Podcasts about importantly

  • 1,450PODCASTS
  • 2,451EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 16, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about importantly

Show all podcasts related to importantly

Latest podcast episodes about importantly

Locked On Cougars
BYU Eager To Celebrate Senior Day But More Importantly Reach Bowl Eligibility - November 16, 2022

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:12


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Wednesday, November 16, 2022 The BYU Cougars are eager for Senior Day and team captain Clark Barrington says he's looking forward to being honored Saturday Clark and Jake Hatch then talked about facing Utah Tech and the bigger goal of reaching bowl eligbility to ensure a 13th game for BYU Finally, Clark and Jake talked about some of his teammates who are set to be honored as well as Clark's memories of playing at BYU Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  LinkedIn - LinkedIn jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at Linkedin.com/LockedOnCollege. Terms and conditions apply Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order Upside - Today's episode is brought to you by Upside. Download the FREE Upside App and use promo code Locked to get $5 or more cash back on your first purchase of $10 or more Underdog - Today's episode is brought to you by Underdog. Sign up on underdogfantasy.com with the promo code LOCKED ON and get your first deposit doubled up to $100! SimpliSafe - Today's episode of Locked On Cougars is sponsored by SimpliSafe Home Security. With Fast Protect™️ Technology, exclusively from SimpliSafe, 24/7 monitoring agents capture evidence to accurately verify a threat for faster police response. There's No Safe Like SimpliSafe. Visit SimpliSafe dot com slash LockedOnCollege to learn more. Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mikkipedia
Managing Chronic Pain with Professor Howard Schubiner

Mikkipedia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 57:14


This week on the podcast Mikki speaks to Professor Howard Schubiner, mind-body medicine practitioner, all about pain. Prof Schubiner discusses his introduction into mind-body medicine early in his career as a doctor after being made aware of it from a friend who had personal experience of a long term pain being resolved through pain reprocessing techniques (PRT). Prof Schubiner today on the podcast discusses this, what pain actually is,  what conditions there are clinical trials to illustrate its effectiveness, how to determine if your pain is structural versus emotional, and what treatment looks like. They discuss PRT and also emotional awareness and expression therapy (EAET) and how this can help with mental health disorders, chronic fatigue and why it could be helpful for long covid and weight loss resistance. A lot of awesome information in this podcast, with numerous resources to support his work, you will enjoy it.Dr Howard Schubiner is board-certified in paediatrics, adolescent medicine, and internal medicine. He was a full Professor at Wayne State University for 18 years and now works at Providence Hospital in Southfield, MI, USA. He has authored over 60 scientific publications and has given over 250 lectures to scientific audiences regionally, nationally and internationally on topics related to adolescent medicine, ADHD, and stress reduction.Importantly, Dr Schubiner is the founder and director of the Mind Body Medicine Program at Providence Hospital. This program uses the most current research methodologies to treat individuals who suffer from the Mind Body Syndrome (MBS) or Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS) as described by Dr John Sarno. Dr Schubiner has created a program that uses both meditative and cutting edge psychological techniques to help individuals with chronic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, whiplash, back and neck pain, myofascial pain, TMJ syndrome, tension and migraine headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, irritable bladder syndrome, insomnia, anxiety, and other related conditions.Prof Schubiner can be found here https://unlearnyourpain.com/Contact Mikki:https://mikkiwilliden.com/https://www.facebook.com/mikkiwillidennutritionhttps://www.instagram.com/mikkiwilliden/https://linktr.ee/mikkiwillidenSave 20% on all NuZest Products with the code MIKKI20 at www.nuzest.co.nzSave 30% on Hoka One One with the code TEAMMIKKI at www.Hoka.co.nz

All of Life Sermon Audio
The Great Big Story

All of Life Sermon Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 35:53


As All of Life Church moves into our new building, it's a new chapter, out of the same book. Importantly, our story is a small part in the middle of a much bigger and better story - God's Story. Next week, we look at some of the details of our story, but this week, we enjoy and remember The Great Big Story we are a part of.

News Not Noise
No Red Wave: Making Sense of the Midterms

News Not Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 18:42


The big loser in the 2022 midterms: conventional wisdom. The late punditry was all wrong. Enthusiasm was high on both sides. There was no red wave. Women did turn out to vote on abortion. Trumpism suffered some body blows and election deniers did not sweep the board. Importantly voters seemed motivated by multiple issues at once – which shouldn't be shocking but was discounted by the pundits in the final days of the campaign.To break down what we know right now, what it means for issues you care about, control of Congress and the 2024 presidential race, I spoke with NPR's National Political Correspondent, Mara Liasson. She covers the White House, Congress, elections and political trends and is one of the most thoughtful and informed journalists covering politics today. Mara Liasson➤Twitter: twitter.com/MaraLiasson➤Web: npr.orgYou can follow Jessica Yellin here:➤Instagram: instagram.com/jessicayellin​➤Twitter: twitter.com/jessicayellin➤Twitter: twitter.com/newsnotnoise➤Facebook: facebook.com/newsnotnoise➤YouTube: youtube.com/newsnotnoise➤Website: NewsNotNoise.com➤Newsletter: newsnotnoise.bulletin.comSupport this work:➤patreon.com/NewsNotNoiseJessica Yellin is the founder of News Not Noise, a channel dedicated to giving you news with real experts and providing facts, not panic attacks. Jessica is a veteran of network news, traveling the globe, covering conflict and crisis. A former Chief White House Correspondent for CNN, she reported from around the world and won awards. Now, Yellin uses her voice to break down the news, calmly and clearly for you -- free of punditry, provocation, and yelling.

Curious Neuron: Learning and the Brain
How language, music and sleep change the brain with Dr. Emily Coffey

Curious Neuron: Learning and the Brain

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 32:34


In today's episode, we are joined by Dr. Emily Coffey who researches music, language, sleep, and how it relates to neuroplasticity. Have you ever wondered if you should be signing your child up for music lessons? Or if your child should learn more than one language at a time? What about how your brain might be influenced by sleep? All of these common questions are discussed in today's episode. Tune in and take out your Curious Neuron notebook because we get a bit technical talking about how research involving music, language, and sleep is being conducted. Importantly, we learn about music in noise tasks and how they may be able to help your child focus in class.You can read more about Dr. Coffey's research here.If you're interested in taking part in research about music, language, and the brain check out:CRBLM: Centre for Research on Brain, Language, and MusicBRAMS: International Laboratory for BRAin, Music and Sound ResearchThank you to our supporter the Tanenbaum Open Science Institute at The Neuro. The Neuro is the first health sciences institution in the world to commit to Open Science, an approach to research that ensures scientific knowledge is shared widely and transparently.Please leave a rating for our podcast on iTunes!Join our community: Instagram: @curious_neuron Website: www.curiousneuron.com Podcast website: www.curiousneuron.com/curiousneuronpodcast

Daily Detroit
The Porter Burks case, explained (ft. Vince Colella)

Daily Detroit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 19:08


While Porter Burks was in mental crisis, the 22 year old black man was shot 19 times by Detroit Police on the city's west side on October 2, 2022. Police allege he was carrying a knife and went for officers. But video of the incident shows a lot of distance between burks and the police. The incident has drawn national attention, protest, and raised questions about how should we respond to and care for people in these situations. Importantly, there's also a $50 million lawsuit filed on behalf of the family against both the city of Detroit and the five officers involved. Attorney Geoffrey Fieger's case alleges assault, battery, gross negligence, wanton and willful misconduct, violation of department policies — and violations of the freedom of information and persons with disabilities civil right acts. To help sort this out, an attorney who I believe is an expert in the field, Vince Colella of Moss and Colella. He joins me as we discuss police use of force, mental health, the state of the case as it is today, and some likely outcomes. On Vince: https://www.mosscolella.com/team-members/vince-colella Feedback form: https://forms.gle/MnwUf8uJEtpyG9m2A or dailydetroit -at- gmail -dot- com

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Mini summaries of GPI papers by Jack Malde

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 10:21


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Mini summaries of GPI papers, published by Jack Malde on November 2, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. I have previously written about the importance of making global priorities research accessible to a wider range of people. Many people don't have the time or desire to read academic papers, but the findings of the research are still hugely important and action-relevant. The Global Priorities Institute (GPI) has started producing paper summaries, but even these might have somewhat limited readership given their length. They are also time-consuming for GPI to develop and aren't all in one place. With this in mind, and given my personal interest in global priorities research, I have written a few mini-summaries of GPI papers. The extra lazy / time poor can read just “The bottom lines”. I would welcome feedback on if these samples are useful and if I should continue to make them - working towards a post with all papers summarised. It is impossible to cover everything in just a few bullet points, but I hope my summaries successfully inform of the main arguments and key takeaways. Please note that for the final two summaries I made use of the existing GPI paper summaries. On the desire to make a difference (Hilary Greaves, William MacAskill, Andreas Mogensen and Teruji Thomas) The bottom line: Preferring to make a difference yourself is in deep tension with the ideals of benevolence. If we are to be benevolent, we should solely care about how much total good is done. In practice, this means avoiding tendencies to diversify individual philanthropic portfolios or to neglect mitigation of extinction risks in favour of neartermist options that seem “safer”. My brief summary: One can consider various types of “difference-making preferences” (DMPs), where one wants to do good themselves. One example is thinking of the difference one makes in terms of their own causal impact. This can make the world worse e.g. going to great lengths to be the one to save a drowning person even if other people are better placed to do so. This way of thinking is therefore in tension with benevolence. One can instead hope to have higher outcome-comparison impact, where one compares how much better an outcome is if one acts, compared to if one does nothing. This would recommend not trying to save the drowning person, which seems the correct conclusion. However, the authors note that thinking of doing good in this way can still be in tension with benevolence. For example, one might prefer that a recent disaster were severe rather than mild so that they can do more good by helping affected people. Under uncertainty, DMPs are also in tension with benevolence, in an action-relevant way. For example, being risk averse to the difference one individually makes sometimes means choosing an action that is (stochastically) dominated by another action - essentially choosing an action that is ‘objectively' worse under uncertainty, with respect to doing good. This can also be the case when people interact - the authors show that the presence of DMPs in collective action problems with uncertainty can lead to sub-optimal outcomes. Importantly they show that the preferences themselves are the culprits. This is also the case with DMPs under ambiguity aversion (ambiguity aversion means preferring known risks over unknown risks). One could try to rationalise DMPs by saying people are trying to achieve ‘meaning' in their life. But people who exhibit DMPs are generally motivated by the ideal of benevolence. It seems therefore that such people, if they really do want to be benevolent, should give up their DMPs. See paper here. The unexpected value of the future (Hayden Wilkinson) The bottom line: An undefined expected value of the future doesn't invalidate longtermism. A theory is developed to deal with undefined expe...

Duck Season Somewhere
Snow Goose Conservation Past, Present and Future

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 66:39


Let's talk snow geese past, present and future. As long-time wildlife research scientist for Environment Canada, Dr. Ray Alisauskus's expertise is arctic geese. From a small cabin in prairie Canada, he describes snow goose-related activities keeping him busy during the fall, events leading to the now 24 years-old Light Goose Conservation Order, why the geese have been "winning" for the past couple decades, why mid-continent snow goose productivity is waning.  What might it all mean? Importantly, what's this year's hatch look like for us white goose hunters?    Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells https://bossshotshells.com/ Benelli Shotguns https://www.benelliusa.com/shotguns/waterfowl-shotguns Tetra Hearing https://tetrahearing.com/ Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy https://https://kanati.com/ Mojo Outdoors https://www.mojooutdoors.com/p Tom Beckbe https://tombeckbe.com/ Flash Back Decoys https://www.duckcreekdecoys.com/ Voormi https://voormi.com/ GetDucks.com USHuntList.com   It really is duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences year-round: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com

Mises Media
Hermann Morris: The Nail Hub as the Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method in Practice

