Podcasts about win win

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  • 1,258PODCASTS
  • 2,177EPISODES
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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about win win

Show all podcasts related to win win

Latest podcast episodes about win win

SHINE ON! Kacey's Health & Happiness Show

Dr. Davis of Wheat Belly fame is back with a program to clean up your gut. And what's a Flexitarian? Someone who eats well - with a little meat added in sometimes. Julie Wilcox explains the Win Win diet. Eat healthy, my friends! xo Kc

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Trade SZN Part VIII - Win/Win trades with the Mets, Phillies and Nationals

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 51:45


Shaun joins me to complete the Trade SZN series, looking at win/win trades with the Mets, Phillies and Nats. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Trade SZN Part VII - win/win trades with the Pirates, Cardinals and Braves

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 50:10


Part 7 of the trade series, myself and Shaun put forward our proposals with the Pirates, Cardinals and Braves Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Modern Family Matters
Harnessing Your Power to Reclaim Control in Divorce and Make Co-Parenting a Win/Win Situation

Modern Family Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 34:57


Join us as we sit down with Behavior Coach and best-selling author, Gail Rudolph , to discuss how you can set healthy boundaries while navigating divorce, and control your own power dynamic not only in separation, but in co-parenting relationships. In this interview, Gail and Steve discuss the following:•     How Can we Harness Power, Control and Personal Choice in Difficult Situations to Influence Others and Create Healthy Relationship Dynamics?•    What Exactly Does Power Up and Power Down Mean?•    What's the Relationship Between Power, Fear, and Intuition?•    What Role Does Active Listening Play in Powering Up or Down?•    What Are Practical Ways to Set Boundaries When Navigating Divorce?•    How Can You Stop Your Co-Parent from Becoming a Boundary Buster?•    It Can be Incredibly Difficult to Forgive Someone Who's Inflicted Hurt, Harm and Pain Upon Us—Why Should We?If you would like to speak with one of our family law attorneys, please call our office at (503) 227-0200, or visit our website at https://www.landerholmlaw.com.To learn more about Gail, how she can help you, and information about her best-selling book, Power Up Power Down: How to Reclaim Control and Make Every Situation a Win/Win, visit https://gailrudolph.com/Disclaimer: Nothing in this communication is intended to provide legal advice nor does it constitute a client-attorney relationship, therefore you should not interpret the contents as such.

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Trade SZN Part VI - Win/Win trades with the Cubs, Reds & Brewers

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 38:58


We continue our win/win trade series - this time getting into the NL Central - Cubs, Reds and Brewers Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Trade SZN Part V - Win/Win trades with the Dodgers, Padres and Giants

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 46:27


Myself and Shaun continue our series, putting forward win/win trades for the Marlins with the Dodgers, Padres and Giants Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Trade SZN Part IV - Win/Win trades with the Dbacks and Rockies + #MarlinsTwitterMadness

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 50:05


Catching up on all the Marlins news..... including MarlinsTwitterMadness - we then start our win/win trades with in the NL with the Dbacks and Rockies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Big 550 KTRS
Dave Matter: Win-win with CFP expansion

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 10:29


The Mizzou beat writer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on the upcoming rematch of Alabama vs. Georgia,

The Messy Masterpiece with Tori & Chad

Hi y'all! In this episode Tori and I talk about our need for help... To think we can go through this tricky life alone with wisdom and foolish and on top of that when we ask for help our community grows and our pride decreases! WIN WIN!Devotional: https://my.bible.com/reading-plans/13743/day/1?segment=0Help us keep this Podcast ad free by supporting us on Patreon!Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themastersfamFind us on YouTube and IG:YouTube- https://youtube.com/c/ToriMastersTori's- https://www.instagram.com/torimasters/Chad's- https://www.instagram.com/chadmasters/Podcast- https://www.instagram.com/morningwiththemasters

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Trade SZN Part III - WIN/WIN trades for the Marlins with every AL West team

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 57:28


Trade SZN continues with the AL West, where myself and Shaun put forward WIN/WIN proposals for the Marlins with every team in the the division..... well, almost every team..... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

PermLIVE.Info - Intercultural RU-EN News & Teleconferences - RusEU.tk
12 самых вдохновляющих Win-Win News-интервью-подкастов в 2021 году - Влад Воробьев, автор WinWinNews- Vk.com/omdaru - 14.00 - 31.12.2021 - Vk.com/WinWinNews

PermLIVE.Info - Intercultural RU-EN News & Teleconferences - RusEU.tk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 18:43


14.00 - 31.12.2021 - Vk.com/WinWinNews - Прямой эфир на VK.com/VKTPP - Win-Win News № 469 Влад Воробьев, автор WinWinNews- Vk.com/omdaru - 12 самых вдохновляющих Win-Win News-интервью-подкастов в 2021 году https://zen.yandex.ru/media/id/614de554337944763b4f8ab5/12-samyh-vdohnovliaiuscih-winwin-newsinterviupodkastov-v-2021-godu-61cc1666c97cb1018fb85afb Скачать mp3-аудиоподкаст https://disk.yandex.ru/d/kOqDA78EQgYGzQ https://winwinnewslive.blogspot.com/2021/12/12-win-win-news-2021-winwinnews.html --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/permlive/message

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Trade SZN Part II - WIN/WIN trades for the Marlins with every AL Central team

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 61:55


Part 2 of our mini series looking at win/win trades for the Marlins with every MLB team Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Realignment
187 | Roy Bahat: How Can We Build a Win-Win Society?

The Realignment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 57:21


Marshall and Saagar's Book's of the Year Bookshop: https://bookshop.org/lists/marshall-and-saagar-s-realignment-2021-books-of-the-year Subscribe to The Realignment's Substack Newsletter: https://therealignment.substack.com/ Roy Bahat, head of Bloomberg Beta, a venture firm investing in the future of work and former co-chair of New America's Shift Commission on Work, Workers, and Technology, joins The Realignment to discuss the challenges facing labor and capital, the future of work, and how the technology can (and can't) redefine questions of representation and ownership.

Mom Is In Control Podcast
912: [BUSINESS] Win/Win Partnerships

Mom Is In Control Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 14:31


"The win-win situation is the basis for America's entire business world. Instead of wasting our time attempting to defeat each other, let's find a way that will make both of us gain and go home satisfied." -Yair Lapid   In this episode, I talk about: How to create win/win partnerships The importance of these partnerships How to make the most of them   Continue the conversation on Instagram @heatherchauvin_ Apply for Mastery: www.heatherchauvin.com/mastery  Apply for Mastery Business: www.heatherchauvin.com/business

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Trade SZN - Looking at Win/Win trades with each AL East team..... Mullins to the Marlins? Sixto to the Yankees?

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 63:42


Shaun Barrett joins me to put forward win/win trade options for the Marlins with every AL East team. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Productivity Show
How To Say No: Set Boundaries and Create Win-Win Situations (TPS384)

The Productivity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 34:03


In today's episode, we're going to share how to set boundaries and SAY NO. This is the last episode of 2021. If you could set one intention for this upcoming year, a great one is to say NO to more things to prevent yourself from being overcommitted. It's hard for a lot of us – […]

PermLIVE.Info - Intercultural RU-EN News & Teleconferences - RusEU.tk
Win-Win Zoom 88 - Тема: Как создавать экологические свечи- елки из воска - Спикер: Ксения Авдонина- Instagram.com/svechi.honey - 16.00 30.12.2021

PermLIVE.Info - Intercultural RU-EN News & Teleconferences - RusEU.tk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:25


Win-Win Zoom 88 - 16.00 30.12.2021- Прямой эфир на Vk.com/VKTPP - Малый бизнес в кризис -Видеоконференция с подписчиками - Модератор- Влад Воробьев, ведущий ежедневногоWin-Win Zoom 88 - Тема: Как создавать экологические свечи-елки из воска - Спикер: Ксения Авдонина- Instagram.com/svechi.honey делового аудиоподкаста Vk.com/WinWinNews https://teletype.in/@omdaru/resume Скачать mp3-аудиоверсию https://disk.yandex.ru/d/LKsEzmYW3ICr9w https://winwinnewslive.blogspot.com/2021/12/win-win-zoom-88-instagramcomsvechihoney.html --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/permlive/message

Maximize Your Social with Neal Schaffer
What is The Creator Economy, and What Is Its Relationship to Influencer Marketing?

Maximize Your Social with Neal Schaffer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 22:43


While many still cringe at the term "influencer marketing," something that has surpassed that buzzword of late is the "creator economy."So what exactly is the creator economy, its relationship to influencer marketing, and how it can be leveraged by both business and, of course, creators?Listen in to understand the historical perspective of the creator economy, and how the pendulum is swinging more in the favor of creators in this Age of Influence.Key Highlights [05:16] The Creator Economy And Its Relationship To Influencer Marketing[07:19] The Golden Era Of Influencer Marketing[10:19] How Content Creators Leverage Advertisements As Main Revenue Sources[10:34] Other Revenue Sources That Content Creators Have[11:34] Social Media Networks As Potential Revenue Source[13:55] What Does Creator Economy Mean For Influencer Marketers?[15:20] How Creator Economy Brings Transparency and Authenticity In Influencer Marketing[16:37] Start Creating Content Now![17:46] SummaryNotable QuotesYou cannot become an online influencer without publishing online content, they go hand in hand. So being a content creator has always been a necessity to yielding influence online. But not all content creators necessarily become influencers.For the first time social networks are actually paying creators to create content, knowing that it is the content and the influence is creating that content that users trust that keeps people coming back to the site.I would argue that we're seeing an even greater democratization of online influence. And simply put, there are more content creators influencing more people than ever before.For the first time social networks are actually paying creators to create content, knowing that it is the content and the influence is creating that content that users trust that keeps people coming back to the site. Content creators prove that they are the only ones who can truly set the trend for what social media users, ie all of us, end up consuming.The most successful relationships are going to be long term, collaborative, and mutual Win-Win.With the democratization of online influence and digital content creation, we can say with certainty that the Creator economy is here to stay. And as a byproduct, it actually will only strengthen the role of influencer marketing, with additional options for marketers, and access to content that continues to build trust and generate results.Learn More:Join My Digital First Mastermind: https://nealschaffer.com/membership/ Contact Me about My Fractional CMO Consulting Services: https://nealschaffer.com/contact/ The Age of Influence Free Preview: https://nealschaffer.com/age-of-influence-preview Subscribe to my YouTube Channel: https://youtube.com/nealschaffer Learn More about This Podcast:  https://podcast.nealschaffer.com

Profit with Law: Profitable Law Firm Growth
Intake Mistakes? Win-Win Solutions for Small-Firm Lawyers & Clients with Maddy Martin - 276

Profit with Law: Profitable Law Firm Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 33:47


Shownotes can be found at https://www.profitwithlaw.com/276.   During the week of December 20th, 2021 we kicked off a virtual planning event to help you plan your best year ever in 2022. This is our fourth session with Maddy Martin from Smith.ai and she shares the best way to improve operations and boost lead quality through a better intake system. Resources mentioned:   Tired of being a stressed out lawyer? Book a free coaching call with one of our coaches and find out how to become a proud and free law firm owner - profitwithlaw.com/freecoaching   Register for the rest of the Best Year Ever 2022 event: https://www.profitwithlaw.com/annualplanning   Best Year Ever 2022 Law Firm Growth Summit Annual Planning Experience Replay link: https://www.profitwithlaw.com/planningreplay Check out Smith.ai profitwithlaw.com/smithai Join our Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/lawfirmgrowthsummit/   To request a show topic, recommend a guest or ask a question for the show, please send an email to info@dreambuilderfinancial.com.   Connect with Moshe on: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/moshe.amsel LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/mosheamsel/

Bulletproof Radio
Kindness: The Win-Win Superpower – Jamil Zaki, Ph.D. & Leon Logothetis : 888

