Podcasts about Jit

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  • 599EPISODES
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Best podcasts about Jit

Latest podcast episodes about Jit

Lean Blog Interviews
Gauthier Duvall on Kaizen Events, Organizational Development, and ”Veryable” Labor

Lean Blog Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 61:20


Video, transcript, and more: https://leanblog.org/461  My guest for Episode #461 of the Lean Blog Interviews Podcast is Gauthier Duval, the Director of the Lean Center of Excellence at Veryable. He's applied and taught Lean for over 18 years, including time with Freudenberg-NOK (an auto supplier featured in the book Lean Thinking), Simpler Consulting, and other manufacturing companies in the U.S. and Europe. Today, we discuss topics and questions including: Your Lean origin story? The next steps in your career and learning?? Freudenberg-NOK — 2004 — Growtth Consulting spinoff Working with Lean – Europe vs. US? Simpler – worked with Chris Cooper – Episode #129 Your view on the role of what's often called “kaizens” (kaizen events) vs. ongoing daily kaizen improvement? Multi-day events vs. small discontinuous improvements? How should people be participating? The role of the senior leader? Kicking a company president out of a Kaizen Event?? Lessons you've learned on the psychology of change? Organizational behavior and organizational development? — how do you define that?  What makes an organization a “learning organization?” Chris Argyris — why should more Lean people be reading his work? Tell us about Veryable – the company, the problems you solve and how it works… How to expand “JIT” beyond just materials? Variable labor in a “lean mindset” way — including “respect for people”?? The podcast is sponsored by Stiles Associates, now in their 30th year of business. They are the go-to Lean recruiting firm serving the manufacturing, private equity, and healthcare industries. Learn more. This podcast is part of the #LeanCommunicators network.   

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Optimizing Apache JVMs for Apache Kafka

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 71:42 Transcription Available


Java Virtual Machines (JVMs) impact Apache Kafka® performance in production. How can you optimize your event-streaming architectures so they process more Kafka messages using the same number of JVMs? Gil Tene (CTO and Co-Founder, Azul) delves into JVM internals and how developers and architects can use Java and optimized JVMs to make real-time data pipelines more performant and more cost effective, with use cases.Gil has deep roots in Java optimization, having started out building large data centers for parallel processing, where the goal was to get a finite set of hardware to run the largest possible number of JVMs. As the industry evolved, Gil switched his primary focus to software, and throughout the years, has gained particular expertise in garbage collection (the C4 collector) and JIT compilation. The OpenJDK distribution Gil's company Azul releases, Zulu, is widely used throughout the Java world, although Azul's Prime build version can run Kafka up to forty-percent faster than the open version—on identical hardware. Gil relates that improvements in JVMs aren't yielded with a single stroke or in one day, but are rather the result of many smaller incremental optimizations over time, i.e. "half-percent" improvements that accumulate. Improving a JVM starts with a good engineering team, one that has thought significantly about how to make JVMs better. The team must continuously monitor metrics, and Gil mentions that his team tests optimizations against 400-500 different workloads (one of his favorite things to get into the lab is a new customer's workload). The quality of a JVM can be measured on response times, the consistency of these response times including outliers, as well as the level and number of machines that are needed to run it. A balance between performance and cost efficiency is usually a sweet spot for customers.Throughout the podcast, Gil goes into depth on optimization in theory and practice, as well as Azul's use of JIT compilers, as they play a key role in improving JVMs. There are always tradeoffs when using them: You want a JIT compiler to strike a balance between the work expended optimizing and the benefits that come from that work. Gil also mentions a new innovation Azul has been working on that moves JIT compilation to the cloud, where it can be applied to numerous JVMs simultaneously.EPISODE LINKSA Guide on Increasing Kafka Event Streaming PerformanceBetter Kafka Performance Without Changing Any CodeWatch the video version of this podcastKris Jenkins' TwitterStreaming Audio Playlist Join the Confluent CommunityLearn more with Kafka tutorials, resources, and guides at Confluent DeveloperLive demo: Intro to Event-Driven Microservices with ConfluentUse PODCAST100 to get an additional $100 of free Confluent Cloud usage (details)   

La Gran Travesía
🤘 La Historia del Hard Rock y del Heavy Metal. Programa 16. La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 73:29


Hoy en La Gran Travesía os dejamos el podcast número 16 de la Historia del Hard Rock y del Heavy Metal. En el programa podréis escuchar a Deftones, Marilyn Manson, Fu Manchu, Monster Magnet, Megadeth, Dream Theater y muchos más. Aquí os dejamos todos los podcast anteriores dedicados a dicha serie en Radio Free Rock. 🤘 https://www.ivoox.com/historia-del-heavy-metal_bk_list_5787125_1.html Recordaros de nuevo que ya se han abierto las votaciones para la 5ª Edición de los premios iVoox. ✅ Aquí tenéis el enlace desde el que podéis votar vuestros podcast favoritos 👉 https://bit.ly/3RwWfA3 🎧 Los musicales están en el último apartado, el apartado 15. Y La Gran Travesía lo tenéis dentro de esa categoría, al principio junto otros buenísimos podcast también. 📅 No lo dejéis que las votaciones se cierran el lunes 24 de octubre!! Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Edgar Xavier Sandoval Morales… y a los mecenas anónimos

Fukabori.fm
82. Node.js、Deno、Bun (前編) w/ yosuke_furukawa

Fukabori.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 39:57


話したネタ denoの話 Bun first impressions Node.js、Deno、Bunとは何か? JavaScriptランタイムとは何か? サーバーサイドJavaScript expressを利用してWebサーバーを立てるコードは、Node.js以外でも動くのか? ECMAScript と ランタイム との関係は? TC39 Node.js はどんな経緯で生まれてきた? Rubyを書くタイミングと、JavaScriptを書くタイミングでのコンテキストスイッチ netv8 イベントループモデルとは何か? ブロッキング処理、for文やJSON.parse() なぜ、Node.jsはここまで人気が出たのか? V8(JavaScriptエンジン)とは何か? JavaScriptCore Edge Workerとの相性の良さ JITコンパイラ Denoはどういう背景で生まれてきているのか? モジュールを取り巻く課題 JSConf JP 訂正 冒頭で第81回と話しておりますが、82回の誤りです。 番組のスポンサーD.Node採用募集ページはこちら

La Gran Travesía
U2, Dire Straits, Kinks, Beach Boys, Radiohead, Teardrop Explodes...La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 72:24


Hoy os dejamos en La Gran Travesía un programa donde podréis escuchar a Solomon Burke, Teardrop Explodes, Backbeat Band, Radiohead, U2, Dire Straits, Kinks, Beach Boys, Wallflowers... Recordaros de nuevo que ya se han abierto las votaciones para la 5ª Edición de los premios iVoox. ✅ Aquí tenéis el enlace desde el que podéis votar vuestros podcast favoritos 👉 https://bit.ly/3RwWfA3 🎧 Los musicales están en el último apartado, el apartado 15. Y La Gran Travesía lo tenéis dentro de esa categoría, al principio junto otros buenísimos podcast también. 📅 No lo dejéis que las votaciones se cierran el lunes 24 de octubre!! Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Edgar Xavier Sandoval Morales… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
El baño de masas de R.E.M. Automatic For The People cumple 30 años.

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 43:46


Se cumplen 30 años de la publicación de aquel magistral Automatic For The People de R.E.M, un álbum diametralmente opuesto a lo que se podía esperar de ellos en plena vorágine del terremoto de Seattle y en esa batalla de distorsión y decibelios en la que estaba inmerso el mundo de la música rock. Hoy en La Gran Travesía recuperamos toda su historia, anécdotas y sus éxitos. Por otro lado, recordaros que ya se han abierto las votaciones para la 5ª Edición de los premios iVoox. - ⌚️ Aquí os dejamos el enlace para que apoyéis y votéis vuestros podcast favoritos. https://bit.ly/3RwWfA3 Los musicales están en el último apartado, el número 15. Y La Gran Travesía lo tenéis dentro de esa categoría, al principio. No lo dejéis que las votaciones se cierran el lunes 24 de octubre!! - Por otro lado, recordaros la Fiesta que tenemos preparada en Murcia en el Plan 9, para el próximo sábado 3 de diciembre y con motivo del 1.000.000 de descargas/escuchas que está a punto de alcanzar La Gran Travesía en iVoox solamente gracias a tod@s vosotr@s!! Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Edgar Xavier Sandoval Morales… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans.

Gemba Academy Podcast: Lean Manufacturing | Lean Office | Six Sigma | Toyota Kata | Productivity | Leadership

This week's guest is Patrick Dippel. Ron and Patrick talked about volatility and how leaders and organizations everywhere can deal with uncertain times. Patrick also explained the merits of on-demand labor and how his website Veryable works. An MP3 audio version of this episode is available for download here. In this episode you'll learn:  The quotes Patrick likes (3:58) His background (5:24) About his time at GE (7:54) What "volatility" means (10:55) Pat's thoughts on the "Great Resignation" (13:47) How to survive and thrive in volatile times (16:34) About on-demand labor and how Veryable works (18:35) What the operator experience is like on Veryable (23:26) The parallels between JIT and on-demand labor (26:52) Advice for those dealing with volatility and uncertainty (29:43) Podcast Resources Right Click to Download this Podcast as an MP3 AME Conference - Use Promo Code Gemba15 for 15% off Patrick on LinkedIn Patrick's Blog Veryable Veryable on LinkedIn Veryable on YouTube Veryable on Twitter What Do You Think? How do you deal with volatility?

