travel, descriptives, you name it, we can do it. We do that through either, believe you're using the glasses right now. We have horizon glasses we use and then or through technology in the phones, we use remote cameras, to help them to see the world around them and describe it to them. And to help them navigate through Michael Hingson 58:17 it to real quick stories. One, one IRA agent helped someone once while they were on an African safari to describe what was going on. But my favorite IRA story is that a father once wanted to find out if his daughter was really doing her homework. So he activated IRA. And he went in with the agent and said, How are things going? And she said, Oh great. I'm almost done with my homework. And the Irish said Irish and said, No, she's playing a game on her iPhone. AIRA 58:48 Yes, we also bust children whenever we need to. Michael Hingson 58:54 Kenny, I appreciate your time. I'm going to go ahead and finish chatting with these folks. But appreciate you taking the time to chat today. AIRA 59:02 You bet. Thanks for calling AIRA. Michael, we'll talk to you again soon. Michael Hingson 59:04 Thank you, sir. Bye. And that's what and that's what I read is all about. The whole the whole point is that I get access to all the information I otherwise don't have access to. Because ironically, in our modern technological world, sometimes it's actually becoming harder for me to get access to information. Too many websites are inaccessible and shouldn't be too many books may be scanned, but they're not put in a textual form that I have access to. There have been lawsuits over that. But the bottom line is that IRA creates access, or I should say it creates inclusion it gives me access to the information that I otherwise wouldn't have access to. So be glad to show that to any of you What I'd like to do is to end this now, with some words from Dr. Tim Brooke, that the person I mentioned earlier, this is part of a speech that he gave at the 1956 convention of the National Federation of the Blind in San Francisco. So it is a convention of blind people. But what I'm reading to you now could just as easily apply to any group. And I'm sure that Dr. Tim Burke intended it that way. And this is what he wrote. In the 16th century, john Bradford made a famous remark, which has ever since been held up to us as a model of Christian humility, and correct charity, and which you saw reflected in the agency quotations I presented earlier, seeing a beggar in his rags creeping along a wall through a flash of lightning in a stormy night, Bradford said, but for the grace of God, there go I compassion was shown. Pity was shown, charity was shown. Humility was shown. There was even an acknowledgment that the relative positions of the two could and might have been switched. Yet, despite the compassion, despite the pity, despite the charity, despite the humility, how insufferably arrogant there was still an unbridgeable gulf between Bradford and the beggar. They were not one but two, whatever might have been, Bradford thought himself Bradford, and the beggar a beggar one high, the other low one Why's the other misguided, one strong, the other weak, one virtuous, the other depraved. We do not and cannot take the Bradford approach. It is not just that beggary is the badge of our past, and is still all too often the present symbol of social attitudes toward us, although that is at least a part of it. But in the broader sense, we are that bigger, and he is, each of us, we are made in the same image. And out of the same ingredients, we have the same weaknesses and strengths, the same feelings, emotions, and drives. And we are the product of the same social, economic and other environmental forces. How much more constant with the facts of individual and social life, how much more a part of a true humanity to say, instead, there within the grace of God, do go I. And I want to leave you with that, because I think that sums it up as well as I can possibly do. We're all on the same world together. And you have the awesome responsibility to help children. And perhaps their parents grow, and truly become more included in society. So this afternoon, I'll be talking about the concept of moving from diversity to inclusion, and I'll tell you why choose that title. And I'll tell you now, when you watch television, you hear all about diversity. How often do you ever hear disabilities mentioned? You don't? Hollywood doesn't mention us. The candidates aren't mentioning us in all the political debates. Michael Hingson 1:03:46 Even though 20% of the population has some sort of a disability, not concluding politicians who have their own disabilities, but we want to go we need to demand and we ask your help to create a true inclusive society. I challenge you to do that. I hope we get to chat later. Come to the presentation this afternoon and come and see us. We'll be selling Thunder dog books, and you can visit with Alamo. And also again, if you know anyone else who needs a speaker, it's what I do, as you can tell, did you all feel you'll learn something today? vendors and everyone like Thanks very much, and I hope we get to chat some more. Thank you. Michael Hingson 1:04:43 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Outdoors Radio with Dan Small
Show 1638: Jeff Kolodzinski breaks his own record for the most fish caught in 24 hours to raise funds for Fishing for Life and local first responders in Spring Valley, Ill. Cackle Creek offers great upland hunting close to Milwaukee and Madison. Dumper Da

