Podcasts about Palouse

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  • 77PODCASTS
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  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Oct 26, 2021LATEST
Palouse

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Best podcasts about Palouse

Latest podcast episodes about Palouse

Give ‘Em Hell, Brigham
Wazzu Postgame Fireside

Give ‘Em Hell, Brigham

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 51:09


Let's get loose about the Palouse.

Locked On Cougars
Aaron Roderick & Jaren Hall on Hall's all-time-caliber career arc & Collin Chandler to visit BYU - October 21, 2021

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:51


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Wednesday, October 20, 2021 Thursday's podcast began with BYU offensive coordinator Aaron Roderick's comments about the issues his offense faced against Baylor and what he expects as they try to right the ship this weekend in Pullman, WA against the Washington State Cougars aided by a return of some starters on the offensive line More comments from Coach Roderick on the atmosphere in Martin Stadium on The Palouse as well comments from Jaren Hall about his progress as a quarterback dominated the second stanza of the show. Coach Roderick says the Hall is on an all-time trajectory through seven games started Finally, the show wrapped up with the other BYU news and notes out there, including another win for the No. 12 BYU women's soccer program at USF, the Thursday schedule for other BYU teams and a huge official visit taking place this weekend by Farmington HS star Collin Chandler, who will be in Provo to see all that the Cougars have to offer him Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline.AG - There is only one place that has you covered and one place we trust to place our wagers. That's BetOnline! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use the promo code "LOCKEDON" for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. SweatBlock - Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code "LOCKEDON," or at Amazon and CVS. PrizePicks - Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “LOCKEDON” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The TreeCast with Troy Clardy
Palouse Preview, Hoops Happenings

The TreeCast with Troy Clardy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:35


Previewing Stanford Football's trip to Washington State with Cardinal CB Kyu Blu Kelly, and spending six good minutes with Stanford Men's Basketball HC Jerod Haase at Pac-12 Media Day.

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion
Tunnel Vision - Successful debut for USC interim head coach Donte Williams & QB Jaxson Dart

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 80:14


The Tunnel Vision crew of Keely Eure, Shotgun Spratling and Ryan Abraham are back in studio breaking down USC's successful road trip to Pullman (Wash.) where interim head coach Donte Williams got his first win and true freshman quarterback Jaxson Dart made a splash with a record setting performance coming off the bench. The team shares what it was like up on the Palouse with Trojan fans extremely happy with the new direction of the program, they discuss the quarterback controversy with Kedon Slovis and Dart and look ahead to what should be an interesting week in practice. This is a podcast version of our video show Tunnel Vision that you can find on our Facebook or YouTube pages. Make sure you check out USCFootball.com for complete coverage of this USC Trojan football team.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion
Tunnel Vision - Interim head coach Donte Williams to make his debut on the Palouse

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 77:38


The Tunnel Vision crew of Keely Eure, Shotgun Spratling and Ryan Abraham are back in studio doing their best to make sense of a crazy week around the USC football program and the aftermath of head coach Clay Helton being fired by athletic director Mike Bohn. The team shares what it was like this week at the Trojans football practice with interim head coach Donte Williams calling the shots and the players trying to get past losing their long time head coach and turning their focus to the upcoming road trip to Pullman (Wash.) where they will take on the Washington State Cougars. This is a podcast version of our video show Tunnel Vision that you can find on our Facebook or YouTube pages. Make sure you check out USCFootball.com for complete coverage of this USC Trojan football team.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lady Preacher Podcast
Rev. Kevin Beebe: Praying Our Way through Marriage

Lady Preacher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 66:30


It's HERE! Our most-requested episode with Pastor Kelsey and her husband, Rev. Kevin Beebe! They talk about everything from how they handle conflict to how they pray keep faith an integral part of their relationship. We took requests for questions and had a blast talking through them. Here are some of the things you asked and we answered:What is your story? How did you meet?What are your Enneagram numbers and how have we used Enneagram as a tool in our marriage?How do you handle conflict?What role does faith play in your relationship? Do you have any practical tips for integrating faith in a marriage?How do you manage being a part of two denominations (United Church of Christ and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America)?What are the joys and challenges of being a clergy couple? And how do you pay attention to the way patriarchy may influence that?What is it about the other that makes you continue to choose them? How has being in a relationship with each other helped you grow?Pastors Kevin and Kelsey offer the caveat that they are not marriage experts, but pray this episode offers you insight into their relationship, what they are learning, and perhaps that will both help you feel less alone in your struggles and maybe provide you with a few extra tools in your relationship toolbox.Let us know your thoughts in a review or send us a message on social media!...The Rev. Kevin Beebe joined Spirit Alive! Church in Kenosha, WI as Pastor in September 2019. He arrived at Spirit Alive! after previously completing his internship at The Bridge in St. Charles, MO and finishing his Master of Divinity at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary of California Lutheran University. Prior to seminary, Kevin graduated from the University of Montana and served as a Young Adult in Global Mission of the ELCA, working in conjunction with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land as an English teacher in Ramallah, Palestine. He grew up in Pullman, WA, nestled between the wheat fields of the Palouse and the cultural center of Washington State University. Kevin and his wife, Kelsey, and their cat, Velcro, live in Kenosha.Pastor Kevin is driven by an understanding that God's Love is constantly breaking into our lives, pulling us into deeper relationship with the Divine and the rest of creation. He is drawn to the ways God's grace thrusts us into the world to live out God's justice and proclaim that the Kin-dom is at hand.

The Nature of Idaho
The Nature of Idaho Palouse Prairie

The Nature of Idaho

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 29:07


On this episode join Dr. Leif Tapanila and Peter Pruett as they discuss prairies in Idaho with Lovina Englund. She's the executive director of the Palouse Land Trust.

Prevmed
Address Stress Program, The Power Of Calm - review

Prevmed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 9:58


The Power of Calm, or Address Stress program contains a series of books and apps. It includes a 14-day introductory program, introductory books, and an app I accessed on my iPhone.Advantages:  it includes books as well as an app for those that need one or the other mediait has good content describing and defining stresslots of pictures are includedIt even includes in written and pictures mention of telomere length and size of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortexthe app is easy to learn, intuitivethe app includes lots of focus on breathing and soothing soundsit provides good lists of ways to manage stress, like yoga, tai chi, and mindfulness What it's not good at:it doesn't get deep in terms of scientific citationsneither the book nor the app gets that deep in terms of the concepts covered in Palouse, Tolle, or Untethered Soul, or westernized concepts of Buddhist concepts of mindfulnessit also does not even mention these important resources for understanding and managing stress.For more information, contact us at 859-721-1414 or myhealth@prevmedheartrisk.com. Also, check out the following resources:  ·PrevMed's website·PrevMed's YouTube channel·PrevMed's Facebook pageFor more information, contact us at 859-721-1414 or myhealth@prevmedheartrisk.com. Also, check out the following resources:  ·PrevMed's website·PrevMed's YouTube channel·PrevMed's Facebook page

Ask Dr. Universe
Episode 10: Ice Cream, Berries, Learning Hard Stuff

Ask Dr. Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 10:55


Welcome back, young scientists. I'm Dr. Universe and if you're anything like me you've got lots of big questions about our world. On this episode, we'll investigate great questions from young scientists like, Why does ice cream melt? Why are some berries poisonous? And how do we learn things that are really, really hard?   A big thanks to the scientists at Washington State University and our kid narrator from Regional Theatre of the Palouse. Ask a question at askDrUniverse.wsu.edu/ask

Exploring Washington State
Brian Jennings Exploring Washington State with a Camera

Exploring Washington State

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 67:19


Brian Jennings joins us for this episode. Brian is photographer who has captured images throughout out Washington State.Brian grew up in the Spokane area and spent his professional career in TV and Radio in Oregon and Washington.  Now Brian explores Washington State and the rest of the U.S. and captures amazing images with his camera.We chat about Washington State and some of the special places Brian enjoys visiting to capture images with his camera.  The Palouse is a special place and Brian shares a lot of stories about his journeys in that area of the state. If you like to hear about off the beaten path places, and if you have an interest in photography you will love this episode. Make sure you take a look at Brian's photography on his website. There are so many amazing places to explore in Washington State, you should just pack your bags and go! Explore Washington State is the perfect place for inspiration. Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/ExploringWash)

