Podcasts about Boise State University

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  • 248PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Boise State University

Latest podcast episodes about Boise State University

Chatty Broads with Bekah and Jess
327: Thanksgiving Lies + Indigenous Grief and Celebration with Cali Wolf & Tai Simpson (Rereleased Episode)

Chatty Broads with Bekah and Jess

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 91:56


(Rereleased Episode: this episode was originally recorded and released November 26, 2020) The Broads sit with Tai Simpson and Cali Wolf to talk about indigenous people's history, lies and misconceptions that are taught in “US History”, land back, Tai and Cali's personal stories, the violence of cultural appropriation, the truth about Thanksgiving, and much more. **This podcast was recorded on Tongva land   CALI WOLF: Cali is Sicangu Lakota. She is an ER nurse, mother, and the coordinating director of an Indigenous womxn led nonprofit called Native Women's Wilderness!   Follow Cali: https://www.instagram.com/caliwolf/ Donate to Native Women's Wilderness here: https://www.nativewomenswilderness.org/donate Follow Native Women's Wilderness: https://www.instagram.com/nativewomenswilderness/ ***Next week Native Women's Wilderness 2021 Gives Back Campaign will be released - follow @nativewomenswilderness on Instagram to find out more and get donation links!   TAI SIMPSON: Tai Simpson is “The Storyteller” in the indigenous language of the Nimiipuu nation (Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho). She is a direct descendant of Chief Redheart of the Nez Perce tribe and a tireless advocate for social justice. Tai's academic background is in Political Philosophy & Public Law at Boise State University where she served as the vice president and president of the Intertribal Native Council student organization. She speaks on issues afflicting marginalized communities including race, missing & murdered Indigenous women, and the intersections of oppression facing the United States. Her appearances and interviews can be heard or read on Boise State Public Radio, TEDxBoise, and several news outlets. She was recently awarded the National Native American 40 Under 40 Award by the National Center for American Indian Development recognizing her work around missing and murdered Indigenous people.   Follow Tai: https://www.instagram.com/taisimpson/ Website: https://www.taisimpson.com Watch Tai's TedxTalk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5RhEStF_bQ   Read Tai's recent piece in Cosmopolitan “Working to End the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Crisis Is Like Mopping Up the Ocean”: https://www.cosmopolitan.com/lifestyle/a37793702/missing-murdered-indigenous-women-gabby-petito/ ***The Indigenous Idaho Alliance is beginning holiday fundraising for families who need food, gifts, clean water, and support with heating and utility bills - DONATE at VENMO: @indigenousidaho      RESOURCES DISCUSSED IN EP:  ***The “All My Relations” podcast discussed “Thankstaking or Thanksgiving”: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/thankstaking-or-thanksgiving/id1454424563?i=1000499682949 ***Watch the documentary “Blood Memory” here: https://worldchannel.org/episode/arf-blood-memory/ ***Read “An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States”: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/237686/an-indigenous-peoples-history-of-the-united-states-by-roxanne-dunbar-ortiz/ ***Check out the “Indigenous Action” podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/indigenous-action/id1532103976 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
King of Stuff: How Russian Literature Can Save the World from Wokeness (#353)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 45:22


The King of Stuff welcomes Prof. Scott Yenor to discuss how Russian literature can help us oppose the woke hysteria of today. Scott is a professor of political science at Boise State University and a Washington Fellow at the Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His most recent book is The Recovery […]

King of Stuff
E353. How Russian Literature Can Save the World from Wokeness

King of Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 45:22


The King of Stuff welcomes Prof. Scott Yenor to discuss how Russian literature can help us oppose the woke hysteria of today. Scott is a professor of political science at Boise State University and a Washington Fellow at the Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His most recent book is The Recovery of Family Life: Exposing the Limits of Modern Ideologies. Russia endured political upheaval in the 19th century and beyond as the Czarist regime was opposed by liberal reformers, radical socialists, and violent nihilists. Authors such as Leo Tolstoy, Ivan Turgenev, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky chronicled the rapid changes and predicted the carnage that would result from communism and scientific materialism. Much of the discussion focuses on Dostoyevsky’s The Possessed (also known as Devils or Demons), a novel exploring how a cell of radical leftists can take down a small community from within. Subscribe to the King of Stuff Spotify playlist featuring picks from the show. This week, Jon recommends “Tomorrow” by  Swedish band Makthaverskan.

Mission43 Podcast
NFL to Army Veteran: Daryn Colledge (Pod#035)

Mission43 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 35:15


In Podcast #035 we welcome Daryn Colledge to the studio. Daryn was an All-WAC offensive tackle at Boise State University in the early 2000's before being drafted in the second round of the 2006 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers. His NFL career spanned 9 years and included a super bowl win in 2010. After retiring from professional football, Daryn made the decision to join the Idaho Army National Guard where he deployed to Afghanistan. Listen in as he describes his life in the NFL, what brought him back to Idaho, why he decided to serve in the military, and how he plans to live a life of continued service.

Shock Your Potential
What is Your Money Temperament- Ted McLyman

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:59


“Behavioural financial wellness means you understand what makes you tick with money, how you're naturally wired, and work for a one size fits you approach.” Ted McLyman One of the major aspirations for individuals is financial security. In order to support the efforts towards achievement this goal, experts continue to improve the population's financial capabilities by conducting programs that enhance individual financial knowledge and financial behavior. Ted McLyman has been in involved in numerous programs that deal with financial education and says that the concept of having a money coach should be normalized. Ted McLyman is an entrepreneur, business owner, author, speaker, trainer, Lt Col, USMC (Ret), and Ironman All World age group triathlete. Ted has over 30 years of award-winning experience, helping individuals and organizations achieve peak performance. He has al BA Social Relations from Colgate University; a MA Public Administration from Pepperdine University; and MS Instructional and Performance Technology from Boise State University. Ted is the founder of Apexx Behavioural Financial Group, Director of Behavioural Finance, DreamSmartAcademy.com, financial advisor/agent; economics instructor, US Naval Academy; Aide to the Under Secretary of the Navy for Financial Management; Head, Marine Corp Training Management Division; Commander, USMC Financial Management School; artillery officer; Executive Office, Battle Assessment Team, Operation Desert Storm. He has authored three books on behavioral finance and has also created Quick Scan Money Temperament Assessment. He is a technical consultant for "Behind the Money" program at Impact television and Director for Behavioral Finance, and Advisory Board Member at DreamSmartAcademy.com. In today's episode, Ted will talk about his career in the military and the opportunities that helped him build knowledge and skills in financial management. Listen in!   Social media handles ​Website: www.tedmclyman.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TedMcLyman/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tedmclyman/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TedMcLyman LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ted-mclyman/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/tedmclyman   I didn't know how important and consequential it would be to become a vet until I became one. [3:05] I grew up in upstate New York in the Finger Lakes area and after University I decided to join the military. [3:39] I served on several assignments and then put in a letter to get out of the Marine which wasn't accepted. [4:22] I picked up my first graduate degree at Pepperdine and my payback was to teach economics at the Naval Academy which was incredible. [[5:00] It was an opportunity to work with some of the future leaders of the country, the best and the brightest. [5:10] I was teaching classical economics which led me to my career on money behavior. [5:16] I picked up another master's degree in performance technology, worked more for the military and after retirement, I opened my first financial planning practice. [5:48] I started realizing that my job as an entrepreneur was to build my business and take care of my clients. [6:33] I also learned that I was in the business of managing behavior, not money and that became the basis of my writing where we are right now and It has been a great experience. [6:40] The wrong decisions I witnessed being made by young people who had joined the military was absolutely the catalyst for me getting started in this. [8:22] The institutional side was reactive rather than proactive and held marines accountable and the programs we had were never dealing with the behavior. [9:13] We have to understand that money is a subset of modern culture and being human our brains are designed to keep us alive and pass on our genes and not planning. [10:32] We talk about behavior and consequences, accountability and coaching in almost everything else in our life but nobody ever talks about a money coach. [11:30] The question I always ask myself is how do you know if you're hardwired to do the things that we are expecting you to do. [11:54] There's a money mindset and a wealth mindset where a money mindset is to spend while the wealth mindset is to build equity, pass it on and create true wealth. [12:47] In the modern military you're trained to be resourceful, innovative, resilient, and get the job done. [14:38] You are encouraged to think of all the scenarios to put together plans and alternatives and so I found the transitioning to entrepreneurship not that difficult. [15:07] I had the opportunity to do all kinds of incredible things because I raised my hand and gave it a shot. [16:27] Delegation means as an entrepreneur you focus on what you're good at, you become an expert, a professional, and then you build your team around you to compensate. [18:11] A successful entrepreneur has a plan and if you've got a military background, all you've got to do is think of the planning cycle you went through for your first deployment. [19:01] Commercial break. [21:30] I help people understand their behavior with money because behavior is unique to everyone. [23:30] I dropped all my licenses, sold my practice, and I'm working full time as an author, speaker and a coach, trying to change the dialogue about money. [23:54] In our culture, particularly United States, we look at money as an independent entity. [24:04] Our brains are wired to do things very differently than society wants them to do so our biology gets in the way of our feeling brain. [24:40] Modern society demands some accountability which tasks our thinking brain to do things that are uncomfortable and that's usually money stuff and for most people, the default is do nothin [25:04] What I am trying to do right now is launch a movement comprising of group of motivated people that are fed up with business as usual in the financial industry. [25:33] If you want to know what your values are, take a look at your calendar and your bank statement. [26:24] The next thing you've got to look at is your money temperament because you've got a unique spending pattern which is a function of where you grew. [27:32] Culture is an incredible driver in our money perspective whose influences on our brain are putting us into a spending state that we've never had to deal with before. [27:49] I am trying to get people to understand that we need to start moving to a behavioral approach to money. [29:37] Behavioral financial wellness means you understand what makes you tick with money, how you're naturally wired, and work for a one size fits you approach. [29:44] For the veterans out there, you stepped out and took a risk to join the military and worked out. It's the same thing would be an entrepreneur. [35:30] You can be an entrepreneur within an organization by starting small. Take an assessment of who you are and find out what you're good at and step out. [35:55] ……………………………………. Thank you to our April Sponsor: Entrepreneur's Guide to Financial Well-Being or Wayne Titus Imagine starting a long journey without a map…or even a clear idea of the obstacles ahead. That's exactly what it's like for entrepreneurs who start companies with a lot of passion, but without the financial expertise to grow and scale their businesses and create long-term wealth for their families.  Wayne Titus shows you how to find a financial adviser who can help you map a better journey. In his book, The Entrepreneur's Guide to Financial Well-Being.  With the right adviser at your side, you'll have the freedom to focus on what really matters to you. Get The Entrepreneur's Guide to Financial Well-Being at Amazon.com and in the virtual bookstore on the Shock Your Potential app.

Idaho Matters
Got innovation? New Idaho center could change the food and dairy industry

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 10:22


Boise State University was recently awarded over $2 million to create a Food and Dairy Innovation Center over the next five years to meet the growing needs of the industry in Idaho.

Just Around The Corner – Dennis Mansfield
S2 Episode 8: How Michael Seals Built a Successful Recording Studio

Just Around The Corner – Dennis Mansfield

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 41:20


What does it take to start a successful recording studio? In this episode, Dennis interviews Michael Seals to find out. Michael is the founder, producer, and audio engineer at Sanctuary Studios in Boise, Idaho. Michael has been involved in music since he first picked up a guitar at 10 years old. After getting a degree in music from Boise State University, Michael believed his future would be centered around professionally performing. After his life took a turn, Michael put his family first while pursuing other career goals, but never lost his love of music and performing. He's played in local bands, church worship groups, and eventually decided to start the recording studio to cater to other artists who were looking at capturing a professional sound while enjoying a relaxed atmosphere. Sanctuary Studios provides an incredibly chill recording environment and access to top-notch equipment including microphones, preamps, and audio interfaces. Michael works with every client to determine what will bring out the best sound and can even provide assistance during recording to ensure a quality, great sounding end product. In addition to musical recording, Michael has recorded podcasts, audiobooks, and more in his studio. In fact, since Just Around the Corner was launched in July 2019, every episode has been recorded at Sanctuary Studios with Michael playing a vital role in its success. Featured in this episode are short clips recorded at Sanctuary Studios. These include: "Plunge" by Hannah Buckley "If You're Lucky" recorded with a live band in studio "Like Literally Anything" podcast - Spotify Link "To Trust In What We Cannot See" audiobook by Dennis Mansfield - Amazon Link To schedule a recording session at Sanctuary Studios, reach out to Michael at sealsongs@hotmail.com. Thanks for listening to Just Around the Corner! Find out more about Dennis, his coaching, and his books at DennisMansfield.com.