Outdoors Radio with Dan Small

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 50:00


Charter captain Dan Welsch, proprietor of Dumper Dan Sportfishing Charters, wraps up his Lake Michigan fishing reports for this season with good news--mature king salmon are starting to move closer to shore and into harbors and rivers. (dumperdan.com) Jody Kehl, owner of Cackle Creek Game Preserve, invites listeners to enjoy a classic hunt for pheasants, bobwhite quail or chukars at Cackle Creek this fall. (cacklecreek.net) Marathon Man Jeff Kolodzinski, fishing products brand manager for Johnson Outdoors, reports on his 24-hour effort to catch one fish to commemorate every life lost in the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and set a new world record. (marathonmanfishing.com, givemn.org/organization/Fishing-For-Life/) In the Madison Outdoors Report, archery expert JC Chamberlin offers advice for early-season bowhunting and previews his Wyoming elk hunt. (pappastradingpost.com)

Treefinger
Treefinger presents: An Unexceptional Nigger episode 1 Spring Valley Race Riots

Treefinger

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 11:51


Treefinger presents: An unexceptional nigger tells stories from the white area he grew up in. Tales from the Valley: This is episode 1 The Spring Valley Race Riots. They don't teach this in school! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Faith in Christ Fellowship
Psalm's of the Summer Series - Psalm 23

Faith in Christ Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 59:16


*A special hello to our listeners in: Frankfurt, Germany; Spring Valley, NV; Dallas, TX; Los Angeles, CA; Renton, WA; Cameroon; New York, NY; Beaumont, TX;  and those in the Upstate New York area. Thank you for listening. Please help us grow the ministry of Faith in Christ Fellowship by sharing our sermons through Social Media with your friends, neighbors, family, and co-workers. Help us reach the nations with the truth of God's Word.  This message is part of the teaching ministry of Faith in Christ Fellowship in Chadwicks, NY. Faith in Christ Fellowship is a church that seeks to declare the supremacy of God in all things. If you would like to visit our church please feel free to join us for our Sunday morning worship at 10am at 3431 Oneida Street in Chadwicks. For more information about our church, about who God is, or for additional sermons, please visit our website at www.ficfellowship.com.

Hop & Barrel Happy Hour
6/28 - 7/11 2012

Hop & Barrel Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 26:43


This week Brian and Justin are joined by Anthony to talk about the Spring Valley location, Booster Days and the RJ's Meats Hot Dog Eating Consest!

Jewish History Soundbites
Great American Jewish Cities #21: Monsey Part I

Jewish History Soundbites

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 44:22


Monsey. Rockland County. The Hudson River Valley. The image of suburbia. This small town across the Tappan Zee Bridge somehow developed into one of the largest Jewish Orthodox enclaves worldwide. Though the area had some minor Jewish beginnings from the end of the 19th century, it was with the vision of Rav Shraga Feivel Mendlowitz that Monsey began to develop as a Jewish community. Rav Shraga Feivel built Bais Medrash Elyon and his family and students laid the foundations of many Torah institutions including Yeshiva of Spring Valley and Bais Shraga. Rabbi Yosef Dov Soloveitchik was an early rabbi in Spring Valley, while his wife Rebbetzin Shoshana was a pioneer in girls education, standing at the helm of the Monsey Bais Yaakov for decades. Great personalities who resided in the town and contributed to its development included Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky, Rav Mordechai Schwab, Rav Nosson Horowitz, Ronnie Greenwald, the Vizhnitz Rebbe Rav Mottele Hager, Rav Moshe Neuschloss in nearby New Square and many others.    For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com   Subscribe To Our Podcast on:    PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/   Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

CannaBlogger's Corner
Episode 19: Sara Astudillo & Taking the Trash Out

CannaBlogger's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 40:44


On this week's episode, I'm seshing with the brilliant mind behind the Taking the Trash Out initiative you heard about in one of our last episodes, Sara Astudillo (@seaweed710). She's making it her mission to not only clean up the communities around us in San Diego but also change the way in which we do it. Her “zero footprint” clean-up concept shines a light on how we dispose of our trash and garbage to reduce the amount of plastic and toxic waste infecting our planet. She's collaborating with some amazing folks in the cannabis industry, such as Friendly Farms and Chingona Cakes, to help spread Taking the Trash Out to communities around the world. You can RSVP here for their next event located in Spring Valley on April 25, 2021. -- Huge thanks to Chris Cantore and the YEW! Podcast Network! Check out the rest of the YEW! podcast fam at https://www.yewonline.com/. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cannabloggers-corner/message