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022


Breakthrough theory becomes effective practice when it is successful applied by real-life entrepreneurs. The E4B entrepreneurial method is actualized by Hermann and Elizabeth Morris in the very distinctive business model for their brand, The Nail Hub. Knowledge Capsule The true purpose of a B2B business is to help your customers succeed. While outside observers focus on transactions — how much does this business sell, what are its revenues? — entrepreneurial business owners and operators focus on customers and customer relationships. Revenues follow from relationships. This insight is critical, since it guides business model development. Business-to-business models are especially responsive to relationship strategies. When a customer feels that the relationship with a supplier makes their business performance better, they can become a customer for life. That's a recipe for strong and sustainable growth. First, observe the ecosystem in which you operate, and identify gap opportunities. Systems thinking is an important component of the entrepreneurial method. A firm is a component or a node in a network of interconnected services we can call an ecosystem. Hermann's and Elizabeth's ecosystem is the Nail Fashion industry. Nodes include salons and salon owners, the nail technicians (sometimes employees, sometimes independent contractors) who provide service to consumers in the salons, equipment manufacturers and suppliers, product manufacturers and suppliers (for nail gel, etc.), and product distributors. [[{"fid":"136708","view_mode":"image_no_caption","fields":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""}},"attributes":{"alt":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","class":"media-element file-image-no-caption media-wysiwyg-align-center","data-delta":"1"}}]] Hermann and Elizabeth were able to identify a number of gaps in the ecosystem. Many salon owners were enthusiastic about their industry but not well-trained or experienced in the basic economics of business. Many of the technicians were passionate about their trade, but not highly trained in the latest techniques and technologies and in product selection. There were aspects of marketing that were underdeveloped, such as audience segmentation. And there were inconsistencies between products in both quality and safety. In the mind of the entrepreneur, these gaps are opportunities. The entrepreneurial question is: how best to fit in and contribute to the ecosystem. The business model response is determined by individual entrepreneurial orientation. The beginning orientation was that of an operator. Given their knowledge of both the high potential of the industry and the gaps to be addressed / problems to solve, the Morrises' entry point was as an operator. They embarked upon the journey to design a differentiated salon experience with superior nail technique, better products, better trained technicians. They ran the salon with better business acumen (they both came from high-level corporate positions and were able to bring sophisticated operating and financial experience). They segmented with an unusual and especially comfortable in-salon appeal, and via location. They were successful. There was a lot of learning, which Hermann identifies as overcoming pain points. The next growth step comes from re-orientation to larger scale. How could the Morrises scale their salon business? They thought through multiple openings (e.g., open and operate 20 salons), acquisition (acquire 20 salons), and franchising (sell franchises to multiple independent owners). All of these alternatives would require new capability development: establishing standards and a repeatable business model, including a reliable financial model, designing a multi-unit system of supply chains, capital deployment, décor, training and location scouting, and a new kind of marketing to salon managers or franchisees. The Morrises were reorienting to thinking as proprietors of a new kind of multi-division business. It's a different orientation, seeing the same ecosystem from a different perspective. Meanwhile, Elizabeth had the idea for a podcast to share her expertise and knowledge and passion for the industry. It was free business advice, free guidance, free technical training, teaching different aspects of running a salon and technical aspects for nail technicians. Its purpose was a service to consumers (better salon experiences), to technicians (better craftsmanship) and owners (better business operations). The podcast was called The Nail Hub. It generated a great positive reputation in the ecosystem and a lot of positive feedback. The knowledge that The Nail Hub podcast shared was enthusiastically welcomed. The Nail Hub podcast feedback resulted in a further re-orientation. The Nail Hub podcast was helping salon owners and those technicians who were independent contractors renting positions in salons to improve the way they ran their businesses: better management, better understanding of customer needs and segmentation, better approaches to pricing, revenue and profits, better techniques, and better products. What if a podcast can become a business model? Hermann and Elizabeth developed an entirely new B2B services business model which could be summarized as “educate the industry on how to operate a business, and supply them with the highest quality products to fit their business”. Importantly, the education is free to consume. The Nail Hub YouTube channel is free to access, and offers over 140 videos on every aspect of business operations, finances, equipment, products, and techniques. The videos are expensive to produce. The model is that the investment in education will be repaid through loyal customers buying the products that The Nail Hub offers for purchase. The curation of products itself is a service. The Nail Hub has identified a distinctive set of criteria for product selection (health, safety, non-toxic ingredients, cruelty-free) and does the research and validation so that purchasers can be confident in their choices and tin he integrity of their promises to the end-consumer. The products are not the lowest price, they are the highest quality. Salon owners who have not fully absorbed The Nail Hub's education on consumer segmentation, pricing, and customer experience will not be a good fit within The Nail Hub's customer set. The Nail Hub business model has a high internal consistency and integrity. The Nail Hub has re-oriented to B2B service provider educating an entire industry to provide superior consumer experiences, better product quality and profitable operations — i.e., re-orienting from facing those challenges to helping others to face and overcome them. One of the cornerstones of the B2B services model is authentic subject matter expertise. The Nail Hub can help salon owners and nail technicians thrive through their independent action because Hermann and Elizabeth developed a deep subject matter expertise. They've been salon owners and faced all the developmental issues that owners face. They've trained nail technicians. They've evaluated salon equipment and they've committed their resources and time to researching high quality, innovative products that meet their highest standards. Hermann stresses that the arduous development of subject matter expertise is the necessary foundation for a trusted service business. Another is to choose customers carefully. The Nail Hub is making a substantial investment in their customers via their free training and education. The business model that they enable is specific: the highest standards, with the best trained operators, providing a reliably superior consumer experience. The pricing model is premium, which supports the use of the highest quality products and the provision of the highest quality salon environment. Race-to-the-bottom operators who pursue the lowest prices as a competitive edge are not a good fit in The Nail Hub ecosystem, and Hermann makes this a clear element of The Nail Hub's B2B communications. Choose your customers to match your positioning. The evaluation of the business model does not lie in conventional metrics. When the business model is to invest in the success of customers, the conventional metrics of revenue, margins and annual profits are not the primary measures of success (although, of course, they must be acknowledged). The evaluation of the model comes via the feedback loops. Is the educational service welcomed? Does it result in better operations on the part of salon owners? Do salon owners and independent technicians become customers for life? Do product manufacturers clamor for entry into The Nail Hub's curated product set? Are product trends — safe, non-toxic, healthy, etc. — moving in the desired direction? This is the entrepreneurial ethic: make customers more successful, make the world a better place. Additional Resources "Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model" E4B Graphic (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_194_PDF The Nail Hub YouTube Channel: YouTube.com/TheNailHub The Nail Hub Website: TheNailHub.com

Economics For Business
Hermann Morris: The Nail Hub as the Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method in Practice

Economics For Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022


Breakthrough theory becomes effective practice when it is successful applied by real-life entrepreneurs. The E4B entrepreneurial method is actualized by Hermann and Elizabeth Morris in the very distinctive business model for their brand, The Nail Hub. Knowledge Capsule The true purpose of a B2B business is to help your customers succeed. While outside observers focus on transactions — how much does this business sell, what are its revenues? — entrepreneurial business owners and operators focus on customers and customer relationships. Revenues follow from relationships. This insight is critical, since it guides business model development. Business-to-business models are especially responsive to relationship strategies. When a customer feels that the relationship with a supplier makes their business performance better, they can become a customer for life. That's a recipe for strong and sustainable growth. First, observe the ecosystem in which you operate, and identify gap opportunities. Systems thinking is an important component of the entrepreneurial method. A firm is a component or a node in a network of interconnected services we can call an ecosystem. Hermann's and Elizabeth's ecosystem is the Nail Fashion industry. Nodes include salons and salon owners, the nail technicians (sometimes employees, sometimes independent contractors) who provide service to consumers in the salons, equipment manufacturers and suppliers, product manufacturers and suppliers (for nail gel, etc.), and product distributors. [[{"fid":"136708","view_mode":"image_no_caption","fields":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""}},"attributes":{"alt":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","class":"media-element file-image-no-caption media-wysiwyg-align-center","data-delta":"1"}}]] Hermann and Elizabeth were able to identify a number of gaps in the ecosystem. Many salon owners were enthusiastic about their industry but not well-trained or experienced in the basic economics of business. Many of the technicians were passionate about their trade, but not highly trained in the latest techniques and technologies and in product selection. There were aspects of marketing that were underdeveloped, such as audience segmentation. And there were inconsistencies between products in both quality and safety. In the mind of the entrepreneur, these gaps are opportunities. The entrepreneurial question is: how best to fit in and contribute to the ecosystem. The business model response is determined by individual entrepreneurial orientation. The beginning orientation was that of an operator. Given their knowledge of both the high potential of the industry and the gaps to be addressed / problems to solve, the Morrises' entry point was as an operator. They embarked upon the journey to design a differentiated salon experience with superior nail technique, better products, better trained technicians. They ran the salon with better business acumen (they both came from high-level corporate positions and were able to bring sophisticated operating and financial experience). They segmented with an unusual and especially comfortable in-salon appeal, and via location. They were successful. There was a lot of learning, which Hermann identifies as overcoming pain points. The next growth step comes from re-orientation to larger scale. How could the Morrises scale their salon business? They thought through multiple openings (e.g., open and operate 20 salons), acquisition (acquire 20 salons), and franchising (sell franchises to multiple independent owners). All of these alternatives would require new capability development: establishing standards and a repeatable business model, including a reliable financial model, designing a multi-unit system of supply chains, capital deployment, décor, training and location scouting, and a new kind of marketing to salon managers or franchisees. The Morrises were reorienting to thinking as proprietors of a new kind of multi-division business. It's a different orientation, seeing the same ecosystem from a different perspective. Meanwhile, Elizabeth had the idea for a podcast to share her expertise and knowledge and passion for the industry. It was free business advice, free guidance, free technical training, teaching different aspects of running a salon and technical aspects for nail technicians. Its purpose was a service to consumers (better salon experiences), to technicians (better craftsmanship) and owners (better business operations). The podcast was called The Nail Hub. It generated a great positive reputation in the ecosystem and a lot of positive feedback. The knowledge that The Nail Hub podcast shared was enthusiastically welcomed. The Nail Hub podcast feedback resulted in a further re-orientation. The Nail Hub podcast was helping salon owners and those technicians who were independent contractors renting positions in salons to improve the way they ran their businesses: better management, better understanding of customer needs and segmentation, better approaches to pricing, revenue and profits, better techniques, and better products. What if a podcast can become a business model? Hermann and Elizabeth developed an entirely new B2B services business model which could be summarized as “educate the industry on how to operate a business, and supply them with the highest quality products to fit their business”. Importantly, the education is free to consume. The Nail Hub YouTube channel is free to access, and offers over 140 videos on every aspect of business operations, finances, equipment, products, and techniques. The videos are expensive to produce. The model is that the investment in education will be repaid through loyal customers buying the products that The Nail Hub offers for purchase. The curation of products itself is a service. The Nail Hub has identified a distinctive set of criteria for product selection (health, safety, non-toxic ingredients, cruelty-free) and does the research and validation so that purchasers can be confident in their choices and tin he integrity of their promises to the end-consumer. The products are not the lowest price, they are the highest quality. Salon owners who have not fully absorbed The Nail Hub's education on consumer segmentation, pricing, and customer experience will not be a good fit within The Nail Hub's customer set. The Nail Hub business model has a high internal consistency and integrity. The Nail Hub has re-oriented to B2B service provider educating an entire industry to provide superior consumer experiences, better product quality and profitable operations — i.e., re-orienting from facing those challenges to helping others to face and overcome them. One of the cornerstones of the B2B services model is authentic subject matter expertise. The Nail Hub can help salon owners and nail technicians thrive through their independent action because Hermann and Elizabeth developed a deep subject matter expertise. They've been salon owners and faced all the developmental issues that owners face. They've trained nail technicians. They've evaluated salon equipment and they've committed their resources and time to researching high quality, innovative products that meet their highest standards. Hermann stresses that the arduous development of subject matter expertise is the necessary foundation for a trusted service business. Another is to choose customers carefully. The Nail Hub is making a substantial investment in their customers via their free training and education. The business model that they enable is specific: the highest standards, with the best trained operators, providing a reliably superior consumer experience. The pricing model is premium, which supports the use of the highest quality products and the provision of the highest quality salon environment. Race-to-the-bottom operators who pursue the lowest prices as a competitive edge are not a good fit in The Nail Hub ecosystem, and Hermann makes this a clear element of The Nail Hub's B2B communications. Choose your customers to match your positioning. The evaluation of the business model does not lie in conventional metrics. When the business model is to invest in the success of customers, the conventional metrics of revenue, margins and annual profits are not the primary measures of success (although, of course, they must be acknowledged). The evaluation of the model comes via the feedback loops. Is the educational service welcomed? Does it result in better operations on the part of salon owners? Do salon owners and independent technicians become customers for life? Do product manufacturers clamor for entry into The Nail Hub's curated product set? Are product trends — safe, non-toxic, healthy, etc. — moving in the desired direction? This is the entrepreneurial ethic: make customers more successful, make the world a better place. Additional Resources "Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model" E4B Graphic (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_194_PDF The Nail Hub YouTube Channel: YouTube.com/TheNailHub The Nail Hub Website: TheNailHub.com

Thoughts on the Market
Private Markets: Uncertainty in the Golden Age

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 6:48


Over the last decade private markets have outperformed versus public markets, but given the recent public market volatility, will private markets continue to attract investors? Head of Brokers, Asset Managers, and the Exchanges Team Mike Cyprys and Head of European Asset Managers, Exchanges, and Diversified Financials Research Bruce Hamilton discuss.----- Transcript -----Mike Cyprys: Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Mike Cyprys, Morgan Stanley's Head of Brokers, Asset Managers and Exchanges Team. Bruce Hamilton: And I'm Bruce Hamilton, Head of European Asset Managers, the exchanges and Diversified Financials Research. Mike Cyprys: And on this special episode of the podcast, we'll talk about our outlook on the private markets industry against an uncertain macro backdrop and market upheaval. It's Tuesday, November 1st at noon in New York. Bruce Hamilton: And 4 p.m. in London. Mike Cyprys: We spend most of our time on this podcast talking about public markets, which are stocks and bonds traded on public exchanges like Nasdaq and Euronext. But today, we're going to talk a little bit about the private markets, which are equity and debt of privately owned companies. You probably know it as private equity, venture capital and private credit, but it also encompasses private real estate and infrastructure investments, all of this largely held in funds owned by institutions such as pension funds and endowments and increasingly high net worth investors. Today, there is nearly 10 trillion of assets held across these funds globally. But despite the different structure, private markets have been faced with the same macro challenges facing public markets here in 2022. So Bruce, before we get into some of the specifics, let's maybe set the context for our listeners. How have private markets fared vis a vis public markets over the last decade? Bruce Hamilton: So the industry has grown at around 12% per annum on average over the past decade in terms of asset growth and a faster 17% over the past three years, driven by increasing allocations from institutional investors attracted to the historic outperformance of private markets versus public markets, a smoother ride on valuations given that assets are not mark to market, unlike public markets, and an ability to source a more diversified set of exposures, including the faster growth in earlier stage companies. Mike Cyprys: And what are some of the near-term specific risks facing private markets right now amidst this challenging market backdrop? Bruce Hamilton: The near-term concerns really focus around the implications of a tougher economic environment, impacting corporate earnings growth at the same time that increasing central bank interest rates across the globe are feeding into increased borrowing costs for these companies. This raises questions on how this will impact the profitability and investment returns from these companies and whether investors will continue to view the private markets as an attractive place to allocate capital. The uncertain economic outlook has dramatically reduced the appetite to finance new private market deals. However, there are factors that mitigate the risks forced to refinance in the short term. Secondly, corporate balance sheets are in relatively good health in terms of profits to cover interest payments or interest cover. Moreover, flexibility built into financing structures such as hedging to lock in lower interest rates should reduce the impact of rising rates. Importantly, the private market industry also has significant dry powder, or available capital, to invest in new opportunities or protect existing investments. For players active in the private markets. We think that there are undoubtedly risks in the near term, linked to congested fundraising with many private market firms seeking to raise capital from clients against a decline in public markets, which has left clients with less money in their pockets. From the performance of existing portfolio companies, given the more difficult market and economic environment and from subdued company disposal and investment activity linked to the more difficult financing markets. This has kept us pretty cautious on the sector this year. Bruce Hamilton: But Mike, despite these near-term risks and concerns, you remain convicted in your bullish outlook on the next five years. In a recent work, you've outlined five key themes that you see lifting private markets to your 17 trillion assets under management forecast. What are these themes and how do you see them playing out over time? Mike Cyprys: Look, clearly, I would echo your concerns in the short term. And I do think growth moderates after an exceptional period here. But we do see a number of growth drivers that we feel are more enduring. Specifically, five key engines of growth, if you will. First is democratization of private markets that we think can spur retail growth and unlock a $17 trillion addressable market or TAM. This is the single largest growth contributor to our outlook. Product development, investor education and technological innovation are all helping unlock access here as retail investors look to the private markets for income and capital appreciation in addition to a smooth ride with lower volatility versus the public markets. The second growth zone is private credit that we think is poised to penetrate a $23 trillion TAM as traditional bank lenders retrench, providing an opportunity for private lenders to step in. For corporate issuers, private credit offers greater flexibility on structure and terms, and provides greater certainty of execution. For investors, it can provide higher yields and diversification from public credit. The third growth zone is infrastructure investing, which we think can help solve for decades-long underinvestment and addresses a $15 trillion funding gap over the next 20 years. This is underpinned by structural tailwinds for the 3 Ds of digitization, decarbonization and deglobalization. The fourth growth zone is around liquidity solutions. As you know, the private markets are illiquid. And so as the asset class grows, we do expect some investors will want to find ways to access some degree of liquidity over time. And that's where solutions such as secondaries and NAV based lending can be helpful. The fifth and final growth zone is around impact in ESG investing. In public markets, we've seen significant asset flows into ESG and impact investing strategies as investors look to have a positive impact on society. And we expect that this will also play a role in the private markets, though it's a bit earlier days. Today we estimate about 200 billion invested in private market impact strategies, and we think that can reach about 850 billion in five years time. Mike Cyprys: So for investors, this does boil down to an impact on publicly traded companies. Given the specific challenges of the current environment, Bruce, which business models do you think are best positioned to succeed both near-term and longer term? And what should investors be looking at? Bruce Hamilton: Well, Mike, whilst we think the challenging macro conditions could continue to weigh on the sector near-term, we think that investors may want to look at companies with the best exposure to the five growth themes that you mentioned, who are building out global multi-asset investment franchises with diverse earnings streams, a high proportion of durable management fee related earnings—rather than heavy reliance or more volatile carry or performance fees—and deployment skewed to inflation protected sectors like infrastructure or real estate. Mike Cyprys: Bruce, thanks for taking the time to talk. Bruce Hamilton: Great speaking with you, Mike. Mike Cyprys: And thanks for listening. If you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts and share the podcast with a friend or colleague today.