The Academy of Esports
A Conversation with Dr. Chris Haskell // Head Coach of Boise State University Esports

The Academy of Esports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 40:36


Dr. Chris Haskell, Head Coach of Boise State University Esports, returns to the podcast for the third time. Our conversation revolves around the development of an esports culture, and the careful considerations one must take when considering corporate sponsorships of your program. -- Dr. Chris Haskell // Twitter // Website Boise State Esports Check out the First Interview with Dr. Haskell Check out the Second Interview with Dr. Haskell -- Esports is organized competitive video games allowing schools to redefine their athletic culture, diversify opportunities for student participation, promote physical and mental health, increase collegiate scholarship pathways, and play games! We cannot forget the importance of play! James O'Hagan (LinkedIn // Twitter) is the Founder and Host of The Academy of Esports podcast. The Academy of Esports (Website // Twitter) You may email any questions or topic suggestions to contact@taoesports.com. -- Music provided Royalty Free "8 Bit Adventure!" Querky Fun Game Music by HeatleyBros iTunes: https://goo.gl/M3b16f Spotify: https://goo.gl/5SbVuk License: https://goo.gl/jadB5E Twitter: https://goo.gl/fKqyrj Facebook: https://goo.gl/PrsTvS --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/taoesports/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/taoesports/support

Heart of the Athlete
Skip Hall

Heart of the Athlete

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 25:00


Today’s show features Skip Hall, former head football coach at Boise State University. Ken and Skip discuss Skip’s new book, Coach’Em Up: The Skip Hall Story.

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: Civic Engagement in Higher Education

