Podcasts about Spanish flu

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1918–1920 pandemic of H1N1 influenza A virus

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  • Oct 11, 2021LATEST
Spanish flu

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Best podcasts about Spanish flu

Latest podcast episodes about Spanish flu

Tell Me What to Google
The Anti-Mask Controversy: It's Not New

Tell Me What to Google

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 34:18


"Anti-Mask" rants have taken over school board meetings, city council meetings, airplanes and stores throughout America. But did people act like this during the Flu Pandemic of 1918? In this episode, we examine what happened during the "Spanish Flu" when mask mandates were put into effect. Then we chat with Comedian Kelly Collette for the quick quiz! Review this podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-internet-says-it-s-true/id1530853589   Get half off when you sign up for an annual plan at One Day University: http://onedayu.com/internet Bonus episodes and content available at http://Patreon.com/MichaelKent For 15% at SCOTTeVEST, visit http://scottevest.cwv7.net/a3VBZ

What's Left?
Covid: The Cure for Capitalist Crisis (An Economic Analysis)

What's Left?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021


 We discuss Fabio Vighi's  Marxist explanation for what is behind the lockdowns, vaccine mandates and general pandemic panic over the last 2 years.  We are joined by Robert Doyle, a banker in the United States, to help explain some of the nuances described in the article.  The entire article is worth reading before you view/listen to this episode. Read the full article this episode is based onhttps://thephilosophicalsalon.com/a-self-fulfilling-prophecy-systemic-collapse-and-pandemic-simulation/Resources for this episode:19:59 :   History of Spanish Flu ;https://www.history.com/topics/world-war-i/1918-flu-pandemic How Pandemics Endhttps://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/20/learning/lesson-of-the-day-how-pandemics-end.html57:32:   Big Short Explainedhttps://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/020115/big-short-explained.asp1:00 :  Gold Standard – Great Depressionhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/nathanlewis/2020/02/25/did-the-gold-standard-cause-the-great-depression/?sh=24b797667c63 History of the Gold Standardhttps://www.thebalance.com/what-is-the-history-of-the-gold-standard-33061361:03  to 1:06.  Modern Monetary Theory (MMT)https://www.fraserinstitute.org/studies/primer-on-modern-monetary-theory·         Monetary Policy https://www.frbsf.org/education/teacher-resources/what-is-the-fed/monetary-policy/·         Fiscal Policyhttps://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/basics/fiscpol.htm ·         Yield Curve and Interest Rates https://www.investopedia.com/articles/03/122203.asp·         Fed “printing” Money : https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/082515/who-decides-when-print-money-us.asp 1:10 :  Fed Balance Sheethttps://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-the-feds-balance-sheet-is-expected-to-top-9-trillion-after-it-starts-reducing-its-monthly-asset-purchases-116261356421:12 :  Money Multiplier in Economicshttps://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/multipliereffect.asp 1:27 :  Fed and Repurchase Orders,  https://www.bankrate.com/banking/federal-reserve/why-the-fed-pumps-billions-into-repo-market/  Fed and Municipal Bonds https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2021/08/31/how-well-did-the-feds-intervention-in-the-municipal-bond-market-work/; Fed and Corporate Bondshttps://www.barrons.com/articles/federal-reserve-corporate-bond-portfolio-516226797011:54 :  U3 v U6 unemployment:  https://www.thebalance.com/what-is-the-real-unemployment-rate-3306198ITunes and Spotify only show our last 150 episodes:To see all our episodes go to:What's Left? Website:Contact us @:  What's Left Over: (alternate site if we are cancelled)https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCieONcoThHsDofxLo8K3_yQSubscribe to What's Left? on Telegram:iTunes: Spotify: Bitchute: YouTube:  LBRY: Telegram :Odysee: stitcher: Googleplaymusic: 

Hold The Line with Buck Sexton
PANDEMICS: FROM THE BLACK DEATH TO COVID-19

Hold The Line with Buck Sexton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 44:53


Covid-19 may be the latest pandemic to hit mankind, but it's scope and lethality are far from unprecedented. In this special edition of Hold The Line, Buck speaks to historians and experts about the great pandemics of history, from the Black Death and Spanish Flu, to the modern plagues of SARS and Covid-19.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition
This Week's Top Stories - Coronavirus Deaths Surpass Spanish Flu, New Zealanders Smuggle KFC & More

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 27:37


The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 surpasses that of the 1918 Spanish flu, New Zealand police arrest men suspected of smuggling fried chicken, and a belief in ghosts skyrockets. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Simple English News Daily
Wednesday 22nd September 2021. World News. Today: UN general assembly. Guterres on the abyss. US COVID worse than Spanish flu. Haiti deporta

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 8:02


World News in 7 minutes. Wednesday 22nd September 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Help us with our testimonials page! send7.org/testimonialsToday: UN general assembly. Guterres on the abyss. US COVID worse than Spanish flu. Haiti deportations. India heroin haul. Pakistan cricket problems. Russia killed Litvinenko. Croatia unidentified woman. Sudan coup attempt. Burkina Faso strong man.Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Stephen Devincenzi and Khadija Tahir.SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Joe Madison the Black Eagle
FLASHBACK: Remembering The 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic

Joe Madison the Black Eagle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 13:09


Listen to the Joe Madison Show tomorrow for Annette Fournier's complete documentary about the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, and listen here as Joe Madison rebroadcasts their interview from June 2020 about the similarities between the deadly pandemic from 100 years ago and the even deadlier one happening today.

The Mike Madison Show
Tu 9.21.21 Hospital Profits During Covid? / Comparisons to Spanish Flu Deaths

The Mike Madison Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 81:30


The profiteering on Covid is out of control and assures that we will be trapped in this system until we DEMAND an end to the fearmongering. Hear the latest local hospital profit numbers! And they are now saying Covid has killed more than the Spanish Flu. That is ridiculous on many levels.

