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Emotional state experienced as the result of an unexpected event

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Latest podcast episodes about surprisingly

Adventures In Feeding My Fam: SIMPLE Meal Prep, Non Diet Weight Loss, Family Table and Healthy Hacks for the Entire Family

This topic has been on my mind for a while, but I've dragged my feet on recording this episode because it is heavy and close to my heart.  So talking about it makes me feel a little vulnerable.Surprisingly, 4 college students reached out to me this summer, kids of people I know, Surprising because I don't usually work with this age group, but the mom's thought my messaging was appropriate for their childWhat they all had in common was poor body image and to varying degrees disordered eatingI helped each in different ways, as I thought was appropriate, one I referred to an eating disorders facilityThis really broke my heart, because they are all tremendous young women, thriving on the outside, being traditionally successful at school, socially, etcBut on the inside they're hurting, their self-images and self-esteem is not idealAnd their perception of food is very skewedThey have so many questions about good foods/bad foods, feel guilt about what they eat, confusion about foodAnd it's primarily because these wonderful beautiful young women are bombarded with images, on their social media feeds, pictures from peers, and celebrities or others touting-cures for bloating, or weight loss on social media.This is why it is more important than ever as women, as mothers to get a handle on our own relationships with food so we can role model a fantastic relationship with food.I provide some specific guidelines to get you started in this episode.

THE Sales Japan Series by Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo, Japan

Have you ever paid for something that you found was very good and which you used for many years.  You will have forgotten perhaps the price you originally paid, but you have not forgotten the quality you received.  You always maintain a positive mindset about that company and the product or service. On the other hand, if you paid for something that didn't deliver what you expected, over time, you will forget the exact amount of money involved, but you will always recall that the quality was poor and not acceptable.  This is where salespeople make the mistake of concentrating on price and don't make the effort to bolster the quality aspects of what they are supplying.   Not only does the item or service suffer from a negative association with poor quality, the salesperson's personal brand is also damaged and maybe irrecoverably.  When you find a bad deal, you make the determination to never buy from that supplier again and by extension from that person again.  Not only that, you will also make a point of warning others not to deal with that person, because they are not reliable or they lack integrity or they are a rip off.  In the market our reputation is everything and we cannot afford to allow it to be stained with ill repute.   Sometimes even good quality firms have problems.  Machines, supply chains, people are not perfect so there can be problems. How these problems are addressed says everything about the integrity of who you are dealing with.  No one likes people who want to justify the unjustifiable and you would think that no one would be that stupid, but you would be wrong.  Yes, there are people who will try to slip out of any and all accountability and who run from taking any responsibility.  We can all accept that things can go wrong, but what we want is for it to be fixed and fixed pronto.  We will forget the price we paid, but we will remember that the problem was sorted out fast and with integrity and no arguments.   Given all of this logical discussion about price versus quality, the expectation would be that when salespeople talk to clients they are concentrating on quality to justify the price.  Instead what do we get?  The pitch.  The salesperson goes into great detail about the specs for the widget but doesn't take the time to align what the widget does with what the buyer wants.  The latter is the quality conversation, not the rattling off of data and details about the weight, size, colour, etc of the widget.  Getting the requirement to be matched by what is going to be supplied is the key aspect of providing a quality service.   How do we know what is required?  No mysteries there – we simply ask. In Japan, this is where things break down.  You might be thinking “wait a minute, how hard can it be to ask what they buyer wants in Japan?”.  Surprisingly, salespeople here usually don't ask questions, because they are busy going headlong into their pitch.  One cultural twist is that the buyer has been trained to expect a pitch and every Japanese person has been trained since childhood to do what everyone else is doing and don't stand out and be different.  As the sales leader you can talk to you are blue in the face about what they are supposed to do, but if you don't actually go with them to make sure they are asking questions, they won't take that route.  Conformity is a crushing weight in Japan and few are willing or able to buck its oppressive limitations.   Once you have asked the first key question, life gets better immediately.  What is that key question?  It is so simple – “may I ask you a few questions”.  We not quite that simple, because you have to set it up.  You need to talk about what it is you do, then mention some results you have had for similar clients, proffer that “maybe” you could do the same for this client.  At this point you then say, “in order for me to know if that is possible or not, would you mind if I asked a few questions?”.  There is a very tiny number of buyers who will dismiss this approach and ask for the pitch anyway.  That cannot be helped and that comment is a red flag anyway, which tells you it is better to hightail it out of there and find a better client.  The vast majority of clients will agree and then you can start aligning what you have with what they want and the whole quality dimension possibly starts to go straight up.   If we keep in mind that quality lingers in the mind of the buyer, then we are always better off to be concentrating on that.  Prices fluctuate based on the market, supply chain, energy disruptions and currency movements, but the fundamental quality doesn't fluctuate, unless there has been an unforeseen event.  If we can align the price to justify the quality, then over time the memory of the price paid fades, but the recollection of the quality never goes away.  When it comes to the time to do more business with you, the buyer is open to that because the track record is there and the trust has been built.

The Greater Purpose Podcast
062: The Ideal Workout Length

The Greater Purpose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 16:01


Is there a perfect workout time? That length of workout that gives you exactly what you need? Surprisingly, NO! The length of your workout is very dependent on what your goals are, but even more so, how you spend the time you have in the gym. What we do know? If you only have a few minutes, you're going to need to include some intensity! If you have loads of time, figuring out how to use that time most effectively and efficiently is important too, because just hammering yourself for hours on end every day won't help your fitness either. Have a listen to find out more about how to make the most of your workout time. Start your fitness Journey at Greater Purpose Health and Fitness https://greaterpurposehealthandfitness.com Follow us on instagram! @gphealthandfitness

Unlocked: Daily Devotions for Teens
Friendship in the Laundry Room

Unlocked: Daily Devotions for Teens

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 3:46


During the summer after finishing high school, I had the opportunity to fulfill a dream: leading my all-state marching band as drum major. Along with other musicians and dancers in this group, I flew for many hours across many states to Honolulu, Hawaii. Once there, we performed in multiple venues and enjoyed free time in a beautiful destination. What would you guess were the most memorable experiences of that trip? Tropical beaches, beautiful food, the parade we marched in with spectators cheering for us? Surprisingly, no. My most special memories of that time centered around the laundry room in the dorm where we stayed. At the end of each day, finished with rehearsals and touring, we headed to our dorm. After dinner, we gravitated to the laundry room. It provided space for all of us to hang out where we had permission to be together. We talked and laughed and ate lots of candy bars. I have photos of gorgeous sunsets. But the pictures that bring a smile to my face are the ones of my buddies sitting atop washing machines and clothes dryers making goofy faces for the camera. What about the laundry room made it significant? It gave us a place for community, a place to be together and build friendships. God is a relational God, and He created us for relationships. First and foremost, He yearns for us to be in relationship with Him. Even though humanity has rejected God, He came and made a way for us to be reconciled to Him. When we trust in Jesus for the forgiveness of our sins, we begin a relationship with the God who loves us. And God also made us for connection with others. We're not meant to do life alone. We're stronger when we have others to walk with us through life. As I interacted with new friends who also loved Jesus, I felt boosted in my own faith. As you invest in relationships, you can be there to encourage your friends when they stumble—and you can receive their help when you need to be strengthened too. • Allison Wilson Lee • Why do you think God calls us to invest in friendships? Perfume and incense bring joy to the heart, and the pleasantness of a friend springs from their heartfelt advice. Proverbs 27:9 (NIV)

Marketplace Minute
July jobs report comes in surprisingly strong - Midday - Marketplace Minute - August 5, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 1:50


U.S. economy added 528,000 jobs; wages rose 5.2 percent in July; China to issue unspecified sanctions against Pelosi; Amazon buys Roomba maker iRobot To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast
July Winners & Losers -- Tyson Stockton // previsible.io

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 22:33


Tyson Stockton, PreVisible.io Co-Founder and Education Partner, looks at the trends behind SEO's biggest movers, shakers, and slackers in July. With the hike in interest rates and the downturn in the economy, we've seen titans like Walmart and Shopify suffer in terms of business performance. Surprisingly, real estate and car sites aren't showing the same type of impact in performance. Today, Tyson discusses this month's SEO winners and losers. Show NotesConnect With: Tyson Stockton: Website // LinkedInThe Voices of Search Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Meridian Magazine--Come Follow Me Latter-day Saint Podcast
Come Follow Me OT Podcast 33, “God is For Me,” -- Psalms 1-2; 8; 19-33; 40; 46

Meridian Magazine--Come Follow Me Latter-day Saint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 37:21


August 8-14 Today we begin study of the largest book in the Old Testament. Surprisingly, it is Psalms with 97 pages of moving poetry that particularly explores our inner journey in seeking to find God. These are prayers, prophecy, wisdom, exultations, laments and pleadings for relief. It is a very ancient book where we can find immense comfort today.

This Matters
How the B.C. coast is a cruise ship dumping ground

This Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 18:28


Guest: Anna Barford, Canadian Shipping Campaigner with Stand.earth While cruise ship lines took a hit during the pandemic, business is back in full swing. Cruise ships are floating cities on the water and generate all kinds of waste. Surprisingly, U.S. rules around dealing with such waste are much more stringent compared to Canada where we have lax regulations. According to a recent report from Stand.earth and B.C.-based West Coast Environmental Law, ships travelling along the Canadian West Coast are incentivized to dump waste in Canadian waters as it is cheaper and easier. This episode was produced by Alexis Green, Paulo Marques and Raju Mudhar. Audio sources: CNN and NPR

Sefer Hachinuch
Misva #252: Not to Shave One's Beard With a Razor

Sefer Hachinuch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022


The Torah commands in Parashat Kedoshim (Vayikra 19:27), “Ve'lo Tash'hit Et Pe'at Zekanecha” – forbidding cutting the hair of one's face. The Sages understood this command as referring to the removal of one's hair from five areas of the face – the upper cheeks on both sides, the lower cheeks on both sides, and the chin. The Sefer Ha'hinuch explains that the Torah forbade shaving one's face because it was customary for the ancient pagan priests to remove their facial hair. The Torah thus issued this prohibition in order to emphasize our outright rejection of idolatrous worship. Removing facial hair is forbidden only when it is done with a razor, but not with scissors; indeed, it is customary today for men to shave with electric shavers, which remove hair in a manner similar to scissors. Surprisingly, the Rambam writes that one who removes facial hair with scissors is “Patur” – exempt from punishment, implying that it is nevertheless forbidden. Some explain that the Rambam refers only to scissors which cut hair “Ke'en Ta'ar” – in a manner similar to a razor, whereas cutting facial hair with ordinary scissors would be permissible even according to the Rambam. This prohibition applies in all places, in all times, and only to males. A woman who shaves a man's beard is not in violation of this command. Non-Jewish male servants are included in this prohibition, even though non-Jewish servants are generally bound only by Torah commands which are binding upon both men and women. Although it is customary to permit shaving with electric shavers nowadays, as mentioned earlier, nevertheless, some brands of shavers act like a razor, and thus could potentially be forbidden. One who uses such a brand is in violation of a Torah command each time he shaves. It is therefore imperative to consult with one's Rabbi for guidance in this regard. Certainly, it is forbidden to shave with a razor and shaving cream.