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Brian Mateo, associate dean of civic engagement and director of strategic partnerships in Bard College's Globalization and International Affairs Program and security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, discusses how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic if you would like to reference after today's discussion. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. So with that, I'm delighted to have the pleasure of introducing Brian Mateo to talk about how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues. We've shared his bio with you, so I'll just give you a few highlights. Mr. Mateo serves as associate dean of civic engagement at Bard College, where he works with faculty and students across the Open Society University Network on experiential learning and civic engagement opportunities. Previously he worked with public diplomacy programs sponsored by the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs on U.S. foreign policy and engagement. He's also a security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, a term member at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a trained climate reality leader under former Vice President Al Gore. So, Brian, thank you very much for being with us. If we could just dive right in to talk about what is the role of higher education in civic engagement? How do you define it, and how do you encourage administrators and students to get more involved? MATEO: Thank you very much for having me here today at the Council on Foreign Relations, Irina. I'm very excited for this opportunity. So, yes, what is the role of higher education institutions when it comes to civic engagement? So the American Psychological Association defines civic engagement as individuals and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public concern. At the core of Bard's mission is to be a private college in the public interest. And how we do that is by providing access and education, especially for students that are underrepresented or may not have access to a liberal arts education. This is evidenced by our Bard Early Colleges, which are high school—which are for high school aged students that can take up to a year or two years of free college credit to be able to accelerate their college career. It's also evidenced by our Bard Prison Initiative, which is the largest prison education program for incarcerated individuals in the nation. So when we think about how do we do this, I see—I can't help but think about Astin's model of student development, which says that for students that are hyper-involved in their institutions, they get to be more engaged and involved, and the quality of their involvement goes up. And if we provide high level of programs and resources, students are more likely to be engaged. And then Astin also encourages us to make sure that we are providing resources and programmatic efforts that are meeting the needs of the students today. And I will begin to talk about how we do this from the student level, the faculty/staff level, institutionally, and also talk about how we work with communities. And before I begin, Bard also is a founding member of the Open Society University Network, which is comprised of over forty academic and research institutions. So not only are we also collaborating with our local communities, we also have a transnational network that we're working with. So how do you engage students? We do this by making sure that we're merging the curricular and co-curricular learning. This is also evidenced by our Certificate of Civic Engagement Program, which is a structured path for undergraduate students that are interested in deepening their knowledge and understanding of civic engagement and community engagement. And students are able to participate in this program and also earn a certificate that will also be added to their transcript. We also provide students with grants and opportunities to pursue internships that are unpaid, which are—which are called Community Act Awards. So students that find unpaid internships related to civic engagement and also social justice issues can apply for a grant to be able to supplement that, and making it more equitable for our students. We also provide what are called microgrants, which are seed funding for students that want to be able to do community-based projects. For faculty and staff, we encourage them to teach courses on experiential learning. And these courses enable students to not only work with the community but bring the community also into our classroom. And looking at David Kolb's experiential learning cycle, where students need—where students start with concrete experience, work on reflection, and also thinking about the experience while then planning and learning what they've—and executing what they've learned, is very important when it comes to civic engagement work because students are—students are introduced to some of these issues in the classroom, and then they have the ability to work through those issues with a professor and community members as well. And some example of these courses are—I teach a course on civic engagement myself, where the course is historical, theoretical, and experiential. And we look at social movements in America that help effect change. And we look at the civil rights movement, women rights, LGBT rights, climate activism and climate action, as well as the role of the media and what is misinformation and disinformation. And in this course, students also have to conduct what's called the Community Needs Assessment. And the Community Needs Assessment, students come with a research question and then work to interview community members to see what are the issues that are happening there. For faculty that also want to learn more about how to create courses on experiential learning, we also offer an experiential leaning institute where faculty from the OSUN network can participate. And then students—examples of work that faculty have done with students have been implementing a digital platform to assist with teaching or tutoring practices, historical tours and workshops, and also storytelling and interviews of community partners as well. Faculty that teach experiential learning, students say that about 89 percent of them say that engagement this way has helped their awareness to social justice and community issues. And in 2020 we had over eight hundred students that participated in about eighty courses. And those courses worked with ninety-five community agencies or organizations. We also help faculty and graduate students on conducting engaged research and scholarship practice. So some of examples of these are looking at LGBT issues in South Africa, the intersection of how music supports education with people—with people with disabilities, and also peacebuilding and storytelling as well. And we also help staff and faculty create civic action plans, which help colleges around the OSUN network institutionalize civic engagement and strategically think of how these four pillars can work together. While working with community partners, we're also very intentional in making sure that we have equitable practices. We developed what's called the Principles of Equity, where faculty/staff and community members can read on our website on how we work with the community, and making sure that it's reciprocal, making sure that it's—that we're deepening and creating sustainable partnerships while also engaging community with resources and developing shared resources as well that can benefit both the community and students and the institution. When it comes to institutional engagement, I gave examples of the Bard Early Colleges and Bard Prison Initiative. Bard has also been able to work with student-led—with other student-led initiatives that have become part of the institution. Examples of these as well are Brothers At, which is a mentoring and college-readiness program nationwide for young men of color, as well as Sister to Sister, that does similar work but with young women of color. And recently, Bard also has worked with trying to evacuate nearly two hundred Afghan students and helping them get an education throughout our network as well. So those are some examples of institutional engagement at Bard—at Bard as well. And I constantly think to myself: What is it that we want our students to gain when they participate in our—in our program, or engage with our network? And looking back at Astin's theory of student involvement, we see that Astin talks about inputs, which are what students come with, the environment, what is it that we're providing for our students, and the outputs. As a result of a student attending our universities, what is it that we want them to get out of this, aside from just, you know, the academic knowledge. But how do we want them to be involved? And in my opinion, I feel like there's a few outputs that we would want, as higher education administrators. And I'll state them and then conclude my presentation. So I strongly believe that, you know, we want them to be critical thinkers. We want them to understand and practice equity, be strategic problem solvers, understand the power of reflection and active listening, community builders, practice empathy, be lifelong learners, and also ultimately be engaged individuals. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Brian, thank you very much. Let's go to all of you now. (Gives queuing instructions.)  So I'm going to go first go to Manuel Montoya. Please unmute yourself and tell us your institution. Q: Yeah. Hello. My name's Manuel Montoya and I am from the University of New Mexico. Thank you, Irina, for setting this up. I think this is an important discussion. And thank you, Mr. Mateo, for your presentation. I'm pleased to hear all the work that you're doing. That's inspiring. I will, I guess, do two parts. I will share some of the work that I've done and then share a question that I think is germane to this particular issue. We recently set up a global experiential learning curriculum at the university that is designed to get students to merge theory with practice and some sort of practical impact in terms of the global economy and other things. And we have a—we have a group of students that work with the largest folk art market in the world, which is based in Santa Fe. And we're trying to get them to work with indigenous communities throughout the world to try to have a larger platform for market entry. And we're—we've been in talks for the past four years to try to get the Olympic games to have some sort of mini pop-up folk art market that represents these types of market activities. And inside of that there is a lot of issues about human rights, but also about the value of crafting economy. There's all sorts of things that students are trying to engage with that require a liberal arts education. My question, or my frustration, often happens at places that aren't like Bard College, places that don't necessarily see community-engaged learning as having some sort of incentive structure for faculty. I'm one of many faculty members that does that, likely because I care about the issues and also because I think that it does make research and other forms of academic and intellectual contributions valuable. So my question to Mr. Mateo, or just generally to whoever's participating, is how are we creating an incentive structure for faculty and for other people who are engaged within the university system to make this transition to do the kind of work that Mr. Mateo is talking about? And what is that—what is that going to take in places that are embedded a little bit more traditionally in the way that higher education either incentivizes or evaluates faculty and stuff in more traditional ways? MATEO: Yes. Thank you so much for your question. And it's a question that we're all grappling with, right, as well. Some of us—some of us are doing the work deeper and, you know, sometimes taking risks, and others are in the inception piece. So I'll elaborate by saying this: Students more and more are asking how do I apply what I'm learning in the classroom to a job? How do I make sure that, as a result of me attending this institution, I'm also going to be competitive or be able to contribute to society, right? So I think that—I think that more and more institutions and faculty are thinking about this, because you—you know, students are less inclined to go be taught something and not be able to apply it. At the same time, students also want to see themselves, their history, and also what's going on in the community into the curriculum too. So this is also driving the conversation. It is not easy to teach courses on experiential learning. It takes a lot of time. It also takes resources. And you have to embed reflection and community engagement into the syllabus. And sometimes when you're teaching two days a week for an hour or an hour and a half—you know, fifteen-week curriculum for the semester, that can be difficult to do. So what we've done is that we've developed an experiential learning institute to help faculty understand how to bring this thing into it, how to work with community, how to start that timeline. Because it's very different to develop a syllabus than to bring in community, because you sometimes have to start setting that up earlier. And also, we provide grants to support them to be able to do either—to buy resources for transportation, if they need to hire a student intern to help them with this work as well. So those are some of the ways that we have tried to do this. I also want to talk about data and assessment, because I can't stress enough how much—how important that is. Because when you're measuring students' learning and you see that their learning has grown exponentially from an experiential based course, you cannot argue with that, right? So we try to do our best to make sure that we are—that we're also assessing learning and making sure that when—that when we are asking for funding or that when we are trying to create new programs and initiatives, that we are doing this not only evidence-based in theory and practice, but also on the data that proves that this is something that is of a benefit to the community, to our students, and our institution. Q: Thank you, Mr. Mateo. I guess I have one follow-up question, if it's permissible, Irina. FASKIANOS: Sure. Go ahead, Manuel. Q: Yeah, yeah. So I think you're entirely right. I think that assessment at the student level and the student engagement level, being able to see how this connects to the vocational and even their social destinies is a really, really important factor. I've noted that many institutions across the country are having a great difficulty trying to incorporate or embed community engagement as how they evaluate their faculty. And I'm a tenured faculty at the university, and it's a research one institution. It's not a liberal arts institution. But, you know, publish or perish becomes still one of the ways in which I'm evaluated. So I have to—I have to attend to this kind of master of publishing in peer-reviewed journals, while at the same time my heart and really the most effective work that I do is during community engagement work. So I guess my question is also fundamentally about how we're—how we're transforming institutions to be able to adapt and really incorporate the type of community engagement work that you're talking about, Mr. Mateo, while at the same time valuing and validating its value with the assessment of faculty every year. Because I would say that you'd get a ton of faculty who'd be really good at doing this kind of work, but they're disincentivized to do it because they're only evaluated by their peer-reviewed journal work. So how does one connect the two? What is the frontier for that in higher education that you guys have seen? And I'd really, really like to know, because I think that's going to be a really important part of the frontier of what higher education is dealing with. MATEO: Well, yes, thank you. And, you know, as a field of higher education we're here not only teach, but provide knowledge, and hopefully that that knowledge helps better communities or help create an awareness, right? So that's something that needs to—that needs to be a driving source and conversation because, you know, what we try to do is to incentivize faculty whenever they aren't conducting research, and also students as well, when they want to do community-based work, to see who they can partner with, how they can go about and do that. And making sure that we're amplifying voices and showing the level of work that people are doing so, like, that their work can be recognized and that it also shows that there's a value to this as well. So that's what I would say there. It's still something that I think institutions grapple with, but more and more I believe that as institutions begin to see the value of being civically engaged, because at the end of the day, you know, we all also exist in the community. Our colleges and our campuses are within our community, within a community, within a domestic national and international realm. And, you know, what is it that we want to do? We want to contribute. And that's one of the reasons why we also provide engaged research grants for faculty too. So I hope that that answers your question, Manuel, and I'm happy to elaborate more. Q: I'll yield to other questions. But thank you very much. I appreciate it. FASKIANOS: I'm going to go next to Laila Bichara, who has a raised hand. And if you could unmute and identify your institution. Q: Hi. Well, I work for SUNY Farmingdale. And generally speaking, I teach with experiential learning. I use all kinds of newspapers and case studies and current affairs to make sure that the theory we cover in global business, you know, management and all other courses are, you know, applied and showing the results and what's going on. That said, I am currently serving on an adjunct staff to work on couple of issues. One is social mobility and the second is community engagement, and I see a lot of interrelation between this and experiential learning. And I just wanted to see if there is any work done or papers done in the social mobility, because our students are typically first-generation college students. They don't have role models at home and they rely heavily on us to guide them, and they're usually kids or, you know, students in their twenties that have two or three jobs to pay for their education. So any ideas, any links, any guidance for me to start to make advancement in that project and help my students. MATEO: Great. Thank you. So what I hear you say is that looking at the linkages between social mobility, community engagement, and which one was the third one? Q: Experiential learning as well. MATEO: Experiential learning. Yes. Q: Yeah. It's all a kind of, like, spiral to me. You know, that's how I see it. MATEO: Yes. So when allowing students to do experiential learning into the classroom and bringing into the classroom, you're also helping them get applied skills, and yes, so there is at times a level of—a disadvantage when a student is working three jobs while also studying and then you're telling them like, oh, go volunteer, or go do this, right. By embedding experiential learning into the curriculum, you're still teaching students with some of these applicable skills that they can use as a part of a resume and also can speak to in an interview and saying, like, this is how I was able to do this as evidenced by that, right. And that, in turn, helps students to be able to find other opportunities as well. In terms of links, so we do have resources at our Center for Civic Engagement website, which is cce.bard.edu, and there's a resource link there, and then we also have resources as well on our OSUN website, osun.bard.edu. So those are—those are places that you that you can find some of these resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And we'll send out after this a link to this webinar as well as with those URLs so that people—websites so people can go back and dig deeper. So I'm going to go next to David Kim's written question. He's an assistant professor at UCLA. Thank you for this discussion. I'd like to hear more about insights into community engagement on an international or global level. What are some best practices when faculty, communities, and students work across borders—international borders? How are they different from community engagement at a local or national level? MATEO: Thank you. So we have to be aware of, you know, what we can provide and also what is it—what are some of the needs or how it can be reciprocal. So a lot of listening and intentionality has to be brought into it because sometimes, you know, we can come in with our own mindset of, oh, this is how we do it and we do it well, and then you meet other counterparts and then they're, like, well, but this is also another way of doing it. So there has to be a collaborative and reciprocal way or a mutual, respectful, reciprocal way of engaging, and, typically, you know, how we've done that is that we've partnered with other universities. We've also seen who are the community partners that are there in the international realm and how we can work around that, too. So I would say being intentional, making sure that you have capacity for what you are doing so, like, that you can deliver and also having a mutual reciprocal approach as well as active listening, and be willing to learn also from our international partners, too. FASKIANOS: I think, Brian, you mentioned that you were looking at LGBTQ+ issues in South Africa. Do you have any partnerships? Can you sort of give us examples of how you're doing that? MATEO: Yes. That's one of the research grants that we have provided to someone to be able to do that research. So the individual there is partnered with organizations and are conducting that research, and once that research is done we will make sure to publish it. FASKIANOS: Great. OK. I'm going to go next to Isaac Castellano from Boise State University. Our career center just landed a grant to pilot a program to pay students for their internship experiences. For us, a lot of students—our students have to work and this is another way beyond embedding experiential learning into their coursework. So I think he's sharing more than asking a question, but maybe you have a reaction to that. MATEO: Yes, and thank you so much, Isaac. So yeah. So we piloted this a couple of years ago and it's been very successful, and the way that it—the way that it works is it's for summer internships and students can request up to $3,000 for any unpaid internship. And we have them submit an application as well as a supervisor form and an agreement of what the students will be doing for that organization. And then, in return, the students will write one to two reflection papers on their experience, and then when they come back to campus the next semester they get to present about their experience and what they've done for that internship. So that's how we—that's how we run our community action awards, and it's been super successful. It has been able to provide access to students that wouldn't otherwise be able to do an unpaid internship, and the students submit a budget of up to $2,000 and then we see how we can—how we can help fund that. So I highly encourage you to definitely do that pilot, and if you do want any other insight or how to be able to do that, I'm happy to share my email as well with Irina when she sends out the resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And Isaac has a follow-up. Where does the money come from, that paid summer program that you're talking about? MATEO: It could—grants. We also try to fund—try to find funding and resources as well. So it comes through various sources, and so that's how we try to support our students. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. OK. So the next question is another written question. And people can ask their questions, too, but this is from Chip Pitts at Stanford University. Have you encountered obstacles in this environment characterized by major demographic changes and increasing polarization, e.g., mandates against critical race theory, based on the perceived political nature, even leftist nature of, quote/unquote, “social justice” and “human rights” or “environmental community engagement efforts”? And if so, or for those in places where there are more conservative values, what have you seen or would you suggest to shore up and spur more courage and leadership among the reluctant or shy faculty and administrators and overcome and avoid such blockages? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Thank you. So you have to meet communities where they're at, right, and making sure that they also understand that we're here to work with them, too, and this is why active listening and making sure that there is a reciprocal approach to this is important. And it's not—sometimes it can be fairly easy to be able to say, hey, we want to collaborate with you, and other times it can be extremely difficult and tenuous. But continuing to demonstrate and show the level of learning or how that community is continuously being engaged is something that's very important because, in my opinion, I think that sometimes, you know, we have a hard time of showing all the great work that we're doing, and in order for us to be able to partner and work more with community members we also have to show the research and demonstrate and be able to present this so people understand what we are trying to do. So there are times that it is challenging, and there are some things that will work with some communities and some things that will not. So where then are you able to then find what can work and how you can make it happen, and then from there be able to build up from there—from the ground up. So yeah, so there are some communities where you can do, like, one to ten things and then other communities that you can do one to three things and, hopefully, that you can start to do four or five, but then how do you still provide that access and education and equity as well. FASKIANOS: Brian, what would you say are the—in your opinion, the global issues students are most interested in? And, you know, if a college can only take on or faculty can only take on one issue that they're trying to push, you know, what would be the one, or to drive a—foster more civic engagement? What do you think would be a viable and a good starting—steppingstone to sort of expand this into their community and both on campus and off? MATEO: Wow. That's a great question, Irina. I would say that students are very interested in gender equity, LGBT. They're also very interested in making sure that underrepresented populations are included in conversations, as well as awareness in disability. An all-encompassing issue that students are also passionate about because most of them experience this globally every day is climate change, and making sure that, you know, how we can engage students through there. So that—so out of everything that I mentioned, this also encompasses these issues as a major one, and Bard, through the Open Society University Network, is actually having a global teach-in, which is—you can find this in the Solve Climate by '30 and I can send the link to Irina as well—where all colleges and universities can come in and do a global teach-in and as well get resources, and we're providing opportunities for students around the world to also be able to receive opportunity to get engaged, too. So we're doing this in March, and we're trying to get a robust number of institutions to participate in this because climate doesn't only affect, you know, our living environment, but it also affects students' educational pursuits. Harvard conducted a study called Heat and Learning that showed that for every degree Fahrenheit that goes up student learning goes down by 1 percent. It's also shown disparities that—you know, climate change also has, you know, a disproportionate effect on young people of color because of regions where people live in cold and hot environments, as well as disparities when it comes to gender. Women are more likely to be taken out of the classroom when there are climate change disasters to be caretakers, and we're also seeing a rise in child marriages because of that, too. You know, it also—you also talk about sanitation when it comes to climate change and educational environments. You know, if you start to—if your building starts to get moldy and also if students start to get sick because of the infrastructure or it gets too hot, you're going to see an increased rate of students showing up—not showing up and being absent or dropout rates as well. So climate change exacerbates or, as it's called, a threat multiplier, and this is something that as higher education administrators we have to also make sure that we are—that we're constantly thinking and showing how can we, based on students' interests, can help to solve climate as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So if others have questions—Manuel, I don't know if you had a follow-on. You said you would cede the floor but you can come back on. You can raise your hand or write—type your question in the Q&A box, or I could ask more. Just waiting to see if Manuel wanted to come back in. OK. There is a—oh, Manuel said his question was answered. OK. Great. So—sorry, I'm just looking—toggling a lot of things. All right. So my next question would be—you did talk about this earlier—you know, there has been a lot written about what is a college education worth, and I think this connection of the critical thinking and the internships and the experiential learning. But could you talk a little bit more about students' educational performance and career path and how they can leverage these—you know, what they're doing, civic engagement, into their future career plans? MATEO: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: And then I have another random question. Mmm hmm. MATEO: Yes. So helping students to understand that some of the work that they do outside of a classroom could also translate both inside as well because when I have—when I see students when they're thinking about their career path, they're like, oh, but I've never done an internship before, or, oh, but I've never actually had a job here or there. But then when you start to look at the classes that they're taking and the application piece in those courses, you can sort of say, yes, but you also in this course did storytelling of a community and also created a podcast. So this is also an application piece where you can add to your resume, too. So helping students to think and link experiential learning to application, and demonstrating that is definitely an added plus, and this is why a lot of these courses are also very popular and very highly rated for students because they're starting—they start to see that they're also gaining transferable skills while engaging in these courses, too, that they can then add to their resume and be able to speak to at an interview as well. Like, I'll give you the example of the community needs assessment that the students that I work with conduct. You know, they can talk about research. They can talk about, you know, being able to work with communities. They also have to interview a leader in that community, whether that be a politician or a school leader or anyone. You know, so there are skills that they can then say here are some tangible outcomes as a result of this assignment, and that's why experiential learning can also help when it comes to merging career paths for students. FASKIANOS: Great. So a few more questions in the chat. Jim Zaffiro, who is at Central College, has asked what recommendations would you have for incorporating civic engagement into a common first-year experience course? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Yes. So looking back at Astin's model of input-environment-outputs, right, so we need to figure out, like, you know, how can we create a baseline for students to best understand what it means to be civically engaged and the environments piece of it. So what I would say, making sure that they understand the community they're a part of, what are some of the issues and needs, providing reflection for them to talk about how they have been engaged, how do they see themselves as engaged citizens and providing opportunities for them to get exposure to working with community members and working outside of the community as well. So we do this starting from our orientational language and thinking, where we start to not only provide articles and readings on this but we're also getting students to volunteer and get—and having students to think about how they want—how they want to be involved, and showing them a lot of the student-led initiatives that we offer that they can either get involved or start on their own. And then throughout the first year they also have what's called the Citizen Science Program, which is a January term, where students start to see how science and citizenship come together and work together. And during that time, we also have our MLK Day of Engagement, which is a day for students to also go out and volunteer into the community and reflect on their volunteer work as well. So that's kind of how we've embedded a lot of engagement for our first-years to making sure that we're providing them with engagement, adding courses for them to think about what does it mean to be engaged in either a civic engagement course or experiential learning courses and opportunities throughout the year for them to be involved, which, ultimately, we were then promoting for them how they can—how they can apply for these community action awards and also for the summer, but also what are ways for them to get engaged through the broader OSUN network. FASKIANOS: Great. How has the pandemic exacerbated preexisting community needs? How have you at Bard deepened students' civic engagement in order to help alleviate the pandemic-related effects that we are seeing in our communities? MATEO: Yes, and as we all know, when it comes to community-based work in civic engagement, you know, we all had to, you know, come indoors, and we had this notion that we had to be there to be able to engage with the community. So we developed—and this is also part of our civic engagement website—a tool kit on how to do engagement virtually, how to be able to do blended learning as well, and making sure that we still had a commitment to our community leaders. And our community partners also were able to come into our classes via Zoom and engage with students as well, and we helped students find virtual engagement, whether it be tutoring, whether it be, you know, helping to analyze something and sending it back. So these were some of the ways. But it did definitely create a halt, though we quickly found ways to not only build and provide resources but also pivot and making sure that we provide opportunities for students that were online and making sure that we showed a commitment to our partners as well. FASKIANOS: So John Dietrich at Bryant University asks for examples, more examples in practice of bringing experiential learning into the classroom, so if you could put some— MATEO: Yes. Yeah, so we have a course that's called All Politics is Local and what we do in that—and what the faculty members do in that course is that they're able to pair students with local internships in different government organizations, so not only are students learning about local government in the class but they're actually interning at the same time in different local governments. Another example of a professor that teaches studio arts is a class called Portraits and Community where they get to talk to community members and identify the history of that community, also talk with Congress—with a member of Congress while painting these community members and learning their stories, learning how to tell their stories but using art as a way of engagement. Another example is being able to develop tool kits, so, for example, looking at, you know, if you're a professor in biology or in chemistry and you have a local river or you have, you know, an ecosystem or environment, you know, how has that changed throughout the years and how can students create experiments and be able to then provide knowledge for local leaders or community members to see if there has been change that has been happening there? So I hope that this gives you some examples of community-based learning and education when it comes to doing it in the classroom. Podcasts have also been something that have been very important because students not only learn the skill on how to run a podcast and how to do a podcast, but then they also get to interview community members and do it—and be able to speak and provide the opportunity for storytelling as well. FASKIANOS: Can you talk a little bit about the role civic engagement plays in international students' educational experience? I mean, a lot of campuses have international students, and what does it mean for them and what are they taking back to their countries? MATEO: Yeah, so working with the OSUN network I've learned a lot about what other campuses have been doing and how they do civic engagement, and at some campuses civic engagement is embedded from the beginning. They are taking courses, they have to graduate with a certain amount of hours to be able to get their degree, you know, and some institutions in the United States do that, some don't per se, you know, so—and then also thinking about what—so for them also thinking about what does it mean to be engaged in their communities, and what are some of the work that they are doing as well? So civic engagement can look differently, so some of it can be tutoring. Some of it can be, you know, mostly youth engagement. A lot of it can be gender equity and working to raise awareness on gender issues. So there has been a great sense of education knowledge on my part on seeing how other institutions work on civic engagement. At the same time, it's also great because we're able to talk about civic engagement and develop that baseline and learn how we can grow together, and what are some things that they're doing that we can do and vice versa? So that—so I would say that in some institutions globally, civic engagement is embedded from the beginning and students have to make sure that they are taking courses on engagement. Some of them have, like, first-year sophomore-, junior-, senior-level seminars on engagement, and then others, you have to have a requirement of graduation for a certain amount of hours. So that's how, kind of, it's worked. FASKIANOS: Brian, you talked about inputs and outputs and metrics, so have you measured how civic engagement, the programs that you're doing are affecting students' perspectives on diversity, equity, and inclusion? MATEO: Yes, we have, actually, and—I have this here in my notes—yes, and 89 percent of them say that it has created an awareness of social justice issues and it has also enhanced their learning. So we're seeing that this is something that is showing and demonstrating that by engaging, and also at times engaging with difference, it has helped their learning. And over 90 percent of students say that they would continue to engage our—engage with arts and science courses or experiential courses as a result of that. FASKIANOS: Do you do that survey after each semester or is it at the end of the academic year? How are you doing that? MATEO: Yeah, so we do that survey at the end of each semester when it comes to faculty courses. When it comes to the engagement that students are doing outside of the classroom we also try to assess that, too, which I do midway and also at the end, and some students also do culminating projects, as well, that they are incorporating—at the end of their academic career they are talking about how civic engagement has helped them. So an example of that is—and this is the certificate in civic engagement that we've recently launched. You know, students will be able to apply for what's called an engaged senior project grant that they can get funding to be able to add civic engagement into their final project too, so that's—we're measuring and seeing how many students are interested and want to be able to engage in that. So I would say all together we are doing—you know, and sometimes, you know, we capture a lot of data and sometimes, you know, so we try to make sure that we're doing it as holistic as possible but we do it at the end, so at the end of each semester if a course qualifies as experiential learning, we are doing—so it's a separate evaluation outside of the normal class evaluation, and then we start to see and look at the metrics and what students have learned and, like, now we can start to gather and tell stories behind, you know, what these courses are doing. FASKIANOS: Great. So we have a follow-up question from Manuel Montoya: How does experiential learning and community engagement avoid essentializing the communities you engage with? On a related note, how does one navigate who gets to represent community needs when working on issues of engagement? MATEO: Yeah, this is a very, very, very, like, a thin line. Right? And it comes, again, with mutual respect, reciprocity, active listening. Some of the time community partners come to us and say, hey, we have a need and then we evaluate it and see how we can help that need. Other times, faculty or even students are like, hey, here is something that we should be working on and then we do that. Right? So an example of that is the Bard Prison Initiative. A student came and said, hey, look, we should be working on this and then it became an institutional part of Bard and now it's one of the largest prison education programs for incarcerated individuals across the nation. You know, so—and it takes a lot of reflecting and making sure that the community's needs are also in the forefront, because we don't want to usurp or take on, you know, or say, like, oh, this is ours now. No, this is “in collaboration with.” This is not a “we do this” per se. So that's why we have developed the principles of equity, and I'll share that, as well, with Irina so you can get a sense—that talks about this is, how can we make this equitable? How can we acknowledge and reflect on the work that we're doing? How do we—how are we not making sure that we're showing up and saying, like, oh, look, we're here, as like, you know, how—saving a community. But no, we're here to help enhance a community while they're enhancing our learning and providing assistance for us as well. So it has to be reciprocal in order for you to maintain a deep and sustained relationship. FASKIANOS: Great. And I'm just going to flag—I don't know if people are looking at the Q&A but Chip Pitts was building on what you talked about the importance of climate as a health issue. There's a study that's worth looking at, www.thelancet.com/countdown-health-climate, so you can look there. MATEO: Thank you, Chip. FASKIANOS: We do have another comment. I've benefited immensely from this discussion, bringing to fore the relevance of community engagement for students and faculty. I'm seeing new areas I can suggest for experiential learning to my institution. Terrific. That's great. MATEO: Thank you. I'm glad. FASKIANOS: Really appreciate that from NenpoSarah Gowon—and the last name is cut off. All right, so I wanted to ask you about—in your view, do you—I mean, you've been doing this for a long time. What do you see as the challenges that you've faced in sort of bringing this along in your community? And what have been the unexpected surprises and the receptivity to this approach of experiential learning and critical thinking, et cetera? MATEO: Thank you. That's an excellent question and here's reflection, you know, as we talk about experiential learning. Right? So I would say that my—so I was—so I'm fortunate enough to be able to work with the OSUN network to be in—and become a lifelong learner myself and learn how other institutions have been doing this. And going back to what Manuel was alluding to is that when something is new it's hard to bring in change. Right? So when asking people, hey, do you want to teach a course on experiential learning or asking a student, hey, do you want to also do this type of civic engagement work, what sometimes is heard is, oh, this is more work; this is going to be too hard. Right? So how do you show those benefits, right? And in the beginning, initial stages, it's going to be an uphill battle. But once you have one or two or a group of people doing it and talking about how great it is and how their students are engaged—like, in some of the assessments students are asking for more time in those courses because they're like, this is so—this is great, that we want to make sure that we meet more or we want to make sure we have more time to do—to engage in these courses, so now we're seeing that students want more of these courses and not just of the courses in general but maybe adding a third section instead of just meeting two times a week per se. You know? And then—and funding can also be something that's very—that can be challenging because, you know, you need to make this a commitment in saying, like, yes, we are going to fund, let's say, for example, thirty student internships over the summer because we believe that this is going to help engage their learning. We believe this is going to create an opportunity for them moving forward. Right? So—and researcher—sometimes, you know, if you're in a metropolitan area, it's easier for you to say, yeah, we're going to go to a museum or we're going to go to this community because we can all just take public transportation. But if you're in a rural environment, you're relying on vans and buses and so on and so forth, and that can sometimes run you $500 to $2,000 per visit, you know. So you also have to think really strategically and think smarter, not harder, and how are you engaging? Right? Because one of the detriments is that great, we went to one community once and as a result of that, like, what would happen—because, again, it goes back to sustained, deepening relationships, so those are some of the things that can be some of the challenges. Some of the breakthroughs for me is when you start to see the learning connect, when a student's like, you know—you know, I once had someone from the New York City's mayor's office come speak to the students in my class and it really warmed my heart when a student was like, I didn't know that I had access; I didn't realize that someone like me could be able to speak to someone from the mayor's office. And I'm like, but you're also a citizen of New York City and this is what—you know, so there was that disconnect for the student; it was like, wow, I can do this. Another student wants to—is pursuing, you know, a degree in political science and stuff like that. You know, or even when a student did a research project on the tolls of the taxi in New York City because that student felt they had a personal connection to this, and then they were able to see how, you know, some stories were similar to what—to the narrative that they had and be able to then share some possible solutions and show that they can also be active citizens and engage and be empowered. That is the other piece that, like, once you see that people start to be empowered, they want to continue doing this work and it's, you know, my job and the job of others at other higher education institutions to continue to empower and continue to provide opportunities and shed light, you know, because some of this is also exposure. You know, thinking about outputs; it's like sometimes you know what you know, but then when you meet a professor that's doing some type of research that you're just like, wow, this is so intriguing; I never knew I could do this. That's something that is also very influential for the student. And I'll give you a personal anecdote about myself. I myself have been an experiential learner. You know, I went to college and I got my master's in higher ed administration, but all of a sudden I'm working with international communities, I'm also part of the Council on Foreign Relations doing research on climate, and teaching experiential learning. And that is as evidenced by Bard being a private college for public interest, and also enabling us to be a part of the system that we ourselves can be experiential learners and be able to do different things and sometimes, you know, like, not necessarily shift our careers but find new interests, because this is what we want to do and develop the system that can be reciprocal for our students, faculty, staff, and community. FASKIANOS: Well, with that, we've reached the end of our hour. Brain Mateo, thank you very much for sharing what you're doing at Bard, your stories, and we will circulate to everybody the resources that you mentioned, and, you know, just want to thank you for your dedication. And to everybody on this call, I mean, it really has brought home for me the important work that you all are doing to raise the next generation of leaders, and we need them and you all are role models for young adults who, as somebody said, their parents have never gone to college and really need some guidance on next steps. So thank you to you, Brian, and to everybody on this call for what you're doing in your communities. We will share Brian's email address and you can follow him on Twitter at @brianmateo. So I encourage you to follow him there. Our next Higher Education Webinar will be in November, and we will send the topic speaker and date under separate cover. And so I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic on Twitter, and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for more resources. And of course, as always, you can email cfracademic@cfr.org, with suggestions of future topics or speakers you would like to hear from. We're trying to be a resource for all of you and support you and the important work that you are doing. So Brian, thank you again. MATEO: Thank you. And I'll make sure to share resources with you. Have a great day. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. (END)