The Dan O'Donnell Show
COVID-19 is Not the Spanish Flu. Not Even Close

The Dan O'Donnell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 80:45


The Complete Show from 9-21-2021

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
The O'Reilly Update, September 21, 2021

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 12:49


Republican Governors request a meeting with Joe Biden to discuss the border crisis, the President addresses the United Nations, the White House ends the international travel ban, COVID's carnage surpasses the Spanish Flu. Plus, Bill's Message of the Day, James Bond goes woke. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bill O'Reilly
The O'Reilly Update, September 21, 2021

Bill O'Reilly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 12:49


Republican Governors request a meeting with Joe Biden to discuss the border crisis, the President addresses the United Nations, the White House ends the international travel ban, COVID's carnage surpasses the Spanish Flu.Plus, Bill's Message of the Day, James Bond goes woke. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Spanish Flu compared to Covid 19

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 8:30


Steve Gruber discusses news and headlines.

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 69: Tango Alpha Lima: Convention AAR, Army Vaccine Mandate and Suicide Prevention

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 32:55


The hiatus is over and Team Tango is back to tackle the news of the week. CV kicks things off with a reminiscence of the podcast team's experience at National Convention in Phoenix. Jeff revisits the subject of COVID-19 vaccines for the military, now that the Army has issued mandates. Ashley discusses how purpose plays a role in the in reducing the rate of veterans suicide. RAPID FIRE U.S. Flag sewn by POW during Vietnam War heading for Smithsonian WWII veteran meets grade-school pen pal, now National Guard member. Food inflation hits commissaries.

5 Things
Biden to tackle climate, COVID-19 and US alliances at annual UN meeting

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 13:32


The president also again addressed climate on Friday. Plus, thousands of Haitian migrants are still at the Texas border as the U.S. and Mexico send many back to Haiti, COVID-19 has now killed as many Americans as Spanish Flu, the latest tropical storms form in the Atlantic and a new book looks at the final days of the Trump presidency.(Audio: Associated Press)Episode Transcript available hereAlso available at art19.com/shows/5-ThingsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

History Extra podcast
The Paris Peace Conference: everything you wanted to know

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 60:55


Professor David Stevenson answers listener questions on the 1919-20 conference that sought to resolve the aftermath of the First World War In the latest episode in our series on history's biggest topics, Professor David Stevenson explores the 1919–20 conference that sought to resolve the aftermath of the First World War, and whose legacy has been fiercely debated ever since. Was the resulting Treaty of Versailles too harsh on Germany? Did the peacemakers create lasting problems in the Middle East? And what effect did the Spanish Flu have on proceedings? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 9-16-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 5:14


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for September 16th, 2021.A tough statistic for the “it's like the chicken pox” crowd. 19 months into the pandemic, 1 in 500 American residents has died from COVID-19. The death rate for certain demographics age 40-64 is even more stark; for black Americans, 1 in 480 has died, for Hispanics, 1 in 390, and 1 out of every 240 Native Americans have died.Public health officials in Los Angeles County will begin requiring proof of at least one dose of a vaccine by October 7 for customers and employees at indoor bars, wineries, breweries, and nightclubs. By November 4, full vaccination will be required. Government guidelines in England say healthcare staff can decide whether children 12-15 get a vaccine against their parents' wishes. School headmasters worry this virtually guarantees disruptive protests are right around the corner. Shots will be administered by School Age Immunization Service teams and if parents don't give their consent but the child is deemed able to make an informed decision and wants the vaccine, the parents will be overruled. There was a time it was believed when someone an anti-vaxxer knew personally died of COVID, it would change their minds. A new Pew poll says maybe not. 72% of American adults know someone who's been hospitalized or killed. The death count in America is now a few thousand away from surpassing the 1918 Spanish Flu as the single largest death toll from a pandemic in the U.S. It's probably the saddest aspect of the vaccine debate, friends and family ripping themselves apart and ending relationships over their disagreements. A Harris poll shows 33% of vaccinated Americans have stopped seeing people they know because they haven't been vaccinated. 8% don't intend to ever socialize with them again even if they do eventually get vaccinated. In the United States cases were down 8%, deaths are up 37%, and hospitalizations are down 4% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,523,673 active cases in the United States.With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations over 14 days are Montana up 47%, Ohio 40%, West Virginia 34%, Alaska 31%, and Idaho and New Hampshire 29%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Knox, KY. Perry, KY. Monroe, KY. Martin, KY. Powell, KY. Whitley, KY. White, IL. Lincoln, MT. Russell, KY. And Lewis, WV. There have been at least 666,598 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related.The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 68.7%, Connecticut at 67.3%, and Maine at 67%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 40%, Wyoming at 40.2%, and Idaho at 40.3%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 54%.The 5 countries with the largest recent 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Ethiopia up 102%. Kosovo 3%. And South America, Oceana, and Australia 2%. Globally, cases were down 17% and deaths were down 10% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 27. There are 18,641,559 active cases around the world.The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 164,509. The U.K. 30,597. India 30,361. Turkey 28,224. And Iran 19,731. There have now been at least 4,659,290 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Getting Through This with Tom and Scott

If only there was a Tom and Scott to help people in 1918 get through the Spanish Flu. There were no podcasts then, only wax cylinders that would have had to be shipped to each listener. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tom-saunders9/support

RNZ: Morning Report
Waiouru museum exhibit highlights 1918 pandemic

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 3:44


As the world continues to battle Covid-19 and New Zealand is in the midst of another lockdown, a pandemic that struck over 100-years ago is in part being highlighted in an exhibition at the National Army Museum in Waiouru. Due to open last week, it's now delayed until a return to alert level 2 or lower. The exhibition focuses on what came to be known as the Death Ship, a troop ship from this country enroute to the U.K, but hit by the Spanish Flu in 1918. Andrew McRae takes up the story.

On The Record on WYPR
History Of Anti-Maskers

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 25:08


A small piece of cloth continues to spark big debate in the U.S. Some Americans believe mandates to wear a mask infringe on their personal freedoms. Turns out, this has happened before. Marian Moser Jones, formerly of the University of Maryland's School of Public Health, tells us about the ‘anti-mask league of 1918.' Jones admits that today's mask-wearing mandates can feel inconvenient, but says we can learn from the Spanish Flu pandemic: “The flu tells us, and the response to the flu tells us, that the more restrictions you have for longer periods of time, the lesser the mortality and the morbidity is going to be.”  Plus, how did that deadly flu play out in Baltimore? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 08.27 - Dr. Lilly on COVID-19

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 40:06


Nick Reed and Dr. John Lilly are live on location at Scramblers Diner for our Heroes Breakfast. Here's what they cover: Different places that the Friday Road Show has been in the past. Liberal Ron COVID-19 deaths. In 2020 (for 8 months), there was 353,000 deaths. In 2021 (for 8 months), there was around 297,000 deaths.  The worst 12 months were from June 2020 to June 2021. Dr. John Lilly talks about the leading cause of death. Lessons from the 1918 Spanish Flu. How does a virus work? Nick talks about his anti-body test that he took several months ago. COVID-19 characteristics, majority of deaths, natural immunity, and more. FDA "off label" use of medication. Treatment that hasn't been promoted. Quarantine vs. civil liberties.

