Podcasts about peasants

Pre-industrial agricultural laborer or farmer with limited land ownership

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Best podcasts about peasants

Latest podcast episodes about peasants

New Books in British Studies
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in Early Modern History
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Intellectual History
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Literary Studies
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in History
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in European Studies
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books Network
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 3 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 31:02


Part 3 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 6 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 29:30


Part 6 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 5 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 30:41


Part 5 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 4 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 31:03


Part 4 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 1 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 31:45


Part 1 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 2 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 30:59


Part 2 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Jonathan Kogan Show
Biden's Speech: An Apolitical Take - #76

The Jonathan Kogan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 28:48


Joe Biden's speech was "interesting" to say the least. However, there is a huge problem on the internet. There seems to only be "political" takes on the speech from Democrats, Republicans, and Independents, but no "apolitical" takes without bias. The Jonathan Kogan Show is here to solve that. On this podcast, we only give honest, apolitical takes on difficult issues on behalf of the people aka the peasants of society (not the propaganda arm of the elites trying to shape the narrative).So, was Biden's speech good, normal, or did it seem like we were watching a Dictator in the Third Reich?Rumble - https://rumble.com/v1iidrt-bidens-speech-an-apolitical-take-76.html ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Jonathan Kogan Show
Biden's Speech: An Apolitical Take - #76

The Jonathan Kogan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 28:48


Joe Biden's speech was "interesting" to say the least. However, there is a huge problem on the internet. There seems to only be "political" takes on the speech from Democrats, Republicans, and Independents, but no "apolitical" takes without bias. The Jonathan Kogan Show is here to solve that. On this podcast, we only give honest, apolitical takes on difficult issues on behalf of the people aka the peasants of society (not the propaganda arm of the elites trying to shape the narrative).So, was Biden's speech good, normal, or did it seem like we were watching a Dictator in the Third Reich?Rumble - https://rumble.com/v1iidrt-bidens-speech-an-apolitical-take-76.html ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Living Chassidus Podcast
SAI Tishrei 5783 Kickoff with Rabbi Yossi Paltiel

The Living Chassidus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 80:08


Michal Weiss explains how the SAI program for Elul and Tishrei works. Rabbi Yossi Paltiel speaks about The King in the Field and the Peasants in the Palace. Sign up here: https://livingchassidus.org/sai/

Father's Rage English Podcast
54 F-Rage English Podcast - Season Two - Ep.54 - Death of a Government Cleark by Anton Chekhov

Father's Rage English Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 11:20


The Death Of A Government Clerkby Anton ChekhovFULL TEXT - https://lnnk.in/iidJONE fine evening, a no less fine government clerk called Ivan Dmitritch Tchervyakov was sitting in the second row of the stalls(партере), gazing (смотря) through an opera glass at the Cloches de Corneville. He gazed and felt at the acme of bliss(на пике блаженства). But suddenly. . . . In stories one so often meets with this "But suddenly." The authors are right: life is so full of surprises! But suddenly his face puckered up(сморщилось), his eyes disappeared, his breathing was arrested . . . he took the opera glass from his eyes, bent over and . . . "Aptchee!!" he sneezed as you perceive. It is not reprehensible (предосудительно) for anyone to sneeze anywhere. Peasants sneeze and so do police superintendents, and sometimes even privy councillors. All men sneeze. Tchervyakov was not in the least confused, he wiped his face with his handkerchief, and like a polite man, looked round to see whether he had disturbed any one by his sneezing. But then he was overcome with confusion. He saw that an old gentleman sitting in front of him in the first row of the stalls was carefully wiping his bald head and his neck with his glove and muttering something to himself. In the old gentleman, Tchervyakov recognised Brizzhalov, a civilian general serving in the Department of Transport."I have spattered(забрызгал) him," thought Tchervyakov, "he is not the head of my department, but still it is awkward. I must apologise."Tchervyakov gave a cough, bent his whole person forward, and whispered in the general's ear."Pardon, your Excellency, I spattered you accidentally. . . .""Never mind, never mind.""For goodness sake excuse me, I . . . I did not mean to.""Oh, please, sit down! let me listen!"Tchervyakov was embarrassed, he smiled stupidly and fell to gazing at the stage. He gazed at it but was no longer feeling bliss. He began to be troubled by uneasiness. In the interval, he went up to Brizzhalov, walked beside him, and overcoming his shyness, muttered(пробормотал):"I spattered you, your Excellency, forgive me . . . you see . . . I didn't do it to . . . .""Oh, that's enough . . . I'd forgotten it, and you keep on about it!" said the general, moving his lower lip impatiently."He has forgotten, but there is a fiendish(дьявольский) light in his eye," thought Tchervyakov, looking suspiciously(подозрительно) at the general. "And he doesn't want to talk. I ought to explain to him . . . that I really didn't intend . . . that it is the law of nature or else he will think I meant to spit(плевать) on him. He doesn't think so now, but he will think so later!"On getting home, Tchervyakov told his wife of his breach(нарушение) of good manners. It struck him that his wife took too frivolous a view of the incident; she was a little frightened, but when she learned that Brizzhalov was in a different department, she was reassured(успокоилась)."Still, you had better go and apologise," she said, "or he will think you don't know how to behave in public.""That's just it! I did apologise, but he took it somehow queerly(странно) . . . he didn't say a word of sense. There wasn't time to talk properly."FULL TEXT - https://lnnk.in/iidJ

Croco's Corner
From Heirs To Peasants: Spicy Portugal II

Croco's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 26:23


Welcome to our second From Heirs To Peasants, in this edition we continue our convo on the history of spices. Hope you enjoy!

Croco's Corner
From Heirs To Peasants: Spicy Portugal I

Croco's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 36:59


Welcome to... From Heirs To Peasants. This is our very first spin off from Problems In History, where we aim to look at the history of the very things that effect us every day. For our first topic Anthony and Nyle discuss the history of spices!