Oracle On Purpose | Lia Dunlap
EP107: 3 Lessons from the Ashes of My Business Failure and Business Growth with Amanda Bedell

Oracle On Purpose | Lia Dunlap

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 17:20


Did you know that only 20% of your work generates 80% of your income? This includes leads, conversions, transactions, pricing, and profits. Sounds overwhelming? Business expert Amanda Bedell organizes the chaos so you can focus on your true money generators. It's time to find the strategies to fix your numbers and expose what you have control over. WATCH: 3 Lessons from the Ashes of My Business Failure and Business Growth with Amanda Bedell Key points covered in this episode:  ✔️ These are what you should focus on. The three different areas are the top line, the bottom line, and the cogs (the overhead costs).  ✔️Use social media for conversion. Expect to get clients "out in the wild." Your leads will be looking you up and checking your credibility. If that doesn't work, quickly look for another strategy. ✔️ Be the tide that lifts all boats. The foundation of a business isn't profit, it's purpose. You've been given the gifts of leadership and a position of influence. Create as much positive impact as you can. ✔️ One-man businesses matter. Surprisingly, over 85% of businesses are run solo, and the top 10% are managed by under four people and yet still gross $250,000 a year. You, too can have a slice of the pie! ✔️ Operate locally. With worsening inflation, work with people around you and promote skilled people in your area. Fund the hidden talents near you instead of relying on larger companies to grow your business. ✔️Reflect on your past mistakes. What lessons could this be trying to teach you? Write them down, get back up, and give it your best as you take your next step. ______________________________________________________________________ As a business chaos sorter, Amanda Bedell uses financial statements and step-by-step actions to bring clarity and focus to business owners who want to make more money. If you'd like to see $75,000 or more hit your income statement in 90 to 120 days, reach out to Amanda. Amanda has spent over 15 years in the marketing and public relations fields working with multi-million dollar organizations and in the entertainment industry. In between, she built a bakery from a farmers market booth to a brick-and-mortar and manufacturing facility employing 15 people. By 2018, through a series of decisions she made over six years, she had run out of cash. She sold the bakery defeated and exhausted. From the ashes of her business failure combined with marketing experience, BCC Business Consulting was born. Amanda now helps business owners who are beyond the startup phase and are experiencing tighter than anticipated resources after building for three-to-five years or more. Her work centers around employee relations, efficiency systems, and marketing strategy. ______________________________________________________________________ The Oracle on Purpose podcast is for the intuitive entrepreneurs or inspired leaders who want a powerhouse business that makes money while making a difference in the world. It's time to find your unique life purpose and get back on track with your business strategy to become fulfilled in your work.  About Lia Dunlap: Dubbed the Oracle on Purpose, Lia Dunlap's Intuitive Guidance and 25 years of successful operational business experience will help you find your Unique Life Purpose. Get back on track with your business strategy to become fulfilled again in the work you do. It's time to remember... You are here on purpose. You've got a mission to fulfill, and we are here to make sure, no matter what, you achieve it. Loved this episode? It's time to escape the monotony of shallow work without losing everything you've worked so hard for. Download your FREE Purpose and Prosperity Road Map. Discover the five essential steps to go from frustrated, annoyed, or not living your purpose to a successful purpose-driven leader. purposeandprosperityroadmap.com

The Scoot Show with Scoot
Surprisingly few Americans are watching cable news

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 33:22


Scoot talks to WWL listeners about how to understand cable news television ratings - FOX is king but even their massive ratings represent pretty few Americans

HodderPod - Hodder books podcast
YOUNG BLOOMSBURY written and read by Nino Strachey - audiobook extract

HodderPod - Hodder books podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 5:36


Surprisingly little has been written about second-generation Bloomsbury who tantalised the original 'Bloomsburies' at Gordon Square parties with their captivating looks and provocative ideas. Young Bloomsbury introduces us to an extraordinarily colourful cast of characters, including novelist and music critic Eddy Sackville-West, 'who wore elaborate make-up and dressed in satin and black velvet', sculptor Stephen Tomlin and writer Julia Strachey. Talented and productive, these larger-than-life figures had high-achieving professional lives and extremely complicated emotional lives. Bloomsbury had always celebrated sexual equality and freedom in private, but by the 1920s, self-expression was becoming more public, with cross-dressing Young Bloomsbury giving Old Bloomsbury a new voice in a chosen family of a shared rebellion against pre-war conventions.

Captivate the Room
Value with Chris Burand

Captivate the Room

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 48:30


Welcome to the show! Today, I've got my friend Chris Burand on the show. You don't want to miss the conversation because Chris is one of the smartest people I know but it's his approachability and quick wit that will have you thinking about insurance, business, possibility and conflict in a brand new way. Surprisingly… or maybe not, there are so many similarities in what Chris sees out in the world in the ways that people sabotage their own success and the things I teach. We worked together years ago and have collaborated since then. Everyone needs to make an impact, no matter what business they are in. Today, Chris and I will help you understand how to make that happen.   Guest Bio: Chris Burand has more than 30 years' experience providing consulting services for the property & casualty insurance industry and is recognized as a leading industry consultant.  His mission is to help his clients, carriers and distributors, achieve their goals through bespoke solutions. Cookie-cutter/consultant speak approaches are not winning solutions.  Chris has a unique analytical ability that enables him to get to the bottom of issues and provide the insight necessary to create specific solutions for each situation. Chris is a Certified Business Appraiser (CBA), a designation earned from the Institute of Business Appraisers.  The CBA designation is only earned by those who prove they have a high knowledge of business appraisals including applicable tax law and case law. He is also an approved E&O auditor, certified E&O seminar provider, E&O expert witness, and has written a book on how to avoid E&O claims.  Chris is a nationally recognized speaker and author. He has been a featured speaker at more than 400 seminars and educational programs. He is a monthly columnist for The Insurance Journal, a past columnist for American Agent & Broker, and his articles have appeared in Rough Notes, The National Underwriter, A.M. Best, and many regional insurance publications. He also publishes Burand's Insurance Agency Adviser for independent insurance agents. Chris can be reached at: Burand & Associates, LLC 215 S. Victoria St., Suite E Pueblo, CO 81003 p: 719.485.3868 chris@burand-associates.com www.burand-associates.com

The La Jolla Cosmetic Podcast
Patient Taylor: Surprisingly Smaller Than Expected

The La Jolla Cosmetic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 28:00


Taylor's least favorite body part has always been her arms. Working in the medical spa at La Jolla Cosmetic, Taylor knew there were a lot of ways to approach body contouring, including those arms. She had already lost 30 lbs, and plastic surgeon Dr. Swistun motivated her to lose 15 more to ensure successful results by showing her what she might look like using special imaging software called Vectra 3D. After reaching her goal weight, Taylor moved ahead with surgery. Dr. Swistun sculpted her body with 360 lipo to her upper and lower back, full abdomen up to her bra line, arms, and thighs, followed by Renuvion to tighten everything up. Although she read about it in her pre-op booklet, Taylor was surprised to actually be that person who cries upon waking up from surgery. But the biggest surprise for Taylor, even while still early in recovery, is how much smaller she is than she expected to be. She shares her “roller coaster of emotions” as her body changed through the stages of recovery, from waking up in the recovery room through the first weeks with her new body. LINKS See Taylor's before and after photo progression through her recovery on our blog: https://www.ljcsc.com/blog/podcast-patient-taylor-surprisingly-smaller-than-expected/ Read more about 360 Lipo: https://www.ljcsc.com/procedures/cosmetic-surgery/body/360-lipo/ See 360 Lipo before and after photos: https://www.ljcsc.com/gallery/body/liposuction/ Meet Taylor's plastic surgeon, Dr. Luke Swistun: https://www.ljcsc.com/about/meet-the-team/plastic-surgeons/dr-luke-swistun/ More episodes about Liposuction: https://www.ljcsc.com/blog/category/cosmetic-surgery/body/360-lipo/ Take a screenshot of this podcast episode with your phone and show it at your consultation or appointment, or mention the promo code PODCAST to receive $25 off any service or product of $50 or more at La Jolla Cosmetic, redeemable in the med spa (https://www.ljcsc.com/) or toward any service with our plastic surgeons. La Jolla Cosmetic is located just off the I-5 San Diego Freeway at 9850 Genesee Ave, Suite 130 in the Ximed building on the Scripps Memorial Hospital campus. To learn more, go to https://www.ljcsc.com/ or follow the team on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/ljcsc/ The La Jolla Cosmetic Podcast is a production of The Axis http://www.theaxis.io/ Special Guest: Taylor Camarena, MA.

Ask the A&Ps
"I don't have a baby monitor on the engine"

Ask the A&Ps

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 48:42 Very Popular


This month Mike, Paul, and Colleen take questions from owners with round engines, fabric, fire-breathing aerobats, and more. Send your questions to podcasts@aopa.org for a chance to get on the show. Full notes below.... Bruce has an a Continental O-300 and recently replaced all six cylinders. Number four is still running hot, and number six used to run hot. He played with the baffling to reduce the temps on number six, but number four is still around 400 degrees in cruise. He also added a splitter on the top to direct more air. He has checked the induction. By changing the baffling to help cool number six, Mike thinks he has made the problem worse for number four. The plate at the front is there to prevent number six from hogging all the cooling air, he says. When this happens Mike naturally looks at the inter-cylinder baffles, which are easy to mis-position. The first troubleshooting step is to shine a light from below and check if you can see it from above. If so, air can escape and cooling efficiency drops. Derek is looking to buy a Maule that's been sitting in a hangar and he's wondering how to check the condition of the Ceconite fabric. The Ceconite manual has inspection procedures. Colleen said it's not the fabric you're necessarily testing, but the dope. If the dope can block UV light then the fabric is presumably fine. If you push against the fabric and it's pliable and flexible, that's good. You can find the manual online https://www.conaircraft.com/_files/ugd/d66f5e_9653c858211f4636b7d4fcbb4787e540.pdf Oscar is wondering if safety wire isn't meant to hold a torque, why don't we use the same size for everything? Mike said there are three common sizes of safety wire, but almost everything is .032. Paul mentions that turnbuckles are an important exception. AC43.1B Change 1 https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/AC_43.13-1B_w-chg1.pdf describes how to safety wire turnbuckles. An interesting and detailed discussion of turnbuckles that has nothing to do with safety wire follows… Scott has an N3 with a Wright engine and he's wondering about leaning. The manual for the engine says not to lean, and he asks whether it would be better to leave it full rich or lean a bit. Mike calls for a vote and says that while in cruise he would lean it to the onset of roughness, and enrichen it only enough to smooth out the engine again. Colleen said she loves leaning and would lean as well. Surprisingly, it's unanimous and Paul said he would lean as well. Bob has an Extra with a Lycoming IO-580 engine. He has noticed that his old Extra, with the same engine and virtually the same airframe, ran much cooler. He said he can barely lean at all now because of temperature limitations. Number five is the hottest, but only by a little. Paul wonders about his leaning technique, which is to lean slowly to find peak. The guidance is to pull much more quickly. The hosts also focus on a cabin heat shroud that's in the cowling but not hooked up to the cabin. Bob thinks it partially blocks the exit airflow, which is a critical part of the cowling cooling system. 

The Luke and Pete Show
YouTube shredded beef

The Luke and Pete Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 31:35


Pete went rogue and almost started beef with a film director on YouTube. Surprisingly the man was into it and a potential friendship is now on the cards. Oh, what a strange life Donny leads...Elsewhere, Macaque's have injured 42 people in Japan and we discuss topless lad etiquette.Want to contact the show? Email: hello@lukeandpeteshow.com or you can get in touch on Twitter or Instagram: @lukeandpeteshow. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Level 857 Video Game Podcast
What Are Some Surprisingly Good Games?