The Gottesdienst Crowd
[Gottesblog] A Reply to the Texas District Paper on Internet Communion — Larry Beane

The Gottesdienst Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 27:17


A Reply to the Texas District Paper on Internet Communion Here is the video of the recent three-martini Texas District convention. Someone shared this with me as a chance to respond to the “Bible Study” that begins at roughly 1:09 and ends at 2:04. The official title is “The Church in a Post-Covid World,” but that's not really what it is about. It is, in fact, an advocacy and apologia for “internet communion.” The presenter is the Rev. Zach McIntosh of Concordia Lutheran Church in San Antonio. He seems like a nice, bright guy. And I have to say that I like the fact that he's a McIntosh. His Highlander ancestors probably fought with mine in the wars of Scottish independence with a confederation known as the Clan of Cats. I have to give him props for that, especially as we Celts are dreadfully outnumbered by Germans in our synod. Having said that, the cuisine in Texas and Louisiana beat anything cooked up by Scots or Germans. That said, I have to give him a demerit for lecturing about Holy Communion (part of his argument for internet communion is the profound importance of the Holy Sacrament) given that his congregation only celebrates it on the first Sunday of the month. I cannot even grasp it. Not counting holidays, that's twelve times a year. That sounds like starvation rations to me. My little congregation offers the Holy Sacrament more than a hundred times a year. Perhaps Pastor McIntosh can give a presentation to his own congregation on Article 24 and the importance of the Holy Eucharist and its frequent reception. I notice that other advocates of home-internet communion tend to be pastors of churches that practice infrequent communion. I have no explanation for this. All that said, Pastor McIntosh is open and honest that this is indeed a position paper more than a Bible Study. He presents it based on four “theses.” A thesis is part of an argument. And during the course of his talk, he openly admits that the real question behind the paper, that is the real thesis statement is: “Is it possible for a local church to rightly participate together in a livestreamed Word and Sacrament service while remaining in their individual homes?” And he is open about his answer: Yes, he is “sympathetic” to the idea of a livestreamed “Word and Sacrament” service. He also admits that the service of the Word is not really problematic, but the service of the Sacrament is the actual controversial issue. And that it is. His four theses are: The Church is Invisible. The Church is Confessional. The Church is Inter-Spatial. The Church is Fraternal.   The Church is Invisible This is really nothing more than the assertion that faith is invisible. He cites Eph 5:33, AC 7&8, he quotes Luther using the term “invisible,” and cites 1 Cor 6:19 and 1 Pet 2:5. The Church is Confessional He explains the development of the ecumenical creeds and the Lutheran confessions. He argues that although the Bible, Creeds, and Confessions never address remote electronic worship, we can use these resources to discern whether we should or should not make use of such technology. One statement that he makes is “There was no Mass when the New Testament was written.” This is simply untrue. Jesus established the Lord's Supper “on the night when He was betrayed.” St. Paul, in 1 Cor 11, explains that the Words of Institution were already a tradition that was handed over to him when he was writing the letter in about 55 AD. Indeed, the Sacrament of the Altar was being celebrated by the apostles on a weekly basis very early on, according to Acts 2:42, when none of the New Testament had even yet been written. Pastor McIntosh refers to this very verse later on. This thesis that “The Church is Confessional” is really just a premise to use the confessions to make arguments regarding administration of the Sacrament. For some reason, he omitted the longest treatment of the Divine Service and Holy Communion in the Book of Concord: Article 24 in the Augsburg Confession and the Apology. The Church is Inter-Spatial This is where the rubber meets the road, as they used to say in Akron, Ohio. This word “inter-spatial” is a neologism coined by the presenter just to make the obvious point that the Church is both universal and local. He addresses the universality of the Church by appealing to the Una Sancta of the Nicene Creed. More accurately, the Church is “catholic.” The word “Universal” is a weak translation of καθολικός, which comes from two words: κατά (kata - according to) and ὅλος (holos - the whole). Catholicity not only means that the Church is more than simply the local congregation, it means that the Church is una owing to a wholesomeness and fullness of doctrine. And it is ironic that he should appeal to the Church's catholicity to argue for communion celebrated by either laymen speaking the verba, or the remote words of a pastor who is not present for the consecration. This is as un-catholic as you can get. It is sectarian, as no historic communion that confesses the Real Presence ever had, or has, practiced this, or confessed a doctrine that allows it. Pastor McIntosh points out the both/and nature of the universality and the locality of the Church by comparing it to an interstate highway that is both within states, and crosses state lines. I think this illustration betrays him, as we are talking about roads that actually exist in space and time. You cannot be on Interstate-10 and not exist somewhere physically. If I'm in a Zoom session in Iowa, then I'm not on I-10. Roads are incarnational. The fact that the road is in California doesn't negate the fact that when I'm driving to Baton Rouge, I'm in Louisiana. He uses the term “ecclesiis sanctorum” from Jerome's Latin of 1 Cor 14:33. He translates this as “multiple churches with many holy ones.” “Sanctorum” is a genitive plural. It is better translated as “churches of the saints,” as does the ESV. Of course, there are multiple churches in the sense of local congregations, even as there is one holy catholic and apostolic Church (una sancta). This reality has nothing to do with internet communion. He tries to argue for internet communion based on Acts 4:42, 46-47 - “breaking bread in their homes.” Of course, prior to Constantine, nearly all Christian worship was conducted in homes. There is no indication that these services were lay-led, or that the pastors somehow conducted services from afar, perhaps by epistle or messenger or carrier pigeon. And local churches meet in homes to this very day, including parishes of our sister church body, the Siberian Evangelical Lutheran Church. I visited one such congregation in 2015, with a Divine Service held in a parishioner's apartment. But the Mass was officiated by ordained clergymen who drove a long way to lead the service. It would be unthinkable to our sister church body to conduct a Divine Service over Zoom, or to just have the laity speak the verba over bread and wine themselves - in spite of the reality that it takes a lot of time and money to physically travel. And it was the same way in the LCMS's frontier days. Pastor McIntosh cites Luther giving assent to meeting “alone in a house somewhere… to baptize and to receive the sacrament” (AE:53:63-64). But the larger context is not lay-led communion or allowing pastors to somehow consecrate from afar. This quotation comes from The German Mass and Order of Service (1526). In it, Luther identifies three types of “divine service or mass.” The first is the Evangelical Latin Mass, to be used in a parochial setting where the people speak Latin. The second is the German Mass, which is to be used for “untrained lay folk” who do not speak Latin. And then there is the “third kind of service,” which: should be a truly evangelical order and should not be held in a public place for all sorts of people. But those who want to be Christians in earnest and who profess the gospel with hand and mouth should sign their names and meet alone in a house somewhere to pray, to read, to baptize, to receive the sacrament, and to do other Christian works. According to this order, those who do not lead Christian lives should be known, reproved, corrected, cast out, or excommunicated, according to the rule of Christ, Matthew 18. Here one could also solicit benevolent gifts to be willingly given and distributed to the poor, according to St. Paul's example, II Corinthians 9. Here would be no need for much and elaborate singing. Here one could set up a brief and neat order for baptism and the sacrament and center everything on the Word, prayer, and love. Here one would need a good short catechism on the Creed, the Ten Commandments, and the Our Father. Nowhere does Luther advocate lay-led or remotely-led clerical ministry of Sacraments. He is describing a house-church - obviously where there is no Evangelical parish church to attend. This was certainly the case in many places during the Reformation. Luther is describing what we would call today, a “church plant,” and avers that “the rules and regulations would soon be ready.” In fact, Luther goes on to say that church planting is not his particular thing, but “if I should be requested to do it, and could not refuse with a good conscience, I should gladly do my part and help as best I can.” He adds, “In the meanwhile, the two above-mentioned orders of service [i.e. the Latin and German parochial Masses] must suffice.” He also warns of the risks of such a church, that care should be taken lest it “turn into a sect.” Pastor McIntosh does finally admit the real crux of the problem: “There's not a pastor there.” So how does a pastor give care and oversight when he's not in the same room? He acknowledges the limits of pastoral care even in the same room, such as the pastor's inability to know about all people who should be excluded from the Christian congregation because of wickedness. He points to St. Paul's giving pastoral care