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 34:20


WE APPRECIATE OUR PARTNERS. CHECK THEM OUT!Kratom for Energy, Focus & Pain Relief: https://superspeciosa.com, use code DAVE to get 20% offUpgrade Digestive Health: https://globalhealing.com/dave; use code DAVE15 to get 15% offMore Meditation in Less Time: https://40yearsofzen.comIN THIS EPISODE OF THE HUMAN UPGRADE...… the conversation centers on what kindness is, how to practice it, and why it matters. Kindness is a powerful tool – it helps people feel less alone and truly makes the world a more joyful and tolerant place. The two insightful guests you'll hear from in this episode – Jamil Zaki, Ph.D., and Leon Logothetis – will leave you feeling lighter, more optimistic and, well, kinder!Jamil Zaki, Ph.D., uses tools from psychology and neuroscience to help you understand how empathy works. As a professor of Psychology at Stanford University and the director of the Stanford Social Neuroscience Lab, he explains how kindness is a learnable skill. You can use it in your life more often.Jamil's kindness research includes empathy and compassion to form a triad. “Kindness is a behavior that benefits another person,” he explains. Scientists view empathy like a big umbrella term for emotional connection and then compassion as one of the components of emotional connectedness to others.You can dive into more of his research in his book, “The War for Kindness: Building Empathy in a Fractured World.”Leon Logothetis invites you to join the kindness rebellion. He's certain you'll find wealth in health and happiness, success in inner peace and a definite cool factor in being kind. Leon's a motivational speaker, adventurer and philanthropist known as the “The Kindness Guy.” His travels take him all over the world looking for and spreading kindness (binge watch both seasons of “The Kindness Diaries”). He speaks to children and adults at schools and companies about the importance of being kind in the world. Empathy and compassion have a lot to do with that.Check out his latest book: “Go Be Kind-A Life-Changing Little Journal: 28½ Adventures Guaranteed to Make You Happier,” to find out how you can get in on the kindness movement.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Music (ed) Matters
Episode 85: Episode 85 - A&C Series: Advocacy and Collaboration Spotlight — Music Educators and Administration- how to create a win-win for all (with Dr. Jay Butterfield)

Music (ed) Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 46:17


Administration plays a huge role in our musical successes and situations. In this release in the "Advocacy & Collaboration Series," we talk with Dr. Jay Butterfield - a lifelong musician, performer, educator, and administrator. We define culture, talk about the power of servant leadership and then dive into five fantastic tips for creating a win-win for all parties. Whether you're dealing with administration, a board, or other governing body - you'll walk away with techniques to empower and elevate music for all. Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/M_hObsklJug Join us over at Patreon.com/MusicEdMatters for monthly meet-ups, monthly bonus episodes, special pre-release book content, and more!Support the companies that make The Music (ed) Matters Podcast possible: —Kaleidoscope Adventures - find your adventure today, kaleidoscopeadventures.com/. — The Kinnison Choral Company - check out their quality resources - or get your tracks made today - at KinnisonChoralCo.com. **Show music originally written by Mr. Todd Monsell**Show photography provided by Dr. Dan Biggerstaff

Read to Lead Podcast
402: Reclaim Control and Make Every Situation a Win-Win with Gail Rudolph

Read to Lead Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 37:12


I've had the chance, recently, to welcome more and more guests on the show that have been introduced to me by previous guests. It's a nice problem to have. Let me take this moment to give a shoutout to Honoree Corder, our guest from just last month in Episode #399. Thanks to Honoree, I get […] The post 402: Reclaim Control and Make Every Situation a Win-Win with Gail Rudolph first appeared on Read to Lead Podcast.

One White Woman
Ep. 24 - ThePocketUSA, with Brian Wilturner

One White Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 16:13


YouTube of this conversation. ThePocketUSA - includes excellent info about interacting with police when pulled over for a traffic stop. ClippersandCops - effectively mending the gap between community and police: definitely a site worth checking out to see the positive community-level work being achieved. Once in awhile, a problem is so pervasive it seems insurmountable, and then someone comes along with a solution so sensible and so simple that you can't help but wonder why it took so long to show up. Well, Brian Wilturner, a Black man and the loving father of a teenage boy had plenty of motivation to come up with a legitimate solution for traffic stops by police. Our conversation is short and to the point, and, while acknowledging the tragic outcomes of far too many traffic stops by police involving Black people, what we focus on together is the many layered benefits for all of us, no matter the color of our skin, including benefits for police officers. Thank you for joining us to learn about one more way in which a racially-based challenge is being creatively addressed in the most Win-Win of ways. Welcome to the One White Woman podcast. My name is Nini White and I'm truly grateful to you for being the person who is taking time to learn so that real change can happen and move all of us, all Americans, forward. Oh, and this conversation, as all One White Woman conversations going forward, is viewable on YouTube if you'd like to see the actual item that Brian is talking about. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/onewhitewoman/message

Fridays on the Fly
322 - Win Win Car Project Plan

Fridays on the Fly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021


Anime. Death Note, Demon Slayer, AvatarFuture project: spray paint can spinnerDownspout repairEric's workshop upgradesEric's car projectsEric and Ward hatch a win-win car project planWikipedia does not need my money

Main Street Author Podcast
Ep:88—An Interview with Executive Coach & Author, Gail Rudolph

Main Street Author Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 29:05


On this episode of the Main Street Author Podcast, I am having a conversation with executive coach and author, Gail Rudolph.Gail has a 25 year track record of serving in leadership positions across a spectrum of organizations. She is a Cialdini Method Certified Trainer , one of only 13 people globally —and one of only two women and the only woman in the United States— to hold this distinction.Gail is the author of the new book, Power Up Power Down, How to Reclaim Control and Make Every Situation a Win/Win. Learn more about Gail by visiting GailRudolph.com.

We All Want Clean H2O
On biodigesters - are they a real win-win technology?

We All Want Clean H2O

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 33:18


In this episode, we talk about biodigesters, their potential unintended consequences in areas of high Confined Animal Feeding Operations' densities, and why there are so many laws at the state and federal levels being proposed or passed to support them (hint: it's got to do with climate change mitigation policies).   

Next Matters Most
Creating a WIN-WIN Program For Universities, Investors, and Entrepreneurs With Brett Danforth

Next Matters Most

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 65:40


Brett Danforth is the co-managing director of NC State University's Wolfpack Investor Network, an angel network currently comprised of 150 NC State-affiliated angel investors that have deployed over $10 million into NC State-affiliated early stage companies over the last two and a half years. Prior to joining WIN, Brett was a Venture Banker at Square 1 Bank, lending to venture-backed early and growth stage companies in the Southeast. His career also includes experience with a family office investor and a financial consulting firm serving nonprofits. Brett is a graduate of the Poole College of Management at NC State University. Personally, Brett lives in Raleigh, NC, with his wife, Lindsey and their three daughters. He enjoys playing golf, is a member at Providence Church and serves on the First Tee – Triangle's Young Professional Board. - Want to take this episode with you? anchor.fm/nextmattersmost To learn more about Brett Danforth & Nick Jordan: nextmattersmost.com/blogs/ We've got more to offer on our social platforms! linktr.ee/_nickjordan Thank you for watching this episode of the Next Matters Most Podcast! What did you think of this episode? Let us know in the comments!

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation

Our guest today is Jeremy Pollack, a leader of the field of workplace conflict resolution and peacebuilding and author of the book, The Conflict Resolution Playbook. Listen as we discuss what creates conflict in the workplace and practical tips and real life scenarios to eliminate destructive conflict and build healthier relationships.   Jeremy holds a Master's degree in Evolutionary Anthropology from California State University, Fullerton under anthropologist John Patton. Jeremy also holds a Master's degree in Negotiation, Conflict Resolution, and Peacebuilding (NCRP) from California State University, Dominguez Hills. Currently, he is finishing his doctoral work in Psychology, with an emphasis in motivation and social psychology, at Grand Canyon University. Jeremy is also a research fellow at Stanford University, where he leads research projects in social psychology and conflict resolution as an interdisciplinary effort between the Stanford Social Concepts Lab (Dept. of Psychology) and the Stanford Center on International Conflict & Negotiation (Dept. of Law). As a conflict resolution consultant, Jeremy has mediated conflicts between couples, co-executives, and organizations, aiming as often as possible to transform relationships and create Win-Win resolutions for all parties involved. He also works as a personal development coach, helping individuals discover internal conflicts impeding them from living happy, fulfilling lives. He is a regular contributor on the topics of leadership and conflict management for publications like Forbes.com, Fast Company, Industry Week, and more. He is also formerly the Managing Editor of “The Peace Psychologist“, the official newsletter for the Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict, and Violence, Division 48 of the APA. What We Discuss with Jeremy Pollack in This Episode What creates conflict in the first place Six psychological human needs and how to get them met 10 organizational satisfiers Reframing how we look at conflict – why it is a good thing How to resolve the social conflict going on right now The distinction between conflict and escalation What causes escalation to happen De-escalation on an individual level when social escalation is present How to use “I” and “You” statements Creating a conversation protocol for successful communication Applying the spirit of curiosity vs condemnation Honoring diversity and inclusion in the workplace How to avoid triggering people through judgments What is gaslighting and how to deal with it How to avoid false assumptions Episode Show Notes: https://tinyurl.com/f2u8ecpv

dog happi
Should You Use Probiotics When Giving Antibiotics?

dog happi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 25:52


Would you like to know how to support your dog's health while on antibiotics?   Dr. Holly Ganz and Carlton Osbourne from AnimalBiome explain that and more in this episode.  You will have a clear plan of action to have a healthier dog even when you have to use antibiotics or other medications.Check out AnimalBiome.comYou can receive 20% off your purchase if you use the dog-happi coupon code.  You receive a discount and I receive a commission too.  Win-Win!  Thank you AnimalBiome! Check out doghappi.com for more content.Thank you for being here!Stay happi!

The Clement Manyathela Show
BMW front seat to tomorrow- The green economy, a win-win for South Africa

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 20:53


On part five of the BMW Front Seat to Tomorrow. Clement speaks to Masopha Moshoeshoe,  a Green Economy specialist in the Investment and Infrastructure Office in the Presidency on whether the green economy is a win-win for South Africa. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mission Matters Innovation
Sabina Bhatia Talks About The Win-Win Proposition of Prompt Wage Access for Hourly Workers

Mission Matters Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 30:49


Sabina Bhatia, Chief Customer Officer at Payactiv, was interviewed on Mission Matters Innovation Podcast by Adam Torres. Sabina Bhatia says her mission is to help the millions of Americans living paycheck to paycheck support themselves and their families through prompt access to wages and smart financial tools. Follow Adam on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/askadamtorres/ for up to date information on book releases and tour schedule.Apply to be interviewed by Adam on our podcast:https://missionmatters.lpages.co/podcastguest/Visit our website:https://missionmatters.com/

Affiliated: ClickBank's Official Affiliate Marketing Podcast
How To Bridge an Offer to Make it a Win/Win for Both Businesses

Affiliated: ClickBank's Official Affiliate Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 25:56


In this episode, Nick Fisher talks to the psychology and process of connecting the people, patterns, and opportunities that drive great offers. Fisher is the founder and CEO of Agexa, a digital marketing agency that works with brands who are highly motivated for growth and are dedicated to pursuing paid traffic as a source of revenue. They work best with companies who are already spending on paid traffic, but are facing a scale wall. Learn more at https://www.agexa.com/

Aufhören der Podcast
Xmas, Mind & Soul - 6. Türchen mit Juliette Van Der Weijde

Aufhören der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 11:32


Voilà, one of my favourite Yoga teachers in Berlin. About her teaching style (I wrote that right after class): ✨The kind of strictness that helps to surrender ✨The kind of structure that supports to feel progression ✨The kind of clarity that makes it easier to be really present I especially love the backbends class. Because bending your back means opening your heart! And this happens on a physical, mental and spiritual level, DUUUH So Juliette is a student and teacher of opening up with so much strength and integrity that the opening does not hurt or bring injuries over time. Her job is to support people to open their hearts. What a wonderful work to do! Also, her lifestyle is a living proof that YOGA WORKS. She travels a lot, teaches classes, workshops, retreats all over Europe and at the same time … whenever I connect with her I feel so much calmness, grounding and stability. That's for sure no co-incident but also a result of practicing yoga: Being flexible AND connected to a strong, stable core. Transitioning while being conscious and clear. Do not listen to my words, but listen to your heart while you hear Juliette's words in today's message of XMAS, Mind & Soul. ✨ She talks about SIMPLICITY ✨