Bob Enyart Live
RSR's List of Not So Old Things

Bob Enyart Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021


  [While Bob & Cheryl Enyart go fishing we invite you to enjoy from the RSR archives our favorite List of Not So Old Things! Photos from today, June 25, 2021.] -- Finches Diversify in Decades, Opals Form in Months,  Man's Genetic Diversity in 200 Generations, C-14 Everywhere: Real Science Radio hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams present their classic program that led to the audience-favorites rsr.org/list-shows! See below and hear on today's radio program our list of Not So Old and Not So Slow Things! From opals forming in months to man's genetic diversity in 200 generations, and with carbon 14 everywhere it's not supposed to be (including in diamonds and dinosaur bones!), scientific observations fill the guys' most traditional list challenging those who claim that the earth is billions of years old. Many of these scientific finds demand a re-evaluation of supposed million and billion-year ages. * Finches Adapt in 17 Years, Not 2.3 Million: Charles Darwin's finches are claimed to have taken 2,300,000 years to diversify from an initial species blown onto the Galapagos Islands. Yet individuals from a single finch species on a U.S. Bird Reservation in the Pacific were introduced to a group of small islands 300 miles away and in at most 17 years, like Darwin's finches, they had diversified their beaks, related muscles, and behavior to fill various ecological niches. Hear about this also at rsr.org/spetner. * Opals Can Form in "A Few Months" And Don't Need 100,000 Years: A leading authority on opals, Allan W. Eckert, observed that, "scientific papers and textbooks have told that the process of opal formation requires tens of thousands of years, perhaps hundreds of thousands... Not true." A 2011 peer-reviewed paper in a geology journal from Australia, where almost all the world's opal is found, reported on the: "new timetable for opal formation involving weeks to a few months and not the hundreds of thousands of years envisaged by the conventional weathering model." (And apparently, per a 2019 report from Entomology Today, opals can even form around insects!) More knowledgeable scientists resist the uncritical, group-think insistence on false super-slow formation rates (as also for manganese nodules, gold veins, stone, petroleum, canyons and gullies, and even guts, all below). Regarding opals, Darwinian bias led geologists to long ignore possible quick action, as from microbes, as a possible explanation for these mineraloids. For both in nature and in the lab, opals form rapidly, not even in 10,000 years, but in weeks. See this also from creationists by a geologist, a paleobiochemist, and a nuclear chemist. * Finches Speciate in Two Generations vs Two Million Years for Darwin's Birds?  Darwin's finches on the Galapagos Islands are said to have diversified into 14 species over a period of two million years. But in 2017 the journal Science reported a newcomer to the Island which within two generations spawned a reproductively isolated new species. In another instance as documented by Lee Spetner, a hundred birds of the same finch species introduced to an island cluster a 1,000 kilometers from Galapagos diversified into species with the typical variations in beak sizes, etc. "If this diversification occurred in less than seventeen years," Dr. Spetner asks, "why did Darwin's Galapagos finches [as claimed by evolutionists] have to take two million years?" * Blue Eyes Originated Not So Long Ago: Not a million years ago, nor a hundred thousand years ago, but based on a peer-reviewed paper in Human Genetics, a press release at Science Daily reports that, "research shows that people with blue eyes have a single, common ancestor. A team at the University of Copenhagen have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye colour of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today." * Adding the Entire Universe to our List of Not So Old Things? Based on March 2019 findings from Hubble, Nobel laureate Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute and his co-authors in the Astrophysical Journal estimate that the universe is about a billion years younger than previously thought! Then in September 2019 in the journal Science, the age dropped precipitiously to as low as 11.4 billion years! Of course, these measurements also further squeeze the canonical story of the big bang chronology with its many already existing problems including the insufficient time to "evolve" distant mature galaxies, galaxy clusters, superclusters, enormous black holes, filaments, bubbles, walls, and other superstructures. So, even though the latest estimates are still absurdly too old (Google: big bang predictions, and click on the #1 ranked article, or just go on over there to rsr.org/bb), regardless, we thought we'd plop the whole universe down on our List of Not So Old Things!   * After the Soft Tissue Discoveries, NOW Dino DNA: When a North Carolina State University paleontologist took the Tyrannosaurus Rex photos to the right of original biological material, that led to the 2016 discovery of dinosaur DNA, So far researchers have also recovered dinosaur blood vessels, collagen, osteocytes, hemoglobin, red blood cells, and various proteins. As of May 2018, twenty-six scientific journals, including Nature, Science, PNAS, PLoS One, Bone, and Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, have confirmed the discovery of biomaterial fossils from many dinosaurs! Organisms including T. Rex, hadrosaur, titanosaur, triceratops, Lufengosaur, mosasaur, and Archaeopteryx, and many others dated, allegedly, even hundreds of millions of years old, have yielded their endogenous, still-soft biological material. See the web's most complete listing of 100+ journal papers (screenshot, left) announcing these discoveries at bflist.rsr.org and see it in layman's terms at rsr.org/soft. * Rapid Stalactites, Stalagmites, Etc.: A construction worker in 1954 left a lemonade bottle in one of Australia's famous Jenolan Caves. By 2011 it had been naturally transformed into a stalagmite (below, right). Increasing scientific knowledge is arguing for rapid cave formation (see below, Nat'l Park Service shrinks Carlsbad Caverns formation estimates from 260M years, to 10M, to 2M, to it "depends"). Likewise, examples are growing of rapid formations with typical chemical make-up (see bottle, left) of classic stalactites and stalagmites including:- in Nat'l Geo the Carlsbad Caverns stalagmite that rapidly covered a bat - the tunnel stalagmites at Tennessee's Raccoon Mountain - hundreds of stalactites beneath the Lincoln Memorial - those near Gladfelter Hall at Philadelphia's Temple University (send photos to Bob@rsr.org) - hundreds of stalactites at Australia's zinc mine at Mt. Isa.   - and those beneath Melbourne's Shrine of Remembrance. * Most Human Mutations Arose in 200 Generations: From Adam until Real Science Radio, in only 200 generations! The journal Nature reports The Recent Origin of Most Human Protein-coding Variants. As summarized by geneticist co-author Joshua Akey, "Most of the mutations that we found arose in the last 200 generations or so" (the same number previously published by biblical creationists). Another 2012 paper, in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology (Eugenie Scott's own field) on High mitochondrial mutation rates, shows that one mitochondrial DNA mutation occurs every other generation, which, as creationists point out, indicates that mtEve would have lived about 200 generations ago. That's not so old! * National Geographic's Not-So-Old Hard-Rock Canyon at Mount St. Helens: As our List of Not So Old Things (this web page) reveals, by a kneejerk reaction evolutionary scientists assign ages of tens or hundreds of thousands of years (or at least just long enough to contradict Moses' chronology in Genesis.) However, with closer study, routinely, more and more old ages get revised downward to fit the world's growing scientific knowledge. So the trend is not that more information lengthens ages, but rather, as data replaces guesswork, ages tend to shrink until they are consistent with the young-earth biblical timeframe. Consistent with this observation, the May 2000 issue of National Geographic quotes the U.S. Forest Service's scientist at Mount St. Helens, Peter Frenzen, describing the canyon on the north side of the volcano. "You'd expect a hard-rock canyon to be thousands, even hundreds of thousands of years old. But this was cut in less than a decade." And as for the volcano itself, while again, the kneejerk reaction of old-earthers would be to claim that most geologic features are hundreds of thousands or millions of years old, the atheistic National Geographic magazine acknowledges from the evidence that Mount St. Helens, the volcanic mount, is only about 4,000 years old! See below and more at rsr.org/mount-st-helens. * Mount St. Helens Dome Ten Years Old not 1.7 Million: Geochron Laboratories of Cambridge, Mass., using potassium-argon and other radiometric techniques claims the rock sample they dated, from the volcano's dome, solidified somewhere between 340,000 and 2.8 million years ago. However photographic evidence and historical reports document the dome's formation during the 1980s, just ten years prior to the samples being collected. With the age of this rock known, radiometric dating therefore gets the age 99.99999% wrong. * Devils Hole Pupfish Isolated Not for 13,000 Years But for 100: Secular scientists default to knee-jerk, older-than-Bible-age dates. However, a tiny Mojave desert fish is having none of it. Rather than having been genetically isolated from other fish for 13,000 years (which would make this small school of fish older than the Earth itself), according to a paper in the journal Nature, actual measurements of mutation rates indicate that the genetic diversity of these Pupfish could have been generated in about 100 years, give or take a few. * Polystrates like Spines and Rare Schools of Fossilized Jellyfish: Previously, seven sedimentary layers in Wisconsin had been described as taking a million years to form. And because jellyfish have no skeleton, as Charles Darwin pointed out, it is rare to find them among fossils. But now, reported in the journal Geology, a school of jellyfish fossils have been found throughout those same seven layers. So, polystrate fossils that condense the time of strata deposition from eons to hours or months, include: - Jellyfish in central Wisconsin were not deposited and fossilized over a million years but during a single event quick enough to trap a whole school. (This fossil school, therefore, taken as a unit forms a polystrate fossil.) Examples are everywhere that falsify the claims of strata deposition over millions of years. - Countless trilobites buried in astounding three dimensionality around the world are meticulously recovered from limestone, much of which is claimed to have been deposited very slowly. Contrariwise, because these specimens were buried rapidly in quickly laid down sediments, they show no evidence of greater erosion on their upper parts as compared to their lower parts.- The delicacy of radiating spine polystrates, like tadpole and jellyfish fossils, especially clearly demonstrate the rapidity of such strata deposition. - A second school of jellyfish, even though they rarely fossilized, exists in another locale with jellyfish fossils in multiple layers, in Australia's Brockman Iron Formation, constraining there too the rate of strata deposition. By the way, jellyfish are an example of evolution's big squeeze. Like galaxies evolving too quickly, galaxy clusters, and even human feet (which, like Mummy DNA, challenge the Out of Africa paradigm), jellyfish have gotten into the act squeezing evolution's timeline, here by 200 million years when they were found in strata allegedly a half-a-billion years old. Other examples, ironically referred to as Medusoid Problematica, are even found in pre-Cambrian strata. - 171 tadpoles of the same species buried in diatoms. - Leaves buried vertically through single-celled diatoms powerfully refute the claimed super-slow deposition of diatomaceous rock. - Many fossils, including a Mesosaur, have been buried in multiple "varve" layers, which are claimed to be annual depositions, yet they show no erosional patterns that would indicate gradual burial (as they claim, absurdly, over even thousands of years). - A single whale skeleton preserved in California in dozens of layers of diatom deposits thus forming a polystrate fossil. - 40 whales buried in the desert in Chile. "What's really interesting is that this didn't just happen once," said Smithsonian evolutionist Dr. Nick Pyenson. It happened four times." Why's that? Because "the fossil site has at least four layers", to which Real Science Radio's Bob Enyart replies: "Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha", with RSR co-host Fred Williams thoughtfully adding, "Ha ha!" * Polystrate Trees: Examples abound around the world of polystrate trees:  - Yellowstone's petrified polystrate forest (with the NPS exhibit sign removed; see below) with successive layers of rootless trees demonstrating the rapid deposition of fifty layers of strata. - A similarly formed polystrate fossil forest in France demonstrating the rapid deposition of a dozen strata. - In a thousand locations including famously the Fossil Cliffs of Joggins, Nova Scotia, polystrate fossils such as trees span many strata. - These trees lack erosion: Not only should such fossils, generally speaking, not even exist, but polystrates including trees typically show no evidence of erosion increasing with height. All of this powerfully disproves the claim that the layers were deposited slowly over thousands or millions of years. In the experience of your RSR radio hosts, evolutionists commonly respond to this hard evidence with mocking. See CRSQ June 2006, ICR Impact #316, and RSR 8-11-06 at KGOV.com. * Yellowstone Petrified Trees Sign Removed: The National Park Service removed their incorrect sign (see left and more). The NPS had claimed that in dozens of different strata over a 40-square mile area, many petrified trees were still standing where they had grown. The NPS eventually removed the sign partly because those petrified trees had no root systems, which they would have had if they had grown