remotely. And here, I think Pastor McIntosh sinks his own boat. Giving remote pastoral care is nothing new. But let's consider how technology has or has not been used. We have audio and video livestreaming today, but we have had the ability to send remote visual and audio images over the air since the 1940s. The LCMS was actually a pioneer in television programming. But no one in decades past, in the Golden Age of television, ever encouraged people at home in the viewing audience to put bread and wine on a TV tray while a televised pastor “teleconsecrated” the elements. There were services for shut-ins, but no suggestion of some kind of “private Mass” with “home communion” over the airwaves. And before TV, we had radio, the technology of which predates the 20th century. And yet not even during World War I and the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic was anyone suggesting the use of the pastor's transmitted radio voice to “teleconsecrate” remote elements. Before radio was the telephone. And even before the telephone, dating back to 1844, Samuel Morse found a way to encode words over telegraph lines. And again, not even in remote frontier locations did anyone even dream of having a pastor send a consecratory telegram or phone in the Words of Institution. And long before electronic communication, we had pen and ink technology and mail delivery. And this is where Pastor McIntosh defeats his own argument. St. Paul indeed provided pastoral care remotely by means of epistles. But not even in 1 Cor 11 does the apostle ask that the verba be read by a layman over bread and wine outside of the pastor's sight and control. Rather, Paul preaches the Word and gives catechetical instruction in writing. Baptisms and Eucharists were conducted by “elders” (presbyters) who were appointed for pastoral service in the local churches. The Church is Fraternal Pastor McIntosh's last thesis has nothing to do with the argument other than to try to prevent argument. He uses AC 26:44 “Diversity does not violate the unity of the Church” to argue that whether one uses internet communion or not, this doesn't affect our unity. He said, “False doctrine, yeah, that's a problem… but not every diverse practice is evidence of doctrinal disagreement.” And that is true. But it is equally true that not every expression of diversity is evidence of correct doctrine. He should not assume that internet communion is as indifferent as the color of the walls in the parish hall. We are dealing with the consecration of the elements. That is not a matter of “anything goes.” Contextually, Article 26 is dealing with diversity in fasting practices, not with consecrating the elements. This is a very different matter. In his conclusion, Pastor McIntosh says, “It's so important to continue to offer, whether it's in a cathedral or in a condo, the gifts of God to the people of God” [including] “the reception of the sacraments.” Yes, this is true. And parish pastors typically celebrate Masses in church buildings on Sundays, and often during the week at hospital beds for patients and at kitchen or living room tables for shut-ins. Yes, we do this both “in the cathedral and in the condo,” so to speak. But the point is that we pastors celebrate and consecrate, we preach, baptize, and absolve as circumstances dictate. We don't just tell the shut-ins to commune themselves. We don't just facetime them and say “magic words” while they hold the phone over bread and wine. That would be to treat the consecration as ex opere operato. Pastor McIntosh's presentation overlooks and omits all of the potential problems of remote consecration - assuming that it is even valid. But let's say that it is valid for the sake of argument. There are unintended consequences. For example, if I'm consecrating at the altar, and I misspeak a word, or get tongue-tied, I can simply repeat the verba. This is what celebrants are instructed to do based on the fact that we have been doing this for nearly two millennia, and stuff happens. But what happens if, unbeknownst to the remote celebrant, the Zoom transmission gets garbled, and the pastor's voice begins to sound like ET on Quaaludes? That happens all the time. So what then? What happens if only part of the verba are heard and the connection drops? What do we tell the viewing audience at home to do with the bread and wine? Are they, or are they not, the body and blood of Christ? It matters. It really does! And how can the pastor be a “steward of the mysteries” while he isn't there? The steward was an ancient office dedicated to table service. The steward could water down a diner's wine if he were getting inebriated, or even cut him off. That's because he is able to watch and listen and make changes based on feedback. Pastors do something similar when they officiate. They may need to consecrate more hosts, or break some in half. They may need to get stingy with the Lord's blood at the last table, or they may need to consecrate more. A theoretical remote communion separates the pastor from his vocation of stewardship. He cannot say what is being consecrated and what is not. In my practice, I count out how many hosts I need and only consecrate those in the paten on the corporal. The rest in the ciborium remain unconsecrated. I consecrate only the wine in the chalice, not every drop in the cruet. So I know what is the Lord's body and blood, and what is not. If I were not in the room, how would I do this? Is the wine in the glasses on the table the only ones consecrated? What about the bottle on the table? If there is a leftover piece of toast from breakfast on the table, is that now consecrated? These are not inconsequential questions. The Eucharist is not do-it-yourself project. Jesus established an office of steward. And how is the reliquiae taken care of afterwards? And if an accidental desecration happens, why should we put the burden on laymen, perhaps miles away, when we pastors are the stewards? And all of the above problems grant the assumption that remote consecration is possible, that this is a valid consecration. One glaring problem is that the pastor's voice never actually comes into contact with the elements. What comes out of a speaker is a simulation of the pastor's voice that fools your brain into thinking that it is his voice - not unlike the RCA Victor dog. In the same way, a Zoom image or a photograph is not actually the person, but is rather a simulation of that person that gives an appearance of that person's presence. Da Vinci's Last Supper is only a painting. It is not really Jesus and the apostles. I argue that because of this reality, it is physically impossible to consecrate the elements remotely. And even if it were possible, it would still open up a Pandora's Box of problems. And this is why we don't tear down Chesterton's Fence. This is why we don't do sectarian things. This is why catholicity is more than just “universality” in the sense that local manifestations of Church are to be found hither and yon. In times past, there have been wars, plagues, tyrannical rulers, and natural disasters that have impeded the ability of pastors to preach and administer Sacraments. We do what we can with our human limitations, and we accept those limitations as part of our humanity - the same humanity that our Lord Jesus Christ took on at His incarnation. Unlike the technocratic Klaus Schwabs of the world, we don't look to transcend those human limitations by means of turning ourselves into transhumanistic cyborgs. The Church is indeed invisible in the sense that faith is not seen by the naked eye. But the Church is also visible, as she gathers around a visible preacher even as faith comes by hearing, heard from someone preaching, one who has been sent (Romans 10). The Church is visible as the administration of the Sacraments is visible, as real, physical bread and wine and water occupy space and time, and we experience them with our bodies by means of our senses. Pastor McIntosh only spoke of the invisible Church, not the visible Church. We must consider both halves of the paradox to get the full picture. The Church is indeed confessional, and our confessions address the question of who is charged with consecrating the elements (AC 14) and how that is to be done (AC 24, Ap 24). The Church is both local and trans-local - as evidenced by the fact that instead of a single temple, we have altars all over the world with the miraculous presence of God resting on them. And Holy Communion is not called “the Sacrament of the Altar” by our confessions for nothing. The elements are consecrated by the Word by means of one authorized to proclaim that Word - not just any person, and not by a simulacrum of a pastor's voice. And indeed, the Church is fraternal. It is an act of fratricide to introduce a divisive, sectarian, ahistorical practice in the Church that leaves people in doubt and scandalized, not to mention leaving behind a host of other chaotic consequences in its wake. At the conclusion of Pastor McIntosh's “Bible Study,” President Newman pointed out that there just so happened to be resolutions pertaining to internet communion yet to be voted on by the body, and that the CTCR and seminary faculties have already weighed in. And to my knowledge, none of them agree with Pastor McIntosh and President Newman that this practice should be done in our churches. Hopefully, this whole uproar about internet communion will be nothing more than an eyebrow-raising little episode in LCMS history that future generations will find quaint when they read about the synod's 21st century history. And in the short term, I hope that our synod will find some way, even with our convoluted polity, to enforce biblical, confessional, and catholic doctrine and practice, and facilitate the restoration of a genuine Eucharistic piety and of yearning for its frequent reception in our churches, an ethos that would make internet communion - not to mention the practice of churches withholding the Sacrament of the Altar for three weeks out of the month - unthinkable.