Jet talk with Tate
Jet talk shorts | Kings vs. Peasants

Jet talk with Tate

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 0:59


There are important men and unimportant men. A mans value is built in the gym, in work, in war. They become powerful via effort. There is no such thing as an "ugly" man. Simply men who are lazy and men who are not. Which are you? JettalkwithTate.com

Cancelled Culture TODAY
By arguing that Leopold's illegal state monopoly was robbing British merchants as well as African peasants, Morel was able to enlist

Cancelled Culture TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 0:46


Explaining History (explaininghistory) (explaininghistory)
The Soviet State and the Peasants (Part Two)

Explaining History (explaininghistory) (explaininghistory)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 26:27


The world of the Soviet peasantry was complex and seemingly contradictory, and did not easily fall into the class stratification that the new Soviet regime believed could define all social categories. The lower to middle peasants, the Serednyaks, who would both work for others and sometimes hire labour themselves presented the regime with a conundrum - were they workers or were they exploiters? The outcome of these questions would determine how this group would be treated by the regime, a fact that would have dire consequences during the era of collectivisation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/explaininghistory.

Myanmar Oral History Project - life stories
"Trials in Burma" by Maurice Collis - extracts dealing with the Peasants' Rebellion of 1930

Myanmar Oral History Project - life stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 12:37


Maurice Collis was born in Dublin in 1889, the son of an Irish solicitor, and went to Rugby in 1903 and then in 1907 to Oxford.  He was posted to Burma  in 1912. He had postings at Sagaing  and elsewhere in Burma. In 1917, the British army raised a Burmese brigade with which Collis went to Palestine. In 1919, he went on leave and travelled in Europe. In the 1920s he was district commissioner in Arakan State.  In 1929–1930, a period when relations between Burmese, Indians and British became particularly difficult, he was district magistrate in Rangoon and much of the book deals with that period  and three particular cases;  the political trial of J.M Sen Gupta, the mayor Calcutta and two criminal trials.   My particular interest however is in the sections dealing with the Peasants' Rebellion in 1930 and Collis' deep understanding of the Burmese and the failings on the British Government.  He left Burma in 1931 and wrote a number of books on the country and died in 1973.The book can be purchased as an ebook from Amazon - https://www.amazon.com.au/Trials-Burma-Maurice-Collis-ebook/dp/B00Z4M9N3E - and possibly other ebook sellers.The photo of Collis is from the National Portrait Gallery, London

Catholicism in the Car
55. Medieval Peasants

Catholicism in the Car

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 12:25


This episode consists of a bunch of ramblings regarding civilization, including the state of Medieval peasants. OUR NEW WEBSITE: www.catholicisminthecar.com If you wish to SUPPORT our work, you can visit: https://www.catholicisminthecar.com/support Find Catholicism in the Car on: Anchor, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Podchaser, Audible, Amazon Music, Castbox, Radio Republic, Player FM, and Stitcher. Also find us on: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeCdyv4dtHnU4504ILGOQTg Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Catholicism-in-the-Car-107936008608917 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/catholicism.in.the.car/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/PZCatechesis Locals [In-Progress]: https://catholicisminthecar.locals.com/ View my blog at: https://www.parkerzurbuch.com/ Contact me via email at: parkerzurbuchcatechesis@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/parker-zurbuch6/support