Real Estate Good Life
#289 If you are to follow a "Guru", make sure they have a COMPLETE Life philosophy to follow - AND, most importantly - they actually live by that philosophy

Real Estate Good Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 5:53


#289 If you are to follow a "Guru", make sure they have a COMPLETE Life philosophy to follow - AND, most importantly - they actually live by that philosophy Visit www.realestategoodlife.com and be sure to email me directly: bart@bartsellshouses.com PLEASE be sure to leave me a rating and a review for this podcast on whichever podcast app you listen on.

Interviews
Hermann Morris: The Nail Hub as the Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method in Practice

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022


Breakthrough theory becomes effective practice when it is successful applied by real-life entrepreneurs. The E4B entrepreneurial method is actualized by Hermann and Elizabeth Morris in the very distinctive business model for their brand, The Nail Hub. Knowledge Capsule The true purpose of a B2B business is to help your customers succeed. While outside observers focus on transactions — how much does this business sell, what are its revenues? — entrepreneurial business owners and operators focus on customers and customer relationships. Revenues follow from relationships. This insight is critical, since it guides business model development. Business-to-business models are especially responsive to relationship strategies. When a customer feels that the relationship with a supplier makes their business performance better, they can become a customer for life. That's a recipe for strong and sustainable growth. First, observe the ecosystem in which you operate, and identify gap opportunities. Systems thinking is an important component of the entrepreneurial method. A firm is a component or a node in a network of interconnected services we can call an ecosystem. Hermann's and Elizabeth's ecosystem is the Nail Fashion industry. Nodes include salons and salon owners, the nail technicians (sometimes employees, sometimes independent contractors) who provide service to consumers in the salons, equipment manufacturers and suppliers, product manufacturers and suppliers (for nail gel, etc.), and product distributors. [[{"fid":"136708","view_mode":"image_no_caption","fields":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""}},"attributes":{"alt":"E4B Graphic: Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model","class":"media-element file-image-no-caption media-wysiwyg-align-center","data-delta":"1"}}]] Hermann and Elizabeth were able to identify a number of gaps in the ecosystem. Many salon owners were enthusiastic about their industry but not well-trained or experienced in the basic economics of business. Many of the technicians were passionate about their trade, but not highly trained in the latest techniques and technologies and in product selection. There were aspects of marketing that were underdeveloped, such as audience segmentation. And there were inconsistencies between products in both quality and safety. In the mind of the entrepreneur, these gaps are opportunities. The entrepreneurial question is: how best to fit in and contribute to the ecosystem. The business model response is determined by individual entrepreneurial orientation. The beginning orientation was that of an operator. Given their knowledge of both the high potential of the industry and the gaps to be addressed / problems to solve, the Morrises' entry point was as an operator. They embarked upon the journey to design a differentiated salon experience with superior nail technique, better products, better trained technicians. They ran the salon with better business acumen (they both came from high-level corporate positions and were able to bring sophisticated operating and financial experience). They segmented with an unusual and especially comfortable in-salon appeal, and via location. They were successful. There was a lot of learning, which Hermann identifies as overcoming pain points. The next growth step comes from re-orientation to larger scale. How could the Morrises scale their salon business? They thought through multiple openings (e.g., open and operate 20 salons), acquisition (acquire 20 salons), and franchising (sell franchises to multiple independent owners). All of these alternatives would require new capability development: establishing standards and a repeatable business model, including a reliable financial model, designing a multi-unit system of supply chains, capital deployment, décor, training and location scouting, and a new kind of marketing to salon managers or franchisees. The Morrises were reorienting to thinking as proprietors of a new kind of multi-division business. It's a different orientation, seeing the same ecosystem from a different perspective. Meanwhile, Elizabeth had the idea for a podcast to share her expertise and knowledge and passion for the industry. It was free business advice, free guidance, free technical training, teaching different aspects of running a salon and technical aspects for nail technicians. Its purpose was a service to consumers (better salon experiences), to technicians (better craftsmanship) and owners (better business operations). The podcast was called The Nail Hub. It generated a great positive reputation in the ecosystem and a lot of positive feedback. The knowledge that The Nail Hub podcast shared was enthusiastically welcomed. The Nail Hub podcast feedback resulted in a further re-orientation. The Nail Hub podcast was helping salon owners and those technicians who were independent contractors renting positions in salons to improve the way they ran their businesses: better management, better understanding of customer needs and segmentation, better approaches to pricing, revenue and profits, better techniques, and better products. What if a podcast can become a business model? Hermann and Elizabeth developed an entirely new B2B services business model which could be summarized as “educate the industry on how to operate a business, and supply them with the highest quality products to fit their business”. Importantly, the education is free to consume. The Nail Hub YouTube channel is free to access, and offers over 140 videos on every aspect of business operations, finances, equipment, products, and techniques. The videos are expensive to produce. The model is that the investment in education will be repaid through loyal customers buying the products that The Nail Hub offers for purchase. The curation of products itself is a service. The Nail Hub has identified a distinctive set of criteria for product selection (health, safety, non-toxic ingredients, cruelty-free) and does the research and validation so that purchasers can be confident in their choices and tin he integrity of their promises to the end-consumer. The products are not the lowest price, they are the highest quality. Salon owners who have not fully absorbed The Nail Hub's education on consumer segmentation, pricing, and customer experience will not be a good fit within The Nail Hub's customer set. The Nail Hub business model has a high internal consistency and integrity. The Nail Hub has re-oriented to B2B service provider educating an entire industry to provide superior consumer experiences, better product quality and profitable operations — i.e., re-orienting from facing those challenges to helping others to face and overcome them. One of the cornerstones of the B2B services model is authentic subject matter expertise. The Nail Hub can help salon owners and nail technicians thrive through their independent action because Hermann and Elizabeth developed a deep subject matter expertise. They've been salon owners and faced all the developmental issues that owners face. They've trained nail technicians. They've evaluated salon equipment and they've committed their resources and time to researching high quality, innovative products that meet their highest standards. Hermann stresses that the arduous development of subject matter expertise is the necessary foundation for a trusted service business. Another is to choose customers carefully. The Nail Hub is making a substantial investment in their customers via their free training and education. The business model that they enable is specific: the highest standards, with the best trained operators, providing a reliably superior consumer experience. The pricing model is premium, which supports the use of the highest quality products and the provision of the highest quality salon environment. Race-to-the-bottom operators who pursue the lowest prices as a competitive edge are not a good fit in The Nail Hub ecosystem, and Hermann makes this a clear element of The Nail Hub's B2B communications. Choose your customers to match your positioning. The evaluation of the business model does not lie in conventional metrics. When the business model is to invest in the success of customers, the conventional metrics of revenue, margins and annual profits are not the primary measures of success (although, of course, they must be acknowledged). The evaluation of the model comes via the feedback loops. Is the educational service welcomed? Does it result in better operations on the part of salon owners? Do salon owners and independent technicians become customers for life? Do product manufacturers clamor for entry into The Nail Hub's curated product set? Are product trends — safe, non-toxic, healthy, etc. — moving in the desired direction? This is the entrepreneurial ethic: make customers more successful, make the world a better place. Additional Resources "Evolving The Nail Hub Business Model" E4B Graphic (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_194_PDF The Nail Hub YouTube Channel: YouTube.com/TheNailHub The Nail Hub Website: TheNailHub.com

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder
Don't Miss This! S11e27 2cor8:1

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 7:55 Transcription Available


Don't miss this truth. It is critically important.  It will benefit you and others. But wait! It is about MONEY and giving and generosity.  The Corinthians get compared with another church's example of GIVING.  They get some crazy math of: severe affliction + abundant joy + extreme poverty = overflowing generosity on their part.  Importantly, they didn't start their giving with their checkbooks.  First, they gave themselves to the LORD, then to LEADERS, then to the WORK.It was a challenge then and it is a challenge now.  Why take the challenge and even consider this? Because it is the best way to live.  That is why I don't want you to miss this 7 minutes today and another day if you subscribe at bewithme.us or google podcasts.

Food Sleuth Radio
Aaron Johnson, Program Manager for Challenging Corporate Power at Rural Advancement Foundational International – USA (RAFI-USA.)

Food Sleuth Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 28:09


Did you know that most poultry sold in supermarkets is produced by an unjust “tournament system” that pits farmer against farmer? Join Food Sleuth Radio host and Registered Dietitian, Melinda Hemmelgarn, for her interview with Aaron Johnson, Program Manager for Challenging Corporate Power at Rural Advancement Foundational International – USA (RAFI-USA), a non-profit organization based in North Carolina that challenges the root causes of unjust food systems, and supports and advocates for economically, racially, and ecologically just farm communities. Johnson describes vertical integration within the poultry industry, how “tournament systems” exploit poultry farmers, and how banks and taxpayers support this unjust system. Importantly, Johnson helps us rethink cultural narratives on regulation. The film, “Under Contract,” takes us behind the scenes to understand the lives of contract poultry farmers: https://rafiusa.org/undercontractfilm/Related website:   https://www.rafiusa.org/programs/challenging-corporate-power/ 

Oncotarget
Press Release: Oncotarget Is Again On MEDLINE

Oncotarget

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 2:54


BUFFALO, NY- October 27, 2022 – On September 15, 2022, Oncotarget was accepted again for indexing by MEDLINE. Oncotarget is now indexed by MEDLINE/PubMed and PubMed Central/PubMed. *** The United States government is firmly committed to making credible biomedical research available to the public. In operation since 1996, PubMed is an online biomedical literature database operated by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). PubMed provides free access to over 34 million citations from MEDLINE, PubMed Central (PMC) and the National Center for Biotechnology Information databases. Started back in the 1960s, MEDLINE is a large bibliographic citation and abstract database for life science articles in journals and other scientific publications. MEDLINE now contains more than 29 million references to articles in over 5,200 journals. In 2000, PMC was launched as a free, full-text archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature. Both MEDLINE and PMC are operated by the NIH's National Library of Medicine. Importantly, PubMed and MEDLINE use the same controlled vocabulary thesaurus, called Medical Subject Headings, or MeSH, to ensure that content is easily searchable and properly indexed. The vast scope of scholarly publications in MEDLINE is why Oncotarget is proud to have its papers indexed by this database. Oncotarget, launched in 2010, is a peer-reviewed, open-access and primarily oncology-focused biomedical journal. This journal has international reach—publishing research from world-renowned institutions. The cornerstones of Oncotarget's publishing practices are insightful peer review, scientific integrity, rigorous ethical standards, up-to-date tools and resources, and a commitment to local and scientific communities. Oncotarget aims to maximize research impact, eliminate borders between specialties and foster the application of basic and clinical science. To learn more about Oncotarget, visit Oncotarget.com and connect with us on social media: Twitter – https://twitter.com/Oncotarget Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Oncotarget YouTube – www.youtube.com/c/OncotargetYouTube Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/oncotargetjrnl/ LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/company/oncotarget/ Pinterest – https://www.pinterest.com/oncotarget/ LabTube – https://www.labtube.tv/channel/MTY5OA SoundCloud – https://soundcloud.com/oncotarget For media inquiries, please contact media@impactjournals.com

Brian, Ali & Justin Podcast
Brian is not gay, but more importantly, Brian is not Irish [10-26-22, 6:00AM]

Brian, Ali & Justin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 22:48


Don't ever make that mistake again.  Chicago's best morning radio show now has a podcast! Don't forget to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts and remember that the conversation always lives on the Q101 Facebook page.  Brian, Ali, & Justin are live every morning from 6a-10a on Q101. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CFA Society Chicago
Investment Exchange Forum – sorting through US election issues with Donald Schneider

CFA Society Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 42:40


CFA Society Chicago member Rich Excell, CFA and Donald Schneider, the Deputy Head of US Policy at Piper Sandler, look at the upcoming US elections. What are the key issues that voters care about? What are the polls indicating? Importantly, what do we as investors need to know about what can change after the elections?   Connect with Rich on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/richexcellcfa/ and find his blog posts here - https://www.cmegroup.com/newsletters/excell-with-options-report-from-rich-excell.html & Stay Vigilant | Richard Excell | Substack Connect with Donald on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/donald-schneider-56a0585b/ Piper Sander - https://www.pipersandler.com/

You Just Have To Laugh
305. "I knew Muhammad Ali, but more importantly, he knew who I was." John Pinney brings us inside the world of being a professional boxer.

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 48:00


John Pinney is back with another great You Just Have To Laugh Podcast. This time, John brings us into the world of being a professional boxer. He explains how he got involved in boxing at at a young age all the way through being a professional. Funny and very informative.