Shock Your Potential
Planet Subaru - Jeff Morill

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:42


“There are all these Win-Win situations, if you're intentional about looking for them and building that into your culture and operating philosophy.” Jeff Morill The most successful and sustainable business often have their strengths anchored in the fundamental values rather than products. These values dictate how these business relate with both their employees and customers. This is according to our guest today, Jeff Morill, who believes that once established and entrenched in the business culture, positive values will remain alive and serve your business a great deal. Jeff Morill's first business was Planet Subaru, perhaps the world's first ethical car dealership. He co-founded Planet Subaru, “your undealership,” in 1998, and built it into one of the most successful privately-held car dealerships in the United States. He later started other businesses in automotive retail, real estate, telecommunications, and insurance that generate over $100,000,000 in annual revenue. His achievements in building profitable and ethical companies have been featured in a variety of national media including USA Today, Entrepreneur Magazine, Automotive News, The Boston Globe, and others. After Jeff nearly killed himself in an accident, he wrote a book to pass along the unusual things he had learned about how to sell a lot without selling out your integrity. The book comes out February 28th and is titled ‘Profit Wise: How to Make More Money in Business by Doing the Right Thing.' Learn more at www.jeffmorrill.com (I'm donating all author royalties to charity.) Jeff reveals things about the car business, but prefers to speak thoughtfully about personal development and entrepreneurship. For example, He developed a straightforward hiring process that makes a lot more sense than what most businesses are using (if they have any process at all). In today's episode, Jeff discusses how he was able to form a highly profitable company based that was anchored on ethical practices and superior customer experiences. Listen in! Social media handles: https://www.jeffmorrill.com/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC59FdefHNgM1pxwNSipQOqw When we opened our business, we saw an opportunity to differentiate ourselves from the terrible state of the showroom experience. [3:03] My brother who is the co- founder business partner, and I grew up under very modest conditions. [3:42] We knew from the beginning that we wanted our lives to be about a lot more than just moving iron and making profits. [4:16] Other businesses that we've bought have put us in a position to do some pretty neat things in terms of giving back and serving the community. [4:26] I think it's important to understand that with all the success we've had, we've had some struggles too. [5:32] I guess I look at it like a garden, that is growing and it has its own energy and we have to go in and make sure that we're providing it with all the resources it needs. [6:19] It's a ton of focus on making sure that the stated values that you started the company with are actually alive in it every day. [6:44] One of the things that has really made us successful relative to competition is our ability to hire people. [7:29] A lot of businesses though, if you lose the interest in making those investments, the withdrawals happen sort of automatically. [10:13] What I want to do is articulate this vision and hopefully inspire other entrepreneurs to think about it the way I do. [11:38] One of the things I'm really proud of at the Subaru dealership, we've hired many female technicians which supports their families and their communities. [12:18] There are all these Win-Win situations, if you're intentional about looking for them and building that into your culture and operating philosophy. [13:56] The most conspicuous thing we see from having more women in our team is that the men felt like they needed to act a little more professionally. [15:48] Commercial break [18:05] I think I have a very high pain threshold, which has served me very well and another thing that I'm really proud of is my communication ability [19:48] I was very scared for many years that we were going to lose it all because we're very lightly capitalized, highly leveraged. [23:55] If I could write myself a letter back to when I was starting a business, I would tell myself to make sure I enjoy it along the way and that it was going to turn out fine. [24:22] One of the things I did do well is I started the business with love in the model. [24:54] Human institutions ultimately need to be there for the benefit of people, and to serve others and to benefit the earth in some way. [26:06] If all your business does is pad your pockets, you've failed regardless of how rich you are, that's where I'm coming from. [26:20] If you're going to succeed in business, just make sure that you're doing it for the right reasons and that you're taking care of people. [26:26] ………………………………………………… Thank you to our December sponsor!  KukuaBiz can provide dedicated and affordable talent from Kenya to help you grow and scale your business. Virtual employees are skilled in administrative functions, sales, podcast management, video editing, marketing, social media marketing, website design and management, and more. Learn more: https://www.kukuabiz.com

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
How to Be Accessible Beyond the Sliding Scale