Leftist Reading
Leftist Reading: Russia in Revolution Part 11

Leftist Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 54:16


Episode 99:This week we're continuing Russia in Revolution An Empire in Crisis 1890 - 1928 by S. A. Smith[Part 1]Introduction[Part 2-5]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905[Part 6-8]2. From Reform to War, 1906-1917[Part 9-10]3. From February to October 1917Dual PowerLenin and the BolsheviksThe Aspirations of Soldiers and WorkersThe Provisional Government in Crisis[Part 11 - This Week]Revolution in the Village - 0:25The Nationalist Challenge - 10:43Class, Nation and Gender - 26:04[Part 12]3. From February to October 1917[Part 13 - 16?]4. Civil War and Bolshevik Power[Part 17 - 19?]5. War Communism[Part 20 - 22?]6. The New Economic Policy: Politics and the Economy[Part 23 - 26?]7. The New Economic Policy: Society and Culture[Part 27?]ConclusionFootnotes:55) 0:32Orlando Figes, Peasant Russia, Civil War: The Volga Countryside in Revolution, 1917–1921 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989); John Channon, ‘The Peasantry in the Revolutions of 1917', in E. R. Frankel et al. (eds), Revolution in Russia: Reassessments of 1917 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992), 105–30.56) 2:41Graeme J. Gill, Peasants and Government in the Russian Revolution (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1979), 46–63, 75–88.57) 3:29J. L. H. Keep, The Russian Revolution: A Study in Mass Mobilization (New York: Norton, 1976), 179.58) 5:35Keep, Russian Revolution, 160.59) 7:52Channon, ‘The Landowners', in Service (ed.), Society and Politics in the Russian Revolution, 120–46.60) 8:47Aaron B. Retish, Russia's Peasants in Revolution and Civil War: Citizenship, Identity, and the Creation of the Soviet State, 1914–1922 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008); John Channon, ‘The Bolsheviks and the Peasantry: The Land Question during the First Eight Months of Soviet Rule', Slavonic and East European Review, 66:4 (1988), 593–624.61) 10:20V. V. Kabanov, Krest'ianskaia obshchina i kooperatsiia Rossii XX veka (Moscow: RAN, 1997), 81.62) 10:59Ronald G. Suny, ‘Nationalism and Class in the Russian Revolution: A Comparative Discussion', in Frankel et al. (eds), Revolution in Russia, 219–46; Ronald G. Suny, The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution and the Collapse of the Soviet Union (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1993), ch. 2.63) 11:21Mark von Hagen, ‘The Great War and the Mobilization of Ethnicity in the Russian Empire', in B. R. Rubin and Jack Snyder (eds), Post-Soviet Political Order: Conflict and State Building (London: Routledge, 1998), 34–57.64) 12:58John Reshetar, The Ukrainian Revolution, 1917–1920 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1952); Bohdan Krawchenko, Social Change and National Consciousness in Twentieth-Century Ukraine (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1985), ch. 1.65) 15:35Steven L. Guthier, ‘The Popular Base of Ukrainian Nationalism in 1917', Slavic Review, 38:1 (1979).66) 16:11David G. Kirby, Finland in the Twentieth Century (London: Hurst, 1979), 46; Anthony F. Upton, The Finnish Revolution, 1917–1918 (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1980), ch. 6.67) 22:57Ronald G. Suny, The Making of the Georgian Nation (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1988), ch. 9.68) 24:06Tadeusz Świętochowski, Russian Azerbaijan, 1905–1920: The Shaping of National Identity in a Muslim Community (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985), ch. 4.69) 29:23Boris I. Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda and Anti-“Burzhui” Consciousness in 1917', Russian Review, 53 (1994), 183–96 (187–8).70) 29:44Donald J. Raleigh, Revolution on the Volga: 1917 in Saratov (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1986).71) 30:20T. A. Abrosimova, ‘Sotsialisticheskaia ideeia v massovom soznanii 1917g.', in Anatomiia revoliutsii. 1917 god v Rossii: massy, partii, vlast' (St Petersburg: Glagol', 1994), 176–87 (177).72) 30:46Steinberg, Voices, 17.73) 31:22Michael C. Hickey, ‘The Rise and Fall of Smolensk's Moderate Socialists: The Politics of Class and the Rhetoric of Crisis in 1917', in Donald J. Raleigh (ed.), Provincial Landscapes: Local Dimensions of Soviet Power, 1917–53 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001), 14–35.74) 32:57Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda', 190, 191.75) 32:49Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda', 189.76) 33:00Figes and Kolonitskii, Interpreting, 154.77) 34:00A. Ia. Livshin and I. B. Orlov, ‘Revolutsiia i spravedlivost': posleoktiabr'skie “pis'ma vo vlast' ”, in 1917 god v sud'bakh Rossii i mira: Oktiabr'skaia revoliutsiia (Moscow: RAN, 1998), 254, 255, 259.78) 34:12Howard White, ‘The Urban Middle Classes', in Service (ed.), Society and Politics in the Russian Revolution, 64–85.79) 34:35Bor'ba za massy v trekh revoliutsiiakh v Rossii: proletariat i srednie gorodskie sloi (Moscow: Mysl', 1981), 19.80) 35:18O. N. Znamenskii, Intelligentsiia nakanune velikogo oktiabria (fevral'-oktiabr' 1917g.) (Leningrad: Nauka, 1988), 8–9.81) 35:53Bor'ba za massy, 169.82) 36:45Michael C. Hickey, Competing Voices from the Russian Revolution (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2011), 387.83) 38:05Michael Hickey, ‘Discourses of Public Identity and Liberalism in the February Revolution: Smolensk, Spring 1917', Russian Review, 55:4 (1996), 615–37 (620); V. V. Kanishchev, ‘ “Melkoburzhuaznaia kontrrevoliutsiia”: soprotivlenie gorodskikh srednikh sloev stanovleniiu “diktatury proletariata” (oktiab'r 1917–avgust 1918g.)', in 1917 god v sud'bakh Rossii i mira, 174–87.84) 39:14Stockdale, Paul Miliukov, 258.85) 40:53Revoliutsionnoe dvizhenie v avguste 1917g. (razgrom Kornilovskogo miatezha) (Moscow: Izd-vo AN SSSR, 1959), 407.86) 41:58V. F. Shishkin, Velikii oktiabr' i proletarskii moral' (Moscow: Mysl', 1976), 57.87) 42:18Steinberg, Voices, 113.88) 44:32O. Ryvkin, ‘ “Detskie gody” Komsomola', Molodaia gvardiia, 7–8 (1923), 239–53 (244); Krupskaya, ‘Reminiscences of Lenin'.89) 45:58Ruthchild, Equality and Revolution, 227.90) 46:36Engel, Women in Russiā, 135; Ruthchild, Equality, 231.91) 47:49Jane McDermid and Anna Hillyard, Women and Work in Russia, 1880–1930 (Harlow: Longman, 1998), 167.92) 48:31Engel, Women in Russia, 141.93) 49:01Sarah Badcock, ‘Women, Protest, and Revolution: Soldiers' Wives in Russia during 1917', International Review of Social History, 49 (2004), 47–70.94) 49:19Steinberg, Voices, 98.95) 50:03D. P. Koenker and W. G. Rosenberg, Strikes and Revolution in Russia, 1917 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1989), 314.96) 50:21Smith, Red Petrograd, 193.97) 51:37Z. Lilina, Soldaty tyla: zhenskii trud vo vremia i posle voiny (Perm': Izd-vo Petrogradskogo Soveta, 1918), 8.98) 51:59L. G. Protasov, Vserossiiskoe uchreditel'noe sobranie: istoriia rozhdeniia i gibeli (Moscow: ROSSPEN, 1997), 233.99) 52:31Beate Fieseler, ‘The Making of Russian Female Social Democrats, 1890–1917', International Review of Social History, 34 (1989), 193–226.

History of the Germans
Episode 67 Germany in the Year 1200 - The Peasants

History of the Germans

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 25:28 Transcription Available


This is about the peasants, no kings, emperors, popes, bishops at all. Ok one brother of a duke at the end because I simply cannot help myself. But yes, peasants. What was the life of a peasant in Germany in around 1200 really like? How much do we actually know about their living conditions? Did it differ much from country to country? The correct answer to all of these is – we are not really sure. These sections of the podcast are always the hardest ones. Following some king or emperor around is fairly straightforward. That s what the sources are focused on and you can compare them as well as the different interpretation and you get a half decent picture of what is likely to have happened. But nobody has written a chronicle about the poor Michel, sharecropper on the lands of the count of Pfullendorf. Let alone a second one from the perspective of the count. Still we try. As always, this episode has a dedicated website with the transcript and maps, pictures and additional comments to read along. It is to be found at https://historyofthegermans.com/63-2/ (https://historyofthegermans.com/67-2/) The music for the show is Flute Sonata in E-flat major, H.545 by Carl Phillip Emmanuel Bach (or some claim it as BWV 1031 Johann Sebastian Bach) performed and arranged by https://www.windrep.org/Michel_Rondeau (Michel Rondeau) under https://imslp.org/wiki/Flute_Sonata_in_E-flat_major%2C_H.545_%28Bach%2C_Carl_Philipp_Emanuel%29 (Common Creative Licence 3.0). As always: Homepage with maps, photos, transcripts and blog: http://www.historyofthegermans.com/ (www.historyofthegermans.com) Facebook: @HOTGPod  Twitter: @germanshistory Instagram: history_of_the_germans Reddit: u/historyofthegermans Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans (https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans)