Tony P. Oddcast
It Bees Like That

Tony P. Oddcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 15:19


Handling protestors is all in a day's work for police officers across the world. From facing abuses to defending themselves against projectiles such as stones, there is not much they are not ready for. However, deputies from the Sheriff's Department in Hampden County, Massachusetts, recently faced something that they would have never imagined even in their wildest dreams: a protestor attacking them with thousands of bees. The bizarre incident occurred on 12 October 2022 in Longmeadow, Hamden County, when members of the Sheriff's Civil Process Division were executing an eviction order at a home. Rorie Susan Woods, 55, a resident of Hadley, Hamden County (over 20 miles from Hamden County), drove to the location with several bee hive towers and set the insects upon the deputies, injuring several of them. She was arrested, arraigned, and released without bail. Stating that he had never "seen something like this", Robert Hoffman, Chief Deputy of the Civil Process Office, said in a statement: "I'm just thankful no one died because bee allergies are serious. I hope that these out-of-county protesters will reconsider using such extreme measures in the future because they will be charged and prosecuted." Woods faces multiple charges of assault and battery. According to the statement, deputies from the Sheriff's Civil Process Division were enforcing a court-ordered eviction at a house—that has been under the process of eviction for nearly two years—in the Memery Lane area of Longmeadow on the morning of 12 October. Several protestors were also present on site to oppose the eviction. Importantly, Woods was not a resident of the house and lived in Hadley, around 25 miles away from Longmeadow. At around 9:15 am, when the officers were at the mentioned residence, Woods arrived in her SUV with a trailer carrying multiple bee hive towers in tow. She got out of the vehicle and began "shaking" a hive and tried to release the thousands of bees stored in it. A deputy immediately boarded the trailer and attempted to stop Woods. However, she managed to smash the lid of the tower, causing bees to escape and sting the deputy several times on his head and face. Following this, Woods tossed the entire hive tower on the ground, which agitated the bees it held, and caused them to swarm the area. Several deputies were stung as a result. The 55-year-old, however, was not done. She wore a beekeeper's suit and moved on to another tower with the intention of releasing more bees. Luckily, she was stopped by the deputies and apprehended. After being arrested, the Woods called out to another protester and asked them to take care of her pet dog who had accompanied her and was in the SUV. As she was being walked to the department's cruiser, a deputy informed Woods that he and some of his colleagues were allergic to bees. She responded: "Oh, you're allergic? Good." Nick Cocchi, Sheriff of Hamden County, commented that the department is always prepared to handle protests at evictions. However, he noted that most protesters know that his office is carrying out its statutory duty in accordance with the law. "But this woman, who traveled here, put lives in danger as several of the staff on the scene are allergic to bees. We had one staff member go to the hospital and luckily, he was alright or she would be facing manslaughter charges," he added. Following her arrest, Woods was arraigned and released without bail. She faces seven felonies and one misdemeanor charge and is set to appear in court at a later date.

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
Preparing for the End Game: An Oncologist Shares His Reflections After a Close Friend's Death

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 22:19


Listen to ASCO's Journal of Clinical Oncology essay, “Preparing for the End Game,” by Dr. William Beck, a University Distinguished Professor Emeritus and Professor of Pharmacology and Molecular Genetics at The University of Illinois at Chicago. The essay is followed by an interview with Beck and host Dr. Lidia Schapira. Beck reflects on his own mortality and what it means to live, following his good friend's illness and death from lung cancer.   TRANSCRIPT  Narrator: Preparing for the End Game, by William T. Beck, PhD (10.1200/JCO.22.01758) Recently, Jordan, a dear friend who had stage 4 lung cancer, died of his disease, a year and a half from his diagnosis. His tumor had activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor, making him a candidate for treatment with osimertinib, a targeted therapy, one of the recent rewards of the remarkable advances in precision medicine. Jordan was my age, late 70s when he died. He was a lifetime nonsmoker, had several outstanding lung cancer oncologists, and was determined to fight his disease. That said, 3-year and 5-year survival rates for people with his disease are not high, but living beyond those years is statistically and biologically possible. That was not so in Jordan's case. Jordan's illness was distressing to me because he was my good friend. We went back decades and began our academic careers together, and we bonded through our shared academic experiences and our love of good wines, food, books, humor, and politics. Over the course of his illness, I tried to think of how I could be there for Jordan and his wife, also a good friend, as he went forward on this very difficult journey. Jordan was very fortunate to have state-of-the-art medical care, a loving wife and adult children, and many close and caring friends who wanted to walk with him on this journey to the extent that he wanted us with him. Because I was in the cancer field, I was able to help him and his wife better frame the questions to ask his oncologists, understand the tests ordered and drugs he was taking, identify other oncologists for second opinions, and search the literature to help them find the best treatments to hold the tumor at bay.   Jordan's illness, however, was distressing to me for another reason. It made me think about my own mortality and how, if it were me, would I want to spend my last months and years, knowing that the end is now a reality. Jordan was a retired academic, scientist, and long-term and consequential university administrator. Like my friend, I have been retired for a few years, having run a productive academic cancer research laboratory and having held a number of administrative positions as well. My distress was compounded by external events over these past few years. We have seen the deaths of so many people from COVID-19 in this country and the world, all so painful and many unnecessary. We have also seen the continued violent deaths due to guns and drugs. These, however, were largely deaths in the abstract; they did not have a face for me. That began to change with the extraordinary culmination of the epidemic of Black deaths at the hands of the police, especially the murder of George Floyd. These deaths brought home to me the face and randomness of death and fragility of life, writ large. The past year brought more faces of death to me: many prominent artists and baseball players, whose careers I had followed; internationally impactful cancer scientists and physicians, many of whom I knew personally; and the untimely death of the famous architect, Helmut Jahn, at age 81 years, in a bicycle accident. All these passings have given me pause in a way that I had not expected and starkly reminded me that there is absolutely no guarantee of a tomorrow. Indeed, I will no longer live by the brilliant conceit offered by William Saroyan: “Everybody has got to die, but I have always believed an exception would be made in my case. Now what?”1 Now what, indeed. One frequently hears about people who have survived near-death experiences or those who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness, having an epiphany and wanting to live each day to the fullest extent possible. One also hears about realists who exhort us to live every day as if it were our last. Certainly sound advice. But do we normals really adhere to these dictums? Many people probably do, but my experience, both personal and from talking with friends, is that most of us still go about our lives doing the quotidian things that we have always done. There is always tomorrow, but Jordan's illness has caused me to rethink that. Indeed, it has become increasingly clear to me, finally, that I should not put off doing things for another tomorrow, a tomorrow that is not guaranteed. Despite knowing—in the abstract—that much more of my life is behind me than in front, my good health and full days have led me to think that this can go on for some time, with the inevitability of death still relatively far in the future. Jordan's situation, however, has changed that perception and has got me thinking about how I would like to spend my remaining days, hopefully many, and thinking about how to really prepare for this end game, taking these final laps. Paul Kalanithi, a young surgeon, wrote so tenderly in When Breath Becomes Air2 about his struggles while suffering the ravages of lung cancer and his hopes for his wife and young children. Even at my advanced age, I too have similar hopes for my wife, children, and grandchildren. And Christopher Hitchens chronicled, in Mortality,3 his last year with esophageal cancer as fiercely as he had always done in his critical atheist's view of the world. But it was not until Jordan's sickness and death that I have taken Hitchens's clear view of life's limitations to heart. In his book, Being Mortal,4 Atul Gawande, the physician-writer, has chronicled both the advances and limitations that modern medicine has brought us as we face the end, including the complications that limit our autonomy in this passage. Gawande notes that as we age and become infirm, either as a normal process or because of disease, we become more dependent on medical and social networks that may, unfortunately, effect on our independence. Gawande suggests that a good death may be difficult to achieve but a good life less so. I saw this good life in Jordan's terminal illness. Indeed, another physician-writer, Oliver Sacks, emphasized in a short collection of four essays entitled Gratitude,5 the utility of a good and fulfilling life in helping us cope as we approach the end. Near the end of his life, as his body was being consumed by cancer, Sacks continued to do what he always did, for as long as he could: His days were always full, and he wrote beautifully of his clinical and social observations. Importantly, Sacks expressed enormous gratitude for his life as a sentient and thinking person, who loved and was loved, and whose life was consequential. What more can one want? My friend Jordan was such an individual: sentient, smart, and funny; a man who lived a consequential and impactful life, who loved and was loved. His illness, however, was not one of going softly into the good night, as was depicted in the movie Love Story.6 Toward the end, my friend suffered with pain, balance problems, fractures from falls, shortness of breath, insomnia, and the like. But through it all, he presented, at least to me, an admirable grace and equanimity that gave us all hope that despite his suffering, there would be one more day, one more week, one more month. My wife and I went out to northern California last winter to visit Jordan and his wife, and although unsaid, to say good-bye. But now, more than a half year later, he died, just days short of their 50th wedding anniversary. We have stayed in close contact with Jordan's wife since his death. The funeral was private, but my wife and I attended a subsequent memorial service for Jordan at which family, friends, and colleagues remembered him and his consequential life and bid him a proper farewell. So, here we are. My good friend is gone, and his struggles have been hard to watch, even from a distance, but he has helped me see more clearly that this all does come to an end at some point. So how do I want to pursue this end game? Certainly, I want to stay engaged in my science-related activities. But I also want to use what time I have left while I am healthy to spend as much time as I can with my wife and family, to be with good friends as much as they will tolerate me, to continue to read, to go to theater and concerts, to travel, finding humor in life, and enjoying good wines and food—all the typical things that people do and say they want to do as they approach the end game. Indeed, I want to do as many of these things as possible, but with a renewed sense of wonderment and gratitude, gratitude in the way Oliver Sacks expressed it. My friend, Jordan, the academic, still has some lessons to offer, so I will try to follow his example to live as good a life as possible, and if I become infirm, I will try to remember how he approached the end: with grace, courage, and equanimity and reflect on all the good things I have had in this life, with a great sense of gratitude. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Hello, and welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by ASCO podcasts, which covers a range of educational and scientific content, and offers enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all ASCO shows, including this one at: podcasts.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Schapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford University. Today, we are joined by Dr. William Beck, a university distinguished Professor Emeritus, and Professor of Pharmacology and Molecular Genetics at the University of Illinois, at Chicago. In this episode, we will be discussing his Art of Oncology article, 'Preparing for the End Game.' At the time of this recording, our guest has no disclosures. Bill, welcome to our podcast. Thank you for joining us. Dr. William Beck: Thank you, Lidia. I appreciate the opportunity. I think this is a unique and valuable feature of JCO, and I hope I can do it justice. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's terrific to have you. Tell our listeners a little bit about the motivation for writing about Jordan, and the effect that his illness and passing had on you. Dr. William Beck: Yes. Well, his illness and death made me think of my own mortality, and how if it were me, would I want to spend whatever remaining days I have, hopefully, many. But hopefully, in a way that would allow me to honor his life, and also do justice to my own situation. So, that was the nexus of the issue. I spoke to a writer friend, Eric Lax, he's written a number of books; one is, The Mold in Dr. Florey's Coat. If you haven't read it, I highly recommend it. It's about commercialization issues during World War II, and he's written some other books as well, a book with the hematologist Robert Peter Gale on radiation. And I asked him what he thought about this, and he was very positive. As you, I'm not accustomed to opening myself up in the scientific literature. I write scientific papers, and they're not emotional. One might get emotional about the reviewer's comments, but that's another story. And so, this was a difficult thing for me to write, but I felt if done correctly, it might be useful not only to help me articulate my own feelings, but it might be useful for others, especially oncologists with whom I've been around in my entire professional life, and who deal with these matters daily, as you do. But most likely, and of necessity, keep their thoughts and their own mortality locked away. And I sort of thought that this might be a way to help others think about ‘Preparing for the End Game'. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You bring up some interesting points because in order to write a piece that will resonate with others, you have to allow yourself to be vulnerable, and that is not something that we are taught to do in our academic and professional lives. Was that hard for you? Dr. William Beck: Very, yes. Dr. Lidia Schapira: And how did you work through that period of deciding to make yourself vulnerable and then share that with colleagues whom you may never know or meet? Dr. William Beck: Thank you for that question. I wanted to write somewhat of an homage for my friend, Jordan, and that made it a little easier to open myself up. And I might add, I shared this, after it was accepted, with Jordan's family - his wife, who is a friend, and his two adult children. And they all very, very much appreciated what I had done. So, I felt I was on the right path with that. So, it was in part for an homage to Jordan, and I had walked with him and his wife during his illness, and then with his death, and I wanted to mark the event in a way that I felt more than just giving money to a memorial fund. I felt I wanted to make it very personal, he was a good. I don't know if that answers your question, but that's why I started it. Dr. Lidia Schapira: In thinking about your essay and the way you chose to honor your friend and his memory, what do you think is the message for some of our young readers? Dr. William Beck: That's a good question. I put myself in the 40-year-old Bill Beck mindset, and back in those days, as I said in my essay, you know, everyone has to die, but in my case, I thought an exception would be made. Jordan's death, and those of others around my age have led me to understand that an exception will not be made, and I want to make the best of it, and if our young readers who know that this is an abstract that's very far away, but it becomes more and more of a reality as you approach the end, and I'm guessing that our younger readers who are oncologists can wall that off with difficulty, but can wall it off to a certain extent. But it's there. It's inescapable, and so, maybe preparing early, if it even makes you think about enjoying a little bit more time with your kids, enjoying a vacation for another day, or even putting a little bit more money away for your IRA for your retirement, that could be very useful for them. Dr. Lidia Schapira: On the flip side of that, Bill, you write in your essay that you have continued to remain involved in your science, and I imagine that's because you love your science. So, tell us a little bit more about how you're thinking now, as you are mature-- I won't use the word senior, or old, about continuing to remain involved in a career that is not just work, but something that you love. Dr. William Beck: I could not imagine retiring. What I enjoy about my retirement is that I basically do everything that I did before, except the administrative part - the running a department for so long. And I do it on my schedule, not somebody else's schedule, and that is liberating. I just came back from a two-hour lecture that I gave yesterday; I mentor young people, I review grant applications and manuscripts, I read the literature. So, I stay involved. I can't imagine not being involved. And as Oliver Sacks, whom I've cited in the essay, he went at it all the ways best he could all the way to the end, and I hope that I will have that opportunity to do so as well. Dr. Lidia Schapira: What advice would you have for some of our listeners who are themselves accompanying a friend who is ill, or perhaps a relative who is facing a chronic or terminal illness? Dr. William Beck: I'm loath to give advice, but I would suggest that they might want to be there as much as their friend wants them to be there for them. To be there, and for them to know that they're there. I was in a unique position because I knew a little bit about the cancer field, and I could help Jordan and his wife navigate the shoals of interacting with physicians, and understanding their drugs, and getting second opinions, actually, for them. So, I was in a fairly unique position, but I think that the key thing is to be there to the extent that the individual wants you to be there with them is important. That's what I've learned from my deep emotional involvement with Jordan, but with others as well. Dr. Lidia Schapira: As you know from reading the essays we've published in Art of Oncology, Grief is a common theme, and I ask many of our authors to recommend, perhaps, some books they've read, or works of art that have helped them in processing their own grief. So, let me ask you if you can recommend any books, or poems to our listeners. Dr. William Beck: I'm not much into poetry, but I did happen to see an amazing interpretation of Psalm 23 on the Jewish Broadcasting Network recently that was eye-opening to me as a non-religious person. That was very interesting. In terms of books, I think a good start is the beautiful essays of Gratitude by Oliver Sacks. I've started to peel into, and peer into a book on Morality, by Jonathan Sacks-- no relation, I don't think. He was the Chief Rabbi of the UK. And in terms of art, I can think of music - the ‘Pastoral', by Beethoven, and the ‘9th', by Beethoven, are the ones that just are so uplifting to me, that I think would be very important to calm one's soul. Also, if I might add, The Stones are pretty good too, for that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, let me conclude our interview by asking you a little bit more about the role of storytelling, and essays, and narrative, in helping us come together as a community of professionals who are actually dedicated to looking after patients who are seriously ill. How have you used stories in your approach to Medicine and Academia, and what do you see as the role of these narratives in the future education of oncologists and hematologists? Dr. William Beck: So, I think young people, especially, need to hear stories of how these things begin. They need to hear origin stories, and middle stories, and end stories. Joseph Campbell, is one who's delved into where we came from, and about storytelling, as being very important in development of societies and traditions. So, I've tried in my work, even though it's scientific work, and maybe some of my reviewer critics would say, "Well, it's all stories and fables," but I've tried to develop several lines of science storytelling for our colleagues. And I think in general, whether it's in science or this kind of essay, yes, it's very important that the young people get outside of the, "What do I need to know for the exam?" mentality, to look at the bigger picture; and I'm afraid that's getting lost in modern education. The guy who introduces me, when I give the general lecture to all the students who are first time, first day in the room, never to be in the room again, always says, "And Dr. Beck won't answer any questions about what's on the exam." Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I thank you for sharing some of your humanity with the readers of JCO, through the essay. I know, as you told us, during the review, that you're not used to writing these kinds of essays, and you're much more comfortable with scientific work. But I think we need to show the human side of our scientists. I think that Jordan's family is right in thanking you for the tribute you paid to him through this essay, and I'm very glad that you did write it, and decided to share it with us. Dr. William Beck: Thank you. Well, I'm really glad that you have this venue, and I'm honored to have my essay published in it. I thank you, and your colleagues. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Thank you, Bill. Until next time, thank you for listening to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology. Don't forget to give us a rating or review, wherever you listen. Be sure to subscribe, so you never miss an episode. JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology is just one of ASCO's many podcasts. You can find all of the shows at: podcasts.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy, should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Show Notes: Like, share and subscribe so you never miss an episode and leave a rating or review.   Bio: Dr. William Beck is a university distinguished Professor Emeritus, and Professor of Pharmacology and Molecular Genetics at the University of Illinois, at Chicago.  