there. Instead, the trees of this "fossil forest" have roots that are abruptly broken off two or three feet from their trunks. If these mature trees actually had been remnants of sequential forests that had grown up in strata layer on top of strata layer, 27 times on Specimen Ridge (and 50 times at Specimen Creek), such a natural history implies passage of more time than permitted by biblical chronology. So, don't trust the National Park Service on historical science because they're wrong on the age of the Earth. * Wood Petrifies Quickly: Not surprisingly, by the common evolutionary knee-jerk claim of deep time, "several researchers believe that several millions of years are necessary for the complete formation of silicified wood". Our List of Not So Old and Not So Slow Things includes the work of five Japanese scientists who proved creationist research and published their results in the peer-reviewed journal Sedimentary Geology showing that wood can and does petrify rapidly. Modern wood significantly petrified in 36 years these researchers concluded that wood buried in strata could have been petrified in "a fairly short period of time, in the order of several tens to hundreds of years." * The Scablands: The primary surface features of the Scablands, which cover thousands of square miles of eastern Washington, were long believed to have formed gradually. Yet, against the determined claims of uniformitarian geologists, there is now overwhelming evidence as presented even in a NOVA TV program that the primary features of the Scablands formed rapidly from a catastrophic breach of Lake Missoula causing a massive regional flood. Of course evolutionary geologists still argue that the landscape was formed over tens of thousands of years, now by claiming there must have been a hundred Missoula floods. However, the evidence that there was Only One Lake Missoula Flood has been powerfully reinforced by a University of Colorado Ph.D. thesis. So the Scablands itself is no longer available to old-earthers as de facto evidence for the passage of millions of years. * The Heart Mountain Detachment: in Wyoming just east of Yellowstone, this mountain did not break apart slowly by uniformitarian processes but in only about half-an-hour as widely reported including in the evolutionist LiveScience.com, "Land Speed Record: Mountain Moves 62 Miles in 30 Minutes." The evidence indicates that this mountain of rock covering 425 square miles rapidly broke into 50 pieces and slid apart over an area of more than 1,300 square miles in a biblical, not a "geological," timeframe.  * "150 Million" year-old Squid Ink Not Decomposed: This still-writable ink had dehydrated but had not decomposed! The British Geological Survey's Dr. Phil Wilby, who excavated the fossil, said, "It is difficult to imagine how you can have something as soft and sloppy as an ink sac fossilised in three dimensions, still black, and inside a rock that is 150 million years old." And the Daily Mail states that, "the black ink was of exactly the same structure as that of today's version", just desiccated. And Wilby added, "Normally you would find only the hard parts like the shell and bones fossilised but... these creatures... can be dissected as if they are living animals, you can see the muscle fibres and cells. It is difficult to imagine... The structure is similar to ink from a modern squid so we can write with it..." Why is this difficult for evolutionists to imagine? Because as Dr. Carl Wieland writes, "Chemical structures 'fall apart' all by themselves over time due to the randomizing effects of molecular motion." Decades ago Bob Enyart broadcast a geology program about Mount St. Helens' catastrophic destruction of forests and the hydraulic transportation and upright deposition of trees. Later, Bob met the chief ranger from Haleakala National Park on Hawaii's island of Maui, Mark Tanaka-Sanders. The ranger agreed to correspond with his colleague at Yellowstone to urge him to have the sign removed. Thankfully, it was then removed. (See also AIG, CMI, and all the original Yellowstone exhibit photos.) Groundbreaking research conducted by creation geologist Dr. Steve Austin in Spirit Lake after Mount St. Helens eruption provided a modern-day analog to the formation of Yellowstone fossil forest. A steam blast from that volcano blew over tens of thousands of trees leaving them without attached roots. Many thousands of those trees were floating upright in Spirit Lake, and began sinking at varying rates into rapidly and sporadically deposited sediments. Once Yellowstone's successive forest interpretation was falsified (though like with junk DNA, it's too big to fail, so many atheists and others still cling to it), the erroneous sign was removed. * Asiatic vs. European Honeybees: These two populations of bees have been separated supposedly for seven million years. A researcher decided to put the two together to see what would happen. What we should have here is a failure to communicate that would have resulted after their "language" evolved over millions of years. However, European and Asiatic honeybees are still able to communicate, putting into doubt the evolutionary claim that they were separated over "geologic periods." For more, see the Public Library of Science, Asiatic Honeybees Can Understand Dance Language of European Honeybees. (Oh yeah, and why don't fossils of poorly-formed honeycombs exist, from the millions of years before the bees and natural selection finally got the design right? Ha! Because they don't exist! :) Nautiloid proves rapid limestone formation.* Remember the Nautiloids: In the Grand Canyon there is a limestone layer averaging seven feet thick that runs the 277 miles of the canyon (and beyond) that covers hundreds of square miles and contains an average of one nautiloid fossil per square meter. Along with many other dead creatures in this one particular layer, 15% of these nautiloids were killed and then fossilized standing on their heads. Yes, vertically. They were caught in such an intense and rapid catastrophic flow that gravity was not able to cause all of their dead carcasses to fall over on their sides. Famed Mount St. Helens geologist Steve Austin is also the world's leading expert on nautiloid fossils and has worked in the canyon and presented his findings to the park's rangers at the invitation of National Park Service officials. Austin points out, as is true of many of the world's mass fossil graveyards, that this enormous nautiloid deposition provides indisputable proof of the extremely rapid formation of a significant layer of limestone near the bottom of the canyon, a layer like the others we've been told about, that allegedly formed at the bottom of a calm and placid sea with slow and gradual sedimentation. But a million nautiloids, standing on their heads, literally, would beg to differ. At our sister stie, RSR provides the relevant Geologic Society of America abstract, links, and video. *  Now It's Allegedly Two Million Year-Old Leaves: "When we started pulling leaves out of the soil, that was surreal, to know that it's millions of years old..." sur-re-al: adjective: a bizarre mix of fact and fantasy. In this case, the leaves are the facts. Earth scientists from Ohio State and the University of Minnesota say that wood and leaves they found in the Canadian Arctic are at least two million years old, and perhaps more than ten million years old, even though the leaves are just dry and crumbly and the wood still burns! * Gold Precipitates in Veins in Less than a Second: After geologists submitted for decades to the assumption that each layer of gold would deposit at the alleged super slow rates of geologic process, the journal Nature Geoscience reports that each layer of deposition can occur within a few tenths of a second. Meanwhile, at the Lihir gold deposit in Papua New Guinea, evolutionists assumed the more than 20 million ounces of gold in the Lihir reserve took millions of years to deposit, but as reported in the journal Science, geologists can now demonstrate that the deposit could have formed in thousands of years, or far more quickly! Iceland's not-so-old Surtsey Island looks ancient.* Surtsey Island, Iceland: Of the volcanic island that formed in 1963, New Scientist reported in 2007 about Surtsey that "geographers... marvel that canyons, gullies and other land features that typically take tens of thousands or millions of years to form were created in less than a decade." Yes. And Sigurdur Thorarinsson, Iceland's chief  geologist, wrote in the months after Surtsey formed, "that the time scale," he had been trained "to attach to geological developments is misleading." [For what is said to] take thousands of years... the same development may take a few weeks or even days here [including to form] a landscape... so varied and mature that it was almost beyond belief... wide sandy beaches and precipitous crags... gravel banks and lagoons, impressive cliffs… hollows, glens and soft undulating land... fractures and faultscarps, channels and screes… confounded by what met your eye... boulders worn by the surf, some of which were almost round... -Iceland's chief geologist * The Palouse River Gorge: In the southeast of Washington State, the Palouse River Gorge is one of many features formed rapidly by 500 cubic miles of water catastrophically released with the breaching of a natural dam in the Lake Missoula Flood (which gouged out the Scablands as described above). So, hard rock can be breached and eroded rapidly. * Leaf Shapes Identical for 190 Million Years?  From Berkley.edu, "Ginkgo biloba... dates back to... about 190 million years ago... fossilized leaf material from the Tertiary species Ginkgo adiantoides is considered similar or even identical to that produced by modern Ginkgo biloba trees... virtually indistinguishable..." The literature describes leaf shapes as "spectacularly diverse" sometimes within a species but especially across the plant kingdom. Because all kinds of plants survive with all kinds of different leaf shapes, the conservation of a species retaining a single shape over alleged deep time is a telling issue. Darwin's theory is undermined by the unchanging shape over millions of years of a species' leaf shape. This lack of change, stasis in what should be an easily morphable plant trait, supports the broader conclusion that chimp-like creatures did not become human beings and all the other ambitious evolutionary creation of new kinds are simply imagined. (Ginkgo adiantoides and biloba are actually the same species. Wikipedia states, "It is doubtful whether the Northern Hemisphere fossil species of Ginkgo can be reliably distinguished." For oftentimes, as documented by Dr. Carl Werner in his Evolution: The Grand Experiment series, paleontogists falsely speciate identical specimens, giving different species names, even different genus names, to the fossil and living animals that appear identical.) * Box Canyon, Idaho: Geologists now think Box Canyon in Idaho, USA, was carved by a catastrophic flood and not slowly over millions of years with 1) huge plunge pools formed by waterfalls; 2) the almost complete removal of large basalt boulders from the canyon; 3) an eroded notch on the plateau at the top of the canyon; and 4) water scour marks on the basalt plateau leading to the canyon. Scientists calculate that the flood was so large that it could have eroded the whole canyon in as little as 35 days. See the journal Science, Formation of Box Canyon, Idaho, by Megaflood, and the Journal of Creation, and Creation Magazine. * Manganese Nodules Rapid Formation: Allegedly, as claimed at the Wikipedia entry from 2005 through 2021: "Nodule growth is one of the slowest of all geological phenomena – in the order of a centimeter over several million years." Wow, that would be slow! And a Texas A&M Marine Sciences technical slide presentation says, “They grow very slowly (mm/million years) and can be tens of millions of years old.” But according to a World Almanac documentary they have formed "around beer cans," said marine geologist Dr. John Yates in the 1997 video Universe Beneath the Sea: The Next Frontier. There are also reports of manganese nodules forming around ships sunk in the First World War. See more at at youngearth.com, at TOL, in the print edition of the Journal of Creation, and in this typical forum discussion with atheists (at the Chicago Cubs forum no less :). * "6,000 year-old" Mitochondrial Eve: As the Bible calls "Eve... the mother of all living" (Gen. 3:20), genetic researchers have named the one woman from whom all humans have descended "Mitochondrial Eve." But in a scientific attempt to date her existence, they openly admit that they included chimpanzee DNA in their analysis in order to get what they viewed as a reasonably old date of 200,000 years ago (which is still surprisingly recent from their perspective, but old enough not to strain Darwinian theory too much). But then as widely reported including by Science magazine, when they dropped the chimp data and used only actual human mutation rates, that process determined that Eve lived only six thousand years ago! In Ann Gibbon's Science article, "Calibrating the Mitochondrial Clock," rather than again using circular reasoning by assuming their conclusion (that humans evolved from ape-like creatures), they performed their calculations using actual measured mutation rates. This peer-reviewed journal then reported that if these rates have been constant, "mitochondrial Eve… would be a mere 6000 years old." See also the journal Nature and creation.com's "A shrinking date for Eve," and Walt Brown's assessment. Expectedly though, evolutionists have found a way to reject their own unbiased finding (the conclusion contrary to their self-interest) by returning to their original method of using circular reasoning, as reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics, "calibrating against recent evidence for the divergence time of humans and chimpanzees,"  to reset their mitochondrial clock back to 200,000 years. * Even Younger Y-Chromosomal Adam: (Although he should be called, "Y-Chromosomal Noah.") While we inherit our mtDNA only from our mothers, only men have a Y chromosome (which incidentally genetically disproves the claim that the fetus is "part of the woman's body," since the little boy's y chromosome could never be part of mom's body). Based on documented mutation rates on and the extraordinary lack o