Level 857 Video Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 172:07


Level 857 Video Game Podcast Ep-222: What Are Some Surprisingly Good Games? In this podcast we discuss underrated games that unexpectedly took us by surprise and wowed us with an unforgettable experience, right after we react to some news topics and share some current games we've played! News Topic Reactions: You'll Play as Black Panther's Successor in New Single Player Game by EA Halo Infinite campaign co-op won't offer online matchmaking Zelda Breath of the Wild Unofficially Gets Split-Screen Co-Op LeBron James Isn't Voicing Himself In MultiVersus Subscribe to our co-op gaming channel: https://goo.gl/Zy9RT --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/level857/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/level857/support

Malicious Life
Andrew Ginter: A 40-Years-Old Backdoor [ML B-Side]

Malicious Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 29:18


Ken Thompson is a legendary computer scientist who also made a seminal contribution to computer security in 1983, when he described a nifty hack that could allow an attacker to plant an almost undetectable malicious code inside a C compiler. Surprisingly, it turns out a very similar hack was also used in the Solarwinds attack.

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast
642: Private Money: What the Experts Warn Against Before You Lend (Or Borrow!)

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 55:54 Very Popular


Is private money lending the next best way to invest? To the everyday landlord, home flipper, or once-in-a-while investor, private lending seems completely foreign. Why would you lend money when you can put it into your deals? And even if you wanted to, wouldn't it take millions, or at least a few hundred thousand dollars to get started? Surprisingly, private money lending is available to more people than you think, and it could be your next way to make truly passive income.Alex Breshears and Beth Johnson were neither millionaires nor active investors when they started lending private money. Over time, they realized that they had grown relationships with active real estate investors, many of which always needed funding for the next deal. While swinging hammers and painting baseboards may sound fun to active BRRRRers or flippers, to Alex and Beth, the passive income that came in from private money lending was even better.They're now so ingrained in the world of private money lending that they've written the newest BiggerPockets book, Lend to Live, where they talk about how to build “hassle-free passive income” by lending private money. In this episode, they go over how a new investor can start lending, what to look out for in a lender when you need money for deals, and how even with a few thousand dollars, you too can start building truly passive income streams.In This Episode We Cover:How any investor can start lending money for a substantial profitWhy private lending has become more popular as investment funding becomes limitedHard money vs. private money and why you should never confuse the twoWhat to look for in a private money lender and how to vet them before you investProtecting your money as a private lender and what you need to do to secure a returnWhere private money lenders can find investors who are looking to invest And So Much More!Links from the ShowBiggerPockets Youtube ChannelBiggerPockets ForumsBiggerPockets Pro MembershipBiggerPockets BookstoreBiggerPockets BootcampsBiggerPockets PodcastGet Your Ticket for BPCon 2022Listen to All Your Favorite BiggerPockets Podcasts in One PlaceLearn About Real Estate, The Housing Market, and Money Management with The BiggerPockets PodcastsGet More Deals Done with The BiggerPockets Investing ToolsFind a BiggerPockets Real Estate Meetup in Your AreaDavid's BiggerPockets ProfileDavid's InstagramRob's BiggerPockets ProfileRob's YoutubeRob's InstagramRob's TikTokRob's TwitterWhy Private Money Lending is a Perfect Alternative to Active InvestingThe Perks & Process of Becoming a Private LenderBooks Mentioned in the ShowLend to Live by Beth Johnson and Alex BreshearsExtreme Ownership by Leif BabinCashflow Quadrant by Robert KiyosakiPsycho-Cybernetics by Maxwell Maltz, M.DConnect with Beth & Alex:Alex and Beth Email on Lend2LiveBeth's Email on Flynn Family LendingAlex' BiggerPockets ProfileBeth's BiggerPockets ProfileLend2LiveFlynn Family LendingClick here to check the full show notes: https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/real-estate-642Interested in learning more about today's sponsors or becoming a BiggerPockets partner yourself? Check out our sponsor page!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Universe Today podcasts with Fraser Cain
857: JWST Damage Assessment // Two New Mars Helicopters // Teaching Robots to Die

Universe Today podcasts with Fraser Cain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 17:49 Very Popular


It's time for our weekly Spacebites news segment. This week we learn how JWST is doing after its micrometeorite strike, two more helicopters are flying to Mars, and how do you stop the Milky Way from turning into self-replicating robot probes? Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/universetoday 00:00 - Intro 00:27 - How bad the JWST damage really is https://www.universetoday.com/156793/you-can-see-where-jwst-took-a-direct-hit-from-a-micrometeorite-on-one-of-its-mirrors/ 03:41 - China launches space station module https://www.universetoday.com/156896/china-has-added-a-science-module-to-its-new-space-station/ 06:48 - Two new helicopters going to Mars https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-will-inspire-world-when-it-returns-mars-samples-to-earth-in-2033 08:38 - Teaching Robots to die https://www.universetoday.com/156778/before-we-develop-self-replicating-machines-to-explore-the-universe-we-should-figure-out-how-to-turn-them-off-again/ 10:27 - Most sensitive dark matter detector https://www.universetoday.com/156900/the-worlds-most-sensitive-dark-matter-detector-has-come-online/ 12:16 - NASA needs your help https://www.universetoday.com/156829/nasa-wants-your-help-designing-a-starshade-to-observe-exoplanets/ 14:27 - Surprisingly comfortable lava tubes https://www.universetoday.com/156932/lava-tubes-on-the-moon-maintain-comfortable-room-temperatures-inside/ 16:09 - Outro Host: Fraser Cain Producer: Anton Pozdnyakov Editing: Artem Pozdnyakov

Plan B is a Sugar Daddy
82: PBSD Plays We're Not Really Strangers

Plan B is a Sugar Daddy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 34:02


This week the girls are playing We're Not Really Strangers. WNRS is a purpose driven card game and movement all about empowering meaningful connections. Surprisingly, Rach and Leone learn new things about one another and share a few wild stories prompted by level 3.

Initial Conditions: A Physics History Podcast
Enter the Anthropocene: Climate Science in the Early 20th Century

Initial Conditions: A Physics History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 40:42 Very Popular


 In this episode we discuss the efforts of three scientists–Svante Arrhenius, Guy Callendar, and Charles David Keeling–to figure out exactly what fossil fuel emissions might be doing to the atmosphere and the global temperature. Surprisingly, Arrhenius and other early climate scientists didn't necessarily think that global warming would be…such a bad thing? But by the 1970s scientists began to push for more concerted efforts to research the effects of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. We'll pick up that part of the story in the next episode. You'll also hear about Guy Callendar's contributions to climate science. Guy was a fellow who held no academic degrees in science but did live through a dangerous childhood. We'll conclude with Charles Keeling and his famous curve showing how the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere began increasing at an accelerating rate during the twentieth century.  

Deeper Look At The Parsha
MASSEI - UNIQUE AND UNEXCEPTIONAL

Deeper Look At The Parsha

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 8:08


Rabbi Dunner describes his recent visit to Mexico, where he visited Mount Sinai Congregation, the "oldest synagogue in Mexico City." Surprisingly, the Jewish community in Mexico is barely a century old. Rabbi Dunner explains why, and reveals an epiphany that he had while praying mincha at Mount Sinai. There is a powerful message embedded in Parshat Massei that reflects the success of Jewish immigration over the past 3,500 years.

Our Auto Expert
Mini Takes the States 2022 //Two cars two R's - 7/23/22

Our Auto Expert

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 79:04


Nik drove the Mini takes the states event. Surprisingly, no tickets.  Tony Greco from Ford, makes his case on why we should all get a Ford Raptor R - we are sold by the way Auto Andy has an opinion on the 2022 Chevrolet 1500 AWD/High Country Everyone's favorite go-getter, the Civic Type R. Carl Pulley tells us what's going on with the fan favorite. 

Booker, Alex and Sara - Daily Audio
Waiting By the Phone: He was surprisingly high maintenance BUT that destroy the date...or did it?

Booker, Alex and Sara - Daily Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 5:05


Can being high maintenance on a first date be a good thing???

Booker, Alex and Sara - Waiting by the Phone
Waiting By the Phone: He was surprisingly high maintenance BUT that destroy the date...or did it?

Booker, Alex and Sara - Waiting by the Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 5:05


Can being high maintenance on a first date be a good thing???

Locked On MLB Prospects
The Tampa Bay Rays (surprisingly) took prep 1B Xavier Isaac in the 1st round - why? And what will become of Vidal Brujan?

Locked On MLB Prospects

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 36:37


On today's show, we're talking with Kevin Weiss and Ulises Sambrano of LockedOn Rays about the 2022 MLB Draft. The Tampa Bay Rays went outside of the conventional wisdom to take prep 1B Xavier Isaac at 29 overall - did they see something the rest of us didn't? Who else in this draft class, which was hitter heavy early, has the potential to be contributors for this Rays squad? And what will happen with Vidal Brujan? Is it too late for him? Find and follow LockedOn MLB Prospects on your favorite podcast platforms: Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/locked-on-mlb-prospects/id1525225214 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2wzJIf26tGgVbB7rsoKyLD Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/locked-on-mlb-prospects Follow along with LockedOn MLB Prospects host Lindsay Crosby as we follow 120+ affiliated teams throughout the 2022 season! From prospect call-ups to impactful trades to the ever evolving battle for minor league living and working conditions, Lindsay is covering it all on five days a week. Available exclusively on the Locked On Podcast Network. Follow the show on twitter @LockedOnFarm and email your Mailbag Monday questions to LockedOnMLBProspects@gmail.com Follow Lindsay for up to the minute details on all things Minor League Baseball: On Twitter: https://twitter.com/CrosbyBaseball Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Sports Card Investor Download the Sports Card Investor App today and easily browse over 630K cards from every sport, with hundreds more added each week . Available for free in the Google Play and Apple App stores or go to sportscardinvestor.com/lockedon. Blue Nile Make your moment sparkle with jewelry from Bluenile.com. And, going on now is the Blue Nile Anniversary Sale … Save up to forty percent on classic fine jewelry pieces and twenty-five percent on engagement ring settings. Shop stress free and find your forever piece. Go to BlueNile.com today. LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Did you know every week, nearly 40 million job seekers visit LinkedIn? Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONMLB. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In Defense of Ska
In Defense of Ska Ep 80: Jake Matter (Ska or Nah, Grey Matter)

In Defense of Ska

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 71:10 Very Popular


Jake Matter thought it was a good idea to start tweeting at celebrities to see if they liked ska or not. Surprisingly, quite a few answered. While most said yes, some did not, like Converge, who told him "Fuck No!" This exchange went viral and earned the Ska or Nah Twitter account 3,000 new followers in under 8 hours, and an article in Loudwire. Several of the people that Ska Or Nah has tweeted at have been on this very podcast, and their responses have served as part of our research for the episodes, including Ted Leo, Max Collins (Eve 6), Laura Jane Grace, John Darnielle (Mountain Goats), Elliot Babin (Touche Amore) and Arizona Ice Tea. Today we talk to Jake about Ska or Nah, his skacore band Grey Matter and why he thinks nu metal deserves to be defended. He tells us about the personal importance of tweeting at Tony Hawk and Rivers Cuomo, what it was like to release a record on Bad Time Records just before the pandemic, how amazing it was to play at this year's Stoopfest in Lansing, Michigan, and the many influences of his eclectic band, Grey Matter: La Dispute, Parquet Courts, Ceremony, We Are The Union, Blue Meanies, Flaming Tsunamis, and Fatter Than Albert. He also tweets at two celebrities during the interview (Melissa Villasenor, Bill Clinton). But do they respond before the episode is finished? Listen and find out!Sounding Out with Izzy: A Grrrl's Two Sound Cents PodcastHosted by Isabel Corp, founder of the feminist music blog A Grrrl's Two Sound Cents,...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Support the show