Writing on the Wall
Jacob Daukei - Most Importantly be there for one another

Writing on the Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 84:51


In this episode Blue and Cris sit down with Tribal Council Candidate Jacob Daukei who is a young Medicine Man with a mission to bring the community back together.

NIGHT DEMON HEAVY METAL PODCAST
Episode #117 - Heavy Hamburg Halloween III - Preview

NIGHT DEMON HEAVY METAL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 68:20


On October 29, 2022, at the legendary Markthalle in Hamburg, Germany, the third installment of the single-day Heavy Hamburg Halloween festival will take place. This week's episode is a preview of that earthshattering event. You'll hear all the whys and wherefores of how the festival came to be, its history in prior years, and the configuration for 2022. Importantly, Jarvis guides you band-by-band through each act on this eclectic bill, including commentary about how and why they were chosen plus a handpicked track from Jarvis to showcase their talents. Tickets are still available, so don't miss your chance to be part of heavy metal history with Night Demon and a host of their friends and compatriots in the north of Germany at the end of this month. Become a subscriber today at nightdemon.net/subscriber. This week, subscribers have access to the bonus content below:Playlist of the songs from this episode Markthalle - https://markthalle-hamburg.de/Night Demon "Black Widow" video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkgZ4mKA_jkDragon Productions - https://dragon-productions.eu/Branca Studio - https://www.brancastudio.com/Psychopunch - https://www.facebook.com/Psychopunch/Wytch Hazel - https://wytchhazel.bandcamp.com/musicPortrait - https://portraitsweden.bandcamp.com/album/at-one-with-noneSatan - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAN8v-sw0TcThe Other - https://www.facebook.com/theotherhorrorpunk/Primordial - https://www.primordialofficial.com/ Listen at nightdemon.net/podcast or anywhere you listen to podcasts! Follow us on Instagram Like us on Facebook

Discover Lafayette
Senator Fred Mills on Louisiana’s Child Welfare Crisis and Department of Children and Family Services

Discover Lafayette

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 39:20


State Senator Fred Mills, chair of the Senate Health and Welfare Committee, joins Discover Lafayette to talk about recent news concerning the effectiveness of the Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services ("DCFS"), in particular Child Protective Services, after recent news of the deaths of two toddlers, each two years of age. One died following his third fentanyl overdose and the other was found in a trash can after dying from blunt force trauma. These tragic deaths caused the operations of DCFS to come under intense scrutiny as legislators pushed for answers. The Senate Health and Welfare Committee is calling a series of oversight meetings every six weeks to discuss and monitor the agency's handling of child welfare cases. Senator Mills says the purpose of the oversight is to have DCFS come up with a game plan for improvement, provide a timeline to achieve their goals, and also inform on the return on investment in changes made. Chronic underfunding has left the agency short-staffed for years with the budget being slashed under the administration of Gov. Bobby Jindal. Senator Mills also says that current and former employees report that the agency's environment is 'toxic" and staffers are working 17 to 18 hours per day. There is a 25% attrition rate at DCFS yet only about 7.8% report leaving over pay issues; people leave because of work conditions. Employees report that supervisors at high levels don't understand what caseworkers in the field experience. Mills did note that there has been conflicting testimony from supervisors who say they are working to put all hands on deck to address the shortage of staff. DCFS receives about 100,000 calls per year from physicians, teachers and laypeople reporting potential cases of abuse with about 20,000 of those calls turning into cases to be handled. With high-risk Level 1 reports of abuse, DCFS has a statutory mandate to react within 24 hours and staff members report that there is not enough manpower to handle the volume as well as these mandated timelines. With 400 authorized jobs not being filled currently, each case worker is pushed to the maximum. In 2008, DCFS had 5,242 employees; in 2021 it had 3,561 full-time workers. Senator Mills reports that the majority of the calls requesting help for children are from the East Baton Rouge and New Orleans area. August and September of each year see a huge spike in calls to DCFS as children are returning back to school and teachers and physicians interact with the young ones. Senator Mills gets many calls from grandparents asking for help as they witness their grandchildren struggling in abusive environments; their own children (the parent) may be on drugs, the family is dysfunctional, and the children are in danger. They ask, "What can we do?" The average entry-level age of a caseworker is 35 as DCFS experiences trouble hiring people right out of college. The Senate Oversight Committee asked if outreach in all 64 parishes was being done to recruit through special job fairs and working with local economic development agencies. There has also been talk of modifying job requirements to be able to entice people to come to work. Currently, a social worker degree is required but older workers who have been with DCFS for 30 to 40 years say they have no degree, just experience and a great passion for the work. These older, seasoned workers feel DCFS is spending too much time trying to recruit based on education when the agency is unable to fill positions. They say, "If you have attrition and can't fill positions, what you're offering is not selling." DCFS is working to add a team approach to handling cases and reports of abuse. Importantly, a medical component to assist the caseworkers was reported this week as 50 positions are to be filled to add nurses to make home visits to families where the infants were exposed to drugs in utero. Senator Mills also said that retired law enforcement officials could be hired t...

Bombshell Business Podcast with Amber Hurdle
Passion, Profession and Imposter Syndrome with Sarah Franzen (143)

Bombshell Business Podcast with Amber Hurdle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 53:07


Today's guest is someone I've had the privilege to get to know over the past year, and as a brand connoisseur have developed a deep respect for her unapologetically authentic personal brand. What I've learned about her is that she has found her way to pursue both her passion and her vocation, as different as they may be, while overcoming limiting beliefs to successfully define and position her value within her industries. Importantly for me, anyway, I have fallen in love with her deep intention in all areas of her life, while nurturing the connections she makes along the way. About Sarah Franzen Sarah Franzen, Director of Revenue Management and Analytics at Natural Retreats, a luxury vacation rental management company, is the recipient of the inaugural “Vacation Rental Revenue Manager of the Year” award, presented at the DARM conference in 2021. Methodical, yet a creative strategic thinker and doer, Sarah is a seasoned professional with dynamic experience and education in sales, business, marketing, revenue management, and the performing arts.  With an MBA from the UGA Terry College of Business, a Master of Music from San Joe State University, and a double undergrad major in both Music, Vocal Performance and Business Statistics, Sarah is passionate about the arts and arts education, understanding human behavior and what drives it, and establishing and nurturing mutually-beneficial relationships with my global community.  Connect with Sarah Franzen LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarahfranzen/ About Natural Retreats Natural Retreats is a luxury vacation rental management company operating in some of America's most iconic destinations. From well-appointed vacation homes with guest services and access to unforgettable activities, we elevate the travel experience to make our guests feel at home and our homeowners feel like guests. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trending with Timmerie - Catholic Principals applied to today's experiences.

A recent California law mandating car seats had an unexpected effect -- it might've lowered birth rates. Why? According to one researcher: because it makes having a child more expensive... Importantly, we must recognize that excuses, like these car seats, abound around us, and keep us from fulfilling our mission. We break down how we can recognize these obstacles, and free ourselves from them for good!

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. Bill Russell's Second Wind Part 4 #TheMightyTelevision #SportsBetting

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


The Katherine Massey Book Club @ The C.O.W.S. hosts the 4th study session on the late Bill Russell's 1979 publication, Second Wind: The Memoirs of an Opinionated Man. Russell passed away on July 31st of this year at the age of 88. The NBA titan won eleven championships and an Olympic gold medal, and was elected to the basketball Hall of Fame. Russell is second only to his contemporary Wilt Chamberlain in all time NBA rebounds. The Louisiana native is also credited with being the first black head coach in the National Basketball Association. Last week, Russell detailed his high school travels up and down the west coast and into Canada playing basketball. Their racially mixed team bucked the basketball authority of the time by shooting jump shots and jumping on defense to black opponents' shots. Defense in general and shot-blocking specifically was not valued, taught, or even recorded at the time. The young prodigy said White coaches branded their style of play "n!@@#rball" and frequently accused he and his teammates of cheating. Importantly, Russell invested a great care detailing how he would use his brain computer to visualize basketball plays. Imaging himself dominating on the hardwood became a key cerebral element of Russell's basketball supremacy. #BlackSelfRespect #HarlemGlobetrotters #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943#

Coffee and a Case Note
Australian Karting Association Ltd [2022] NSWCA 188

Coffee and a Case Note

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 8:07


A was the national body responsible for go-karting in Australia and trustee of a related trust: [12] R was responsible for go-karting in NSW and the ACT, and a member of A: [14] A's constitution obliged its members to pay on the fees they collected from go-kart drivers in races A approved: [15], [16] A was Tee of a fund for the construction of new go-kart tracks: [17] The trust deed empowered A to distribute trust capital and income to benefs, who were its members: [24], [25] A, as trustee, would loan funds for track construction to the relevant state body. The loans were 5 for 10 years with interest not charged if terms were complied with. On default, the loan was repayable in full plus the interest: [20] From 2014 R queried A's management asked for return of funds held on trust for it: [28] In 2019 the members of A voted to expel R as a member, a default event: [14] The net assets of the trust were recorded in the annual financial statements of the trust as $1: [33] The trust's financial statements were audited and approved by A's board (and A's predecessor's management committee) in the relevant years: [35], [38] A sought repayment of its loan plus interest. R cross-claimed seeking unpaid distributions: [2] A lost on both points and appealed. A said the money it recorded as held in a loan account for R showed what was to be paid to R (and other benefs in R's position) when he trust vested, and so was not a distribution: [43] The question or not it was a distribution was pivotal. If it was, it would have to be paid to R on demand: [44], [49] The primary judge had found that the recording of the loans in R's favour were distributions, held by A on bare trust and not as part of the track construction trust: [46] Importantly, no estoppel by convention claim was raised at first instance, and so was not available on appeal: [56] On appeal, A argued the loan were a liability contingent on the vesting of the trust, though this new argument was no available on appeal: [58], [64] In any case, the audited accounts recorded the loans as actual liabilities, not contingent liabilities: [68], [69] There was no evidence that the benefs intended to make a loan to A, and the financial records acknowledged debt to the benefs in the amount of the unpaid distributions: [70] A's argument that it intended to accumulate income was unfounded because of what the financial statements showed: (i) the P and L reflected income as distributed to benefs; (ii) the accounts reflected a corresponding liability; and (iii) the trust assets remained $1.00 rather than increasing: [108] The resolution of A's directors to approve the accounts in the relevant years gives rise to an inference A resolved to make distributions to the benefs (including R): [138] There was no error by the primary judge. A's appeal was dismissed. Costs followed the event: [144], [147] __ If you'd like to contact me please look for James d'Apice or Coffee and a Case Note on your favourite social media spot - I should pop up right away! #coffeeandacasenote​​​​​​​​ #auslaw​​​​​​​​

Aging-US
Longevity & Aging Series (EP 5): Dr. Amit Sharma

Aging-US

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 34:44


In the fifth episode of the Longevity & Aging Series, Dr. Amit Sharma, Group Lead from SENS Research Foundation, Mountain View, CA, discusses a research paper he co-authored that was published in Volume 14, Issue 5, of Aging (Aging-US), entitled, “Enhanced co-culture and enrichment of human natural killer cells for the selective clearance of senescent cells.” DOI - https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.203931 Corresponding Author - Amit Sharma - amit.sharma@sens.org Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQR8_gm2gUI Abstract In the context of aging and age-associated diseases, Natural Killer (NK) cells have been revealed as a key cell type responsible for the immune clearance of senescent cells. Subsequently, NK cell-based therapies have emerged as promising alternatives to drug-based therapeutic interventions for the prevention and treatment of age-related disease and debility. Given the promise of NK cell-mediated immunotherapies as a safe and effective treatment strategy, we outline an improved method by which primary NK cells can be efficiently enriched from human peripheral blood across multiple donors (ages 20-42 years old), with a practical protocol that reliably enhances both CD56dim and CD56bright NK cells by 15-fold and 3-fold, respectively. Importantly, we show that our co-culture protocol can be used as an easily adaptable tool to assess highly efficient and selective killing of senescent cells by primary NK cells enriched via our method using longer co-culture durations and a low target to effector ratio, which may be more physiological than has been achieved in previous literature. Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article - https://aging.altmetric.com/details/email_updates?id=10.18632%2Faging.203931 Longevity & Aging Series Aging (Aging-US) and FOXO Technologies have teamed up for a special collaboration on aging research with a monthly video series: Longevity & Aging Series. This series invites Aging researchers to speak with host Dr. Brian Chen, an adjunct faculty member at the University of California San Diego and Chief Science Officer of FOXO Technologies. Learn more - https://www.aging-us.com/longevity Keywords - aging, senescence, natural killer cells, NKCC, immune surveillance About Aging-US Launched in 2009, Aging-US publishes papers of general interest and biological significance in all fields of aging research and age-related diseases, including cancer—and now, with a special focus on COVID-19 vulnerability as an age-dependent syndrome. Topics in Aging-US go beyond traditional gerontology, including, but not limited to, cellular and molecular biology, human age-related diseases, pathology in model organisms, signal transduction pathways (e.g., p53, sirtuins, and PI-3K/AKT/mTOR, among others), and approaches to modulating these signaling pathways. Please visit our website at https://www.Aging-US.com​​ and connect with us: SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/Aging-Us Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AgingUS/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/AgingJrnl Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/agingjrnl/ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/agingus​ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/aging/ Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/AgingUS/ Media Contact 18009220957 MEDIA@IMPACTJOURNALS.COM