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 33:42


How to Be Accessible Beyond the Sliding Scale An interview with Lindsay Bryan-Podvin, LMSW, about how therapy can be accessible (and not just financially). Curt and Katie chat with Lindsay about capitalism versus money exchange, the social enterprise model, and how therapists can make a good living without feeling like greedy capitalists. We also explore the many different types of accessibility and the importance of setting your fees based on your needs and values rather than as a mechanism to single-handedly fix the broken system or to meet an artificial money goal.     It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. Interview with Lindsay Bryan-Podvin, LMSW, Mind Money Balance Lindsay Bryan-Podvin (she/her) is a biracial financial therapist, speaker, and author of the book "The Financial Anxiety Solution." In her therapy practice, Mind Money Balance, she uses shame-free financial therapy to help people get their minds and money in balance. She's expanded her services to help private practice therapists with their money mindset, sustainable pricing, and authentic marketing so they can include financial self-care in their work. She lives with her partner and their dog on the traditional land of the Fox, Peoria, Potawatomi, and Anishinabewaki peoples also known as Michigan. In this episode we talk about: How therapy can be more accessible (and not just monetarily) The money “shit” that gets in the way of us thinking about other options for accessibility Decreasing stigma and the notion that therapy is by and for white folks Are we making our practices accessible for all sorts of folks? ADA compliance, supporting neurodivergent and disabled folks Cultural competence, the ability to apply that in sessions with clients who are different than us Being embedded in our communities Taking therapy out of the shadows The challenges in getting out and having a larger voice How accessibility is intertwined with therapist visibility How to become part of your community in effective and impactful ways Financial ways to make your practice more accessible beyond sliding scale Social Enterprise Model: intersection of what you do well, what values you stand for, and what can you get paid well to do Feeling like a greedy capitalist What it means to be paid well How to think about setting your fees Fee-setting based on what you need to survive and thrive (not capitalist principles) The problem with “know your worth” The big cognitive shift required to move from community mental health pricing and work-life balance, fees Tying money to quality of life, not specific monetary goals Getting to “enough” not more and more Capitalism versus money exchange The wealth of knowledge we have as therapists (and how therapists take it for granted and/or devalue it) Sharing your knowledge as a mechanism of accessibility to your whole community To practice self-care, you have to be able to afford it Our Generous Sponsor: Trauma Therapist Network Trauma is highly prevalent in mental health client populations and people are looking for therapists with specialized training and experience in trauma, but they often don't know where to start. If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There are so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan, LCSW-C created Trauma Therapist Network.  Trauma Therapist Network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work and what they specialize in, so potential clients can find them. Trauma Therapist Network therapist profiles include the types of trauma specialized in, populations served and therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them.  The Network is more than a directory, though. It's a community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect, consult and network with colleagues around the country. Join our growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code:  MTSG20 at www.traumatherapistnetwork.com.   Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! www.mindmoneybalance.com https://www.instagram.com/mindmoneybalance/ Lindsay's podcast: Mind Money Balance   Relevant Episodes: Lindsay's previous podcast episode: Financial Therapy Katie Read: Therapists Shaming Therapists Negotiating Sliding Scale Making Access More Affordable Asking for Money Reimagining Therapy Reimagined   Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated)   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is sponsored by trauma therapist network.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Trauma therapist network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work, and what they specialize in so potential clients can find them. Visit traumatherapistnetwork.com to learn more,   Curt Widhalm  00:27 listen at the end of the episode for more about the trauma therapist network.   Announcer  00:31 You're listening to the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide, where therapists live, breed and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:47 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm, with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about things that we do things that we don't do things that maybe we should do. And both Katie and our guests today are looking at me like, where is this going? And honestly, this is just one of those rambling intros that we have. So rather than making this more awkward, we're joined once again by Lindsey Bryan Podvin. She's been a guest to the show before spoken at therapy reimagined with us, talking to us about money and ways that we could be looking at it for our practice. So thank you for joining us again.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  01:35 Oh, yeah, I'm really happy to be here. This is my favorite thing to chat about, and to be in community with you guys. Again, it's fun.   Katie Vernoy  01:43 Oh, we're so glad to have you back. And we'll definitely link to your previous episode in our show notes. But for folks who haven't heard from you for a while, or for our new listeners, tell us who you are and what you're putting out into the world.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  01:57 Yeah, so as Curt mentioned, my name is Lindsay Bryan-Podvin. I'm a social worker, and financial therapist, and I have kind of two arms of what I'm putting out there into the world, I have my clinical arm, and then I have my consulting arm. So in my clinical world, I'm doing financial therapy, which is helping clients with the emotional and psychological side of money, which spoiler alert is all of it, I think. And then, on the consulting side, I know you all know that therapists have money, shit, and we have a lot of hang ups about it. And so in my consulting arm, I help mostly other therapists, though, over the past year, I'll say that other kind of helping professionals have woven their way in, whether it's dietitians, acupuncturist, Reiki healers, because I think a lot of us get similar messaging about what money is and what it isn't. And so I help them work on their emotional and psychological relationship with money so they can have sustainable and profitable businesses. And I do, like outside of the the hands on work, or the zoom work, I suppose I have a podcast and Instagram, a pretty active blog and an email list that keeps me using my creative side of my brain.   Katie Vernoy  03:13 Nice. I love it.   Curt Widhalm  03:15 One of the big discussions that's been in the social justice aspects of our field, especially for private practitioners, and admittedly also here on our show, is talking about things like accessibility and being able to make our services go beyond just those top paying cash pay clients. Can you walk us through kind of what you hear in these discussions about accessibility for practices, and especially as it relates to some of these monetary issues?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  03:50 Yeah, I think as therapists we get really stuck on accessibility being only a monetary issue. So we think about solving for that problem by sliding our scale or by offering pro bono spaces. But we forget about all the other ways in which we can and should be accessible if that works in alignment with us. So as I think you guys were talking with Katie read about like the the the money talk that comes up on therapists forums and how there's so much guilt and shame and, and judgment about what people do or don't do, whether they do or don't take insurance, whether they do or don't slide their scale, but that's where most of us get stuck. And there are so many things beyond sliding our scale and the fee that we charge that can bring about accessibility for our practices and in our communities.   Katie Vernoy  04:45 What are some of the things that we can think about beyond sliding scale because I think I get stuck there as well with and maybe this is just our focus is that we're so focused on the monetary aspects and our own money shit as you described it, and We aren't thinking about what else isn't making us accessible.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  05:03 Yeah, I think taking a few steps back before a client even finds our website or finds us on a therapist directory, really thinking about how can we make our field more accessible by talking about what is therapy, I think in a lot of communities, we still have these stigmas that therapy is buy in for white people. And it's done on a couch with, you know, a person who's got reinforced elbows and they're smoking a pipe, right? You know, like, we have that imagery. And if we are not talking to our communities about what therapy is and who it is for, and how it can be helpful by not just talking about what it is, but also the stigma reduction, we don't even get people landing on our websites or knocking on our, you know, figurative door, right. So being in our communities and talking about what it is and who it's for, and how it can be helpful. And also talking about just the ins and outs of therapy, that it is confidential. I think in a lot of communities, there's a fear that if I go to a therapist, then you know, my mom's cousins going to find out about it, or that my employer will be told about it, or that my partner will be told about it. So I think there's some education that has to happen on the backend before people even get to our doors. And then in terms of other measures of accessibility outside of this scale. Let's get really granular on on what is accessibility? Do our clients see themselves reflected in the way that we practice therapy? Can clients who have disabilities, either neurodiversity or physical limitations, do they have actual access to our offices? Are they ADA compliant? Do we offer you know, nowadays, so many of us offer basically zoom therapy? Which makes it so much more accessible? Are we operating on bus routes and public transportation? Is there easy parking, like the literal accessibility piece? And then the cultural competency piece? Can they speak my language? If I don't speak English? Do I have somebody sitting across from me in the therapy room? Who gets what I'm talking about? When we talk about cultural competence? Not just thinking about, you know, whether or not you took a class on Southeast Asian Studies. But what does that mean? And how does that show up in our spaces, and being embedded in our community beyond just like, hiding in this little bubble, where we're kind of shrouded in mystery, I think, taking therapy out of the shadows and making it more commonplace in our communities, like we are healers in our communities. And we shouldn't be hiding behind the walls of like mystery what when there are community events, I would love to see more therapists out and they're out and about, as sponsors, as networkers and things like that, like, we also have to take ourselves out of the shadow. So there's, there's a lot of different ways we can talk about accessibility.   Curt Widhalm  07:59 So I love what you're saying, I completely agree with getting out there. There's some some stumbling steps that can happen in putting ourselves out there, because so much of our history is in being shrouded to the, you know, the shadows. And sometimes the responses that I hear from clinicians is, oh, that person went out and was talking about this, but didn't represent themselves. Well, it isn't representing the field. Well, do you have any advice as far as taking some of these steps? You know, look at you, and all of the things that you post in your newsletters and social media and this kind of stuff, money seems to be kind of like a fairly neutral ground as far as being able to talk about relationships with money. For those who are looking to maybe take some other steps as far as making this accessibility happen, that might be around more unique issues to communities. Do you have any suggestions on how people might find the confidence to be able to make those steps?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  09:03 Yeah, I really like this question. Because I think that accessibility and visibility are are intertwined. And visibility isn't just social media. So let's say you do want to be more accessible in your community and you do want to be more visible in your community, but you're talking about something that is more sensitive, like you know, sexual trauma, then yeah, maybe going on in doing an Instagram live about it isn't probably the most appropriate way because you don't know who's on the other side of it, you really can't create a container of people to make sure that it's safer or at least safer. So maybe in that instance, it's going to, you know, a high school and pulling a you know, having a group of 30 kids that you are talking to about this in like a speaking engagement setting or maybe it is going to the healthcare system and sitting down and talking to the medical social workers about what you know, or to the nurse midwives about what you know, right there. Different ways to get out and become a part of the community that don't involve these kind of one way one sided communication methods. Does that make sense?   Katie Vernoy  10:11 It does, I think this idea of making the whole profession more accessible to folks and all folks, and not just the kind of historical white people and the, the, the patches and the pipes. I think that to me is, it's really, really important. And I think it also is only a first step. Because when they get to our door is there still is I think, you know, financial accessibility concerns for a lot of folks. And so are there financial ways to be accessible that don't involve involves sliding your scale?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  10:48 Yeah, of course. So, undoubtedly, money is a real accessibility issue. I'm not just saying like, Oh, you know, just get out there. That's it sounds it? All. Right, exactly. Exactly. An email newsletter is not going to fix accessibility. But as you guys have also talked about on this podcast, it's not the responsibility of an individual therapist, to fix the broken medical system salute here. And at the same time, there are more creative ways to provide services to people in your community that are might be easier on their pocketbooks. So group therapy is also a really great option, because you as the clinician are still generating the revenue that you need to, and the people on the other side are usually paying you less dollars per session. Insurance, I know there's a big again, it's not your job to accept insurance if they don't reimburse you well, but accepting insurance is a measure of accessibility. And even if you aren't accepting insurance, helping your clients out, walking them through what a super bill is, you know, spending a little bit of time in session, making sure that they know what that means and how to actually get it done. That, to me is incredibly helpful. So providing a bit of space in the in the session to talk through how you can do that, particularly if they have anxiety, or they've got some ADHD, you know, they might need a little extra hand holding to get those things done. There are depending on your licensing board, I've seen some people do sponsored therapy spot. So it's a little bit different than a pro bono. It's Think of it like a scholarship for therapy. So the way that I've seen this work is for clients who pay a full fee, you essentially tell them look by you paying a full fee, a portion of your fee goes towards sponsoring somebody who would not be able to afford therapy with me. So you're still getting income, but you're also having the clients who are able to pay your fee, kind of some buy in that they are also kind of helping out other people in the community. So those are some different ways to be accessible, that don't involve sliding your scale doesn't mean you have to do all or any of them. It's just different ways to think about it.   Curt Widhalm  13:04 On of the things that you talked about in your presentation at the therapy reimagined conference, this social enterprise.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  13:12 Yes.   Curt Widhalm  13:14 Can you tell us more about that, what it means for people who maybe didn't attend the conference and what the social enterprise model is and how this might fit in for therapists?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  13:24 Yeah, I think so many therapists struggle with this idea of charging for services because we've internalized so many things about what money is or what it isn't. And the social enterprise model essentially says, look, there are three things to provide something that you can feel good about doing. And also know that you are being compensated fairly for it. And it exists at the intersection of these three things. One, what do you do well, what values do you stand for? And what can you be paid? Well to do, and as therapists I think, if we can think about ourselves at the intersection of that, of existing, and I do this really well, these are in alignment with my values, this type of therapeutic intervention is in alignment with my values, and I can be paid well to do that. You know, that you are contributing to the greater good of the community by making sure that you're not just wringing out your clients for the most dollars you can get right? I think so many of us think that if I charge money, then I'm a greedy capitalist, but it's also about am I being compensated for the skills that I offer and the transformations that I'm able to help facilitate in a meaningful way?   Katie Vernoy  14:41 I know that there are a lot of different perspectives on how you decide how much money to wring out of your client. And, and and you mentioned the episode with Katie Read and we've had other conversations as well, just about the shoulds. And you know, how I should set my fees and those types of things. Yeah, and to me, it feels like there's so much nuance. It's it's a wide open space, there's a lot of shit. So people feel like it's not wide open, but I feel like it really is. What advice do you have on on setting those fees? Because when we're in that space where I can be paid well for it, it's aligned with my values, and I can do it well, like, it can be hard to figure out like, and what does being paid? Well mean, that I can feel good about?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  15:30 Yeah. And I think that's such a good question. Because this idea of what does it mean to be paid? Well, is so skewed in our field, my first job, I was making $32,000, you know, with a master's degree, and I don't think that's an unfamiliar number or salary for people to hear. And so when a lot of people go into private practice, they hold themselves to that standard, oh, well, I was making 40k or 50k. I think that's a reasonable salary. I think that's what I'll try to make. So we haven't thought beyond what do we actually need to survive and thrive. And that's where doing things in alignment with your values can be really beneficial. So when it comes to fi setting, you're not just thinking about what are you charging your clients? You're also thinking about? Does that fee sustain me and allow me to practice financial self care? Which means Can I take care of my financial needs? Yes, but do Am I also able to support my mental, my emotional and my spiritual self. With that? I know, I was, I was loving your episode on burnout. And I love the modeling that the two of you did by saying, Look, we're going to hit pause on the therapy reimagine conference, we also have to build in time off and time for restoration, there is a study that says we need, I think, oh, shoot, I'm going to botch it. Now. I think it's eight or 10 consecutive days off in a row to actually unplug from work. So making sure that you have that built in to your time off. So making sure it covers your time off making sure it covers your health insurance. Unfortunately, we live in a society where your healthcare is tied with your employment. So when you're self employed, you have to make sure that you can cover your health insurance, you have to also make sure that you're thinking about your future self in traditional employment, we often have access to retirement plans or programs. And when we move into entrepreneurship, we are our own 401k or four, three B plan. So we have to make sure that all of those things are taken into account. And we don't want to be overworking ourselves. When we show up exhausted and burnt out and watching the clock, we are not being good clinicians we just aren't. And just taking stock of our own energy, my full pre pandemic was 18, I could comfortably see 18 clients a week that felt like a good fit for me, I wasn't burnt out, I wasn't presenting my clients, I had downtime to get the things done, I needed to do and I charged accordingly. Now, my max is 12. I have found that doing zoom therapy. While there are so many advantages of it, like I genuinely really like it, I find that literally the physicality of sitting still and staring at my screen and just what really watching so much harder for nuances through the screen takes so much more energy out of me and I can no longer comfortably and competently feel like I'm a good practitioner when I'm seeing 18 clients when I've had to scale that back to 12. And then what do I have to do to make up for that income? So that was a long answer of saying it depends. You have to figure out what money you need to be bringing in and you need to make sure that you're not just thinking about comparing it to what you use to earn an agency job because you were likely being underpaid there.   Katie Vernoy  18:47 It's hard not to feel like a greedy capitalist. With that it means you have to charge a premium fee mostly   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  18:56 Yeah, yeah.   Curt Widhalm  18:59 Give me advice for people making that jump to those premium price because I'm sure that there's a lot of our listeners who might be considering leaving an agency job and being like, you know, I know you know my session value in this agency and this aligns maybe with my values but in going out and charging somebody three four or five times that fee in order to meet my money goals seems like it has a lot of opportunity to bring up some that imposter syndrome and really being able to balance that for those individuals you have any guidance on what to really look at hopefully beyond just kind of know your worth.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  19:43 Yeah. Oh my god. Thank you for saying that because also the Know your worth thing. That's a trope I used to find myself repeating. And then a friend of mine who's a behavioral economist, she shared with me Jaquette Timmons and she's goes Lindsay You have to stop saying that because we as humans We don't have a worth. So instead, she invited me to reframe it as charged the value of what your services are worth to give yourself a little bit of psychic distance there between like, I'm worth $300. Now it's like no, the value of my services are worth $300 an hour. So anyway, tangent aside, how can you come into charging fees for your services, I think there is a pendulum swing that I see happen when people try to get out of the mentality of sliding their scale as low as possible to charging premium fees. And so they go from being in spaces where being a good therapist means charging very little into spaces that are like, You need to be a six, seven figure business owner, and you need to be charging premium fees, which can be as we know, a big jump cognitively. And so I always invite people to come back to your values, your lifestyle needs, your unique financial goals. And I'm not about bashing the people who are saying, Oh, you need to make six figures or seven figures. My practice does generate six figures. But I don't think that is a magical goalposts where all your problems are suddenly solved. I think this chase this money charge, the premium fees, you have to work more can backfire. In that it forces us to work more meaning when you have that mentality of I have to work harder, I have to chase this x figure goal or this premium fee number. What happens often is you get into this space where I'll just use myself for an example that that 12 clients Oh, I saw 12 clients a week, I made enough money to hit my goals. I started to cultivate work life balance. But now what if I saw twice as many people, I could make twice as much money? What could I do it twice as much money. And then all of a sudden you forget about why you did it in the first place. So coming back to how much do I need? How much do I desire and is the money that I'm charging, allowing me to do things in alignment with my values, let's say family is like the most important value to me. And I want my 10 consecutive days off in a row with my family. And I want to go somewhere where I don't have to worry about you know, finding activities for us to do or cooking a bunch of food, I want to make sure that I have enough money to pay for that Airbnb to pay for takeout and that Airbnb is conveniently located to a lot of like outdoor activities. That's a goal that I can kind of reverse engineer my way. And to me, it's also modeling for your clients, you don't necessarily have to say to your client, like, Oh, my financial goal was this, this and this, and I was able to achieve it. But you're also modeling for your clients the importance of taking time off of adhering to your boundaries and practicing self care. So again, that's a tangent of an answer. But I guess the long and short of it is as you move towards charging premium fees come back to like, what your WHY IS, and when you feel that anxiety to work more and charge more and go harder, you actually may already have enough.   Katie Vernoy  23:02 I like that I think the piece that resonates for me is this, the letting go of I must get to this number, I must make more money. And I think for me, there's also this big push of like we must leverage we must, we must continue to grow and expand. And I think there's a point at which we have enough I mean, there, there may still be challenges that we need to do. But there's this, this freedom and not having to constantly grow and, and make my business bigger and make my business more successful. Like there's each person has to decide where they land or where they land for a time and you know, different seasons of what I need and what I want and what's most important to me, but it feels like it and this is kind of circling back to the the social enterprise model and kind of this idea of capitalism versus money exchange and, you know, clarifying all of that, but but it seems like when it's completely tied to values, what you're positing is that feels better than just making money for money's sake. And so, so tell us a little bit more about this. Because to me, I feel like I'm just starting to grasp the idea I was I was too caught up in the greedy capitalism, to understand kind of what what we were what we were starting to talk about with a social enterprise model.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  24:24 Yeah. So to bounce off of this idea of what is the difference between capitalism and money exchange? I think it's important to note that capitalism is a is a political economic system that we we know the dangers of right it is propped up by the unpaid and underpaid labor. So the person or people who are in charge, get the greatest amount of profit available. And as such, as we kind of touched on earlier, it's a system where we give all the praise to the people who Make a lot of money because they must have worked hard and simultaneously shamed the people who didn't make a lot of money because they must have not been hard workers. And we've we bought into that idea as a society so much so that you know, at the time that we're recording this, if you're on Twitter right now, you can see people rallying around Elon Musk saying like, yeah, he shouldn't have to pay taxes, he worked really hard. So we've got all these people saying, like, yeah, we save the billionaires instead of let's make sure we have a safety net that people can't fall through for the greater good of our society. So that's capitalism. And there's a lot of problems with it. And even if you disagree with it, unfortunately, we live in that society. Yeah. And money exchange, on the other hand has been around since the dawn of time, whether it was literal dollars or coins, there has always been an exchange of things for other things, or things or other services. And when we think about small business owners, which is most private practice owners, if we can think about ourselves as kind of the community farmstand, it helps to shift that mentality. So for example, if I go down to the farmers market, and I purchased a half a dozen eggs, I'm helping to support sustainable agriculture in my community, I get to know the person who grew my crew, my eggs, I don't think we're growing eggs, but you don't I mean, maybe if you're vegan, actually, you're growing your eggs. So you're growing your eggs substitutes? Got it? So we want to think about as therapists, how can we kind of fit into that model, where what we do in charging for services, and helping people in our community is a win win. Because when we have a healthier person in our community, because we are helping them with their mental health, what is that ripple effect on the community? And how can that be beneficial?   Curt Widhalm  26:57 It sounds like, you know, this is what a lot of practitioners do by going out into the community and sharing even some of the things that you were talking about at the top of the episode of just going and talking about mental health and about their practices and doing some, I guess, pro bono work and in the way of psychoeducation, or community education that helps to make that Win Win happen.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  27:25 Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. I think it's so so powerful. I think when we are in our spaces where we're surrounded by other mental health, folks, we forget what the baseline is of mental health knowledge. Oh, yeah, forget, just like what a wealth of information we have, like the other day, I did a presentation for non mental health care providers about what financial anxiety is, and tips to cope with it right. And for anybody in the therapy field, they'd be like, that's like, entry level CBT, maybe if you're lucky. But for this group of people, it wasn't that they don't, it's just we forget how much knowledge we have, and how valuable explaining some basics of how our minds and bodies and thoughts are connected, can be a huge value for other people in our community. So just don't take what your knowledge is for granted. Get out of your academic kind of echo chambers and go talk to people who aren't in the mental health care field. And that is really where you can offer a lot of wisdom and value in your community.   Curt Widhalm  28:33 So once again, echoing stop hanging out with therapists.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  28:41 That might be a theme. Yeah.   Katie Vernoy  28:44 Maybe it's stopped just hanging out with therapists   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  28:47 That's a good reframe  Katie   Katie Vernoy  28:49 I know, I just it's really hard. I know, for me, and we've all spoken for therapists, we've all kind of done that thing. And I'm sure, just from the way you described it, Lindsay, you've got the thing. Like, that was a really nice reminder. And like, it is so dismissive. When a therapist comes up and says that to you, you're like, Yeah, but why did you need that reminder? You know, so I think it's that piece of when you start talking to folks who are not therapists, you recognize this is really important information. And it's not going to be discarded as Oh, I already knew that because it is this new piece that's coming in, that then allows, and this is, I guess, going to do accessibility thing. It allows this information to be disseminated more widely widely. It's something where they then are able to implement it, and maybe some people wouldn't need therapy if this information are readily available and was there first and so I think I'm putting the pieces together, Lindsay, I'm starting to see but it's it's really sharing the knowledge. It's making sure that you're available and that you've set up a fee system that makes sense for the folks that you're Working with but it's, it's this additional piece of you know, maybe you get creative and you do sponsorships or I mean there's people that have whole mechanisms for nonprofits to donate for, for scholarships for therapy. So I, there's, there's so much creativity that doesn't require an individual to slide their scale to an unsustainable fee. But this notion of just be accessible for all with all of these other pieces, I think is is hard to do. If you're not making enough money to survive, and you're seeing 40 clients a week,   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  30:33 Ding ding ding that is exactly it. We cannot care for other people in our community when we don't take care of ourselves. And it's, you know, we hammer on this message as therapists but we forget that in order to practice self care, we need to be able to fucking afford it. Like we just do.   Katie Vernoy  30:48 Yeah, exactly.   Curt Widhalm  30:52 And it's not just kind of the big luxurious, affording things like yeah, you know, that eight to 10 days, go and do a vacation if that's your jam, but it's also being able to afford the consistent little things of and you know, it's going home at a decent time of night. It's being you know, not spending your your off hours catching up on notes, or it's having all of the other systems and everything else that we've talked about on this podcast of being able to have the convenience of being able to afford shutting off at each and every day.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  31:30 Yeah, absolutely in in those are the things that we know, make. The biggest difference is that consistency and that predictability, that predictability that you can power down the predictability that you can pay your bills that helps to give us that mental space to rest and to be safe.   Katie Vernoy  31:51 Where can people find you?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  31:53 My website is called Mind money balance. It's the same name as my practice. My podcast is of the same name. My Instagram handle is of the same name so people can find me on any of those places.   Curt Widhalm  32:08 And we'll include links to Lindsay's stuff in our show notes. You can find those over at MCSG podcast calm and also follow us on our social media and join our Facebook group, the modern therapist group. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy And Lindsey Bryan-Podvin.   Katie Vernoy  32:26 Thanks again to our sponsor, trauma therapist network.   Curt Widhalm  32:30 If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you can know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There's so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan LCSW WC created trauma therapist network. Trauma therapist network therapist profiles include the types of traumas specialized in population served therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them. Network is more than a directory though it's a community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect, consults, and network with colleagues around the country.   Katie Vernoy  33:07 Join the growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code MTSG 20 at traumatherapistnetwork.com Once again that's capital MTS G the number 20 at Trauma therapist network.com   Announcer  33:23 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Balanced Working Moms Podcast
Ep #61: Why You Need To Use Win-Win In Your Relationships