La Gran Travesía
David Bowie, Meat Puppets, The Electric Alley, Smashing Pumpkins...La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 72:14


Hoy os dejamos en La Gran Travesía un programa donde podréis escuchar parte de la banda sonora del nuevo documental sobre David Bowie, Moonage Daydream, recientemente estrenado en los cines. Además podréis escuchar el nuevo tema de los gaditanos The Electric Alley además de grupos como Meat Puppets, Smashing Pumpkins, No Doubt, Fiona Apple... Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans.

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

Hoy en La Gran Travesía, con motivo del 40 aniversario del primer single publicado por Madonna (Everybody fue lanzado el 6 de octubre de 1982), os dejamos la primera parte del especial dedicado a la que es indiscutiblemente la Reina del Pop. Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans.

La Gran Travesía
Madonna. 40 años como La Reina del Pop.

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 68:06


Hoy en La Gran Travesía, con motivo del 40 aniversario del primer single publicado por Madonna (Everybody fue lanzado el 6 de octubre de 1982), os dejamos la primera parte del especial dedicado a la que es indiscutiblemente la Reina del Pop. Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans.

La Gran Travesía
Black Crowes, Rage Against The Machine, DeWolff, Tina Turner, AC/DC, Chuck Berry... La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 105:25


Hoy en La Gran Travesía tenemos un programa donde podréis escuchar a los Black Crowes con motivo de su inminente gira europea, que llegará a Barcelona y Madrid en las próximas semanas (domingo 16 y martes 18 de octubre) con motivo de la gira del 30 aniversario de Shake Your Money Maker, álbum debut de la banda de Atlanta. También sonarán sus teloneros, los holandeses DeWolff, junto con grupos como Supergrass, Suede, Rage Against The Machine, Tina Turner, Dessert Mountain Tribe, Liza Colby Sound, AC/DC, Chuck Berry, T Rex...y muchos más. Un programa que nos gustaría dedicar a Rafael Carlos Roca, amigo y oyente del programa desde Bruselas. Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans.

La Gran Travesía
Stone Temple Pilots. Core 30 aniversario

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 43:29


Hoy en La Gran Travesía, con motivo del 30 aniversario del debut de Stone Temple Pilots, Core, tenemos un programa especial que nos gustaría dedicar a dos grandes seguidores, Miguel Ángel Torres y Ángel Ortega. Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans. Aquí os dejamos el podcast que le dedicábamos a Scott Weiland y Stone Temple Pilots https://www.ivoox.com/recordando-a-scott-weiland-stone-temple-pilots-velvet-audios-mp3_rf_61388775_1.html y aquí tenéis uno dedicado a Alice in Chains https://www.ivoox.com/alice-in-chains-especial-recordando-a-layne-staley-audios-mp3_rf_74569245_1.html

La Gran Travesía
Stevie Wonder y su enorme legado. Songs in the Key of Life Revisited

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 33:02


Hoy en La Gran Travesía recuperamos un disco clásico de los años 70, Songs in the Key of Life de Stevie Wonder, con motivo de su 46º aniversario y que seguía la estela de aquella otra maravilla de Marvin Gaye llamada What´s Going On? Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans.

La Gran Travesía
La reválida de Interpol. Antics - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 28:18


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Hoy en La Gran Travesía, con motivo del 18º aniversario del segundo álbum de Interpol, tenemos un programa especial dedicado al grupo de Nueva York. Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans.Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de La Gran Travesía. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/489260

La Gran Travesía
50 años del Volumen 4 de Black Sabbath

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 35:05


Hoy en La Gran Travesía, con motivo del 50 aniversario del Vol 4 de Black Sabbath, recordamos cómo fue la grabación del LP de uno de los grupos que definieron el heavy metal. Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans.

La Gran Travesía
Los días extraños de Jim Morrison y The Doors.

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 34:42


Hoy en La Gran Travesía, con motivo del aniversario del segundo LP de los Doors, recordamos cómo fue la grabación de ese disco a cargo del grupo californiano. Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas y patrocinadores por vuestro apoyo: Ramón José, Laura Canovas, Mireia Pérez, Carlos Benavente, Horns UP! Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans. Aquí os dejamos los enlaces a los dos programas anteriores dedicados a la banda de Jim Morrison: - Los inicios del grupo: https://www.ivoox.com/inicios-the-doors-jim-morrison-50-audios-mp3_rf_72295421_1.html - L.A Woman: https://www.ivoox.com/the-doors-l-a-woman-cumple-50-anos-audios-mp3_rf_68814020_1.html

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

Hoy, con motivo del 92 aniversario del nacimiento de Ray Charles, recuperamos un especial en La Gran Travesía dedicado a uno de los grandes pioneros del Soul y del Rythm and Blues. Su historia, sus grandes éxitos, colaboraciones y mucho más en el programa de hoy. Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Ray Charles y el nacimiento del Soul.

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 70:08


Hoy, con motivo del 92 aniversario del nacimiento de Ray Charles, recuperamos un especial en La Gran Travesía dedicado a uno de los grandes pioneros del Soul y del Rythm and Blues. Su historia, sus grandes éxitos, colaboraciones y mucho más en el programa de hoy. Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

Remote Ruby
You Gotta Risk It For The Brisket

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 43:43 Very Popular


[00:00:15] What is this cursed idea thing Andrew did with Storybook?[00:05:31] Andrew mentioned using MDX format and he tells us what it is, Chris brings up the PHP days and components, and Andrew talks about architecture. [00:10:51] Being a visual person, Andrew explains another thing he really likes about Storybook.[00:17:29] Jason talks about finding his Zen using Tailwind in a project.  [00:20:25] Chis wonders if Jason runs into issues with having to undo some of the stuff, and Jason explains how he's been using more CSS and a problem he ran into.  [00:24:02] CSS Variables are discussed and why they're awesome, and Andrew tells us about the fallback for CSS Variables.  [00:24:37] There's a discussion about using JIT and PurgeCSS, an amazing tool. [00:27:41] Chris tells us about using a template from Bootstrap for the Rails Hackathon homepage.[00:30:17] The guys discuss using React Components, Bootstrap, and using Tailwind over Bootstrap.  [00:33:57] Jason talks about Inertia, which is a library for Laravel and Rails. [00:34:37] Find out what Jason is doing with View Components and Job Boardly, that he hopes will get Andrew's acceptance.[00:36:29] Andrew explains why he's obsessed with component architecture, and Chris tells us about his first real serious project he did with the Python recreation of the apt package manager. [00:38:55] Chris announces Tender Love (a.k.a. Aaron Patterson) mentioned he's going to cut a new release of Rails, and he talks about Rails Hackathon coming up.Panelists:Jason CharnesChris OliverAndrew MasonSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason Twitter10 Best Tech Podcasts in 2022 (as Chosen by the Rails Community)-Planet ArgonRemote Ruby Podcast-Episode 165: GitHub Codespaces & Docker with Benjamin Wood (Recommended episode from Planet Argon)StorybookMDXPurgeCSSBootstrapRails HackathonRemote Ruby Podcast-Episode 139: Learning in Public, Alpine & InertiaRemote Ruby Podcast-Episode 66: Joined by Jonathan Reinink, Creator of Inertia.jsAaron Patterson TwitterRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar Twitter

La Gran Travesía
Stephen King cumple 75 años.

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 57:57


Hoy tenemos en La Gran Travesía un programa especial dedicado a uno de los grandes escritores de terror y de suspense de todos los tiempos...y que está de cumpleaños, Stephen King. Acaba de cumplir 75 años y acaba de publicar su último libro, llamado Cuento de Hadas, que además se acaba de confirmar que será llevada también al cine por el director Paul Greengrass. Motivo más que suficiente para brindarle nuestro pequeño y modesto homenaje desde La Gran Travesía. Y para eso lo hacemos con unos cuantos amigos, colaboradores y fans de todo el mundo relacionado con el autor. Además Stephen King es un gran amante del rock. Dos de sus grupos preferidos también sonarán hoy en el programa… e incluso recordaremos que él de vez en cuando hacía sus pinitos en un grupo de versiones llamado Rock Bottom Remainders. Todo eso y mucho más, con las colaboraciones de: - Adolfo Vera, autor del blog sobre Stephen King llamado Lectores Constantes, - José Ramón Álvaro, que es la persona que lleva las Redes sociales de Stephen King en España, - José Sanz director del programa La Hora Sonora, - Miguel Angel Barquero director del programa Planeta Tentaciones Radio Show, - Ariel Bosi, escritor del libro autorizado por Stephen King...y que se llama Todo sobre Stephen King, - Luis Rey, director del programa Música Sin Filtros - Vicente Velasco, dueño de la Librería La Montaña Mágica, en Cartagena, una de las librerías más recomendables, sin duda. Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo para fans. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

Screaming in the Cloud
Azul and the Current State of the Java Ecosystem with Scott Sellers