Living to 100 Club
A Conversation about Overeating and Binge Eating

Living to 100 Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 42:09


A Conversation about Overeating and Binge Eating Our guest for this Living to 100 Club Podcast is Glenn Livingston, a veteran psychologist and CEO of a multi-million dollar consulting firm servicing clients in the food industry. We take a deep dive into the practice of overeating and binge eating. Why is overeating so prevalent in our culture today? We discuss Glenn's decades of research on the nature of bingeing, and what he learned about the food industry's approaches to “food obsessed” individuals. Importantly, we explore the notion of creating our own food plan and ending the overeating process. Glen also shares his own personal journey out of obesity and food prison, to a normal healthy weight. This is an important conversation with a leading authority on an alternative, controversial approach to eating disorders. Click HERE to listen, and be sure to download his free book. Mini Bio Glenn Livingston, Ph.D. is a veteran psychologist and was the long time CEO of a multi-million dollar consulting firm. This firm has serviced several Fortune 500 clients in the food industry. You may have seen his (or his company's) previous work, theories, and research in major periodicals like The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Sun Times, The Indiana Star Ledger, The NY Daily News, American Demographics, or any of the other major media outlets you see on this page. You may also have heard him on ABC, WGN, and/or CBS radio, or UPN TV. Disillusioned by what traditional psychology had to offer overweight and/or food obsessed individuals, Dr. Livingston spent several decades researching the nature of bingeing and overeating via work with his own patients. He also was instrumental in conducting a self-funded research program with more than 40,000 participants. Most important, however, was his own personal journey out of obesity and food prison to a normal, healthy weight and a much more lighthearted relationship with food. Click here to learn more about his book: "Never Binge Again: Stop Overeating and Binge Eating and Reprogram Yourself to Think Like a Permanently Thin Person...on the Food Plan of Your Choice!" For Our Listeners Glenn's Website, Free Book, and Food Plan Templates: Never Binge Again

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Things for grant applicants to remember about living expenses by Julia Wise

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 2:19


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Things for grant applicants to remember about living expenses, published by Julia Wise on October 7, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Some grant applicants don't have much experience estimating how much money they'll need to live on, so it can be difficult to work out how much grant money to ask for. Different people need different advice here. Some people are prone to asking for more money than makes sense, while others will be too frugal. Do your best to calibrate. Some things to remember to factor in: You will likely be responsible for paying taxes on your grant / stipend, and this will probably be significantly higher than taxes you would pay as an employee (because a self-employed worker makes both the employer and the employee contributions.) This may be due quarterly. Check the website of the tax agency in your country - "self employment tax" may be a useful search term. If you live in the US or another country without national healthcare, will you need to get your own health insurance? If you are on your parents' insurance in the US, remember that ends when you turn 26. Might you need additional private care not covered by your insurance or national healthcare system? Will you need to make payments on student loans or other loans? Will you have enough to cover not just basic living costs, but some amount of unplanned expenses like medical bills or car repair? Will you need work equipment like a laptop or a standing desk? Will your project involve travel? Consider getting short-term disability insurance. (You might search for “self employed short term disability.”) This would provide income for around 1-6 months if you can't work because of illness, surgery, mental illness, or giving birth. Importantly, most policies only cover pregnancy if you start the policy before you are pregnant. Many employers also don't provide paid leave if you started the job recently. So for example if you plan to have a baby in about a year and don't expect to get paid parental leave from an employer, you might want to get short-term disability insurance early, because most policies won't cover pregnancy-related leave for the first 9 or 12 months. If you know other grantees in your country, you might chat with them about any taxes / insurances they're aware of relevant to your country. See also advice in the comments on this post. Thanks for listening. To help us out with The Nonlinear Library or to learn more, please visit nonlinear.org.

Climate Correction Podcast
Natural Climate Solutions The Power of Parks and Public Lands - Presented by Trust for Public Land

Climate Correction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 28:29


From Florida Climate Week 2022 - https://floridaclimateweek.org/ Quality parks and green spaces are a fundamental requirement for sustaining healthy, equitable, and climate resilient communities. Importantly, natural solutions help people translate climate concern into real, close-to-home opportunities to act on climate. In addition, climate conservation provides a range of other benefits from coastal protection to improving air and water quality to cooling increasingly dangerous temperatures in our communities. During this session, speakers from the Trust for Public Land will use a mix of case studies to highlight the power of natural climate solutions and share lessons learned about how to maximize the climate, health, and equity benefits that these solutions provide. The presenters will also train attendees on how to use a new publicly available geospatial tool called the Conservation Carbon Map. This tool was developed with input from experts around the country and identifies areas with high potential for protecting carbon-rich landscapes. For users in Florida, the map identifies: 1) carbon storage and sequestration by state, county, watershed, and parcels over 100 acres; 2) threats to these carbon stocks from development, disease, and wildfire; and 3) where conservation can deliver additional co-benefits by protecting important habitats, rare ecosystems, and water supplies. Learn more about Trust for Public Land.  Speakers Brendan Shane(Speaker)Trust for Public Land, Climate Director, Land and People Lab Taj Schottland(Speaker)Trust for Public Land, Associate Director, Climate Program, Land and People Lab Kate Brown(Speaker)Trust for Public Land, Senior Project Manager Brian Tavernia(Speaker)Trust for Public Land, Project Manager, Geospatial Science

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. Bill Russell's Second Wind Part 3 #BayArea #415 #HenriChristophe

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022


The Katherine Massey Book Club @ The C.O.W.S. hosts the 3rd study session on the late Bill Russell's 1979 publication, Second Wind: The Memoirs of an Opinionated Man. Russell passed away on July 31st of this year at the age of 88. The NBA titan won eleven championships and an Olympic gold medal and was elected to the basketball Hall of Fame. However, he is most known for his counter-racist efforts - which includes lots of writing. Importantly, Russell's memoir is co-authored by award-winning White historian Taylor Branch, so any omission of relevant information or minimizing of White Terrorism should be thought of as deliberate Racism by Branch. Last week, Russell described a pivotal moment of his childhood. Oakland Public Library was Russell's sanctuary and the Bay Area transplant devoured books. While flipping through a history book, Russell read a passage that insisted slavery was the best thing to ever happened to ignorant, primitive black people. This paragraph gnawed at him for weeks and lit a simmering anger in Russell about the mistreatment of black people. Tragically, Russell sounds just like 21st century non-white children when he describes "bitter" White teachers forced to labor at Oakland's McClymonds High School. He also details how his grandfather, "The Old Man," was dumbfounded upon attending his first NBA game years later. Seeing his black grandson coach a team where White men had to follow Russell's commands, scrambled his brain computer. However, entering the locker room where White and black males showered together, left the elder Russell in total discombobulation about White Supremacy/Racism. #CounterViolence #BayArea #DelectableNegro #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943#

Future Tripping
Deadria Boyland: Intimate Relationships - What To Do When They Become Manipulative/Controlling/Abusive

Future Tripping

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 70:00


Join Laura this week as she talks with an esteemed leader in the Anti-Violence and Domestic Violence fields, Deadria Boyland. Having done this work for over 30 years, Deadria brings her wealth of knowledge to the conversation and together they discuss how we can recognize manipulation, control, and abuse in our own relationships as well as in relationships of loved ones and those around us. Whether it's a blossoming relationship in middle school or a long-held one by older adults, warning signs are discussed and strategies are offered. Importantly, Laura and Deadria remind us that abuse in relationships can happen to anyone and that it's imperative we reflect on our own judgments and stereotypes. And because no conversation with Deadria is complete without laughter, they find the levity where they can, even within this complex and critically important topic. National Network to end Domestic violence https://nnedv.org/National Domestic Violence Hotline https://www.thehotline.org/tel:1.800.799.7233Futures Without Violence https://www.futureswithoutviolence.org/Love is Respect https://www.loveisrespect.org/get-involved/tdvam/ Teen Dating Violence https://www.teendvmonth.org/To learn more about Future Tripping, Laura's work, and The Trauma Stewardship Institute, or to email a question you'd like Laura and her guests to respond to, please click here, or call 360-228-5804 anytime and leave us a voicemail.  And you can find us on Instagram here. 

1 Pastor's Point of View
We Also Need to Be Instructed By His Spirit: A Special Type of World.

1 Pastor's Point of View

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 43:31


Greetings, if you would like to support Free Gospel Church and our ministries, you can make a donation at FreeGospelAssembly.com.  If you have any Podcast topic suggestions, please send an email to Freegospel3@gmail.com.  Thank you for listening. God bless you. Main Texts: Jeremiah 15:16; 16:19-21; 31:31-34; Isaiah 55:8-11  A special word or communication came to a young priest unexpectedly, supernatural: he didn't read it in the Torah. It was a prophetic word/communication, directly to him and it began to transform his world. God speaks through multiple venues: visions, dreams, impressions, through the body of Christ, special messages by His Spirit: usually Sovereign. Such a communication came to Jeremiah and many others (Paul) in Scripture. And we must be open to God speaking to us supernaturally (usually called a “Rhema” word among Pentecostals.) But most Importantly all the above must be fairly evaluated by the written word, “rightly divided.” 2 Timothy 3:15-17 But also note Hebrews 4:12-13; consider in verse 13, the Word is referred to a Him, Jesus Christ! John chapter 1, Jesus is referred to as “The word of God” and co-creator. Also, the prophetic word given to a prophet is reflected in Isaiah 55:8-11. Also, in the New Testament, Acts 1:8 and Act 2 etc. In the New Testament such sovereign personal communication frequently occurred and to His servants, both deacons and apostles. But, because of human imperfections, Paul suggests both openness and caution; 1 Thessalonians 5:19-22. God continues at His choosing instructs us by such communication. In Jeremiah's case, the prophetic word came as a hammer confronting a challenging the other prophets of the temple's prophetic guilds; and the rulers of Judah who participated in syncretistic practices. They claimed that while they had the sacred Temple among them, God would never judge them: This is never true (Jeremiah 7:1-7). People not buildings are therefore as a result of God's prophetic communication to him, he suffered much persecution: note Jeremiah 20:1-6; 38:6 and finally the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians. What Jeremiah experienced is that these communication from God, in his particular situation, caused him personal conflict and some theological confusion. 

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.05.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 64:07 Very Popular