The Obligatory PSU Podcast
FALL '21 Episode 14: Will Nittany Lions Become Penn State Employees?

The Obligatory PSU Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 72:47


Even as the Nittany Lions chase another Big Ten title, fighting to defend a Top 10 ranking while battling the injury bug, it wouldn't be a season of the podcast without a couple of #Obligatory digressions, and what better time for one than coming off Penn State's bye week? (Boiler Up.) It has become increasingly difficult over the last 12 months for even the most casual college football fans to evade news stories and commentary about the social and legal battles roiling the future of the NCAA and college sports. From the halls of the United States Supreme Court to the memoranda of the National Labor Relations Board, public opinion and political willpower are shifting in ways that could drastically transform the future of college sports at Penn State and beyond. In order to start unpacking a dense and complicated topic, Chris and Kevin enlist the help of Sam C. Ehrlich, J.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Legal Studies in the Department of Management at Boise State University. Are student athletes destined to become university employees? Where and how did this process start, and what does the future hold? We spend a solid hour with an expert, exploring the answers to these questions and others driving the most volatile era for college athletics in at least 50 years. HOSTED BY: Kevin Horne, Chris BuchignaniGUEST: Dr. Sam Ehrlich

Hey Coach!
Beyond Football: Interview with Tobruk Blaine S2Ep38

Hey Coach!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 38:32


Interview with Tobruk BlaineFrom Idaho, Tobruk, loved sports but gravitated to cheerleading. She was a high school cheerleader and then went on to cheering at Oregon State.After graduation she was a high school and college cheerleading coach at Eagle and Rocky Mountain High Schools in Idaho and at Boise State University. Her high school teams won the Idaho 5A state cheerleading championships twice for Eagle High (2005, 2006 and 2008) and twice for Meridian's Rocky Mountain High (2010). The 2016 and 2017 Boise State teams were named the United Spirit Association's (USA) national champion in the Division I Small Coed cheerleading category. Blaine was named the 2006 state of Idaho Cheerleading Coach of the Year for leading Eagle High to its championship.An effective fund raiser for the Boise State spirit squad program, she annually raised more than double the program's annual operating budget to support the university's cheerleading, dance and mascot's program activities.A new football coach at San Jose State reached out to her to bring in the Beyond Football program to San Jose State.In her role, she is responsible for enhancing the lives of football student-athletes through the university's new Beyond Football program. Student-athletes are encouraged to explore what is around them, identify interests, and inspire themselves and others through a culture of volunteerism in a greater community. Student-athletes will develop career-focused proficiencies and cultivate knowledge, relationships and skills necessary to establish a successful personal and professional life beyond the game of football.Twitter:Tobruk Blaine (@tobrukblaine_TB) / TwitterSan Jose State Beyond Football (@sanjosestateBF) / TwitterBeyond Sparta (@sanjosestatebys) / TwitterLinkedIn:(3) Tobruk Blaine | LinkedInEric Reyes: Host of Hey Coach! Podcastemail:eric@heycoachreyes.comLinkedIn:Eric Reyes | LinkedInFacebook:(1) Hey Coach | FacebookInstagram :Eric Reyes (@reys6103) • Instagram photos and videos

BLOC Podcast
Episode 33: Roberta Dombrowski

BLOC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 35:40


In this episode, I talk to Roberta Dombrowski, VP of User Research, about how to encourage a culture of learning in your organization and what mindfulness in the workplace looks like.Roberta Dombrowski, MS is the VP, UXR at User Interviews, a research recruitment platform aimed at helping teams discover and embrace user insights. Roberta previously led product research at Year Up, edX, and Pluralsight. In her free time, Roberta is an adjunct professor through Boise State University's Organizational Performance and Workplace Learning (OPWL) program and mindfulness teacher.LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robertadombrowskiLinktree: https://linktr.ee/robertalearnsRoberta's suggestion for those who want to make a bigger impact on the learning culture at their organization: Teresa Torres' Continuous Discovery Habits: Discover Products that Create Customer Value and Business

Nate Shelman Show
Pandemic Ideas and Solutions

Nate Shelman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 100:20


Brian Wiley joined Nate at the beginning of the show to discuss why the Dow Jones went down today.In local COVID News, Boise State University will require all atendees of football games to either show proof of at least one Covid shot, or a negative test. Nate has an idea that might be better than that. What ideas do you have to get us through this pandemic? Pfizer has announced that they will seek emergency use authorization for the COVID Vaccine for kids 5-11 years old. (9/20/21)

Nate Shelman Show
Is Attending Large events Irresponsible?

Nate Shelman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 112:31


There is a doctor in the valley that, in his medical opinion, said that it is irresponsible for people to be attending sporting events and festivals. What is our personal responsibility when attending these events? Boise State University announced that at tomorrow's game it will require all students to show proof of vaccination, a negative COVID test, or proof of the first shot. The same move might be coming for fans. (9/1/21)

Hoop Heads
Clint Hordemann - Select Basketball Director of Player Development - Episode 528

Hoop Heads

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 54:10


Clint Hordemann is the Director of Player Development for Select Basketball, an AAU Program based in Garden City, Idaho.  After playing at Boise State University, Clint began his coaching career at the University of Nevada-Reno under Trent Johnson. He also worked for the Idaho Stampede of the NBA's Developmental League before starting with Select Basketball in 2003 . Clint graduated from Boise State in 2001 after 4 seasons on the Bronco basketball team, including a run to the Big West Conference Championship game. After attending Clackamas Community College as a freshman, Clint walked on at Boise State and earned a full scholarship for his three remaining seasons. If you're looking to improve your coaching please consider joining the Hoop Heads Mentorship Program.  We believe that having a mentor is the best way to maximize your potential and become a transformational coach. By matching you up with one of our experienced mentors you'll develop a one on one relationship that will help your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset.  The Hoop Heads Mentorship Program delivers mentoring services to basketball coaches at all levels through our team of experienced Head Coaches. Find out more at hoopheadspod.com or shoot me an email directly mike@hoopheadspod.com Follow us on social media @hoopheadspod on Twitter and Instagram and be sure to check out the Hoop Heads Podcast Network for more great basketball content. Website - https://selectbasketballusa.com/ (https://selectbasketballusa.com/) Email - clint@idahoselect.org Twitter - https://twitter.com/SelectHoopsUSA (@SelectHoopsUSA)  Visit our Sponsors! https://www.drdishbasketball.com/ (Dr. Dish Basketball) Mention the Hoop Heads Podcast when you place your order and get $300 off a brand new state of the art Dr. Dish Shooting Machine! http://www.fastmodelsports.com/ (Fast Model Sports) Use Code SAVE10 to get 10% off the number one play diagramming software for coaches https://gripspritz.net/ (Grip Spritz) Grip Spritz revitalizes and cleans the soles of your basketball shoes to stop you from slipping and sliding on the court! Better Grip, Better Game! Twitter Podcast - https://twitter.com/hoopheadspod (@hoopheadspod) Mike - https://twitter.com/hdstarthoops (@hdstarthoops) Jason - https://twitter.com/jsunkle (@jsunkle) Network - https://twitter.com/HoopHeadsPodNet (@HoopHeadsPodNet) Instagram https://www.instagram.com/hoopheadspod/ (@hoopheadspod) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/ (https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/) YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoVTtvpgwwOVL4QVswqMLQ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoVTtvpgwwOVL4QVswqMLQ) Support this podcast

Idaho Matters
Boise State University Focuses On Impact Of COVID-19 On Students' Mental Health

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 11:42


New classes, new people and new schedules are all likely stressors for college students. But now, with pandemic disruptions, social isolation and general unrest — college life may be harder than ever.

Everything with Everett
Finding Common Ground

Everything with Everett

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 39:21


Do you listen to the "other" side? Every person has a reality that is valid to their story and situation; we need to listen and consider them as well in our mind for the world around us.Join Everett for a brief discussion about finding common ground, look for areas where each argument "against" was actually right, and how when both sides are placed together, the failure is actually on both sides for not listening or considering the opposing reality.Convert Your VHS tapes to Digital Video Everett can save your VHS tapes digitally for you to enjoy today and share in the future. Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEVoiceovers by Molly, LLC Voiceovers by Molly, LLC - She wants to collaborate with you!Support the show (https://paypal.me/emcconnaughey)

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST
RU156: DR GAUTAM BASU THAKUR ON POSTCOLONIAL LACK, IDENTITY, CULTURE, SURPLUS

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 67:04


Rendering Unconscious welcomes Dr. Gautam Basu Thakur to the podcast! Gautam Basu Thakur is a critical theorist working in the fields of comparative cultural studies; postcoloniality and globalization studies; British Literature of the Empire; race and sexuality studies; and world cinema. More specifically, he is interested in theoretical psychoanalysis and its interventions in postcolonial studies; the British Empire and its afterlife in global/transnational literary and (new) media cultures; film; and comparative cultural politics. His books include: 1) Postcolonial Theory and Avatar (2015) https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/postcolonial-theory-and-avatar-9781628925654/ 2) Postcolonial Lack: Identity, Culture, Surplus (2020) http://www.sunypress.edu/showproduct.aspx?ProductID=6858&SEName=postcolonial-lack 3) Lacan and the Nonhuman (2018) https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783319638164 4) Reading Lacan's Seminar VIII (2020) https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783030327415 He has a chapter included in Lacan and Race: Racism, Identity and Psychoanalytic Theory (Routledge, 2021) edited by Sheldon George and Derek Hook: https://www.routledge.com/Lacan-and-Race-Racism-Identity-and-Psychoanalytic-Theory/George-Hook/p/book/9780367345976 Gautam Basu Thakur is the recipient of The Faculty Excellence Award in the College Arts and Sciences, Boise State University, Jan 2020. This episode also available at YouTube: https://youtu.be/puNaEmBkQDU LACK conferences mentioned in this episode: https://lackorg.com/2016-conference/ You can support the podcast at our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vanessa23carl Thank you so much for your support! Rendering Unconscious Podcast is hosted by psychoanalyst Dr. Vanessa Sinclair: http://www.drvanessasinclair.net Visit the main website for more information and links to everything: http://www.renderingunconscious.org Rendering Unconscious: Psychoanalytic Perspectives, Politics & Poetry (Trapart 2019): https://store.trapart.net/details/00000 The song at the end of the episode is “Situated in the gap (for Derek Jarman)” from the album "This is Voyeurism" by Vanessa Sinclair and Pete Murphy. https://vanessasinclairpetemurphy.bandcamp.com/album/this-is-voyeurism Many thanks to Carl Abrahamsson, who created the intro and outro music for Rendering Unconscious podcast. https://www.carlabrahamsson.com Portrait of Dr Gautam Basu Thakur

Sci & Tell
Saleh Ahmed: Climate Change Equity from Idaho to Bangladesh

Sci & Tell

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 23:22


After a summer of erratic weather and the recent IIRC report, the effects of climate change seem urgent now more than ever. Which is why we were so excited to talk to Saleh Ahmed on Sci & Tell. Saleh is a professor of Environmental Studies, Global Studies, and Public Policy at Boise State University. His research focuses on how climate change is affecting marginalized communities around the world, whether that be communities on coastal Bangladesh or India, Rohingya refugees, or people in the Intermountain West. In this episode, we talked about his research, the importance of communicating science to those affected by it, and how climate change isn't an abstract concept for the future- it's here, and it's affecting people's lives right now. This episode was produced by Shane M Hanlon and Nisha Mital, and mixed by Collin Warren. Artwork by Karen Romano Young.