History Extra podcast
The Peasants' Revolt: everything you wanted to know

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 43:35 Very Popular


In 1381, thousands of men and women surged into London, attacking jails, burning down palaces, murdering the Archbishop of Canterbury and confronting the king. But what caused the Peasants' Revolt? Is it even accurate to describe the rebels as “peasants”? Was Richard II sympathetic to their grievances? And how brutal was the authorities' response to the revolt? Speaking to Spencer Mizen, Helen Carr answers your top queries on the turbulent events of 1381. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Explaining History (explaininghistory) (explaininghistory)

In the decade after the October Revolution the relations between the Soviet government and the peasantry declined as Stalin, Lenin and Trotsky all percieved that a new 'capitalist' peasantry was emerging in the guise of the Kulak class. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/explaininghistory.

Moments With MsJaye (Podcast)
Peasants; They Don't Matter and They Never Will

Moments With MsJaye (Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 3:58


They're like annoying flies that want to upset you. A fan who wants your attention. Not the fans (family) we love, but those who are parched to be acknowledged. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Jonathan Kogan Show
Wait, now you DON'T like censorship?! - #32

The Jonathan Kogan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 22:54


In the wake of the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, Facebook has begun censoring posts about mailing abortion pills. It's a reminder that even if you support the idea of tech censorship now, sooner or later your views will be on the 'raw side of the discussion'. Regardless of your political party affiliation, tribal communities, or any other kind of label you want to put on yourself or others, the mere idea of 'censorship' is not to anyone's advantage unless you are a person in power or a large corporation where you can leverage censorship to boost your own profits. Most likely, you are like me...a peasant. Peasants - like us - must stick together against totalitarian corporations like Meta and those in power from ANY party because they are not acting in YOUR best interest, but rather THEIR OWN best interest. If we can see through this madness and come together as a society, we can redirect our anger and frustration to the "powers that be" rather than bickering amongst ourselves because when it's ALL said and done, we will all be on the 'raw side of the deal'. The only people that win are the "Mark Zuckerberg's" and "Klaus Schwaub's" of the world. Not YOU or I! References: https://jacobin.com/2022/06/facebook-antiabortion-pills-censorship-content-moderation-social-media https://www.vice.com/en/article/m7gav3/facebook-is-banning-people-who-say-they-will-mail-abortion-pills https://apnews.com/article/abortion-technology-politics-health-016eb3efd65dafc2b568af1495f5bac5 https://youtu.be/SA6hTJ10f6w https://anchor.fm/jsk/episodes/Wait--now-you-DONT-like-censorship-----32-e1kuoo8 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jsk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jsk/support ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Jonathan Kogan Show
Wait, now you DON'T like censorship?! - #32

The Jonathan Kogan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 22:54


In the wake of the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, Facebook has begun censoring posts about mailing abortion pills. It's a reminder that even if you support the idea of tech censorship now, sooner or later your views will be on the 'raw side of the discussion'. Regardless of your political party affiliation, tribal communities, or any other kind of label you want to put on yourself or others, the mere idea of 'censorship' is not to anyone's advantage unless you are a person in power or a large corporation where you can leverage censorship to boost your own profits. Most likely, you are like me...a peasant. Peasants - like us - must stick together against totalitarian corporations like Meta and those in power from ANY party because they are not acting in YOUR best interest, but rather THEIR OWN best interest. If we can see through this madness and come together as a society, we can redirect our anger and frustration to the "powers that be" rather than bickering amongst ourselves because when it's ALL said and done, we will all be on the 'raw side of the deal'. The only people that win are the "Mark Zuckerberg's" and "Klaus Schwaub's" of the world. Not YOU or I! References: https://jacobin.com/2022/06/facebook-antiabortion-pills-censorship-content-moderation-social-media https://www.vice.com/en/article/m7gav3/facebook-is-banning-people-who-say-they-will-mail-abortion-pills https://apnews.com/article/abortion-technology-politics-health-016eb3efd65dafc2b568af1495f5bac5 https://youtu.be/SA6hTJ10f6w https://anchor.fm/jsk/episodes/Wait--now-you-DONT-like-censorship-----32-e1kuoo8 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jsk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jsk/support ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Revolution - Untold Story of Indian Freedom Struggle
S1E22 - S1E21 Peasants and Tribal Movement - Part 3

The Revolution - Untold Story of Indian Freedom Struggle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 8:17


Episode Notes Episode Length: 8:17 Thanks so much for tuning in. ● Contact Us ● leave us a comment! ● Visit us and give us a ‘like' on our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/The-Revolution-Untold-Story-of-Indian-Freedom-Struggle-111694233709330/ ● Follow us on Twitter @ksproductionsus Credits: “The Revolution - Untold Story of Indian Freedom Struggle” is produced by KS Productions, Inc. in collaboration with Pastel Entertainment. Our Executive Producers are Kaushik Mazumdar and Susmita Mazumdar from KS Productions, INC and Shanoli Majumdar from Pastel Entertainment Our researcher is Dipanjan Maiti Content developed by Dipanjan Maiti, Bratati Chakraborty & Kaushik Mazumdar Sound designed & original music composed by Satyajit Sen

London Walks
Today (June 15) in London History – the Peasants’ Rebellion

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 9:38


History Daily
The Peasants' Revolt

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 21:17 Very Popular


June 13, 1381. After years of political unrest in England, the people rise up against the ruling classes and storm the gates of London in the Peasants' Revolt.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Not A Real Libertarian
Not A Real Broadcast Ep 33: Dirty Peasants, Do as we say

Not A Real Libertarian

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:07


Nick Sawall joins Bootleg for an exclusive dual news reading and funds raiser. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/notareallibertarian/message