Balanced Working Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 19:38


Remember when your husband left his stinky workout clothes on the floor, AGAIN? Yuck. If you want to create positive, caring relationships (that looks like a thoughtful husband who picks up his workout clothes before the smell knocks you over), the secret is to use win-wins as much as possible. In this episode, learn what a win-win relationship looks like and how to create one.Show Notes:   Why You Need To Use Win-Win In Your RelationshipsGrab free downloadables - Sign up for the free resource library Join the Facebook community group for a regular dose of support and encouragement.Connect with Rina:Blog - balancedworkingmoms.comCommunity - balancedworkingmomscommunityFacebook - balancedworkingmomsPinterest - rinameushawStock Media provided by TrendingMusic / Pond5

Spill the D - Disney World, Disneyland, Movies, and more
Ep. 44: Destination D23 Announcements!

Spill the D - Disney World, Disneyland, Movies, and more

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 48:05


News, news, and more news! So many new announcements came out of Destination D23, a Disney fan expo, this past weekend. With all the changes coming to the parks and resorts, Gina and Sabrina wanted to make sure you had the full run down! Plus a special Black Friday code just for the listeners? Win-Win! Enjoy episode 44 of Spill the D and Happy Thanksgiving! Want your very own Spill the D merch?! Click here: SpilltheDmerch on Etsy Instagram: Gina and Sab ★ Disney Podcast (@spillthedpod) • Instagram photos and videos Tiktok: Sab & Gina - Disney Podcast (@spillthedpod) TikTok | Watch Sab & Gina - Disney Podcast's Newest TikTok Videos Spill the D website: Home | My Site (wixsite.com) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/spillthed/message

Par Jupiter !
Les communicants d'Eric Zemmour

Par Jupiter !

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 3:16


durée : 00:03:16 - Le sketch, par Jupiter ! - par : Charline Vanhoenacker, Alex Vizorek - L'agence Win-Win reprend du service pour orchestrer les opérations de communication du polémiste Éric Zemmour.

What the Fundraising
20: A Model for Building True Win-Win Partnerships in the International Development Sector with Phillipa White

What the Fundraising

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 45:34


Philippa White is the founder, and CEO of The International Exchange, and a true believer in the power of business and leadership to solve some of the world's biggest problems. In this episode, Philippa shares some of her experiences with building partnerships through TIE and how for 15 years they've made successful collaboration between sectors possible. Join in and listen to this expert's experience changing things up and challenging both sectors to be better and bolder!  Episode highlights :  02:09 - Who is Philippa White? Her family background in the business of helping and how she landed in the third sector after experiencing the advertising world.  7:10 - The story behind TIE: Why the private sector needs leaders capable of meaningful change and how to get there (especially during COVID). 15:07 - Is this what organizations need?: Recognizing mutual benefit and win-win dynamics between companies and organizations. 22:50 - Changing our perception around organizations: How to be an accelerator of change and impact in the real world.  29:48 - Stigma around NGOs: Inefficiency, money, and some of the obstacles of nonprofit organizations. 37:36 - Where to find TIE and Philippa + A shoutout to CCC, Philippa's favorite nonprofit at the moment!

Three Guys Before The Game
WVU Mountaineers - Win Win Weekend (Episode 331)

Three Guys Before The Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 73:54


Mountaineer fans are smiling after a successful weekend by WVU sports teams. West Virginia's football, basketball and soccer teams were all victorious. On this episode, the "Guys" discuss wins in football, basketball and soccer. Why was the Mountaineer football team able to top Texas? What's the real identity of the WVU basketball team? Can the Mountaineer soccer team make a long run in the NCAA tourney? Is West Virginia about to build a dynasty in Esports? Join Brad, Tony and Hoppy Wednesday for their preview of the Mountaineers final game of the regular season at Kansas, and the basketball team's Friday home game against Eastern Kentucky.

The Gold Collar Investor
TGCI 165: Equipment Leasing Fund! How to become a bank and creating a win-win?

The Gold Collar Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 33:12


In today's show, Pancham interviews Josh McCallen - a business turnaround expert, resort rehab specialist, owner of Renault Winery Resort and Golf and investment firms Accountable Equity and VIVÂMEE Hospitality. In every business that you think of, you would always need some sort of equipment to be able to operate the business. What if we tell you that instead of sourcing and leasing your equipment from external companies, you could be the bank itself by creating a fund and be able to create a win-win situation for you and your investors? Today, Josh is back on the show to unpack all this knowledge! In this episode, join us as he discusses the concept of equipment leasing funds and how he became a bank in his resort business! He will also share how he was able to turn around his hospitalities and was able to strive during the pandemic, how the Efficient Income Funds (EiFs) benefits both parties, and why maximizing your riches is simply like a golden carousel! Listen and enjoy the show!   Quote: “And I said, “You know what? Everyone's offering me leases, everybody's offering me loans on equipment, Why don't I just give all that profit to my investors?” Timestamped Shownotes: 2:13 - Pancham welcomes back Josh to the show 4:03 - His background and how he has been during the past year  6:27 - How their hospitalities survived through the pandemic 12:25 - Overview and how equipment leasing fund works (and how it came about!) 22:54 - How EiFs helps provide satisfactory yields between him and investors 25:51 - On the types of equipment they're leasing and where they focus their funds on 27:23 - Their payment model and the price breakdown on the investor's yield 3 Key Points: The COVID-19 pandemic had hospitalities kept under wraps as some would shut down but he was able to turn it around through wedding contracts. Curating the EiFs has helped provide a win-win situation as they can get profit from equipment leasing and investors could get their capital back along with other benefits. Rather than building wealth, the EiFs intend to give a steady cycle of payment and be able to preserve your wealth. Get in Touch: Accountable Equity - https://accountableequity.com/ Renault Winery Resort and Golf - https://www.renaultwinery.com/ Listen to the previous The Gold Collar Investor's episode with Josh McCallen at https://thegoldcollarinvestor.com/show60 The Gold Collar Investor Club - https://thegoldcollarinvestor.com/club/ Pancham Gupta Email - p@thegoldcollarinvestor.com Book: Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! By Robert T. Kiyosaki - https://www.amazon.com/Rich-Dad-Poor-Teach-Middle/dp/1612680194

Intuitively Rich with Ani Rich
S2 E44 Set Boundaries and Gain YOUR POWER BACK w/ Gail Rudolph

Intuitively Rich with Ani Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 31:54


In this episode of Intuitively Rich Ani talked to Gail about power dynamics at work, how women can gain their power back, how to ask and receive what you want, and more. Gail Rudolph is the author of the new book, Power Up Power Down: How to Reclaim Control and Make Every Situation a Win/Win. She has spent years as an executive professional maneuvering the power dynamics that happen in all interpersonal interactions. One day, she had an epiphany: Nobody takes our power. We give it away. The go-to expert on how to harness interpersonal power and create win/win outcomes, Gail's mission is to help those who often feel overlooked and under-estimated. FOLLOW Gail: Website: https://gailrudolph.com/ Ani Rich is a Life Coach, an Embodiment Yoga Teacher, a Mother, a Podcast Host, and a Life Coach. FOLLOW Ani: Hear Ani's Story https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yWsX... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ (personal) https://www.instagram.com/ani_rich_co... Website: https://anirich.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ani-rich-... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXAi... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/anirichcoaching Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08VS7DG76 Much love Ani Rich --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ani-rich/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ani-rich/support

Grow My Cleaning Company's Podcast
How to Stepping Out of Cleaning as a Win-Win for Everyone: Episode 727

Grow My Cleaning Company's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:28


Welcome to the podcast Cleaning Nation! Today, we have Deanna Jennings of “Totally Clean”. Deanna started her company in January of 2019. Deanna wants coaching on how she can hire employees that have longevity and do as good of a job cleaning as she does. She worries they aren't being properly trained because she herself is so busy cleaning. Listen in as Mike gives some sage advice on how to get out of our own way and trust that others can add just as much if not more valuable to the company we are building.   4:10 You Aren't The Only Magical Cleaning Unicorn 8:03 Enter Mindset  8:43 Know What They Want so They Don't Have to, Then GIve it to Them 11:28 Frame Stepping Out of Cleaning as a Win-Win for Everyone  Want to know more about these tools and what you can do to get out of your own way and improve your mindset? Go to growmycleaningcompany.com to listen to our FREE webinar or growmycleaningcompany.com/talk and book a call with one of our coaches. They will get you set up with all the tools, systems, and more to build the business you've always wanted.