Discover Lafayette
Dr. Bryan Sibley, Pediatrician Reporting on Rapid Rise in Delta Variant of COVID in Children

Discover Lafayette

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 32:59


Our guest is Dr. Bryan Sibley, a well-known pediatrician in Lafayette who has dedicated his professional life to taking care of our youngest. We asked Bryan to join us to discuss how the Delta variant of COVID has evolved to affect children in ways that the initial wave of coronavirus never did. It's been a tough year and a half for all of us, including pediatricians. In the initial stages of the coronavirus pandemic, children were socially distancing, not in school and playing on their school playgrounds, no longer participating in organized sports and activities. They were staying home and playing in the backyard. For the first time in years, they weren't getting sick, breaking bones, coming down with viruses. Entire days would go by with no children being admitted to the hospital or going in with their parents to see their pediatrician. Dr. Sibley shared that 90% of children's illnesses are caused by respiratory viruses, mostly colds. We typically think that when our little ones get the sniffles it is an allergy, but last spring when all the kids were outside playing and keeping a social distance from others, they didn't get sick! "We usually think it's allergies when kids get the sniffles, but last spring (2020) they were all outside playing and they didn't get sick! We would go two to three days with no kids being admitted to emergency rooms, no admissions for broken arms or twisted. Children were healthy. It was awesome for public health, terrible for pediatricians! Then in April 2021, schools and daycares were reopened, the COVID vaccines rolled out, and in May, June, and July, a wave of sick children began showing up, much sicker than pediatricians across the U. S. had ever seen. While virtually no children got COVID in 2020, by the second week of July 2021, children started getting really sick with COVID, presenting with coughs and runny noses. The 12 to 18 year old group seem to have been hit the hardest, and almost everyone that Dr. Sibley tests in that age group have been positive for COVID. Most are not sick enough to be hospitalized but they have to quarantine and they suffer. Infants and children up to age ten or eleven have not been hit as hard with COVID at this point in time. Previously only a handful of children had been hospitalized, but in the past few weeks, 50 to 60 children per day have been admitted to pediatric hospitals. While there have been a few deaths, most children do get better and get to go home. The Delta variant of COVID has changed all of the expectations as to who will get sick. "This is no longer a benign process for children. The COVID vaccine is not yet available to children under twelve years of age. Testing is ongoing and we anticipate vaccine approval for children sometime this school year. The reality is this Delta variant is more contagious and more severe. Children are dying. Hospitals are at a breaking point with staff, personnel, bed space. The mask mandate has been controversial and Dr. Sibley harkened back to the last major pandemic experienced worldwide: "Last time we had a pandemic, the Spanish Flu in 1918, people got past the crisis by wearing masks. They figured it out. Germs weren't shared and people moved on. They got better." He believes it is important for the health and safety of our children and school administrators that everyone remain masked since the children can't be vaccinated yet. The COVID mask mandate has seemingly been of great help to the outbreak of flu. In a typical flu season, there are millions of cases of flu and thousands of people die. In the 2020-21 flu season, there were less than 5,000 cases in the U. S., an unheard-of occurrence. There were fewer cases than any season on record. The flu vanished. Mask-wearing and hand-washing measures seemed to have kept the flu away. When we spoke of people's concerns about their personal freedoms being taken away by the mask mandates and other measures, Dr.