Downballot Counts
Democrats Gain Confidence, But It May Not Last

Downballot Counts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 21:31


If midterms are supposed to be bad for the party in the White House, why are Democrats gaining confidence ahead of this November's elections? Surprisingly large fundraising hauls are one reason. Weaker than expected Republican Senate nominees are another. And a third reason is that the President's dismal approval ratings don't seem to be hurting downballot candidates as much as one might expect, according to Nathan Gonzales, editor and publisher of the nonpartisan newsletter Inside Elections. Gonzales joins Bloomberg Government's Kyle Trygstad and Greg Giroux to talk about these dynamics and why he thinks Democrats' polling figures will gravitate downward toward Biden's as election day gets closer. Do you have feedback on this episode of Downballot Counts? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
EP326 - The Authentic Lawyer with Brad Winters Part Two

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 26:22


As a mediator for more than 600 civil cases, Brad Winters is an expert on the skill and science of mediation. Surprisingly, his goal is not to settle the case but to elicit the plaintiff and defendant's best proposals to find out if the parties can settle. Brad's insights on the effectiveness of opening statements in mediation, how to set a positive tone and the value of trust can help you be more effective in your next mediation.

Talk Louder
Nasty Ronnie

Talk Louder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 97:14


Nasty Ronnie In the mid-1980s, Nasty Savage helped birth Florida's formidable extreme metal scene alongside peers and followers, including Death, Morbid Angel, Obituary, Deicide and others. At center stage was hulking vocalist Nasty Ronnie whose gladiator-style showmanship made him a one-man wrecking crew. Surprisingly soft-spoken and genuinely passionate about his many creative pursuits, he joins us to discuss Nasty Savage, wrestling, television (and not just the ones he smashed) and how “West Side Story” kicked off his interest in music. Created and Produced by Jared Tuten

Lifegate Church Podcast
Made for Sex

Lifegate Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 49:42


We live in a world where sex has caused so much pain and confusion, and yet we all want it anyway. Surprisingly, our desire for sex isn't the problem. The problem is that we don't know what sex is actually for and how to feed the desire. In this message, we'll discover the liberating truth about sex in the Scriptures.

The John Batchelor Show
2/4: Impact: How Rocks from Space Led to Life, Culture, and Donkey Kong Hardcover – by Greg Brennecka (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 7:13


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/4: Impact: How Rocks from Space Led to Life, Culture, and Donkey Kong Hardcover – by  Greg Brennecka  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Impact-Rocks-Space-Culture-Donkey/dp/0063078929/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= The Solar System. Dinosaurs. Donkey Kong. What is the missing link? Surprisingly enough, it's meteorites. They explain our past, constructed our present, and could define our future. Impact argues that Earth would be a lifeless, inhospitable piece of rock without being fortuitously assaulted with meteorites throughout the history of the planet. These bombardments transformed Earth's early atmosphere and delivered the complex organic molecules that allowed life to develop on our planet. While meteorites have provided the raw materials for life to thrive, they have radically devastated life as well, most famously killing off the dinosaurs and paving the way for humans to evolve to where we are today. As noted meteoriticist Greg Brennecka explains, meteorites did not just set us on the path to becoming human, they helped direct the development of human culture. Meteorites have influenced humanity since the start of civilization. Over the centuries, meteorite falls and other cosmic cinema have started (and stopped) wars, terrified millions, and inspired religions throughout the world.  With humor and an infectious enthusiasm, Brennecka reveals previously untold but important stories sure to delight and inform readers about the most important rocks on Earth.

The John Batchelor Show
3/4: Impact: How Rocks from Space Led to Life, Culture, and Donkey Kong Hardcover – by Greg Brennecka (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 12:01


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/4: Impact: How Rocks from Space Led to Life, Culture, and Donkey Kong Hardcover – by  Greg Brennecka  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Impact-Rocks-Space-Culture-Donkey/dp/0063078929/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= The Solar System. Dinosaurs. Donkey Kong. What is the missing link? Surprisingly enough, it's meteorites. They explain our past, constructed our present, and could define our future. Impact argues that Earth would be a lifeless, inhospitable piece of rock without being fortuitously assaulted with meteorites throughout the history of the planet. These bombardments transformed Earth's early atmosphere and delivered the complex organic molecules that allowed life to develop on our planet. While meteorites have provided the raw materials for life to thrive, they have radically devastated life as well, most famously killing off the dinosaurs and paving the way for humans to evolve to where we are today. As noted meteoriticist Greg Brennecka explains, meteorites did not just set us on the path to becoming human, they helped direct the development of human culture. Meteorites have influenced humanity since the start of civilization. Over the centuries, meteorite falls and other cosmic cinema have started (and stopped) wars, terrified millions, and inspired religions throughout the world.  With humor and an infectious enthusiasm, Brennecka reveals previously untold but important stories sure to delight and inform readers about the most important rocks on Earth.

The John Batchelor Show
4/4: Impact: How Rocks from Space Led to Life, Culture, and Donkey Kong Hardcover – by Greg Brennecka (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 8:33


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/4: Impact: How Rocks from Space Led to Life, Culture, and Donkey Kong Hardcover – by  Greg Brennecka  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Impact-Rocks-Space-Culture-Donkey/dp/0063078929/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= The Solar System. Dinosaurs. Donkey Kong. What is the missing link? Surprisingly enough, it's meteorites. They explain our past, constructed our present, and could define our future. Impact argues that Earth would be a lifeless, inhospitable piece of rock without being fortuitously assaulted with meteorites throughout the history of the planet. These bombardments transformed Earth's early atmosphere and delivered the complex organic molecules that allowed life to develop on our planet. While meteorites have provided the raw materials for life to thrive, they have radically devastated life as well, most famously killing off the dinosaurs and paving the way for humans to evolve to where we are today. As noted meteoriticist Greg Brennecka explains, meteorites did not just set us on the path to becoming human, they helped direct the development of human culture. Meteorites have influenced humanity since the start of civilization. Over the centuries, meteorite falls and other cosmic cinema have started (and stopped) wars, terrified millions, and inspired religions throughout the world.  With humor and an infectious enthusiasm, Brennecka reveals previously untold but important stories sure to delight and inform readers about the most important rocks on Earth.

The John Batchelor Show
1/4: Impact: How Rocks from Space Led to Life, Culture, and Donkey Kong Hardcover – by Greg Brennecka (Author)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 11:27


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/4: Impact: How Rocks from Space Led to Life, Culture, and Donkey Kong Hardcover – by  Greg Brennecka  (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Impact-Rocks-Space-Culture-Donkey/dp/0063078929/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= The Solar System. Dinosaurs. Donkey Kong. What is the missing link? Surprisingly enough, it's meteorites. They explain our past, constructed our present, and could define our future. Impact argues that Earth would be a lifeless, inhospitable piece of rock without being fortuitously assaulted with meteorites throughout the history of the planet. These bombardments transformed Earth's early atmosphere and delivered the complex organic molecules that allowed life to develop on our planet. While meteorites have provided the raw materials for life to thrive, they have radically devastated life as well, most famously killing off the dinosaurs and paving the way for humans to evolve to where we are today. As noted meteoriticist Greg Brennecka explains, meteorites did not just set us on the path to becoming human, they helped direct the development of human culture. Meteorites have influenced humanity since the start of civilization. Over the centuries, meteorite falls and other cosmic cinema have started (and stopped) wars, terrified millions, and inspired religions throughout the world.  With humor and an infectious enthusiasm, Brennecka reveals previously untold but important stories sure to delight and inform readers about the most important rocks on Earth.

Aging in Style with Lori Williams
096. Is it dementia? Or Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus?

Aging in Style with Lori Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 34:28


What if I told you some people diagnosed with dementia may not have dementia at all? Surprisingly, it's estimated that 5 percent of people institutionalized for dementia actually have Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH). NPH looks similar to Parkinson's or forms of dementia such as Alzheimer's, but it's actually treatable. It's caused when normal production of spinal fluid goes awry and builds up in brain ventricles, which cushions and nourishes the brain. This throws off brain pressure and causes neurological and physical symptoms such as imbalanced gait. Senior Services Expert Lori Williams welcomes Gary Chaffee to share his incredible story with Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus. Currently, a 75-year-old volunteer with the Hydrocephalus Association, he started having signs of NPH when he was only in his early 30s. It wasn't until 2001 when he moved to Texas that he received a diagnosis and shunt surgery that helped him return to normalcy - and his “gray life” brightened. Today he feels like an 18-year-old with a renewed sense of purpose and a wealth of education to share with not only seniors, but people at any age who experience similar symptoms. A diagnosis of NPH can be a relief to many individuals and families, as they're able to take treat it with surgery and restore their abilities and health. Topics discussed: Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Dementia misdiagnosis Ventricles Spinal fluid Hydrocephalus vs. dementia or Parkinson's Shunt surgery / replacement Brain surgery Takeaways from this episode: -Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus is a misnomer - it's an abnormal accumulation of spinal fluid in the brain and can affect you at any age, but primarily over age 60. -Implanting a shunt during brain surgery is the main form of treatment for Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus. You can get by with one or two shunts, but statistics are showing after 5 years it's likely you'll need a new one. -NPH is “wet, wacky, and wobbly”: it's marked by urinary incontinence and frequency, wobbly gait, and cognitive issues and forgetfulness. -Many people are misdiagnosed, so know the signs and discuss them with your doctor. CT scans can typically identify it. Resources discussed: Learn more on the Hydrocephalus Association website: Hydroassoc.org https://www.facebook.com/HydroAssoc?ref=mf%2F To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast, please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter, please visit: https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/ https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/ https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/

Furry, Explained
How to Become a Furry Artist

Furry, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 24:52


Over the past few weeks, we have done a good job exploring some of the more nuanced aspects of art in the furry fandom. But each time we looked at something, we took the perspective of someone wanting to get art, not the producer of that art itself. So this week, as we wrap up our mini-series on art in the fandom, we shift our view towards the artist themselves, and specifically go over what is needed to become an artist in this fandom! Surprisingly, the steps are rather simple, but do not mistake simple for easy...Follow Me On Twitter for Updates and Info about the Show: @FinnThePantherSources and Stuff to Check Out:Pocari Roo: Get started in Art!RegalMoney: How to Make Money as a Furry ArtistArtByZhivago: How To Draw Furries - Where to start?Thank you for checking out the show! iTunes/Apple Podcast listeners: make sure to leave a rating and review! Stay wild!Music from Epidemic SoundIcons made by Freepik from Flaticon

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)
Pixel 6A vs. iPhone SE: The Cameras Are Surprisingly Different

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022


I compared the cameras on the $449 Google Pixel 6A against the ones on Apple's $429 iPhone SE (2022).