Hire Power Radio
How to Compete & Win-Win Against a Huge Salary with Michael Downing

Hire Power Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:15


How do you compete against a huge company like Amazon or even a really well funded startup?  If you are competing checkbook to checkbook, you will lose… Every time!  The only way to tilt the odds in your favor today is to really understand the career wounds of the person and to be able to connect the dots as to how your opportunity fulfills their desires.  This requires you to listen. Stop selling and start understanding what is important to the individual. This will allow you to stand out from the competition and allow the person you need to hire to see value above and beyond the paycheck. Our guest today: Michael Downing, Founding Partner of MDSV Fund  Michael is a Silicon Valley serial entrepreneur, has co-founded 6 software companies over a 28 year career, 3 of his companies were acquired and one had an IPO in 2006. For the last 3 years, Downing has focused on investing in promising early-stage tech companies via his venture capital fund MDSV. Michael has recruited, hired and managed hundreds of employees over the span of his career. Today we discuss: Why leading with the checkbook is a very bad idea How to win talent by NOT leading with the money Challenge today? People are getting paid crazy numbers People need to have a major passion of belief in the company Now this is a requirement Conviction & belief are the new requirement wild/ disruptive concepts draw in talent Without a big/bold vision you struggle- pirate ship opportunity- highly disruptive company Why is this important to the company? Key positions are being filled by people doing side hustles Full Time at companies like facebook Necessity for side hustles Rick's Nuggets People are jumping ship because they no longer align with the company values Too often big salaries = lot's of problems (attrition, toxic culture, bad leadership, undefined work)  If someone turns you down for a higher offer, you blew your hiring process.  “Rent gold before buying silver” - Steve Newcomb How do we solve the problem?  Be new, bold, unique, disruptive concept- big vision A new way to solve a problem, product in a totally different way Investor pitch- ½ people say “that's crazy”- your onto something Make believers in what you are doing Build an advisory board first Thoughtful about who the members are Translates to 6-12 contacts that can be team members Credibility Positioning Funding Rick's Nuggets Have a interviewing process (you are being judged too) People to take you seriously Key Takeaways that the Audience can plug into their business today!  - Value: Set Yourself Up For Hiring Success: It's got to be a Big, Bold, Kickass Vision Plant Your Roots Early: Your advisory board can be the single most valuable hiring resource in the earliest of days Don't Conform: Adapt Your Policies & Benefits to people's changing lifestyles Guest Links: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaeldowning/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/michael.downing.7161953 Twitter:  https://twitter.com/michaeldowning   This show is proudly sponsored by Criteria Corp: https://www.criteriacorp.com/

Grow My Cleaning Company's Podcast
Why Starting a Podcast is a Win-Win for Everyone Involved: Episode 721

Grow My Cleaning Company's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 21:16


What's up Cleaning Nation! Today on the podcast, we have Lindsay talking John Gluck of Generation Commercial Cleaning Company. John is looking for tips and tricks on starting a podcast of his own. Listen in as Lindsay coaches him on making this vision a reality, and learn why starting a podcast just might be a good business move for you too.  3:31 Why Create a Podcast as an Owner of a Cleaning Company  8:04 Niching Your Podcast 11:40 More Tips for Starting a Podcast Want to know more about these tools and what you can do to get out of your own way and improve your mindset? Go to growmycleaningcompany.com to listen to our FREE webinar or growmycleaningcompany.com/talk and book a call with one of our coaches. They will get you set up with all the tools, systems, and more to build the business you've always wanted.

Optimal Performance Podcast
347 The best collagen powder and powdered MCT oil in your coffee with Sean Lake of BUBS Naturals

Optimal Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 54:43


If you're not taking collagen powder daily...where have you BEEN?! Protein, joint support, gut health, lean muscle mass support.. but in your coffee? Whole 30 approved and and NSF For Sport Certified. Yep! Sean Lake is the co-founder  of BUBS Naturals which gives 10% of all proceeds to support retired special opps veterans. Win Win.  Get 20% off your entire first online order here: https://shop.bubsnaturals.com/discount/OPP In this ep

School Of Laughs
COMEDY WIN-WIN OPPORTUNITIES WITH CHESTER GOAD [EP. 251]

School Of Laughs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 34:57


Today I am discussing comedy win-win opportunities with Chester Goad. I met Chester a few years ago at the BIG PODCAST conference with David Hooper. We've been in the loop ever since. During the past 18 months, we've spent many hours on coaching calls. Sometimes it is spent developing material, or creating a game plan. And always, trying to find win-win opportunities to develop his stage time and material. Chester is also a writer and actor. A podcast host (Film Fresh and Leader Byte). Learn more and contact Chester Goad at https://www.chesterg.com. COMEDY WIN-WIN OPPORTUNITIES WITH CHESTER GOAD SHOW NOTES Specifically, we talk about: cutting your teeth on shows where patrons don't expect to see a comedian providing value to a venue instead of asking for stage time writing about what you know connecting with the audience through local material networking in a real way with other comics the value of encouragement sometimes the payoff comes later than you expect Gutty's Comedy Club The Clean Comedy Challenge What Chester knows about BIGFOOT and much more. === NEVER MISS A PODCAST OR POST If you enjoy this PODCAST please subscribe in iTunes or STITCHER and leave a comment and ranking. Better yet, subscribe to the monthly School of Laughs “Insider Tips” email and get exclusive information delivered right to your inbox. It's fast, free, useful, and fun. Just email: SchoolOfLaughs@gmail.com and put “insider tip sheet” in the subject header. I'll make sure you get the official tip sheet and I promise to keep your email anonymous and spam-free.

Go Birds
Eagles-Lions Preview Pod: Sunday is a Win-Win

Go Birds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 62:24


James Seltzer and Eliot Shorr-Parks preview Eagles-Lions. The guys talk Sirianni and the flower analogy, Minshew Mania, and much more. Presented by Parx Casino Sportsbook App, new users download in app store or click ParxCasino.com/PA and use the promo code “GOBIRDS” for first bet risk-free up to $500. Must be 21. Gambling Problem—Call 1800-Gambler. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Remote Real Estate Investor
The entrepreneur journey, with the co-founders of Roofstock, Stessa, and Great Jones