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 36:35


About ScottWith more than 28 years of successful leadership in building high technology companies and delivering advanced products to market, Scott provides the overall strategic leadership and visionary direction for Azul Systems.Scott has a consistent proven track record of vision, leadership, and success in enterprise, consumer and scientific markets. Prior to co-founding Azul Systems, Scott founded 3dfx Interactive, a graphics processor company that pioneered the 3D graphics market for personal computers and game consoles. Scott served at 3dfx as Vice President of Engineering, CTO and as a member of the board of directors and delivered 7 award-winning products and developed 14 different graphics processors. After a successful initial public offering, 3dfx was later acquired by NVIDIA Corporation.Prior to 3dfx, Scott was a CPU systems architect at Pellucid, later acquired by MediaVision. Before Pellucid, Scott was a member of the technical staff at Silicon Graphics where he designed high-performance workstations.Scott graduated from Princeton University with a bachelor of science, earning magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa honors. Scott has been granted 8 patents in high performance graphics and computing and is a regularly invited keynote speaker at industry conferences.Links Referenced:Azul: https://www.azul.com/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest on this promoted episode today is Scott Sellers, CEO and co-founder of Azul. Scott, thank you for joining me.Scott: Thank you, Corey. I appreciate the opportunity in talking to you today.Corey: So, let's start with what you're doing these days. What is Azul? What do you folks do over there?Scott: Azul is an enterprise software and SaaS company that is focused on delivering more efficient Java solutions for our customers around the globe. We've been around for 20-plus years, and as an entrepreneur, we've really gone through various stages of different growth and different dynamics in the market. But at the end of the day, Azul is all about adding value for Java-based enterprises, Java-based applications, and really endearing ourselves to the Java community.Corey: This feels like the sort of space where there are an awful lot of great business cases to explore. When you look at what's needed in that market, there are a lot of things that pop up. The surprising part to me is that this is the direction that you personally went in. You started your career as a CPU architect, to my understanding. You were then one of the co-founders of 3dfx before it got acquired by Nvidia.You feel like you've spent your career more as a hardware guy than working on the SaaS side of the world. Is that a misunderstanding of your path, or have things changed, or is this just a new direction? Help me understand how you got here from where you were.Scott: I'm not exactly sure what the math would say because I continue to—can't figure out a way to stop time. But you're correct that my academic background, I was an electrical engineer at Princeton and started my career at Silicon Graphics. And that was when I did a lot of fantastic and fascinating work building workstations and high-end graphics systems, you know, back in the day when Silicon Graphics really was the who's who here in Silicon Valley. And so, a lot of my career began in the context of hardware. As you mentioned, I was one of the founders of graphics company called 3dfx that was one of, I think, arguably the pioneer in terms of bringing 3d graphics to the masses, if you will.And we had a great run of that. That was a really fun business to be a part of just because of what was going on in the 3d world. And we took that public and eventually sold that to Nvidia. And at that point, my itch, if you will, was really learning more about the enterprise segment. I'd been involved with professional graphics with SGI, I had been involved with consumer graphics with 3dfx.And I was fascinated just to learn about the enterprise segment. And met a couple people through a mutual friend around the 2001 timeframe, and they started talking about this thing called Java. And you know, I had of course heard about Java, but as a consumer graphics guy, didn't have a lot of knowledge about it or experience with it. And the more I learned about it, recognized that what was going on in the Java world—and credit to Sun for really creating, obviously, not only language, but building a community around Java—and recognized that new evolutions of developer paradigms really only come around once a decade if then, and was convinced and really got excited about the opportunity to ride the wave of Java and build a company around that.Corey: One of the blind spots that I have throughout the entire world of technology—and to be fair, I have many of them, but the one most relevant to this conversation, I suppose, is the Java ecosystem as a whole. I come from a background of being a grumpy Unix sysadmin—because I've never met a happy one of those in my entire career—and as a result, scripting languages is where everything that I worked with started off. And on the rare occasions, I worked in Java shops, it was, “Great. We're going to go—here's a WAR file. Go ahead and deploy this with Tomcat,” or whatever else people are going to use. But basically, “Don't worry your pretty little head about that.”At most, I have to worry about how to configure a heap or whatnot. But it's from the outside looking in, not having to deal with that entire ecosystem as a whole. And what I've seen from that particular perspective is that every time I start as a technologist, or even as a consumer trying to install some random software package in the depths of the internet, and I have to start thinking about Java, it always feels like I'm about to wind up in a confusing world. There are a number of software packages that I installed back in, I want to say the early-2010s or whatnot. “Oh, you need to have a Java runtime installed on your Mac,” for example.And okay, going through Oracle site, do I need the JRE? Do I need the JDK? Oh, there's OpenJDK, which kind of works, kind of doesn't. Amazon got into the space with Corretto, which because that sounds nothing whatsoever, like Java, but strange names coming from Amazon is basically par for the course for those folks. What is the current state of the Java ecosystem, for those of us who have—basically the closest we've ever gotten is JavaScript, which is nothing alike except for the name.Scott: And you know, frankly, given the protection around the name Java—and you know, that is a trademark that's owned by Oracle—it's amazing to me that JavaScript has been allowed to continue to be called JavaScript because as you point out, JavaScript has nothing to do with Java per se.Corey: Well, one thing they do have in common I found out somewhat recently is that Oracle also owns the trademark for JavaScript.Scott: Ah, there you go. Maybe that's why it continues.Corey: They're basically a law firm—three law firms in a trench coat, masquerading as a tech company some days.Scott: Right. But anyway, it is a confusing thing because you know, I think, arguably, JavaScript, by the numbers, probably has more programmers than any other language in the world, just given its popularity as a web language. But to your question about Java specifically, it's had an evolving life, and I think the state where it is today, I think it's in the most exciting place it's ever been. And I'll walk you through kind of why I believe that to be the case.But Java has evolved over time from its inception back in the days when it was called, I think it was Oak when it was originally conceived, and Sun had eventually branded it as Java. And at the time, it truly was owned by Sun, meaning it was proprietary code; it had to be licensed. And even though Sun gave it away, in most cases, it still at the end of the day, it was a commercially licensed product, if you will, and platform. And if you think about today's world, it would not be conceivable to create something that became so popular with programmers that was a commercially licensed product today. It almost would be mandated that it would be open-source to be able to really gain the type of traction that Java has gained.And so, even though Java was really garnering interest, you know, not only within the developer community, but also amongst commercial entities, right, everyone—and the era now I'm talking about is around the 2000 era—all of the major software vendors, whether it was obviously Sun, but then you had Oracle, you had IBM, companies like BEA, were really starting to blossom at that point. It was a—you know, you could almost not find a commercial software entity that was not backing Java. But it was still all controlled by Sun. And all that success ultimately led to a strong outcry from the community saying this has to be open-source; this is too important to be beholden to a single vendor. And that decision was made by Sun prior to the Oracle acquisition, they actually open-sourced the Java runtime code and they created an open-source project called OpenJDK.And to Oracle's credit, when they bought Sun—which I think at the time when you really look back, Oracle really did not have a lot of track record, if you will, of being involved with an open-source community—and I think when Oracle acquired Sun, there was a lot of skepticism as to what's going to happen to Java. Is Oracle going to make this thing, you know, back to the old days, proprietary Oracle, et cetera? And really—Corey: I was too busy being heartbroken over Solaris at that point to pay much attention to the Java stuff, but it felt like it was this—sort of the same pattern, repeated across multiple ecosystems.Scott: Absolutely. And even though Sun had also open-sourced Solaris, with the OpenSolaris project, that was one of the kinds of things that it was still developed very much in a closed environment, and then they would kind of throw some code out into the open world. And no one really ran OpenSolaris because it wasn't fully compatible with Solaris. And so, that was a faint attempt, if you will.But Java was quite different. It was truly all open-sourced, and the big difference that—and again, I give Oracle a lot of credit for this because this was a very important time in the evolution of Java—that Oracle, maintained Sun's commitment to not only continue to open-source Java but most importantly, develop it in the open community. And so, you know, again, back and this is the 2008, ‘09, ‘10 timeframe, the evolution of Java, the decisions, the standards, you know, what goes in the platform, what doesn't, decisions about updates and those types of things, that truly became a community-led world and all done in the open-source. And credit to Oracle for continuing to do that. And that really began the transition away from proprietary implementations of Java to one that, very similar to Linux, has really thrived because of the true open-source nature of what Java is today.And that's enabled more and more companies to get involved with the evolution of Java. If you go to the OpenJDK page, you'll see all of the not only, you know, incredibly talented individuals that are involved with the evolution of Java, but again, a who's who in pretty much every major commercial entities in the enterprise software world is also somehow involved in the OpenJDK community. And so, it really is a very vibrant, evolving standard. And some of the tactical things that have happened along the way in terms of changing how versions of Java are released still also very much in the context of maintaining compatibility and finding that careful balance of evolving the platform, but at the same time, recognizing that there is a lot of Java applications out there, so you can't just take a right-hand turn and forget about the compatibility side of things. But we as a community overall, I think, have addressed that very effectively, and the result has been now I think Java is more popular than ever and continues to—we liken it kind of to the mortar and the brick walls of the enterprise. It's a given that it's going to be used, certainly by most of the enterprises worldwide today.Corey: There's a certain subset of folk who are convinced the Java, “Oh, it's this a legacy programming language, and nothing modern or forward-looking is going to be built in it.” Yeah, those people generally don't know what the internal language stack looks like at places like oh, I don't know, AWS, Google, and a few others, it is very much everywhere. But it also feels, on some level, like, it's a bit below the surface-level of awareness for the modern full-stack developer in some respects, right up until suddenly it's very much not. How is Java evolving in a cloud these days?Scott: Well, what we see happening—you know, this is true for—you know, I'm a techie, so I can talk about other techies. I mean as techies, we all like the new thing, right? I mean, it's not that exciting to talk about a language that's been around for 20-plus years. But that doesn't take away from the fact that we still all use keyboards. I mean, no one really talks about what keyboard they use anymore—unless you're really into keyboards—but at the end of the day, it's still a fundamental tool that you use every single day.And Java is kind of in the same situation. The reason that Java continues to be so fundamental is that it really comes back to kind of reinventing the wheel problem. Are there are other languages that are more efficient to code in? Absolutely. Are there other languages that, you know, have some capabilities that the Java doesn't have? Absolutely.But if you have the ability to reinvent everything from scratch, sure, go for it. And you also don't have to worry about well, can I find enough programmers in this, you know, new hot language, okay, good luck with that. You might be able to find dozens, but when you need to really scale a company into thousands or tens of thousands of developers, good luck finding, you know, everyone that knows, whatever your favorite hot language of the day is.Corey: It requires six years experience in a four-year-old language. Yeah, it's hard to find that, sometimes.Scott: Right. And you know, the reality is, is that really no application ever is developed from scratch, right? Even when an application is, quote, new, immediately, what you're using is frameworks and other things that have written long ago and proven to be very successful.Corey: And disturbing amounts of code copied and pasted from Stack Overflow.Scott: Absolutely.Corey: But that's one of those impolite things we don't say out loud very often.Scott: That's exactly right. So, nothing really is created from scratch anymore. And so, it's all about building blocks. And this is really where this snowball of Java is difficult to stop because there is so much third-party code out there—and by that, I mean, you know, open-source, commercial code, et cetera—that is just so leveraged and so useful to very quickly be able to take advantage of and, you know, allow developers to focus on truly new things, not reinventing the wheel for the hundredth time. And that's what's kind of hard about all these other languages is catching up to Java with all of the things that are immediately available for developers to use freely, right, because most of its open-source. That's a pretty fundamental Catch-22 about when you start talking about the evolution of new languages.Corey: I'm with you so far. The counterpoint though is that so much of what we're talking about in the world of Java is open-source; it is freely available. The OpenJDK, for example, says that right on the tin. You have built a company and you've been in business for 20 years. I have to imagine that this is not one of those stories where, “Oh, all the things we do, we give away for free. But that's okay. We make it up in volume.” Even the venture capitalist mindset tends to run out of patience on those kinds of timescales. What is it you actually do as a business that clearly, obviously delivers value for customers but also results in, you know, being able to meet payroll every week?Scott: Right? Absolutely. And I think what time has shown is that, with one very notable exception and very successful example being Red Hat, there are very, very few pure open-source companies whose business is only selling support services for free software. Most successful businesses that are based on open-source are in one-way shape or form adding value-added elements. And that's our strategy as well.The heart of everything we do is based on free code from OpenJDK, and we have a tremendous amount of business that we are following the Red Hat business model where we are selling support and long-term access and a huge variety of different operating system configurations, older Java versions. Still all free software, though, right, but we're selling support services for that. And that is, in essence, the classic Red Hat business model. And that business for us is incredibly high growth, very fast-moving, a lot of that business is because enterprises are tired of paying the very high price