The Heart of the Matter
#54 Immigration Law, Filmmaking and Activism

The Heart of the Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 101:07


Alex Amar Kannan is an attorney and independent filmmaker. He operates a practice (Kannan Law Firm, Inc.) in Spring Valley, Ca that focuses on immigration, criminal and personal injury cases. However, we talked more about his passion for making documentaries and his advocacy for immigrant and transgender communities. Alex also shared his approach to personal wellness and managing job stress. For more info on Kannan Law Firm, Inc., visit the website: https://san-diego-abogado.com

The Light in Every Thing
What 2020 Asked of and Gifted Us

The Light in Every Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2021 60:01


In this Episode, Jonah and Patrick reflect on the extraordinary year that was 2020, and look forward into 2021. What did 2020 ask of you? What did it give you?The God of the Door, of Gateways and Transitions, was named Janus in the Roman tradition.  He was a God of Beginnings and is depicted (see the above sculpture) as looking backward with one face and forward with another.  This practice of stepping out of oneself in the evening and looking back over the day that was and ahead to the day that is coming is a core element in the spiritual disciplines we encourage here at the seminary.  Standing at the gateway of the new year and the close of the old at the end of the Holy Nights is a powerful time to practice this on a larger scale: looking back of the ‘day' of the previous year and ahead to the coming one.  We invite you to do the same!  What did 2020 ask of you?  What did it gift you?  And what do you anticipate is coming your way in 2021?  These are the guiding questions of Jonah and Patrick's conversation in this episode and questions we'd love to hear your answers to.  Please share your reflections in the comment section below.The conversation we share today is a conversation of many firsts: the first episode of the new year, the first conversation over Zoom (instead of our usual sit-downs), and the first since Patrick's move back to the United States. Patrick has returned to Spring Valley to shepherd the Ordinands in their Ordination semester.Our thanks to Elliott Chamberlin who composed the opening music, "On the Road" and the closing music, "Seeking Together".  You can find more of his music here.Our thanks also to Emily Watson for her digital production work behind the scenes!If you'd like to join our support circle, visit our Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/ccseminary/posts)

The Light in Every Thing
"The New Advent" - a Christmas Conversation

The Light in Every Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2020 64:03


It is nearly Christmas and time to take up the question: What is the birth we are anticipating, the one that is coming? Where is it that the divine, creative Word of God is newly speaking? Where is ‘burgeoning life' - as Jonah Evans calls it in this episode - seeking to incarnate anew?In this last episode before Christmas, Jonah and Patrick take up these questions by exploring the special elements that appear in the sacred act of worship during Advent time in The Christian Community.(scene along the 'fairy stream' in Spring Valley, NY, where the ordination students will be begin in January)Themes that are touched on in this episode include:What is True Life?The Service as an “Apocalypse of the Heart”The New Birth in the Gospel of JohnThe Advent Liturgy Heresy: God is Evolving!The Mystery of Golgotha Speaking in each Human SoulThe Divine Soul: A New Revelation of the Mary MysteryHow We are Made Truly Social & The Self that is Full of True LifeIn many ways these themes and this event of Christmas touches the very core of our mission here at the seminary.  We would be a schooling that serves to work like a kind of 'birth center' for its students.  A place where the different teachers and fellow students serve as 'doulas' for each other on the path and where the nearly daily entrance into the sacred space of the chapel becomes an experience of being inside the 'womb of becoming' where the new human being is forming, gestating and stirring to life.We hope and pray that this Christmas Word as New Advent might be heard in your souls this Christmas time.If you'd like to join our support circle, visit our Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/ccseminary/posts)

Root of all yips
Travis Harrison Golf Pro

Root of all yips

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2020 56:04


Travis Harrison joins me to discuss the yips and his experiences with mental preparation Travis's Bio includes- Full PGA member for 12 years 2016/17 Vic PGA club pro of the year 2018/19 Vic PGA game development coach of the year 2008 Victorian trainee of the year Head professional and manager Brighton golf course 2009-2019 Started Harrison Golf Academy at Spring Valley 2019-current PGA Trainee lecturer and mentor 2009-current Presenter to AFL coaches association on skill acquisition 2016-current Sports Coaching and Administration degree Deakin uni Professional Snowboarder and coach 1998-2005 tharrison@pgamember.org.au Insta: https://www.instagram.com/travharrisongolf/ Facebook: Travis Harrison Golf Academy Online lessons: Download "Skillest" in the app store and search for Travis Harrison in coaches In person lessons: https://springvalleygolfclub.gettimely.com/book?location=108669&category=145386&staff=269184 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rootofallyips/message