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Real Science Radio
RSR's List of Not So Old Things

Real Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021


[While Bob & Cheryl Enyart go fishing we invite you to enjoy from the RSR archives our favorite List of Not So Old Things! Photos from today, June 25, 2021.] -- Finches Diversify in Decades, Opals Form in Months,  Man's Genetic Diversity in 200 Generations, C-14 Everywhere: Real Science Radio hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams present their classic program that led to the audience-favorites rsr.org/list-shows! See below and hear on today's radio program our list of Not So Old and Not So Slow Things! From opals forming in months to man's genetic diversity in 200 generations, and with carbon 14 everywhere it's not supposed to be (including in diamonds and dinosaur bones!), scientific observations fill the guys' most traditional list challenging those who claim that the earth is billions of years old. Many of these scientific finds demand a re-evaluation of supposed million and billion-year ages. * Finches Adapt in 17 Years, Not 2.3 Million: Charles Darwin's finches are claimed to have taken 2,300,000 years to diversify from an initial species blown onto the Galapagos Islands. Yet individuals from a single finch species on a U.S. Bird Reservation in the Pacific were introduced to a group of small islands 300 miles away and in at most 17 years, like Darwin's finches, they had diversified their beaks, related muscles, and behavior to fill various ecological niches. Hear about this also at rsr.org/spetner. * Opals Can Form in "A Few Months" And Don't Need 100,000 Years: A leading authority on opals, Allan W. Eckert, observed that, "scientific papers and textbooks have told that the process of opal formation requires tens of thousands of years, perhaps hundreds of thousands... Not true." A 2011 peer-reviewed paper in a geology journal from Australia, where almost all the world's opal is found, reported on the: "new timetable for opal formation involving weeks to a few months and not the hundreds of thousands of years envisaged by the conventional weathering model." (And apparently, per a 2019 report from Entomology Today, opals can even form around insects!) More knowledgeable scientists resist the uncritical, group-think insistence on false super-slow formation rates (as also for manganese nodules, gold veins, stone, petroleum, canyons and gullies, and even guts, all below). Regarding opals, Darwinian bias led geologists to long ignore possible quick action, as from microbes, as a possible explanation for these mineraloids. For both in nature and in the lab, opals form rapidly, not even in 10,000 years, but in weeks. See this also from creationists by a geologist, a paleobiochemist, and a nuclear chemist. * Finches Speciate in Two Generations vs Two Million Years for Darwin's Birds?  Darwin's finches on the Galapagos Islands are said to have diversified into 14 species over a period of two million years. But in 2017 the journal Science reported a newcomer to the Island which within two generations spawned a reproductively isolated new species. In another instance as documented by Lee Spetner, a hundred birds of the same finch species introduced to an island cluster a 1,000 kilometers from Galapagos diversified into species with the typical variations in beak sizes, etc. "If this diversification occurred in less than seventeen years," Dr. Spetner asks, "why did Darwin's Galapagos finches [as claimed by evolutionists] have to take two million years?" * Blue Eyes Originated Not So Long Ago: Not a million years ago, nor a hundred thousand years ago, but based on a peer-reviewed paper in Human Genetics, a press release at Science Daily reports that, "research shows that people with blue eyes have a single, common ancestor. A team at the University of Copenhagen have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye colour of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today." * Adding the Entire Universe to our List of Not So Old Things? Based on March 2019 findings from Hubble, Nobel laureate Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute and his co-authors in the Astrophysical Journal estimate that the universe is about a billion years younger than previously thought! Then in September 2019 in the journal Science, the age dropped precipitiously to as low as 11.4 billion years! Of course, these measurements also further squeeze the canonical story of the big bang chronology with its many already existing problems including the insufficient time to "evolve" distant mature galaxies, galaxy clusters, superclusters, enormous black holes, filaments, bubbles, walls, and other superstructures. So, even though the latest estimates are still absurdly too old (Google: big bang predictions, and click on the #1 ranked article, or just go on over there to rsr.org/bb), regardless, we thought we'd plop the whole universe down on our List of Not So Old Things!   * After the Soft Tissue Discoveries, NOW Dino DNA: When a North Carolina State University paleontologist took the Tyrannosaurus Rex photos to the right of original biological material, that led to the 2016 discovery of dinosaur DNA, So far researchers have also recovered dinosaur blood vessels, collagen, osteocytes, hemoglobin, red blood cells, and various proteins. As of May 2018, twenty-six scientific journals, including Nature, Science, PNAS, PLoS One, Bone, and Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, have confirmed the discovery of biomaterial fossils from many dinosaurs! Organisms including T. Rex, hadrosaur, titanosaur, triceratops, Lufengosaur, mosasaur, and Archaeopteryx, and many others dated, allegedly, even hundreds of millions of years old, have yielded their endogenous, still-soft biological material. See the web's most complete listing of 100+ journal papers (screenshot, left) announcing these discoveries at bflist.rsr.org and see it in layman's terms at rsr.org/soft. * Rapid Stalactites, Stalagmites, Etc.: A construction worker in 1954 left a lemonade bottle in one of Australia's famous Jenolan Caves. By 2011 it had been naturally transformed into a stalagmite (below, right). Increasing scientific knowledge is arguing for rapid cave formation (see below, Nat'l Park Service shrinks Carlsbad Caverns formation estimates from 260M years, to 10M, to 2M, to it "depends"). Likewise, examples are growing of rapid formations with typical chemical make-up (see bottle, left) of classic stalactites and stalagmites including:- in Nat'l Geo the Carlsbad Caverns stalagmite that rapidly covered a bat - the tunnel stalagmites at Tennessee's Raccoon Mountain - hundreds of stalactites beneath the Lincoln Memorial - those near Gladfelter Hall at Philadelphia's Temple University (send photos to Bob@rsr.org) - hundreds of stalactites at Australia's zinc mine at Mt. Isa.   - and those beneath Melbourne's Shrine of Remembrance. * Most Human Mutations Arose in 200 Generations: From Adam until Real Science Radio, in only 200 generations! The journal Nature reports The Recent Origin of Most Human Protein-coding Variants. As summarized by geneticist co-author Joshua Akey, "Most of the mutations that we found arose in the last 200 generations or so" (the same number previously published by biblical creationists). Another 2012 paper, in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology (Eugenie Scott's own field) on High mitochondrial mutation rates, shows that one mitochondrial DNA mutation occurs every other generation, which, as creationists point out, indicates that mtEve would have lived about 200 generations ago. That's not so old! * National Geographic's Not-So-Old Hard-Rock Canyon at Mount St. Helens: As our List of Not So Old Things (this web page) reveals, by a kneejerk reaction evolutionary scientists assign ages of tens or hundreds of thousands of years (or at least just long enough to contradict Moses' chronology in Genesis.) However, with closer study, routinely, more and more old ages get revised downward to fit the world's growing scientific knowledge. So the trend is not that more information lengthens ages, but rather, as data replaces guesswork, ages tend to shrink until they are consistent with the young-earth biblical timeframe. Consistent with this observation, the May 2000 issue of National Geographic quotes the U.S. Forest Service's scientist at Mount St. Helens, Peter Frenzen, describing the canyon on the north side of the volcano. "You'd expect a hard-rock canyon to be thousands, even hundreds of thousands of years old. But this was cut in less than a decade." And as for the volcano itself, while again, the kneejerk reaction of old-earthers would be to claim that most geologic features are hundreds of thousands or millions of years old, the atheistic National Geographic magazine acknowledges from the evidence that Mount St. Helens, the volcanic mount, is only about 4,000 years old! See below and more at rsr.org/mount-st-helens. * Mount St. Helens Dome Ten Years Old not 1.7 Million: Geochron Laboratories of Cambridge, Mass., using potassium-argon and other radiometric techniques claims the rock sample they dated, from the volcano's dome, solidified somewhere between 340,000 and 2.8 million years ago. However photographic evidence and historical reports document the dome's formation during the 1980s, just ten years prior to the samples being collected. With the age of this rock known, radiometric dating therefore gets the age 99.99999% wrong. * Devils Hole Pupfish Isolated Not for 13,000 Years But for 100: Secular scientists default to knee-jerk, older-than-Bible-age dates. However, a tiny Mojave desert fish is having none of it. Rather than having been genetically isolated from other fish for 13,000 years (which would make this small school of fish older than the Earth itself), according to a paper in the journal Nature, actual measurements of mutation rates indicate that the genetic diversity of these Pupfish could have been generated in about 100 years, give or take a few. * Polystrates like Spines and Rare Schools of Fossilized Jellyfish: Previously, seven sedimentary layers in Wisconsin had been described as taking a million years to form. And because jellyfish have no skeleton, as Charles Darwin pointed out, it is rare to find them among fossils. But now, reported in the journal Geology, a school of jellyfish fossils have been found throughout those same seven layers. So, polystrate fossils that condense the time of strata deposition from eons to hours or months, include: - Jellyfish in central Wisconsin were not deposited and fossilized over a million years but during a single event quick enough to trap a whole school. (This fossil school, therefore, taken as a unit forms a polystrate fossil.) Examples are everywhere that falsify the claims of strata deposition over millions of years. - Countless trilobites buried in astounding three dimensionality around the world are meticulously recovered from limestone, much of which is claimed to have been deposited very slowly. Contrariwise, because these specimens were buried rapidly in quickly laid down sediments, they show no evidence of greater erosion on their upper parts as compared to their lower parts.- The delicacy of radiating spine polystrates, like tadpole and jellyfish fossils, especially clearly demonstrate the rapidity of such strata deposition. - A second school of jellyfish, even though they rarely fossilized, exists in another locale with jellyfish fossils in multiple layers, in Australia's Brockman Iron Formation, constraining there too the rate of strata deposition. By the way, jellyfish are an example of evolution's big squeeze. Like galaxies evolving too quickly, galaxy clusters, and even human feet (which, like Mummy DNA, challenge the Out of Africa paradigm), jellyfish have gotten into the act squeezing evolution's timeline, here by 200 million years when they were found in strata allegedly a half-a-billion years old. Other examples, ironically referred to as Medusoid Problematica, are even found in pre-Cambrian strata. - 171 tadpoles of the same species buried in diatoms. - Leaves buried vertically through single-celled diatoms powerfully refute the claimed super-slow deposition of diatomaceous rock. - Many fossils, including a Mesosaur, have been buried in multiple "varve" layers, which are claimed to be annual depositions, yet they show no erosional patterns that would indicate gradual burial (as they claim, absurdly, over even thousands of years). - A single whale skeleton preserved in California in dozens of layers of diatom deposits thus forming a polystrate fossil. - 40 whales buried in the desert in Chile. "What's really interesting is that this didn't just happen once," said Smithsonian evolutionist Dr. Nick Pyenson. It happened four times." Why's that? Because "the fossil site has at least four layers", to which Real Science Radio's Bob Enyart replies: "Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha", with RSR co-host Fred Williams thoughtfully adding, "Ha ha!" * Polystrate Trees: Examples abound around the world of polystrate trees:  - Yellowstone's petrified polystrate forest (with the NPS exhibit sign removed; see below) with successive layers of rootless trees demonstrating the rapid deposition of fifty layers of strata. - A similarly formed polystrate fossil forest in France demonstrating the rapid deposition of a dozen strata. - In a thousand locations including famously the Fossil Cliffs of Joggins, Nova Scotia, polystrate fossils such as trees span many strata. - These trees lack erosion: Not only should such fossils, generally speaking, not even exist, but polystrates including trees typically show no evidence of erosion increasing with height. All of this powerfully disproves the claim that the layers were deposited slowly over thousands or millions of years. In the experience of your RSR radio hosts, evolutionists commonly respond to this hard evidence with mocking. See CRSQ June 2006, ICR Impact #316, and RSR 8-11-06 at KGOV.com. * Yellowstone Petrified Trees Sign Removed: The National Park Service removed their incorrect sign (see left and more). The NPS had claimed that in dozens of different strata over a 40-square mile area, many petrified trees were still standing where they had grown. The NPS eventually removed the sign partly because those petrified trees had no root systems, which they would have had if they had grown there. Instead, the trees of this "fossil forest" have roots that are abruptly broken off two or three feet from their trunks. If these mature trees actually had been remnants of sequential forests that had grown up in strata layer on top of strata layer, 27 times on Specimen Ridge (and 50 times at Specimen Creek), such a natural history implies passage of more time than permitted by biblical chronology. So, don't trust the National Park Service on historical science because they're wrong on the age of the Earth. * Wood Petrifies Quickly: Not surprisingly, by the common evolutionary knee-jerk claim of deep time, "several researchers believe that several millions of years are necessary for the complete formation of silicified wood". Our List of Not So Old and Not So Slow Things includes the work of five Japanese scientists who proved creationist research and published their results in the peer-reviewed journal Sedimentary Geology showing that wood can and does petrify rapidly. Modern wood significantly petrified in 36 years these researchers concluded that wood buried in strata could have been petrified in "a fairly short period of time, in the order of several tens to hundreds of years." * The Scablands: The primary surface features of the Scablands, which cover thousands of square miles of eastern Washington, were long believed to have formed gradually. Yet, against the determined claims of uniformitarian geologists, there is now overwhelming evidence as presented even in a NOVA TV program that the primary features of the Scablands formed rapidly from a catastrophic breach of Lake Missoula causing a massive regional flood. Of course evolutionary geologists still argue that the landscape was formed over tens of thousands of years, now by claiming there must have been a hundred Missoula floods. However, the evidence that there was Only One Lake Missoula Flood has been powerfully reinforced by a University of Colorado Ph.D. thesis. So the Scablands itself is no longer available to old-earthers as de facto evidence for the passage of millions of years. * The Heart Mountain Detachment: in Wyoming just east of Yellowstone, this mountain did not break apart slowly by uniformitarian processes but in only about half-an-hour as widely reported including in the evolutionist LiveScience.com, "Land Speed Record: Mountain Moves 62 Miles in 30 Minutes." The evidence indicates that this mountain of rock covering 425 square miles rapidly broke into 50 pieces and slid apart over an area of more than 1,300 square miles in a biblical, not a "geological," timeframe.  * "150 Million" year-old Squid Ink Not Decomposed: This still-writable ink had dehydrated but had not decomposed! The British Geological Survey's Dr. Phil Wilby, who excavated the fossil, said, "It is difficult to imagine how you can have something as soft and sloppy as an ink sac fossilised in three dimensions, still black, and inside a rock that is 150 million years old." And the Daily Mail states that, "the black ink was of exactly the same structure as that of today's version", just desiccated. And Wilby added, "Normally you would find only the hard parts like the shell and bones fossilised but... these creatures... can be dissected as if they are living animals, you can see the muscle fibres and cells. It is difficult to imagine... The structure is similar to ink from a modern squid so we can write with it..." Why is this difficult for evolutionists to imagine? Because as Dr. Carl Wieland writes, "Chemical structures 'fall apart' all by themselves over time due to the randomizing effects of molecular motion." Decades ago Bob Enyart broadcast a geology program about Mount St. Helens' catastrophic destruction of forests and the hydraulic transportation and upright deposition of trees. Later, Bob met the chief ranger from Haleakala National Park on Hawaii's island of Maui, Mark Tanaka-Sanders. The ranger agreed to correspond with his colleague at Yellowstone to urge him to have the sign removed. Thankfully, it was then removed. (See also AIG, CMI, and all the original Yellowstone exhibit photos.) Groundbreaking research conducted by creation geologist Dr. Steve Austin in Spirit Lake after Mount St. Helens eruption provided a modern-day analog to the formation of Yellowstone fossil forest. A steam blast from that volcano blew over tens of thousands of trees leaving them without attached roots. Many thousands of those trees were floating upright in Spirit Lake, and began sinking at varying rates into rapidly and sporadically deposited sediments. Once Yellowstone's successive forest interpretation was falsified (though like with junk DNA, it's too big to fail, so many atheists and others still cling to it), the erroneous sign was removed. * Asiatic vs. European Honeybees: These two populations of bees have been separated supposedly for seven million years. A researcher decided to put the two together to see what would happen. What we should have here is a failure to communicate that would have resulted after their "language" evolved over millions of years. However, European and Asiatic honeybees are still able to communicate, putting into doubt the evolutionary claim that they were separated over "geologic periods." For more, see the Public Library of Science, Asiatic Honeybees Can Understand Dance Language of European Honeybees. (Oh yeah, and why don't fossils of poorly-formed honeycombs exist, from the millions of years before the bees and natural selection finally got the design right? Ha! Because they don't exist! :) Nautiloid proves rapid limestone formation. * Remember the Nautiloids: In the Grand Canyon there is a limestone layer averaging seven feet thick that runs the 277 miles of the canyon (and beyond) that covers hundreds of square miles and contains an average of one nautiloid fossil per square meter. Along with many other dead creatures in this one particular layer, 15% of these nautiloids were killed and then fossilized standing on their heads. Yes, vertically. They were caught in such an intense and rapid catastrophic flow that gravity was not able to cause all of their dead carcasses to fall over on their sides. Famed Mount St. Helens geologist Steve Austin is also the world's leading expert on nautiloid fossils and has worked in the canyon and presented his findings to the park's rangers at the invitation of National Park Service officials. Austin points out, as is true of many of the world's mass fossil graveyards, that this enormous nautiloid deposition provides indisputable proof of the extremely rapid formation of a significant layer of limestone near the bottom of the canyon, a layer like the others we've been told about, that allegedly formed at the bottom of a calm and placid sea with slow and gradual sedimentation. But a million nautiloids, standing on their heads, literally, would beg to differ. At our sister stie, RSR provides the relevant Geologic Society of America abstract, links, and video. *  Now It's Allegedly Two Million Year-Old Leaves: "When we started pulling leaves out of the soil, that was surreal, to know that it's millions of years old..." sur-re-al: adjective: a bizarre mix of fact and fantasy. In this case, the leaves are the facts. Earth scientists from Ohio State and the University of Minnesota say that wood and leaves they found in the Canadian Arctic are at least two million years old, and perhaps more than ten million years old, even though the leaves are just dry and crumbly and the wood still burns! * Gold Precipitates in Veins in Less than a Second: After geologists submitted for decades to the assumption that each layer of gold would deposit at the alleged super slow rates of geologic process, the journal Nature Geoscience reports that each layer of deposition can occur within a few tenths of a second. Meanwhile, at the Lihir gold deposit in Papua New Guinea, evolutionists assumed the more than 20 million ounces of gold in the Lihir reserve took millions of years to deposit, but as reported in the journal Science, geologists can now demonstrate that the deposit could have formed in thousands of years, or far more quickly! Iceland's not-so-old Surtsey Island looks ancient. * Surtsey Island, Iceland: Of the volcanic island that formed in 1963, New Scientist reported in 2007 about Surtsey that "geographers... marvel that canyons, gullies and other land features that typically take tens of thousands or millions of years to form were created in less than a decade." Yes. And Sigurdur Thorarinsson, Iceland's chief  geologist, wrote in the months after Surtsey formed, "that the time scale," he had been trained "to attach to geological developments is misleading." [For what is said to] take thousands of years... the same development may take a few weeks or even days here [including to form] a landscape... so varied and mature that it was almost beyond belief... wide sandy beaches and precipitous crags... gravel banks and lagoons, impressive cliffs… hollows, glens and soft undulating land... fractures and faultscarps, channels and screes… confounded by what met your eye... boulders worn by the surf, some of which were almost round... -Iceland's chief geologist * The Palouse River Gorge: In the southeast of Washington State, the Palouse River Gorge is one of many features formed rapidly by 500 cubic miles of water catastrophically released with the breaching of a natural dam in the Lake Missoula Flood (which gouged out the Scablands as described above). So, hard rock can be breached and eroded rapidly. * Leaf Shapes Identical for 190 Million Years?  From Berkley.edu, "Ginkgo biloba... dates back to... about 190 million years ago... fossilized leaf material from the Tertiary species Ginkgo adiantoides is considered similar or even identical to that produced by modern Ginkgo biloba trees... virtually indistinguishable..." The literature describes leaf shapes as "spectacularly diverse" sometimes within a species but especially across the plant kingdom. Because all kinds of plants survive with all kinds of different leaf shapes, the conservation of a species retaining a single shape over alleged deep time is a telling issue. Darwin's theory is undermined by the unchanging shape over millions of years of a species' leaf shape. This lack of change, stasis in what should be an easily morphable plant trait, supports the broader conclusion that chimp-like creatures did not become human beings and all the other ambitious evolutionary creation of new kinds are simply imagined. (Ginkgo adiantoides and biloba are actually the same species. Wikipedia states, "It is doubtful whether the Northern Hemisphere fossil species of Ginkgo can be reliably distinguished." For oftentimes, as documented by Dr. Carl Werner in his Evolution: The Grand Experiment series, paleontogists falsely speciate identical specimens, giving different species names, even different genus names, to the fossil and living animals that appear identical.) * Box Canyon, Idaho: Geologists now think Box Canyon in Idaho, USA, was carved by a catastrophic flood and not slowly over millions of years with 1) huge plunge pools formed by waterfalls; 2) the almost complete removal of large basalt boulders from the canyon; 3) an eroded notch on the plateau at the top of the canyon; and 4) water scour marks on the basalt plateau leading to the canyon. Scientists calculate that the flood was so large that it could have eroded the whole canyon in as little as 35 days. See the journal Science, Formation of Box Canyon, Idaho, by Megaflood, and the Journal of Creation, and Creation Magazine. * Manganese Nodules Rapid Formation: Allegedly, as claimed at the Wikipedia entry from 2005 through 2021: "Nodule growth is one of the slowest of all geological phenomena – in the order of a centimeter over several million years." Wow, that would be slow! And a Texas A&M Marine Sciences technical slide presentation says, “They grow very slowly (mm/million years) and can be tens of millions of years old.” But according to a World Almanac documentary they have formed "around beer cans," said marine geologist Dr. John Yates in the 1997 video Universe Beneath the Sea: The Next Frontier. There are also reports of manganese nodules forming around ships sunk in the First World War. See more at at youngearth.com, at TOL, in the print edition of the Journal of Creation, and in this typical forum discussion with atheists (at the Chicago Cubs forum no less :). * "6,000 year-old" Mitochondrial Eve: As the Bible calls "Eve... the mother of all living" (Gen. 3:20), genetic researchers have named the one woman from whom all humans have descended "Mitochondrial Eve." But in a scientific attempt to date her existence, they openly admit that they included chimpanzee DNA in their analysis in order to get what they viewed as a reasonably old date of 200,000 years ago (which is still surprisingly recent from their perspective, but old enough not to strain Darwinian theory too much). But then as widely reported including by Science magazine, when they dropped the chimp data and used only actual human mutation rates, that process determined that Eve lived only six thousand years ago! In Ann Gibbon's Science article, "Calibrating the Mitochondrial Clock," rather than again using circular reasoning by assuming their conclusion (that humans evolved from ape-like creatures), they performed their calculations using actual measured mutation rates. This peer-reviewed journal then reported that if these rates have been constant, "mitochondrial Eve… would be a mere 6000 years old." See also the journal Nature and creation.com's "A shrinking date for Eve," and Walt Brown's assessment. Expectedly though, evolutionists have found a way to reject their own unbiased finding (the conclusion contrary to their self-interest) by returning to their original method of using circular reasoning, as reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics, "calibrating against recent evidence for the divergence time of humans and chimpanzees,"  to reset their mitochondrial clock back to 200,000 years. * Even Younger Y-Chromosomal Adam: (Although he should be called, "Y-Chromosomal Noah.") While we inherit our mtDNA only from our mothers, only men have a Y chromosome (which incidentally genetically disproves the cla