to Oracle for Java support and they're looking for an open-source alternative that is exactly the same thing, but comes in pure open-source form and with a vendor that is as reputable as Oracle. So, a lot of our businesses based on that.However, on top of that, we also have value-added elements. And so, our product that is called Azul Platform Prime is rooted in OpenJDK—it is OpenJDK—but then we've added value-added elements to that. And what those value-added elements create is, in essence, a better Java platform. And better in this context means faster, quicker to warm up, elimination of some of the inconsistencies of the Java runtime in terms of this nasty problem called garbage collection which causes applications to kind of bounce around in terms of performance limitations. And so, creating a better Java is another way that we have monetized our company is value-added elements that are built on top of OpenJDK. And I'd say that part of the business is very typical for the majority of enterprise software companies that are rooted in open-source. They're typically adding value-added components on top of the open-source technology, and that's our similar strategy as well.And then the third evolution for us, which again is very tried-and-true, is evolving the business also to add SaaS offerings. So today, the majority of our customers, even though they deploy in the cloud, they're stuck customer-managed and so they're responsible for where do I want to put my Java runtime on building out my stack and cetera, et cetera. And of course, that could be on-prem, but like I mentioned, the majority are in the cloud. We're evolving our product offerings also to have truly SaaS-based solutions so that customers don't even need to manage those types of stacks on their own anymore.Corey: On some level, it feels like we're talking about two different things when we talk about cloud and when we talk about programming languages, but increasingly, I'm starting to see across almost the entire ecosystem that different languages and different cloud providers are in many ways converging. How do you see Java changing as cloud-native becomes the default rather than the new thing?Scott: Great question. And I think the thing to recognize about, really, most popular programming languages today—I can think of very few exceptions—these languages were created, envisioned, implemented if you will, in a day when cloud was not top-of-mind, and in many cases, certainly in the case of Java, cloud didn't even exist when Java was originally conceived, nor was that the case when you know, other languages, such as Python, or JavaScript, or on and on. So, rethinking how these languages should evolve in very much the context of a cloud-native mentality is a really important initiative that we certainly are doing and I think the Java community is doing overall. And how you architect not only the application, but even the Java runtime itself can be fundamentally different if you know that the application is going to be deployed in the cloud.And I'll give you an example. Specifically, in the world of any type of runtime-based language—and JavaScript is an example of that; Python is an example of that; Java is an example of that—in all of those runtime-based environments, what that basically means is that when the application is run, there's a piece of software that's called the runtime that actually is running that application code. And so, you can think about it as a middleware piece of software that sits between the operating system and the application itself. And so, that runtime layer is common across those languages and those platforms that I mentioned. That runtime layer is evolving, and it's evolving in a way that is becoming more and more cloud-native in it's thinking.The process itself of actually taking the application, compiling it into whatever underlying architecture it may be running on—it could be an x86 instance running on Amazon; it could be, you know, for example, an ARM64, which Amazon has compute instances now that are based on an ARM64 processor that they call Graviton, which is really also kind of altering the price-performance of the compute instances on the AWS platform—that runtime layer magically takes an application that doesn't have to be aware of the underlying hardware and transforms that into a way that can be run. And that's a very expensive process; it's called just-in-time compiling, and that just-in-time compilation, in today's world—which wasn't really based on cloud thinking—every instance, every compute instance that you deploy, that same JIT compilation process is happening over and over again. And even if you deploy 100 instances for scalability, every one of those 100 instances is doing that same work. And so, it's very inefficient and very redundant. Contrast that to a cloud-native thinking: that compilation process should be a service; that service should be done once.The application—you know, one instance of the application is actually run and there are the other ninety-nine should just reuse that compilation process. And that shared compiler service should be scalable and should be able to scale up when applications are launched and you need more compilation resources, and then scaled right back down when you're through the compilation process and the application is more moving into the—you know, to the runtime phase of the application lifecycle. And so, these types of things are areas that we and others are working on in terms of evolving the Java runtime specifically to be more cloud-native.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: This feels like it gets even more critical when we're talking about things like serverless functions across basically all the cloud providers these days, where there's the whole setup, everything in the stack, get it running, get it listening, ready to go, to receive a single request and then shut itself down. It feels like there are a lot of operational efficiencies possible once you start optimizing from a starting point of yeah, this is what that environment looks like, rather than us big metal servers sitting in a rack 15 years ago.Scott: Yeah. I think the evolution of serverless appears to be headed more towards serverless containers as opposed to serverless functions. Serverless functions have a bunch of limitations in terms of when you think about it in the context of a complex, you know, microservices-based deployment framework. It's just not very efficient, to spin up and spin down instances of a function if that actually is being—it is any sort of performance or latency-sensitive type of applications. If you're doing something very rarely, sure, it's fine; it's efficient, it's elegant, et cetera.But any sort of thing that has real girth to it—and girth probably means that's what's driving your application infrastructure costs, that's what's driving your Amazon bill every month—those types of things typically are not going to be great for starting and stopping functional instances. And so, serverless is evolving more towards thinking about the container itself not having to worry about the underlying operating system or the instance on Amazon that it's running on. And that's where, you know, we see more and more of the evolution of serverless is thinking about it at a container-level as opposed to a functional level. And that appears to be a really healthy steady state, so it gets the benefits of not having to worry about all the underlying stuff, but at the same time, doesn't have the downside of trying to start and stop functional influences at a given point in time.Corey: It seems to me that there are really two ways of thinking about cloud. The first is what I think a lot of companies do their first outing when they're going into something like AWS. “Okay, we're going to get a bunch of virtual machines that they call instances in AWS, we're going to run things just like it's our data center except now data transfer to the internet is terrifyingly expensive.” The more quote-unquote, “Cloud-native” way of thinking about this is what you're alluding to where there's, “Here's some code that I wrote. I want to throw it to my cloud provider and just don't tell me about any of the infrastructure parts. Execute this code when these conditions are met and leave me alone.”Containers these days seem to be one of our best ways of getting there with a minimum of fuss and friction. What are you seeing in the enterprise space as far as adoption of those patterns go? Or are we seeing cloud repatriation showing up as a real thing and I'm just not in the right place to see it?Scott: Well, I think as a cloud journey evolves, there's no question that—and in fact it's even silly to say that cloud is here to stay because I think that became a reality many, many years ago. So really, the question is, what are the challenges now with cloud deployments? Cloud is absolutely a given. And I think you stated earlier, it's rare that, whether it's a new company or a new application, at least in most businesses that don't have specific regulatory requirements, that application is highly, highly likely to be envisioned to be initially and only deployed in the cloud. That's a great thing because you have so many advantages of not having to purchase infrastructure in advance, being able to tap into all of the various services that are available through the cloud providers. No one builds databases anymore; you're just tapping into the service that's provided by Azure or AWS, or what have you.And, you know, just that specific example is a huge amount of savings in terms of just overhead, and license costs, and those types of stuff, and there's countless examples of that. And so, the services that are available in the cloud are unquestioned. So, there's countless advantages of why you want to be in the cloud. The downside, however, the cloud that is, if at the end of the day, AWS, Microsoft with Azure, Google with GCP, they are making 30% margin on that cloud infrastructure. And in the days of hardware, when companies would actually buy their servers from Dell, or HP, et cetera, those businesses are 5% margin.And so, where's that 25% going? Well, the 25% is being paid for by the users of cloud, and as a result of that, when you look at it purely from an operational cost perspective, it is more expensive to run in the cloud than it is back in the legacy days, right? And that's not to say that the industry has made the wrong choice because there's so many advantages of being in cloud, there's no doubt about it. And there should be—you know, and the cloud providers deserve to take some amount of margin to provide the services that they provide; there's no doubt about that. The question is, how do you do the best of all worlds?And you know, there is a great blog by a couple of the partners in Andreessen Horowitz, they called this the Cloud Paradox. And the Cloud Paradox really talks about the challenges. It's really a Catch-22; how do you get all the benefits of cloud but do that in a way that is not overly taxing from a cost perspective? And a lot of it comes down to good practices and making sure that you have the right monitoring and culture within an enterprise to make sure that cloud cost is a primary thing that is discussed and metric, but then there's also technologies that can help so that you don't have to even think about what you really don't ever want to do: repatriating, which is about the concept of actually moving off the cloud back to the old way of doing things. So certainly, I don't believe repatriation is a practical solution for ongoing and increasing cloud costs. I believe technology is a solution to that.And there are technologies such as our product, Azul Platform Prime, that in essence, allows you to do more with less, right, get all the benefits of cloud, deploy in your Amazon environment, deploy in your Azure environment, et cetera, but imagine if instead of needing a hundred instances to handle your given workload, you could do that with 50 or 60. Tomorrow, that means that you can start savings and being able to do that simply by changing your JVM from a standard OpenJDK or Oracle JVM to something like Platform Prime, you can immediately start to start seeing the benefits from that. And so, a lot of our business now and our growth is coming from companies that are screaming under the ongoing cloud costs and trying to keep them in line, and using technology like Azul Platform Prime to help mitigate those costs.Corey: I think that there is a somewhat foolish approach that I'm seeing taken by a lot of folks where there are some companies that are existentially anti-cloud, if for no other reason than because if the cloud wins, then they don't really have a business anymore. The problem I see with that is that it seems that their solution across the board is to turn back the clock where if I'm going to build a startup, it's time for me to go buy some servers and a rack somewhere and start negotiating with bandwidth providers. I don't see that that is necessarily viable for almost anyone. We aren't living in 1995 anymore, despite how much some people like to pretend we are. It seems like if there are workloads—for which I agree, cloud is not necessarily an economic fit, first, I feel like the market will fix that in the fullness of time, but secondly, on an individual workload belonging in a certain place is radically different than, “Oh, none of our stuff should live on cloud. Everything belongs in a data center.” And I just think that companies lose all credibility when they start pretending that it's any other way.Scott: Right. I'd love to see the reaction of the venture capitalists' face when an entrepreneur walks in and talks about how their strategy for deploying their SaaS service is going to be buying hardware and renting some space in the local data center.Corey: Well, there is a good cost control method, if you think about it. I mean very few engineers are going to accidentally spin up an $8 million cluster in a data center a second time, just because there's no space left for it.Scott: And you're right; it does happen in the cloud as well. It's just, I agree with you completely that as part of the evolution of cloud, in general, is an ever-improving aspect of cost and awareness of cost and building in technologies that help mitigate that cost. So, I think that will continue to evolve. I think, you know, if you really think about the cloud journey, cost, I would say, is still in early phases of really technologies and practices and processes of allowing enterprises to really get their head around cost. I'd still say it's a fairly immature industry that is evolving quickly, just given the importance of it.And so, I think in the coming years, you're going to see a radical improvement in terms of cost awareness and technologies to help with costs, that again allows you to the best of all worlds. Because, you know, if you go back to the Dark Ages and you start thinking about buying servers and infrastructure, then you are really getting back to a mentality of, “I've got to deploy everything. I've got to buy software for my database. I've got to deploy it. What am I going to do about my authentication service? So, I got to buy this vendor's, you know, solution, et cetera.” And so, all that stuff just goes away in the world of cloud, so it's just not practical, in this day and age I think, to think about really building a business that's not cloud-native from the beginning.Corey: I really want to thank you for spending so much time talking to me about how you view the industry, the evolution we've seen in the Java ecosystem, and what you've been up to. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to find you?Scott: Well, there's a thing called a website that you may not have heard of, it's really cool.Corey: Can I build it in Java?Scott: W-W-dot—[laugh]. Yeah. Azul website obviously has an awful lot of information about that, Azul is spelled A-Z-U-L, and we sometimes get the question, “How in the world did you name a company—why did you name it Azul?”And it's kind of a funny story because back in the days of Azul when we thought about, hey, we want to be big and successful, and at the time, IBM was the gold standard in terms of success in the enterprise world. And you know, they were Big Blue, so we said, “Hey, we're going to be a little blue. Let's be Azul.” So, that's where we began. So obviously, go check out our site.We're very present, also, in the Java community. We're, you know, many developer conferences and talks. We sponsor and run many of what's called the Java User Groups, which are very popular 10-, 20-person meetups that happen around the globe on a regular basis. And so, you know, come check us out. And I appreciate everyone's time in listening to the podcast today.Corey: No, thank you very much for spending as much time with me as you have. It's appreciated.Scott: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Scott Sellers, CEO and co-founder of Azul. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an entire copy of the terms and conditions from Oracle's version of the JDK.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