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:16


Over the past year, Roofstock has acquired Stessa, an asset management platform made for real estate investors by real estate investors, and Great Jones a Property management company specifically suited to serve remote real estate investors. This helps make Roofstock a one-stop-shop for remote investors. In this episode we have the cofounders of all three of these companies on to explain the companies, why they joined forces with Roofstock, and their pearls of wisdom for investing and entrepreneurship. --- Transcript   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Tom: Greetings, and welcome to The Remote Real Estate Investor. We have a really fun episode today Michael and I are going to be interviewing the co founders of all the different companies that make up the Rootstock ecosystem. So if you're not aware, over the past six to 12 months, rootstock has acquired an asset management platform called Stessa. A really cool software to manage all of your properties that an asset management layer, as well as a property management company called Great Jones. And altogether it's a it's a really powerful stack of real estate technology tools and operations for investors to have and we brought on the founders from all of these different companies.   So we have Gary Beasley from Roofstock, who was a co founder. We have the two co founders from Stessa in Heath Silverman and Jonah Schwartz. And we have two co founders from great Jones and Jay Goldklang, as well as Abigail Besdin. And we ask them about their company, the fit within the roofstock ecosystem, some pearls of wisdom on investing on starting companies, all of that good stuff. So really excited about the episode we have today. And let's get into it.   Michael: All right, everyone. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your very, very, very busy schedule. We've got a lot of heavy hitters on the line here. So I would love if you could all introduce yourselves to our listeners. One by one. Gary, you want to kick things off? We'll start with you.   Gary: Sure. Great to be here. I'm Gary Beasley. I'm the co founder and CEO of Roofstock.   Michael: Fantastic. And Abigail.   Abigail: Hi, I'm Abigail Besdin. And I am a co founder of Great Jones.   Michael: Perfect Jay.   Jay: Hi, I'm Jay Goldklang, founder and CEO of Great Jones now a Roofstock company.   Michael: And Heath.   Heath: Hey, I'm Heath Silverman, co-founder of Stessa.   Michael: And last but certainly not least, Jonah.   Jonah: Yeah, I'm Jonah Schwartz, co-founder of Stessa,   Michael: And we've got Tom Schneider on the line as well.   So I would love if you all could share, why Roofstock, Stessa, Great Jones decided to join forces. What was the impetus behind that?   Gary: When we first started Roofstock we knew not only did we want to have a marketplace for transactions, but we wanted to build deeper relationships with owners and build a community. And to do that, we knew that we needed to be relevant to all property owners who own single family rentals, not just those who are looking to trade at any given time. And so from the very early days, we were trying to figure out how to do that. And I met Heath and Jonah was 2017. Yeah, 2017. And we just hit it off right away. And I said, Wow, these guys are building something really cool that it could provide software for every single family rental owner out there. And like a Credit Karma app for real estate owners, it'd be a great way to stitch together community get a lot of data and and invite people into the marketplace at the right time.   So we had a marketplace and no community they had this great community they were building through the software. And so when I knew that it would be quite interesting to try to bring the companies together. Unfortunately, they decided to sell their company to JLL and not to us, JLL at the time was a little bit larger than Roofstock still is. But we'll talk about later life comes full circle very recently we were able to buy the business from gll and bring them into the Rootstock family and so that's worked out really well.   And then with with Jay and Abigail we also knew that we needed to have a relevant connectivity to retail owners and offer property management because that's the biggest pain point for owners is to be able to outsource a lot of those challenging tasks to professionals and and so we've been tracking Jay Abigail and Great Jones for a long time. There was an opportunity this year to get together get to know each other more recently and that was sort of the one missing piece of our fully integrated platform was retail property management. We have institutional grade property management through Streetlane, which was the first company that we purchased a couple of years ago and now with Great Jones and with Stessa we've all kind of come into the the ecosystem together one big happy family under the Rootstock umbrella.   And now we're in the process of integrating the businesses and, and, and growing. So. So why don't we turn it over to maybe Heath or Jonah, maybe you go first and then Jay, Abigail, you could you could chat about how, how this all has worked for you guys.   Heath: Yeah, I mean, I don't know if I have anything additional to add other than I still remember those drinks we had back in 2017, where we got introduced and started sort of as a more casual conversation about what we were doing and turned into a couple hours of just diving deep into both of our businesses. And I think it was just very refreshing and super exciting to meet somebody who had, you know, the same big vision, you know, of how do we bring transparency and accessibility to this asset class, that traditionally was just one that, you know, was hard for a lot of people to get into, and just didn't have great technology to help power investors out there. So, yeah, fantastic, it came full circle, we're super excited to be part of rootstock. And yeah, excited to see what we're gonna do together.   Jay: I think Heath and I, and also Gary and I have talked about how similar some of the visions are, that we've articulated, maybe the starting points have been a little bit different, because there's a lot to do. But sort of, I think each of us are organically as heard from, you know, the owners we work with, and to some extent, the residents that we work with, how many different moments they they'd like to, you know, have our partnership or, or, you know, partnership with like minded folks to think about using technology or operations to sort of remove friction and let them focus on on what they enjoy doing best. And I would say, you know, really, for the last 12 to 18 months, we've felt even more pull to help our customers, you know, buy more assets, dispose of assets, make good decisions. And so, you know, when, when there came an opportunity to come together, you know, not just in a partnership, but but but more than that with Roofstock. And also with the Stessa. Folks, it's been really exciting to get to work together, you know, to take take on the world, but with a with a shared vision.   Jonah: Yeah, we hear that from a lot of our customers as well, that they're, you know, what, what they get from stessa is great, but they'd love for us to do more, they want sort of that one stop shop, full stack solution to a lot of these problems, including transaction, including property management. So, you know, fitting together and putting out one solution for our customer base, or shared customer base makes a lot of sense.   Tom: I think what's so neat about these three companies is just solving, you know, three very different problems, from transactions to ownership to asset management. I think a lot of times as a startup, you know, you can have really big eyes and be like, Oh, you know, we want to do all of this, and it works really wonderfully. When it's able to come together. All together, I'd love to hear kind of the evolution that you guys had kind of originally, you know, was it always kind of to build out this full stack on your own? Or was it you know, more niche, I'd love to hear just kind of the evolution of your thought of the strategy of the business. And you know how that unfolded into where we're at today, which I think is a really nice platform, I'll say.   Abigail: I could take the great John's piece there. But it sounds like we're all describing a different starting point that very quickly led to this broader vision. Because ultimately, that's what we all learned pretty quickly, the customer wanted a no friction, one stop shop for the full puzzle. And on the great john side, you know, we started, we exclusively were serving what we call the retail customer, the mom and pop investor. And we had started to describe ourselves as institutional grade PM, institutional grade property management, which meant a whole host of things around the type of service that you deliver, and what you actually do as the property manager.   But it became clear that to really be institutional grade, you had to give the retail investor access to all the things that institutions have access to, which is really a full stack solution to investing. And so we I mean, I think Jay can correct me, but I think within a matter of months of the business existing had articulated that it's actually a platform vision that property management is this wedge into this much larger space. And it It took us quickly to realize that and then that's a drum that we beat throughout the duration of the business, and continue to hear and in talking to both Gary and Heath and Jonah, it feels like everybody had the same path. It was just a different what is the wedge, but the thesis is the same.   Heath: Yeah, 100% are our wedge, we always believe that financials were sort of the foundation of every real estate investors business. So by starting with the financials, we could become the system of record, we have all this data around the performance of their properties of their portfolio. And with that information, we can start providing you know, insights to help them maximize the value of the portfolio. You know, automate a lot of the you know, by automating the financials, we can save them a lot of time, help them make more money and doing so It would basically get us into a place where we could then long term become that platform. But of course, now that we have Roofstock and Great Jones, we've we've definitely accelerated that vision and are able to move a lot faster.   Jonah: Another thing that we hear from Stessa users is that by using Stessa, it gives them the confidence to expand their portfolio and obviously Roofstock and the Roofstock marketplace is there when our customers are ready to expand.   Gary: Yeah, I think bringing these companies together was a really natural thing. And we could talk about why I think it's working. It's still early, but it's working quite well, relative to I think a lot of business combinations. And I think what you're hearing is a lot of commonality of vision. And as Abigail, I think, probably like aptly, we put, we all just started from a different place, but we're kind of going in the same direction.   And so So for us, I think it just says accelerated kind of the growth and the amount of time it would take, rather than having to build all these things ourselves. By bringing them all together, we could just do it much more quickly. And and that's I think what we're seeing and then by getting the businesses together, then in addition to it's not just a one plus one plus one equals three, there are synergies, and we should each be able to grow our businesses faster and more efficiently. Because we're sharing data, we're sharing talent across the organization.   And there's a reason most mergers fail. And a lot of that is cultural. We have been very, you know, careful as we evaluate any of the transactions that we've done, it's got to be the right cultural fit. And this these clearly have been an honor. And I think one of the reasons that we've we actually ended up doing both of these deals was the people probably the primary reason they both had good tech and good businesses, but being able to attract all the the talent, the energy and the knowledge of the founding teams and their their core leaders around them really, really powerful. It's it's just hard to find that out in the market. So. So there's lots of reasons I think we're seeing early returns being very promising for this.   Abigail: I think that we all started a different entry points, and not randomly, but because those entry points were our strengths. So I see Stessa has like having firsthand financial issues with their portfolios, like really understanding that space very well, coming at it from like a real software sophistication, Jay and I and the team that we've built both come from really heavy hitter operators, you know, operationalizing messy businesses with technology. And then you had Roofstock with really deep real estate expertise, having done more at scale in the transaction space than probably any any other team combined. So it's not that we all just had the shared vision and happen to be coming at it differently, you have these really deep strengths that we're all playing to. And when those come together, I think that's part of the one plus one equals three that Gary's referring to.   Tom: Perfect segue into the next question, Abigail. So we've been talking about this kind of platform of the different layers of asset management, property management transactions, I'd love to hear the different founders talk about what is the special sauce within their layer of the transaction? Maybe technology, technology wise, you can explore the face the space of the question, but what would you say is some of the competitive advantages within that vertical of the company that you've started that has come together to form this this platform? I'd love to hear your guys's thoughts on, you know, what makes your segment that much better than other options out there.   Jay: On the Great Jones side, I think what we saw was, you know, a number of different areas of inspiration, I think, as Abigail mentioned, a lot of our sort of founding team. And I think at the core of what a lot of what we do is, you know, how do you take hard kind of online offline problems, maybe where there hasn't been a tremendous focus on sometimes efficiency or the Cust customer experience and build something better? That's sort of enabled by by technology and maybe enables, you know, higher growth and higher levels of quality?   So, you know, what does that mean, with respect to property management, I think the experience that investors have often had is that it can be run as a local service business. And as with many of those cases, there will be a really wide distribution where some people will be excellent, some some teams won't be. There's not a tremendous amount of consistency, facilitated facilitated by technology. It's heavily reliant on the people.   And I think what we found, you know, both them in prior experiences and that Great Jones is by I think the core, the core of what we're doing is thinking about What are the outcomes we want to deliver at the end of the day that creates, you know, a great customer experience and really solid returns? How do we think about instrumenting processes that haven't been instrumented previously? And what that allows? And how do we build great, you know, really nice interfaces for, you know, our own team members, owners, residents, vendors, anyone who needs to engage to create that great outcome.   And what we find that that then leads to, is a much more consistent and controllable level of performance, where we, where our team has much more transparency into how can we drive those returns? How can we drive that quality. And because we've instrumented things beyond captured, that data that maybe historically wasn't structured or captured, we can create much more visibility for an owner or a resident on the status of something.   And so an example would be, you know, doing a property turnover, where it sort of, if you if you know, from move out to kind of rent ready, that there are, there's a bunch that needs to happen in terms of doing a full inspection, considering the different paths to remediate or improve anything, coordinating the work of many different vendors, managing timelines, managing costs, you know, giving an owner the appropriate level of choice. And so we've built things like workflow tools for our own team, external interfaces, owner approvals flows, to really make that more of ultimately, almost like an e commerce and messaging experience for the owner. And that's what we think people have been accustomed to, you know, in other experiences, and enables the owner maybe to to Jonah's point to feel more comfortable growing their portfolio doing so across a number of markets, because they know, you know, the quality outcomes that can come with that.   And so, when we've done that being one example, but I think we consider a lot of the core of what we've done to think about, you know, how do we infuse maybe more consumer tech into a space that that hasn't necessarily had that to create a more, a higher performing, maybe more digital, more consistent experience?   Tom: That's awesome. transparency, control, all of that good stuff. I love it, Jay. Gary, do you want to want to speak next?   Gary: Sure. You know, one thing that I neglected to talk about at the beginning, and I know you wanted us to talk a little bit about our real estate investing experience. And I guess what, what it brought to mind that I was sort of thinking about this, which I think is sort of relevant to what we're all doing is, I started really, at very large scale on the institutional side buying 1000s and 1000s of homes during the last financial crisis, and really, kind of cut my teeth figuring out how to build institutional grade tools that would be used by institutions. And I think what we're doing here together now is taking a lot of those learnings that that I and my co founders, Gregor and Rich, kind of, were deeply embedded in institutional scale. And I don't want to say dumbing them down at all, because that's that it sounds derogatory. Simplifying them, and, and having a lot of that same power that we developed, you know, for institutions, and putting in the hands of, of retail investors. And, and, which is, by the way, where 98% of the home set.   So when we think about the addressable opportunity, as a platform catering to real estate investors, it just gets me so excited that we can take all those learnings and apply them now through these different business models at real scale to to retail investors, which as well as institutional investors. And I think one of the other I think, I guess, learnings or I would say, observations that might be counterintuitive, as people are out there thinking about building their own businesses, and how it might relate, you know, to what they're doing in their own lives.   But we took a little bit of a different path to building Roofstock, where oftentimes people will say, you got to pick the retail segment, or you got to pick the institutional segment, and then focus ruthlessly on that single customer, and don't try to boil the ocean. Well, we did try to boil the ocean in that we, we took a contrarian view and said, there's, you know, 90 million homes out there about, you know, 17 million of them or so are rentals. But that rental home doesn't know whether it's an institutional home or a retail home, it's a home. So we need to understand the whole market.   And by catering to both types of customers. We get data from all of them. And the market is the market. It could be an institutional buyer, retail buyer could be any of that. So So I guess I would just encourage people as they're thinking about that. Their own entrepreneurial journeys don't necessarily always listen to conventional wisdom. Because we didn't, we came at it differently, perhaps more ambitious than we then might have been wise coming out of the gate, but we felt like it was the right strategy has turned out to be, it's a work. And so you know, a lot of it comes down to execution. And being able to prioritize and ruthlessly prioritize when you're trying to do a lot of ambitious things, you have to figure out which is the most important which are the most important and focus on them.   And then also know when to pivot and when to stick to your strategy. That's just kind of another thing is for entrepreneurs out there. And that would be one of the things maybe that's interesting for everyone else on the call is that we've all had times where we've had to pivot our strategy. And that's one of the hardest things as an entrepreneur, you have to have conviction around what you're doing, until you decide you need to do something differently. And I'd be curious if there if any of you, my or my colleagues here had any, any observations around that, but that is something that as entrepreneurs and as real estate investors, you You are always trying to figure out well shoot, do I need to change my strategy here? Or do I need to stick to my stated goals?   Abigail: We had something similar where a great John's we I mean, almost identical, we were serving the retail customer exclusively. And we had the opportunity to serve an institutional customer, which was so different and clearly frightening because you have your your heart envision set around a certain customer experience but but took the leap and did it and we too ended up finding not just that it works, but that it it benefited both customer segments. So the the wisdom of have a single customer segment we too maybe walked away from, and both customer segments benefited in a way that I think, paid off the courage of that paid off. I had definitely received the advice early in my career, less about Greg Jones and more in previous contests to get great at murdering my darlings, which I believe is a literary phrase around being willing to like, you know, move away from a plotline, if it's, you know, not serving the momentum of the book or whatever piece that you're writing and definitely sticks with me. It's it sounds ruthless, but I think it ultimately pays off ends up being the bolder decision.   