Fitzy & Wippa
Stop Watching Porn At Work, Please

Fitzy & Wippa

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 40:49


Wippa read a story that 60% of people are apparently watching porn at work, which led to looking at the rest of the team with suspicion. Surprisingly, we even got a few listeners calling in to confess to doing this! Plus, an awkward A Current Affair clash, wedding drama and Am I The Only One… strangers pay to wake up on TikTok? That's what we asked today, before listeners called up and shared their own secret side hustles. And some are so simple anyone can do them.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CNET News (HD)
Pixel 6A vs. iPhone SE: The Cameras Are Surprisingly Different

CNET News (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022


I compared the cameras on the $449 Google Pixel 6A against the ones on Apple's $429 iPhone SE (2022).

Alignment Newsletter Podcast
Alignment Newsletter #173: Recent language model results from DeepMind

Alignment Newsletter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 16:43


Recorded by Robert Miles: http://robertskmiles.com More information about the newsletter here: https://rohinshah.com/alignment-newsletter/ YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfGGFXwKpr-TJ5HfxEFaFCg   HIGHLIGHTS Scaling Language Models: Methods, Analysis & Insights from Training Gopher (Jack W. Rae et al) (summarized by Rohin): This paper details the training of the Gopher family of large language models (LLMs), the biggest of which is named Gopher and has 280 billion parameters. The algorithmic details are very similar to the GPT series (AN #102): a Transformer architecture trained on next-word prediction. The models are trained on a new data distribution that still consists of text from the Internet but in different proportions (for example, book data is 27% of Gopher's training data but only 16% of GPT-3's training data). Like other LLM papers, there are tons of evaluations of Gopher on various tasks, only some of which I'm going to cover here. One headline number is that Gopher beat the state of the art (SOTA) at the time on 100 out of 124 evaluation tasks. The most interesting aspect of the paper (to me) is that the entire Gopher family of models were all trained on the same number of tokens, thus allowing us to study the effect of scaling up model parameters (and thus training compute) while holding data constant. Some of the largest benefits of scale were seen in the Medicine, Science, Technology, Social Sciences, and the Humanities task categories, while scale has not much effect or even a negative effect in the Maths, Logical Reasoning, and Common Sense categories. Surprisingly, we see improved performance on TruthfulQA (AN #165) with scale, even though the TruthfulQA benchmark was designed to show worse performance with increased scale. We can use Gopher in a dialogue setting by prompting it appropriately. The prompt specifically instructs Gopher to be “respectful, polite, and inclusive”; it turns out that this significantly helps with toxicity. In particular, for the vanilla Gopher model family, with more scale the models produce more toxic continuations given toxic user statements; this no longer happens with Dialogue-Prompted Gopher models, which show slight reductions in toxicity with scale in the same setting. The authors speculate that while increased scale leads to an increased ability to mimic the style of a user statement, this is compensated for by an increased ability to account for the prompt. Another alternative the authors explore is to finetune Gopher on 5 billion tokens of dialogue to produce Dialogue-Tuned Gopher. Interestingly, human raters were indifferent between Dialogue-Prompted Gopher and Dialogue-Tuned Gopher. Read more: Blog post: Language modelling at scale: Gopher, ethical considerations, and retrieval Training Compute-Optimal Large Language Models (Jordan Hoffmann et al) (summarized by Rohin): One application of scaling laws (AN #87) is to figure out how big a model to train, on how much data, given some compute budget. This paper performs a more systematic study than the original paper and finds that existing models are significantly overtrained. Chinchilla is a new model built with this insight: it has 4x fewer parameters than Gopher, but is trained on 4x as much data. Despite using the same amount of training compute as Gopher (and lower inference compute), Chinchilla outperforms Gopher across a wide variety of metrics, validating these new scaling laws. You can safely skip to the opinion at this point – the rest of this summary is quantitative details. We want to find functions N(C) and D(C) that specify the optimal number of parameters N and the amount of data D to use given some compute budget C. We'll assume that these scale with a power of C, that is, N(C) = k_N * C^a and D(C) = k_D * C^b, for some constants a, b, k_N, and k_D. Note that since total compute increases linearly with both N (since each forward / backward pass is linear in N) and D (since the number of forward / backwards passes is linear in D), we need to have a + b = 1. (You can see this somewhat more formally by noting that we have C = k_C * N(C) * D(C) for some constant k_C, and then substituting in the definitions of N(C) and D(C).) This paper uses three different approaches to get three estimates of a and b. The approach I like best is “isoFLOP curves”: 1. Choose a variety of possible values of (N, D, C), train models with those values, and record the final loss obtained. Note that not all values of (N, D, C) are possible: given any two values the third is determined. 2. Draw isoFLOP curves: for each value of C, choose either N or D to be your remaining independent variable, and fit a parabola to the losses of the remaining points. The minimum of this parabola gives you an estimate for the optimal N and D for each particular value of C. 3. Use the optimal (N, D, C) points to fit N(C) and D(C). This approach gives an estimate of a = 0.49; the other approaches give estimates of a = 0.5 and a = 0.46. If we take the nice round number a = b = 0.5, this suggests that you should scale up parameters and data equally. With 10x the computation, you should train a 3.2x larger model with 3.2x as much data. In contrast, the original scaling laws paper (AN #87) estimated that a = 0.74 and b = 0.26. With 10x more computation, it would suggest training a 5.5x larger model with 1.8x as much data. Rohin's opinion: It's particularly interesting to think about how this should influence timelines. If you're extrapolating progress forwards in time, the update seems pretty straightforward: this paper shows that you can significantly better capabilities using the same compute budget and so your timelines should shorten (unless you were expecting an even bigger result than this). For bio anchor approaches (AN #121) the situation is more complicated. For a given number of parameters, this paper suggests that it will take significantly more compute than was previously expected to train a model of the required number of parameters. There's a specific parameter for this in the bio anchors framework (for the neural network paths); if you only update that parameter it will lengthen the timelines output by the model. It is less clear how you'd update other parts of the model: for example, should you decrease the size of model that you think is required for TAI? It's not obvious that the reasoning used to set that parameter is changed much by this result, and so maybe this shouldn't be changed and you really should update towards longer timelines overall.   TECHNICAL AI ALIGNMENT PROBLEMS Ethical and social risks of harm from Language Models (Laura Weidinger et al) (summarized by Rohin): This paper provides a detailed discussion, taxonomy, and literature review of various risks we could see with current large language models. It doesn't cover alignment risks; for those you'll want Alignment of Language Agents (AN #144), which has some overlap of authors. I'll copy over the authors' taxonomy in Table 1: 1. Discrimination, Exclusion and Toxicity: These risks arise from the LM accurately reflecting natural speech, including unjust, toxic, and oppressive tendencies present in the training data. 2. Information Hazards: These risks arise from the LM predicting utterances which constitute private or safety-critical information which are present in, or can be inferred from, training data. 3. Misinformation Harms: These risks arise from the LM assigning high probabilities to false, misleading, nonsensical or poor quality information. 4. Malicious Uses: These risks arise from humans intentionally using the LM to cause harm. 5. Human-Computer Interaction Harms: These risks arise from LM applications, such as Conversational Agents, that directly engage a user via the mode of conversation. (For example, users might anthropomorphize LMs and trust them too much as a result.) 6. Automation, access, and environmental harms: These risks arise where LMs are used to underpin widely used downstream applications that disproportionately benefit some groups rather than others. FIELD BUILDING How to pursue a career in technical AI alignment (Charlie Rogers-Smith) (summarized by Rohin): This post gives a lot of advice in great detail on how to pursue a career in AI alignment. I strongly recommend it if you are in such a position; I previously would recommend my FAQ (AN #148) but I think this is significantly more detailed (while providing broadly similar advice).   OTHER PROGRESS IN AI REINFORCEMENT LEARNING Learning Robust Real-Time Cultural Transmission without Human Data (Cultural General Intelligence Team et al) (summarized by Rohin): Let's consider a 3D RL environment with obstacles and bumpy terrain, in which an agent is rewarded for visiting colored spheres in a specific order (that the agent does not initially know). Even after the agent learns how to navigate at all in the environment (non-trivial in its own right), it still has to learn to try the various orderings of spheres. In other words, it must solve a hard exploration problem within every episode. How do humans solve such problems? Often we simply learn from other people who already know what to do, that is, we rely on cultural transmission. This paper investigates what it would take to get agents that learn through cultural transmission. We'll assume that there is an expert bot that visits the spheres in the correct order. Given that, this paper identifies MEDAL-ADR as the necessary ingredients for cultural transmission: 1. (M)emory: Memory is needed for the agent to retain information it is not currently observing. 2. (E)xpert (D)ropout: There need to be some training episodes in which the expert is only present for part of the episode. If the expert was always present, then there's no incentive to actually learn: you can just follow the expert forever. 3. (A)ttention (L)oss: It turns out that vanilla RL by itself isn't enough for the agent to learn to follow the expert. There needs to be an auxiliary task of predicting the relative position of other agents in the world, which encourages the agent to learn representations about the expert bot's position, which then makes it easier for RL to learn to follow the expert. These ingredients by themselves are already enough to train an agent that learns through cultural transmission. However, if you then put the agent in a new environment, it does not perform very well. To get agents that generalize well to previously unseen test environments, we also need: 4. (A)utomatic (D)omain (R)andomization: The training environments are procedurally generated, and the parameters are randomized during each episode. There is a curriculum that automatically increases the difficulty of the environments in lockstep with the agent's capabilities. With all of these ingredients, the resulting agent can even culturally learn from a human player, despite only encountering bots during training. Rohin's opinion: I liked the focus of this paper on identifying the ingredients for cultural transmission, as well as the many ablations and experiments to understand what was going on, many of which I haven't summarized here. For example, you might be interested in the four phases of learning of MEDAL without ADR (random behavior, expert following, cultural learning, and solo learning), or the cultural transmission metric they use, or the “social neurons” they identified which detect whether the expert bot is present. DEEP LEARNING Improving language models by retrieving from trillions of tokens (Sebastian Borgeaud et al) (summarized by Rohin): We know that large language models memorize a lot of their training data, especially data that gets repeated many times. This seems like a waste; we're interested in having the models use their parameters to implement “smart” computations rather than regurgitation of already written text. One natural idea is to give models the ability to automatically search previously written text, which they can then copy if they so choose: this removes their incentive to memorize a lot of training data. The key to implementing this idea is to take a large dataset of text (~trillions of tokens), chunk it into sequences, compute language model representations of these sequences, and store them in a database that allows for O(log N) time nearest-neighbor access. Then, every time we do a forward pass through the model that we're training, we first query the database for the K nearest neighbors (intuitively, the K most related chunks of text), and give the forward pass access to representations for those chunks of text and the chunks immediately following them. This is non-differentiable – from the standpoint of gradient descent, it “looks like” there's always some helpful extra documents that often have information relevant to predicting the next token, and so gradient descent pushes the model to use those extra documents. There's a bunch of fiddly technical details to get this all working that I'm not going to summarize here. As a side benefit, once you have this database of text representations that supports fast nearest neighbor querying, you can also use it to address the problem of test set leakage. For any test document you are evaluating on, you can look for the nearest neighbors in the database and look at the overlap between these neighbors and your test document, to check whether your supposedly “test” document was something the model might have trained on. The evaluation shows that the 7 billion parameter (7B) Retro model from the paper can often do as well as or better than the 280B Gopher or 178B Jurassic-1 (both of which outperform GPT-3) on language modeling, and that it also does well on question answering. (Note that these are both tasks that seem particularly likely to benefit from retrieval.)   NEWS Apply to the Open Philanthropy Technology Policy Fellowship! (Luke Muehlhauser) (summarized by Rohin): This policy fellowship (AN #157) on high-priority emerging technologies is running for the second time! Application deadline is September 15. Job ad: DeepMind Long-term Strategy & Governance Research Scientist (summarized by Rohin): The Long-term Strategy and Governance Team at DeepMind works to build recommendations for better governance of AI, identifying actions, norms, and institutional structures that could improve decision-making around advanced AI. They are seeking a broad range of expertise including: global governance of science and powerful technologies; the technical landscape; safety-critical organisations; political economy of large general models and AI services. The application deadline is August 1st. Also, the Alignment and Scalable Alignment teams at DeepMind are hiring, though some of the applications are closed at this point. Job ads: Anthropic (summarized by Rohin): Anthropic is hiring for a large number of roles (I count 19 different ones as of the time of writing). Job ad: Deputy Director at BERI (Sawyer Bernath) (summarized by Rohin): The Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative (BERI) is hiring a Deputy Director. Applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis. Job ads: Centre for the Governance of AI (summarized by Rohin): The Centre for the Governance of AI has several roles open, including Research Scholars (General Track and Policy Track), Survey Analyst, and three month fellowships. The application deadlines are in the August 1 - 10 range. Job ads: Metaculus (summarized by Rohin): Metaculus is hiring for a variety of roles, including an AI Forecasting Lead. Job ads: Epoch AI (summarized by Rohin): Epoch AI is a new organization that investigates and forecasts the development of advanced AI. They are currently hiring for a Research Manager and Staff Researcher position. Job ad: AI Safety Support is hiring a Chief Operating Officer (summarized by Rohin): Application deadline is August 14.