Medieval Death Trip
MDT Ep. 91: Concerning Wage Warfare after the Plague

Medieval Death Trip

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 40:39 Very Popular


This episode, we follow up on a question from Ep. 90 about why the wandering worker Thomas Fuller might have fallen in with a criminal shepherd by looking at a pair of vagrancy and labor laws from the economically disrupted decades following the Black Death: the Statute of Laborers of 1351 and the Commons' Petition against Vagrants of 1376. We also learn a bit about late medieval prisons. Today's Texts: Henderson, Ernest F., editor and translator. Select Historical Documents of the Middle Ages. George Bell and Sons, 1892, pp. 165-168. Google Books. "Commons' Petition Against Vagrants" of 1376," reprinted in R.B. Dobson, The Peasants' Revolt of 1381. MacMillan, 1970, pp. 72-74. Google Books. References: Clark, Elaine. "Institutional and Legal Responses to Begging in Medieval England." Social Science History, vol. 26, no. 3, Fall 2002, pp. 447-473. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/40267786. Geltner, Guy. "Medieval Prisons: Between Myth and Reality, Hell and Purgatory." History Compass, vol. 4, 2006, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1111/j.1478-0542.2006.00319.x. Available at guygeltner.net.

Episode #109-"You Peasants"

"Stuck In Traffic"

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 70:11


In this episode #SIT with us as we discuss backlash from our last episode, The Game & Eminem, T.I. and his son King terrorize "short order cooks”, coward cops, and Dubb H explains The Rittenhouse Effect. Subscribe, share, comment, and like.

The Midnight Ride
The Midnight Ride Ep. 036 - Disarming the Peasants

The Midnight Ride

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 77:46


With America's economy on the precipice of a recession, President Biden and the Democrats are using the Uvalde and Buffalo shootings as an election issue to stave off a red tidal wave. Will it work? Connor and Paul lay out the issue from a constitutional perspective, and discuss some of the solutions being proposed. Also, the USDA will cut off school lunches to states which do not allow boys into girls' bathrooms and onto girls' sports teams. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

WikiFreakz
#122 - Sjafruddin Prawiranegara, German Peasants' War, Martin Luther, Hymnwriter & Methodism!

WikiFreakz

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 41:17


We begin with SJAFRUDDIN PRAWIRANEGARA an Indonesian Icon! He preached RELIGIOUS SOCIALISM which was highly influential during the GERMAN PEASANTS' WAR. And which famous man of the people was actually against the people aka peasants? MARTIN LUTHER! He was a famous HYMNWRITER you know? And where do many hymns come from? Why METHODISM! It's a religious episode which includes the slaughter of 100,000 to 300,000 peasants! The two go hand in hand! Follow WikiFreakz IG and Twitter @wikifreakzz ————————————————————————————————————- Follow Jill Weiner on IG and Twitter @jill_lives www.jilllives.com Venmo @jill-weiner-1 -------------------------------------------------------------------- Follow Connor Creagan on IG and Twitter @connorcreagan www.connorcreagan.info Venmo @connor-creagan

Nola Moon Mystik Dreamers
Ancestor messages: Frauds / Peasants off with your heads!

Nola Moon Mystik Dreamers

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 127:36


The ancestors, angels and Gods are upset about what tf has been happening behind y'all back they give advice and insight on what karma is happening to these misleading mfs --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nola-moon/support

The Wiggin Sessions
Mark Rossano—Should We be Worried About Food Shortages in the US? EP57

The Wiggin Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 36:03


Food shortages are coming to the US, or are they? At the G7 meeting last month, President Biden warned that food shortages are coming, but could we really experience a scarcity like we see in other countries here at home, and if so, how do we prepare? Mark Rossano is a financial industry veteran and renowned expert on global financial markets and supply-chain analysis. As Founder and CEO of C6 Capital Holdings LLC, he provides investment and consulting services to clients across multiple sectors with a pronounced focus on global product flows. On this episode of The Wiggin Sessions, Mark joins me to discuss the underlying factors that are at play that are causing the food shortages. We'll look at climate change and the cumulative effects of bad infrastructure decisions. Plus, we'll peek behind the curtain at what's really happening with the accidents and fires at food production facilities. Listen in to understand how to survive and thrive through the upcoming food supply shortages from the broken supply chains. Mark also offers us some ideas for the ‌companies to invest in that are at the forefront of repairing supply chain issues as we rebuild the economy. Key Takeaways Mark offers us a look at the supply chain and the natural path from the hydrocarbon from the wellhead to the end-user How climate change is causing shortages and disruption in supply chains worldwide Why food might be ‘the last straw' that will bring about uprisings like the Peasants' Revolt How the droughts, shrinking yields, and geopolitical supply chain problems are knocking down almost 28% of the global wheat market How the new 20s will be an amalgamation of the worst parts of the 30s and the 70s How the food shortage here in the US will come down to putting aside our wants to focus on our needs Mark offers his insight into how the US views a food shortage and what that means in the rest of the world What comes to the surface when we have to struggle to pay for food Why a stressed infrastructure combined with a labor shortage is a recipe for disaster Why Mark thinks the lack of and poor solutions to the fragile ecosystem and the other crises are being caused by epic political stupidity across the board and not some more significant underlying theme The key places to invest in right now while food shortages, and supply chain and energy issues are a big deal Connect with Mark Rossano C6 Capital Holdings LLC Mark on LinkedIn Mark on Twitter Connect with Addison Wiggin Consilience Financial Be sure to follow The Wiggin Sessions on your socials. You can find me on— Facebook @thewigginsessions Instagram @thewigginsessions Twitter @WigginSessions Resources Peasants' Revolt Mark Rossano's Report on Investments During A Food Shortage Byron King—The Danger in Weaponizing the US Dollar EP48