Gary: And you thought all that stuff that you learned when you were a writer was not going to be beneficial in your entrepreneurial career.   Abigail: Exactly. Here I am.   Heath: I'll add, you know, with Stessa we actually pivoted pretty early on. So the first customers that we targeted were really mid market investors. So people with, I don't know, 50 to 100 million in assets under management who we go after and provide full service bookkeeping to. And that's kind of how we got started offering and create financial solution. But we quickly learned that the really massive market, as Gary was saying, is really this, you know, retail investor out there. So shortly, I don't know, what was it Jonah, was like a year and a half after, after we started signing up customers paying customers, we basically made a big decision, hey, we're gonna go off to this much bigger market much harder to reach. You know, these are investors who are very hard to identify, often not willing to pay upfront. So with a free self service product, and we had to go back and fire all of our existing paid customers, which was, which was a very painful experience, but put us on really the right track to get to where we are today.   And when we went after those retail investors, one of the things that we learned that was really interesting is that, while technology and data is really you know, there's quite a bit out there, it's very pervasive out there today, many of these investors were just not using anything, we found that most of them, they actually had no clue if they were making or losing money on any of their investments. They kept most of their financial data in a out of date static spreadsheet, and the only time that they knew if they'd made or lost that money, or how their properties were performing was once a year when they got the returns from their accountant.   So that was a pretty big insight, we realized that when we built Stessa, and when we targeted these guys, we really needed to make this an incredibly intuitive, very much a consumer grade offering for these guys. So we built this self service to all, you know, purpose built for investors, built by investors, you know, really based on our own pain points that Jonah and I have had after being investors. For a number of years together.   And one of the one of the wonderful things about that is again, this was very, very painful decision to to make this change. But nowadays, our you know, our biggest, one of our biggest areas of customer acquisition is just investors referring other investors. And when you go into our net promoter score comments and see what people are writing, I actually did this. The other week, I took all the words created a word cloud, and the two biggest, most common words that people use when they describe it that our users use when they describe Stessa is easy and love.   Gary: Great, great question prompt Gary, Michael, go ahead. And yet, you know, feel free guys in move in the conversation in a certain direction you think they'll be more engaged in as we're as we're going through, but this is really great. So far, I love the inflection point question of these businesses, I think people are going to love it. Go ahead, Michael.   Michael: So you all individually have mentioned technology and how your companies have leveraged that. So I'm curious if you can give listeners at a high level, what technology you're giving them access to. So they can compete with some of the big players at the institutional level.   Gary: Fundamentally, when we think about what's different about Roofstock it's it's the data and technology that's foundational to what we're doing. So you're you're you've got really the same data and information analytics at your disposal that the major institutional investors have through our platform. And so the whole idea is to make it simple and intuitive, not not overly complex, to have a nice UI, but very powerful data around valuation underwriting how to evaluate investments on a risk adjusted basis with our neighborhood scores.   So the idea would be if you were an experienced investor, or even a novice investor, you can come and use our tools. And, and, you know, we provide, you know, I don't want to say it's training wheels, but but it kind of is your because it's all sort of teed up there with starting assumptions that you could then play with, you could look at other properties, you can, you can participate in the rootstock Academy and learn, you can join that community and share ideas and notes. So we try to provide this as a platform for investors to learn, we have plenty of people who engage with us who never buy anything, but they're just learning about investing and how to how to get on their own journey. And that's fine. It's, it's totally cool, we love it.   But eventually, we were there in case they, they want to do it. So I think in terms of if you if you're not in this in this, professionally, oftentimes just hard to understand how to value something, or how to think about the trade offs of buying a property in a four star neighborhood versus a two star neighborhood and you're playing with a lot of that stuff in. And that's what we're trying to do is continually make make the site in our, our business, intuitive, not overly complex, but have enough power that people can unlock, when they want to get in and do further and further research.   I know, when we were first raising money, we got some feedback from venture capitalists, it turned out to be very good advice. The first version of our site was way too complicated. We sort of nerded out on a bunch of different calculators and all these kinds of things that as kind of professional investors were like, oh, wouldn't it be cool if we could do this and that and that, and we did. And his feedback was, guys, this is a Frankenstein product, I get why everything is there. And it seems like it was kind of you just kept adding things because they were cool. And that's exactly what we did. We we did not, we didn't edit properly. And so that was a really good forcing function for us.   He said, If you could ever clean this up, you'll have a monster company, but it just, you know, it's gonna, everyone's gonna get lost in this. So we did and we, we simplified it greatly. And we took a lot of that functionality, we buried it a little bit deeper into the sites, you can unlock some of the sales analytics and things like that. But there's a real balance between having a powerful set of tools and a simple set of tools. And while people want choice, complexity can be it could tie you up in knots.   And so it's got to be this balance between, you know, editing and providing curated data and choices for people versus you know, maybe say that, like if you walked into a store and none of the products were organized into sections, it'd be so overwhelming, right? But if you if you could get guided to the right part of the store, and then you have three things to choose from, it's a heck of a lot easier. So that was I think another kind of interesting lesson as we were building just because you can do stuff doesn't mean you should In many cases, simpler is better.   Tom: Gary one thing I've been meaning to hear you articulate a response. This question is, for some investors, there's a perception that Roofstock is more for like an intro investor, they buy a house on roof stock, and then they bought it, the training wheels are off and they go buy somewhere else. What would you say to that comment of thinking of Roofstock as kind of like, exclusively as like, on the retail side, just for the training wheels, like the initial investor, and then you, you know, go somewhere else, I'd love to hear your your kind of thoughts on that stigma?   Gary: Sure. Well, I would say it depends on what you're trying to accomplish, right, we have some of the most sophisticated investors in the world buying homes off Roofstock. So it's not just for novice investors, it but we do have a unique positioning, and that there are very few on ramps for investors to to learn how to do it, and we provide that that guide. And if someone buys a home in a particular market, and they want to buy more homes, I think, you know, there's no obligation to do it through Roofstock, you certainly can can use those those skills that you have developed.   But it's it's certainly a heck of a lot easier. Because we've you've got all those tools already. And so there's no reason not to, it doesn't really cost you much to use our system. It's it's a, we charge a small marketplace fee to buyers, but you get all the data and analytics and all that to go there. So I would say if you want to buy remotely, it's very hard to do it on your own. So Roofstock has that infrastructure where we compare you with property management, financing, all the comps and analytics, that you certainly could go do it. But if you're looking at homes in four or five, six different markets on your own, it's very challenging, you have to travel, you have to find real estate brokers to work with.   And so, you know, I don't think, you know, I guess I really don't think about our platform is catering, certainly exclusively to first time investors, although a lot of people do start with us, I think on average, now we're just under two homes per investor. You know, people were using the site, I think a lot of people are trying to buy a home a year. For our platform, there's certainly no obligation to continue to use this. But I think for the most part, what we're seeing is people kind of continuing to use us and maybe using more and more of the tools over time, as they do get more sophisticated, maybe you do start to think about portfolio construction and think about where you want to own homes and set up little alerts, put yourself on a program to get build a diversified approach.   So I think it's it's a testament to the platform that we're building and the veracity of it, that it can be something that someone could start with, and then stay with throughout the lifecycle. And you can get as as geeked out is as you know, intense as you want about some of the tools and analytics, but you don't have to.   Gary: And plus all the other additional layers within stessa. Great Jones and Michael, do you want to just reiterate that question that Gary answered first related to technology we can have. Jay, Jonah and Heath take a stab at it as well.   Michael: Yeah, absolutely. So curious to know, because you all come from a technology background, what technologies and tools the individual investor has, Abigail, I think you said a nice that the mom and pop investor has at their disposal because of the companies that you all have founded?   Jonah: So I think he then I, you know came to this not because we were full time real estate investors, right? Real estate was sort of like our side side hustle while we were working in in the tech industry. And you know, that our day jobs in the tech industry, you have access to workflow automation, KPI, dashboards, like, you know, sophisticated modeling tools. And when we were working on our side hustle, owning a moderately sized real estate portfolio, we were doing spreadsheets and sending a lot of emails back and forth and had a stack of stack of paper documents on our desk. And so that was that was really the core problem that we were looking to solve is is give people that those sort of, you know, professional tools, but make it simple and make it purpose built for real estate.   Jay: Yeah, I think, you know, taking on a bit more of the operational side of property management but with a similar lens. A lot of our product strategy has been about, you know, how do we build the internal tool set and structured data that helps us create the outcomes in a scalable way. across, you know, an increasing number of markets, so enabling, you know, investors to work with us across a bunch of markets, that then leads to that transparency for the owner. And I think, you know, I talked a bit about how we've thought about turns in that context, I think that sort of measurement also allows us to then, you know, really lean in and maybe build some more custom tooling where we see there's going to be a benefit.   So for example, when we were very focused on once we had built a lot of the measurement of turn times, we saw there was an opportunity to get, you know, our staff out to homes to inspect them faster, that led to us building a set of sort of prioritization and routing tools, focused on that problem, that sort of prioritization of field work and, and completing that. And so I think part of where that thing goes, in addition to the outcomes for our investors, is a new layer of intelligence into that operational layer. So because we're measuring things like processes, or costs, maybe ROI around things like maintenance or turns or, you know, how did those decisions work out that we made around renewals or leasing, it's been our, you know, our goal, to think about how to structure those data sets, maybe into the owner, you know, web application, or, or help owners make their next decisions based on a sort of a layer of ownership that they haven't had that transparency into historically.   Michael: So I've got just one last question for everybody and very curious to see where it takes us. But I would love if you all can share a little pearls of wisdom or a nugget that you've picked up, because you are founders and co founders of tech companies that you find really applicable to real estate investors, what's the kind of an actionable takeaway or something that an investor can walk away from listening the episode today, from you all that have that have founded companies?   Abigail: I already shared, that you need to murder your darlings. So let that ne a minimum pearl.   Tom: We should we should name the episode.   Abigail: The website, you know, the original Roofstock website was so complex that he had to murder maybe just bury some darlings. So I think we saw that that the same lesson play out there, the the main piece of advice I have is to not overreact to things that are on fire. So just sort of set that your baseline is that all things will be on fire, there'll be multiple fires, and that you shouldn't over pivot or over course, correct, based on anyone, you know, imminent moment of pain, which I think takes a degree of articulation and commitment to where you're going and what the longer term path is. Less that be taken too literally, for real estate investor, I don't mean to use fire, like if something's on fire. Surely, that's not the lesson to be learned there.   Michael: I was just gonna say, do you know about the two fires that I've had in my building, I don't, I don't, where were you two years ago to calm me down.   Abigail: But whatever, whatever the appropriate corollary is, you know, to be confident in whatever strategy you set and be committed to it and not over pivot based on, you know, near term troubles.   Jonah: I would second that, that in real estate, it can be tempting to try to optimize one particular transaction or renovation at the expense of like the long term. You know, thinking about your, your network, your you know, the your business relationship, so the team that you're using to build your real estate portfolio up. And, you know, obviously, you know, building a startup is similar, you can't get, you know, there's the day to day aspect of it. But you also have to make sure you're always building for the long term.   Heath: Everything takes so much longer than you ever expected.   Gary: I would agree with that. I agree with all those those pearls of wisdom. I think having the right long term orientation, making decisions that are right for the long term, very critical, whether you're an entrepreneur starting a company or you're a real estate investor, you know, how much do you want to invest in your renovation, it's going to cost you more, but then it's going to cost you less on an ongoing basis that when you're starting a company, how much do you want to invest upfront in your core technology and in your team, you could do things more on the cheap, but it might not be as enduring. So I would think about investing, you know, in capital and people that are really, really critical.   And then I would say, just on the entrepreneurial side, what has worked for me is real optimism is I think there's different ways and but it's you're intellectually honest, but you're optimistic and you're in solution oriented. You can fall into despair very easily as an entrepreneur or if you have a real estate investment that's going sideways, but if you really sort of say okay, we are where we are, you know, what are our options, how do we fix it and I know we're going to get through this. It You find very few entrepreneurs who won't don't have a glass half full kind of orientation.   A good friend of mine found in Workday. His name's Aneel Bhusri. And he also founded, you know, another company with Dave Duffield earlier in his career. And so Dave co founded Workday with him as well. And, Aneel said one time, he said, Yeah, you know, I'm, I'm, uh, you know, I'm a glass half full kind of kind of person. And I'm a good complement to today, my co founder, you know, by contrast, he's a glasses, entirely full type person. So, you know, it's not as a glass half empty glass half full. And Aneel thought he was, yeah, I'm pretty optimistic. Dave was like, oh, off the charts, this is going to work. And this is how it's worked. He's created multiple billion dollar, you know, multi billion dollar companies. But so I would say attitude is important, and perseverance.   And I think by keeping that positive attitude, not everything is going to go right, you need to try lots of stuff, and celebrate failures, keep going. So we like to say at Roofstock, you know, fail forward fast, try new things, celebrate those things. And it's not easy to celebrate failure. It sounds kind of silly, and it's kind of a West Coast thing. But we do try to do it and you know, talk about things that don't work. And eventually, you're going to find some magic in there. And if people aren't comfortable failing, they don't take those chances. So I think, you know, those are a few things that I would just I would share.   Heath: You know, and I'm gonna add one more, which is luck surface area. And as you're talking about optimism, it kind of reminded me of this. So at my wedding, Jonah actually gave the best man speech. And he spoke a bit about luck surface area and how it applies. And I would say, both in real estate, and in starting a startup, you know, you really got to just put yourself out there, make it known where you want to be, you know, go and scream from the rooftops, hey, this is what I want to accomplish. This is what I want to do make sure everyone is you know, knowing what you're trying to do. And hopefully the right people will kind of step up and, and help you get to that end goal.   Gary: I love that luck surface area. You know, if you think it was Ben Hogan, who also said, the more I practice, the luckier I get. So there's no substitute for that hard work element, as well.   Tom: Jay, do you want to close this out? I haven't heard your pearl yet. Do you want to get to the final pearl?   Jay: Sure. I mean, I think I think it goes back to something Gary said about investing in the team where I think the quality of the team. And I think relationships among the team are just such a huge lever in it, whether it's startups or really trying to be successful at anything. And so I think, being patient around building the right team, having a high high bar for the right team, and sort of, you know, who's your network that you rely on, as you build a portfolio as you build a company, I think has, you know, led to some of our greatest successes and, and some of our missteps occasionally. And so I think, as has always been, you know, something, something I've tried to keep in mind.   Gary: And I would say, you know, one thing that I've also learned over time, and I firmly believe is, is the right strategy, whether you're building a company or a real estate portfolio, even though buying property is transactional, there is a way to live your life and build your career in a way that's more relationship oriented. And I think some of the most successful entrepreneurs, whether it's in tech or real estate, take the long view, and don't view everything as transactional. And while you want to get a good deal on a property, you might be dealing with a serial seller, you deal with that person well, you're going to develop in the long run, you're going to do much better by trying to find Win Win outcomes.   And so that I would put that out there because I think oftentimes in real estate, people view things very much as a one shot deal. very transactional, trying to maximize everything. And I think if you sort of take a step back a little bit, sometimes and optimize for the long run, take more relationship view can be smart.   Tom: We love to hear your feedback. So if you have any questions you want to ask some of these co founders about real estate entrepreneurship. Please, if you're watching this on YouTube, just write it into the comments. We watch that stuff all the time. And if you're listening to this on a podcast, if you could write this in the either Apple podcast comments, or you can just email us you can email us at help at roof stock.com with questions, comments, anything you Want related to this content that we're creating and as always, happy investing