Learning More
Climate Change, Wildfires and Smoke

Learning More

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 29:14


Wildfire has become the smell and sight of summer in many locations throughout the United States and worldwide. What is it doing to our health today? We learn more about wildfires and our house.In this episode of Learning More, we learn more about wildfire smoke and its effects on our health. We speak with Luke Montrose, an Assistant Professor of Community and Environmental Health, Boise State University.Show Links:Luke's department website.Luke's lab website. PurpleAirAirNowHow to make a DIY air filter with a box fanShow Transcription (Automated)Environmental Toxicologist===[00:00:00] Russ: Wildfire has become the smell and sight of summer in many locations throughout the United States and throughout the world. What is it doing to our health today? We learn more about wildfires and our house.All right. Thanks for listening. And thanks for subscribing to learning more, where each episode, we bring you a new story about people, inventions, pop culture, and life. I'm Russ. And this week, I am joined by Luke Montrose. He's an assistant professor of community and environmental health at Boise state university.Thanks for joining me, Luke. Thank you for that. I live in California, which many people call the golden state, but here in California, we know that it's actually become the orange state, at least over the last few years. It's like weeks of the summer are just filled with orange skies here from the wildfires and okay.Yeah. Obvious. Problems with the wildfires are the homes that are being burned down the, you know, lives lost in this, but you've also got to start to think about what is this doing to me and to my health. So you're an environmental toxicologist. Can you tell us a little about that? And then we'll get into kind of what this is doing to each one?[00:01:38] Luke: Yeah. So environmental toxicology is broadly the study. Yeah. The world around us and how it interacts with our bodies causes biological, adverse reactions. So this could be anything from table salt, water, all the way up to cyanide. And so, I specifically study wildfire smoke and what that does from an acute standpoint.So short-term exposures as well, as, as you've mentioned now, these long-term exposures being exposed for multiple months. And maybe even if you live in California for 50, 60 years, what is 50 years of being exposed a couple of months at a time? [00:02:17] Russ: So what does it do [00:02:18] Luke: so we have a wealth of information about what particulate matter does to our lungs and the rest of our body.But what is particulate matter, and why is that different than wildfire smoke? So particulate matter is a very broad term. That essentially means anything that can be suspended in the air that you can breathe into your lungs. So that could be urban particulate matter. So think like car pollution industrial pollution coming out of it.That could be silica dust. So you get that when you're in a farming environment or if you're driving down a dusty road, and then you also have a particulate matter that comes from wildfire smoke, and these do different things to your lungs. And we don't have as much information about wildfire smoke as we do about general air pollution, particulate matter.But what we do know is that it's some particles are small enough that they get all the way into ours. And once they're there, they can call—all kinds of damage. And in particular, they can cause inflammation, and they can disrupt the natural immune response that your body is supposed to have. [00:03:28] Russ: This makes me think instantly about secondhand smoke.We did all these things here, here in California, a little longer ago where you couldn't smoke inside, you know, like bars, restaurants, things like that. We banned that, like, I don't know, years ago I happened to be working as a DJ at the time. So I was in a lot of bars and clubs, and it was amazing once they did this band.Cause I would smell the smoke on my clothes when I would get home. So I'd have to like shower and change when I got home. Just cause it smelled so bad [00:03:55] Luke: here in Boise, Idaho, we get a lot of secondhand smoke from our neighbors to the west. And so that's why and we can get into this, but you know, mitigation strategies to try to tamp down wildfires and the smoke that.It can't be just a state-by-state prerogative. We need to be thinking. Sort of more nationally more globally about this because smoke doesn't know when a zip code changes or when state boundaries change. So we have these issues with it being transient. Okay. [00:04:26] Russ: So there's that issue of the secondhand smoke?I'm thinking what about the issues that we might see with the firefighters going right into the smoke and having to experience this for a longer period of time? So, this is a [00:04:41] Luke: really great question that I am putting a lot of effort into trying to move the needle on this. And spoiler alert, I guess the wildland firefighting community does not have a robust cohort design long-term study going on.So what I mean by that is we are not actively recruiting and following, tracking and monitoring the health of wildland firefighters in the way that we should be doing. Such so that we can answer your questions. And as an example of what I would say. Let's say that we wanted to know the relative risk of lung cancer for a wildland firefighter.Who's worked 50 years versus twenty-five years versus five years. The cohort needed for that does not currently exist. There are no ongoing studies where we would be able to tap into those resources and ask that question. But those are important questions, but that's the spoiler alert. We don't have the answer, but if we were going to have me.I tell my students that environmental exposures environmental toxicology is all about three main things: dose duration and frequency. And so a caveat to that is I'll get asked a lot of times in an interview or in my classes or at a conference, you know, you're talking about Woodsmoke and how bad it is or how bad potentially.Do you sit around a campfire? Do you know, does your family partake in campfires while you're camping? Of course, we do. Again, this gets back to that central sort of idea of toxicology, dose direction, duration, and frequency. So let's talk, let's talk about dose first. While in firefighters job is to engage in with a fire.They're going to try to stay away from the fire as much as possible. They're going to try to stay out of the downwind side. Cause obviously, that's going to be the way that the fire's moving, so they don't want to be in the smoke. If I'm around a campfire, I don't want to be around the smoke. I'm going to do my best not to have an extended duration of exposure, which impacts a dose.As far as duration goes, wildland firefighters like that their job they're going to work an entire season, likely around a fire. They're going to work multiple seasons in a row. Cause that's their career. They're trying to make money. I'm exposed to a campfire on a good year. When I, when I'm trying to go out and go camping as much as possible, you know, maybe four or five weekends out of a year.And that gets into frequency. So how many times in my lifetime will I be exposed to a fire? A how many times throughout my life will I be exposed to a campfire? You know, multiply that out as many good years as I have to go camping. And you know, we're talking, you know, around 50 times maybe, whereas these firefighters.You know, they're exposed to year after year, day after day two. These guys work 14-hour shifts. They go on two-week rolls what they call a, a like a deployment. They call them roles 14 hours a day. These are extreme exposures that we're dealing with. And unfortunately our, we used to say that the the dichotomy between occupational exposures, like wildland firefighters, Public health.So community exposures were so different that we shouldn't even compare them, but now we see communities that can be exposed for months at a time, year after year. The community exposures are starting to look a lot more like our wildland firefighter counterparts, which goes to. We definitely need to be tracking, studying, and monitoring their health because it's probably going to shed light on what's happening to us and our lungs and potentially the rest of our bodies.So [00:08:14] Russ: we're going through, in some cases, six weeks of smelling smoke day after day after day. Sometimes you can't even open your windows because there's so much smoke, but still, there's that exposure. Every single day, especially for those of us that are working outside or I'm spending a lot of time in the [00:08:35] Luke: outdoors.You sparked another idea in my head that I want to make sure that we clarify here. One of the big differences between community exposure and wild wildland, firefighter exposure, or other outdoor. Folks who work outside. So let's list some of those off real quick. So we're talking about agricultural workers.We're talking about construction workers. We're talking about wildland firefighters and all of the other personnel that goes into helping to contain fires—the big difference between community exposure and wild, wild, and firefighter exposure. Let's use you as an example. I'm assuming that for that month and a half, that you were being exposed, you weren't outside, or if you were you're outside infrequently, us standard is about 90% of our time is spent, spent indoors that's in some kind of a structure or in your car.And the reason that that is important is that. For the most part, your structures, your car, all of those have the capability of filtering air. And so it's likely that their indoor air that you're breathing nine out of 10 breaths every day is filtered to some capacity. Now. That depends on where you are.That depends on what type of HPAC system or the air handling system that you have in your house, work car, any differences. Okay. So [00:09:55] Russ: for those of us out there that are exposed for multiple days, multiple weeks, is there data out there? Sorta gives us a little information into what the future. [00:10:06] Luke: holds for.So there is some very, very new data that's coming out right now. A lot of it's coming out of the 2018 fires that happened in California. And there's one specific example in a community in Montana. Researchers from the University of Montana, got a grant to go to this small rural community called Seeley lake.And I'll use that as an example cause these are colleagues of mine who did that study. They essentially, this community, Seeley lake was inundated with smoke for multiple weeks. There was so much smoke there that they were advised by local authorities that they should evacuate. And the majority of the community did not evacuate.So there was this natural experiment essentially set up. And my colleagues went in they started asking some questions. They started asking questions about reasons why they didn't evacuate. They started asking sort of biological questions. Like what was their current immune status? And then with the idea that they wanted to track the immune status of folks who were exposed in Seeley lake and folks who lived in that area but weren't exposed.So just outside of the Seeley lake valley in the path of the smoke, essentially to get a con controller as best control as they could. And what they're finding, doing repeated measures from right after they got exposed to now a couple of years out, they see that their immune response was dysregulated.And that for some. That dysregulation was persistent. So the military its effects, the negative effects of that smoke that they had on their lungs. Their ability for their lungs to respond appropriately was, was being mismanaged by their biological system. And that mismanagement continued. Even after you remove the smoke, the smoke was no longer in their valley.And a year later, it was almost as if you took a snapshot of their immune system. AF right after it had been exposed to smoke. And if you looked at that snapshot a year later and you compared it to what was actually in their lungs a year later, they still look the same, and that we wouldn't have necessarily expected that we would have expected the lung to be able to bounce back if you will.Right. And in this case, that does not appear to be the case now that study's ongoing. And we'll see if, into the future, these folks get some type of return to. [00:12:35] Russ: Wow. Yeah, that's crazy. I bet. I look, you know externally I pull out that the filters that you mentioned earlier, you know like I have a filter on my car.I just changed it. I don't know, about two months after dealing with the fires last year. It was black. You know, it was unrecognizable as, like an air filter. There was so much on there with the pandemic. We were sort of all introduced to our own little filters, the masks that we wear, either the N95 or a cloth maths.Do those actually help in this case with the [00:13:11] Luke: wildfires, that is a very important and frequently asked question. I guess not a complex answer, but it's one that has nuance. Right? So let's break it. Let's break these two masks apart and talk about what they're both good for. So when we're in the COVID pandemic, and we're being advised by our authorities or public health authorities that we need to be wearing a mask for the purposes of containing the spread of a virus, you need to be wearing at minimum a cloth mask, and there are all kinds of resources.The different layering techniques and why that works. And one of the common questions that I get is why does that mask work for a virus that is so, so small, and that is accurate. The actual virus on the individual virus particle is extremely strong, small, but it doesn't travel alone. It travels in groups, and it travels normally agglomerated or stuck to. You can think of them as essentially spit part of.And that's why that cloth mask that's why that cloth mask works. Now let's compare that to the N95 masks that you're going to be advised to wear during a wildfire smoke event. The N 95 mask gets its name because it scrubs out 95% of the airborne particles that are capable of traveling deep into the lungs.So, this is very different than just a cloth mask, which would probably scrub out less than 5% of those particles. It's it would do a pretty good job on the larger part. But you already have a system in place for scrubbing out those large particles, and that's your nose and your nose hair. And you know that from being in a dirty place for a while, you know, you go blow your nose, the tissues, all dirty, you know that your nose is doing a pretty good job at, at scrubbing out those large particles.So another small caveat to this, about those in 95. Is the folks who listen to this podcast won't may not know this, but I have a beard. And that's a very important feature to think about when you're talking about an in 95 in 95 need to be essentially fit tested. So you have to go to an industrial hygienist or another author.A person who checks the actual fitment of the mass, not just the size and shape of your face, but also the seal. And there's some training that's involved in that. And so, a guy like me with a beard will not ever get a satisfactory fitment of a mask. All of the particles just are able to go around the mask, through my beard, and then into my nose and mouth, providing me limited to no.Protection. So those are the two types of masks and what they're good for. It's a little bit of a nuanced answer, but it's really important for folks to know. [00:16:04] Russ: that. Yeah, yeah, no, I also have a beard, you know, maybe what we need to do is like have these like reverse goatees. So that just underneath the mask, [00:16:12] Luke: that would be, that would make a great cartoon, I think.[00:16:15] Russ: Yeah. Yeah, it would. Hey, we're going to take it a short break here. We've got more to talk about on this topic. We'll be right back.[00:17:15] Russ: Thanks for listening. And thanks for subscribing to learning more where each episode, we bring you a news story about people, inventions, pop culture, and life. I'm Russ.And this week, I'm talking to Luke Montrose. He's an assistant professor of community and environmental health at Boise state university and an environmental toxicologist telling us about the air that we breathe. So, okay. I went down to Los Angeles just a couple of weeks ago. And looking over this. There was definitely less smart.Now I was only there for a day, so I just saw it a little bit, but you know; usually I'm used to not being actually able to see the buildings when I drive through LA anyway, continue down the road. And then, all of a sudden, now I'm dealing with wildfire smoke for so long. We have been talking about clean air, and you know, the EPA X, long ago of trying to make our air better.Are the wildfires just kind of taking all of this progress that we've made? Away some [00:18:16] Luke: of the most recent projections that I've seen on wildfire smoke and its contribution to the overall amount of particulate matter that the United States is exposed to throughout the year, suggest that we're on track for wildfire smoke to reach 50% of our annual particulate matter.If, think of it like, wait, if it were all put on a scale, all other sources on one side. And wildfire, on the other, they would balance each other out. Now what's even more disturbing about that is these projections suggest that in some Western communities that wildfire smoke may make up as much as 70% of their annual.A weight of particulate matter. And this really gets at that idea that we talked about, where I said that different types of particulate matter impact our body in different ways. This is because you can think of particulate matter like a vehicle or a car that's carrying passengers. And in this case, those passengers are chemicals, and that chemical profile is different.Based on where the particulate matter was generated from. So wildfire smoke generated from a wildfire has a very different profile chemical profile on the outside of particles than does urban particularly, let's say, car exhaust. And what we're finding there was just a study recently published from a group in California that looked at some recent California wildfires and then looked at what.Rates of hospitalization, mortality, and some other aspects were it was a wildfire when there wasn't a wildfire, and they were able to model out essentially non-wildfire days, they were able to compare what, what are they, what are the health metrics when it's just urban particulate matter?And what are the health metrics when it's just wildfire? They found that wildfire smoke days produced more hospital visits and mortality. This is small, this was a relatively small study in just California. But this is troubling data when we think about this transition to more wildfire smoke by weight compared to all other particulate matter sources.And we see that wildfire smoke is particularly toxic. And then we look at what's been done so far and we, and we really. We know, we know a lot about urban particulate matter, but we really don't know that much about wildfire smoke. So I think that this is a timely thing to consider, and hopefully, we're able to put some more effort behind producing the types of data that we would need to make some of these conclusions.Wow, [00:20:46] Russ: just jeez. So, okay. Let's, let's go to this if I were to give you a magic one. And environmental toxicologist, what would you do? How would you help to address the issue of wildfire smoke? [00:21:04] Luke: So that's a great question. There's there would be a reactionary approach, which would be, well, we can't fix the wildfires or the smoke, but we could maybe help.And so these would be intervention and money for intervention and mitigation strategies and educational resources for all the people who are going to be exposed to smoke. But reactionary strategies are most often not as effective as you know, mitigation strategies that go toward them, of the cause.And in this case, there's an open debate on what that is, which makes answering your question problematic because you have one camp of people who say, you know, this could be climate change. Do you have one camp of people who say this is more about forest management or mismanagement over the last five or six decades?And then you have folks who say, you know, this is the way that we put out fires. Is actually causing this so fire management. And so it depends on which camp you're in as to which strategy we might, you know, proceed with. And I think what we need to do is come together and whether you're in any, either of those three camps, there's probably a solution that we could all agree on.If we take the, the buzzwords or the hot button issues. If, if, if climate change rubs you the wrong way, you know, let's talk about you know, let's talk about drought-related issues. I think we can all agree that we're in the middle of like a 20 year in some of our Western states, we're in a 20-year drought, whether you agree with, with the folks on whether that's due to climate change or global warming here, that's neither here nor there.If you're forest management if you're in that. Let's talk about the types of strategies that we could be used across the state borders so that everyone's on the same page that we should be implementing. And when it comes to fire management, let's talk about that. W when should we let fires burn, and when should we put them out?What are the, you know, the tools and the matrices that we need to use to address those types of issues? And then let's not forget about, you know, the community impacts of this. So when we're going to let these fires burn, what can we be doing to protect the downwind communities? It's going to be a comprehensive look at this question.That's going to result in a viable solution, and fighting between those three camps is not going to do anything. To help find resolve as [00:23:38] Russ: far as what we do in the meantime is to you know, limit, you said what dose duration and frequency try to stay out of this if, if we can, as much as possible, what other things can we do to kind of protect our own health?And let's say the health of our kids. [00:23:55] Luke: Yeah, this is very, very important. And what I tell colleagues, friends students. You, you should empower yourself. You should become a citizen scientist, and you should look for any resource you can to help bolster your knowledge on how you can lower your exposure to wildfire smoke.And I'll give you a few examples of how to do that. One is to have an HVAC professional come and service your air conditioner and furnace. And while they're out there, ask them. What is the highest level of filtration? So they measure filtration in what's called a Merv, and Merv stands for a minimum efficiency reporting value.So ask your HVAC personnel. What's the highest Merv rating filter I can put in my HVAC system. The next thing I would do is look into purchasing a HEPA air filter, a standalone air filtration unit. I would encourage you to think about where do you spend the most time in your house. If that's your living room and you're only going to buy one, put it in your living room.In my house, we have two; we have one in our living room and one in our bedroom. The next thing I would do is. Somewhere in this conversation, we were discussing whether or not indoor air quality is actually better than outdoor air quality. The best way to find that out is to measure it. And there are so many cool new, low-cost monitors on the market.Today, you can pick these things up for free. So $100, and there definitely aren't a regulatory monitor. They have the limitations, but for home use and for your own educational purposes, ask yourself, what's my air inside today. What's my air outside. What's the air like that at the gym. What is the air like at night?Place of business. Now, if you're using your one monitor to do all of those different tests, whether or not it perfectly matches with a regulatory unit that your department of environmental quality uses really doesn't matter all that much because you're comparing apples to apples, to apples, to apples.Right? And so, by doing that, you are empowering yourself to learn more about the air. And hopefully, that motivates you to think about some of those mitigation strategies that I mentioned. [00:26:11] Russ: buying one of these devices is one way of doing it, but there are also places online where people can go. [00:26:16] Luke: So another thing that people can do is follow along either on Twitter or Facebook or just on their internet webpage with your local department of environmental quality.Your state may have something like Idaho has, which is called the Idaho smoked blog, where they consolidate a lot of information on where fires are burning, where the smoke is going and what your local air quality is. If you don't have that in your community, you can go to the EPA resource.They have a smoke since act, and they also have an air now app, and both of these will tell you about your local community air. And then there's a lot of new sort of crowdsourced resources on the internet. For example, purple air is a fairly low-cost monitor that has such a robust network that it's now being adopted by a lot.Local authorities, you can go onto the purple air website, and you can view the purple air map, which will show you air quality from all around the world, including if there is a monitor in your neighborhood. [00:27:16] Russ: Awesome. And Luke was nice enough to provide links to some various places where you can go to get air monitors, a link over to purple air, and other resources.All of those links are in the description. Luke. Thank you so much for joining me today and helping us learn or about wildfires and our health. [00:27:37] Luke: Thank you so much. [00:27:38] Russ: All right, we continue the conversation next week. It's a three-part series. We're talking about climate change. Last week we talked how it's going to affect our finances.If you miss that show, definitely do go check that one out. And next week, you're going to want to hang in there for this one. We're going to learn about sea-level rise and all of these floods, all of these issues with water. Well, and in some places, lack of water, like here in California. That is next week.The best way to remember to listen to Learning More is to subscribe. And the best way to help us out is to share the show and also review the show wherever you can. Oh yeah. Also, check out our daily show. This is today. There's a link available for that in the podcast description. Thanks for listening.I'm Russ. And I'll talk to you next time. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Marketplace All-in-One
Consumer price index shows less inflation. The producer price index shows more. What’s happening?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 10:35