Leftist Reading
Leftist Reading: Russia in Revolution Part 2

Leftist Reading

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 41:54


Episode 90:This week we're continuing Russia in Revolution An Empire in Crisis 1890 - 1928 by S. A. Smith[Part 1]Introduction[Part 2 - This Week]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905 - 00:38Autocracy and Orthodoxy - 21:23Popular Religion - 33:17[Part 3 - 4?]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905[Part 5 - 7?]2. From Reform to War, 1906–1917[Part 8 - 10?]3. From February to October 1917[Part 11 - 14?]4. Civil War and Bolshevik Power[Part 15 - 17?]5. War Communism[Part 18 - 20?]6. The New Economic Policy: Politics and the Economy[Part 21 - 24?]7. The New Economic Policy: Society and Culture[Part 25?]ConclusionFigures:1) Nicholas II, Alexandra, and their family. - 21:31Footnotes:1) 00:58Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: The Russian Revolution, 1891–1924 (London: Jonathan Cape, 1996).2) 05:08V. O. Kliuchevsky, A History of Russia, vol. 1 (London: J. M. Dent, 1911), 2.3) 07:13D. C. B. Lieven, Towards the Flame: Empire, War and the End of Tsarist Russia (London: Allen Lane, 2015), 9.4) 08:05Cited in Paul Kennedy, Rise and Fall of the Great Powers (New York: Random House, 1987), 177.5) 13:02Lieven, Towards the Flame, 85.6) 14:07http://demoscope.ru/weekly/ssp/rus_lan_97.php7) 14:38Jane Burbank and Mark von Hagen (eds), Russian Empire: Space, People, Power, 1700–1930 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2007); John W. Slocum, ‘Who, and When, Were the Inorodtsy? The Evolution of the Category of “Aliens” in Imperial Russia', Russian Review, 57:2 (1998), 173–90.8) 15:05Theodore Weeks, Nation and State in Late Imperial Russia: Nationalism and Russification on the Western Frontier, 1863–1914 (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1996); Alexei Miller, ‘The Empire and Nation in the Imagination of Russian Nationalism', in A. Miller and A. J. Rieber (eds), Imperial Rule (Budapest: Central European University Press, 2004), 9–22.9) 15:37Robert D. Crews, For Prophet and Tsar: Islam and Empire in Russia and Central Asia (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006).10) 17:26Paul Werth, At the Margins of Orthodoxy: Mission, Governance, and Confessional Politics in Russia's Volga-Kama Region, 1827–1905 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2002).11) 18:11Alexander Morrison, Russian Rule in Samarkand, 1868–1910: A Comparison with British India (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008).12) 18:38Robert Geraci, Window on the East: National and Imperial Identities in Late-Imperial Russia (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001).13) 19:13Charles Steinwedel, ‘To Make a Difference: The Category of Ethnicity in Late Imperial Russian Politics, 1861–1917', in D. L. Hoffmann and Yanni Kotsonis (eds), Russian Modernity: Politics, Knowledge, Practices (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2000), 67–86.14) 19:49Andreas Kappeler, The Russian Empire: A Multiethnic History (Harlow: Pearson, 2001); Willard Sunderland, ‘The Ministry of Asiatic Russia: The Colonial Office That Never Was But Might Have Been', Slavic Review, 60:1 (2010), 120–50.15) 20:04Geoffrey Hosking, Russia: People and Empire (London: Fontana, 1998).16) 21:19Miller, ‘The Empire and Nation', 9–22.17) 21:48Dominic Lieven, Nicholas II: Emperor of All the Russias (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1989).18) 22:25http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/royalty/russia/rfl.html19) 25:04Abraham Ascher, The Revolution of 1905, vol. 2: Authority Restored (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1992), 222.20) 25:09Richard Pipes, Russia under the Old Regime (New York: Penguin, 1977).21) 26:36Peter Waldron, ‘States of Emergency: Autocracy and Extraordinary Legislation, 1881–1917', Revolutionary Russia, 8:1 (1995), 1–25.22) 26:56Waldron, ‘States of Emergency', 24.23) 27:26Neil Weissman, ‘Regular Police in Tsarist Russia, 1900–1914', Russian Review, 44:1 (1985), 45–68 ( 49).24) 27:47Jonathan W. Daly, The Watchful State: Security Police and Opposition in Russia, 1906–1917 (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2004), 5–6. Daly, incidentally, gives a higher figure—100,000—than Weissman for the number of police of all kinds in 1900.25) 28:14Figes, People's Tragedy, 46.26) 28:50T. Emmons and W. S. Vucinich (eds), The Zemstvo in Russia: An Experiment in Local Self-Government (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982), 215.27) 30:25Hans Rogger, Russia in the Age of Modernisation and Revolution, 1881–1917 (London: Longman, 1983), 72.28) 31:18J. S. Curtiss, The Russian Church and the Soviet State (Boston: Little, Brown, 1953), 10.29) 32:09Gregory L. Freeze, ‘Handmaiden of the State? The Orthodox Church in Imperial Russia Reconsidered', Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 36 (1985), 82–102.30) 32:46Simon Dixon, ‘The Orthodox Church and the Workers of St Petersburg, 1880–1914', in Hugh McLeod, European Religion in the Age of Great Cities, 1830–1930 (London: Routledge, 1995), 119–41.31) 33:49Vera Shevzov, Russian Orthodoxy on the Eve of Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).32) 35:23A. K. Baiburin, ‘Poliarnosti v rituale (tverdoe i miagkoe)', Poliarnost' v kul'ture: Almanakh ‘Kanun' 2 (1996), 157–65.33) 36:28Vera Shevzov, ‘Chapels and the Ecclesial World of Pre-revolutionary Peasants', Slavic Review, 55:3 (1996), 585–613.34) 37:00Chris J. Chulos, Converging Worlds: Religion and Community in Peasant Russia, 1861–1917 (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2003), 159.35) 37:59J. S. Curtiss, Church and State in Russia: the Last Years of the Empire, (New York: Columbia University Press, 1965), 118.36) 38:46David G. Rowley, ‘ “Redeemer Empire”: Russian Millenarianism', American Historical Review, 104 (1999), 1582–602.37) 39:18James H. Billington, The Icon and the Axe: An Interpretive History of Russian Culture (New York: Vintage Books, 1970), 514.38) 40:18Nadieszda Kizenko, A Prodigal Saint: Father John Kronstadt and the Russian People (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000), 271.39) 40:34Sergei Fomin (comp.), Rossiia pered vtorym prishestviem: prorochestva russkikh sviatykh (Moscow: Sviato-Troitskaia Sergieva Lavra, 1993). This is a compendium of prophecies of doom about the fate of Russia by saints, monks, nuns, priests, theologians, and a sprinking of lay writers, including Dostoevsky, V. V. Rozanov, and Lev Tikhomirov.