Meaningful Life Skills: Weekly Global Class
World Peace Begins with Inner Peace

Meaningful Life Skills: Weekly Global Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 34:09


When asked, "What would you hope to witness in your lifetime?", world peace might be the most common -- and cliched -- response. But what does this really mean on a practical level? What is the secret to achieving global peace, and how can I, one of billions of people that make up this world, make a difference - or even a slight dent - in achieving this monumental objective? So many world leaders, thinkers and philosophers - especially in the last century - have been aspiring and seeking all types of methods to create a world that lives in peace. All types of attempts have been made, including the establishment of the United Nations, NATO, ambassadors and diplomatic relations, international alliances and treaties, summit meetings, etc. And while much progress has been made, there is much more work to be done; though our efforts until now have worked to some extent, the world is far from a place of peace. So what is the secret that has been evading us all this time? Surprisingly, or maybe not so surprisingly, it all begins at your doorstep, within you. World peace must begin with inner peace. Please join Rabbi Simon Jacobson on a journey through psychology and physics demonstrating how our personal lives impact the world around us. Discover what we can do in our internal lives to create harmony and peace inside ourselves and in turn create a ripple -- butterfly -- effect that brings harmony between spouses, parents and children, families and communities, friends and strangers, and by extension, to the larger world. Despite the diversity of nations, let's find the harmony within our diversity, the intrinsic bond that connects us all on a deeper level. We are, after all, indispensable parts of one larger mosaic; musical notes in one grand cosmic symphony. And when we find inner peace between our conflicting voices and drives, we bring peace to the world. Because at the end of the day, the billions of people that make up the world are comprised of individuals like you and I. And we will be the change needed in this world.

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 89: The Fourth Industrial Revolution post-COVID-19