Diane Swonk helps us make sense of inflation appearing to slow down Wednesday, only for producer numbers to show inflation coming up. China unveiled a plan to tighten regulations across a variety of areas in its economy. The two largest oil companies in the U.S. are looking to boost their presence in the renewables market while trying to avoid big costs to adapt. Boise State University allowed its students to partake in a less-expensive gap year program for college credit.

Marketplace Morning Report
Consumer price index shows less inflation. The producer price index shows more. What’s happening?

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 10:35


Diane Swonk helps us make sense of inflation appearing to slow down Wednesday, only for producer numbers to show inflation coming up. China unveiled a plan to tighten regulations across a variety of areas in its economy. The two largest oil companies in the U.S. are looking to boost their presence in the renewables market while trying to avoid big costs to adapt. Boise State University allowed its students to partake in a less-expensive gap year program for college credit.

Idaho Reports
Episode: Water, Growth, Climate

Idaho Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 29:08


Heat, drought and population growth have dominated Idaho headlines this summer. This week, the director of Boise State University's Lab for Ecohydrological Applications and Forecasting (LEAF) Dr. Alejandro "Lejo" Flores joined Melissa Davlin to discuss water's role at the intersection of those topics, ranging from agriculture, housing and land use planning to the future of climate in Idaho. Learn more about LEAF at http://leaf.boisestate.edu

ParentingAces - The Junior Tennis and College Tennis Podcast
Junior Tennis ✅ What's Next? Episode 1 ft. Jack Heslin

ParentingAces - The Junior Tennis and College Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 52:16


Welcome to Season 10, Episode 31, of the ParentingAces Podcast, a proud member of the Tennis Channel Podcast Network. This week's podcast is the first in a new series we'll be exploring here at ParentingAces, one that came at the suggestion of my son, Morgan. He had the brilliant idea to check in with some of the players he trained and competed with during his Junior Tennis years to see what they did once finishing high school and where they are now in their early to mid twenties. There are many pathways in Junior Tennis but maybe even more once that journey is complete. Professional tennis, college tennis, club tennis, and no tennis at all are some of the options, and each has its pros and cons. I hope you find it valuable to hear from the players themselves about what role tennis played in their formative years and what role, if any, it plays in their adult lives. The first in our new series is an interview with my son's college roommate and teammate at Boise State University, Jack Heslin. Jack was born in London and moved with his family at a very young age to Auckland, New Zealand, where he and his two brothers grew up. Jack competed in tennis internationally starting around age 14 but always had the goal of playing college tennis in the US. In this week's podcast, Jack describes his Junior Tennis Journey, how he handled college recruiting, and his life after college. As always, a big thank you to Morgan Stone, aka STØNE, for our intro and outro music this season. You can find more of his music at SoundCloud.com/stonemuzic. If you're interested in House Music, please be sure to check out his social media channels on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you're so inclined, please share this – and all our episodes! – with your tennis community. You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or via your favorite podcast app. If you haven't already, be sure to become a Member of ParentingAces by clicking here. And check out our logo'd merch in our online shop (Premium Members received FREE SHIPPING every day!). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The American Mind
The Interview: Dr. Scott Yenor on The Recovery of Family Life

The American Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 53:08


In this ongoing series, Ryan Williams, President of The Claremont Institute, interviews prominent scholars in the Claremont Institute's orbit. Dr. Scott Yenor, Professor of Political Science at Boise State University and Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute's Center for the American Way of Life, joins Ryan to discuss his recent book, The Recovery of Family Life. The book traces the intellectual and political roots of our current family crisis and presents a series of practical approaches to revitalizing and restoring the American family. Ryan and Dr. Yenor discuss existing family policy (or lack thereof), and what can be done to improve it.

Seasoned to Taste
S2 Ep 3 - Deep Fried Good Times

Seasoned to Taste

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 29:42


Jordan Gerberding is a 4th year IT Management student at Boise State University. Both having internships in Akron Ohio this summer and a love of food, we have quickly become good friends. So what makes food special to Jordan? Deep Fried Good Times. That doesn't mean Jordan only eats his vegetables coated in crispy batter but it does mean he enjoys unique restaurants that aren't trying to prove anything. Interesting food enjoyed in a fun atmosphere with friends and family alike are they keys to what Jordan considers a great food experience. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/seasoned2taste/message

Education Evolution
64. One Stone with Chad Carlson

Education Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 55:38


Chad Carlson has been in the field of independent education for more than seventeen years, working with both middle and high school students in humanities, language arts, and Spanish. He recently returned to Boise after several years at an International Baccalaureate School in Bogotá, Colombia, and at an independent school in Sun Valley, Idaho. Chad received his B.A. in humanities from the University of Oregon and his M.A. in Latin American studies from UCSD and recently earned his Masters in Educational Leadership at Boise State University. Learn more about One Stone by following them on Facebook and Twitter.   Jump in the Conversation: [2:21] The origin story of One Stone, a student-founded high school [5:03] Benefits of student-driven learning [9:14] A student journey of discovery and redefinition [16:03] Living in Beta [22:22] Roadblocks to student-led and real-world, relevant learning [46:15] Chad's Magic Wand: Getting rid of standardized tests and curriculum [47:26] Maureen's Take-Aways   Links and Resources: Living in Beta Wayfinding Episode 47: Wayfinding Academy College Careers in a lifetime Episode 56: Learning About the Subconscious' Impact on Our School Decisions Think Again by Adam Grant 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez All it Takes is Ten Minutes, TEDx by Andy Puddicombe, founder of Headspace Email Maureen The Education Evolution Facebook: Follow Education Evolution Twitter: Follow Education Evolution LinkedIn: Follow Education Evolution EdActive Collective Maureen's book: Creating Micro-Schools for Colorful Mismatched Kids Micro-school feature on Good Morning America The Micro-School Coalition Facebook: The Micro-School Coalition LEADPrep

Idaho Matters
Former Boise State Professor Writes About Challenges Facing Tech And Democracy Around The World

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 12:15


Steven Feldstein is a Senior Fellow of Democracy, Conflict and Governance at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington D.C. The former Boise State University professor has a new book out titled “The Rise of Digital Repression: How Technology Is Reshaping Power, Politics, and Resistance.”