Convo By Design
New, Now & Next: Evolution in the Kitchen and Bath | 339 | The Wellness & Design Thought Leadership Series Presented By ThermaSol

Convo By Design

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 67:31


Today, we are breaking down new, now and next specifically in the kitchen and bath, part of the Wellness and Design Thought Leadership Series presented by ThermaSol.If the kitchen is the heart of the home, the bathroom would be the frontal cortex…the relaxation center. Both could also be considered the central nervous system setting the tone for our peace of mind and ability to cope with life. Something this important requires planning, product sourcing and both site and space planning. This conversation is a strategic exploration. This is a deep dive into the properties, form and function behind the design itself with a focus on how to maximize every available foot of space. And this is what we are exploring on the show today. This panel was convened to talk about this very subject and this cohort is strong. Designers Jhoiey Ramirez and Christopher Grubb are joined by Boston Firm, Bees Knees Interior Design founders Mary Maloney and Kylie Bodiya talk about developing trends that are shaping new ways we use the kitchen and bath.So listen, we are all really sick of talking about the pandemic, I get it, me too. I have mentioned this before but it bears repeating… Major architectural and design innovations follow moments of great disruption. From earthquakes come foundation reinforcement, fires bring flame retardant and non-flammable materials into modern design, well, a pandemic is no different. In 1918, the Spanish Flu pandemic brought use of subway tile into residential design. Some think it's been a bit overused, fine, that was 100 years ago tiled walls remain a major design choice. Other innovations included use of outdoor sleeping porches which could be directly connected to our love of indoor-outdoor design, use of linoleum, the powder bath as a place for “not family” to use. Uses of outdoor spaces in general because it kept strangers out of the house… More on that, architects like Richard Neutra were experimenting with massive amounts of glass in design which served as both barrier and ability to open the space. “Hygiene and moral health depend on the lay-out of cities,” Le Corbusier said, “without hygiene and health, the social cell becomes atrophied.”That idea from 100 years ago is more powerful now to a new generation experiencing ‘social atrophy' in real time.This is why conversations like these are so important, and you are going to hear some next-gen ideas here. It's exciting. This is New, Now & Next - K and B, part of our continuing Wellness and Design Thought Leadership Series presented by ThermaSol.Are you subscribing to the podcast, if not, please do so you get every episode automatically when they are published. You can find Convo By Design everywhere you find your favorite podcasts and now, you can find us on DesignNetwork dot Org, a destination dedicated to podcasts, all things design and architecture so make sure to check it out.Thank you, Jhoiey, Mary, Kylie and Christopher. Thank you for your time, talent, vision and skill. Thank you Walker Zanger and ThermaSol for your partnership. And, thank you for listening and subscribing to the podcast. Keep those emails coming convo by design at Outlook dot com. I am looking forward to seeing you again in person at a design event near you very soon. Until then, be well and try to take today first.

The John Batchelor Show
1595: Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 80:18


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021. Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.   A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The Softhearted Cynic
Pandemic is nowhere near over

The Softhearted Cynic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 4:47


Epidemiologist : https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/09/covid... Spanish Flu : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3x1aL...

The John Batchelor Show
1574: Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 80:18


Photo: Amsterdam, Netherlands: Promise of marriage to the Führer - Trouwbetuiging aan den Führer - Fotodienst der NSB - NIOD - 156216  CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021. Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.   A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

Speaking of Writers
Sandra Brown- Blind Tiger

Speaking of Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 18:07


Sandra Brown has written masterful romantic suspense novels for decades—72 New York Times bestsellers with more than 80 million copies in print worldwide in 34 languages. In BLIND TIGER (2021), Sandra returns to historical fiction with one of her best books ever. The year 1920 comes in with a roar in this rousing story where Prohibition is the new law of the land, but murder, mayhem, lust, and greed are already institutions in the Moonshine Capitol of Texas. And it just so happens that “blind tiger” is another name for a speakeasy. The social and cultural landscape of the 1920s was strikingly similar to today: Americans were trying to recover from the Spanish Flu, a global pandemic that claimed the lives of millions, and a coordinated women's movement resulted in the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, finally granting women the right to vote. These parallels between the past and present have inspired Sandra Brown to write an unforgettable romance between a young widow and an enigmatic drifter, a mystery spawned from a shocking disappearance and a murder that sets the whole town on edge. Thatcher Hutton, a war-weary soldier on the way back to his cowboy life, jumps from a moving freight train to avoid trouble, but lands in more than he bargained for. On the day he arrives in Foley, Texas, a local woman goes missing. Thatcher, the only stranger in town, is suspected of her abduction, and worse. Standing between him and exoneration are a corrupt mayor, a crooked sheriff, a notorious cathouse madam, a sly bootlegger, feuding moonshiners, and a young widow whose soft features conceal an iron will. What was supposed to be a fresh start for Laurel Plummer turns to tragedy. Left destitute but determined to dictate her own future, Laurel plunges into the lucrative regional industry, much to the dislike of the good ol' boys, who have ruled supreme. Her success quickly makes her a target for cutthroat competitors, whose only code of law is reprisal. As violence erupts, Laurel and—now deputy—Thatcher find themselves on opposite sides of a moonshine war, where blood flows as freely as whiskey. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/steve-richards/support