La Gran Travesía
Wilco, 16 Horsepower, Steve Earle, Cracker, Sheryl Crow, Days of the New... La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 57:29


Hoy en La Gran Travesía podréis escuchar a Steve Earle, Wilco, Days of the New, Cracker, 16 Horsepower, Sheryl Crow y muchos más. Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Playlist. Los 50 mejores temas de 1984. La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 222:35


Hoy os dejamos en La Gran Travesía una nueva lista con las 50 canciones más destacadas del año 1984. Es simplemente una playlist, sin comentarios añadidos, y donde podréis escuchar a The Cure, Tina Turner, Metallica, Talk Talk, Bruce Springsteen, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, Echo and The Bunnymen, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Simple Minds, R.E.M, Van Halen, Mike Oldfield, The Cars, Depeche Mode, Queen, Red Hot Chili Peppers, ... y muchos más. Y aquí tenéis la lista con los 500 temas más destacados de la década de los 80. https://www.ivoox.com/500-mejores-canciones-80_bk_list_5787084_1.html Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone apoyar, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
The Waterboys. Especial La Gran Travesía. Aniversario This is the Sea

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 35:28


Hoy os dejamos un programa especial dedicado a los Waterboys y a su disco This is the Sea, con motivo de su aniversario y de su visita a nuestro país, con su actuación en el Visor Fest en Murcia el viernes 16 de septiembre. Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Los 1.000 mejores discos de la Historia del Rock. Programa 077. La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 129:39


Aquí os dejamos en La Gran Travesía el programa número 77 dedicado a los 1.000 mejores discos de la Historia del Rock. Hoy recorremos los álbumes que van desde el puesto 240 al 230. Aquí tenéis también el enlace a la lista con todos los podcast dedicados a los 1.000 mejores discos de la Historia del Rock https://www.ivoox.com/1-000-mejores-discos-historia-del_bk_list_771695_1.html Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
El minuto caliente de Red Hot Chili Peppers. Especial La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:31


Hoy con motivo del aniversario de One Hot Minute, de Red Hot Chili Peppers, rescatamos en La Gran Travesía la historia del disco. Sin duda sería su trabajo más polémico hasta el momento, tras la salida de John Frusciante y la incorporación de Dave Navarro, de los Jane´s Addiction. Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone apoyar, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Las 500 mejores canciones de los 90. Programa 15. La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 53:51


Hoy continuamos en La Gran Travesía con el repaso a los 500 temas más destacados de la década de los 90 con el programa número 15. Seguimos con el repaso al año 1992, con el Top 10 y donde podréis escuchar a Blind Melon, Eric Clapton, The Black Crowes, Pearl Jam y muchos más. Aquí os dejamos la lista con los anteriores programas https://www.ivoox.com/500-mejores-canciones-90_bk_list_9987185_1.html Y aquí tenéis la lista con los 500 temas más destacados de la década de los 80. https://www.ivoox.com/500-mejores-canciones-80_bk_list_5787084_1.html Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone apoyar, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