Western Civ
Episode 194: The Peasants' War

Western Civ

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 49:09


While Martin Luther thought his reformation was about theology and humankind's relationship to God, many people felt it was about a great deal more. The peasants of Germany, for example, heard Luther's words and thought this meant the time was right for REAL change on earth, not in heaven, but here in Germany and right now. Luther sides with the princes during the rebellion and, in the midst of all the chaos, Martin Luther gets married.  Check out the WEBSITE for more content. Become a PATRON today and support the show. Sources: Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet  

League of Lore - A League of Legends Lore Podcast
League of Lore: Episode 17 Demacian Nobility, Peasants and Monsters (Fiora, Quinn, and Vayne)

League of Lore - A League of Legends Lore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 35:10


In Demacia there is a great diversity of peoples and their struggles. The nobility, the peasants and the monsters between. Today we will be discussing those champions who live, protect, and fight those traits in their country. League of Lore is a video game lore podcast focusing on League of Legends and is a member of the Rocket Club, a subsidiary of the Robots Radio Network created to help upcoming or new podcasts achieve their goals in the podcasting world. To send a question for the next episode of League of Lore send it to: loreofruneterra@gmail.com You can also follow the official twitter @LeagueofLore2 to get updates on upcoming episodes as well as lore tidbits and inquiries. Thank you all for listening!

Andrew Lake Podcast
When Peasants Rise – From Rags to Riches

Andrew Lake Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 28:34


In this episode we discuss the classic ‘rags to riches' trajectory and what it means to live class mobility. We look at a few examples and compare the ‘peasant' life with the ‘millionaire' life.   Learn Developmental Psychology: https://www.udemy.com/course/draft/4198002/?referralCode=231420FB84FE700AE286   Learn Time Travel and Lucid Dreaming Methods: https://www.udemy.com/course/time-travel/?referralCode=75A0CD67A06929D40550   Check out my Udemy instructor profile: https://www.udemy.com/user/dosta-3/   Check out my Graffiti channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC5OBsGtVMhGDiGiJ3yPvQg   Follow DELM on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/delm413/   Check out my Music channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4vj9mQw0231izQXfUppnwg   Talks on Tantra and Sex: https://onlyfans.com/dosta   Podcast on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/andrew-lake-podcast/id1439388762?mt=2   Podcast on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/36T6M5UiOt9E35U6faNQUi   Dosta YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzanoRaVmvE&t=15s   Discover The Chronicles of Dosta: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvn6OHvvKedz2OdVozaKRuA/videos   Learn Public Speaking and Voice Awareness: https://www.udemy.com/course/public-speaking-and-voice-awareness-techniques/?referralCode=E14F4ABA11339CECD409   Learn MDMA Online: https://www.udemy.com/course/mdma-nyw/?referralCode=A82F4DAC24E593162453   MDMA Promo Vid: https://youtu.be/MH3cT1mfPvY   Theme song music by pmajor: https://pmajor.bandcamp.com/album/static-on-the-frequency   Support my work directly on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/dosta     Related terms:   Meditation. Awareness. Psychology. Culture. Personal Development. History. English Literature. Philosophy. Greek Philosophy. Consciousness. Perception. The Dosta Method. Developmental Psychology. Self Help. Music. Time Travel. Time Dilation. Ecstasy. Guided Meditation. Education. Skill Development. High-Level Functioning. Self-Knowledge. Relationship Advice. Motivation. Knowledge. Book Smart. Intelligence. Tantra. Awareness Techniques. Mysticism. Religion. Antiquity. Classical History. Stoicism. Hermeticism. Mythology. Cultural Commentary. Public Discourse. Intellectual Explorations. Explanation. Clarity. Wisdom. Insight. Truth. Beauty. Love.

Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness
Ep.2 – The Great Armored Train by Nick Mamatas

Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 69:01


Episode Notes Strangers In A Tangled WIlderness can be found at here or on twitter @tangledwild. You can support this show by subscribing to our Patreon. A more reader friendly copy of the story can be found at https://www.tangledwilderness.org/featured/the-great-armored-train Along with amazing art by Robin Savage. This story appeared in Nick Mamatas's collection The People's Republic of Everything, published in 2018 by Tachyon Publications. About the author: Nick Mamatas is the author of seven novels, including Love is the Law, I Am Providence, and the forthcoming Hexen Sabbath. His short fiction has appeared in Best American Mystery Stories, Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy, and many other venues. Nick is also an anthologist; his books include the Bram Stoker Award winner Haunted Legends (co-edited with Ellen Datlow), the Locus Award nominees The Future is Japanese and Hanzai Japan (both co-edited with Masumi Washington), and Mixed Up (co-edited with Molly Tanzer). His fiction and editorial work has been nominated for the Hugo, Locus, World Fantasy, Bram Stoker, Shirley Jackson, and International Horror Guild Awards. Mamatas lives in Oakland, California. About the interviewer: Margaret Killjoy is a transfeminine author and editor currently based in the Appalachian mountains. Her most recent book is an anarchist demon hunters novella called The Barrow Will Send What it May, published by Tor.com. She spends her time crafting and complaining about authoritarian power structures and she blogs at birdsbeforethestorm.net. The theme music is also by Margaret Killjoy. Show art is by Robin Savage The Host is Inmn Neruin. You can find them on instagram @shadowtail.artificery **Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness 2: The Great Armored Train by Nick Mamatas** Inmn Neruin: Hello and welcome to Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness...the podcast. I'm your host Inmn Neruin and I use They/them pronouns . Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness is a collectively run publisher dedicated to producing and curating inclusive and intersectional culture informed by anarchistic ideals. This can include stories, fiction, poetry, memoir, non-fiction, theater pieces, comics, books, pop culture analysis, recipes, music, history, podcasts...and occasionally essays and theory. We are looking for content that doesn't know where it fits in, for people that don't know where they fit in. On this podcast we have audio versions of our monthly featured zine read by a brilliant voice actor along with interviews with the author. If you would like to hold in your hands a hard copy of our monthly feature, please consider subscribing to our Patreon where you will be mailed a lovely zine once a month along with other occasional trinkets to add to your horde. Our Patreon helps make things like this podcast possible as well as supporting other podcasts we put out like Live Like The World Is Dying. It also helps us pay authors of the monthly features, transcribers, artists, editors and translators. So if you like what you hear, please consider subscribing at Patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. If you would like to submit a piece that you think would shine nicely in our little dragon horde, please visit Tangledwilderness.org for our submission guidelines! This month, we are kind of cheating…We bring to you a previously recorded episode of the now on-hold podcast We Will Remember Freedom. In this re-print episode, one of our collaborators, Margaret Killjoy talks with Nick Mamatas about his short story The Great Armored Train. We feel this story is more relevant than usual considering Russia's current invasion of Ukraine. This story pits Trotsky's giant armored train against polish folk magic. I really loved this story mostly because it's simple and I love learning about magic within resistance movements, but I also appreciate a good critique of State Communism. Much like State Communism  paraded this idea of liberating the people, while building a power base for a new oppressive state, Putin claims to be trying to save Ukraine from itself, going so far as to parade that idea that he hopes to de-nazify it. A facist claiming to free people from other fascists. Seems sketchy.  And much like during the  reign of the Bolsheviks or the quarrels of any nation states, the common people are usually who suffer most and are used as pawns. But as in this story, resistance can be…phantasmal and there have always been echos of stateless worlds, tremors of a bell rung long ago, now ever ringing, “Land to the Peasants” as the  Black Army emblazoned on their battle standards as they fought for a free-territory in Ukraine almost exactly one century ago in conflicts with Bolsheviks and Monarchists. Our hearts go out to the Anarchists and anti-authoritarians organizing in  Ukraine and Russia right now, and those of you fighting on the frontlines, organizing evacuations, refugees and medical support, for those who stayed and for those who fled and of course for those who fell. We hope the fantasy and comedy of this story can offer some levity and hope within this ongoing conflict, and those exactly like it happening all over the world, and hope if people can empathize with Ukrainian people right now they can see the similarities between this conflict and those in places like Palestine, Syria, and Rojava to name a few. So remember, sharpen your talons, listen for the echos, and keep fighting.  *For a print version of the story please visit http://tangledwild.org * Inmn Neruin: That was Margaret talking to Nick Mamatas about “The Great Armored Train.” Please check out the online version for this story as well as other content at [http://tangledwild.org](http://tangledwild.org). You can even see some amazing artwork done for the story by our artist Robin Savage. I've heard many stories of Ukrainian women offering sunflower seeds to Russian soldiers, so that when they die at least something beautiful and useful will grow. I hope so much to hear stories in the future of seeds that spontaneously burst to life inside tanks, consuming them and rendering them useless except as homes to wayward critters.  If you would like to learn more about this conflict in Ukraine and those like it, check out our friends at the Final Straw Radio at [https://thefinalstrawradio.noblogs.org/](https://thefinalstrawradio.noblogs.org/) for interviews with Ukrainian Anarchists, as well as our friends at [http://Crimethinc.com/](http://crimethinc.com/) for histories and interviews with Russian and Ukrainian Leftists, Anarchists and anti-authoritarians. If you would like to support anarchists and anti-authoritarians in Ukraine right now check out a link tree for Ukranian mutual aid group Operation Solidarity at [https://linktr.ee/operation.solidarity](https://linktr.ee/operation.solidarity) and an Anarchist armed detachment The Black Headquarter at [https://linktr.ee/Theblackheadquarter](https://linktr.ee/Theblackheadquarter) Thanks so much for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast please go tell someone about it. Whisper it in their ear, put it on at work, write a review and feed it to the ocean, cry its name to the gloaming daring an owl to answer. If you would like to support us as well as the authors, translators, editors and artists that we work with please consider subscribing to our Patreon. Subscribers receive at different levels: access to digital copies of our archived zines and features, digital copies of new work, Patreon-only content, discounts of printed work and monthly printed copies of our featured zine mailed to you along with whatever else we feel like that month. You can find us at Patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness or check out our website for more free content, including blogposts, zines, books, games, comics, how-to guides and other works we have to distribute. We can be found at TangledWilderness.org or check us out on twitter @Tangledwild. And as always, if you don't want to or can't contribute financially please rate and review us, and tell a friend. We like having friends. You do incredible things that we are endlessly marveled by. We would especially like to thank these friends: Mikki, Nicole, David, Dana, Chelsea, Micaiah, Staro, Jenipher, Eleanor, Natalie, Kirk, Hugh, Nora, Sam, Chris, and Hoss the dog for making this podcast and so many other projects possible. If you feel like a stranger that would like to find their story a home in this tangled wilderness consider submitting it; the pages are thirsty.  Next month, we bring to you something a little bit different. I will be talking with Celeste Inez Mathilda of Liminal Spaces about their zine “Taraxacum Officinale: Dandelion. Break the Binary. Migration is Beautiful” as well their views on the ethics of wildcrafting. Stay Well. We hope you come back. Find out more at https://strangers-in-a-tangled-wildern.pinecast.co

The Cringe Posts Podcast
Ep. 60 Medieval peasants had it better than us

The Cringe Posts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 56:52


On today's episode, we hear a cry about people's behaviors post-mask mandate, discuss why Cruella De Vil is a feminist icon, see a premature declaration of victory over the COVID regime, learn how white people invented races, compare how much better off medieval peasants were without capitalism, and learn that the price of freedom just costs wearing simple cloth masks over your face.

Confidently Wrong
#063 WWL - Brian Gives Us Uncultured Peasants A Lesson In Taste

Confidently Wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 44:27


The four of us share what we're loving these days and Brian takes that one step further (farther?) by giving us a rundown on a movie that is causing the cultural elite to salivate. Brian is our maitre d' into the world of the finer things.  Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts and Spotify!Twitter: @confidently_podInstagram: @confidently_podWebsite: https://confidentlywrong.simplecast.comCredits:Hosted by: Wesley Nakamura, Mike Smith, Brian Redondo, Savon JonesEdited by: Wesley NakamuraTheme Music: Implied Authority by Bass ElfLink: https://soundcloud.com/bass_elf_music

Savage Continent
The Soviet Ordeal Ep. 6 The Holodomor

Savage Continent

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