Own The Future
Hitler's rise to power 100 years ago mirrors 2021 [E245]

Own The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 64:31


Over the weekend, July 29, 2021, marked 100 year anniversary of Hitler's rise to power. The Terrifying news for us in 2021? The path the globe is walking on today bears an eerie resemblance to historical events that gave way to Hitler and the Nazi Germany . . . and the unthinkable atrocities that followed.Time Stamps00:00 100 Year Anniversary of Hitler's Rise to Power 0:31 Intro 1:00 National Socialist Party = "conservative" 1:44 Spanish Flu of 1918 2:39 Hitler, Individual rights? Or collective power? 5:01 Was Hitler a "Capitalist"? 6:04 Progressives becoming "Conservative" 7:10 Fascists with anti-capitalist and Socialist 8:33 The Spanish Flu on 1918 led to rise of conservatism 9:32 Dr Randy Thornhill on Parasitic Stress's affect on Society and Political view. 14:07 Deaths from Spanish flu and Votes for Hitler 18:00 Xenophobia vector of parasites 18:59 Hitler's war against infectious diseases lead to genocidal cleansing 25:37 Euthanasia was "merciful and compassionate" 27:40 Are we in a global social political shift towards collectivism and totalitarianism 29:09 Why are "liberals" acting like "conservatives?" 32:02 Progressivism becoming totalitarianism 34:00 Laws and Morality stems from worldviews 36:10 Libertarianism in Christianity 38:19 What is the source of your morality? Divine Laws 39:40 Beyond "baseline morality" -- uncontrollable moral codes 41:52 Normative family values are relatively "new" in history. 45:15 In Roman and Greece sexual moral codes 49:40 Normative values are new, but the old values are abusive and oppressive 51:43 Yeah that makes sense 52:05 New Pride Flag 53:31 Human Trafficking, real issues ignored. 56:45 Value for Value 58:04 Weaver and Loom 01:01:07 Eugene Ionesco 01:03:49 Help others by asking better Questions Detailed Show Notes and Media/Article links: http://245.lucasskrobot.com/VALUE FOR VALUE- If you get value out of this show— support the show in the value that you've received. You can do that by visiting the website and giving Fiat currency thereORYou can stream bitcoin by listening Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx – Podstation To find one visit http://newpodcastapps.com and find a player with the “VALUE” tag. I personally listen on Breez. If you want to get MORE value out of the show, talk about it with a colleague or co worker, or friend. You will begin to build (hopefully) stronger relationship and culture through texting this to a friend and then talking about the concepts discussed here. Remember, as leaders our first job is to define reality and define culture and that is done brick by brick. Until next time… uncover your purpose, discern the Truth, and own the future.To take more steps to live a focus life to achieve your dreams and fulfill your destiny–get my book Anchored the Discipline to Stop Drifting.  https://amzn.to/2Vwb22nThank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220http://www.LucasSkrobot.comTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lucasskrobotLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucasskrobotInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lucasskrobot★ Support this podcast ★

The John Batchelor Show
1553: Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 80:18


Photo:  LOC caption : "At close grips with the Hun, we bomb the corkshaffer's, etc." Two United States soldiers run past the remains of two German soldiers toward a bunker. Still image from The Battle of the Somme showing a wounded soldier being carried through a trench. The accompanying title frame read:  :British Tommies rescuing a comrade under shell fire. (This man died 30 minutes after reaching the trenches.) CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021. Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.   A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps ..  ..  ..  Permissions For documentary purposes the German Federal Archive often retained the original image captions, which may be erroneous, biased, obsolete or politically extreme. Factual corrections and alternative descriptions are encouraged separately from the original description. Additionally errors can be reported at this page to inform the Bundesarchiv. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Western_Front_(World_War_I)_2.jpg At_close_grips2.jpg: H.D. Gridwood The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2.jpg: Geoffrey Malins Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-R05148,_Westfront,_deutscher_Soldat.jpg: Unknown FT-17-argonne-1918.gif: Unknow (U.S. Army soldier or employee) Royal_Irish_Rifles_ration_party_Somme_July_1916.jpg: Royal Engineers No 1 Printing Company. Gotha_G_IV_Flug.jpg: Unknown author derivative work: Rupertsciamenna (talk) .. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unportedlicense. | You are free:to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work - to remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions: -  attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
Can pandemics cause empires to fall?

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 13:47


Plagues like the black death or the 1918 pandemic are not solely responsible for the rise and fall of civilizations and empires, but they do play an important role in history. Investigating how plagues have impacted civilizations in the past has offered Cambridge political economist John Rapley some clues into the impact of COVID-19 on our world today.

Government Secrets  Podcast
Worst Cases of Military Waste & How The US Created The Spanish Flu - Gov't Secrets Ep. 050

Government Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 71:05


The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Nicole Moore: Surviving a Shark Attack

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 28:25


On Jan. 31, 2011, Nicole Moore waded into the Caribbean Sea outside a resort in Cancun and was viciously attacked by a bull shark. She lost 60 per cent of her blood, an arm, was left with a permanently disfigured leg, and in intervening years had countless surgeries. She laid it all out in her book, "Shark Assault: An Amazing Story of Survival" - which brought her to The Agenda in 2016 for a conversation about pain, loss, and resiliency. Then, Hamilton-Niagara Hub journalist Justin Chandler recounts how Niagara-on-the-Lake's experience during the Spanish Flu is commemorated there. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Delving into Niagara's Spanish Flu

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 8:00


Every year since the Spanish flu outbreak in 1919, people have made a pilgrimage to Niagara-on-the-Lake to honour the Polish men who died at a military training camp - and the Elizabeth Ascher, the "angel of mercy" who cared for them. Hamilton-Niagara Ontario Hub journalist Justin Chandler recounts this unique history. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hoochin' & Hollerin' Podcast
Firsts: Midnight Sun Chapters 18-20

Hoochin' & Hollerin' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 71:59


Monique and Ciera try the Sweet Heat cocktail, discuss how Chapters 18-20 are full of firsts, announce this episode's Prom King, and give a brief lesson on the Spanish Flu.