Hoy os dejamos el especial de La Gran Travesía dedicado a la próxima edición del Visor Fest, a celebrar en Murcia los días viernes 16 y sábado 17 de septiembre. Con las actuaciones el viernes de Lagartija Nick, Mudhoney, Waterboys y New Model Army y el sábado de Australian Blonde, Lightning Seeds, Teenage Fanclub y James. Allí estaremos La Gran Travesía como medio acreditado. Os dejamos el enlace a su web con toda la información y horarios https://visorfest.com/ así como el enlace para comprar las entradas https://visorfest.com/entradas/ Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone "apoyar", y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo con cientos de programas. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Visor Fest 2022. Especial La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 57:44


Hoy os dejamos el especial de La Gran Travesía dedicado a la próxima edición del Visor Fest, a celebrar en Murcia los días viernes 16 y sábado 17 de septiembre. Con las actuaciones el viernes de Lagartija Nick, Mudhoney, Waterboys y New Model Army y el sábado de Australian Blonde, Lightning Seeds, Teenage Fanclub y James. Allí estaremos La Gran Travesía como medio acreditado. Os dejamos el enlace a su web con toda la información y horarios https://visorfest.com/ así como el enlace para comprar las entradas https://visorfest.com/entradas/ Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone "apoyar", y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo con cientos de programas. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Vetusta Morla. Especial La Gran Travesía Revisited

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 73:18


Hoy en La Gran Travesía recuperamos la historia de uno de los grandes grupos nacionales, Vetusta Morla. En esta primera parte abarcamos desde sus inicios, año 2000, hasta la publicación de su tercer álbum, La Deriva (2014). Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone "apoyar", y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo con cientos de programas. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Víctor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Hole, Waterboys, Allman Brothers, Bad Religion, Neko Case, Tom Waits... La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 70:50


Hoy en La Gran Travesía recordaremos dos de los momentos más emocionantes del pasado concierto homenaje a Taylor Hawkins en el estadio de Wembley. También podréis escuchar a Hole, Tom Waits, Neko Case, Bad Religion, Alice in Chains, Allman Brothers Band, Waterboys... Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone "apoyar", y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo con cientos de programas. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Victor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Screaming Trees. y Sweet Oblivion. 30 Aniversario en La Gran Travesía

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 66:34


Hoy celebramos en La Gran Travesía el 30 aniversario de uno de esos discos esenciales de los años 90, una joya oculta, Sweet Oblivion de los que podrían ser los Héroes anónimos del grunge, Screaming Trees. Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone "apoyar", y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo con cientos de programas. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Victor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021
Grandes Voces Femeninas en La Gran Travesía. Programa 17

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 61:38


Hoy en La Gran Travesía recordamos algunas de las voces femeninas más destacadas del panorama pop y rock en este especial número 17, y en el que podréis escuchar a Pretenders, Gossip, Breeders, Starcrawler, L7, Joan Jett, Torres, Ann Wilson, Baboon Show... Aquí os dejamos la lista con los anteriores programas de Voces Femeninas de La Gran Travesía https://www.ivoox.com/gran-travesia-voces-femeninas_bk_list_580485_1.html Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone "apoyar", y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo con cientos de programas. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Victor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Grandes Voces Femeninas en La Gran Travesía. Programa 17

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 61:38


Hoy en La Gran Travesía recordamos algunas de las voces femeninas más destacadas del panorama pop y rock en este especial número 17, y en el que podréis escuchar a Pretenders, Gossip, Breeders, Starcrawler, L7, Joan Jett, Torres, Ann Wilson, Baboon Show... Aquí os dejamos la lista con los anteriores programas de Voces Femeninas de La Gran Travesía https://www.ivoox.com/gran-travesia-voces-femeninas_bk_list_580485_1.html Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone "apoyar", y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo con cientos de programas. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Victor Bravo, Gin1975… y a los mecenas anónimos

La Gran Travesía
Taylor Hawkins Tribute. Concierto Wembley 3 Septiembre 2022

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 289:37


Hoy os dejamos en La Gran Travesía el concierto homenaje a Taylor Hawkins, batería de Foo Fighters, fallecido el 25 de marzo de 2022. Para la ocasión, Dave Grohl ha decidido organizar dos conciertos benéficos, para recaudar fondos para Musicares y Music Support, una ONG destinada a ayudar a aquellas personas que trabajan en la música o eventos en directo y que han caído afectados por problemas de salud mental y adicciones. Aquí tenéis el enlace por si alguien quiere apoyar https://www.musicares.org/ 2 conciertos para celebrar la trayectoria del músico, una celebración plagada de amigos que han decidido no perderse la ocasión y mostrar todo su cariño y respeto a un músico muy querido. Pasado, presente y futuro del rock and roll se dan la mano en un acto necesario y vibrante, con momentos para bailar, reir, llorar y gritar como dice Dave Grohl. Desde Brian Jones de AC/DC, Stewart Copeland... batería de Police, Lars Ulrich de Metallica, Paul McCartney, Liam Gallagher, Nile Rodgers, Brian May y Roger Taylor de Queen, Alain Johannes, Josh Homme, Supergrass, John Paul Jones de Led Zeppelin, Pretenders, Joe Walsh y los James Gang, varios miembros de Rush, Travis Barker, Justin Hawkins del grupo Darkness, la banda Coattail Riders, donde también tocaba Taylor Hawkins, su grupo de versiones llamado Chevy Metal... y el futuro del rock and roll...sin duda con Wolfgang Van Halen, hijo del guitarrista, Violet Grohl, hija de Dave Grohl (que se marca dos maravillosas versiones de Jeff Buckley), Rufus Taylor, hijo de Roger Taylor. También aparece en el concierto Nandy Bushell, una joven batería de 12 años...y que lleva varios años siendo todo un fenómeno en las redes sociales.. Por cierto, también aparece Oliver Shane Hawkins, hijo de Taylor Hawkins...de 16 años, que también se marca una interpretación de My Hero...para enmarcar. Un concierto que no tiene desperdicio y que vais a poder escuchar íntegramente en la Gran Travesía...un espectáculo que parecía en gran parte un homenaje a otros músicos que han fallecido en los últimos años… y que eran algunos de los grandes ídolos de Taylor Hawkins... caso de Eddie Van Halen, David Bowie, Queen, Rush, Jeff Buckley, AC/DC, Amy Winehouse...incluso en una de las baterías del escenario, en el bombo aparece la imagen creo que era de Olivia Newton John...si no me equivoco. En definitiva...toda una celebración de la vida, el amor, la amistad...y la pasión por el rock and roll...uniendo distintas generaciones. Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox donde pone "apoyar", y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo con cientos de programas. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Victor Bravo, Gin1975, Contell Carles… y a los mecenas anónimos

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021
🤘 La Historia del Hard Rock y del Heavy Metal. Programa 15. La Gran Travesía

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 74:16


Hoy en La Gran Travesía os dejamos el podcast número 15 de la Historia del Hard Rock y del Heavy Metal. En el programa podréis escuchar a y muchos más. Aquí os dejamos todos los podcast anteriores dedicados a dicha serie en Radio Free Rock. 🤘 https://www.ivoox.com/historia-del-heavy-metal_bk_list_5787125_1.html Y ya sabéis, si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyarnos y colaborar con nosotros por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes, desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Jit, Karlos Martinez, Daropa, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62, Eulogiko, Ikatza, Fonune, Juan Carlos González, Victor Bravo… y a los mecenas anónimos

Wait, What?
Wait, What? - Episode 347

Wait, What?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 139:05


JIt is the middle of August and our first episode in almost a month! Join Graeme McMillan and Jeff Lester as we catch up on San Diego Comic Con, C2E2, the surprising spotlight panels on Chris Claremont and Todd McFarlane, how and why the undisputed masters of comics are now very much disputed, the first series of The Sandman on Netflix, Ducks: Two Years in the Oil Sands by Kate Beaton, Brink, Book 5 by Dan Abnett and I.N.J. Culbard, Yokohama Kaidashi Kikou and much, much more in this two-plus hour episode. Comments on the show are available at waitwhatpodcast.com, we welcome your questions at WaitWhatPodcast@gmail.com, and we invite you to look out for us on Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, and Patreon!

UBC News World
Best Privilege Access Management For Cloud Security: Just-In-Time Permissioning

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 2:55


Add an additional layer of security with the privileged access management system by Britive. The company offers just-in-time (JIT) grants that only allow access to data for a specific time. Learn more at https://www.britive.com/news/defense-in-depth (https://www.britive.com/news/defense-in-depth)

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021
Éramos unos niños. Jóvenes estrellas Especial La Gran Travesía

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 49:09


Hoy en La Gran Travesía recordamos los primerísimos años de algunas de las grandes estrellas del pop y del rock. Michael Jackson con los Jackson Five debutaría con apenas 7 años de edad. Stevie Wonder con 16 años ya había publicado 5 LPs. Aretha Franklin ya cantaba gospel en iglesias de Detroit con apenas 14 primaveras. Mike Oldfield con 17 años había compuesto ya gran parte de su primer LP Tubular Bells, donde tocaría casi una veintena de instrumentos. También recordaremos a David Bowie cuando todavía se hacía llamar Davie Jones with the King Bees, Antes de los Beatles existieron The Quarrymen... La historia del rock está repleta de innumerables ejemplos de desbordante talento, creatividad y energía cuando todavía muchos de ellos no habían cumplido los 18. Hoy lo repasamos en esta primera parte del especial de La Gran Travesía. Y recordad que si os gusta el programa y os apetece, podéis apoyar La Gran Travesía y haceros patrocinadores por el simple precio de una cerveza al mes desde el botón azul de iVoox, y así, además acceder a todo el archivo histórico exclusivo. Muchas gracias a todos los mecenas. Lourdes Pilar, José Diego, Dora, Raf, Suibne, Dani, Miguel Ángel Torres, Santi Oliva, familia Pignatelli, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Azimut, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Elliot SF, Aida, Mati, Redneckman, Guillermo Gutiérrez, Daniel A, Raúl Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Álvaro Oliva, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Luis Benedicto, Álvaro Pérez, Karlos Martínez, Vicente DC, Marcos París, Ángel Hernández, Milo Stone, Luisa, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Victor Vosgos, Millo, Jit, Daropa, Gin1975, Vicente DC, Francisco Gónzalez y a los colaboradores anónimos.