Idaho Matters
Former Boise State Professor Writes About Challenges Facing Tech And Democracy Around The World

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 12:15


Steven Feldstein is a Senior Fellow of Democracy, Conflict and Governance at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington D.C. The former Boise State University professor has a new book out titled “The Rise of Digital Repression: How Technology Is Reshaping Power, Politics, and Resistance.”

Idaho Matters
Boise State MFA Graduate On Her Well-Reviewed New Novel "Brood"

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 10:55


"Brood" is the title of one of the best-reviewed novels in the first half of this year. Author Jackie Polzin attended Boise State University's creative writing MFA program, and she spoke with Boise State Public Radio Morning Edition host George Prentice about her new book.

Idaho Matters
Boise State Professor Seeks To Solve Mysteries of Quantum Physics

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 9:37


Albert Einstein called it spooky. But generations later, a Boise State University researcher is trying to determine how photons communicate instantly with each other across great distances. Idaho Matters talks with physics professor Paul Simmonds about his work in quantum physics, nanotechnology and much more.

Head To Heart
In The Pursuit Of Happiness With Karin Hobbs - S1E11

Head To Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 94:20


What are you living for? What's your purpose? What's your passion? What is it that drives you? These are some of the questions we dive into as we chat with our good friend Karin Hobbs. Karin Hobbs is a mother, wife and business owner. She is an extremely talented person that has been through a lot in her life. Her and her husband Evan own an aerial yoga studio in downtown Boise called Dash Aerial Yoga. Karin has years of experience with being an athletic trainer and nutrition expert. She is an IFBB WPD Pro, a 2x IFBB WPD Olympian, Y3T Athlete, an NPC Regional Judge and an Air Certified Aerial Yoga Instructor. Karin received her Bachelors Degree in Health Promotion from Boise State University. Her aerial yoga certification was obtained through AIR, located in Chicago, Illinois. She has 3 children, Casey, Chloe and Ava, as well as a big fur baby, Ronix. To see more of Karin, you can follow her on Instagram at @dashaerialyoga. Karin is so relatable and has a wealth of knowledge! We know you will love this episode! Follow Head to Heart on social media: Podcast page: https://anchor.fm/head-to-heart1 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9nJf13iatwSkeQGPwNjerg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/weareheadtoheart/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Head-To-Heart-111053981031030/ TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMe2XV8FP/

Supersonic Leaders & Teams
Assistant VP Boise State University, Nicole Nimmons' Leadership Journey & How She Supported Students at Campus

Supersonic Leaders & Teams

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 37:59


Nicole Nimmons is the Associate Vice President of Student Services at Boise State University. A well-respected and goal-oriented executive with extensive leadership skills, Nicole has spent the past 16 years leading teams to support students and operations at BSU, including managing the logistics for a highly successful visit by President Obama in 2015, where he noted the innovative culture of the university.Tune in as she shares her journey as a leader and how her innovative ideas have been proven to enhance the Boise State student experience.

Supersonic Leaders & Teams
Assistant VP Boise State University, Nicole Nimmons' Leadership Journey & How She Supported Students at Campus

Supersonic Leaders & Teams

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 37:59


A well-respected, ambitious, dedicated, and goal-oriented executive with extensive leadership skills proven with 15 years in innovative leadership positions. Passionately creating and delivering strategic visions and missions through collaborative engagement, transparency, with a sense of urgency with an affirmative, and proactive positive lens.Always guiding others to perform through personal strengths, amidst competing priorities and deadlines. Strong values aligned with integrity, compassion, and sound judgment. Continuously creating positive relationship-oriented agile cultures, with the capacity to navigate sensitive and complex work through listening, patience, tolerance for ambiguity, and most of all sense of humor.

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
E119: Eric Landrum: What Goes Around Comes Around, Or, The Wake-Up Call Edition

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 111:57


In this episode Garth interviews PsychSessions co-founder Eric Landrum from Boise State University in Boise, ID. In November 2019, during a PsychSessions working meeting in Boise, Eric surprised Garth with a request to record a PsychSessions interview (Episode #074). In their first meeting face-to-face since the pandemic, Garth and Eric met again in Boise, and it was only fair that Eric sit still, be patient, and answer Garth's delightful interview questions. You might want to recharge the batteries because this guy is long-winded, but attempting to be a leader during a pandemic with a health scare can make a fella talkative. Opt-in at bit.ly/psychsessions-email to receive email updates about upcoming PsychSessions episodes and more!

The Mountain Top For Men (formerly The Chick Whisperer):
Why Is Society Lying To You About Women, Sex And Relationships? - MTP250

The Mountain Top For Men (formerly The Chick Whisperer):

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 45:28


My guest Scott Yenor is a professor of political science at Boise State University and a Washington Fellow of the Claremont Institute. The main focus of his work is on the family in political thought. I first found out about him when he was on the Tucker Carlson show, of all places, where he discussed the fascinating social dynamic of how we as men tend to avoid marriage and fatherhood in our younger years, only to wish we had a wife and kids in our later years. Above and beyond that, this episode is a deep dive into societal agendas imposed upon men, women, sex and relationships. In his book, 'The Recovery of Family Life: Exposing the Limits of Modern Ideologies', Yenor exposes the three main pressures on men, women and family life in the post-modern world. Regardless of which party you tend to vote for, I invite you to tune in for this all-important discussion of how powerful social movements absolutely influence our dating, relating and sexual patterns in western culture. Not only do we get to the bottom of why we as men in particular are scared to death to become husbands, let alone fathers, you won't believe how many different outside influences have been working against male/female relations and the family unit as we know it. I also issue a special invitation to any man out there who has become jaded against women and negative or bitter toward them. Listen closely, because your conclusions have probably been influenced--or as Scott would say, 'unbuckled'--in more subtle ways than you've ever considered. And wait until you discover what Scott calls 'the problem with no name'. Subscribe to the free newsletter, get the free special reports and more when you visit https://mountaintoppodcast.com === HELP US SEND THE MESSAGE TO GREAT MEN EVERYWHERE === We'll keep the solid, actionable content coming...all for free. If you love what you hear, please give us a 'thumbs up' by rating the show (takes one second) and leaving us a review. As we say here in Texas, we appreciate you!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E12: Evolutionary Psychology, a Teleprompter, and Rob's Email Address Walk into a Bar: Season 1 is Done

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 37:09


This is Episode 12 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E11: Skills (Finally!) and Skills Gaps, the Blame Game, Transfer of Training, and Online MOOC Sharing: Assessment May Be the Center of the Universe

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 35:28


This is Episode 11 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E10: Oh Bother, Eeyore (Learning Styles Myth), Is Scaffolding Handholding, Prerequisites and Other Zombie Ideas: Keeping Hope Alive

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 31:06


This is Episode 10 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E9: K-12 Teacher Training, Nebraska All Over, the Think Tank, and Non-Traditional Impact: Watching Steve Become the Video Star

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 20:16


This is Episode 9 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E8: Conference Promiscuity, the Teacher's Developmental Arc, the Second-Best Textbook, and Error Correction: Pick a Lane, Boys

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 25:24


This is Episode 8 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E7: Social Norms, Waving Goodbye on Zoom, the Power of YouTube: Times, They Are A-Changin'

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 18:27


This is Episode 7 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E6: Pandemic Silver Linings, Future Conferences, Knee-Biters and Kids: Who Can Tune the Crystal Ball?

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 22:28


This is Episode 6 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E5: The Rob and Eric Origin Story, AP Reading Memories ("Young Rob" is Born), and THE Triumvirate:  How We Met Each Other

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 25:14


This is Episode 5 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E4: Live Episode Planning,  Educational Myth-Busting, Content Worship, and Publishing: Who Do These Hosts Think They Are? 

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 24:50


This is Episode 4 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E3: Lecturing, Teaching, "Curving," the AP Reading, and Naming Sh*t: What's Missing is the Kitchen Sink

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 30:50


This is Episode 3 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
TM S1E2: Vaccines, Woodworking, and Libraries: What the Heck is this Train Wreck?

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 20:03


This is Episode 2 of Season 1 of the series TEACHING MATTERS on the PsychSessions network.  This series is co-hosted by Rob McEntarffer, an assessment specialist for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, NE & Eric Landrum, professor and chair of Psychological Science at Boise State University in Boise, ID. If you have ideas for future topics or want to comment, most podcast outlets allow for comments, or you can email us at psychsessionspodcast@gmail.com. Thank you for listening!

Inside the Headset with the AFCA
Tobruk Blaine, Dir. of Beyond Football - San Jose State

Inside the Headset with the AFCA

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 21:53


This week on Inside the Headset we are featuring the San Jose State University Coordinator of Beyond Football, Tobruk Blaine. Blaine discusses three key pillars of the Beyond Football program, shares the importance of impactful leadership, and highlights the value of pursuing personal goals. Tobruk Blaine is the coordinator for the Beyond Football program at San Jose State University. In her role, she is responsible for enhancing the lives of football student-athletes. Through the Beyond Football program, student-athletes develop career-focused proficiencies and cultivate knowledge, relationships and skills necessary to establish a successful personal and professional life beyond the game of football. This mission is accomplished by encouraging student-athletes to explore opportunities around them, identify key interests, and inspire themselves and others through a culture of volunteerism in a greater community. Blaine joined the San Jose State athletic department with a background in coaching, teaching, fund raising and program building. Previously, she was a high school and college cheerleading coach at Eagle and Rocky Mountain High Schools (in Idaho) and at Boise State University. [1:36] Start of session [2:08] Implementing the Beyond Football program [4:34] Three pillars for the Beyond Football program [8:12] Off-field contributions lead to on-field success [10:51] Cultivating personal relationships with coaches and athletes [13:24] Expanding the program to Beyond Sparta [16:01] Pursuing personal goals

A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers

Ron Jude is an American photographer and educator, born in Los Angeles in 1965 and raised in rural Idaho. He lives and works in Eugene, Oregon, where he teaches photography as a professor of art at the University of Oregon. His recent work explores the relationship between place, memory, and narrative through multiple approaches ranging from the use of appropriated images to photographs that echo traditional documentary methodologies.Ron earned a BFA in studio art from Boise State University in 1988, and an MFA from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge in 1992. His photographs have been widely exhibited nationally and internationally and are held in the permanent collections of the George Eastman House, Rochester, NY; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others.Ron is the author of ten books, including Emmett (2010); Lick Creek Line (2012); Lago (2015); and, most recently, 12Hz. He has received grants or awards from Light Work; San Francisco Camerawork; the Aaron Siskind Foundation; and the Friends of Photography and was the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 2019. He is represented by Gallery Luisotti in Santa Monica and Robert Morat Galerie in Berlin.Ron lives in Eugene with fellow photographer Danielle Mericle and their son Charley. On episode 153, Ron discusses, among other things:Why he switched to digital for 12HzNot wanting to romanticise the landscapeFeeling like it was a riskNot intending to make a book and then actually making a bookHis interest in incorporating soundLago and other booksHow working with images that weren’t his taught him a lot about the book making processLick Creek LineWhy he doesn’t photograph peopleNausea and the inherent flaws in the education systemWhy metaphor should be deployed with cautionReferenced:Joshua BonnettaMike KelleyRoe EthridgeDanielle Mericle Website | Instagram “To some degree it’s just practice. It’s like playing an instrument - you practice, and if you don’t practice you get rusty. And then you have to start all over again.”