The Permaculture Podcast
Allen Clements - An Introduction to Biodynamic Agriculture

The Permaculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2020 45:23


Donate to The Permaculture Podcast Online: via PayPal Venmo: @permaculturepodcast My guest today is Allen Clements, a permaculture practitioner who, when we recorded this interview in January, 2020, was completing his certification in Biodynamic Agriculture at the Pfeiffer Center in Spring Valley, New York.   I've been intrigued by biodynamic agriculture as a farming practice since first hearing about the growth of biodynamic wineries in Sonoma Valley, California. How did Rudolf Steiner's philosophy impact the way we managed the land? How does Biodynamic Agriculture differ from permaculture or organic ag? And, what was the deal with the preparations, like stuffing a cow horn full of manure and burying it in a field? Thankfully, I knew of Allen Clements through our local permaculture community and saw that he'd posted some info about biodynamic agriculture to his Instagram feed. Reading some of his blog entries, he was just getting started with all of this, so seemed like the perfect person for me to sit down with, in person, to explore these ideas. Together, we could capture his perspective as a relatively new practitioner, and my bewilderment as someone with only a passing familiarity with the name, let alone the practices.  You can find Allen's at his blog ForestRancher.wordpress.com, on Instagram @forestranchregenerative, and his YouTube channel, Forest Ranch Regenerative. On his channel, you'll also find an interview he recorded with me about The Permaculture Podcast. As you can hear in this interview, I am skeptical of some aspects of biodynamic agriculture, but also convinced that there is something to these practices that leads to improved landscapes and healthy plants. Is it in planting and harvesting according to the calendar, mindful of the root, fruit, leaf, and flower days? Do the preparations offer the nutritional density missing in conventional, and even organic agriculture? Or do the changes come from the attention and connection to the land found by engaging with these practices? I don't know yet but would like to learn more about the origins, efficacy, and deeper practices. Not just the preparations, but also how the calendar is calculated. Why farmers chose to convert to biodynamic agriculture (Is to restore degraded land? As a branding opportunity? To increase returns?) and also to hear how Biodynamic Agriculture has grown from the ideas set out by the founder, Rudolph Steiner, a century ago. If you'd like me to air this exploration on the show and join me through this period of discovery, let me know and I'll produce more episodes on Biodynamic Agriculture. Also, do you currently practice biodynamic agriculture? What are your thoughts? What would you like to learn more about? Or do you see this as a system incompatible with permaculture? Let me know. Leave a comment in the show notes, send me an email: The Permaculture Podcast. From here, the next interview is a conversation with Nigel Palmer, to discuss his work creating hyper-local soil amendments from mineral and biological ferments and extracts. Until the next time, spend each day considering your preparations while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.  

We Nurture - A Kimberton Waldorf School Podcast Series
Connecting Communities: Beekeeping with Gunther Hauk

We Nurture - A Kimberton Waldorf School Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2020 27:26


Gunther Hauk has been a biodynamic gardener and beekeeper for four decades. A former college teacher in the US (MA from the University of Tennessee), and then a Waldorf School gardening and environmental teacher for 22 years in Germany. He returned to the USA in 1996 to co-found the Pfeiffer Center for Biodynamic and Environmental Studies in Spring Valley, NY. For 11 years he taught the subject "gardening" to Foundation Year and Teacher Training classes at Sunbridge College. He has traveled throughout the USA and internationally, giving workshops and talks on Sustainable, Biodynamic Beekeeping, Gardening with Children, and Biodynamic Farming & Gardening. Since the mid-seventies he has been a beekeeper, deeply involved in researching how to keep bees in ways that would be more in harmony with their own needs, thus raising their level of vitality and health. In his book Toward Saving the Honeybee, first published 5 years before the Colony Collapse Disorder crisis, in 2002, he called for a radical change in beekeeping methods. Together with his wife Vivian, he co-founded Spikenard Farm Honeybee Sanctuary in 2006, a non-profit education and research organization located in the Blue Ridge Mountains in Floyd, Virginia.Music is Cloud Chamber by Pictures of the Floating World.