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 35:03


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In episode 9 of the podcast (@AugmentedPod), the topic is: The Fourth Industrial Revolution post-COVID-19. Our guest is Francisco, Betti, Head of Advanced Manufacturing and Production, World Economic Forum.In this conversation, we talk about why he got into manufacturing and how the World Economic Forum works. We discuss how the Forum has changed over these past 5 years and how manufacturing has become the lead topic among the global elite. The manufacturing platform is now, arguably, the primary among 17 flagship initiatives at the World Economic Forum. We go deeply into the changing business models of manufacturing and what the next decade holds.After listening to this episode, check out World Economic Forum as well as Francisco, Betti's social profile.World Economic Forum: https://www.weforum.org/Francisco, Betti: https://www.linkedin.com/in/francisco-betti-10074342/?originalSubdomain=chTrond's takeaway: Manufacturing has escalated in prominence during COVID-19, and for good reason. What we can produce decides what we can become. The deep digitalization gains society has made over the past few years had to quickly be implemented on the factory floor. Surprisingly, a large part of the industry was ready. But the process now needs to complete and the results will likely be an entirely new production platform for the world. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like episode 4: A Renaissance of Manufacturing or episode 6: Work of the Future. Augmented--the industry 4.0 podcast. Transcript: TROND: Augmented reveals the stories behind a new era of industrial operations where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In Episode 9 of the podcast, the topic is The Fourth Industrial Revolution post-COVID-19. Our guest is Francisco Betti, Head of Advanced Manufacturing and Production, The World Economic Forum. In this conversation, we talk about why he got into manufacturing and how The World Economic Forum works. We discuss how the forum has changed over these past five years and how manufacturing has become the lead topic among the global elite. The manufacturing platform is now arguably the primary among 17 flagship initiatives at The World Economic Forum. We go deeply into the changing business models of manufacturing and what the next decade holds. Augmented is a podcast for leaders hosted by futurist, Trond Arne Undheim, presented by Tulip.co, the manufacturing app platform, and associated with MFG.works, the manufacturing upskilling community launched at The World Economic Forum. Each episode dives deep into a contemporary topic of concern across the industry and airs at 9:00 a.m. U.S. Eastern Time every Wednesday. Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast. Francisco, it's great to have you here. FRANCISCO: Excellent. Well, thank you for hosting me, Trond. TROND: Well, Francisco, you are an international development professional. You are now working for The World Economic Forum. And I meet you regularly because you support an enormous amount of activity there in manufacturing. But I wanted to bring us back a little bit to your origin. I know you went to The Sapienza University in Rome, studied international relations, and then worked a little bit in consulting. What was it that got you interested in manufacturing? Because it's a path that I always have to ask people about. It's not the obvious path today. But perhaps it would be the obvious path tomorrow, which we'll get to. But I'm curious about your way. FRANCISCO: It's a great question, Trond. And indeed, I have a background in international development relations, economic development as well. And I had a past career in consulting. How did I start focusing in manufacturing? It was at The World Economic Forum back in 2015. Actually, when I joined the forum, I realized there was a need to launch a new piece of work, a new conversation on the future of production on the future of manufacturing. And we started at the time working on a very small concept that was pretty much oriented towards...it was the policy angle, which is why there you get the connection with the international development space. At that time, we were in conversations with a few governments who were not yet aware of this concept of The Fourth Industrial Revolution but who started to see coming a wave of transformations that they knew were going to disrupt their manufacturing base and have an impact on their manufacturing base. And therefore, we started the conversation with prime ministers, with minister of industry, that then led to put together a product concept that evolved over time. And today, it's one of the 17 global platforms and initiatives that The World Economic Forum is running that I lead on the future of advanced manufacturing and production. At the very beginning, we started focusing pretty much on the policy angle. Today it's a real public-private platform where both companies and governments advocate for the actions that need to be taken to shape the future of production that works for all. TROND: Francisco, it's a fascinating journey for you. But it's also an incredibly fascinating journey for the field of manufacturing. And I wanted to address a little bit how manufacturing as a platform became one of the 17 flagship initiatives, and by that, how The World Economic Forum itself has changed over these past few years. And then lastly, the last year has meant enormous change with preparation around COVID. And again, manufacturing has been escalated into this enormous importance. And I would imagine that your development background has come in handy because the kinds of issues that suddenly became foreground were a little unusual, I guess, for manufacturing as well. So firstly, what has happened at The World Economic Forum over these years that has catapulted manufacturing into this prominence? FRANCISCO: What I think is that in the conversations with our private sector community but also with the public sector, we realize that there was an urgent need for a public-private dialogue to be brought back on top of the agenda. We all know what happened with COVID. The disruptions that we saw in manufacturing, I think, made us realize that when things go wrong in manufacturing, you run out of essential products, not even talking about the protective equipment, ventilators, and all the things that were most needed because of the public crisis. But even basic supplies such as food or toilet paper became an issue, and people started talking about those. So let's say that there was a realization that manufacturing still plays a major role in our global economies and society. And that's something that is quite exciting and interesting, but you need to look a couple of years back. And I think if you look at the pre-COVID war, and you start thinking about how different megatrends were shaping the war, you also realize why manufacturing came back and became an important issue on top of the global agenda for both private and public sector communities. And what I'm talking about is the combination of mainly probably three or four megatrends, but it's The Fourth Industrial Revolution, which is a concept that our Executive Chairman launched back in 2017, mainly referring to the blurring lines in between the OT and IT war that are transforming not just how our companies operate but probably who we are and what we do as human beings. So it was the concept of The Fourth Industrial Revolution together with climate change, the imperative for sustainability, with the geopolitical trends and tensions that we saw over the past four to five years. And, of course, all things that relate to the geo-economic evolution in which you can add elements such as aging population or the slowing of the global economy. But it's all those trends and combinations that made people realize the importance of manufacturing, and that brought it back onto the global agenda. So it's been a fascinating journey. There have been plenty of discussions which would trend from the technology angle, and how technology can transform manufacturing for the good, and what's the positive impact it would have in society. And most recently, about the role that manufacturing can play in the context of this concept of stakeholder capitalism and the need to create value, a new value that is delivered not just to shareholders but to shareholders, workers, society, and the environment overall. TROND: It's fascinating because many of these concepts to some of us are fairly abstract still because like stakeholder capitalism unless you truly are in this battle, or you either were fighting for it to even emerge, or you are at the C-level, and you're basically being tasked with figuring out what this concept is going to translate into... But it seems to me that what you're saying is that with manufacturing becoming such a forefront of many battles in society, this is not theoretical anymore. And it's something that all people can relate to whether you are on the factory floor implementing your OT, as you said, your operational technology or you are at the leadership level and trying to strategize about what this means for the organization as a whole. FRANCISCO: And, Trond, you're absolutely right. Manufacturing needs exactly what change is happening today. We are hearing on a daily basis global companies making commitments towards the SDGs. There was the concept of stakeholder capitalists setting very ambitious targets by 2025-2030 getting CO2 emissions. The only place in which we are seeing that happening now it's in manufacturing. Manufacturing is changing the speed. When you double-click on how digital technologies, digital solutions advance manufacturing, industry for control, it's transforming the world of operations, driving massive efficiencies, productivity revolutions, driving growth, and at the same time, augmenting workers, contributing towards the sustainability targets by cutting energy consumption, water consumption, material consumption, optimizing waste management. I think that's when you realize that it's probably in the real economy space, in the manufacturing space, where all those commitments are starting to come to life, and that we are seeing real change and real action. It's extremely exciting. TROND: Yeah, and it's also an interesting time because without getting into the politics of this, there clearly is a bit of an outcry because of the success of technology in other fields. Social platforms and other digital advances that we have made have created both an enormous opportunity, which of course, explains why so many things can be achieved in manufacturing. But they were about to run awry a little bit in the sense that they weren't or aren't still contributing to the global good in the direct sense that the manufacturing industry, of course, is primed to do but for so many years was not. It still boggles my mind, though, that we are having these conversations at the forum. These conversations are happening. But I don't think that everybody is fully aware of how far manufacturing is about to change and emerge on the world stage. Give us a little bit of a sense before we get into the meat. And I want to talk about business model changes in the industry. But what do you think is needed for the greater public? And by that, I mean young people, older people to realize that manufacturing is actually where things are happening today. What does it take to see it? FRANCISCO: Well, I think that it's a great question, Trond. And I think that one of the...we probably need to start by asking what can manufacturers do to get closer to the general public? And things like open up facilities so that people can see what both a factory, you know, not of the future but the factory of today looks like and how shopfloor operators are interacting with new software technologies, new interfaces, the world of advanced robotics. We are even seeing drones flying within facilities with inspection, right? The level of technological transformation and the pace in which it's happening within manufacturing facilities it's amazing. And if you link that to the jobs conversation and how that connects with new generations, I think that...I'm sure that you know younger generations will get very excited if they have a chance to see. So I think manufacturing has been traditionally, and because that's the role that it used to play, always behind the scenes. I think that we do have an opportunity for manufacturers to start showing to the general public what it is, and what it really looks like, and how exciting it is, and also the contribution it makes. A lot of the things that we enjoy today in life could not be enjoyed if there wasn't a factory, if there wasn't a facility, if there wasn't an entire supply chain behind it. So yes, I think that there's something that the manufacturing community can do better, which is to talk more about the things that are happening in manufacturing in a very transparent, open way. And that's one of the things that we are looking at the forum, providing that platform to interact with the general public. TROND: I just wanted to point out that, again, these are sensitive things, but the forum for a long time was just the way it was set up was a conversation between leaders. But I have seen over the last few years that more and more you realize, or maybe explain it to me, that it's more than a conversation between leaders. Clearly, this conversation is more important than ever. But in addition to a conversation between leaders, you and the industry need to foster a conversation with small and medium-sized enterprises and, as you pointed out, actually, with the greater public because the battle here is kind of a battle of interpretation. Is this an interesting space to be in? And if so, we all need to innovate within this space. That must be challenging for a network that was basically mostly set up to dialogue with leaders. I wanted you to talk a little and begin this discussion because I know you have written a paper on changing business models. But at the same time, as you're writing this paper, the forum is almost having to change its own business model. So I want you to address that just because business models is such an abstract thing. So I wanted you to personalize it a little bit as you're explaining what business models mean in manufacturing these days. FRANCISCO: Absolutely. And I think that we are all transforming our self-set speed within the current context. It's either transform, innovate, or die nowadays. And that happened to every organization regarding this space in which they operate. Maybe on the first part of your question, I think that 50 years ago or 51, when the forum was founded by the Executive Chairman, Professor Klaus Schwab, of course, the main role was to convene leaders. But then, over time, we evolved and became an international organization for public-private cooperation in which dialogue is just an important component of what we do. What really happens at the forum is the formation of communities that are able to drive action and impact over time. Now, of course, in the context of the current pandemic, it's how do you bring leaders together? And how you orchestrate and incubate those sections that will deliver impact became a challenge. But it forced us to adopt digital technologies at a pace that we didn't think we could. We were doing that before, but COVID played a major accelerator role. And I'll give you an example to make it tangible. You hear about our initiative, which we call The Global Lighthouse Network, that we are deploying together with McKinsey and other colleagues. And what was fascinating is that we had a process in place through which we were physically assessing the facilities. As soon as the COVID crisis started, we were now forced to change the approach. And we ended up coming up with the process to run virtual remote visits, and we realized that the technology was ready. By shipping a simple kit in which you have a phone stabilizer, a headset with a canceling noise effect, and a few other very basic technologies, you could almost get to the same product that you could get when visiting the facilities in person. So we reorganized ourselves. And what I'm very proud of is that if you look at how we have been running some of our key gatherings but also some of the initiatives that are having a real impact on the ground, we were able to triple the pace in which we were operating. And we have seen the same happening in the manufacturing space to connect that with your second part of the question, which is how are business models and operating models evolving? I think that during the crisis, because of the shortages from the supply disruptions on the demand side, every company in the operations, in the manufacturing space was facing new challenges, which forced them to take innovations to new and unprecedented levels. Now what we saw is, in a very short period of time, new ways of generating and delivering value coming up. When I say generating, I'm referring to the operating model, the operating model in the way in which we defined it together with the professors who wrote for that position paper you referred to. The operating model is a way in which your company generates, creates value. Now the business model is a way in which that value is taken to the customers. It's delivered and then converted into revenues. And someone could say that the innovations that we started to see accelerating at speed probably were of three or four main types. The first one is that we saw companies finding new innovative ways to make the products they were making before, so a lot of innovations in the way in which they were operating, finding new sources of supply, but also adopting technology to take those products to a new level, and very often finding that those products could be made even better because of the innovations that were injected. The second relating to that was the emergence of new products. So companies started to repurpose and reposition manufacturing to be able to deliver new goods that were in high demand. The most obvious example there is the companies who started to make masks and any type of protective equipment or ventilator, or hand sanitizer. But what that shows and proves is that quite rapidly, with the right level of technology innovation, you can repurpose, and you can turn into a manufacturer of something different, which can generate new value linking that to the business model. Now, the third type is this idea of topping up products with services. So this is providing a digital thread across your entire value chain to be able to generate new value and deliver new value to the customers not just by the hardware or the physical products that companies were selling but by setting them up with new services, being able to get data all the way from the customers to continue to improve performance and augment the experience that customers were getting. And then the fourth one that is a very exciting one is the as a service concept. We have seen many manufacturing companies that were able to rapidly sort out operational and business issues for themselves and became services providers. Now, if you look at those four things, what I believe is exciting is that someone could argue that manufacturing it's again at the age of becoming a new engine of economic growth. I mean, there is a lot of growth that is going to come from all these innovations that we're seeing accelerating and who are, let's say, experts, emerging from manufacturing. And at the same time, because of what we discussed before, we have the opportunity to make that grow more sustainable, inclusive and make sure it works for a larger number of stakeholders. So that's what makes it very, very exciting. And maybe the final thought on that is that because of the connection with business models, because of the ability to enable growth, manufacturing today is seeing CEO compensation. We are seeing more and more CEOs getting closer to the operation. Or the other way to look at it, we are seeing more and more chief operating or chief supply chain officers who are either stepping into the CEO role who will likely become the next generation of CEO for their companies. TROND: Francisco, this is fascinating because it almost brings us historically back to the heydays of manufacturing. And manufacturing has always been at the heart of every Industrial Revolution. And I think when Klaus Schwab first wrote about The Fourth Industrial Revolution, I don't know that everyone really accepted it because it sounds nice, right? And it would be nice if it was happening. And arguably, you're looking at these technologies. You're saying there has to be a revolution. But back in the day when that was written and the precursors of this discussion, in all honesty, there was perhaps no revolution yet. Because there were platform technologies that were available, but you would still have to implement them. But what you're talking about now is how it is basically over the last very few years becoming implemented into not just large but also smaller organizations and then creating new ones. But to address the first part of what you were saying about these larger firms, so these kinds of superstar firms, I believe you call them in your report, there is a value there as well in an economy to have superstar firms that are actually creating value. There's, of course, less value to a society to have superstar firms that are only creating value for themselves. So that's an important distinction to make. But I wanted to bring this a little bit into the discussion on education. I was reading the other day about, you know, in the olden days when Prussia basically recreated the modern education system, it was largely factory owners who were supporting that even economically and in terms of the pedagogical models. And I was reminded that it is almost a similar challenge we're facing today because it's quite an education challenge on all levels. I wanted to ask you how do you see this happening? How is this shift truly going to take place? Because now the technologies are starting to be put in place. How is the world's worker base going to benefit from this fast enough? How are we going to reshape the education system? Surely we can't put them in four-year colleges. And if we start to reframe the gymnasium, which was the strategy back 250 years ago, that, again, is a nice strategy if you're talking in decades. But this industrial revolution isn't happening over decades; it's happening over years and months. FRANCISCO: I think it's a very important piece of the bigger puzzle. And you cannot talk about the future of manufacturing without talking about the future of skills and pretty much skills revolution that is needed because we know that today there is a skill shortage in manufacturing. Wherever you go in the world, that is happening and not because there are probably not enough hands available but because the people who are coming out of universities do not have the required skills, or out of college, do not have the required skills that are needed on the shop floor or across your engineering base. And maybe to break it down, I could share three different avenues that companies and governments are exploring. The first one is rethinking the way in which companies, universities, and colleges, and governments interact. I think that the concept of you get a college degree or a university degree and then you are all set for life is outdated. If you look at the pace at which technology is evolving and which factories and supply chains are being transformed, we will need to find new mechanisms in which people who work in manufacturing will and should be able to continuously go back and forth in between formation, training, technology updates, and the shop floor and the supply chain. I think that's the very first thing that companies are starting to think about. And there are interesting pilots that are being deployed in many places with new partnerships forming between a specific university and a specific company in a specific location, or people who are or companies who are investing in training students in a specific college by giving them the chance at the very early stages to get an experience on the shop floor. So that's probably the first basket of change that we need to see happening. The second one is maybe around the skills needs. I mean, if technology is growing and developing exponentially, and I'm talking about technology not in general, but technology applied to address very specific production or business issues in the manufacturing space and to be able to develop new use cases. But if that is changing and continuously changing at the pace at which it is changing, we will need to find mechanisms to constantly monitor and identify the skills in which we train people on and how often a college curriculum or university curriculum gets updated; I mean, not often enough. So which should create a new dialogue between those who provide the training and those who are able to identify these key needs to go into a continuous, let's say, update and upgrade process there as well. And the third one, which is the most exciting, is that we probably need to think about how we democratize training in manufacturing. And the best analogy there, you know, how much training did you get to learn how to use the apps that you have on your mobile phone? None, right? You get a new app. You just download the new application that you need, whether it's for navigating a city or learning a new language, or whatever. And after half an hour, you are ready to go. So I think that there's a lot that can be democratized when it comes to training in manufacturing is we leverage technology, not just to transform production but also to transform the way in which people interact in a factory. So this concept of new interfaces and also the fact that we need to think about technology not as a given but as something that we can influence, and that we could tailor, and that we can put...the concept of the series that you are running is, you know, the augmented. You used the word augmented. I think that we can leverage technology today, and we weren't able to do that a few years ago. But we can leverage to augment workers' capabilities. I think that's the secret, and that's the path forward to democratize training in manufacturing and learning. And if we can top up with open source, and we can get companies and in the manufacturing.works platform that you guys are driving; it's amazing how there are more and more companies getting exciting and willing to make their training modules available. So I think that that's going to be probably the fastest way to reach the millions of people who work in manufacturing today. TROND: It's fascinating. As you're speaking, I'm reminded that there obviously has to be a link back to business models with training because if this was simply a case of saying, we're going to outsource these to existing universities, or we're going to outsource the training to these new online training providers, and then the problem is solved, first of all, the incentive wouldn't be there for industry to completely do that. But also, the value created would be isolated to these other institutions. But I think what you're speaking of is some sort of a new dialogue. And there's a combination, though, because open sourcing and democratizing learning, I guess you're not saying that it necessarily forever has to be free. There's a business model, or there are multiple business models that have to be formed around training where there obviously must be incentives for those who create that kind of training. Speak to me a little bit more about the new emerging platforms in manufacturing. And I was fascinated by what you said about technology and interfaces needing to be more intuitive. Historically, that, of course, hasn't been the case (Well, I'm arguing. Let's see what you think.) in manufacturing. If you think about manufacturing technologies, they have been fairly complex, or at least they have been perceived as complex. What is needed, in your mind, to structurally change that aspect? Is it almost like mandating that any technology on the shop floor should be that easy? Or is it just a mindset change among those who buy the technology? Or is it the technology providers that need to themselves take this more seriously? How can this change happen? FRANCISCO: It's a great question, Trond, and we may be at the very beginning of another little revolution within the manufacturing space itself with this concept of new platform or platform tools that are emerging. And for me, the reason is that when you look at some of the data we have when we consulted about why companies failed when it comes to the deployment of new pilots...or to put it in a different way, many companies have been developing great pilots and were able to develop a lot of new use cases. But they failed in the implementation phase because there was pushback from the shop proprietor because they were not developing the right way, or they were not easy to adopt, or not easy enough to adopt. So I think that whichever type of platforms and interfaces that can help create that connection between the technological solution that is going to be deployed on the shop floor and the way in which it will be operationalized and managed on a day-to-day basis can bring huge, huge, huge benefits to the workers, to the shop floor. And I think that something that we keep hearing from companies is that whenever you give shop floor operations a technology that makes their life easier, there is no way that you can get that technology back. There's no way that you can get that use case out of their hands. So I think that it's all about...and it links back with the concept of democratizing the access to training, democratizing the access to tools. But there are some challenges. I think there are things that we need to overcome to take it to the next level so that it connects back to the concept of open source. So, for example, there are many interfaces or tools that can be powered by AI or at least by big data and analytics. The only way to train those algorithms and make them super performant is by having a large volume of data sources. That's something that is not happening yet because you still have companies who are not willing to share their data with the service provider of a specific platform. But they will reach that level in which everyone is comfortable sharing data in a certain way. These tools will be taken to a new and unprecedented level, and I think that is going to be a must-have. I think that workers, when you will be hiring or trying to attract talent if you don't have these types of solutions, they may just not be interested in getting the job or may prefer to go to another manufacturing company who does have them. I think that it's a fascinating topic. And we're at the stage in which we have seen those solutions being deployed for the first time at scale. So I think that very soon we'll see the results of that, and it's going to be very exciting. TROND: Francisco, these are fascinating developments. I hope that I can tap into your expertise several times and on a regular basis on this podcast. This has been a fascinating discussion. And it seems like the gains even in just a short year during...or I guess we cannot say post-COVID, but it is during COVID that a lot of these changes have been enacted. And you have had a central place in coordinating the global response, I must say. Fascinating developments, thank you so much. FRANCISCO: My pleasure. And I think, Trond, the next challenge for the manufacturing community, for the overall manufacturing community, is to see how we can keep the high pace of innovation that was great over the past couple of months. I think that's going to be the greatest next challenge. But thank you very much for hosting me; a real pleasure. TROND: You're welcome. You have just listened to Episode 9 of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was The Fourth Industrial Revolution post-COVID-19. Our guest was Francisco Betti, Head of Advanced Manufacturing and Production at The World Economic Forum. In this conversation, we talked about why he got into manufacturing and how The World Economic Forum works. We discussed how the forum has changed over these past years and how manufacturing has become the lead topic among the global elite. The manufacturing platform is now, arguably, the primary among 17 flagship initiatives at The World Economic Forum. We go deeply into the changing business models of manufacturing and what the next decade holds. My takeaway is that manufacturing has escalated in prominence during COVID-19, and for good reason. What we can produce decides what we can become. The deep digitalization gains that society has made over the past few years had to quickly be implemented on the factory floor. Surprisingly, a large part of the industry was ready. But the process now needs to complete, and the results will likely be an entirely new production platform for the world. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 4: A Renaissance in Manufacturing or Episode 6: Work of the Future. Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast. Special Guest: Francisco Betti.