VIDEOS: Unpayable Debt & Deadly Vax Causing Hell on Earth – Ed Dowd – start 6:30 -20:00 What Greta Thunberg does not understand about climate change | Jordan Peterson – 7:09 Gary Null – Speaks to U.N. on Earth Day (Part 2 of 2) – 9:30 Neil Oliver: ‘By taking back control of the money we can begin regaining control of our world'  Breast health linked to eating peanut butter and nuts Washington University School of Medicine, September 27, 2022 By eating more peanut butter during their high school years, girls could be improving their breast health in adulthood, according to a US study published recently in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. Dr. Graham Colditz, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and colleagues found that girls aged 9 to 15 who ate peanut butter and nuts twice a week were 39% less likely to develop benign breast disease by the age of 30 than girls who did not. Benign breast disease includes lumps or tender spots that turn out to be fibrous tissue and/or cysts, as well as other conditions like hyperplasia, an overgrowth of the cells that line the ducts in the glandular breast tissue. Although benign breast disease is not cancerous, it can raise the risk of developing breast cancer later in life. For their study, he and his colleagues looked at health data on over 9,000 American schoolgirls recruited to The Growing Up Today Study.  The data also included reports from the girls between when they were 18 to 30 years old, that indicated whether they had ever been diagnosed with biopsy-confirmed benign breast disease. When they compared the two sets of data, the researchers found that participants who had eaten peanut butter or nuts twice a week were 39% less likely than peers who never ate those foods to receive a diagnosis for benign breast disease. The data suggest pulse foods – soy and other beans and lentils – and corn may also be linked to reduced risk of benign breast disease, but because they did not feature as much in the diets of these girls, the evidence was not so strong.And they concluded that “consumption of vegetable protein, fat, peanut butter, or nuts by older girls may help reduce their risk of BBD [benign breast disease] as young women.” Pine bark extracts may help curb age-related muscle loss; Study D'Annunzio University (Italy), September 28, 2022 Supplements containing the French maritime pine bark extract Pycnogenol may help stabilize muscle loss, support muscular function, and boosts daily muscle endurance, says a new study. Data from a study with 64 healthy seniors aged 70-78 indicated that 150 mg per day of Pycnogenol may improve muscle function and endurance in a range of everyday activities, from carrying items to climbing stairs and walking. Results published in Minerva Ortopedica e Traumatologica also indicated that supplementation with the pine bark was associated with a reduction in oxidative stress of 14%. Oxidative stress is reportedly a common measurement of sarcopenia which prevents the body from normal detoxifying and repair. “Supplementation with Pycnogenol – suppressing the excess in oxidative stress and controlling muscular pain and fatigue – possibly in association with some specific protein and vitamins supplementation, may produce faster muscular replacement and muscular remodeling improving physical functions and fitness. In this study, muscle loss appeared to be controlled and reduced,” wrote the authors from Irvine3 Labs and D'Annunzio University in Italy. Sarcopenia Muscle loss is a natural part of aging, and researchers have estimated that, after the age of 50, we lose 1-2% of our muscles each year. Strength declines as well, at a rate of 1.5% per year beginning at 50 years and accelerating to 3% after the age of 60. Results showed that the pine bark group experienced greater muscular function and endurance in daily tasks such as carrying items (4-5 lbs) (71% improvement versus 23% in the control group), climbing stairs (52 % improvement versus 20% in the control ground) and distance walked (38% improvement versus 17% in the control group). Supplementation with Pycnogenol was also associated with reduced proteinuria – the presence of protein in urine which, with normal kidney function, can indicate waste from muscle erosion – by 40%. In addition, individuals who took the pine bark extract supplements demonstrated improved general fitness scores by more than 46% in comparison with the control group. Study links prenatal phthalate exposure to reduced childhood lung function Barcelona Institute for Global Health, October 3, 2022 A study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has found that exposure to phthalates in the womb is associated with reduced lung function during childhood. The findings of the study, published in Environmental Pollution, support the European Union's current restrictions on the use of these substances Phthalates are chemical compounds that are widely used as plasticizers, as well as in lacquers and varnishes. They are found in a wide variety of consumer products, ranging from toys to food packaging, clothing, detergents, cosmetics, solvents, etc. Over time, phthalates in these products leach into the surrounding environment—for example, into the air, dust and food—making them virtually ubiquitous. Moreover, human exposure to phthalates starts as early as in utero, given that these compounds are able to cross the placental barrier. Phthalates act as endocrine disruptors and have been associated with numerous developmental and reproductive health problems. “Research has consistently found that gestational phthalate exposure is associated with increased risk of childhood asthma, but the evidence on its possible association with lung function is scarce and unclear,” explained ISGlobal researcher Magda Bosch de Basea, lead author of the study. The study included 641 mother-child pairs from the INMA Project birth cohorts in Sabadell and Gipuzkoa. Gestational phthalate exposure was analyzed using urine samples collected from the mothers during pregnancy. The children's lung function was assessed by spirometry at various stages of development between the ages of four and eleven years. As an indication of the ubiquity of these compounds, laboratory analyses detected all nine of the studied phthalate metabolites—i.e., substances into which phthalates are transformed once metabolized by the human body—in nearly 100% of the urine samples examined. At all stages of development, the studied metabolites were associated with decreases in two lung function parameters: forced vital capacity (FVC), which measures the maximum volume of air a person is able to exhale, and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), which measures the maximum exhaled volume in the first second of exhalation. T The researchers found that the associations between certain metabolites (e.g. MiBP and MBzP) and decreased lung function were generally statistically significant at younger ages, but not in spirometries performed in later years. This pattern is consistent with the findings of studies in animal models suggesting that the possible effects of these compounds on lung function revert over time. Eating late increases hunger, decreases calories burned, and changes fat tissue Brigham and Women's Hospital, October 4, 2022 A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, a founding member of the Mass General Brigham healthcare system, found that when we eat significantly impacts our energy expenditure, appetite, and molecular pathways in adipose tissue. Their results are published in Cell Metabolism. “In this study, we asked, ‘Does the time that we eat matter when everything else is kept consistent?'” said first author Nina Vujović, Ph.D. “And we found that eating four hours later makes a significant difference for our hunger levels, the way we burn calories after we eat, and the way we store fat.” Vujović, Scheer and their team studied 16 patients with a body mass index (BMI) in the overweight or obese range. Each participant completed two laboratory protocols: one with a strictly scheduled early meal schedule, and the other with the exact same meals, each scheduled about four hours later in the day. In the last two to three weeks before starting each of the in-laboratory protocols, participants maintained fixed sleep and wake schedules, and in the final three days before entering the laboratory, they strictly followed identical diets and meal schedules at home. In the lab, participants regularly documented their hunger and appetite, provided frequent small blood samples throughout the day, and had their body temperature and energy expenditure measured. To measure how eating time affected molecular pathways involved in adipogenesis, or how the body stores fat, investigators collected biopsies of adipose tissue from a subset of participants during laboratory testing in both the early and late eating protocols, to enable comparison of gene expression patterns/levels between these two eating conditions. Results revealed that eating later had profound effects on hunger and appetite-regulating hormones leptin and ghrelin, which influence our drive to eat. Specifically, levels of the hormone leptin, which signals satiety, were decreased across the 24 hours in the late eating condition compared to the early eating conditions. When participants ate later, they also burned calories at a slower rate and exhibited adipose tissue gene expression towards increased adipogenesis and decreased lipolysis, which promote fat growth. Notably, these findings convey converging physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying the correlation between late eating and increased obesity risk. “This study shows the impact of late versus early eating. Here, we isolated these effects by controlling for confounding variables like caloric intake, physical activity, sleep, and light exposure, but in real life, many of these factors may themselves be influenced by meal timing,” said Scheer.  The immune system benefits from life in the countrysideAarhus University (Denmark), September 30, 2022Research from Aarhus University has demonstrated that exposure to a farming environment may prevent or dampen hypersensitivities and allergies — even in adultsAdults who move to farming areas where they experience a wider range of environmental exposures than in cities may reduce the symptoms of their hypersensitivities and allergies considerably. This is the result of new research from Aarhus University.This pioneering result was published online in the esteemed periodical, The Journal of Allergy and Clinical ImmunologyThe immune systems of people who work in farming are frequently exposed to a wide range of bacteria, fungi, pollen and other irritants which may trigger a response that protects them against hypersensitivity. Working in a farming environment may therefore serve to prevent or dampen hypersensitivity to the most widespread plant allergens: grass and birch pollen.Surprisingly, the positive effect on the immune system is seen both in people who have lived in urban environments and in adults who were born and raised in farming areas. But the real surprise is that the effect is not only seen in children:”Previously, the assumption was that only persons who had lived in farming areas while growing up would benefit from the environment's protective effect on the immune system. But now we can demonstrate that it's not too late simply because you are an adult,” says postdoc Grethe Elholm.It is, in other words, possible to affect the immune system and thereby the hypersensitivity which may cause allergy and allergic asthma − and what is more, this can be done at a much later point in life than previously assumed. High Blood Pressure Linked To Faster Cognitive Decline, Dementia Risk   University of Michigan, October 1, 2022 High blood pressure, or hypertension, often causes people to feel perpetually stressed out or angry. Now, researchers from the University of Michigan say people with hypertension may also experience a faster deterioration in their cognitive abilities (thinking skills, decision making, memory) in comparison to those with normal blood pressure. The team performed a “study of studies” focusing on high blood pressure's association with declining brain function over a period of several years. They gathered and analyzed datasets collected for six large prior studies. Originally, researchers set out to determine if fluctuations in long-term blood pressure control may somewhat explain why Hispanic Americans experience a 50-percent higher risk of developing dementia by the end of their lives in comparison to non-Hispanic white people living in the United States. Somewhat surprisingly, that study failed to produce a clear answer, as blood pressure-related cognitive decline appears to occur at about the same pace among Hispanics and Caucasians. Study authors conclude their work suggests other factors are at play regarding why Hispanics are generally more at risk of dementia. Still, these findings make a strong case that blood pressure has a connection to cognitive outcomes later in life. Maintaining a healthy blood pressure level looks to protect thinking skills, study authors say. “Our findings suggest that high blood pressure causes faster cognitive decline, and that taking hypertension medication slows the pace of that decline,” says lead study author Deborah Levine, M.D., M.P.H., director of the University of Michigan's Cognitive Health Services Research Program and a professor of internal medicine at the U-M's academic medical center, in a media release. Researchers examined changes in the thinking and memory abilities among a group of adults (18+) who took part in six long-term studies conducted over the past five decades. Study authors enjoyed access to an average of eight years' worth of data for each participant, including systolic blood pressure (the top number in any blood pressure reading). The  data encompassed 22,095 non-Hispanic white adults and 2,475 Hispanic adults. None of the participants had any documented history of stroke or dementia at the time of enrollment. To start, average systolic blood pressure was lower among Hispanic adults in comparison to non-Hispanic white adults (132.5 mmHg compared with 134 mmHg). This is especially notable considering Hispanic adults in the study displayed an older average age than non-Hispanic adults (62 versus 54 years-old). Blood pressure readings tend to increase with age. Among both Hispanics and non-Hispanics, the team observed the same pace of deteriorating thinking skills and memory linked to high blood pressure. However, when researchers focused solely on the two studies that had deliberately recruited Hispanics, they noted an undeniably faster decline in overall cognitive performance among Hispanics in comparison to the non-Hispanic white group. Importantly, though, blood pressure differences between those two groups didn't appear to explain this cognitive decline difference. This may be due to Hispanic participants having lower blood pressure than non-Hispanic whites in these studies, researchers speculate.The study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer s Disease.

The Intuitive Mindset-with Jeannie Lynch
Find Out Your Strongest 6 Sense // Uncover your Intuitive SuperPower

The Intuitive Mindset-with Jeannie Lynch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 11:55


The sixth sense is sometimes described as intuition or the sense of knowing something without previously stored knowledge about it, learn how and why to tap into your “sixth sense.” Everyone can connect to their 6 Sense but the way we do that is different for each person. In this video, we explore which one of the Intuitive Gifts is your strongest Sence. We dive into "The 4 Clairs of Intuition" and use your LANGUAGE to uncover your Intuitive Superpower strengths. ⬇️ Playlist on Youtube of Teaching Intuition ⬇️ https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTL6ZY6HveDx-F3UJVJsJ8xFSocTFNYqS The 4 ‘Clairs' Of Intuition Clairaudience Clairaudient messages sound like someone talking to you in your mind. This ‘voice' of intuition will usually be straightforward. It says things like ‘not now' or ‘yes, this is the right way'. Importantly, clairaudience comes across in short messages which are sometimes even one word. Clairvoyance The term “clairvoyant” is often interchanged with the word psychic. Clairvoyant messages arrive as an image or scene in your mind. When this happens to me, sometimes I will see something I can describe to a client, but other times it can be more metaphoric. When I see a cake, for instance, I know Spirit is acknowledging a birthday. Clairsentience Clairsentient messages are the most common of the four Clairs and come as a feeling. This is why so many people identify with being empathic. Gut feelings, being able to experience others' emotions, or sensing the collective energy of a room all fall under this umbrella. Claircognizance This is the ability to ‘just know' without understanding how or why we know. I describe this as our brains receiving an immediate download from our higher self or Spirit Team. We receive information much like computer downloads, only much faster! *Video & Podcast Production/Content Copyrighted by Jeannie Lynch for my channel only. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jean-e-lynch/message

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Drs. Sheila Rauch & Carmen McLean: The Neuroscience of Prolonged Exposure for PTSD

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 58:42


Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy is among the most effective, empirically supported treatments for posttrauamtic stress disorder.  Importantly, there is a growing literature around the neuroscience of PE which has important implications for the delivery of PE.  Drs. Sheila Rauch & Carmen McLean, join us for a review of some of the core themes in their book Retraining the Brain: Applied Neuroscience in Exposure Therapy for PTSD.  In this discussion we cover:   why Drs. Rauch & McLean wanted to write this booka brief overview of Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapycomparing & contrasting the theoretical mechanism underlying PE vs. research findingsconsidering the window of tolerance in PE through the lens of applied neuroscienceimpact of length of session on treatment from a brain lensthe relative (and interactive) impact of in vivo &. imaginal exposurewhether tailoring the clinical approach (e.g., PE vs CPT) is necessary depending on the client's presentation the potential utility for PE in addressing moral injurya consideration of whether PE could be experienced differently within the brain depending on the client's stance to the treatment i.e., high vs. low willingnessthe provision of PE through virtual platforms best practices around combining medications with PEPsychedelic/MDMA assisted psychotherapy - caveats and opportunitiesnovel augmentation methods for PE avoiding clinician burnout/vicarious traumatization in the context of PE Comments or feedback?  Email the show: oicbtpodcast@gmail.com.  If you are finding value in the podcast, please leave us a rating (or even better, a review!) at Apple podcasts. Thank you!  Sheila A.M. Rauch, Ph.D., ABPP, is Deputy Director of the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program and Director of Mental Health Research and Program Evaluation at the Atlanta VA Healthcare System. She has published scholarly articles, chapters, and books on anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) focusing on neurobiology and factors involved in the development, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety disorders, psychosocial factors in medical settings, and the relation between physical health and anxiety. She is an author of the second edition of the Prolonged Exposure manual and patient workbook as well as the PE for Intensive outpatient programs manuals.  She is a fellow of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy (ABCT), was granted membership in the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and serves as a member of the Board of Directors and Scientific Council of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.  Dr. Carmen McLean is a licensed clinical psychologist and researcher with the Dissemination and Training Division of the National Center for PTSD at the Palo Alto VA Health Care System and a Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliate) at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. Her research examines ways to increase the reach of exposure therapy for PTSD by addressing implementation barriers and testing eHealth interventions. She is currently Co-PI of a DoD-funded study testing a tailored process improvement approach to increasing the use of evidence-based treatment for PTSD in the U.S. military health system. She is PI of a FEMA-funded trial testing an intensive, integrated treatment for PTSD, insomnia, and nightmares in firefighters.  Dr. McLean serves on several journal editorial boards and is currently Associate Editor of the Journal of Anxiety Disorders and Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. She has over 125 scholarly publications including a book on applied neuroscience in exposure therapy for PTSD co-authored with Dr. Sheila Rauch and published by APA.

Understanding Congress
Are members of the House of Representatives legislating in the dark? (with James M. Curry)

Understanding Congress

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 21:14


The topic of this episode is, “Are members of the House of Representatives legislating in the dark?” My guest is https://faculty.utah.edu/u0844867-James_M_Curry/hm/index.hml (James Curry). He's an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Political Science at the University of Utah. Professor Curry studies how contemporary legislative processes and institutions affect legislative politics, with a particular focus on the role of parties and leaders in the US Congress. Importantly for this episode, Jim is the author of the book https://www.amazon.com/Legislating-Dark-Information-Representatives-American/dp/022628171X (Legislating in the Dark: Information and Power in the House of Representatives) (Chicago University Press, 2015). So who better to help us understand the relationship between information and power in Congress? Kevin Kosar: Welcome to Understanding Congress, a podcast about the first branch of government. Congress is a notoriously complex institution and few Americans think well of it, but Congress is essential to our Republic. It's a place where our pluralistic society is supposed to work out its differences and come to agreement about what our laws should be. And that is why we are here to discuss our national legislature and to think about ways to upgrade it so it can better serve our nation. I'm your host, Kevin Kosar. And I'm a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, a think tank in Washington, DC. Welcome to the podcast. James Curry: Thanks for having me. Kevin Kosar: Power in the House of Representatives: it flows from various factors. For example, being in a power position like the Speakership, or take another example, being a great fundraiser. These things can bring power, but these aren't the only factors. Possessing information also conveys power. How so? James Curry: So what I've found in my research is that knowledge or the possession of useful information empowers members of Congress for at least two reasons. First, Congress needs to be able to write laws that achieve the ends that they want to achieve. Congress obviously has staff to help with this process, but it also helps members of Congress to know the ins and outs of policy and the political dynamics at play. It helps the members to know these things themselves. And if, as a member of Congress, you have this kind of knowledge, you're more likely to be looped into the process of developing a bill. If you're recognized as an expert in a policy space, you're also more likely to end up with a seat on a relevant committee that oversees these policies. So altogether, knowledge, expertise, and information can get you—as a member of a Congress—a seat at the table shaping policies early in the process. Second, Congress also needs to be able to build coalitions to pass the things that it has written. Again, knowledge and expertise are going to be necessary and are going to empower those who have it. Most members of Congress don't have the time to become deeply informed and knowledgeable about more than a couple of policy areas. In other words, lawmakers tend to specialize—following certain policies really closely, working in those policy areas over and over again, but remaining relatively uninformed about most everything else. However, they still need to vote on everything else, which means they need to learn enough about what's happening on these other bills in these other policy areas so that they can vote the way that they think they should vote. So, what most members do is they turn to their colleagues who are seen as knowledgeable, who have information, who are seen as experts, and follow their lead on what they should do on these bills. So combined, this means that lawmakers who have knowledge, information, and expertise about a policy are going to—first—be more involved in developing relevant legislation and are—second—going to be able to sway the votes of their colleagues to...