CHEST Pulse
COVID-19: How Did 1918 Prepare Us for Today? How Will 2020-2021 Prepare Us for Tomorrow?

CHEST Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 57:04


The Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918 has in many ways guided the public health, economic, and social responses to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Most of those “lessons learned” proved useful, many perhaps not, and certainly, some have been controversial. This episode examines historical lessons from 1918, how they played out for COVID-19, and how these two pandemics will help us (hopefully) prepare for the next one. (Originally recorded June 24, 2021) Moderator: Ryan Maves, MD, FCCP. Panelists: James Lawler, MD, MPH, FIDSA, and Dale C. Smith, PhD. For more tools to help in the fight against COVID-19, visit CHEST's COVID-19 Resource Center at chestnet.org/COVID19. 

The John Batchelor Show
1515: Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 80:18


Photo: i was there with the yanks on the western front. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021. Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.   A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The Coconuts Podcast
Why Manila's MRT-3 train welcomes cats on board but not children, with Kristine Fonacier | The Coconuts Podcast | Jul 16, 2021

The Coconuts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 55:04


Metro Manila's MRT-3 train line recently announced that pets are now allowed onboard their trains, much to the delight of pet lovers everywhere. But why do fur babies have more rights to travel over… actual babies? According to the city's Covid-19 regulations, persons under 17 years old and above 65 are still not allowed to ride trains during this time, and we speak to Coconuts Manila Regional Managing Editor Kristine Fonacier to find out more.Other stories include:Mask rule violators in Canggu fined IDR1 million on the spot | Thailand gives green light to Sinovac, AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine cocktail | Missing piss-tol: Police officer leaves gun in shopping mall toilet | Emergency PPKM may be extended by 6 weeks: reports | Malaysian health minister mistakes Spanish Flu for Spanish Fly during university talk | Taal Volcano remains under high alert; 185 earthquakes detected over the past 24 hours | Vaccine-crashing Singapore cat turns out to be neighborhood star | Soldiers open fire, disperse crowds refilling oxygen tanks in YangonThe Coconuts Podcast delivers impactful, weird, and wonderful reporting by our journalists on the ground in eight cities: Singapore, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Manila, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Yangon, and Bali. Listen to headline news and insightful interviews on matters large and small, designed for people located in – or curious about – Southeast Asia and Hong Kong.

The John Batchelor Show
1498: Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 80:18


Photo: he British Advance in the West. Huge mountain of empty shell casings. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete, eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021. Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.   A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1480: Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 80:18


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021. Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.   A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1468: Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 80:18


Photo: British and German wounded, Bernafay Wood, 19 July 1916. Photo by Ernest Brooks.. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nick Lloyd #Unbound. The complete eighty-minute interview. June 5, 2021. Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.   A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

Flop of the Heap
Wildcat- “We'd Get the Spanish Flu”

Flop of the Heap

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 63:44


John and Marla go West to search for Broadway Oil, and find only tar. Find out what made Lucille Ball's only musical performance so “lame.” Shenanigans ensue.Wildcat- 1960 - Alvin TheatreMusic- Cy ColemanLyrics- Carolyn LeighBook- N. Richard Nash

The John Batchelor Show
1461: 8/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 7:45


Photo:  8/8   Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.  A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences.35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps 

The John Batchelor Show
1461: 7/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 15:55


Photo: The Council of Four (from left to right): David Lloyd George, Vittorio Emanuele Orlando, Georges Clemenceau and Woodrow Wilson in Versailles, 1919 7/8   Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.  A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences.35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1460: 6/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 8:10


Photo:  6/8   Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.  A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences.35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1459: 5/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 13:40


Photo:  5/8   Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.  A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences.35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1458: 4/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 8:35


Photo:  4/8   Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.  A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences.35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1457: 3/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 15:05


Photo:  3/8   Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.  A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences.35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps    

The John Batchelor Show
1456: 2/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 10:35


Photo:  2/8   Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.  A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences.35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps 

The John Batchelor Show
1456: 1/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 11:15


Photo:  The Entente Powers were a coalition of countries led by France, Britain, Russia, Italy, Japan and the United States against the Central Powers of Germany, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire, Bulgaria and their colonies during the First World War (1914–1918).   Here: 1914 Russian poster depicting the Triple Entente..  ..  .. 1/8 Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover.  A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. As Lloyd reveals, far from being a site of attrition and stalemate, the Western Front was a simmering, dynamic “cauldron of war” defined by extraordinary scientific and tactical innovation. It was on the Western Front that the modern technologies―machine guns, mortars, grenades, and howitzers―were refined and developed into effective killing machines. It was on the Western Front that chemical warfare, in the form of poison gas, was first unleashed. And it was on the Western Front that tanks and aircraft were introduced, causing a dramatic shift away from nineteenth-century bayonet tactics toward modern combined arms, reinforced by heavy artillery, that forever changed the face of war. Brimming with vivid detail and insight, The Western Front is a work in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman and John Keegan, Rick Atkinson and Antony Beevor: an authoritative portrait of modern warfare and its far-reaching human and historical consequences.35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps 

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast
Important Lesson From Spanish Flu Pandemic Of 1918 - Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS)

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 7:37


• Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! • How to Bulletproof your Immune System Course • Dr. Berg's Beginner Guide to Healthy Keto & Intermittent Fasting Plan • Intermittent Fasting Basics for Beginners • Dr. Berg's Healthy Ketogenic Diet Basics: Step 1: https://youtu.be/vMZfyEy_jpI Step 2: https://youtu.be/mBqpaAKtnXE Recent research uncovered some important lessons from the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C

The Readout Loud
Episode 161: Biotech meme stocks, the lessons of Spanish Flu, & becoming a pandemic celebrity

The Readout Loud

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 38:09


First, we discuss Ginkgo Bioworks, the multibillion-dollar biotech company with grand ambitions, a famous ticker symbol, and an affinity for memes. Then, STAT's Helen Branswell joins us to discuss a topic on everyone's mind: How will the Covid-19 pandemic end? Finally, we'll talk about the modern phenomenon of the pandemic celebrity and the case of Ashish Jha, TV's ever-present Covid-19 expert.