Deep State Radio
Joe Biden's Surprisingly Successful Mideast Trip

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 22:39 Very Popular


President Biden just returned from the Middle East but how successful was the trip? David breaks down the trip with Kim Ghattas of the Atlantic, David Sanger of the New York Times, and Rosa Brooks of the Georgetown University. What should we make of Biden's fistbump with MBS? Were the tradeoffs of the trip worth it? What comes next for Biden's globe-hopping? Find out the answer to these and other pressing foreign policy issues during this fascinating episode. Join us.

Deep State Radio
Joe Biden's Surprisingly Successful Mideast Trip

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 25:24


President Biden just returned from the Middle East but how successful was the trip? David breaks down the trip with Kim Ghattas of the Atlantic, David Sanger of the New York Times, and Rosa Brooks of the Georgetown University. What should we make of Biden's fistbump with MBS? Were the tradeoffs of the trip worth it? What comes next for Biden's globe-hopping? Find out the answer to these and other pressing foreign policy issues during this fascinating episode. Join us.

Deep Fat Fried
Steve Harvey: The Ultimate TV Host & Sumo Wrestling: Surprisingly Cool Sport

Deep Fat Fried

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 163:56


Today we're covering Steve Harvey: a loveable and recognizable comedian behind tons of family-friendly shows like the gameshow Family Feud, Little Big Shots, Miss Universe, and Judge Steve Harvey. We're also covering the sport of sumo wrestling from Japan - an exercise with deep roots in the Shinto religion and featuring rare obese athletes.

Bible Thinker
Male Headship: Is it REALLY Biblical? Women in Ministry part 8

Bible Thinker

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 97:34 Very Popular


It's undeniable that the Bible explicitly teaches that a husband is the "head" of his wife. While church history has pretty much always believed this means the husband is the primary leader in the marriage and household, there has been serious pushback against this view from egalitarian scholars in more recent years. Time Stamps!! 0:00 - Intro 1. 10:33 - Part 1: Medical Claims That "Head" Means "Source" 2. 31:47 - Part 2: Bible Context Claims That "Head" Doesn't Imply "Authority" 3. 54:20 - Part 3: Church History Argument 4. 1:01:10 - Part 4: The Battle of Lexicons; does kephale mean authority? 5. 1:33:33 - Conclusions Their basic contention is that "head" doesn't mean what you probably think it means when you read it in Scripture as the description of the relationship between husbands and wives. They tend to offer 4 main arguments to support their case:1) In the Greek speaking world of New Testament times, general medical opinion was that the heart or liver controlled the body while the head was merely the "source" of nutrition. The egalitarians say that we need to factor in this popular medical understanding of "head" or we will mistakenly think the husband is the leader of his wife.2) Egalitarian scholars say that when you look carefully at Paul's use of the metaphor "head" and the specific context of the passages when it is used, you come to see that Paul is NOT meaning to imply anything about authority, but is speaking of nourishment or source. For instance, they will say that man is the source of woman in the sense that Eve was formed from Adam. Adam was her source.3) Surprisingly, some Egalitarians will actually share a quote from Chrysostom to show that one of the church fathers understood perfectly well that this term "head" didn't mean to imply authority. Catherine Kroeger, founder of CBE promotes this view, and many echo her.4) Finally, we get to the biggest one. They will claim that the Greek word translated "head" really means "source" and not "authority." I've found that egalitarians will repeatedly make very similar claims that ancient lexicons do not support the meaning of "authority" and that one very respected lexicon in particular (the LSJ) defends their case. I'm going to analyze each of these claims to see what the Bible really says about husbands being the head of their wives. This is super important, because it doesn't just impact who is in church leadership, it impacts every single marriage in the body of Christ! I can't overstate the practical impact of getting this topic wrong, so I have spent a ton of time gathering and, more importantly, researching to properly vet and test egalitarian claims about male headship. I'll give you the spoiler here in the description. On every single point they are very wrong, and even putting out blatant misinformation. I'll provide both analysis and evidence to support all this in today's video.‬ After years of being a bit confused about the topic of women in ministry, I set out to spend months researching the topic in great detail to produce this exhaustive teaching series on the topic. This is just part 8.

THE VINTAGE PODCAST
Breathless Ep. 54

THE VINTAGE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 79:31


Today we talk about a piece of classic French cinema called Breathless. A film starring Jean Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg takes us on a runaway mission from the police. Surprisingly its a film that not everyone loved, listen to find out who. As always, Go Watch Something.

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast
629: Brandon Turner's 4-Step “Viral” Formula That'll Bring You Deals TODAY

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 85:59 Very Popular


To real estate investors and real estate investing enthusiasts, Brandon Turner is a household name. Not only has he written one of the most successful real estate investing books ever published (The Book on Rental Property Investing), but he also pioneered the real estate podcasting, social media, and blogging space. Funny to think that only a decade or so ago, this massively successful capital raiser, business founder, and CEO was painting rental properties, just trying to quit his soul-sucking job.So how did Brandon do this so quickly, and what's going on in the brain (and under the beard) of one of the most successful real estate investors on the planet? Surprisingly, Brandon doesn't have some secret formula, world-changing analogy, or crystal ball. He simply did what he said he would do—look for deals consistently, make offers whenever he could, and close so he could move on to the next. If this sounds familiar to your situation, but you're struggling to find success, you may find that his system is a little bit different from yours.Brandon gives valuable insight into the “machine-building” he's doing over at Open Door Capital, how he's successfully growing his personal brand, and why real estate investing success should never be a surprise. If you're a new listener to the show, it won't be long before you realize why Brandon Turner was (and still is) one of the most beloved voices for building wealth. In This Episode We Cover:The four levels of entrepreneurialism and how to become the “architect” of your own lifeBuilding a personal brand and finding confidence when creating contentThe skills you need to grow a business and become the CEOThe five-point “viral formula” Brandon has used to raise millions of dollarsWhat it takes to be successful and how to create a machine that will find real estate deals for youAnd So Much More!Links from the ShowBiggerPockets Youtube ChannelBiggerPockets ForumsBiggerPockets Pro MembershipBiggerPockets BookstoreBiggerPockets BootcampsBiggerPockets PodcastGet Your Ticket for BPCon 2022Listen to All Your Favorite BiggerPockets Podcasts in One PlaceSubscribe to The “On The Market” YouTube ChannelHear Our Interview with Jason Drees on Exceeding Your GoalsShould You Quit Your 9-5 Job to Become a Full-Time Real Estate Investor?10 Challenges to Seriously Consider BEFORE Quitting Your Day JobDavid's BiggerPockets ProfileDavid's InstagramDavid's YouTube ChannelAsk David Your Real Estate Investing QuestionRob's YoutubeRob's InstagramRob's TikTokRob's TwitterRob's BiggerPockets ProfileGrab Brandon's FREE MasterclassPurchase Brandon Turner's Best Selling BooksStay Up-to-Date On Your Favorite Real Estate PodcastBiggerPockets Podcast 543 with Gino WickmanBiggerPockets Podcast 584 with Jonathan GreeneBiggerPockets Podcast 264 with Gary VeeDavid's NewsletterBrandon's NewsletterInvest with Open Door CapitalBooks Mentioned in the ShowTraction by Gino WickmanRich Dad Poor Dad by Robert KiyosakiThe Crisis Comfort by Michael EasterLong-Distance Real Estate Investing by David GreeneConnect with BrandonBrandon's BiggerPockets ProfileClick here to check the full show notes: https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/real-estate-629Interested in learning more about today's sponsors or becoming a BiggerPockets partner yourself? Check out our sponsor page!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.