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Let me tell you: WSU
From Senegal with love: WSU's one shining moment

Let me tell you: WSU

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 4:20


Washington State basketball signed the HIGHEST ranked recruit in our program's history. The 34th overall ranked prospect has reclassified from 2022 to 21 and will join the squad for the most anticipated basketball season next year on the Palouse since Klay Thompson. Mouhamed Gueye chose WSU over Kansas, Rutgers, and UCLA. Music:1,000,000 Nine Inch Nails

The Paul & Jordana Show
Prof. Rachel Palouse

The Paul & Jordana Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 10:21


UST Law Professor Rachel Palouse joined Jordana to talk about vaccine intellectual property rights and new voting laws. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ask Dr. Universe
Episode 8: Toothpaste, Sunburns, Saturn's Rings

Ask Dr. Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 10:57


Welcome back, young scientists. I’m Dr. Universe and if you’re anything like me you’ve got lots of big questions about our world. On this episode, we investigate questions about toothpaste, sunburns, and Saturn. A big thanks to our kid narrator from Regional Theatre of the Palouse and to the scientists at Washington State University. 

Ask Dr. Universe
Episode 7: Bird Migration, Touch Screens, Goosebumps

Ask Dr. Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 9:09


Welcome back, young scientists. I’m Dr. Universe and if you’re anything like me you’ve got lots of big questions about our world. On this episode, we are talking birds, touch screen technology, and goosebumps. A big thanks to our narrator Natalie from Regional Theatre of the Palouse and to WSU researchers Heather Watts, Praveen Sekhar and Ryan Driskell for helping with the science on this episode. Kids can submit a question of their own for a chance to be featured at askDrUniverse.wsu.edu/ask

Fresh Growth
Diamond S Farms: Benefits of No-Till

Fresh Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2021 10:34


Western SARE completed our second season of Fresh Growth. Thank you for listening! As we are working toward Season 3, we are sharing some special podcasts. These podcasts were created by students in the Washington State University’s Systems Skills for Agriculture and Food Systems class. The students interviewed producers on topics such as regenerative agriculture, permaculture, marketing, economics, technology and more. We hope you enjoy and learn from their work.In this episode, Palouse wheat growers Kyle and Stacie Schultheis, Diamond S Farms, discuss the benefits they have seen using no-till practices. Kyle's grandfather started working with no-till in the 1970s when the ideas was very new. The farm has been 100% no-till for 20 years. Reduced soil erosion and moisture savings in the soil are two benefits described.

Ask Dr. Universe
Episode 6: Flying Squirrels, Curious Pets, Frosty Patterns, Stinky Cheeses

Ask Dr. Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 11:14


On this episode, we'll explore questions about flying squirrels, our curious pets, frost, and stinky cheese. A big thanks to our kid narrator from Regional Theater of the Palouse. Thanks to everyone who helped with the science on this episode: Todd Wilson, Dr. Jessica Bell, Kai Carter, and Minto Michael.Submit a science question at askDrUniverse.wsu.edu/ask for a chance to be featured on a future episode.