Raw Data By P3
Technophobes Make Amazing Technologists, w/ Kerry Kolosko

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 52:57


Hello friends! On the show today, we have a special treat for you. Straight from the Outback, recorded past midnight, and punny as hell, Kerry Kolosko, freshly minted, accidental Microsoft Data Platform MVP. An avid fan of JIT learning (Just In Time) and a follower of the teachings of Google, Kerry is a self-professed technophobe whose desire to remove redundancies just won't let her disconnect. She has a storied past of chasing answers and creating solutions. She truly is living the dream by dabbling in every interesting technology that comes her way. From Array formulas to Deneb, learning on the fly to save time and frustration is Kerry's superpower. That's not all! Today, we also dig into the age-old question of what hidden fear do many Power BI users share? That great shared doubt when someone asks for the .PBIX file. The irrational trepidation.  The spurt of adrenaline. What one small, inconsequential fear do most OG Dax pros share? BADAXAPHOBIA: The fear of being judged for less attractive DAX coding. Well, friends, we are here to tell you that it is an unfounded fear is. OG DAX was more readable, easily digestible, and inherently more interesting before it was streamlined into mere code. Rob and Kerry agree that bad DAX should enjoy a comeback, and nobody should fear embarrassment for writing human-style DAX. All this and more on today's episode. Don't forget, if you enjoyed this episode, send a link to a friend. Friends don't let friends miss Raw Data by P3 Adaptive where we celebrate data, with the human element. Also on this episode: "MVPness" Doesn't Sound Quite Right w/ MS MVP Ed Hansberry Deneb - Declarative Visualization in Power BI What is Data May Never Die w/ Scree Kerry Kolosko Blog - Visualisations Leaders Need Not Be Flashy, w/ Microsoft VP Dave Gainer LetterKenny: Power BI Workout Abbey Road Paint.net Mullet Man - Dax The Way

Soulful Liberation
10. Discouragement is a blessing in disguise with Ángela Quijada-Banks

Soulful Liberation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 15:47


Discouragement is a blessing in disguise with Ángela Quijada-Banks What if we could see beyond the discouraging experiences and see the blessing within it? Listen in as Ángela shares her journey and how discouraging experiences helped her get more clear about her evolution of self and purpose. Learn more about JIT for Foster Youth: https://jitfosteryouth.org/ ---- Order your copy of The Black Foster Youth Handbook here. About our hostess- Angela Quijada-Banks, (she/her) is an American Award-winning author, a transformational speaker, and a holistic health coach. Her book, the Black Foster Youth Handbook earned her an NAACP Image Award nomination (in the outstanding literary work category), and went on to receive several awards including first place in the Chanticleer International Book Awards. Her Ebook, The 7 Day Raw Cleanse gained quick traction and has over 600 downloads. She is currently writing a new book set to release in March 2023. Ángela has touched thousands through her speaking engagements and message encouraging others to alchemize their pain into purpose and power. Through her coaching, she supports women impact leaders who are also wives by supporting their holistic wellness journey to become re-energized for life and reconnect to their passions, purpose, and partner. As a nationally recognized community leader and philanthropist, Ángela started the Soulful Liberation movement, impacting over 30,000 people. This movement helped to revolutionize historically oppressive systems by healing trauma utilizing holistic health, coaching, workshops, training, and programming. Ángela is an adventurer at heart and wife to her amazing husband, Michael who is a United States Marine. The couple currently live in San Diego, California with their 2 cats, Luna and Felix. Ángela enjoys traveling the world, engaging in creative and artful projects including, music, dance, photography and poetry. She also enjoys exploring nature and nestling her head in a good book. On days she is not leading her company, coaching, or community organizing, you can find Ángela binge-watching tv shows, at a concert, learning something new, or getting an adrenaline rush at an amusement park with beloved family and friends. The Soulful Liberation movement- is all about alchemizing your pain to purpose and power. To explore what freedom, joy, love and the human experience is without the shackles of our past trauma, and generational cultural norms that create harm. It's about being on a journey of holistically healing so that you can go back and support someone else's journey in healing and revolutionizing oppressive systems. Holistically heal. Be Free. Be You. www.soulfulliberation.com

Lean Blog Interviews
Torbjorn Netland, PhD on Company Production Systems, Lean & Technology, and More

Lean Blog Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 61:05


Episode page: https://leanblog.org/450 My guest for Episode #450 of the Lean Blog Interviews Podcast is Professor Torbjorn Netland, Ph.D. Tor is the chair of production and operations management in the department of management, technology and economics at ETH Zurich in Switzerland.  He is a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Future Council on Advanced Manufacturing and Value Chains and a Fellow of the European Academy for Industrial Management.  His award-winning research on managing performance improvement appears in leading scientific journals such as Management Science, MIT Sloan Management Review, Journal of Operations Management,  and more. Tor is a recognized thought-leader in operational excellence (including lean) and is the recipient of two Shingo Research Awards and numerous teaching awards.  His blogs at www.better-operations.com. Like my recent guest, Dr. Lisa Yerian (ep 449), Tor is going to be one of the keynote speakers at the 2022 AME Conference, being held in Dallas — Oct 17 to 20. I'll be there and I hope you will be too. Today, we discuss topics and questions including: Tor, what is the topic of your keynote talk on the AME theme of “Embrace Disruption”? Tell us your thoughts on the role of new technologies in Lean? Not just emulating Toyota of the 1960s Lessons learned about bringing new ideas to people? The dream of the lights-out factory has been haunting us for a while now – GM CEO Roger Smith in the 1980s and in more recent years Elon Musk at Tesla… is that still a dream? Is it a dystopian nightmare? Or something in between? How did you first get interested in Lean and Operational Excellence? Dogma vs practical realities – Buffers? Inspection? Last year, you blogged about the confusion around “what is Lean?” How do you define Lean and what's the most common confusion? Different views of researchers?  How do you describe the role of company-specific production systems? Difference in having YOUR production system vs. just a name? “If you like heated debates, start a discussion thread on the definition of lean on LinkedIn.” Another heated debate — Lean is not TPS? Goes beyond TPS? Tell us why it's wrong to blame JIT for pandemic-era supply chain problems… You have a textbook, written with Michel Baudin, coming out — tell us about that? The podcast is sponsored by Stiles Associates, now in their 30th year of business. They are the go-to Lean recruiting firm serving the manufacturing, private equity, and healthcare industries. Learn more. This podcast is part of the #LeanCommunicators network. 

Blízká setkání
Herečka Petra Bučková o seriálu Jitřní záře: Mámy mi píšou, že z toho jsou úplně rozsekané

Blízká setkání

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 28:04


Je to fikce na základě skutečných příběhů. Tak popisuje seriál Jitřní záře herečka Petra Bučková. „Odebrání té holčičky je opravdu silný motiv,“ ujišťuje v Blízkých setkáních. Kde brala inspiraci pro svoji roli? Je těžké zahrát emoce, které člověk nezažil? Jaké má zkušenosti s holotropním dýcháním? Má něco společného s hlavní hrdinkou seriálu?Všechny díly podcastu Blízká setkání můžete pohodlně poslouchat v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas pro Android a iOS nebo na webu mujRozhlas.cz.

BFM :: General
Popcorn Culture - Review: Spilt Gravy on Rice

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 21:47


Adapted from the acclaimed play by the late Jit Murad, Spilt Gravy on Rice tells the story of an ageing father who invites his five children over to discuss some unresolved family issues. The movie was initially made 10 years ago, but faced numerous challenges getting a cinematic release - finally, it's hitting our screens. Directed by Zahim Albakri, the movie features an illustrious cast of Malaysian actors, including Rahim Razali, Na'a Murad, Sean Ghazi, Bernice Chauly, and Jit himself. We review the film, and dive into the uniquely local stories it has to tell.