JSEDirect with Simon Brown
Rampant dollar (#513)

JSEDirect with Simon Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 18:49


Simon Shares Remgro (JSE code: REM) plans to unbundle its stake in Grindrod (JSE code: GND). There were ideas that maybe Remgro would take out Grindrod, but the unbundling is going in a different direction and Remgro unbundles shares they don't want. Remember also that after the unbundling expect weakness in the Grindrod share price for a few weeks. They've held them since 2011 and hold a 24.81% stake For every 100 Remgro you'll receive 30.70841 Grindrod shares. Last day to trade (LDT) is 11 October 2022. You'll receive them with a base cost that Remgro paid, that value is still to be determined. Barloworld (JSE code: BAW) trading update is not bad. The big news is that they plan to list Avis by year-end. Tiger Brands (JSE code: TBS) trading update was solid off a low base. The chart looks bullish as it rose +10% on Monday after the update. Chart looking decent and a potential delisting target? The UK is an absolute mess. Here the UK 5, 10 & 30 year bonds for September .(with correct carts) . Just September pic.twitter.com/hMj5yP65bC — Simon Brown (@SimonPB) September 28, 2022   Rampant Dollar The US$ Index (code: DXY) is at twenty-year highs and within a few percent taking out the highs from the early 2000s and heading back to levels last seen in the mid-1980s. The reasons are simple and two-fold; The world is scared and fear sees investors rushing to the safety of the US$. Rising rates in the US now see the US ten-year treasury bills trading around 4%, the highest level in over a decade. So investors can flee to the US$ and buy 10-year bills for a ±4% return. Importantly this is hitting every currency in the world. Has earnings implications for US companies selling products offshore as those profits are now lower due to US strength. When does the strength stop? In the short-term a pullback is likely. But as long as fears remain the strength will continue and could continue well into next year. What to do? Don't panic. Consider some JSE listed currency ETFs. Continue with your offshoring strategy. The tables have turned. Emerging markets are much more resilient against the US Dollar than the rest of the G10. Year-to-date, the Dollar has risen a stunning 15% against the G10 (black), but only 5% against emerging markets (blue). EM is the new standard bearer for stability... pic.twitter.com/ToaQvQB9DS — Robin Brooks (@RobinBrooksIIF) September 27, 2022  

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, September 28th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 14:54


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Wednesday, September 28th, 2022. We’re already at hump day! We’ve got a lot to go over today, so let’s get to it. But first… Accountable 2U Using a smartphone or computer opens the door to a host of digital temptations. In a world saturated with pornography and other harmful content, what's a Christian to do? We need to take a proactive approach, welcoming transparency in our digital media choices—and Accountable2You makes that easy. Their accountability software shares detailed activity reports from all your devices, and your kids' devices, in real time to the accountability partners that you choose. With accountability in place, your family can effectively guard against temptations online and live with purity and integrity. Learn more and try it free at Accountable2You.com/FLF https://reason.com/2022/09/27/biden-student-loan-forgiveness-lawsuit-pacific-legal-foundation/ 'Flagrantly Illegal': Law Firm Files Lawsuit To Stop Biden's Student Loan Forgiveness President Joe Biden's plan to forgive hundreds of billions of dollars in student loan debt violates both federal law and the Constitution, according to a just-filed lawsuit from the Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF), a libertarian law firm. This is the first serious challenge to Biden's student loan forgiveness plan, which he announced last month. The lawsuit's plaintiff is Frank Garrison, who's also an attorney at PLF. Garrison borrowed federal student loans to pay for law school, but according to him, Biden's debt forgiveness plan will actually subject him to a financial penalty in the form of a state tax. This gives him standing to sue the U.S. Education Department, his lawsuit argues. According to Garrison, he is already receiving debt relief under Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF), a federal program for borrowers who work in public service at nonprofit organizations. Qualifying borrowers who make a certain number of payments and meet maximum income requirements can have the rest of their debts forgiven by PSLF. Garrison expects to qualify in about four years. Importantly, debt relief under PSLF is not subject to state taxes. Biden's broad forgiveness plan, however, will be taxed as income in Indiana—where Garrison resides—as well as Wisconsin, North Carolina, Minnesota, Mississippi, and Arkansas. Garrison will be "stuck with a tax bill that makes him financially worse off than continuing with his repayment program under PSLF," according to the lawsuit. "He did not ask for cancellation, doesn't want it, and has no way to opt out of it." While the Pacific Legal Foundation's theory is that this gives Garrison standing to sue the Education Department, the lawsuit's case against the Biden forgiveness plan is more straightforward: PLF is arguing that Biden has violated both the Constitution and the Administrative Procedure Act, which give Congress rather than the president the power to make new regulations. Biden's new plan will forgive up to $20,000 worth of debt for many borrowers. The plan could cost U.S. taxpayers anywhere between $300 billion and a trillion dollars. A low estimate of the cost per individual taxpayer is $2,100. The administration has claimed that it has the power to unilaterally forgive student loan debts without consulting Congress. As justification, Biden has cited 2003's Higher Education Relief Opportunities for Students, or HEROES Act. This law gave the president some authority to cancel or delay student loan repayments during national emergencies, with the clear intention of offering relief to borrowers who were serving in combat operations during the war on terror. Biden's view is that the COVID-19 pandemic counts as a national emergency, even though he has now declared it definitively "over." PLF's lawsuit takes issue with the pandemic justification for debt relief, noting that the harms purportedly ameliorated with debt forgiveness are not a "direct result" of the "national emergency," as required by the HEROES Act. Loan forgiveness is set to kick in sometime next month. https://www.theepochtimes.com/officials-issue-mandatory-evacuation-orders-ahead-of-hurricane-ian_4757626.html?utm_source=partner&utm_campaign=BonginoReport Officials Issue ‘Mandatory’ Evacuation Orders Ahead of Hurricane Ian Hurricane Ian is now a major Category 3 hurricane as it lashes the western portion of Cuba, although the storm is still forecast to strengthen further before hitting western Florida as officials have implemented mandatory evacuation orders. “This is a much different storm. [Hurricane] Charley was a lot smaller, it was powerful, it was a Category 4. Most of the damage from Charley was from wind and wind destruction,” DeSantis said on Tuesday morning, referring to a 2004 Category 4 storm that hit western Florida’s coast. Hurricane Ian’s sustained winds intensified to about 125 mph on Tuesday morning as it made landfall in western Cuba, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). It’s expected to hit near the Tampa area around 2 a.m. on Thursday morning, NHC modeling shows. When it makes landfall, Ian will be at least a Category 3 with 111 mph winds at the minimum, according to the model. The governor and other Florida officials warned that people around Tampa should heed evacuation orders due to the significant flooding that Ian is expected to bring. Storm surge of between 5 to 10 feet is anticipated for Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor, said the NHC in its update Tuesday. Five to 8 feet of storm surge is also expected between the Suwannee River to Anclote (An-cloat) River areas. “We expect to have to evacuate 300,000 people, and that will take some time,” Hillsborough County Administrator Bonnie Wise told reporters. “That’s why we are starting today.” https://thepostmillennial.com/shannon-brandt-man-who-ran-down-teen-for-being-a-republican-free-with-no-house-arrest-and-low-bond?utm_campaign=64487 North Dakota man who killed teen claiming he was 'Republican extremist' out on low bond, no house arrest Shannon Brandt, the suspect who ran down 18-year-old Cayler Ellingson for being a Republican with his SUV in McHenry, North Dakota last week, is out free with no curfew and no house arrest. According to Fox News, 41-year-old Brandt, who has been charged with vehicular homicide and leaving the scene of a deadly accident, was released after posting a $50,000 bond, something former assistant US attorney Neama Rahman called "very low" and "woefully inadequate." A suspect can be released by posting bail, which is typically 10 percent of the required bond, meaning Brandt would be free after only providing $5,000. The incident occurred on September 18 when the two had a political dispute after a street dance that was held at a local bar. Brandt admitted that his actions were politically motivated because the teen was part of a "Republican extremist group." There is "no evidence" Ellingson was part of any such group according to North Dakota Highway Patrol Captain Bryan Niewind. As part of his release, Brandt cannot leave North Dakota, cannot consume alcohol, must be in a sobriety program, cannot possess a firearm, and must not be within 300 feet of the Ellingson family. President Joe Biden posted a video to his official Twitter telling Democrats to "fight back against extreme MAGA Republicans" days after Brandt's actions. https://thepoliticalinsider.com/after-u-s-soldiers-were-told-to-go-on-food-stamps-congress-finds-another-12-billion-for-ukraine/ After U.S. Soldiers Were Told to Go On Food Stamps, Congress Finds Another $12 Billion for Ukraine Congressional lawmakers agreed to a deal that would provide another $12 billion in aid to Ukraine, which would bring the total military and economic resources provided to over $66 billion. The news follows the Senate passing a $40 billion aid package in May, along with a $14 billion package in March. President Biden earlier this month asked Congress for an additional $11.7 billion in aid for Ukraine, with Congress, in turn, seems to be jumping at his behest. As a reminder, also earlier this month the Army told active-duty American soldiers to go on food stamps if they were unable to afford food thanks to inflation. Food stamps for American soldiers, endless billions for Ukraine. This is your country now. Reuters reports that the funding agreement for Ukraine would address a variety of financial needs for Ukraine, including the hope that it would “reduce future energy costs.” Meanwhile, the White House which had been touting lower gas prices despite them being well over the national average when Biden took office, has suddenly gone quiet. Why? Because they’re going back up again. FLF Magazine: We are on a mission to make magazines great again. So, subscribe to our Fight Laugh Feast magazine. This is a quarterly mini-book like experience, packed full of a variety of authors that includes theologically-driven cultural commentary, a Psalm of the quarter, recipes for feasting, laughter sprinkled throughout the glossy pages, and more. Sign your church up, sign your grumpy uncle up, and while you are at it…sign up the Pope, Elon Musks, and Russel Moore. Disclaimer: This magazine will guarantee various responses and CrossPolitic is not held liable for any of them. Reading the whole magazine may cause theological maturation, possibly encourage your kids to take the Lord’s Supper with you, and will likely cause you to randomly chuckle in joy at God’s wondrous world. Sign up today! Four issues and $60 per year, that is it. Go to fightlaughfeast.com right now to sign up!. https://www.boundingintosports.com/2022/09/former-washington-state-coach-nick-rolovich-has-no-regrets-not-complying-with-state-vaccine-mandate-even-after-being-fired/ Former Washington State Coach Nick Rolovich Has ‘No Regrets’ Not Complying With State Vaccine Mandate Even After Being Fired Former Washington State coach Nick Rolovich revealed why he did not take the Covid vaccine last year, a decision which ultimately led to his firing after some “ugly conversations” happened between him and the college’s administration. Coach Rolovich sat down with sports reporter Allison Williams, host of the new Daily Wire exclusive series Breakaways, and spoke regarding his thoughts on the impacts of the controversial vaccine as well as how his stance as a traditional Catholic ultimately led to confrontations with other staff after he chose not to comply with the mandate. Rolovich and four other assistant coaches were fired from Washington State in 2021 for their non-compliance with the state vaccine mandate. Because of this, Rolovich was unable to collect the estimated $9 million remaining on his contract with the school. Feeling his rights had been violated, he embarked on a $25 million wrongful termination suit against his former employers. https://twitter.com/i/status/1574072486223699972 - Play Video “The priest broke it down to me,” said Rolovich. “Because he wanted to know why, and I said, ‘This is just how I’m feeling,’ and he says, ‘Well, that’s your conscience talking to you and the Catholic Church recognizes your conscience.’ That was what was speaking to me the whole time.” However, Rolovich made it clear that his biggest regret regarding the whole situation was not making it public earlier while still an employee at Washington State that he was not going to take the shot on the grounds of religious reasons. One tense moment came with Pat Chun, the Washington State athletic director, who laid down the potential pathways things would go down if Rolovich decided to still not comply. “[Chun] said, ‘You got four options: resign, get the vax, get a medical exemption, get religious exemption,” said Rolovich. “I’m not getting the shot. I’m not resigning. I’m not going to get a medical because I could go get a fan card, easy, but then I’d be lying… I’m going to do a religious [exemption]. And they both said ‘We’re not going to believe you, you know, the governor’s not happy with you.'” Rolovich did choose the religious exemption route, which was even approved by the school’s Human Resources department, but Chun intervened and wrote a letter putting Rolovich’s reasoning into question, going as far as to call him a science denier. Because of Chun, Rolovich’s exemption was shot down. Rolovich was not the only employee who was intentionally targeted for questioning the vaccine. David Fox, who was the school’s director of football operations, had asked the school’s professor of pathology and infectious diseases during a presentation made to the athletic department in a presentation regarding the vaccine, whether it had any long-term impact on women and their ability to become pregnant. This question upset Chun, who later decided he would not renew Fox’s contract with the school. Rolovich was upset with Chun’s decision regarding Fox, saying “I already said to renew him, I was happy with the job he did.” A verbal argument spun out when Rolovich confronted Chun, and from there everything got worse. For now, Rolovich doesn’t know whether he’ll ever be able to obtain another position coaching again, but if that’s the case, he’s at peace with it. “Sitting here seven months later, to me, God was right, trusting that feeling and that belief really did end up helping me out.” Last thing I’ll say in this newsbrief, is this… Pat Chun? AD of WSU, you need to resign. You are a coward, who needs to be away from a leadership position over young men, and has no business being in the position that you are. Your handling over this situation is revolting, and you need to be on your knees, repenting to the Lord. Will Pat ever hear this? Probably not… but worth mentioning. By the way, if you want to call for Pat to step down, you can send him an email at Athletics.Director@wsu.edu. This has been your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. If you liked the show, hit that share button for me down below. If you want to come to our conference next week, if you want to sign up for a club membership, or sign up for a magazine subscription, you can do all of that at fightlaughfeast.com. As always, if you’d like to email me a news story, ask about our conference, or become a corporate partner of CrossPolitic, email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News, I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great day, and Lord bless.