Breaking Trail
Katie Egland Cox: Land Conservation and Thinking About Our Legacy

Breaking Trail

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 48:45


Katie Cox brings her background in architecture and design to the world of land conservation and I love talking to people who find purpose through two disparate passions. As the executive director of the Kaniksu Land Trust, she brings a new approach to conservation and we talk about the impact it has on the community. It will give you thought on how it can change yours. If you are running in Sandpoint on trails early in the morning, you are likely to pass Katie Cox during her morning run. Katie’s love of nature was cultivated during her youth, growing up in the wilds of Idaho. Summers were spent swimming in lakes, backpacking into the Frank Church Wilderness and taking long drives around the Palouse wheat fields. Born and raised in Moscow and Elk City, Idaho, Katie has always believed that spending time in nature is integral to one’s growth. She and her husband, Brian, believe in cultivating these same values and traditions in their three young girls. Katie has spent her lifetime intersecting various realms of education. Her mother taught junior high in Moscow and then was a teacher and principal at the small school in Elk City. Because of this modeling, Katie highly values the role education has played in her life, grateful for the opportunities it provides for everyone. Katie received her B.S. in Education from the University of Idaho and a Masters in Architecture from the University of Washington. Thus far, Katie has focused her professional life in the fields of Education and Architecture, with a particular interest in building community. Her career started at the University of Idaho where she worked directly in support of education, focusing on organizing and supporting large capital projects and a variety of programs for the university. For the last decade she has had her own architecture practice while also wearing many hats in volunteer roles, most notably her work as co-chair of the Pine Street Woods capital campaign. The threads of Katie’s life have woven together her deepest passions — a love of the Idaho landscape, teaching and learning, bringing people together, and spending time outdoors. This makes her the ideal advocate for Kaniksu Land Trust. Katie looks forward to sharing the good work of KLT with its regional community, focusing on growing the conservation, education, and recreation programs. In her spare time, you will typically find Katie with her family running, biking, swimming, or skiing. We had a great conversation about the projects that they are working on, and how small grassroots nonprofits can work together to make really big projects happen. I am going to stop and turn it over to our conversation so we can jump right into it. So let's listen in and gear up for what's next. Where to find Katie and other links: www.kaniksu.org info@kaniksu.org LinkedIn BEFORE YOU LEAVE - If you are enjoying the shows, I hope you’ll subscribe, rate, review and share with your friends!   About Lisa Gerber: Lisa advises CEOs and senior-level management on how to use the power of storytelling and effective communication to influence action and bring ideas to life.   She guides companies through the digital maze of constantly changing tools to build discovery, loyalty, and ultimately help them achieve their own big leaps.   When she is not in her office, she might be out skiing or trail running. This is where she does her best creative problem-solving.   To learn more about booking Lisa for consulting, speaking or workshops, visit www.bigleapcreative.com.

Ask Dr. Universe
Episode 5: Seasons, Black Holes, Ponds, Shadows

Ask Dr. Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2021 10:53


Welcome back, young scientists. On this episode, our questions take us to outer space the bottom of the pond and into the fascinating world of light and shadows. A big thanks to our kid narrator from Regional Theatre of the Palouse. Thanks to our friends at Washington State University for helping with the science: Vivienne Baldassare, Sukanta Bose, Joan Wu and Anya Rasmussen. And thanks to you for listening. If you enjoy the podcast, leave a review for Dr. Universe on your favorite podcast app.As always, you can submit a question for a chance to be featured on a future podcast at askDrUniverse.wsu.edu/ask.

Black and White Photography
An interview with Curt Pradelt, well known landscape photographer

Black and White Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2021 28:43


Curt will discuss his techniques for landscape photography. He does both color and black-and-white. You can find the YouTube video here; https://youtu.be/0lEYELZtxPE   You can find Curt's website here; https://curtpradeltphotography.smugmug.com

Exploring Washington State
Peace Vans: A Conversation About Exploring Washington in a Camper Van. Plus Other topics.

Exploring Washington State

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2021 63:30


In this episode Scott Cowan has a conversation with Harley Sitner. Harley is the owner of Peace Vans.Based in Seattle Peace Vans restores, rents, and converts vans. Specializing in Volkswagen air cooled vans Peace Vans is possibly the coolest van repair shop on the West Coast.Not only do they restore and repair, they rent beautifully restored Volkswagen Vanagons and Mercedes Metris vans. Peace Vans is working on converting older Volkswagens to electric! Imagine your old hippy van at 80 MPH on the freeway! Truly magical!Harley explains how Peace Van helps you Explore Washington State with their curated travel trips, private campgrounds and more.Have you wanted to check out the Olympics, or perhaps the Palouse in a camper van? Peace Vans can help you check that off your bucket list.If you want other great ideas of places to visit, or to find out more about people who are making amazing things in Washington State you can visit Explore Washington State.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/ExploringWash)

Guides Gone Wild
Start Today: Amy Margolis (GGW030)

Guides Gone Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2020 63:38


The pod train is stopping at Inspiration Station once again this week. My guest is Amy Margolis, a listener who reached out to me after my conversation with Krista Alderdice in Episode 17. Krista had interviewed Amy and her husband David for her Blue Collar Runners site, because they are the epitome of everyday people doing extra cool things in running - a concept I can obviously get behind!Amy and David are triathletes, ultrarunners, vanlifers…. There are so many things that make their stories unique and interesting. But what I love above all about my conversation with Amy is that it all comes back to community, every time. Amy was never athletic, and hadn’t been taking very good care of herself as she turned 30. She felt stuck in a bad marriage, and felt herself spiraling downward toward a place she knew deep down she didn’t want to land. But then she got herself over to her local YMCA. And if her story from that point on doesn’t light a fire under your butt for the new year, I’m not sure anything will….There’s an old saying, ‘a rising tide lifts all boats’, and Amy’s story is this aphorism in action.Amy leaves us with a ton of inspiration to end 2020. As she says, let’s just be happy to be out there. Let’s take an extra moment every day to feel gratitude about what we CAN do, whom we CAN see and spend time with, and how we ARE able to move our body. Let’s celebrate all of the opportunity we have, rather than focus on our lack. The light is at the end of the tunnel…. We may or may not be getting close, but it IS there and we WILL reach it.You can follow Amy's adventures in running, tri, and vanlife on Instagram, @David_Amy_Mira. You can also check out Amy and David’s YouTube channel here, and make sure to watch Amy’s amazing 2020 ‘Boston Marathon’! (You’ll probably agree with me that Boylston street looks like it could use a repave…..)Wishing you all a safe and happy new year - make sure you find a little time to get outdoors and get some fresh air before you start getting a little wild!Some links to rock you into the new year:Leukemia & Lymphoma SocietyAmerica’s Most Beautiful Bike Ride (Lake Tahoe)Light at the End of the Tunnel Marathon (Seattle, WA)John Wayne Trail (renamed Palouse to Cascades Trail)Unbound Gravel Race (Emporia, KS)What is boondocking?Hyland’sTailwind NutritionArrowhead 135Laura Siebert of 180 Health (GGW Episode 21; recommending the SheWee)XOSKIN socksSuperfeet insoles

Ask Dr. Universe
Episode 4: Mushroom Rings, Apple Cider, Tree Sap, Glass Colors, Lost Connections

Ask Dr. Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2020 11:03


Hello young scientists. I’m Dr. Universe and if you are anything like me, you’ve got lots of big questions about our world. On this episode, we will investigate questions about why mushrooms grow in rings, how to make apple cider, the art of stained glass, why trees have sap, and finally, investigate why the internet goes down. Thanks to our friends Washington State University who helped with the answers: David Wheeler, Bri Valliere, Nadia Valverdi, Dustin Regul, and Dingwen Tao. And a big thanks again to guest narrator Vivian from Regional Theater of the Palouse and Parker for helping read the questions on this episode. As always, thanks to you for listening. You make this podcast possible. Kids can submit a science question of their own for a chance to be featured at askDrUniverse.wsu.edu/ask

Palouse Church on a Hill
255 | What Comes Next? [122220]

Palouse Church on a Hill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2020 24:50


In Episode 255, "What Comes Next?" Pastor Corey and Tim discuss Palouse area Christmas events, Christmas Eve Service options (there are many) and this Sunday's sermon from Galatians 4:4-7.

No-Till Farmer Podcast
No-Till and Direct Seeding in the Palouse

No-Till Farmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2020 45:39


For this episode of the No-Till Farmer "Influencers & Innovators" podcast, brought to you by Mosaic Susterra, No-Till Farmer editor Frank Lessiter talks with the production ag manager for the Spokane Conservation District, Ty Meyer who discusses how no-till got started in the Palouse area, the challenges of integrating cover crops on dryland acres and much more.

Tubs At The Club
Vandal Hoop'n | Sac State, WSU & #24 Texas | Week 1 2020

Tubs At The Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2020 49:57


Brian & Marten breakdown the Idaho Mens and Womens basketball teams games against Sacramento State to open Big Sky conference play. They also preview the Battle of the Palouse against our neighbors in Pullman, WA the Washington State Cougars for Matchup 276 of the country's longest running consecutively played non-conference rivalry. Also the Women are in Austin Texas against #24 Texas Longhorns. Thank you to our Patreons This episode is not possible without them:Tub Club:Dallas Hammer, Nick Weber, Mathew Janicek & Daryn CozakTub Token: Nick StutzmanPremium Drink Token: Dave Ellison, Taylor CashSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/TubsAtTheClub)Episode is brought to you by:Montucky Cold Snackshttps://montuckycoldsnacks.com/pages/.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/TubsAtTheClub)

BirdNote
Bringing Back the Native Palouse Prairie

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020


In north-central Idaho, Kas Dumroese is restoring retired agricultural land to native Palouse Prairie, an ecosystem that’s been almost entirely wiped out. Kas seeds native plants like lupine. Some grassland birds, like the Savannah Sparrow, can thrive in agricultural landscapes, but other birds of

The Dan Cave - Seahawks, Mariners and more...
Episode 104: Seahawk midseason grades. 3-game losing streak? Division title out of the question? WSU first impressions.

The Dan Cave - Seahawks, Mariners and more...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2020 60:24


**My Seahawks mid-season grades. Who earned honors, and who's failing? **Are we on the verge of a 3-game losing streak? If so, does it doom the season? **Why the sky is NOT falling. **WSU first impressions. Defense on the Palouse?! **What dynamic NFL QB does Jayden de Laura remind me of? **Quiet week for the Mariners, but a BIG week elsewhere in baseball. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thedancave/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thedancave/support

KUOW Newsroom
Economy, jobs and more on the minds of Palouse voters

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2020 1:11


Northwest News Network's Anna King is talking with voters east of Washington's Cascade Mountains to hear how they feel about the upcoming 2020 election. Here's what folks in the Palouse area had to say.

Pac-12 Perspective
Coug Spirit: Nick Rolovich Prepares For His First Season In Pullman

Pac-12 Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 20:12


Nick Rolovich has brought the Run & Shoot to the Palouse, where he must develop a new quarterback to work with exciting skill position talent on the Cougars' roster. Coach Rolo tells Ashley Adamson and Yogi Roth about navigating season prep and COVID-19 during his first fall at Washington State.