Trucking for Millennials
Latest Logistics News & National Safety Month w/ Jennifer Smith of JIT Truck Parts

Trucking for Millennials

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 43:31


In this episode Michael and Aaron discuss a few stand out news articles from around the industry: Record Diesel Price https://www.freightwaves.com/news/latest-doe-eia-weekly-diesel-price-is-a-record-high Amazon exec departs to become Flexport CEO https://www.freightwaves.com/news/clark-to-become-flexports-ceo-in-september Uber Freight + Waymo Via https://www.freightwaves.com/news/uber-freight-and-waymo-via-envision-autonomous-trucking-for-all and more!  Then Aaron has a conversation with Jennifer Smith of JIT truck parts to discuss June being National Safety Month and a few parts that can help truck drivers be more safety over the road. Here are a few links to products referenced in the conversation: HD Lighting: https://www.jittruckparts.com/electrical/lights-misc-electrical/headlights. Recommended brands: Match Made, Truck Lite, Grote. CB Radios: https://www.jittruckparts.com/electrical/instrumts-radio/radios-speaker. Recommended brand: Pana-Pacific. ADAS technologies – Recommended brand: WABCO: https://www.jittruckparts.com/wabco-brand Mirrors: https://www.jittruckparts.com/cab-chassis/mirrors. Recommended brand: Velvac Cameras: https://www.jittruckparts.com/electrical/lights-misc-electrical/misc-electrical. Recommended brand: Velvac Enjoy!

Lean Blog Interviews
Just the Lean Talk 2 -- Mark Graban & Jamie Flinchbaugh Discuss Lean Supply Chains

Lean Blog Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 55:19


As I did two weeks ago, when Jamie Flinchbaugh and I talked about “Lean 101” training (and should you skip it), I'm sharing another episode (as a “bonus” episode in the “Lean Blog Interviews” podcast series), a “just the Lean talk” discussion. This comes from Episode #27 where we started the episode by taking a deep dive into coffee (making it and drinking it at home) instead of talking whiskey. We were recording in the morning, so whiskey wasn't appropriate. The weather was nice, so Jamie was sitting outside, so we get to hear some birds in his background. Again, we know many of you don't care about the whiskey talk (or coffee talk), but Jamie suggested sharing this segment where we talked about Lean in relation to inventory and supply chains. This is from May of 2021, but we think it's still relevant. If you want to hear coffee talk, listen to or watch the whole version here. Our inventory talk includes a news story about 10 million bourbon barrels that are “resting” in inventory. But it's barely whiskey talk. We talk more about the supposed “death of Just In Time.” Ugh. As I said last time, Jamie Flinchbaugh and I started a podcast series just over three years ago called “Lean Whiskey.” It's a very conversational format and we've enjoyed doing it (and if anybody likes listening, then even better!). Links From the Show (about Lean): 10 Million bourbon barrels resting – too much or not enough?  The Wall Street Journey's misinformed piece on JIT, Jeff Liker on JIT, Dr. Jonathan Byrnes on supply chain shockwaves, and Dr. Byrnes as a guest Mark's LeanBlog podcast MIT's The Beer Game, system dynamics and accumulators and delays, and supply and demand

The Business of Meetings
114: Acquisition Entrepreneurship with Walker Deibel

The Business of Meetings

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 44:09


We have the great pleasure of speaking with Walker Deibel today! Walker is a fantastic individual and the number one name in acquisition entrepreneurship! He created the Acquisition Lab and wrote the book Buy Then Build.  Walker is an entrepreneur, teacher, and father. In this inspiring episode, he tells his story and talks about what it takes to be successful as an entrepreneur. He also gets into the benefits of acquisition entrepreneurship and discusses whether it is better to acquire an existing business or start from scratch. We hope you enjoy listening to today's memorable and encouraging conversation with Walker Deibel!  Bio: Walker Deibel is a serial acquisition entrepreneur, bestselling author, and M&A advisor. Walker acquired seven companies over ten years and co-founded several startups. His bestselling book, Buy Then Build: How Acquisition Entrepreneurs Outsmart the Startup Game, was released to critical acclaim, including being recognized by Forbes as “one of the top 7 books all entrepreneurs must read.” It is currently used in many universities.  His book and the educational company of the same name share his experiences and frameworks to help entrepreneurs learn why buying an existing company is often a better route for entrepreneurs, and how to do it. Their flagship program, the Acquisition Lab, offers buy-side M&A services for first-time financial buyers in a do-it-with-you service; providing information, coaching, tools, and community. Walker is a partner at Quiet Light where he helps online-based businesses exit. He is a Certified M&A Advisor, Certified M&A Professional, former SEC licensed stockbroker, and recipient of the Middle Market Thought Leader of the Year, awarded by the private market Alliance of M&A Advisors. He was recognized as a lower-middle-market thought leader by Axial, and his writing has been featured in Inc, Entrepreneur, Forbes, Fast Company, & Harvard Business Review. Walker is currently the owner of the premiere aluminum railing manufacturer in Missouri and a portfolio of online-based businesses. Historically, he has owned and operated in many industries, including manufacturing, fulfillment, software, education, and eCommerce.  Walker is an Emmy-nominated producer. He worked on almost a dozen films with premieres at some of the world's most prestigious festivals, including Sundance, SXSW, and Toronto International Film Festival. He holds an MBA from the Olin School of Business at Washington University in St. Louis, where he received the Declaration of Accomplishment in Entrepreneurship from the Skandalaris Center of Innovation and Entrepreneurship. He is a Pipeline Entrepreneurs fellow and an adjunct professor at Olin, where he launched the acquisition entrepreneurship class for the MBA program. He lives in St. Louis, Missouri, with his wife and their three children. Walker's backstory Walker grew up in St. Louis, Missouri. Everyone on his dad's side of the family had a small business. On his mom's side, everyone was artistic and creative. So Walker developed a creative interest early on but always felt the need to be economically sustainable.  Stockbroker Walker was an English Literature major in school. He became a stockbroker immediately after graduating in 1995, right at the end of the tech boom when the transition from the old economy to the new digital economy was happening.   Film Walker got laid off during the tech bust along with 6,000 other people. He was full of ideas, so he moved to the San Francisco Bay Area to learn from people doing their own thing in business and ended up getting a foothold in film. Learning from failure After moving back to St. Louis to get an MBA, he launched a startup with some MBA classmates. Unfortunately, it did not work out, but he learned from the experience. It also helped him get to where he is today. The first thing Walker learned that the first thing you need to do as an entrepreneur is to get off the pay-cheque because it is as addictive as crack cocaine! Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship allows you to live the biggest, most engaging, and most impactful life possible. It is part of you, all-consuming, and it gives you a vehicle for wealth creation and wealth destruction simultaneously.  A strong work ethic As an entrepreneur, it is vital to have a strong work ethic and the ability to be imbalanced at times.  The number one reason startups fail Lack of product-market fit is the number one reason nine out of ten startups fail.  Entrepreneurship through acquisition Buying an existing business is affordable. If you buy an existing business, you start with existing customers, revenue, established infrastructure, and ongoing earnings, which form a foundation for innovating and growing the business. Having existing earnings allows you to get a bank loan to acquire the business. Figuring out entrepreneurship  While figuring out entrepreneurship, Walker found that the market was okay, but it was hard to get any data. He also found the market decentralized and fragmented, and there was no efficient way to navigate it. So, after about six months, he went corporate and crushed it! An opportunity Walker did not want to spend all his time building a brand for another company, so he started doing a part-time search for a business of his own. Then his dad invited him to work for him in his small company. (It was a surprise because, for all his life, Walker's dad had told him that there was no role for him in his company.) Walker worked there for about a year. Then he bought the company.  Several things happened Immediately after Walker bought his dad's printing company, several things happened: His dad's cohorts started approaching his dad, wanting to know how he sold his business. Walker realized that knowledge about business sales could be easily acquired.  Walker understood that starting from scratch is very smart- but only sometimes! Books Even though a transition was happening in the print industry and bookstores and newspapers were going out of business because of the internet, more authors were writing and publishing books, and more people were buying books than ever before.   Digital printing technology Walker started looking at digital printing technology because he saw that all his publisher customers had massive libraries of books of which they printed only about twenty percent. They ignored the other eighty percent because that would tie up their cash and inventory. Walker realized that if he could turn short-run digital book printing into JIT inventory for his book publishers, his company could have its best opportunity for growth in eighty years. Becoming a Merger & Acquisition professional Walker sold the printing company in 2013 to an acquisition target and subsequently bought another six companies. He knew the public capital market, but he also wanted to understand the private capital market. So he became a Certified M&A Advisor, an M&A Master Intermediary, and a Certified Exit Planning Advisor. He also spent a lot of time working with brokers to learn about the M&A space.  Buy Then Build Everything Walker learned about M&A culminated in him writing the book Buy Then Build, which became a best-seller. Along the way, Buy Then Build also became a textbook for 30% of the schools that teach entrepreneurship through acquisition. The Acquisition Lab People kept asking Walker to help them find and buy a business, so he created The Acquisition Lab as a solution. The Acquisition Lab is similar to an MBA program. It is designed to help people acquire a business, understand what makes world-class content, and then learn how to build that content. The Acquisition Lab became the most popular elected course for MBA programs at some of the best schools in the world, like Harvard, Stanford, University of Chicago, North Western, London Business School, Yale, and Columbia. The Acquisition Lab program Walker wanted a vetted community for The Acquisition Lab, so only about 25% of the applicants get accepted. You will get in only if they think you will succeed. The program takes twelve months. It is designed to meet people where they are and help them succeed in achieving their dreams.  The team Chelsea Wood is the Managing Director of The Acquisition Lab. Chelsea is a Certified M&A Advisor. She grew a company to three billion dollars and spent five years doing post-merger integration. Karen Heise is the former Director of The Career Center at a top-ranked business school. Chelsea, Karen, and Walker work together to create buyer profiles, bring in debt lenders, and do personality assessments.   Entrepr