12 Pac Radio Podcast
What your team can expect from WSU's Run and Shoot Offense

12 Pac Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2020 51:38


Doug Fraleigh joins the podcast to talk about Washington State's run-and-shoot offense, the basic ideas behind it, its strengths and weaknesses, and what your team can do to stop Nick Rolovich as he installs it in The Palouse. Rob and Bryant also discuss Cal's defensive coaching changes and more. Doug does a great job breaking down Pac-12 film. He's a great twitter follow ( @berk18cfb ) and check out his Patreon pages for a full list of film breakdowns in the Pac-12: https://www.patreon.com/berk18 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

HPJ Talk
HPJ Talk 8.24.20: Political Conventions, Hurricanes, Wheat Harvest from the Palouse, and SUWU Farmer Panel Part 2

HPJ Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 77:32


In this episode of HPJ Talk, Jenni and Kylene discuss the political conventions, the recent hurricanes hitting the east coast, and more. Martha Mintz of Corral Creek Communications gives us a wheat harvest update from the Palouse area of the Pacific Northwest. You’ll also hear the second half of our Farmer Panel from our Sorghum U Wheat U event this year. All that and markets too! #RideWithUs Thanks to our sponsors: Alta Seeds, Unverferth Mfg., Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children, AGCO, BASF, AgriPro Seeds, and All Aboard Wheat Harvest

Viewscapes
Hunting the western toad, recognizing courage, and delving into the novel Stripland

Viewscapes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 16:50


Erim Gómez lives his childhood dream: catching frogs, toads, and salamanders. The doctoral student in environmental studies hunts for the western toad along the Snake River, as he works to determine the biodiversity of amphibians on the Palouse prairie. Also in this episode:Carla Peperzak risked her life and freedom in World War II as a member of the Dutch Resistance. She was only 16 when she secretly saved a number of Jews by making fake IDs. Now a 96-year-old Spokane resident, Carla was honored as Washington state Person of the Year for 2020.Joan Burbick, a retired English professor at Washington State University, talks about Stripland, her novel that explores trauma, perceptions of reality, violence, and connected relationships in the aftermath of a shooting of a Nez Perce man by a white police officer. Her powerful and moving book references the steep stretch of road in Lewiston, Idaho, that slices through the valley from the Snake River to the Nez Perce reservation.Read more about disappearing amphibians, Carla Peperzak's life, and the novel Stripland.Support the show (https://magazine.wsu.edu/give/)

Latitude Photography Podcast
Palouse Panoramas and Segmentation Thoughts

Latitude Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2020 60:49


I recently took two trips to the Palouse area and came away with more panoramas that I usually do. I’ll fill you in on all the details in today’s episode. This is Latitude Photography Podcast, Episode 88 for July 5, 2020 Links Mentioned in today’s show: Watch the YouTube version of this episode: https://youtu.be/yVeFydizzYY Enroll in my Master Photo Printing course and get a full year of LPS free once it’s released!  https://brentbergherm.com/training-center/course-info/master-photo-printing/ YouTube Videos: Segmentation Make, super speed production https://youtu.be/cSK3IZ4Y_Iw Segmentation Make: https://youtu.be/DhlHh4O0LxI Read the blog post and download the e-book for this topic: https://brentbergherm.com/palouse-panoramas Get some free resources here: https://brentbergherm.com/info/resources/ Palouse Shoot-n-Print Photography and Printing Workshop Get on the list for updates on Latitude Photography School  Shop at lensrentals.com with my affiliate link and I’ll get a small commission of the sale. Use the code "latitude15" at checkout and you'll get 15% off your order. I also have an affiliate link with ThinkTank Photo  Thank you for your support! Introduction and Announcements I am your host, Brent Bergherm. Welcome to Latitude Photography podcast, the place where travel-outdoor photographers come to learn, grow, create and be inspired. We’re all on a journey to make more images and to do so with purpose. Thank you so much for being here. I’m doing a solo show today and I’m talking about Palouse Panoramas. I’ve also got a listener question to answer so I’ll get to that as well. First, there’s a few announcements. I’m working hard on my Latitude Photography School and I have a plan to roll it out for beta testing in early August. I’m keeping my fingers crossed but I basically have nothing to do between now and then so it should go fine. Everyone who has purchased my Master Photo Print course will get a free year of access to LPS. The course is easy to find once again on my website and there’s a direct link in the show notes as well. The cost of the course is $149 and it does include the download files for offline viewing after a period of time. Once I release LPS everyone, from those who first purchased it long ago to those two buy it today will get an access code to the rest of all the videos and other training materials I’m providing over the next year. I may decide to throw in some other goodies for those two buy the course but for now this is what I’m going with.The offer ends at the end of business day, July 31, 2020, Pacific Time. I plan to put the site mostly in maintenance mode at that time while still allowing folks who’ve bought the course the ability to still log in and go about their stuff. And then a week or so after that I should have it all arranged and ready to go with all the other lessons and stuff I’m planning. At least to get it rolling and started. Then, I’ll open it up for general enrollment later on, likely the end of August. Then, over the course of the next several months I’ll be rolling out more and more material.The biggest thing I’ll be doing that will set my service apart from the rest is having the ability to have your specific issues and questions addressed. There’s other services that have a much larger library of videos and training materials, and my library of training materials will certainly continue to grow. But with group sessions and the ability to submit specific questions to what you’re fighting in your photographic experience, I’ll be able to help you and make that available to the rest of the members as well.I’m still working on all the particulars, but this is the general idea of what I’m working on and looking to provide.  Main Topic: Palouse Panoramas 10 images Highlight each of the 10 images and describe where they were shot and the setup behind the scenes. A little discussion regarding post-production is also included. See the blog post on this topic for all the details. Secondary Topic: Segmentation A listener, David Hunter, wrote in and asked a bit about my segmentation series. He saw my video on YouTube regarding my image segmentation but he’d like a lot more on the thoughts behind the process. So here we go. I’ve got about 15 total images here, some more segmented than others. Some not as successful than others, but I’m showing them all. And let’s talk about them. Reminders Find us on the web at http://latitudephotographypodcast.com Find me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/brentberghermphoto/ Find the podcast facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/1892577214293688/ Find me on instagram @brentbergherm Find me on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/c/brentberghermphotography Find me online at https://brentbergherm.com And finally, my online learning platform for photographers is found at http://latitudephotographyschool.com

Palouse Church on a Hill
192 | New FM Radio

Palouse Church on a Hill

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2020 9:45


In Episode 192, Pastor Corey and Tim discuss Drive-in-Church and how you can join us for worship on 107.5 FM in Palouse only.

Latitude Photography Podcast
Beginner’s Astro Photography Pt2

Latitude Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 82:10


In this episode we continue with a beginner’s guide to AstroPhotography. We talked about gear and apps and other setup items in the last episode. This episode continues with more shooting and planning techniques. This is Latitude Photography Podcast, Episode 80 for May 13, 2020 Links Mentioned in today’s show: Find Tom’s work here: www.tomwagnerphotography.com Check out Kirk’s work here:  www.keyesphoto.com www.milkywayphotographers.com Darksite finder: https://darksitefinder.com/maps/world.html#8/45.746/-120.193 Palouse Shoot-n-Print Photography and Printing Workshop Get on the list for updates on Latitude Photography School  Shop at lensrentals.com with my affiliate link and I’ll get a small commission of the sale. Use the code "latitude15" at checkout and you'll get 15% off your order. I also have an affiliate link with ThinkTank Photo Gear Links Lumecube 2.0: https://amzn.to/3bedsJi Neewer CN-160: https://amzn.to/2xTthre Luxli Viola: https://amzn.to/2SR8sE8 Thank you for your support! Announcements We’re going to continue the conversation we started last time so you can get ready for shooting the stars. In this episode we’ll talk specific camera settings and a whole lot more, it’s just so jam packed with good information. But I’ve got a few announcements to get out there and the first is all about my shoot-n-print workshop that’s happening this summer. It’s in the Palouse region which is simply an amazing agricultural landscape filled with rolling hills of mostly wheat.  It’s now happening over labor day weekend. Please visit the website, the show notes has all the links and this one is the fourth link down, and you can see about all the changes there. We’ll get to maybe shoot some harvest activities as well as all the printing and sunrise shooting we’ll do. I’ve moved the venue and am limiting it to 5 participants. I hope you’ll consider joining us for this exciting time shooting in one of the most awesome agricultural regions this nation has to offer, and of course, the main purpose which is learning all the post-processing and print techniques required to get awesome gallery-quality prints from your photos. Thank you to those who are leaving comments and reviews in Apple Podcasts. Like RbrtR who recently said, “An enjoyable podcast that often touches on some unexpected areas for a Landscape and Travel Photography program. Yes, there is a fair amount of discussion on potential shooting destinations and travel tips. And there is the expected content related to the technical and artistic sides of photography. But the host often invites guests who bring a broader context to the program. Conversations about creativity, motivation and the creative process would be interesting to a wide variety of artists and creatives. Occasional discussion of the business side of landscape and travel photography make this a pretty well rounded program. Brent, the host, is a university professor, and so his “educational instincts” are never far away. As a result, his content, and his presentation, are thoughtful and calculated.”  Very nice, thank you so much for these kind words. I’m so glad you’re finding value in the show and that you like the mix of material covered here. As I look forward in the calendar of upcoming shows we’ll have a discussion about various locations to shoot on the southern edge of Vancouver Island and we have another conversation with a “newbie” regarding something I call compositional awareness. It’s all about assessing a scene and helping those who are more on the beginning side of the photography journey to explore more and to think about assessing the scene before you. We also have an interest in doing a show on infrared photography too. And one other show we want to do soon is a Q&A. So if you have questions about something related to travel and outdoor photography please drop me at line at brent@latitudephotographypodcast.com or as it in the facebook group and we’ll get it covered on a future episode. And one last thing, did you know that Google has finally released their own podcast app? It’s available for android and iOS. Just another location where you can enjoy the show if you’d like to listen there. OK, now on to the conversation with Tom and Kirk and we’re just going to pick right up where we left off from episode 79. Main Topic: Astro Photography When to go out and shoot  Milky Way Season Milky Way angle in sky for composition (early in season, it is more horizontal, later it is vertical, etc.)  Astronomical Dusk/Dawn - Civil/Nautical/Astronomical Twilight, Blue Hour, Dark Night Moon cycles Clear skies - but clouds are not always your enemy. Deciding on where to shoot Plan Your Shoot Dark skies - shoot away from areas of light pollution if you can’t get to truly dark skies, like out over the ocean. Foreground elements - composition, composition, composition Other environmental considerations - humidity, dew, wind,  Bring a friend, let someone know where you’re going and when you’ll return. Practice, Practice, Practice - learn your gear before you’re in the dark. Setting up and getting the shot Arrive early Warm Clothes, Bring Layers. Take Care in setting up your tripod. Aperture Shutter ISO White Balance Camera settings I have a guideline on steps for focusing - Kirk Focusing - perhaps the hardest aspect -  We’ll leave post processing for part 2 with Ariel Estulin Tips of the Week. [we may skip this since the episode is all tip oriented :) ] Kirk: Memory cards - don’t leave home without one! It seems like such a simple thing to remember, but I hear so many stories about people finding a great shot, only to find they forgot to put a card in their camera. We have a new series at MilkyWayPhotographers.com we call Tuesday Tips- this week, our staff writer Stanley Harper has several tips so you’ll never be without a memory card for your camera.  Tom: Take about 5-8 photos for each composition with the Milky Way in quick succession and use star stacking to reduce noise. This process is involved and beyond the scope of this episode, but it will probably be covered in the post-processing episode, or there are plenty of YouTube videos about how to do it. Reminders Find us on the web at http://latitudephotographypodcast.com Find me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/brentberghermphoto/ Find the podcast facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/1892577214293688/ Find me on instagram @brentbergherm Find me on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/c/brentberghermphotography Find me online at https://brentbergherm.com And finally, my online learning platform for photographers is found at http://latitudephotographyschool.com Find Kirk Keyes here: www.MilkyWayPhotographers.com  Find Tom Wagner here: www.tomwagnerphotography.com & @tomwagnerphotography (Instagram)

Latitude Photography Podcast
Beginner's Astrophotography Part 1

Latitude Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2020 72:33


Astro photography. If you’ve not tried it I think you should. It’s a very different experience and can be quite rewarding. It’s also very challenging for beginners to get everything aligned just right and that’s what we address in this episode. This is Latitude Photography Podcast, Episode 79 for May 10, 2020 Links Mentioned in today’s show: Find Tom’s work here: www.tomwagnerphotography.com Check out Kirk’s work here:  www.keyesphoto.com www.milkywayphotographers.com Darksite finder: https://darksitefinder.com/maps/world.html#8/45.746/-120.193 Palouse Shoot-n-Print Photography and Printing Workshop TaKE The Survey for Latitude Photography School: https://forms.gle/gdmTjMRtaKQJYqJr9 Get on the list for updates on Latitude Photography School  Shop at lensrentals.com with my affiliate link and I’ll get a small commission of the sale. Use the code "latitude15" at checkout and you'll get 15% off your order. I also have an affiliate link with ThinkTank Photo Gear Links Lumecube 2.0: https://amzn.to/3bedsJi Neewer CN-160: https://amzn.to/2xTthre Luxli Viola: https://amzn.to/2SR8sE8 Thank you for your support! Introduction and Announcements I am your host, Brent Bergherm. Welcome to Latitude Photography podcast, the place where we pursue travel and outdoor photography with a passion. Whether we’re talking about dream destinations, something in our backyard, post-processing or just trying to make sense of it all, we’re all on a journey to create more images and to do so with purpose. Thank you so much for being here. Today’s episode is all about Astrophotography and I’ve got two quick announcements or things to talk about before we get to the conversation with Tom Wagner and Kirk Keyes.  First off, theCOVID has caused me to make more changes to my summer shoot-n-print workshop happening in the Palouse region this year. It’s now happening over labor day weekend. Please visit the website, the show notes has all the links and this one is the fourth link down, and you can see about all the changes there. We’ll get to maybe shoot some harvest activities as well as all the printing and sunrise shooting we’ll do. I’ve moved the venue and am limiting it to 5 participants. I hope you’ll consider joining us for this exciting time shooting in one of the most awesome agricultural regions this nation has to offer, and of course, the main purpose which is learning all the post-processing and print techniques required to get awesome gallery-quality prints from your photos. Also, one last call for the Latitude Photography School survey. At the time of this recording I have 56 responses. That’s just amazing! Thank you, but I’d love even more. Please consider sharing your thoughts. I just want to be sure I’m delivering what you want in a service like this. Even if you think this isn’t something for you right now, maybe it is down the road. What types of things would you be interested in with a service like this? And finally, thank you to those who are leaving comments and reviews in Apple Podcasts. Like ClairaMarie, who recently said, “A great podcast for learning new techniques and staying inspired. The topics are of interest to landscape and outdoor photographers. Brent does a great job in keeping the topics fresh. I like the mix of commentary, reviews and interviews, a perfect balance.”  Wow, thank you so much. It’s kind words like these that certainly gives me a bit of a dopamine hit. I’m so honored. Thank you! I’ll read more reviews in future episodes. In the meantime, thank you, from the bottom of my heart for your kind words. I’d love to see more because really the purpose is to adequately tell others what the show is about, from your perspective. And if you review in another app or area please let me know so I can be sure to include that here on the show as well. Main Topic: Astro Photography One of the goals I had when I did my casting call for other photographers to join me on the show was to level up on my astrophotography game. I’m thrilled to say that four of the eight new Latitude Regulars not only have experience in astrophotography but they excel at it. Today we’re talking with Tom Wagner and Kirk Keyes, Fellas, Welcome to the show! To start things off, Kirk, this is your first time on the show. Let’s have you introduce yourself. I’m sure many listeners already know who you are and surely there’s some that don’t.  Kirk: Thanks, Brent. I’m Kirk Keyes, and I live in Portland, OR. I’ve been photographing for about 45 years, since I was 12 years old. Some of my first photos were of star trails and trying to shoot the Moon through a telescope I bought with money from my newspaper route. Through the 80s to mid-2000s, I shot mostly large format landscapes with a 4x5 camera. For the last 5 years, I’ve been shooting astro landscapes. I co-founded and manage MilkyWayPhotographers.com, which despite the name, is dedicated to all forms of night photography.  Great, now let’s get this thing started, Astro Photography. I’d like both of you to give me your two-sentence definition or description of what astrophotography is to you and why you love it so much. Tom: I would describe astrophotography as taking pictures of the night sky, which could be the stars, star trails, or the Milky Way. I love astrophotography because it’s so cool to use our cameras to bring the night sky to life that we can’t see with our eyes. Kirk: Man, I think Tom pretty much covered it! I’ll just add in a few keywords for people to look into like “astro landscape,” “Low-Level Landscape Lighting,” “nightscape,” “deepscape,” and “deep sky photography.” Brent: We have a basic outline that will guide our discussion. So let’s dive in. Gear Camera - manual settings, some sensors have less noise At home -  Turn off Long Exposure Noise Reduction Turn off Electronic Viewfinder Switching, if mirrorless.  Know how to put your camera into Live View 8mm to 35mm, f/1.2 to f/2.8 recommended, f/3.5 can be OK Wide angle, fast lens Camera Batteries - bring extras! Spare Memory card - don’t leave home without them.  Sturdy tripod Tripod Head Trigger release - internal/external, intervalometer - internal/external Headlamp - or not. Star Tracker  Low-Level Landscape lighting Warm Clothes - dress in layers Water and snacks - don’t forget your Milky Way bar! Bug Repellent Camp Chair Niceties  Bring a friend. And let someone know where you are going and when you’ll be back. Let’s briefly cover a few apps that we use Photopills Sun Surveyor PlanIt app Dark Sky Finder MyRadar Pro ClearOutside Windy App Meteoblue app Reminders Find us on the web at http://latitudephotographypodcast.com Find me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/brentberghermphoto/ Find the podcast facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/1892577214293688/ Find me on instagram @brentbergherm Find me on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/c/brentberghermphotography Find me online at https://brentbergherm.com And finally, my online learning platform for photographers is found at http://latitudephotographyschool.com Find Kirk Keyes here: www.MilkyWayPhotographers.com  Find Tom Wagner here: www.tomwagnerphotography.com & @tomwagnerphotography (Instagram)

WSU Coors Light Cougar Podcast
Coug Classics - WSU vs Oregon 10-20-18

WSU Coors Light Cougar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2020 85:59


In possibly the most anticipated regular season game in program history, WSU hosted Oregon in 2018 with ESPN's College Gameday in town, and the Palouse faithful didn't disappoint. Re-live the 34-20 win over the Ducks in front of a wild Martin Stadium crowd in a condensed 90-minute format.

Palouse Church on a Hill
183 | FFA Interview with Megan Wilson

Palouse Church on a Hill

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2020 18:54


In Episode 183 of the Palouse Church on a Hill Podcast, Pastor Corey and Tim interview Gar-Pal teacher and FFA advisor Megan Wilson about her first year on the job here in Palouse - the challenges and successes, and the upcoming FFA Plant Sale. To schedule your appointment for the plant sale, visit the FFA Plant Sale Web site: https://mwilson431.wixsite.com/garpalffa ...Or contact Megan Wilson | 206-265-0004 | mwilson@garpal.net

Pac-12 Perspective
Nick Rolovich Talks Time on the Palouse

Pac-12 Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2020 25:00


Washington State head football coach Nick Rolovich joins Ashley Adamson and Yogi Roth and shares what his life has been like since arriving in Pullman. He discusses the countdown clock to the Apple Cup he owns and describes his transition from Hawaii to the Palouse (4:23). He shares what the communication has been like among the players since being separated due to Covid-19 (5:06) and discusses the pain of losing Bryce Beekman (6:08).Coach Rolovich talks about the challenges of his players training on their own (10:50) and why he has made an effort to support small businesses in Pullman during this crisis (12:00). He describes his current family life (13:35) and shares his review of Tiger King (15:09). Coach expresses why he thinks there will be a football season (18:29) and how his perspective has changed since the pandemic began (19:17). Yogi recalls the first time he met Rolovich and explains why he is a perfect fit for Washington State (20:32).

Kestrel Country Podcast
16. Dr. Shane Needham - "Never be outworked."

Kestrel Country Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2020 34:57


Dr. Shane Needham joined us over the phone today to talk about a hard work ethic, Alturas Analytics, and how he ended up here on the Palouse. Dr. Needham received his B.S. from WSU and his Ph.d. in Chemistry from the University of Rhode Island. And be sure to listen to his podcast, Secrets of Success.https://www.linkedin.com/in/shane-needham-b014151/https://alturasanalytics.comhttps://www.instagram.com/needham_shane/https://www.facebook.com/shane.needham.56

Palouse Church on a Hill
172 | A Merry Mary Welcome

Palouse Church on a Hill

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2020 32:33


In Episode 172 of the Church on a Hill Podcast, Pastor Corey and Tim have a Zoom conference with Palouse artist and community activist Mary Welcome covering a broad range of topics including: The Palouse Hotline, Virtual Open Mic night, a potential theme song for the Podcast, ideas for staying hopeful in the midst of our current circumstances and Mary reads a poem by Mary Oliver to close out the show.

Palouse Church on a Hill
170 | Meet Jared

Palouse Church on a Hill

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2020 22:45


In Episode 170, Pastor Corey and Tim talk with Palouse native Jared Evenson.

Kestrel Country Podcast
15. Brian Points - Points Consulting & Palouse Regional Housing Assessment

Kestrel Country Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2020 36:34


Brian joined us for a phone interview to discuss the Palouse Regional Housing Assessment. Brian is an economist with thirteen years of experience and president of Points Consulting. For anyone interested in housing, investing or building, or thinking of buying a home, the assessment is incredibly interesting and helpful.http://www.pepedo.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/PEPHousing.pdfhttps://points-consulting.com

Palouse Church on a Hill
164 - Interview with EMS Director Annie Pillers

Palouse Church on a Hill

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2020 13:04


In Episode 164, Pastor Corey and Tim interview Palouse EMS Director Annie Pillers about COVID-19, the EMS role and how Palouse residents can help their neighbors. You can find the Joint Fire Board/EMS Guidance at the link below: https://palousechurch.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/2020-03-19-JFB-COVID-19-Newsletter.pdf

Palouse Church on a Hill
161 | Update from Mayor Cook [032520]

Palouse Church on a Hill

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2020 9:50


In Episode 161, Palouse Mayor Chris Cook provides an update about how the City of Palouse is handling the COVID-19 crisis. To sign up for the Palouse city-wide e-mail mentioned in the interview, contact Palouse City Hall: deputyclerk@palouse.com or (509) 878-1811. For information about general city services, visit: http://visitpalouse.com/government/

Old Spiral Podcast
EP11 Alison Crowley: Palouse Conservation District, Conserve Nation

Old Spiral Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2020 55:26


This week is all about the Palouse and conservation. Alison Crowley joins us to talk about her podcast Conserve Nation and her work with the Palouse Conservation District, mainly the 6 episode series called Palouse Pulse. Alison brings up the importance of taking care of yourself, conservation, and how these are closely related. Event announcements are being postponed for now. Just enjoy the show. Find Alison's podcasts on Spotify and Apple Podcasts:Palouse Pulse -  https://open.spotify.com/show/0mAHQYdTprVzmGJWa6LlF6Conserve Nation - https://open.spotify.com/show/59d8J6JuC70shvBwpkJQor

Yahoo Sports College Podcast
Overreaction Monday: Pac-12 After Dark Madness

Yahoo Sports College Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2019 55:03


Dan Wetzel, Pat Forde and Pete Thamel recap all of the insanely entertaining Week 4 action. The guys start with the improbable 32 point 2nd-half comeback UCLA pulled off on the Palouse over Washington State. Is Chip Kelly finally breathing life into the program? (1:05) The heavyweight battle between Notre Dame and UGA lived up to the billing as well. Is Jake Fromm good enough to finally get the Dawgs over the hump? (12:57) The pod then takes a shot at burying Jim Harbaugh's tenure at Michigan after the Wolverines were handed an embarrassing 35-14 loss by the Badgers. (22:00) Dan, Pat and Pete also recap LSU's attempt to drink Nashville dry (37:00) and the controversial Cal-Ole Miss finish. (39:10) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.